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Sample records for alexander kokorin tamara

  1. STS-96 Crew Interview: Tamara Jernigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Jernigan became an astronaut, the events that led to her interest, and her career path. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the logistics and supply mission, why it is important to send equipment to the International Space Station (ISS), and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC). Jernigan mentions Discovery's anticipated docking with the ISS, her scheduled space walk with Daniel T. Barry, plans for the supply and equipment transfers, and a fly-around maneuver to take pictures of the ISS.

  2. Mission Specialist Tamara Jernigan During STRELA EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-96 mission, the second International Space Station (ISS) assembly and resupply flight, launched on May 27, 1999 aboard the Orbiter Discovery for an almost 10 day mission. The Shuttle's SPACEHAB double module carried internal and resupply cargo for station outfitting and the Russian cargo crane, STRELA, was carried aboard the shuttle in the integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC). In this STS-96 onboard photo of the first Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), Mission Specialist Tamara Jernigan totes part of the Russian built crane. Jernigans' feet are anchored on a mobile foot restraint cornected to the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) operated by Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa. The STS-96 flight was the first to perform docking with the ISS.

  3. STS-80 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-80 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39B, with assistance from white room closeout crew members (from left) Ray Villalobos and Bob Saulnier. Behind her is Mission Specialist Story Musgrave.

  4. Alexander I. Ignatowski

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.; Jankovic, Gradimir M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1908, Alexander I. Ignatowski (1875–1955) published his pioneering work that first revealed a relationship between cholesterol-rich food and experimental atherosclerosis. This early experimental work paved a way to the metabolic study of the mechanism of atherosclerosis. Herein, we present a brief account of Ignatowski's work and life. PMID:23914012

  5. Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    West of British Columbia, Canada, and south of the Yukon Territory, the southeastern coastline of Alaska trails off into the islands of the Alexander Archipelago. The area is rugged and contains many long, U-shaped, glaciated valleys, many of which terminate at tidewater. The Alexander Archipelago is home to Glacier Bay National Park. The large bay that has two forks on its northern end is Glacier Bay itself. The eastern fork is Muir inlet, into which runs the Muir glacier, named for the famous Scottish-born naturalist John Muir. Glacier Bay opens up into the Icy Strait. The large, solid white area to the west is Brady Icefield, which terminates at the southern end in Brady's Glacier. To locate more interesting features from Glacier Bay National Park, take a look at the park service map. As recently as two hundred years ago, a massive ice field extended into Icy Strait and filled the Glacier Bay. Since that time, the area has experienced rapid deglaciation, with many large glaciers retreating 40, 60, even 80 km. While temperatures have increased in the region, it is still unclear whether the rapid recession is part of the natural cycle of tidewater glaciers or is an indicator of longer-term climate change. For more on Glacier Bay and climate change, read an online paper by Dr. Dorothy Hall, a MODIS Associate Science Team Member. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  6. What killed Alexander the Great?

    PubMed

    Battersby, Cameron

    2007-01-01

    The cause of the death of the Macedonian King, Alexander the Great, at Babylon in 323 BC has excited interest and conjecture throughout the ages. The information available in the surviving ancient sources, none of which is contemporaneous, has been reviewed and compared with modern knowledge as set out in several well-known recent surgical texts. The ancient sources record epic drinking by the Macedonian nobility since at least the time of Phillip II, Alexander's father. Alexander's sudden illness and death is likely to have resulted from a surgical complication of acute alcoholic excess.

  7. Alexander Lowen: An Energetic Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Glenn E.; Rabinowitz, Fredric E.

    1992-01-01

    Presents interview with Alexander Lowen, prominent psychotherapist, who discusses his personal and professional development, as well as the evolution of bioenergetic analysis. Includes a list of suggested readings by Lowen. (Author/NB)

  8. An Interview with Lloyd Alexander.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnell, Michael O.

    1989-01-01

    Probes Lloyd Alexander's thoughts about his own writing habits and processes; his reflections on his various books and characters; the state of children's publishing today; and fan mail he receives. (RAE)

  9. Alexander A Friedmann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tropp, Eduard A.; Frenkel, Viktor Ya.; Chernin, Artur D.

    1993-06-01

    Our universe can be described mathematically by a simple model developed in 1922 at Petrograd (St. Petersburg) by Alexander Friedmann (1888-1925). Without the benefit of observational evidence, Friedmann predicted that the whole universe would expand and evolve with time. This astonishing prediction was confirmed seven years later by Edwin Hubble. Its originator, unfortunately didn't live to savor this triumph. This vivid biography of an outstanding scientist sets his life and work against a wide backdrop of the history of cosmological studies and its major players, such as Einstein and others. The book is a window on Friedmann's school and university years, military service, and teaching and research during a seminal period of Soviet history. The authors include unique archival material, such as Friedmann's letters from the Russian Front, as well as contemporary records and reminiscences of colleagues. There is a detailed treatment of his work in theoretical cosmology (1922-1924), set in the context of the organization of Soviet science at the time.

  10. Conjecture of Alexander and Orbach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudra, Jayanta; Doiron, Curtis

    2009-03-01

    The dynamical properties of fractal networks have received wide range of attention. Works on this area by several pioneering authors^1-2 have led to the introduction of the spectral dimension that dictates the dynamic properties on a fractal lattice. Most of the studies involving spectral dimension have been performed on a type of fractal lattice known as percolation network. Alexander and Orbach^2 conjectured that the spectral dimension might be exactly 4/3 for percolation networks with Euclidean dimension de >= 2. Recent numerical simulations, however, could not decisively prove or disprove this conjecture, although there are other indirect evidences that it is true. We apply a stochastic approach^3 to determine the spectral dimension of percolation network for de >= 2 and check the validity of the Alexander-Orbach conjecture. Our preliminary results on 2- and 3-dimensional percolation networks indeed show that Alexander-Orbach conjecture is true, resolving a long-standing debate. References: 1. P. G. deGennes, La Recherche 7 (1976) 919. 2. S. Alexander and R. Orbach, J. Phys. Lett. (Paris) 43 (1982) L625. 3. J. Rudra and J. Kozak, Phys. Lett A 151 (1990) 429.

  11. Tamara Shapiro Ledley Receives 2013 Excellence in Geophysical Education Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    It gives me great pleasure to cite Tamara Shapiro Ledley for the AGU Excellence in Geophysical Education Award "for her outstanding sustained leadership in Earth systems and climate change education." Tamara has shown an ongoing commitment to bridging the scientific and educational communities to make geophysical science knowledge and data accessible and usable to teachers and students and by extension to all citizens. She works extensively with both the scientific and educational communities. She began her educational work in 1990 as the leader for weather and climate in my Teacher Research program at Rice University. She continued as the lead for atmospheric sciences in our projects Earth Today and Museums Teaching Planet Earth, which introduced her to the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation). She has served many roles at ESIP, including creating the Standing Committee for Education and serving as vice president. ESIP recognized her many accomplishments with its President's Award in 2012. At TERC her education and outreach efforts have blossomed. She was the lead author of the "Earth as a System" investigation of the GLOBE Teacher's Guide. She was a member of the original Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) Data Access Working Group in 2001, where the idea for a cookbook-like resource to facilitate the use of Earth science data by teachers and students resulted in her leading the development of the "Earth Exploration Toolbook" (EET), which allows teachers to easily access and use real scientific data in the classroom. Her efforts were recognized with the EET being awarded Science Magazine's Science Prize for Online Research in Education in 2011.

  12. Commentary. The diseases of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    York, George K; Steinberg, David A

    2004-06-01

    The accompanying articles that speculate that Alexander the Great had a traumatic carotid dissection or congenital cervical scoliosis demonstrate the difficulties in retrospective diagnosis as a historical enterprise. The extant primary sources were written centuries after Alexander's death and are ambiguous in their original languages, and even more so in translation. Thus we cannot be certain what illness Alexander actually had. Furthermore, anachronistic diagnosis removes Alexander from the medical context of this time, telling us little of historical significance about him. Such investigations also illustrate the more general limits that the absence of context imposes on the study of ancient history.

  13. Dancers' Application of the Alexander Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, Sylvie; Girard, Fernande

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the experience of professional contemporary dancers studying and applying the Alexander Technique to their dancing. This study was motivated by: 1. years of teaching both dance and somatics, 2. a strong desire to better understand how the Alexander Technique can be applied by dancers, and 3. a gap that the…

  14. Cupola Corner 2 - Conversation With Alexander Samokutyaev

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronaut Ron Garan speaks with fellow Expedition 28 flight engineer and Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev about using the view from the International Space Station to inspire people to make a ...

  15. The Haunting Influence of Alexander Graham Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Sue H.

    1971-01-01

    The article examines the significance that Alexander Graham Bell's attitude and actions had on the social and economic conditions experienced by deaf people during his lifetime and into the present. (CD)

  16. A psychoanalytic study of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K R

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to demonstrate how Freudian concepts such as the Oedipus complex, castration anxiety, fear of loss of love, the psychosexual stages of development, and the tripartite structure of personality can be used to understand the life and achievements of Alexander the Great. To accomplish this purpose, specific incidents, myths, and relationships in Alexander's life were analyzed from a Freudian psychoanalytic perspective. Green (1991), in his recent biography of Alexander, has questioned the merit of using Freudian concepts to understand Alexander's character. In fact, he stated specifically: If he (Alexander) had any kind of Oedipus complex it came in a poor second to the burning dynastic ambition which Olympias so sedulously fostered in him; those who insist on his psychological motivation would do better to take Adler as their mentor than Freud (p.56). Later, in the concluding section of his book, Green (1991, pp. 486-487) discounted Freudian interpretations of Alexander's distaste for sex, the rumors of his homosexual liaisons, his partiality for middle-aged or elderly ladies, and the systematic domination of his early years by Olympias as little more than the projected fears and desires of the interpreters. And again, an Adlerian power-complex paradigm was suggested as the preferable theoretical framework to use. Green's argument was based primarily on an exchange, reported originally by Plutarch, which took place between Alexander and Philip prior to Alexander's tutorship with Aristotle. Purportedly, Philip enjoined his son to study hard and pay close attention to all Aristotle said "so that you may not do a great many things of the sort that I am sorry I have done." At this point, Alexander "somewhat pertly" took Philip to task "because he was having children by other women besides his wife." Philip's reply was: "Well then, if you have many competitors for the kingdom, prove yourself honorable and good, so that you may obtain the

  17. GFAP and its role in Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Roy A; Brenner, Michael; Goldman, James E.; Messing, Albee

    2009-01-01

    Here we review how GFAP mutations cause Alexander disease. The current data suggest that a combination of events cause the disease. These include: i) the accumulation of GFAP and the formation of characteristic aggregates, called Rosenthal fibres, ii) the sequestration of the protein chaperones αB-crystallin and HSP27 into Rosenthal fibres, and iii) the activation of both Jnk and the stress response. These then set in motion events that lead to Alexander disease. We discuss parallels with other intermediate filament diseases and assess potential therapies as part of this review as well as emerging trends in disease diagnosis and other aspects concerning GFAP. PMID:17498694

  18. The Mind-Body Connection: An Introduction to Alexander Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Cathy

    2003-01-01

    Explains that the Alexander Technique is a process that allows performers to improve physical-mental coordination while performing. Outlines the fundamentals of the Alexander Technique and how it can be applied for actors and drama teachers. Proposes that drama teachers can incorporate some of the Alexander Technique's fundamentals into their…

  19. Alexander Technique and Dance Technique: Applications in the Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettl-Fiol, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Integrating principles from the Alexander Technique into a dance technique class can provide tools for facilitating a more coordinated use of the self. While the methodologies of Alexander Technique and dance technique may present differences, there are ways of applying the principles of Alexander within the context of a dance technique class that…

  20. Alexander von Humboldt: a revolutionary explorer.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2008-03-01

    After he returned from his five-year expedition to the New World, Alexander von Humboldt promoted himself as a Romantic explorer. Although this image pervades British perceptions, political movements have fashioned different heroic versions of Humboldt in Germany and South America.

  1. The Remarkable Journey of Lloyd Alexander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnel, Michael O.; Jacobs, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This article features Lloyd Alexander, an author who has produced some of the most elegant and powerful prose in the history of modern children's literature. Lloyd began writing seriously in high school, and though he wrote and submitted many poems and short stories, his only success was being named a finalist in the "Writer's Digest" Short Story…

  2. Alexander Graham Bell: Teacher of the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Robert V.

    The lecture on Alexander Graham Bell by Dr. Robert V. Bruce, the author of a biography of Bell, focuses on Bell's association with the Clarke School for the Deaf in Massachusetts. Noted are Bell's employment by the school at 25 years of age and the preceding period during which Bell taught elocution at a boys' school in Scotland and used his…

  3. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Felix & Odile Pratt Valle House, Merchant & Second Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  4. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 DETAIL OF BASEMENT FIREPLACE - Indian Trading Post, Second & Merchant Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, 1934 DETAIL OF ENTRANCE (WEST ELEVATION - FRONT) - Eugene Field House, 634 South Broadway, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  6. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 DETAIL OF STONEWORK (WEST ELEVATION) - Indian Trading Post, Second & Merchant Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  7. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM NORTHEAST - Felix & Odile Pratt Valle House, Merchant & Second Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  8. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM NORTHWEST - Felix & Odile Pratt Valle House, Merchant & Second Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  9. "Most brilliant in judgment": Alexander the Great and Aristotle.

    PubMed

    Lainas, Panagiotis; Panutsopulos, Dimitrios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N; Zoras, Odysseas; Skandalakis, John E

    2005-03-01

    From historical sources, it is evident that Alexander the Great was indebted to one of his teachers, Aristotle of Stagira. It was the teaching of Aristotle that evoked all the nascent talents of young Alexander and turned him into a great man. Alexander was extremely interested in the secrets of medicine and considered it an art. The medical knowledge he acquired from Aristotle may have saved his life and the lives of his troops on many occasions. If Alexander did not possess medical knowledge and if his everyday life had not been so greatly influenced by medicine, he might never have been able to create his empire.

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 DETAIL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer, 1971 DETAIL, ENTRANCE STOOP (LION FIGURE) - Joseph Beale House, 2301 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer August 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer August 1968 BEDROOM FIREPLACE, THIRD FLOOR - Andrew Ross Tenant House II, 1210 Thirtieth Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer August 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer August 1968 SECOND FLOOR PARLOR FIREPLACE - Andrew Ross Tenant House II, 1210 Thirtieth Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 2. NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, ALEXANDER'S MILL (WILSON'S MILL). THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, ALEXANDER'S MILL (WILSON'S MILL). THE 2-1/1-STORY MAIN BLOCK, ERECTED IN 1855, HAS OVERTONES OF THE GREEK REVIVAL STYLE. Photographer: louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 crane flies (Diptera: Pediciidae) of Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Podeniene, Virginija; Byun, Hye-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The Korean crane fly species of the genus Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 (Diptera: Pediciidae) is taxonomically revised. H. gloriosus gloriosus (Alexander, 1924) is redescribed. A new species Heterangaeus koreanus n. sp., which is the first species of Pediciidae from South Korea, is described and illustrated.

  15. Alexander's disease: clinical, pathologic, and genetic features.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anne B; Brenner, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Alexander's disease, a rare and fatal disorder of the central nervous system, most commonly affects infants and young children but can also occur in older children and sometimes adults. In infants and young children, it causes developmental delay, psychomotor retardation, paraparesis, feeding problems, usually megalencephaly, often seizures, and sometimes hydrocephalus. Juvenile cases often do not have megalencephaly and tend to have predominant pseudobulbar and bulbar signs. In both groups, characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings have been described. In adult cases, the signs are variable, can resemble multiple sclerosis, and might include palatal myoclonus. In all cases, the examination of brain tissue shows the presence of widely distributed Rosenthal fibers. Almost all cases have recently been found to have a heterozygous, missense, point mutation in the gene for glial fibrillary acidic protein, which provides a new diagnostic tool. In most cases, the mutation appears to occur de novo, not being present in either parent, but some adult cases are familial.

  16. The death of Alexander the Great: malaria or typhoid fever?

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A

    2004-03-01

    Alexander the Great had a profound effect on world history. His conquests covered the entire known world at the time, and he was responsible for the spread of Greek culture throughout the ancient world. In Babylon in 323 BC, Alexander died when he was nearly 33 years old. Possible explanations for his death have included alcoholic liver disease and strychnine poisoning, but little data support either condition as the cause of his death. Alexander most likely died from malaria or typhoid fever, which were rampant in ancient Babylon. The description of his final illness from the royal diaries is consistent with typhoid fever or malaria but is most characteristic of typhoid fever.

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Second & Gabourie Streets (Old Stone House), Corner of Second & Gabourie Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  18. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 DETAIL OF STONEWORK (SOUTHWEST CORNER) - Second & Gabourie Streets (Old Stone House), Corner of Second & Gabourie Streets, Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  19. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer April 1969 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer April 1969 3034 P STREET (right) AND ADJOINING ROWHOUSES, LOOKING EAST - Smith-Morton Row House, 3034 P Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease.

  1. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, 1934 INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING UP INTO THE DOME - Old St. Louis Courthouse, Fourth to Broadway, Market to Chestnut Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  2. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, 1934 Detail of Rotunda looking west. - Old St. Louis Courthouse, Fourth to Broadway, Market to Chestnut Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  3. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, 1934 GENERAL VIEW FROM NORTHEAST - Old St. Louis Courthouse, Fourth to Broadway, Market to Chestnut Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  4. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, 1934 DETAIL OF ROTUNDA LOOKING NORTH - Old St. Louis Courthouse, Fourth to Broadway, Market to Chestnut Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, 1934 DETAIL OF ROTUNDA - LOOKING NORTH - Old St. Louis Courthouse, Fourth to Broadway, Market to Chestnut Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  6. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 9, 1934 DETAIL OF EAST PORTICO - Old St. Louis Courthouse, Fourth to Broadway, Market to Chestnut Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  7. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  9. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Alexander Piaget, Photographer, April 10, 1934 VIEW FROM NORTH - Jean Baptiste Valle House, 99 South Main Street (Northwest corner of Main & Market Streets), Sainte Genevieve, Ste. Genevieve County, MO

  10. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer February 1969 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer February 1969 EAST ELEVATIONS OF 1208-10 30th STREET - Andrew Ross Tenant House II, 1210 Thirtieth Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer August 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey J. Alexander, Photographer August 1968 SECOND FLOOR PARLOR LOOKING NORTHWEST - Andrew Ross Tenant House II, 1210 Thirtieth Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. Alexander F. Chamberlain: a life's work.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Julia M

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the life and work of Alexander Francis Chamberlain. Though he has received little attention since the early 1900s, the importance of this scholar should not be underestimated. Chamberlain made notable contributions to the body of knowledge in anthropology-a discipline that, at the time, was a combination of anthropological and psychological inquiry. His early work began with investigations into the cultures and languages of two Indian tribes indigenous to Canada and the northern United States and, within a few decades, positioned Chamberlain as the leading scholar in this domain. Beyond his ethnographic insights, Chamberlain queried the development of the child and wrote on the subject of childhood in world folklore. He concerned himself with a scope of worthwhile subjects ranging from linguistics to women's suffrage. No topic was out of range as all forms of human study addressed the need for seeing each group as a contributing force to humanity at large. Chamberlain emphasized that no single racial, ethnic, or religious group should be singled out as inherently superior to another, a belief far ahead of his time. This article is an attempt at drawing a picture of a man whose scholarly achievements and strength of character are captured in the depth and breadth of his writing. PMID:17549937

  13. Alexander F. Chamberlain: a life's work.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Julia M

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the life and work of Alexander Francis Chamberlain. Though he has received little attention since the early 1900s, the importance of this scholar should not be underestimated. Chamberlain made notable contributions to the body of knowledge in anthropology-a discipline that, at the time, was a combination of anthropological and psychological inquiry. His early work began with investigations into the cultures and languages of two Indian tribes indigenous to Canada and the northern United States and, within a few decades, positioned Chamberlain as the leading scholar in this domain. Beyond his ethnographic insights, Chamberlain queried the development of the child and wrote on the subject of childhood in world folklore. He concerned himself with a scope of worthwhile subjects ranging from linguistics to women's suffrage. No topic was out of range as all forms of human study addressed the need for seeing each group as a contributing force to humanity at large. Chamberlain emphasized that no single racial, ethnic, or religious group should be singled out as inherently superior to another, a belief far ahead of his time. This article is an attempt at drawing a picture of a man whose scholarly achievements and strength of character are captured in the depth and breadth of his writing.

  14. Alexander disease: a review and the gene.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anne B

    2002-01-01

    This review presents historical and clinical information on the rare human brain disorder known as Alexander disease (ALX), and reports on the recent discovery of the gene that appears to be causative. The disease is a fatal, white matter disorder (leukodystrophy) of childhood. Adult onset cases also have been described, but it has not been clear whether they represent the same disease. Until recently the diagnosis was made by the pathological examination of brain tissue, in which abundant Rosenthal fibers were found. These abnormal structures occurred within astrocytes, but their composition was unclear. In 1985, a child underwent a diagnostic brain biopsy at this institution, which established the diagnosis of ALX. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry revealed that the Rosenthal fibers contained abundant amounts of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a normal component of astocytic intermediate filaments. Thus, the gene for this filament protein was considered a candidate gene for the cause of ALX, and DNA samples from children presumed or proven to have this disorder were banked for future study. Other work on the same brain biopsy showed that Rosenthal fibers also contained abundant alphaB-crystallin, a heat shock protein, but no defect was found in its gene. A decade after the biopsy, a transgenic mouse with an extra copy of the gene for GFAP was produced. These mice died early and their brains contained Rosenthal fibers. Although not an exact model for ALX, this also suggested that the gene for GFAP should be considered a candidate gene for ALX. Subsequent research has demonstrated that the great majority of childhood ALX cases contain mutations in the gene for GFAP. This work is now being extended as a diagnostic test, as well as to seek understanding of the pathogenesis of ALX and possible approaches for treatment.

  15. Zanvil Alexander Cohn 1926-1993

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Zanvil Alexander Cohn, an editor of this Journal since 1973, died suddenly on June 28, 1993. Cohn is best known as the father of the current era of macrophage biology. Many of his scientific accomplishments are recounted here, beginning with seminal studies on the granules of phagocytes that were performed with his close colleague and former editor of this Journal, James Hirsch. Cohn and Hirsch identified the granules as lysosomes that discharged their contents of digestive enzymes into vacuoles containing phagocytosed microbes. These findings were part of the formative era of cell biology and initiated the modern study of endocytosis and cell-mediated resistance to infection. Cohn further explored the endocytic apparatus in pioneering studies of the mouse peritoneal macrophage in culture. He described vesicular inputs from the cell surface and Golgi apparatus and documented the thoroughness of substrate digestion within lysosomal vacuoles that would only permit the egress of monosaccharides and amino acids. These discoveries created a vigorous environment for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior and visiting faculty. Some of the major findings that emerged from Cohn's collaborations included the radioiodination of the plasma membrane for studies of composition and turnover; membrane recycling during endocytosis; the origin of the mononuclear phagocyte system in situ; the discovery of the dendritic cell system of antigen-presenting cells; the macrophage as a secretory cell, including the release of proteases and large amounts of prostaglandins and leukotrienes; several defined parameters of macrophage activation, especially the ability of T cell-derived lymphokines to enhance killing of tumor cells and intracellular protozoa; the granule discharge mechanism whereby cytotoxic lymphocytes release the pore-forming protein perforin; the signaling of macrophages via myristoylated substrates of protein kinase C; and a tissue culture model in which

  16. Did Alexander the Great die of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Sbarounis, C N

    1997-06-01

    I propose that Alexander the Great died of acute pancreatitis secondary to heavy alcohol consumption and a very rich meal. The cause of death of prominent historic or artistic figures attracts considerable interest of historians and researchers. This is especially the case for Alexander the Great. More than 20,000 publications, books, or monographs on the life and work of Alexander the Great have been published. There are several theories and hypotheses regarding the cause of his death, that are based on historic descriptions, diaries, notations, and interpretations of events. It is inevitable that history and myth intermingle in any investigative approach, no matter how scholarly. In this article, on the basis of several historic sources. I have made an effort to reconstruct the final 14 days of his life and record the course of medical events that preceded his death with the formulation of a plausible diagnosis.

  17. Alexander the Great and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Marr, John S; Calisher, Charles H

    2003-12-01

    Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 BC. His death at age 32 followed a 2-week febrile illness. Speculated causes of death have included poisoning; assassination, and a number of infectious diseases. One incident, mentioned by Plutarch but not considered by previous investigators, may shed light on the cause of Alexander's death. The incident, which occurred as he entered Babylon, involved a flock of ravens exhibiting unusual behavior and subsequently dying at his feet. The inexplicable behavior of ravens is reminiscent of avian illness and death weeks before the first human cases of West Nile virus infection were identified in the United States. We posit that Alexander may have died of West Nile virus encephalitis.

  18. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    With the passing of Donald Alexander MacRae on 6 December 2006 at age 90, the astronomy community lost a visionary scientist and a great educator in the field. Don MacRae was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1916, to Donald Alexander and Laura Geddes (Barnstead) MacRae. His father was originally a classics scholar and preceptor of Greek and Latin at Princeton, but at the time of Don's birth in 1916 he was Dean of the Dalhousie Law School in Halifax. The family moved to Toronto, Ontario, in 1924 when his father joined the faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto as a Professor of Law. After the family moved to Toronto, where he received most of his early education, he obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1937 from the University of Toronto (U of T). He obtained the degree of A.M. in 1940 and of Ph.D. in 1943 from Harvard University under the mentorship of Bart Bok in the field of galactic structure. During his early career he worked briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, and Carbide and Chemical Corporation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For Don the latter work was a brief and somewhat uneasy association with the Manhattan Project. In 1946, he obtained a position at Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where he worked until 1953. In 1953, he accepted a position at the U of T, replacing Ralph Williamson, who had earlier introduced Don to the emerging field of radio astronomy while they both were at Cornell. Don's primary research field was stellar spectroscopy, but his interests were much broader than this, and he possessed an abiding ability to interest students and faculty in new and emerging ideas. In the early 1960s he developed a strong interest in the nature and origin of the lunar surface, and discussed these extensively with colleagues. Many of his ideas on this subject were later confirmed by the lunar exploration program. Don's continuing interest in radio astronomy

  19. Sir Alexander Fleming: Scottish researcher who discovered penicillin.

    PubMed

    Ligon, B Lee

    2004-01-01

    The discovery and development of penicillin changed the entire direction of approaches to treating infectious diseases and saved the lives of millions of people. Indeed, the development of penicillin was a watershed event in the battle against infectious diseases, and the individual who discovered it, Sir Alexander Fleming, remains a prominent individual in the annals of medical history. This article focuses primarily on the personal life of Alexander Fleming, an individual who had a remarkable diversity of interests and who made many contributions to science and medicine.

  20. 8. View of southwest rear and southeast side of AlexanderAlmon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of southwest rear and southeast side of Alexander-Almon House with cement block outbuilding to far left, facing north. - Alexander-Almon House, 130 Philip Almon Road, Roopville, Carroll County, GA

  1. 12. Detail view of southeast side window of AlexanderAlmon House ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail view of southeast side window of Alexander-Almon House with rain barrel at lower left and roof rafter tails at top, facing northwest. - Alexander-Almon House, 130 Philip Almon Road, Roopville, Carroll County, GA

  2. Obituary: Walter Alexander Feibelman, 1930-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oergerle, William

    2005-12-01

    Walter Alexander Feibelman, 79, an astronomer who discovered the E-ring of Saturn, died of a heart attack 19 November 2004 at his home at Riderwood Village in Silver Spring, Maryland. Walter was born 30 October 1925 in Berlin, Germany to Bernard and Dora Feibelman. He came to the United States with his parents in 1941. They were some of the last German Jews to flee Nazi Germany. Years later, he reported his experiences in an account contributed to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. As a youth, he worked at a cleaning shop and as a soda jerk before taking a course in tool and die making. He worked at the Abbey Photo Corp. in New York and in a model-making firm, where he constructed models of aircraft for use in identification courses by the Army Air Forces. After high school, he attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology and received his BS degree in 1956. Until 1969, he was a research scientist at the University of Pittsburgh. While working as an assistant research professor in physics and astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh in 1967, he examined a photo of Saturn taken a year earlier at the university's Allegheny Observatory. The E-ring -- unlike the bright main rings, A, B, C, D and F -- is faint and not easily spotted. He paired his observation with calculations and announced his discovery, which remained unconfirmed until the Pioneer 11 flyby in 1979. Walter joined the Optical Astronomy Division of Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt in 1969, and worked there until 2002, when he became an emeritus astronomer at NASA. He became associated with the International Ultraviolet Explorer project, and worked on developing detectors for the orbiting observatory's spectrograph. The project turned out to be one of NASA's most successful observatories, operating from 1978 to 1996. In his scientific career, he published more than 200 refereed articles, mainly on hot stars and planetary nebulae. He also wrote papers in the fields of photography, spectroscopy

  3. Obituary: Donald Alexander Macrae, 1916-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    With the passing of Donald Alexander MacRae on 6 December 2006 at age 90, the astronomy community lost a visionary scientist and a great educator in the field. Don MacRae was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 19 February 1916, to Donald Alexander and Laura Geddes (Barnstead) MacRae. His father was originally a classics scholar and preceptor of Greek and Latin at Princeton, but at the time of Don's birth in 1916 he was Dean of the Dalhousie Law School in Halifax. The family moved to Toronto, Ontario, in 1924 when his father joined the faculty of Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto as a Professor of Law. After the family moved to Toronto, where he received most of his early education, he obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Physics in 1937 from the University of Toronto (U of T). He obtained the degree of A.M. in 1940 and of Ph.D. in 1943 from Harvard University under the mentorship of Bart Bok in the field of galactic structure. During his early career he worked briefly at the University of Pennsylvania, Cornell University, and Carbide and Chemical Corporation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. For Don the latter work was a brief and somewhat uneasy association with the Manhattan Project. In 1946, he obtained a position at Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University), where he worked until 1953. In 1953, he accepted a position at the U of T, replacing Ralph Williamson, who had earlier introduced Don to the emerging field of radio astronomy while they both were at Cornell. Don's primary research field was stellar spectroscopy, but his interests were much broader than this, and he possessed an abiding ability to interest students and faculty in new and emerging ideas. In the early 1960s he developed a strong interest in the nature and origin of the lunar surface, and discussed these extensively with colleagues. Many of his ideas on this subject were later confirmed by the lunar exploration program. Don's continuing interest in radio astronomy

  4. Alexander the Great, the dahlia, and the tortoise.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Malcolm

    2004-06-01

    Some of the problems of establishing the cause of the death of Alexander the Great are like the attempts to find causes other than hysteria for Anna O.'s symptoms. The more general problem of using plausibility as a criterion of the truth of such reconstructions are illustrated by the arguments embedded in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia.

  5. 46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's Last Street Cars, Daily Press, January 15, 1956) photographer unknown. The first streetcar (with dignitaries) to make the run from Newport News to a new housing development named Hilton Village in September 1918. - Newport News & Old Point Railway & Electric Company, Trolley Barn & Administration Building, 3400 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  6. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David R. Lapp

    2008-01-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and…

  7. Alexander Meiklejohn in Search of Freedom and Dignity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Tony W.

    1982-01-01

    Assesses the contributions of the philosopher/educator Alexander Meiklejohn. Discusses the influences of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and the U.S. Constitution on Meiklejohn's educational theories, which stressed that human freedom and dignity can be enhanced by rigorous examination of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and the meaning of…

  8. Alexander the Great, the dahlia, and the tortoise.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Malcolm

    2004-06-01

    Some of the problems of establishing the cause of the death of Alexander the Great are like the attempts to find causes other than hysteria for Anna O.'s symptoms. The more general problem of using plausibility as a criterion of the truth of such reconstructions are illustrated by the arguments embedded in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia. PMID:15370321

  9. The Century-Old Wisdom of Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Orin

    1990-01-01

    This article reflects on Alexander Graham Bell's 1888 testimony before the Royal Commission of the United Kingdom on the Condition of the Deaf and Dumb, Etc. Excerpts are grouped by reference to (1) language education for the hearing impaired; (2) speechreading; (3) methods of teaching; (4) speech; and (5) sign language. (Author/PB)

  10. View west of the James and Lucy Alexander gravestone and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View west of the James and Lucy Alexander gravestone and family plot among other demarcated family plots in the Female Union Band Cemetery. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. A complex-network perspective on Alexander's wholeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin

    2016-12-01

    The wholeness, conceived and developed by Christopher Alexander, is what exists to some degree or other in space and matter, and can be described by precise mathematical language. However, it remains somehow mysterious and elusive, and therefore hard to grasp. This paper develops a complex network perspective on the wholeness to better understand the nature of order or beauty for sustainable design. I bring together a set of complexity-science subjects such as complex networks, fractal geometry, and in particular underlying scaling hierarchy derived by head/tail breaks - a classification scheme and a visualization tool for data with a heavy-tailed distribution, in order to make Alexander's profound thoughts more accessible to design practitioners and complexity-science researchers. Through several case studies (some of which Alexander studied), I demonstrate that the complex-network perspective helps reduce the mystery of wholeness and brings new insights to Alexander's thoughts on the concept of wholeness or objective beauty that exists in fine and deep structure. The complex-network perspective enables us to see things in their wholeness, and to better understand how the kind of structural beauty emerges from local actions guided by the 15 fundamental properties, and in particular by differentiation and adaptation processes. The wholeness goes beyond current complex network theory towards design or creation of living structures.

  12. Alexander disease: a leukodystrophy caused by a mutation in GFAP.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anne B

    2004-05-01

    Alexander disease, a rare fatal disorder of the central nervous system, causes progressive loss of motor and mental function. Until recently it was of unknown etiology, almost all cases were sporadic, and there was no effective treatment. It was most common in an infantile form, somewhat less so in a juvenile form, and was rarely seen in an adult-onset form. A number of investigators have now shown that almost all cases of Alexander disease have a dominant mutation in one allele of the gene for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) that causes replacement of one amino acid for another. Only in very rare cases of the adult-onset form is the mutation present in either parent. Thus, in almost all cases, the mutation arises as a spontaneous event, possibly in the germ cell of one parent.

  13. Alexander the Great's Tomb at Siwa: The Astronomical Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, M.; Souvaltzis, Em.; Souvaltzi, L.; Moussas, X.

    A preliminary report on the possible astronomical orientation of the Tomb of Alexander the Great, recently found and excavated by the greek archaeologist Liana Souvaltzi. The tomb is a greek building of doric style. Its enormous dimensions make it the largest amongst the found macedonian tombs (much bigger than the tomb of Philip II, Alexander's father). The tomb faces generally south---west and its orientation could be related either to the constellation of Centaurus or to the star Canopus. The walls of the two long sides of the building have strickingly different widhts. Moreover each wall has three doors (opposite in pairs) of slightly different sizes. We examine the possibility the openings of the doors and their assymetries to be designed and constructed according to some astronomical (solar or stellar) orientations.

  14. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L.; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B.

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  15. Alexander's law during high-acceleration head rotations in humans.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Evangelos; Heimberger, Joachim; Sklavos, Sokratis; Anastasopoulos, Dimitri

    2011-03-30

    Alexander's law states that the amplitude of the spontaneous nystagmus grows with increasing gaze in the direction of the fast phase. Using the search-coil method we employed head impulses at various eye-in-orbit azimuth angles to test (i) whether the normal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in the behaviorally relevant high-frequency range has intrinsic properties that could account for Alexander's law and (ii) whether such properties can also be shown in patients with unilateral vestibulopathy. We showed that the gain of the VOR remained unaffected by eye-in-orbit position in contols and in patients, both on ipsilesional and contralesional stimuli. These findings suggest that eye-in-orbit position does not directly modulate the activity in VOR pathways, neither during unbalanced but reciprocal (in controls), nor during unbalanced and nonreciprocal natural vestibular stimulation (in patients).

  16. Alexander the Great and West Nile Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Marr, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 BC. His death at age 32 followed a 2-week febrile illness. Speculated causes of death have included poisoning, assassination, and a number of infectious diseases. One incident, mentioned by Plutarch but not considered by previous investigators, may shed light on the cause of Alexander’s death. The incident, which occurred as he entered Babylon, involved a flock of ravens exhibiting unusual behavior and subsequently dying at his feet. The inexplicable behavior of ravens is reminiscent of avian illness and death weeks before the first human cases of West Nile virus infection were identified in the United States. We posit that Alexander may have died of West Nile encephalitis. PMID:14725285

  17. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  18. Dr Alexander Graham Bell--audiologist and speech therapist.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, R C

    1976-09-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is best known for his role in the invention of the telephone. However, he had a lifelong involvement in speech therapy and audiology besides many other medical investigations. He was also awarded an honorary MD degree from Heidelberg University. In this, the 100th anniversary of his invention of the telephone, his life and some of his medical interests are briefly reviewed. PMID:786234

  19. Dr Alexander Graham Bell--audiologist and speech therapist.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, R C

    1976-09-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is best known for his role in the invention of the telephone. However, he had a lifelong involvement in speech therapy and audiology besides many other medical investigations. He was also awarded an honorary MD degree from Heidelberg University. In this, the 100th anniversary of his invention of the telephone, his life and some of his medical interests are briefly reviewed.

  20. Balance of NH{sub 3} and behavior of polychlorinated dioxins and furans in the course of the selective non-catalytic reduction of nitric oxide at the TAMARA waste incineration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, J.; Deuber, H.; Hunsinger, H.; Kreisz, S.; Linek, A.; Seifert, H.; Stoehr, J.; Ishikawa, R.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-12-31

    Investigations were performed on the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitric oxide (NO) at TAMARA, the pilot-scale waste incineration plant of the Karlsruhe Research Center. Aqueous ammonia (NH{sub 3}) was injected into the combustion chamber as reductant. The influence of NH{sub 3} on various inorganic and organic compounds in the flue gas was investigated. The concentrations of NO were reduced by up to about 90% by NH{sub 3} injection. The concentrations of most of the other inorganic and organic compounds, including in particular PCDD and PCDF, did not change significantly.

  1. The 'horns' of a medical dilemma: Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    Russell, Gül A

    2004-06-01

    Retrospective 'diagnosis' of clinical disorders of famous historical figures has been of medical interest. In the absence of a patient's 'body', the validity of 'physical symptoms' and their interpretation by contemporary diagnostic criteria are questionable. When the symptoms have been gleaned from the patients's effigy which, as in the case of Alexander the Great, is submerged in legend, the enterprise becomes inherently hazardous. In the present paper, some of the conceptual problems underlying retrospective diagnoses will be identified. Then the use of iconographic records, such as numismatics and sculpture, to provide evidence of clinical symptoms will be shown to be highly misleading.

  2. Alexander disease - astrogliopathy considered as leukodystrophy - experience of an institution.

    PubMed

    Mierzewska, Hanna; Mierzewska-Schmidt, Magdalena; Salomons, Gajja S; Dudzińska, Magdalena; Szczepanik, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Alexander Disease (ALXDRD) is an autosomal dominant leukodystrophy caused by mutation in one allele of GFAP gene, encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Most cases occur due to de novo. There are three clinical subtypes of ALXDRD: infantile, juvenile and adult form, but congenital form is also outlined. The disease's spectrum comprises of macrocephaly, progressive pyramidal signs, and seizures in congenital and infantile subtypes. Neuropathologically are enormous number of Rosenthal fibers (RF) mainly around vessels, in subependymal and subpial regions are found. The diagnosis is based on the typical findings on MRI: diffuse white mater lesions with frontal regions preponderance and possibly on the detection of the gene mutation. Here we present six Polish children affected of Alexander disease with congenital (1), infantile (4) and juvenile (1) form. Five of them were previously misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy or unspecific developmental delay; two patients had MRI because of another suspicion, before specific diagnosis was established. Molecular analysis performed in four cases confirmed mutations of GFAP gene; all mutation were de novo. The role of astroglia in brain is shortly reviewed. PMID:27442695

  3. [Alexander Borodin--physician, chemist, scientist, teacher and composer].

    PubMed

    Vik, T

    1998-12-10

    Concert programmes and CD covers suggest that the Russian composer Alexander Borodin (1833-87) was also a great scientist. In this article we examine this proposition. Borodin was born in St. Petersburg as the illegitimate son of a Russian nobleman. As a boy his talents ranged from music to chemistry and languages. Borodin studied medicine at the Medico-Surgical Academy in St. Petersburg from 1850 to 1855 and defended his doctoral thesis on the similarity between arsenic and phosphoric acid in 1858. He did not, however, feel comfortable in his role as a doctor, and soon started to work as a chemist. In 1864 he was appointed professor of chemistry at the Medico-Surgical Academy. In 1861, Borodin attended the first international congress of chemistry in Karlsruhe, and he was among the founders of the Russian Chemical Society in 1868. He published 42 articles and was a friend of Dmitri Mendeleev, the scientist who described the periodic system. In 1872, Borodin started the first medical courses for women in Russia. It seems warranted to conclude that Alexander Borodin was indeed a great scientist and university teacher, though his immortality was earned by his leisure time activities. PMID:9914755

  4. [Alexander Borodin--physician, chemist, scientist, teacher and composer].

    PubMed

    Vik, T

    1998-12-10

    Concert programmes and CD covers suggest that the Russian composer Alexander Borodin (1833-87) was also a great scientist. In this article we examine this proposition. Borodin was born in St. Petersburg as the illegitimate son of a Russian nobleman. As a boy his talents ranged from music to chemistry and languages. Borodin studied medicine at the Medico-Surgical Academy in St. Petersburg from 1850 to 1855 and defended his doctoral thesis on the similarity between arsenic and phosphoric acid in 1858. He did not, however, feel comfortable in his role as a doctor, and soon started to work as a chemist. In 1864 he was appointed professor of chemistry at the Medico-Surgical Academy. In 1861, Borodin attended the first international congress of chemistry in Karlsruhe, and he was among the founders of the Russian Chemical Society in 1868. He published 42 articles and was a friend of Dmitri Mendeleev, the scientist who described the periodic system. In 1872, Borodin started the first medical courses for women in Russia. It seems warranted to conclude that Alexander Borodin was indeed a great scientist and university teacher, though his immortality was earned by his leisure time activities.

  5. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons...

  6. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons...

  7. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons...

  8. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons...

  9. 33 CFR 162.250 - Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Alexander, Alaska; speed of... Alexander, Alaska; speed of vessels. (a) Definition. The term “Port Alexander” includes the entire inlet from its head to its entrance from Chatham Strait. (b) Speed. The speed of all vessels of 5 tons...

  10. The death of Alexander the Great--a spinal twist of fate.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Hutan

    2004-06-01

    Alexander the Great died in 323 B.C. from an unknown cause. Physical depictions of this historical figure reveal the likelihood of a cervical scoliotic deformity. This is substantiated with the medical history and is correlated with his untimely death. For the first time, it is concluded that Alexander's death may have ensued from the sequelae of congenital scoliotic syndrome.

  11. Alexander's (356-323 BC) expeditionary Medical Corps 334-323 BC.

    PubMed

    Retsas, Spyros

    2009-08-01

    Alexander had a profound interest in medicine and healing. Original Greek texts survive mainly from the works of Plutarch and Arrian. This paper examines original sources naming the physicians who participated in Alexander's expedition in Asia, the battle injuries he sustained and his final illness in Babylon.

  12. Kinesthetic Ventures Informed by the Work of F. M. Alexander, Stanislavski, Peirce, and Freud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Ed; Wright, Ben; Protzel, Michael, Ed.

    This book is about education harvested from self-observation. F. Matthias Alexander (1869-1955) studied the experience of self formation, working with motor habits. His method is used in performing arts training to enhance bodily and vocal expression. Like Alexander, Konstantine Stanislavski (1863-1938) and Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) studied human…

  13. 76 FR 28226 - Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander; and AIR 7 Seas... ``Complainant,'' against African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia, ALCO Logistics, LLC; Brenda Alexander; and Air 7 Seas Transport Logistics, Inc.; hereinafter ``Respondents''. Complainant asserts that she is acting agent...

  14. The Astronomer Alexander I. Postoiev (1900-1976)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, P. M.; Matsuura, O. T.

    This is a biographical note on the life of Dr Alexander I. Postoiev, a victim of Stalin's purge of Soviet astronomers in 1936-1937 (McCutcheon, 1985). Along with his family, he left the Soviet Union in 1943, and lived in Germany as a refugee and "displaced person" until 1952, when he moved to Brazil. Then he started the second part of his professional career. Thanks to his efforts the Astronomical and Geophysical Institute (IAG) from the University of Sao Paulo (USP) was involved, for the first time, in programme of international cooperation, thus contributing to the institutional consolidation of IAG/USP as a leading centre of astronomical research and teaching today in Brazil.

  15. Silurian Gastropoda from the Alexander terrane, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    Gastropods are described from Ludlow-age strata of the Heceta Limestone on Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska. They are part of a diverse megabenthic fauna of the Alexander terrane, an accreted terrane of Siberian or Uralian affinities. Heceta Limestone gastropods with Uralian affinities include Kirkospira glacialis, which closely resembles "Pleurotomaria" lindstromi Oehlert of Chernyshev, 1893, Retispira cf. R. volgulica (Chernyshev, 1893), and Medfracaulus turriformis (Chernyshev, 1893). Medfracaulus and similar morphotypes such as Coelocaulus karlae are unknown from rocks that are unquestionably part of the North American continent (Laurentia) during Late Silurian time. Beraunia is previously known only from the Silurian of Bohemia. Pachystrophia has previously been reported only from western North American terranes (Eastern Klamath, York, and Farewell terranes) and Europe. Bathmopterus Kirk, 1928, is resurrected and is only known from the Silurian of southeast Alaska. Newly described taxa include Hecetastoma gehrelsi n. gen. and n. sp. and Baichtalia tongassensis n. gen. and n. sp. ??2008 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Alexander the Great's tombolos at Tyre and Alexandria, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, N.; Goiran, J. P.; Morhange, C.

    2008-08-01

    Tyre and Alexandria's coastlines are today characterised by wave-dominated tombolos, peculiar sand isthmuses that link former islands to the adjacent continent. Paradoxically, despite a long history of inquiry into spit and barrier formation, understanding of the dynamics and sedimentary history of tombolos over the Holocene timescale is poor. At Tyre and Alexandria we demonstrate that these rare coastal features are the heritage of a long history of natural morphodynamic forcing and human impacts. In 332 BC, following a protracted seven-month siege of the city, Alexander the Great's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow sublittoral sand bank to seize the island fortress; Tyre's causeway served as a prototype for Alexandria's Heptastadium built a few months later. We report stratigraphic and geomorphological data from the two sand spits, proposing a chronostratigraphic model of tombolo evolution.

  17. Teaching Nuclear Radiation and the Poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapp, David R.

    2008-03-01

    The recent international story about the death of the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko has more than just a few wondering about radiation poisoning and the sinister sounding polonium-210. I was preparing to begin a nuclear radiation unit the Monday after Thanksgiving 2006. As it turned out, Litvinenko died Thanksgiving Day after a short and terrible three-week illness. Having the story continue to unfold throughout the next two weeks of the new unit provided a daily opportunity for students to see the relevance of what we were doing in class. My students were able to have meaningful and informed conversations with their peers and parents over an important international event. They even began to feel a bit like authorities themselves when listening to experts respond to media questions about polonium-210 and nuclear radiation in general. This paper discusses some of the ways that the story of Litvinenko was used while presenting the topic of nuclear radiation.

  18. Alexander von Humboldt's perceptions of colonial Spanish America.

    PubMed

    Rebok, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    This study presents an in-depth analysis of Alexander von Humboldt's descriptions and critical comments on the colonial society of the different regions he visited during his well-known expedition through the Americas (1799-1804). The criticisms of colonialism that he expressed, reflecting his personal convictions, have already been the focal point of many studies, but Humboldt also was able to offer a more differentiated assessment through comparisons of regional and local traditions and developments. This essay focuses on his personal diaries, which offer many interesting comments on colonial societies. These considerations and impressions made during the expedition are of particular scholarly value since they were not subject to censorship of any kind. PMID:19852391

  19. Alexander von Humboldt's perceptions of colonial Spanish America.

    PubMed

    Rebok, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    This study presents an in-depth analysis of Alexander von Humboldt's descriptions and critical comments on the colonial society of the different regions he visited during his well-known expedition through the Americas (1799-1804). The criticisms of colonialism that he expressed, reflecting his personal convictions, have already been the focal point of many studies, but Humboldt also was able to offer a more differentiated assessment through comparisons of regional and local traditions and developments. This essay focuses on his personal diaries, which offer many interesting comments on colonial societies. These considerations and impressions made during the expedition are of particular scholarly value since they were not subject to censorship of any kind.

  20. Effects of Alexander Technique training experience on gait behavior in older adults.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Matthew M; Anderson, David I; Allen, Diane D; Ross, Christopher; Hamel, Kate A

    2015-07-01

    Heightened fall risk, potentially caused by aging-related changes in gait, is a serious health issue faced by older adults. The Alexander Technique is thought to improve balance and motor function; however, the technique's effect on gait has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Alexander Technique training in older adults on the temporospatial characteristics of gait and medio-lateral center of mass displacement during fast and comfortably paced over-ground walking. Six licensed Alexander Technique teachers and seven controls between the ages of 60 and 75 years of age participated in the study. Alexander Technique teachers exhibited a reduction in medio-lateral center of mass displacement during fast paced walking compared to comfortably paced walking that was not present in controls. Due to this difference Alexander Technique teachers displayed a smaller medio-lateral Center of Mass displacement compared to controls during fast paced walking. Alexander Technique teachers also demonstrated significantly smaller stride width and lower gait timing variability compared to controls. These findings, which suggest superior control of dynamic stability during gait and potentially reduced fall risk in Alexander Technique teachers, warrant further study.

  1. The modern mythology of the left-handedness of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C

    2006-11-01

    The prevalent modern suggestion that Alexander the Great was left-handed probably derives from Michael Barsley's (1966) book, Left-handed man is a right-handed word, perhaps by mutation from as earlier story cited by Wile in 1934 from a 17th century Rabbirical exegesis, which said that Alexander discovered a country where all the inhabitants were left-handed. That itself may derive in part from the medieval Hebrew Book of Jossippon, which mentions Alexander talking of the superiority of the left hand and of how "kings stemming from the tribe of kings are left-handed".

  2. The efficacy of medicine during the campaigns of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, J R

    1992-09-01

    This paper examines the various factors that may have determined the efficacy of physicians during the campaigns of Alexander the Great. Such general variables as the adequacy of preparation, the nature of the medical profession, and the extent of preventative measures are all discussed at the outset of the paper, followed by a more detailed examination of the specific wounds, illnesses, and treatments of Alexander as described in the accounts of the Alexander historians Plutarch, Curtius, and Arrian. Where no remedy is given by these writers (as is usually the case), this paper speculates on the efficacy of possible treatments as advocated in the contemporary Hippocratic corpus. Casualty statistics of the campaigns are compared to a similar review of Homer's Iliad. From these examinations, this paper concludes that wound treatment efficacy was significantly greater than that of illness treatment, and that Alexander lost many more men to disease than to the wounds of war.

  3. The Berlin tradition in Chicago: Franz Alexander and the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Erika S

    2010-01-01

    Freud considered Franz Alexander, the first graduate of the Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute and an assistant in the Berlin Polyclinic, to be "one of our strongest hopes for the future." Alexander went on to become the first director of the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis in 1932 and modeled some of the Chicago Institute's mission on his Berlin experiences. He was also a researcher in psychosomatic medicine, a prolific writer about psychoanalysis and prominent in psychoanalytic organizations. As he proposed modifications in psychoanalytic technique, he became a controversial figure, especially in the elaboration of his ideas about brief therapy and the corrective emotional experience. This paper puts Alexander's achievements in historical context, draws connections between the Berlin and Chicago Institutes and suggests that, despite his quarrels with traditional psychoanalysis, Alexander's legacy may be in his attitude towards psychoanalysis, characterized by a commitment to scientific study, a willingness to experiment, and a conviction about the role of psychoanalysis within the larger culture.

  4. Expedition 8 Crew Interviews: Alexander Y. Kaleri - FE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Russian cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Flight Engineer on Expedition 8 to the International Space Station (ISS), answers interview questions on this video, either himself or with the help of an interpreter. The questions cover: 1) The goal of the expedition; 2) The place in history of Mir; 3) The reaction to the loss of Columbia in Houston; 4) Why the rewards of spaceflight are worth the risks; 5) Why he decided to become a cosmonaut; 6) His memory of Yuri Gagarin's first flight; 7) What happens on a Soyuz capsule during launch and flight; 8) Are Soyuz maneuvers automatic or manual; 8) How the ISS science mission will be advanced during his stay; 9) The responsibilities of a Flight Engineer onboard the ISS; 10) Extravehicular activity (EVA) plans at that time; 11) The Shuttle Return to Flight and his preference for a Shuttle or Soyuz landing; 12) Why the last Soyuz landing was too rough; 13) The most valueable contribution of the ISS program.

  5. What is the alternative to the Alexander-Orbach relation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor M.

    2016-03-01

    The Alexander-Orbach (AO) relation d w = 2d f /d s connecting the fractal dimension of a random walk’s (RW) trajectory d w or the exponent of anomalous diffusion α = 2/d w on a fractal structure with the fractal and spectral dimension of the structure itself plays a key role in discussion of dynamical properties of complex systems including living cells and single biomolecules. This relation however does not hold universally and breaks down for some structures like diffusion limited aggregates and Eden trees. We show that the alternative to the AO relation is the explicit dependence of the coefficient of the anomalous diffusion on the system’s size, i.e. the absence of its thermodynamical limit. The prerequisite for its breakdown is the dependence of the local structure of possible steps of the RW on the system’s size. The discussion is illustrated by the examples of diffusion on a Koch curve (AO-conform) and on a Cantor dust (violating AO relation).

  6. Cyclicity in Silurian island-arc carbonates, Alexander terrane, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kittredge, L.E.; Soja, C.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Silurian carbonates from Alaska (Alexander terrane) record the evolution of a submarine platform during waning volcanism in an island arc. A detailed stratigraphic analysis of a 47 meter-thick sequence revealed the existence of cyclically repeated limestones: coral-stromatoporoid wackestones alternate with oncoid packstones and bioturbated, silty lime mudstones. The coral-stromatoporoid deposits are characterized by a low-diversity assemblage of dendroid corals, massive stromatoporoids, Atrypoidea brachiopods, and rare occurrences of biostromes associated with Solenopora, high-spired gastropods, and crinoids. Oncoids typically are 2-6 mm in diameter and form massive, meter-thick units. Coated grains are symmetrically developed, have a shell or algal nucleus, and are also a minor component of coral-stromatoporoid beds. These lithologic units form seven, shallowing-upwards cycles (parasequences) that range in thickness from 3-9 meters. Coral-stomatoporoid wackestones form the base of each cycle and grade upwards into oncoid packstones with silty, lime mudstones at the top. This succession of lithofacies within each cycle reflects an increase in energy levels from relatively deeper water environments to relatively shallower ones. The lack of abrasion in the corals and stromatoporoids suggests predominantly quiet-water conditions in shallow subtidal areas affected by periodic turbulence. Comparison with correlative sections in Alaska and lack of correspondence with global sea level curves suggest that the primary cause of cyclicity was tectonic perturbations with secondary eustatic effects. Cyclic deposition in peri/subtidal sites was terminated by rapid drowning of the carbonate platform during late Silurian orogenesis.

  7. The life and death of Alexander Bogdanov, physician.

    PubMed

    Huestis, D W

    1996-08-01

    It was early in April in 1928 when the word went out in Moscow that Alexander Bogdanov had died. He was a controversial figure, an old Bolshevik who had left that party long before the 1917 revolution and never returned. All the same, he had had Lenin's respect as a scientist (as long as he stayed out of politics). More recently, he also had the support of the new party strong man, Stalin. Bogdanov opposed the growing despotism of the "dictatorship of the proletariat", under which slogan Communist autocracy was being developed. But he was respected as a tireless propagandist for the socialist cause, an enthusiastic teacher of the proletariat, and a writer of arcane science and philosophy. Bogdanov was held in such respect that Communist bigwigs spoke glowingly at the funeral, praising his intellect, courage, and dedication to science and humanity. They did not fail to point out that he had split with his one-time friend, Lenin, and had succumbed to ideological "errors". Indeed, he had powerful enemies in the early Soviet state. Bogdanov was a physician, economist, philosopher, natural scientist, writer of utopian science fiction, poet, teacher, politician (unsuccesful), lifelong revolutionary, forerunner of what we now call cybernetics and organizational science, and founder of the world's first institution devoted entirely to the field of blood transfusion. You could call him a Renaissance man. Although he clearly fitted the category of the late-nineteenth-century Russian intellectual revolutionary, Bogdanov differed from most of them in being no dilettante. More than just a theorist, he was an active scientist and physician. As a teacher, he firmly believed that education and indoctrination could alter people's ways of thinking and behaving, and that humanity could be perfected under socialism. Like many revolutionaries, Bogdanov tried to keep ahead of the Tsar's police by using a variety of pseudonyms, among them Riadavoy, Werner, Maximov, and Bogdanov. After

  8. Educating with the hands: working on the body/self in Alexander Technique.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Jennifer

    2011-02-01

    Traditionally, forms of body work such as Alexander Technique have been excluded from mainstream biomedicine and healthcare, despite attempts by practitioners to have the work accepted within the medical community. Using data from a UK-based study of Alexander Technique which combined participant observation, interviews with 17 teachers and pupils, and analysis of historical texts, this article examines the relationship of the Alexander Technique to the field of healthcare, looking at its embodied practices, and contrasting these with the discourses in which it is framed. Applying Foucault's concept of 'techniques of the self', the article examines Alexander Technique's physical practices as a form of embodied knowledge, and goes on to look at its use of particular ideas about nature and evolution as guiding authorities, its emphasis on holism through its conception of the 'self', and how it has been positioned in relation to biomedical approaches. The article argues that while the embodied practice of Alexander Technique has much to offer to mainstream healthcare, the discourses and knowledge systems in which it is embedded make it unlikely to receive mainstream medical acceptance.

  9. Obituary: Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, 1956-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc William

    2006-12-01

    Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, Program Coordinator at the Space Telescope Science Institute, was diagnosed with cancer of the gallbladder, pancreas, and liver in May 2005 and died on 29 September 2005. He was forty-nine. Andy was born to Bodo and Helen Lubenow in St. Paul, Minnesota on 4 January 1956. In 1964 at the age of eight, he moved with his family to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and attended the American Community School there until returning with his family in 1973 to St. Paul. Argentina had a big impact on Andy's future as an astronomer. He later recalled how he had observed and was puzzled by the "upside-down" appearance of the Moon in the southern hemisphere. In Argentina, he built his first telescope using a mirror he had ground himself. He never parted ways with that instrument. Andy did not follow a standard educational track. He spent two years at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, before transferring to the University of Minnesota, where he earned his bachelor's degree and began work towards a master's degree in astrophysics. Later he transferred to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he remained until Dr. Peter Stockman hired him to work on the Hubble Space Telescope project. While in school, he worked as a teacher's assistant, taught night school, and gave demonstrations of stargazing. He was an excellent teacher and had a flair for writing. He later wrote articles for a sailing magazine and a pilot's magazine. Andy was a very practical, meticulous, and steady worker, attributes that he combined with an understated and dry sense of humor. He was always able to find a way through a problem, no matter how sticky. If a job required him to roll up his sleeves and get it done through hard work, he would persevere. Nevertheless, he was always on the lookout for an easier way. He had no patience for being forced to deal with stupid things for stupid reasons. At work at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Andy was

  10. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson. Wilson's disease, Queen Square and neurology.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Trocello, J-M; Woimant, F; Lachaux, A; Quinn, N

    2013-12-01

    This historical article describes the life and work of the British physician Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson (1878-1937), who was one of the world's greatest neurologists of the first half of the 20th century. Early in his career, Wilson spent one year in Paris in 1903 where he learned from Pierre-Marie at Bicêtre Hospital. He subsequently retained uninterrupted links with French neurology. He also visited in Leipzig the German anatomist Paul Flechsig. In 1904, Wilson returned to London, where he worked for the rest of his life at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic (later the National Hospital for Nervous Diseases, and today the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery) in Queen Square, and also at Kings' College Hospital. He wrote on 'the old motor system and the new', on disorders of motility and muscle tone, on the epilepsies, on aphasia, apraxia, tics, and pathologic laughing and crying, and most importantly on Wilson's disease. The other objective of our paper is to commemorate the centenary of Wilson's most important work published in 1912 in Brain, and also in Revue Neurologique, on an illness newly recognized and characterized by him entitled "Progressive lenticular degeneration, a familial nervous disease associated with liver cirrhosis". He analyzed 12 clinical cases, four of whom he followed himself, but also four cases previously published by others and a further two that he considered in retrospect had the same disease as he was describing. The pathological profile combined necrotic damage in the lenticular nuclei of the brain and hepatic cirrhosis. This major original work is summarized and discussed in the present paper. Wilson not only delineated what was later called hepato-lenticular degeneration and Wilson's disease, but also introduced for the first time the terms extrapyramidal syndrome and extrapyramidal system, stressing the role of the basal ganglia in motility. The present historical work emphasizes the special

  11. Alexander von Humboldt's charts of the Earth's magnetic field: an assessment based on modern models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandea, M.; Korte, M.; Soloviev, A.; Gvishiani, A.

    2010-11-01

    The 19th century witnessed a resurgence of interest in Earth's magnetic field. Both observational and theoretical aspects were involved, and one of the emblematic figures of this period was Alexander von Humboldt. Throughout a long life he maintained a strong interest in a broad area of subjects, however, here we are interested in his role in geomagnetism, and particularly in his pioneering contributions to charting the geomagnetic field. Alexander von Humboldt efforts in measuring and charting the Earth's magnetic field are recounted and the maps of declination, inclination and total intensity he had prepared are compared, favorably, with maps for the same epoch based on a modern model of the geomagnetic field, gufm1. This modern assessment of the accuracy of von Humboldt's geomagnetic charts illustrates the importance of his work, being also our homage to the 150th anniversary of the death of Alexander von Humboldt.

  12. IN MEMORIAM: In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin In Memoriam: Alexander A Golovin and Alexei M Oparin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    In Memoriam of Alexander A Golovin (1962-2008) Alexander (Sasha) Golovin passed away on 10 September 2008. Sasha's scientific heritage includes seminal works in different fields of physics, from Marangoni convection to self-assembly of quantum dots, and from combustion fronts to anomalous diffusion in flows and on a crystal surface. A graduate of the Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, he had very broad scientific interests and a unique ability to identify and solve new, intellectually challenging and technologically important problems. One of the basic fields of Sasha's research was the fluid dynamics in systems with interfaces. His favorite subject was the motion of droplets, bubbles and particles in the presence of heat and mass transfer. Sasha's early works contained the discovery of the spontaneous motion of droplets due to the Marangoni effect and the investigation of the interaction between solid particles, bubbles and droplets caused by the Marangoni effect, which is a crucial factor that determines the effect of heat/mass transfer on the rate of coalescence. In both cases, Sasha's work was the first in a long sequence of papers written by different authors. Later, Sasha returned to that field when studying such fascinating subjects as levitation of droplets above the surface of an evaporating liquid and encapsulation of particles and bubbles by an advancing solidification front. The subject of interfacial hydrodynamics overlaps with another basic field of Sasha's research, the theory of pattern formation. The contribution of Sasha's work to the modern understanding of the variety of pattern formation phenomena is significant. It includes the analysis of the interaction between long-wave and short-wave instability modes in Marangoni convection, investigation of the large-scale Marangoni convection that led to the prediction of different patterns including quasipatterns, and the description of various non-potential effects in Marangoni convection

  13. Alexander Bain's CUE in the Post-Modern World: Unity Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryden, Phyllis

    In 1866, Alexander Bain proposed that by evaluating unity, coherence, and emphasis (which he brought together under the acronym "CUE"), students could judge the effectiveness of their written paragraphs. One hundred twenty-five years later, the proposition is still central to composition instruction. A review of modern writing textbooks reveals…

  14. A Disciplinary Immigrant. Alexander Smith at the University of Chicago, 1894-1911

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Donald

    2008-01-01

    The publication in 1906 of Alexander Smith's "Introduction to general inorganic chemistry" inaugurated a decisive change in chemical pedagogy in the US, the effects of which are still evident. The nature and extent of Smith's innovations are described through a comparison of his text to its source material and contemporaries. His authoritative…

  15. 76 FR 54800 - Sandy Alexander, Clifton, NJ; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sandy Alexander, Clifton, NJ; Notice of Negative Determination on... (subject firm). The Department's Notice was published in the Federal Register on February 2, 2011 (76 FR... resulted in a negative determination based on the findings that the petitioning worker group did not...

  16. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-05-01

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an ≈1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated ≈8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1-2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system.

  17. Old Age, the Ancient Military, and Alexander's Army: Positive Examples for a Graying America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebric, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Presents examples from ancient Greece and Rome illustrating working aged and intergenerational dependence. Describes normal active participation of elderly as officers and common soldiers in ancient military as example of their capabilities. Notes that Alexander the Great's army, in particular, depended on contributions of older men. (Author/NB)

  18. "In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great" PBS Series. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC.

    This teacher's guide correlates with the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) television series "In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great" hosted by historian Michael Wood. The four episodes of the series are entitled: "Son of God"; "Lord of Asia"; "Across the Hindu Kush"; and "To the Ends of the Earth." The guide consists of four core units related…

  19. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-05-29

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an approximately 1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated approximately 8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1-2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system.

  20. The Alexander N. Charters Library of Resources for Educators of Adults at Syracuse University Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Terrance

    This document describes the contents of the Alexander N. Charters Library of Resources for Educators of Adults at Syracuse University Library. The document begins with a brief history of the development of the library's collections, which occupy 900 feet of shelf space and contain more than 50 groups of personal papers and records of organizations…

  1. Alexander v. Yale: Collected Documents from the Yale Undergraduate Women's Caucus and Grievance Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yale Univ., New Haven, CT.

    Papers concerning the lawsuit charging that Yale University condones sexual harassment of women students, Alexander v. Yale, have been compiled by the Yale Undergraduate Women's Caucus. The specifics of the case are described by Caucus publications and press releases. The suit, filed in July 1977 by four female undergraduates and one male…

  2. Alexander Cameron Rutherford: A Gentleman and a Scholar. Documents in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodysh, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information about Alexander Cameron Rutherford, a provincial politician. Includes a letter written by Rutherford in 1912 that provides insights into his responsibilities to the general public, information about Rutherford himself, the economic conditions of Alberta, Canada in 1912, and information about the individual to whom it was…

  3. Holocene morphogenesis of Alexander the Great's isthmus at Tyre in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Meulé, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    In 332 B.C., Alexander the Great constructed an ≈1,000-m-long causeway to seize the offshore island of Tyre. The logistics behind this engineering feat have long troubled archaeologists. Using the Holocene sedimentary record, we demonstrate that Alexander's engineers cleverly exploited a shallow proto-tombolo, or sublittoral sand spit, to breach the offshore city's defensive impregnability. We elucidate a three-phase geomorphological model for the spit's evolution. Settled since the Bronze Age, the area's geological record manifests a long history of natural and anthropogenic forcings. (i) Leeward of the island breakwater, the maximum flooding surface (e.g., drowning of the subaerial land surfaces by seawater) is dated ≈8000 B.P. Fine-grained sediments and brackish and marine-lagoonal faunas translate shallow, low-energy water bodies at this time. Shelter was afforded by Tyre's elongated sandstone reefs, which acted as a 6-km natural breakwater. (ii) By 6000 B.P., sea-level rise had reduced the dimensions of the island from 6 to 4 km. The leeward wave shadow generated by this island, allied with high sediment supply after 3000 B.P., culminated in a natural wave-dominated proto-tombolo within 1–2 m of mean sea level by the time of Alexander the Great (4th century B.C.). (iii) After 332 B.C., construction of Alexander's causeway entrained a complete anthropogenic metamorphosis of the Tyrian coastal system. PMID:17517668

  4. Identification of metapopulation dynamics among Northern Goshawks of the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and Coastal British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; McClaren, Erica L.; Doyle, Frank I.; Titus, K.; Sage, George K.; Wilson, Robert E.; Gust, J.R.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Northern Goshawks occupying the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, and coastal British Columbia nest primarily in old-growth and mature forest, which results in spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of individuals across the landscape. We used microsatellite and mitochondrial data to infer genetic structure, gene flow, and fluctuations in population demography through evolutionary time. Patterns in the genetic signatures were used to assess predictions associated with the three population models: panmixia, metapopulation, and isolated populations. Population genetic structure was observed along with asymmetry in gene flow estimates that changed directionality at different temporal scales, consistent with metapopulation model predictions. Therefore, Northern Goshawk assemblages located in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia interact through a metapopulation framework, though they may not fit the classic model of a metapopulation. Long-term population sources (coastal mainland British Columbia) and sinks (Revillagigedo and Vancouver islands) were identified. However, there was no trend through evolutionary time in the directionality of dispersal among the remaining assemblages, suggestive of a rescue-effect dynamic. Admiralty, Douglas, and Chichagof island complex appears to be an evolutionarily recent source population in the Alexander Archipelago. In addition, Kupreanof island complex and Kispiox Forest District populations have high dispersal rates to populations in close geographic proximity and potentially serve as local source populations. Metapopulation dynamics occurring in the Alexander Archipelago and coastal British Columbia by Northern Goshawks highlight the importance of both occupied and unoccupied habitats to long-term population persistence of goshawks in this region.

  5. Friendly Letters on the Correspondence of Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan, and Alexander Graham Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Burton

    1985-01-01

    Excerpts from the letters between Alexander Graham Bell and Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller are given to illustrate the educational and personal growth of Helen Keller as well as the educational philosophy of Bell regarding the education of the deaf blind. (DB)

  6. 78 FR 30791 - Airworthiness Directives; Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. Segelflugzeugbau Sailplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. Segelflugzeugbau Models AS-K13, Ka2B, Ka 6, Ka 6 B, Ka 6 BR, Ka 6 C, Ka 6 CR, K7, K8, and K 8 B sailplanes that would supersede... aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as misalignment of the automatic elevator...

  7. Connect the Book. Always Inventing: A Photobiography of Alexander Graham Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2004-01-01

    Cell phones, video phones, voice messaging?one wonders what Alexander Graham Bell would have thought about the many venues today for electronic communication with one another. Bell's March 10, 1876 invention is now 128 years old, but there is no doubt that Bell's "talking machine" changed the world. This article presents a brief review of the…

  8. Russia's Literary Genius Alexander Pushkin: The Great-Grandson of an African Slave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lounsbery, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Pushkin, Russia's most celebrated literary figure, descended from an African slave. On both parents' sides, he was related to Avram Petrovich Gannibal, who was born to an African prince and abducted to become a slave to a Russian diplomat. Pushkin chose to pride himself on both his aristocratic life and his African ancestry. (SM)

  9. Obituary: Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, 1956-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Marc William

    2006-12-01

    Alexander (Andy) Franz Lubenow, Program Coordinator at the Space Telescope Science Institute, was diagnosed with cancer of the gallbladder, pancreas, and liver in May 2005 and died on 29 September 2005. He was forty-nine. Andy was born to Bodo and Helen Lubenow in St. Paul, Minnesota on 4 January 1956. In 1964 at the age of eight, he moved with his family to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and attended the American Community School there until returning with his family in 1973 to St. Paul. Argentina had a big impact on Andy's future as an astronomer. He later recalled how he had observed and was puzzled by the "upside-down" appearance of the Moon in the southern hemisphere. In Argentina, he built his first telescope using a mirror he had ground himself. He never parted ways with that instrument. Andy did not follow a standard educational track. He spent two years at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, before transferring to the University of Minnesota, where he earned his bachelor's degree and began work towards a master's degree in astrophysics. Later he transferred to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he remained until Dr. Peter Stockman hired him to work on the Hubble Space Telescope project. While in school, he worked as a teacher's assistant, taught night school, and gave demonstrations of stargazing. He was an excellent teacher and had a flair for writing. He later wrote articles for a sailing magazine and a pilot's magazine. Andy was a very practical, meticulous, and steady worker, attributes that he combined with an understated and dry sense of humor. He was always able to find a way through a problem, no matter how sticky. If a job required him to roll up his sleeves and get it done through hard work, he would persevere. Nevertheless, he was always on the lookout for an easier way. He had no patience for being forced to deal with stupid things for stupid reasons. At work at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Andy was

  10. Protein misfolding and oxidative stress promote glial-mediated neurodegeneration in an Alexander disease model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Colodner, Kenneth J.; Feany, Mel B.

    2011-01-01

    Although alterations in glial structure and function commonly accompany death of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, the role glia play in modulating neuronal loss is poorly understood. We have created a model of Alexander disease in Drosophila by expressing disease-linked mutant versions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in fly glia. We find aggregation of mutant human GFAP into inclusions bearing the hallmarks of authentic Rosenthal fibers. We also observe significant toxicity of mutant human GFAP to glia, which is mediated by protein aggregation and oxidative stress. Both protein aggregation and oxidative stress contribute to activation of a robust autophagic response in glia. Toxicity of mutant GFAP to glial cells induces a non-cell autonomous stress response and subsequent apoptosis in neurons, which is dependent on glial glutamate transport. Our findings thus establish a simple genetic model of Alexander disease and further identify cellular pathways critical for glial-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21414908

  11. Clinical Experience in Late Antiquity: Alexander of Tralles and the Therapy of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bouras-vallianatos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Alexander of Tralles, writing in the late sixth century, combined his wide-ranging practical knowledge with earlier medical theories. This article shows how clinical experience is used in Alexander’s works by concentrating on his therapeutic advice on epilepsy and, in particular, on pharmacology and the group of so-called natural remedies. I argue that clinical testing is used not only for the introduction of new medicines but also as an instrument for checking the therapeutic effect of popular healing practices. On another level, this article discusses Alexander’s role as the author of a medical compendium; it suggests that by marking the cases of clinical testing with a set of recurrent expressions, Alexander leads his audience to reflect on his medical authority and personal contribution. PMID:25045178

  12. [Urology and National Socialism: the fate of Alexander von Lichtenberg 1880-1949].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Krischel, M; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2010-09-01

    Alexander von Lichtenberg (1880-1949) was one of the famous members of the German Urological Society (DGU) in pre-war Germany. He introduced excretion urography and a special TURP Instrument. In 1928 he was president of the 8th meeting held in the German capital Berlin. His Handbook of Urology, released by Ferdinand Springer publishing house, was a trendsetter in establishing urology as a specialty in Germany and bringing together the whole wisdom of all aspects of urology. He was the founder of the famous Maximilian Nitze Award of the DGU. As a Jew he-like many others-was forced to leave Nazi Germany after 1933. Even in Hungary, his native country, he again had to resist anti-Semitic hostility. Later on he lived in Mexico. Alexander von Lichtenberg has to be remembered with special focus on the exodus of German Jewish scientists during the Nazi time.

  13. Pennsylvanian pluton stitching of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.C.; Bergman, S.C.; Cushing, G.W. ); Plafker, G. ); Campbell, R.B.; Dodds, C.J. ); McClelland, W.C. ); Mueller, P.A. ); MacKevett, E.M. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    A quartz monzonite-syenite-alkali granite plutonic complex in eastern Alaska crosscuts the contact of the Alexander terrane and Wrangellia and intrudes the basement rocks of both terranes. Zircon U-Pb data indicate an intrusion age of 309 {plus minus} 5 Ma (Middle Pennsylvanian) for the pluton, and {sup 40}K-{sup 40}Ar age for hornblende separates indicate cooling to about 450 C during Middle Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time. The new field relations and age data demonstrate the Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane were contiguous during the Middle Pennsylvanian. This conclusion provides an important new constraint on paleogeographic reconstructions of the northwest Cordillera, and necessitates reassessment of stratigraphic and paleomagnetic data that were cited as evidence that the terranes evolved separately until the late Mesozoic.

  14. Paleozoic paleomagnetism and northward drift of the Alexander Terrane, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Der Voo, Rob; Jones, Meridee; Gromme, C. Sherman; Eberlein, G. Donald; Churkin, Michael, Jr.

    1980-10-01

    Paleozoic limestone, graywacke, sandstone, milestone, red beds and volcanic rocks of the Alexander terrane, southeastern Alaska, have yielded six paleomagnetic pole positions after thermal and alternating-field demagnetization. These poles are from sample groups of late Middle Ordovician, Late Ordovician, Devonian, Late Devonian, and early and late Carboniferous age. To test various tectonic models for the structural development of this part of western North America, the paleomagnetic results are compared to those for the North American craton. It is found that the observed inclination and declination values deviate significantly from the values predicted for the present-day position of the Alexander terrane (55.5N, 133.5W). Better matching can be obtained for a paleoposition of the terrane at about 40N, 120W, in the present position of western Nevada and northeastern California. In addition, an in situ 25° clockwise rotation of the terrane is required to restore it to its original position.

  15. Scaphopoda from the Alexander Terrane, Southeast Alaska-The first occurrence of Scaphopoda in the Silurian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.; Baichtal, J.

    2006-01-01

    The scaphopods Dentalium hecetaensis n. sp. and Rhytiodentalium cf. kentuckyensis Pojeta et Runnegar, 1979, are described from Ludlow-age strata of the Heceta Limestone on Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. This is the first occurrence of Silurian scaphopods known to date. They are part of a diverse macrobenthic fauna of the Alexander terrane, an accreted southern Alaskan terrane of Siberian or Uralian affinities. ?? 2006 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS.

  16. A stone at the Siege of Cyropolis and the death of Alexander the Great.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew N; Arnott, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Alexander the Great was struck by a stone at the Siege of Cyropolis in 329 BC and was rendered temporarily blind and inaudible as a result. Although other authors have written extensively about the likely pathological effects of this injury, none have suggested carotid artery dissection as a possible cause. We present evidence that this should be considered as a differential diagnosis and how it might explain an unusual symptom seen at his deathbed in Babylon six years later.

  17. Professor Robert McNeill Alexander CBE FRS (1934-2016).

    PubMed

    Ker, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Robert McNeill Alexander, known to friends and colleagues as 'Neill', was a zoologist with an engineer's eye for how animals work. He used mathematical models to show how evolution has produced optimal designs. His skill was to choose appropriate models: realistic enough to contain the essence of a problem and yet simple enough to be tractable. He wrote fluently and easily: 23 books, 280 papers and a CD-ROM entitled How Animals Move. PMID:27385751

  18. PLC/PRF/5 (Alexander) hepatoma cell line: further characterization and studies of infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Daemer, R J; Feinstone, S M; Alexander, J J; Tully, J G; London, W T; Wong, D C; Purcell, R H

    1980-01-01

    The Alexander hepatoma cell line, PLC/PRF/5, was studied for evidence of hepatitis B virus markers and alpha-fetoprotein. Only hepatitis B surface antigen and alpha-fetoprotein were detected. Induction experiments with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine and inoculation of chimpanzees with whole cells or tissue culture fluid did not reveal evidence of synthesis of additional hepatitis B virus markers or of production of infectious virus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6160110

  19. Alexander H. Leighton's and Jane Murphy's scientific contributions in psychiatric epidemiology: a personal appreciation.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marc-Adélard

    2006-03-01

    This article introduces the special issue of Transcultural Psychiatry in honour of Alexander Leighton. A sketch of his research career is followed by a discussion of the work of his wife, Dr. Jane Murphy, first on St. Lawrence Island, near the Bering Strait, and later as a key figure in the Stirling County project. A brief conclusion highlights the main aspects of their joint legacy to cultural psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology. PMID:16671389

  20. Lithium Decreases Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in a Mouse Model of Alexander Disease.

    PubMed

    LaPash Daniels, Christine M; Paffenroth, Elizabeth; Austin, Elizabeth V; Glebov, Konstantin; Lewis, Diana; Walter, Jochen; Messing, Albee

    2015-01-01

    Alexander disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the astrocyte intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by elevated levels of GFAP and the formation of protein aggregates, known as Rosenthal fibers, within astrocytes. Lithium has previously been shown to decrease protein aggregates by increasing the autophagy pathway for protein degradation. In addition, lithium has also been reported to decrease activation of the transcription factor STAT3, which is a regulator of GFAP transcription and astrogliogenesis. Here we tested whether lithium treatment would decrease levels of GFAP in a mouse model of Alexander disease. Mice with the Gfap-R236H point mutation were fed lithium food pellets for 4 to 8 weeks. Four weeks of treatment with LiCl at 0.5% in food pellets decreased GFAP protein and transcripts in several brain regions, although with mild side effects and some mortality. Extending the duration of treatment to 8 weeks resulted in higher mortality, and again with a decrease in GFAP in the surviving animals. Indicators of autophagy, such as LC3, were not increased, suggesting that lithium may decrease levels of GFAP through other pathways. Lithium reduced the levels of phosphorylated STAT3, suggesting this as one pathway mediating the effects on GFAP. In conclusion, lithium has the potential to decrease GFAP levels in Alexander disease, but with a narrow therapeutic window separating efficacy and toxicity.

  1. Teachers' professional development needs and current practices at the Alexander Science Center School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargus, Gerald Vincent

    This investigation represents an in-depth understanding of teacher professional development at the Alexander Science Center School, a dependent charter museum school established through a partnership between the California Science Center and Los Angeles Unified School District. Three methods of data collection were used. A survey was distributed and collected from the school's teachers, resulting in a prioritized list of teacher professional development needs, as well as a summary of teachers' opinions about the school's existing professional development program. In addition, six key stakeholders in the school's professional development program were interviewed for the study. Finally, documents related to the school's professional development program were analyzed. Data collected from the interviews and documents were used to develop an understand various components of the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program. Teachers identified seven areas that had a high-priority for future professional development including developing skills far working with below-grade-level students, improving the analytical skills of student in mathematics, working with English Language Learners, improving students' overall reading ability levels, developing teachers' content-area knowledge for science, integrating science across the curriculum, and incorporating hands-on activity-based learning strategies to teach science. Professional development needs identified by Alexander Science Center School teachers were categorized based on their focus on content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, or curricular knowledge. Analysis of data collected through interviews and documents revealed that the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program consisted of six venues for providing professional development for teachers including weekly "banked time" sessions taking place within the standard school day, grade-level meetings, teacher support

  2. Origin of Silurian reefs in the Alexander Terrane of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Lower to Upper Silurian (upper Llandovery-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation record several episodes of reef growth in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. As the oldest carbonates of wide-spread distribution in the region, the Heceta limestones represent the earliest development of a shallow-marine platform within the Alexander arc and the oldest foundation for reef evolution. These deposits provide important insights into the dynamic processes, styles, and bathymetry associated with reef growth in tectonically active oceanic islands. Massive stromatoporoids, corals, and red algae are preserved in fragmental rudstones and represent a fringing reef that formed at the seaward edge of the incipient marine shelf. Accessory constituents in this reef include crinoids and the cyanobacterium Girvanella. Small biostromes were constructed by ramose corals and stromatoporoids on oncolitic substrates in backreef or lagoonal environments. These buildups were associated with low-diversity assemblages of brachiopods and with gastropods, amphiporids, calcareous algae and cyanobacteria. Microbial boundstones reflect the widespread encrustation of cyanobacteria and calcified microproblematica on shelly debris as stromatolitic mats that resulted in the development of a stromatactoid-bearing mud mound and a barrier reef complex. Epiphytaceans, other microbes, and aphrosalpingid sponges were the primary frame-builders of the barrier reefs. These buildups attained significant relief at the shelf margin and shed detritus as slumped blocks and debris flows into deep-water sites along the slope. The similarity of these stromatolitic-aphrosalpingid reefs to those from Siluro-Devonian strata of autochthonous southwestern Alaska suggests paleobiogeographic ties of the Alexander terrane to cratonal North America during the Silurian.

  3. Alexander Fleming, citrated blood and penicillin: paths not pursued and applications delayed.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, P P

    2009-12-01

    Ninety years ago Alexander Fleming (later to discover penicillin) jointly wrote a description of the use of indirect transfusions of citrated blood at a World War 1 (WW1) base hospital. It was the longest series yet to be published, incorporating what was then a novel procedure for treating war casualties. Returning to civilian life Fleming, a qualified surgeon and bacteriologist, chose a different career path, and not until the wars of the late 1930s were the advances in transfusion in WW1 fully incorporated into the management of trauma and haemorrhage. Like penicillin, the benefits of indirect transfusion were only slowly realised.

  4. Alexander Dalgarno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jane L.

    Alex Dalgarno saved my career. I entered the Graduate School at Harvard in the Chemistry Department in September of 1973 from the University of Michigan, where I had (unfortunately) majored in Chemistry. Chemistry is considered a "laboratory science" but I had no talent in the laboratory. I had merely fallen in love with the ideal gas law in high school, and I had stubbornly allowed this to determine my course of studies, most of which had nothing to do with the ideal gas law, and much of which was focused on laboratory studies...

  5. Alexander Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... there are no ethnic, racial, geographic, or cultural/economic differences in its distribution. Is there any treatment? ... Fax: 815-748-0844 Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  6. Improvement in Automatic Postural Coordination Following Alexander Technique Lessons in a Person With Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Horak, Fay B; Henry, Sharon M

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose The relationship between abnormal postural coordination and back pain is unclear. The Alexander Technique (AT) aims to improve postural coordination by using conscious processes to alter automatic postural coordination and ongoing muscular activity, and it has been reported to reduce low back pain. This case report describes the use of the AT with a client with low back pain and the observed changes in automatic postural responses and back pain. Case Description The client was a 49-year-old woman with a 25-year history of left-sided, idiopathic, lumbrosacral back pain. Automatic postural coordination was measured using a force plate during horizontal platform translations and one-legged standing. Outcomes The client was tested monthly for 4 months before AT lessons and for 3 months after lessons. Before lessons, she consistently had laterally asymmetric automatic postural responses to translations. After AT lessons, the magnitude and asymmetry of her responses and balance improved and her low back pain decreased. Discussion Further research is warranted to study whether AT lessons improve low back pain–associated abnormalities in automatic postural coordination and whether improving automatic postural coordination helps to reduce low back pain. [Cacciatore TW, Horak FB, Henry SM. Improvement in automatic postural coordination following Alexander Technique lessons in a person with low back pain. PMID:15921477

  7. Possible refugia in the Alexander Archipelago of southeastern Alaska during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, P.E.; Ager, T.A.; Baichtal, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    The interpretation of the extent of late Wisconsin glaciation in southeastern Alaska has varied between geologists and biologists. Maps and reports of the region prepared by geologists commonly indicated that late Wisconsin ice extended as a large uniform front west to the edge of the continental shelf. However, the distribution of plants and animals in the region has led many biologists to suggest that there may have been ice-free areas that served as refugia during the late Wisconsin. Based on analyses of aerial photographs, topographic maps, and bathymetric charts, in conjunction with a review of previous literature and reconnaissance fieldwork throughout the region, this study presents data supporting a limited ice extent in the Alexander Archipelago during the late Wisconsin and identifies possible ice-free areas that may have served as refugia. These areas include (1) the Fairweather Ground, (2) the Herbert Graves Island area, (3) the western coast of southern Baranof Island and adjacent continental shelf, (4) Coronation Island and the adjacent continental shelf, (5) the Warren Island area, (6) the continental shelf from west of Heceta Island to Forrester Island in the south, (7) parts of the west coast of southern Dall Island, and (8) lowland areas in southern Prince of Wales Island. The identification of these possible refugia has bearing on the recolonization of the Alexander Archipelago, as they could have served as centers of biotic dispersal upon regional deglaciation and as stepping stones for early humans with a maritime tradition entering the western hemisphere from Asia. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  8. Trace element analysis of Alexander the Great's silver tetradrachms minted in Macedonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.; Katsanos, A. A.; Touratsoglou, J.

    2000-11-01

    The coinage of Alexander the Great presents a special interest because of its international character in the frame of the ancient times. At least 31 mints (from Aigai to Babylon and from Pella to Alexandreia) operated in the vast state, which was created by Alexander in just over 10 years (334-323 BC). Impressive quantities of tetradrachms were consequently minted for the economic affairs of an expanding state. The mints continued to be active and after the premature death of the Macedonian king, producing among others and tetradrachms in his name. The elemental chemical composition of silver tetradrachms minted in Amphipolis as well as in other Macedonian Greek cities was analysed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), and 12 elements were determined. The problem of the patina (silver corrosion layer) effects on the results was examined by analysis before and after the corrosion product removal. From the results of the chemical composition, a similar numismatic policy is deduced for all the analysed coin as well as metal provenance indications for some of the coins.

  9. Alexander of Macedon, the greatest warrior of all times: did he have seizures?

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2004-10-01

    Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) was likely "the most incomparable general the world has ever seen." His name is often listed among the famous individuals in history who have had seizures. Examination of his illnesses reveals that in 333 BC he entered Tarsus, hot and exhausted, and plunged himself into the River Cydnus, ice-cold from melting mountain snows. His cramps were so severe that he was rescued half-conscious and ashen white, and quickly developed acute pneumonia. Only one doctor dared give him a medication, known for producing powerful and immediate effects. Immediately after drinking this medicine "he lost his speech and falling into a swoon, he had scarcely any sense or pulse left" (Plutarch, ad 75). His reactions were the direct effect of the medication, and this and only this phrase represents the "evidence" for epilepsy. None of his other illnesses involved seizures. Clearly, Alexander the Great did not have epilepsy and his name should be removed from the list of famous individuals who have had seizures.

  10. Geohydrology and water-chemistry of the Alexander Valley, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Loren F.; Farrar, Christopher D.; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2006-01-01

    This study of the geohydrology and water chemistry of the Alexander Valley, California, was done to provide an improved scientific basis for addressing emerging water-management issues, including potential increases in water demand and changes in flows in the Russian River. The study tasks included (1) evaluation of existing geohydrological, geophysical, and geochemical data; (2) collection and analysis of new geohydrologic data, including subsurface lithologic data, ground-water levels, and streamflow records; and (3) collection and analysis of new water-chemistry data. The estimated total water use for the Alexander Valley for 1999 was approximately 15,800 acre-feet. About 13,500 acre-feet of this amount was for agricultural use, primarily vineyards, and about 2,300 acre-feet was for municipal/industrial use. Ground water is the main source of water supply for this area. The main sources of ground water in the Alexander Valley are the Quaternary alluvial deposits, the Glen Ellen Formation, and the Sonoma Volcanics. The alluvial units, where sufficiently thick and saturated, comprise the best aquifer in the study area. Average recharge to the Alexander Valley is estimated from a simple, basinwide water budget. On the basis of an estimated annual average of 298,000 acre-feet of precipitation, 160,000 acre-feet of runoff, and 113,000 to 133,000 acre-feet of evapotranspiration, about 5,000 to 25,000 acre-feet per year is available for ground-water recharge. Because this estimate is based on differences between large numbers, there is significant uncertainty in this recharge estimate. Long-term changes in ground-water levels are evident in parts of the study area, but because of the sparse network and lack of data on well construction and lithology, it is uncertain if any significant changes have occurred in the northern part of the study area since 1980. In the southern half of the study area, ground-water levels generally were lower at the end of the 2002 irrigation

  11. The Four Domains of Moral Education: The Contributions of Dewey, Alexander and Goleman to a Comprehensive Taxonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Ronald Lee

    1998-01-01

    Attempts to place a neglected dimension of John Dewey's work into its proper context. Examines the works of Dewey, F. Matthias Alexander, and Daniel Goldman to create four domains that must be addressed by a truly comprehensive model of moral education: direct external, indirect external, direct internal, and indirect internal. (DSK)

  12. Speciation despite globally overlapping distributions in Penicillium chrysogenum: the population genetics of Alexander Fleming’s lucky fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighty years ago, Alexander Fleming described the antibiotic effects of a fungus that had contaminated his bacterial culture, kick starting the antimicrobial revolution. The fungus was later ascribed to a globally distributed asexual species, Penicillium chrysogenum. Recently, the species has been...

  13. Growing Community: The Impact of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program on the Social and Learning Environment in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Staiger, Petra K.; Gold, Lisa; Johnson, Britt; Macfarlane, Susie; Long, Caroline; Townsend, Mardie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has…

  14. Finding revelation in anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the heretical imperative.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, David N

    2015-09-01

    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espoused for religious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures--Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain--who found in anthropological analysis resources to bolster rather than undermine faith. In both cases these individuals found themselves on the receiving end of ecclesiastical censure and were dismissed from their positions at church-governed institutions. But their motivation was to vindicate divine revelation, in Winchell's case from the physical anthropology of human origins and in Smith's from the cultural anthropology of Semitic ritual.

  15. Neuromusicology or Musiconeurology? "Omni-art" in Alexander Scriabin as a Fount of Ideas.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2016-01-01

    Science can uncover neural mechanisms by looking at the work of artists. The ingenuity of a titan of classical music, the Russian composer Alexander Scriabin (1872-1915), in combining all the sensory modalities into a polyphony of aesthetical experience, and his creation of a chord based on fourths rather than the conventional thirds are proposed as putative points of departure for insight, in future studies, into the neural processes that underlie the perception of beauty, individually or universally. Scriabin's "Omni-art" was a new synthesis of music, philosophy and religion, and a new aesthetic language, a unification of music, vision, olfaction, drama, poetry, dance, image, and conceptualization, all governed by logic, in the quest for the integrative action of the human mind toward a "higher reality" of which music is only a component. PMID:27014167

  16. Investigation of the Alexander L. Kielland failure-metallurgical and fracture analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Almar-Naess, A.; Haagensen, P.J.; Lian, B.; Moan, T.; Simonsen, T.

    1984-03-01

    On March 27, 1980, the semi-submersible platform Alexander L. Kielland broke down in a storm in the North Sea, resulting in a loss of 123 lives. The investigation subsequently performed by the inquiry commission showed that one of the lower tubular bracings had failed by fatigue. As a result, the vertical leg attached to it was torn off, and the platform capsized. The fatigue fracture had started from a double fillet weld joining a 0.325-m tubular attachment to the bracing. The fillet welds were partially cracked in the early history of the platform due to lammelar tearing. Cumulative damage calculations indicated that the design fatigue life of the bracing was inadequate.

  17. Bryan Coast, English Coast, Alexander Island, Fallieres Coast, and Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Antarctica shows the Bryan Coast (lower left), the English Coast (lower central), Alexander Island (middle right), the Fallieres Coast (top right), and the Bellingshausen Sea. The entire continent has been dedicated to peaceful scientific investigation since 1961, with the signing of the Antarctic Treaty.The waters surrounding Antarctica are intensely cold. Salt water freezes at -2C, allowing sea ice to form. The middle left portion of the image shows quite a lot of sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea. During the Antarctic winter, when data for this image was acquired, Antarctica doubles in size to about 28.5 million square km (or about 11 million square miles), and temperatures in the -60C range are common.This true-color image was compiled from MODIS data gathered March 29, 2002. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  18. Neuromusicology or Musiconeurology? “Omni-art” in Alexander Scriabin as a Fount of Ideas

    PubMed Central

    Triarhou, Lazaros C.

    2016-01-01

    Science can uncover neural mechanisms by looking at the work of artists. The ingenuity of a titan of classical music, the Russian composer Alexander Scriabin (1872–1915), in combining all the sensory modalities into a polyphony of aesthetical experience, and his creation of a chord based on fourths rather than the conventional thirds are proposed as putative points of departure for insight, in future studies, into the neural processes that underlie the perception of beauty, individually or universally. Scriabin’s “Omni-art” was a new synthesis of music, philosophy and religion, and a new aesthetic language, a unification of music, vision, olfaction, drama, poetry, dance, image, and conceptualization, all governed by logic, in the quest for the integrative action of the human mind toward a “higher reality” of which music is only a component. PMID:27014167

  19. The name of the father: conflict between Louis and Alexander Agassiz and the Embiotoca surfperch radiation.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, G

    2009-04-01

    The surfperch genus Embiotoca currently comprises two species, Embiotoca jacksoni, the black surfperch, and Embiotoca lateralis, the striped surfperch. Originally, however, Louis Agassiz described a third species in the genus Embiotoca, the rainbow surfperch, Embiotoca caryi. This latter name was changed by Louis' son, Alexander, to Hypsurus caryi, a name that remains valid. In this study, new molecular data (3545 bp of DNA from four mitochondrial and two nuclear DNA regions) indicated that the rainbow surfperch should be retained within the genus Embiotoca, a result consistent with recent morphological data. Adaptive radiation combined with sexual selection resulting in rapid morphological changes in the rainbow surfperch may have contributed to the conflicting position of this species.

  20. Effects of traumatic brain injury on reactive astrogliosis and seizures in mouse models of Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotrina, Maria Luisa; Chen, Michael; Han, Xiaoning; Iliff, Jeffrey; Ren, Zeguang; Sun, Wei; Hagemann, Tracy; Goldman, James; Messing, Albee; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is the only known human pathology caused by mutations in an astrocyte-specific gene, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These mutations result in abnormal GFAP accumulations that promote seizures, motor delays and, ultimately, death. The exact contribution of increased, abnormal levels of astrocytic mutant GFAP in the development and progression of the epileptic phenotype is not clear, and we addressed this question using two mouse models of AxD. Comparison of brain seizure activity spontaneously and after traumatic brain injury (TBI), an effective way to trigger seizures, revealed that abnormal GFAP accumulation contributes to abnormal brain activity (increased interictal discharges) but is not a risk factor for the development of epilepsy after TBI. These data highlight the need to further explore the complex and heterogeneous response of astrocytes towards injury and the involvement of GFAP in the progression of AxD. PMID:25069089

  1. Silurian trace fossils in carbonate turbidites from the Alexander Arc of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) body and trace fossils from the Heceta Formation are preserved in the oldest widespread carbonates in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. They represent the earliest shelly benthos to inhabit a diversity of marine environments and are important indicators of the early stages in benthic community development within this ancient island arc. The trace fossils are significant because they add to a small but growing body of knowledge about ichnofaunas in deep-water Paleozoic carbonates. Proximal to medial carbonate turbidites yield a low-diversity suite of trace fossils that comprises five distinct types of biogenic structures. Bedding planes reveal simple epichnial burrows (Planolites), cross-cutting burrows (Fucusopsis), and tiny cylindrical burrows. These and other casts, including chondrites( )-like burrow clusters, represent the feeding activities (fodinichnia) of preturbidite animals. Hypichnial burrows and rare endichnial traces reflect the activities of postturbidite animals. Broken and offset traces indicate that infaunal biota commenced burrowing before slumping and subsequent soft-sediment deformation. The abundance and density of trace fossils increases offshore in the medial turbidites associated with a decrease in the size and amount of coarse particles and with an increase in mud and preserved organic material. Although diversity levels are similar in the proximal and medial turbidite facies, they are much lower than in Paleozoic siliciclastic turbidites. This may reflect unfavorable environmental conditions for infaunal biota or paleobiogeographic isolation of the Alexander terrane during the Silurian. A greater use of trace fossils in terrane analysis will help to resolve this issue and should provide new data for reconstructing the paleogeography of circum-Pacific terranes.

  2. "Outstanding Services to Negro Health": Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Dr. Virginia M. Alexander, and Black Women Physicians' Public Health Activism.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Vanessa Northington

    2016-08-01

    An examination of the lives and careers of physician-activists Dorothy Boulding Ferebee (1898-1972) and Virginia M. Alexander (1899-1949) demonstrates how Black physicians in the first half of the 20th century used public health to improve the health of Black Americans and provides insights into the experiences of Black women physicians. I discuss their professional and personal backgrounds and analyze their divergent strategies to address health inequities. Ferebee used her leadership in Black women's organizations to develop public health programs and become a national advocate for Black health. Alexander, a Quaker, used her religious connections to urge Whites to combat racism in medicine. She also conducted public health research and connected it to health activism. Both were passionate advocates of health equity long before it gained prominence as a major public health issue. An analysis of their work illuminates past efforts to improve the health of Black Americans.

  3. "Outstanding Services to Negro Health": Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, Dr. Virginia M. Alexander, and Black Women Physicians' Public Health Activism.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Vanessa Northington

    2016-08-01

    An examination of the lives and careers of physician-activists Dorothy Boulding Ferebee (1898-1972) and Virginia M. Alexander (1899-1949) demonstrates how Black physicians in the first half of the 20th century used public health to improve the health of Black Americans and provides insights into the experiences of Black women physicians. I discuss their professional and personal backgrounds and analyze their divergent strategies to address health inequities. Ferebee used her leadership in Black women's organizations to develop public health programs and become a national advocate for Black health. Alexander, a Quaker, used her religious connections to urge Whites to combat racism in medicine. She also conducted public health research and connected it to health activism. Both were passionate advocates of health equity long before it gained prominence as a major public health issue. An analysis of their work illuminates past efforts to improve the health of Black Americans. PMID:27310348

  4. Putting evo-devo into focus. An interview with Scott F. Gilbert. Interview by Alexander T. Mikhailov.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Scott F

    2005-01-01

    This article announces Dr. Scott F. Gilbert as the winner of the Alexander Kowavelsky international prize (2004) and briefly reviews his achievements in developmental biology and evo-devo. Dr. Gilbert replies to the interviewer's questions concerning his personal interest in evo-devo and current controversies within the field. His thoughts and comments represent a unique blend of research talents and skills, curiosity and creativity.

  5. James Alexander Lindsay (1856-1931), and his clinical axioms and aphorisms.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghin S; Moynihan, John B

    2012-09-01

    John Alexander Lindsay was born at Fintona, county Tyrone in 1856, and at the age of 23 he graduated in medicine at the Royal University of Ireland. After two years in London and Europe he returned to Belfast to join the staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital and in 1899 he was appointed to the professorship of medicine. He was valued by the students for his clarity and by his colleagues for his many extracurricular contributions to the medical profession in the positions entrusted to him. He published monographs on Diseases of the Lungs, and the Climatic Treatment of Consumption, but his later Medical Axioms show his deep appreciation of studied clinical observation. Although practice was changing in the new century Lindsay displayed an ability to change with the new requirements, as evidenced by his lecture on electrocardiography as president of the section of medicine of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland in 1915. He was impressed by the way the string galvanometer changed attention from stenosis and incompetence of the valves to the cardiac musculature, but rightly suspected that there was more to be told about the state of the myocardium than Einthoven's three leads revealed. His death occurred in Belfast in 1931.

  6. Alexander Scriabin: his chronic right-hand pain and Its impact on his piano compositions.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Alexander Scriabin was an outstanding pianist and an avant-garde composer who influenced later generations with his innovative "multimedia" conceptions of aesthetic experience. As an adolescent, he was systematically trained as a concert pianist and received lessons from Vassily Safonoff, one of the founders of the legendary Russian Piano School. At age 20, Scriabin suffered an overuse injury of his right hand when attempting to improve the sound quality of his piano touch. This injury caused a deep crisis and influenced his later composition style in his piano works. From this time on, his works were frequently dominated by unusual virtuosic use and wide spans of his left hand. Rest, restricted repertoire, and an increased focus on composition contributed to recovery; however, he always remained anxious concerning the stamina of his right hand. The case report impressively demonstrates the stressors an aspiring young pianist had to cope with at the end of the nineteenth century. Furthermore, it is a convincing example of how resource-oriented behavior and intuition lead to the improvement of health status. Differential diagnoses and the modern concept of multimodal pain therapy in chronic overuse injury will be discussed from a historical perspective. PMID:25684291

  7. James Alexander Lindsay (1856-1931), and his clinical axioms and aphorisms.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghin S; Moynihan, John B

    2012-09-01

    John Alexander Lindsay was born at Fintona, county Tyrone in 1856, and at the age of 23 he graduated in medicine at the Royal University of Ireland. After two years in London and Europe he returned to Belfast to join the staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital and in 1899 he was appointed to the professorship of medicine. He was valued by the students for his clarity and by his colleagues for his many extracurricular contributions to the medical profession in the positions entrusted to him. He published monographs on Diseases of the Lungs, and the Climatic Treatment of Consumption, but his later Medical Axioms show his deep appreciation of studied clinical observation. Although practice was changing in the new century Lindsay displayed an ability to change with the new requirements, as evidenced by his lecture on electrocardiography as president of the section of medicine of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland in 1915. He was impressed by the way the string galvanometer changed attention from stenosis and incompetence of the valves to the cardiac musculature, but rightly suspected that there was more to be told about the state of the myocardium than Einthoven's three leads revealed. His death occurred in Belfast in 1931. PMID:23620615

  8. Speciation despite globally overlapping distributions in Penicillium chrysogenum: the population genetics of Alexander Fleming's lucky fungus.

    PubMed

    Henk, D A; Eagle, C E; Brown, K; Van Den Berg, M A; Dyer, P S; Peterson, S W; Fisher, M C

    2011-10-01

    Eighty years ago, Alexander Fleming described the antibiotic effects of a fungus that had contaminated his bacterial culture, kick starting the antimicrobial revolution. The fungus was later ascribed to a putatively globally distributed asexual species, Penicillium chrysogenum. Recently, the species has been shown to be genetically diverse, and possess mating-type genes. Here, phylogenetic and population genetic analyses show that this apparently ubiquitous fungus is actually composed of at least two genetically distinct species with only slight differences detected in physiology. We found each species in air and dust samples collected in and around St Mary's Hospital where Fleming worked. Genotyping of 30 markers across the genome showed that preserved fungal material from Fleming's laboratory was nearly identical to derived strains currently in culture collections and in the same distinct species as a wild progenitor strain of current penicillin producing industrial strains rather than the type species P. chrysogenum. Global samples of the two most common species were found to possess mating-type genes in a near 1:1 ratio, and show evidence of recombination with little geographic population subdivision evident. However, no hybridization was detected between the species despite an estimated time of divergence of less than 1MYA. Growth studies showed significant interspecific inhibition by P. chrysogenum of the other common species, suggesting that competition may facilitate species maintenance despite globally overlapping distributions. Results highlight under-recognized diversity even among the best-known fungal groups and the potential for speciation despite overlapping distribution.

  9. Testing the equality of students' performance using Alexander-Govern test with adaptive trimmed means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Suhaida; Yahaya, Sharipah Soaad Syed; Yusof, Zahayu Md

    2014-06-01

    Analyzing the equality of independent group has to be done with caution. The classical approaches such as ttest for two groups and analysis of variance (ANOVA) for more than two groups always are favorable selection by researchers. However, sometime these methods were abused by the presence of nonnormality or variance heterogeneity or both. It is known that ANOVA is restricted to the assumptions of normality and homogeneity of variance. In real life data, sometimes these requirements are hard to attain. The Alexander-Govern test with adaptive trimmed mean (AG_atm) is one approach that can be chosen as alternative to the classical tests when their assumptions are violated. In this paper, the performances of AG_atm were compared to the original AG test and ANOVA using simulated and real life data. The simulation study proved that the AG_atm performs better than the original AG test and the classical test. For real life data, student's performance in decision analysis course, measured by final examination score was chosen. Based on the exploratory data analysis, this data found to have problem of nonnormality.

  10. Alexander Scriabin: his chronic right-hand pain and Its impact on his piano compositions.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Alexander Scriabin was an outstanding pianist and an avant-garde composer who influenced later generations with his innovative "multimedia" conceptions of aesthetic experience. As an adolescent, he was systematically trained as a concert pianist and received lessons from Vassily Safonoff, one of the founders of the legendary Russian Piano School. At age 20, Scriabin suffered an overuse injury of his right hand when attempting to improve the sound quality of his piano touch. This injury caused a deep crisis and influenced his later composition style in his piano works. From this time on, his works were frequently dominated by unusual virtuosic use and wide spans of his left hand. Rest, restricted repertoire, and an increased focus on composition contributed to recovery; however, he always remained anxious concerning the stamina of his right hand. The case report impressively demonstrates the stressors an aspiring young pianist had to cope with at the end of the nineteenth century. Furthermore, it is a convincing example of how resource-oriented behavior and intuition lead to the improvement of health status. Differential diagnoses and the modern concept of multimodal pain therapy in chronic overuse injury will be discussed from a historical perspective.

  11. Death by polonium-210: lessons learned from the murder of former Soviet spy Alexander Litvinenko.

    PubMed

    McFee, Robin B; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2009-02-01

    The medical response to radiation--whether the result of radiological warfare, terrorist deployment of improvised radiation dispersal weapons, political assassination, occupational or industrial accidents or the medically radiated patient remains one of the least taught among all disciplines within medical education. In the aftermath of 9/11 among medical vulnerabilities to toxicant threats, of all the categories of weapons of mass destruction (WMD)--whether using the CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive) or NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) acronym--radiation is the least taught in professional schools, responder cultures or civil preparedness organizations. To date, few health care professionals (HCP) possess the fundamental knowledge or skills to identify and diagnose, let alone treat a radiation victim; this vulnerability made even more obvious in the aftermath of the high profile assassination of former Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko. He was poisoned with Polonium210. Radioactive substances are ubiquitous with radiation sources being in or transported through virtually every region nationwide. It is essential to increase preparedness among community and rural health care facilities as well as urban and university hospitals. Managing radiation injuries effectively requires access to specialized equipment and expertise. Radiation sickness is progressive and may require acute, critical and long-term care throughout the course of illness. Regardless of the source, preparedness rests upon acknowledging a threat exists and dedicating the resources to address the risks including the enhancement of training and equipment. Mass or individual exposures to radiation present unique challenges to the entire response continuum from law enforcement, first responders and emergency medical care. Increased education about and practice in responding to radiological threats is essential to enhance preparedness.

  12. Bathymetric gradients within a Paleozoic Island Arc, southeastern Alaska (Alexander Terrane)

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation reflect bathymetric gradients within the ancient island arc exposed in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. These rocks record the earliest occurrence of widespread carbonate deposition in the region and represent the earliest foundation for shallow-water platform development within the arc. The excellent preservation of platform, platform margin, and slope deposits contrasts with the poor preservation of many marine sediments that originated within other island arcs. Hence, these limestones provide important insights into the styles, processes, and bathymetry of carbonate deposition in island arcs. Carbonate depositional sites within the arc extended laterally from nearshore intertidal and relatively shallow subtidal zones of a marine platform, to the seaward margins of a rimmed shelf, and into deeper subtidal areas of a slope environment. Fossiliferous deposits that originated on the platform comprise a diversity of shelly benthos, including corals and stromatoporoids in growth position. Dasycladacean algae, oncoids, and Amphipora also indicate shallow-water conditions. Organic buildups and reefs were constructed by cyanobacteria, massive stromatoporoids, corals, and algae at the platform margin. Deposition beyond the seaward edge of the shelf is evident from the carbonate turbidites that consist of skeletal debris of shallow-water derivation and an absence of coarse siliciclastic detritus. Sedimentation and resedimentation along a bathymetric gradient within the arc is especially well illustrated by the carbonate breccias that are enclosed within these deep subtidal sediments. They comprise detached stromatolites and clasts of shallow-water origin that were derived from the platform and its margin during periodic slumping of the shelf edge.

  13. Project Alexander the Great: a study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education.

    PubMed

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O

    2008-01-01

    Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering is considered amongst the most reputable fields within the global arena, and will likely be the primer for any future breakthroughs in Medicine and Biology. Bioengineering/biomedical engineering education has evolved since late 1950s and is undergoing advancement in leading academic institutions worldwide. This paper delineates an original study on the world proliferation of bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and bears the name 'Project Alexander the Great'. The initial step of the project was to survey all 10448 universities, recognized by the International Association of Universities, spread among the 193 member states of the United Nations within the six continents. The project aims at identifying, disseminating, and networking, through the world-wide-web, those institutions of higher learning that provide bioengineering/biomedical engineering education. The significance of this project is multifold: i) the inception of a web-based 'world-map' in bioengineering/biomedical engineering education for the potential international student desiring to pursue a career in this field; ii) the global networking of bioengineering/biomedical engineering academic/research programs; iii) the promotion of first-class bioengineering/biomedical engineering education and the catalysis of global proliferation of this field; iv) the erection of bridges among educational institutions, industry, and professional societies or organizations involved in Bioengineering/Biomedical Engineering; and v) the catalysis in the establishment of framework agreements for cooperation among the identified institutions offering curricula in this field. This paper presents the results obtained from Africa and North America. The whole project is due to be completed by 2009.

  14. Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex, Alexander terrane (southeastern Alaska): evidence for Early Jurassic rifting prior to accretion with North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Karl, Susan M.; Keppie, J. Duncan; Kontak, Daniel J.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The circular Bokan Mountain complex (BMC) on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, is a Jurassic peralkaline granitic intrusion about 3 km in diameter that crosscuts igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane. The BMC hosts significant rare metal (rare earth elements, Y, U, Th, Zr, and Nb) mineralization related to the last stage of BMC emplacement. U–Pb (zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar (amphibole and whole-rock) geochronology indicates the following sequence of intrusive activity: (i) a Paleozoic basement composed mainly of 469 ± 4 Ma granitic rocks; (ii) intrusion of the BMC at 177 ± 1 Ma followed by rapid cooling through ca. 550 °C at 176 ± 1 Ma that was synchronous with mineralization associated with vertical, WNW-trending pegmatites, felsic dikes, and aegirine–fluorite veins and late-stage, sinistral shear deformation; and (iii) intrusion of crosscutting lamprophyre dikes at >150 Ma and again at ca. 105 Ma. The peralkaline nature of the BMC and the WNW trend of associated dikes suggest intrusion during NE–SW rifting that was followed by NE–SW shortening during the waning stages of BMC emplacement. The 177 Ma BMC was synchronous with other magmatic centres in the Alexander terrane, such as (1) the Dora Bay peralkaline stock and (2) the bimodal Moffatt volcanic suite located ~30 km north and ~100 km SE of the BMC, respectively. This regional magmatism is interpreted to represent a regional extensional event that precedes deposition of the Late Jurassic – Cretaceous Gravina sequence that oversteps the Wrangellia and Alexander exotic accreted terranes and the Taku and Yukon–Tanana pericratonic terranes of the Canadian–Alaskan Cordillera.

  15. The grand experiment, a historical account of a museum/school partnership: The Alexander Science Center School of Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heughins, Andrew R.

    This study tells the history of The Alexander Science Center School, a museum/school partnership between the Los Angeles Unified School District and the California Science Center created with the goal of becoming a national model in elementary science education. To provide a background to the development of the school, this study explores the definition of what constitutes a museum school, including the existence of a formal partnership between a school district and a museum and systemic change in the partner institutions leading to a marriage of formal and informal learning styles. In addition, the literature review explores the unique models of museum/school partnerships developed in the United States. The history of the Alexander Science Center School is told in a narrative style using documentation from the schools development and through interviews with individuals who played key roles, from the schools inception through its opening. The study covers the initiation of concept, architectural design, formation of the partnership, and development of the curriculum. The study also identifies the roadblocks encountered in the schools development and makes recommendations for school districts and institutions seeking to create future museum school projects. In addition, a comparison is made other recently studied museum schools to provide a context for the school's historical and programmatic development.

  16. The metallogeny of Late Triassic rifting of the Alexander terrane in southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, C.D.; Premo, W.R.; Meier, A.L.; Taggart, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    A belt of unusual volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) occurrences is located along the eastern margin of the Alexander terrane throughout southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia and exhibits a range of characteristics consistent with a variety of syngenetic to epigenetic deposit types. Deposits within this belt include Greens Creek and Windy Craggy, the economically most significant VMS deposit in Alaska and the largest in North America, respectively. The occurrences are hosted by a discontinuously exposed, 800-km-long belt of rocks that consist of a 200- to 800-m-thick sequence of conglomerate, limestone, marine elastic sedimentary rocks, and tuff intercalated with and overlain by a distinctive unit of mafic pyroclastic rocks and pillowed flows. Faunal data bracket the age of the host rocks between Anisian (Middle Triassic) and late Norian (late Late Triassic). This metallogenic belt is herein referred to as the Alexander Triassic metallogenic belt. The VMS occurrences show systematic differences in degree of structural control, chemistry, and stratigraphic setting along the Alexander Triassic metallogenic belt that suggest important spatial or temporal changes in the tectonic environment of formation. At the southern end of the belt, felsic volcanic rocks overlain by shallow-water limestones characterize the lower part of the sequence. In the southern and middle portion of the belt, a distinctive pebble conglomerate marks the base of the section and is indicative of high-energy deposition in a near slope or basin margin setting. At the northern end of the belt the conglomerates, limestones, and felsic volcanic rocks are absent and the belt is composed of deep-water sedimentary and mafic volcanic rocks. This northward change in depositional environment and lithofacies is accompanied by a northward transition from epithermal-like structurally controlled, discontinuous, vein- and pod-shaped, Pb-Zn-Ag-Ba-(Cu) occurrences with relatively simple mineralogy

  17. Functional characterization of a GFAP variant of uncertain significance in an Alexander disease case within the setting of an individualized medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Nicole J; Sigafoos, Ashley N; Zimmermann, Michael T; Maus, Rachel L; Cousin, Margot A; Blackburn, Patrick R; Urrutia, Raul; Clark, Karl J; Patterson, Marc C; Wick, Myra J; Klee, Eric W

    2016-09-01

    A de novo GFAP variant, p.R376W, was identified in a child presenting with hypotonia, developmental delay, and abnormal brain MRI. Following the 2015 ACMG variant classification guidelines and the functional studies showing protein aggregate formation in vitro, p.R376W should be classified as a pathogenic variant, causative for Alexander disease.

  18. Prevention and Early Intervention: Individual Differences as Risk Factors for the Mental Health of Children. A Festschrift for Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, William B., Ed.; McDevitt, Sean C., Ed.

    This collection of essays, in honor of child psychiatry pioneers Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas, focuses on their idea that important life outcomes are the product of ongoing interactions between a child's behavioral style and the complimentarity or lack of fit of the parenting environment. Following an introduction, the remaining chapters are:…

  19. Functional characterization of a GFAP variant of uncertain significance in an Alexander disease case within the setting of an individualized medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Nicole J; Sigafoos, Ashley N; Zimmermann, Michael T; Maus, Rachel L; Cousin, Margot A; Blackburn, Patrick R; Urrutia, Raul; Clark, Karl J; Patterson, Marc C; Wick, Myra J; Klee, Eric W

    2016-09-01

    A de novo GFAP variant, p.R376W, was identified in a child presenting with hypotonia, developmental delay, and abnormal brain MRI. Following the 2015 ACMG variant classification guidelines and the functional studies showing protein aggregate formation in vitro, p.R376W should be classified as a pathogenic variant, causative for Alexander disease. PMID:27648269

  20. Alexander Graham Bell's Patent for the Telephone and Thomas Edison's Patent for the Electric Lamp. The Constitution Community: The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schur, Joan Brodsky

    In 1876 Americans held a Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) to celebrate the nation's birth 100 years earlier. Machinery Hall drew the most admiration and wonder. Alexander Graham Bell exhibited the first telephone, and Thomas Alva Edison presented the automatic telegraph, one of more than 1,000 inventions he would patent in his…

  1. The Question of Sign-Language and the Utility of Signs in the Instruction of the Deaf: Two Papers by Alexander Graham Bell (1898)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschark, M.

    2005-01-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is often portrayed as either hero or villain of deaf individuals and the Deaf community. His writings, however, indicate that he was neither, and was not as clearly definite in his beliefs about language as is often supposed. The following two articles, reprinted from The Educator (1898), Vol. V, pp. 3?4 and pp. 38?44,…

  2. Improving Learning Outcomes, Persistence, and Graduation Rates of Academically Underprepared Students: a Case Study of Alexander Community College and Its Developmental Education Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchione, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes how Alexander Community College (ACC), a two-year State University of New York (SUNY) institution is addressing challenges associated with its developmental education effort--primarily high costs for repeated developmental (assumed by the institution and students) and low persistence and graduation rates for developmental…

  3. Discuss: If Essays Are Dead, Then Where Does That Leave Everything Else? A Response to: Shirley Alexander's "Buying Essays: How to Make Sure Assessment Is Authentic"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, Kelvin

    2015-01-01

    Professor Shirley Alexander is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President (Teaching, Learning & Equity) at the University of Technology, Sydney. On 12 November 2014, an article of hers appeared in "The Conversation": "Buying essays: how to make sure assessment is authentic." That article traverses, in an abbreviated way,…

  4. The evolution of ultrahigh carbon steels - from the Great Pyramids, to Alexander the Great, to Y2K

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J

    1999-10-01

    Hypereutectoid steels containing between about 1 and 2.1 wt%C, and now known as ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCS), have both a rich history (dating back to the time of Alexander the Great, i.e. {approximately} 300 BC) and an interesting, recent, technological period of development (from 1975 to the present). The connections between the modern UHCS and their ancient counterparts, and in particular Damascus steels, have received considerable attention. In addition to monolithic products, UHCS have also been used in both ancient and modern times in laminated composites. In the present paper, a summary of the modern development of UHCS and UHCS-containing laminates is given, and parallels are drawn with ancient materials. Also, ancient laminated composites containing other steels are described; controversial issues and a possible solution related to the age of such a laminate found in the Great Pyramid of Gizeh are discussed.

  5. The appearance of the artist to the people: the creativity, personality and malady of Alexander Ivanov (1806-58).

    PubMed

    Lerner, Vladimir; Witztum, Eliezer

    2005-02-01

    Alexander Ivanov was an outstanding Russian painter who lived in the middle of the nineteenth century, during the romantic period. He did not accept romanticism but instead tried to create his own original style, an ambitious combination of spiritual profundity and a manner of execution unparalleled in Western European art. Ivanov's intention and style are best reflected in his major work The Appearance of Christ to the People, a picture on which he worked for over 20 years. He painted more than 400 sketches of the picture while attempting to bring his masterpiece to perfection. At the end of his life Ivanov became disillusioned, renounced his strong religious conviction and became suspicious. This study examines the influence of his background, life story and personality on the creative process. From a diagnostic perspective, Ivanov's personality featured obsessive, narcissistic and schizoid traits. In his final years he suffered from a delusional disorder. PMID:15682233

  6. Map of glacial limits and possible refugia in the southern Alexander Archipelago, Alaska, during the late Wisconsin glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrara, Paul E.; Ager, Thomas A.; Baichtal, James F.; VanSistine, D. Paco

    2003-01-01

    During the late Wisconsin glaciation (circa 26,000-13,000 carbon-14 yr BP) the Cordilleran glacier complex formed vast ice fields and large glaciers along the crest of the Coast Mountains. As these glaciers flowed west to the Pacific Ocean, they were joined by local glaciers originating on the higher reaches of the Alexander Archipelago (Mann and Hamiltion, 1995). This extensive volume of ice was channeled into deep troughs (present-day fiords) that formed major outlet glaciers, such as the glaciers that occupied Chatham Strait and Dixon Entrance. In several places along the coast, deep glacially scoured submarine troughs indicate that glaciers reached to the edge of the continental shelf. For instance, the glacier that extended into the Dixon Entrance trough is known to have extended to the edge of the continental shelf. Its retreat began sometime after 16,000-15,000 carbon-14 yr BP (Barrie and Conway, 1999).

  7. James Sowerby: meteorites and his meteoritic sword made for the Emperor of Russia, Alexander I, in 1814

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    James Sowerby included meteorites in his publications of British and exotic natural history and so raised interest in their nature and origins at a time of much debate and involving the President of the Royal Society, Sir Joseph Banks. The celebrations over the defeat of France in 1814 prompted Sowerby to make a sword from the Cape of Good Hope iron meteorite to present to the Russian Emperor, Alexander I, at the time of his state visit to London in June 1814 and in recognition of his achievements in bringing peace to Europe. The story of its attempted presentation, its final reception and the following response, including publications, all helped to increase interest in meteorites and their properties. The rediscovery of the sword after a lengthy disappearance probably brings an unusual saga to a fitting close.

  8. The Cannery Formation--Devonian to Early Permian arc-marginal deposits within the Alexander Terrane, Southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karl, Susan M.; Layer, Paul W.; Harris, Anita G.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Murchey, Benita L.

    2011-01-01

    cherts on both Admiralty and Kupreanof Islands contain radiolarians as young as Permian, the age of the Cannery Formation is herein extended to Late Devonian through early Permian, to include the early Permian rocks exposed in its type locality. The Cannery Formation is folded and faulted, and its stratigraphic thickness is unknown but inferred to be several hundred meters. The Cannery Formation represents an extended period of marine deposition in moderately deep water, with slow rates of deposition and limited clastic input during Devonian through Pennsylvanian time and increasing argillaceous, volcaniclastic, and bioclastic input during the Permian. The Cannery Formation comprises upper Paleozoic rocks in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. In the pre-Permian upper Paleozoic, the tectonic setting of the Alexander terrane consisted of two or more evolved oceanic arcs. The lower Permian section is represented by a distinctive suite of rocks in the Alexander terrane, which includes sedimentary and volcanic rocks containing early Permian fossils, metamorphosed rocks with early Permian cooling ages, and intrusive rocks with early Permian cooling ages, that form discrete northwest-trending belts. After restoration of 180 km of dextral displacement of the Chilkat-Chichagof block on the Chatham Strait Fault, these belts consist, from northeast to southwest, of (1) bedded chert, siliceous argillite, volcaniclastic turbidites, pillow basalt, and limestone of the Cannery Formation and the Porcupine Slate of Gilbert and others (1987); (2) greenschist-facies Paleozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks that have Permian cooling ages; (3) silty limestone and calcareous argillite interbedded with pillow basalt and volcaniclastic rocks of the Halleck Formation and the William Henry Bay area; and (4) intermediate-composition and syenitic plutons. These belts correspond to components of an accretionary complex, contemporary metamorphic rocks, forearc-basin deposits,

  9. 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Keynote Presentation (Frederick W. Smith, FedEx Corporation), with Introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander (TN)

    ScienceCinema

    Smith, Frederick W. (FedEx Corporation, Chairman, President and CEO)

    2016-07-12

    The third annual ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit was held in Washington D.C. in February, 2012. The event brought together key players from across the energy ecosystem - researchers, entrepreneurs, investors, corporate executives, and government officials - to share ideas for developing and deploying the next generation of energy technologies. Following introduction by Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Frederick W. Smith, Chairman, President, and CEO of FedEx Corporation, gave the third keynote presentation of the day.

  10. Using the Alexander Collection to measure the effects of climate change on the grasshoppers of the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nufio, C. R.; Bowers, D. M.; Guralnick, R. P.

    2007-12-01

    The current study utilizes the recently curated and databased Alexander Grasshopper Collection coupled with a new resurvey program to measure the effects of climate change on grasshoppers found along an elevational gradient in the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The Alexander Collection is composed of approximately 19,000 pinned grasshoppers and a series of field data notebooks from a three year 1958-1960 survey project. During these survey years, Alexander processed over 65,000 grasshoppers from repeatedly sampled sites along an elevational gradient from Boulder (1530 m elev.) to Mt Evans (3900m elev.) in the Colorado Front Range. Data from 2006 shows that at mid-elevation sites grasshoppers are becoming adults 15-28 days earlier than they did nearly a half century ago. We found no changes in the time to reach adulthood at the high elevation sites. Preliminary data from 2007 (a year with milder spring temperatures) suggests that unlike the dramatic patterns documented in 2006, that the time to reach adulthood for grasshoppers at low and high elevation sites was not much different than it was 50 years ago. In 2007, several grasshopper species at mid-elevation did become adults earlier than they had a half century ago.

  11. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 1: formative years, naturphilosophie, and galvanism.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    During the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), who showed an early interest in many facets of natural philosophy and natural history, delved into the controversial subject of galvanism and animal electricity, hoping to shed light on the basic nature of the nerve force. He was motivated by his broad worldview, the experiments of Luigi Galvani, who favored animal electricity in more than a few specialized fishes, and the thinking of Alessandro Volta, who accepted specialized fish electricity but was not willing to generalize to other animals, thinking Galvani's frog experiments flawed by his use of metals. Differing from many German Naturphilosophen, who shunned "violent" experiments, the newest instruments, and detailed measurement, Humboldt conducted thousands of galvanic experiments on animals and animal parts, as well as many on his own body, some of which caused him great pain. He interpreted his results as supporting some but not all of the claims made by both Galvani and Volta. Notably, because of certain negative findings and phenomenological differences, he remained skeptical about the intrinsic animal force being qualitatively identical to true electricity. Hence, he referred to a "galvanic force," not animal electricity, in his letters and publications, a theoretical position he would abandon with Volta's help early in the new century.

  12. Deficits in Adult Neurogenesis, Contextual Fear Conditioning, and Spatial Learning in a Gfap Mutant Mouse Model of Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paylor, Richard; Messing, Albee

    2013-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament of mature astrocytes in the mammalian CNS. Dominant gain of function mutations in GFAP lead to the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Alexander disease (AxD), which is characterized by cytoplasmic protein aggregates known as Rosenthal fibers along with variable degrees of leukodystrophy and intellectual disability. The mechanisms by which mutant GFAP leads to these pleiotropic effects are unknown. In addition to astrocytes, GFAP is also expressed in other cell types, particularly neural stem cells that form the reservoir supporting adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Here, we show that mouse models of AxD exhibit significant pathology in GFAP-positive radial glia-like cells in the dentate gyrus, and suffer from deficits in adult neurogenesis. In addition, they display impairments in contextual learning and spatial memory. This is the first demonstration of cognitive phenotypes in a model of primary astrocyte disease. PMID:24259590

  13. Growing community: the impact of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program on the social and learning environment in primary schools.

    PubMed

    Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Staiger, Petra K; Gold, Lisa; Johnson, Britt; Macfarlane, Susie; Long, Caroline; Townsend, Mardie

    2012-08-01

    This article presents results from a mixed-method evaluation of a structured cooking and gardening program in Australian primary schools, focusing on program impacts on the social and learning environment of the school. In particular, we address the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program objective of providing a pleasurable experience that has a positive impact on student engagement, social connections, and confidence within and beyond the school gates. Primary evidence for the research question came from qualitative data collected from students, parents, teachers, volunteers, school principals, and specialist staff through interviews, focus groups, and participant observations. This was supported by analyses of quantitative data on child quality of life, cooperative behaviors, teacher perceptions of the school environment, and school-level educational outcome and absenteeism data. Results showed that some of the program attributes valued most highly by study participants included increased student engagement and confidence, opportunities for experiential and integrated learning, teamwork, building social skills, and connections and links between schools and their communities. In this analysis, quantitative findings failed to support findings from the primary analysis. Limitations as well as benefits of a mixed-methods approach to evaluation of complex community interventions are discussed.

  14. Listening to the whispers of matter through Arabic hermeticism: new studies on The Book of the Treasure of Alexander.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-Goldfarb, Ana Maria; Jubran, Safa Abou Chahla

    2008-07-01

    The Jabirian Corpus refers to the K. Thahirat Al-'Iskandar, "The Book of the Treasure of Alexander" (hereafter BTA), as one of several forgeries suggesting that alchemical secrets were hidden in inscriptions in various places. The book was neglected until 1926, when Julius Ruska discussed it in his work on the Emerald Tablet, placing the BTA within the literature related to the development of Arabic alchemy. His preliminary study became an essential reference and encouraged many scholars to work on the BTA in the following decades. Some years ago, we completed the first translation of the BTA into a Western language. The work was based on the acephalous Escorial manuscript, which we identified as a fourteenth-century copy of the BTA. This manuscript is peculiar, as part of it is encoded. After finishing our translation, we started to establish the text of the BTA. At present, the text is in process of fixation--to be followed by textual criticism--and has been the main focus of a thorough study of ours on medieval hermeticism and alchemy. A sample of the work currently in progress is presented in this paper: an analysis of the variations between different manuscripts along with a study and English translation of its alchemical chapter. PMID:19048971

  15. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 1: formative years, naturphilosophie, and galvanism.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    During the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), who showed an early interest in many facets of natural philosophy and natural history, delved into the controversial subject of galvanism and animal electricity, hoping to shed light on the basic nature of the nerve force. He was motivated by his broad worldview, the experiments of Luigi Galvani, who favored animal electricity in more than a few specialized fishes, and the thinking of Alessandro Volta, who accepted specialized fish electricity but was not willing to generalize to other animals, thinking Galvani's frog experiments flawed by his use of metals. Differing from many German Naturphilosophen, who shunned "violent" experiments, the newest instruments, and detailed measurement, Humboldt conducted thousands of galvanic experiments on animals and animal parts, as well as many on his own body, some of which caused him great pain. He interpreted his results as supporting some but not all of the claims made by both Galvani and Volta. Notably, because of certain negative findings and phenomenological differences, he remained skeptical about the intrinsic animal force being qualitatively identical to true electricity. Hence, he referred to a "galvanic force," not animal electricity, in his letters and publications, a theoretical position he would abandon with Volta's help early in the new century. PMID:23581538

  16. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 2: the electric eel, animal electricity, and later years.

    PubMed

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    After extensive experimentation during the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt remained skeptical about "animal electricity" (and metallic electricity), writing instead about an ill-defined galvanic force. With his worldview and wishing to learn more, he studied electric eels in South America just as the new century began, again using his body as a scientific instrument in many of his experiments. As had been the case in the past and for many of the same reasons, some of his findings with the electric eel (and soon after, Italian torpedoes) seemed to argue against biological electricity. But he no longer used galvanic terminology when describing his electric fish experiments. The fact that he now wrote about animal electricity rather than a different "galvanic" force owed much to Alessandro Volta, who had come forth with his "pile" (battery) for multipling the physical and perceptable effects of otherwise weak electricity in 1800, while Humboldt was deep in South America. Humboldt probably read about and saw voltaic batteries in the United States in 1804, but the time he spent with Volta in 1805 was probably more significant in his conversion from a galvanic to an electrical framework for understanding nerve and muscle physiology. Although he did not continue his animal electricity research program after this time, Humboldt retained his worldview of a unified nature and continued to believe in intrinsic animal electricity. He also served as a patron to some of the most important figures in the new field of electrophysiology (e.g., Hermann Helmholtz and Emil du Bois-Reymond), helping to take the research that he had participated in to the next level.

  17. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo; Cifelli, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. These GIFT workshops represented the first workshops specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  18. Geosciences Information for Teachers (GIFT) Workshops held in Conjunction with Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) EGU Conferences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, C. E.; Cifelli, F.

    2014-12-01

    Given the increasing success of the GIFT workshops held in conjunction with the General Assemblies, since 2010 EGU has also developed a series of GIFT workshops held in conjunction with AvH conferences. The Alexander von Humboldt Conference Series of the European Geosciences Union are a series of meetings held outside of Europe, in particular in South America, Africa or Asia, on selected topics of geosciences with a socio-economic impact for regions on these continents, jointly organised with the scientists and their institutes and the institutions of these regions. Associated GIFT workshops were held in Merida, Yucatan, on the theme of Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Societies (March 2010), then in Penang, Malaysia (June 2011) on the theme of Ocean Acidification, in November 2012 in Cusco (Peru) on the theme of Natural Disasters, Global Change and the Preservation of World Heritage Sites, finally in Istanbul (March 2014) on "High Impact Natural Hazards Related to the Euro-Mediterranean Region. The next GIFT workshop is already planned for October 2015 in Adis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the theme "Water". In each case, the GIFT workshop was held on the last two days of the AvH conference and reunited 40-45 teachers from the nation where the AvH was held. Keynote speakers from AvH were speakers to the GIFT workshops which also included hands-on activities animated by sciences educators. In 3 cases of the 4 cases, these GIFT workshops represented the first workshop specifically aimed at teachers held in the country, and therefore represents a significant Earth Sciences contribution to secondary education in non European countries.

  19. The wounding of Alexander the Great in Cyropolis (329 BC): the first reported case of the syndrome of transient cortical blindness?

    PubMed

    Lascaratos, J

    1997-01-01

    I believe that the transient blindness which presented Alexander the Great after his being wounded on his head and/or his neck by a stone from a catapult during the siege of Cyropolis (329 BC) was in all probability a case of transient cortical blindness that was recognized as a special entity in the 1960s. I reached this conclusion after the comparative study of the Emperor's clinical picture provided by ancient texts, especially those of Plutarch and Quintus Curtius Rufus, with that of a modern medical bibliography.

  20. The Neotropical tanyderid Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) (Diptera, Tanyderidae), with description of the egg, larva and pupa, redescription of adults, and notes on natural history.

    PubMed

    Madriz, R Isaí; Courtney, Gregory W

    2016-08-30

    Larvae, pupae and adults of Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) were collected during fieldwork in Chilean Patagonia, December 2013 and January 2014. Eggs were obtained from females that oviposited in captivity. Association of all life stages is based on co-occurrence and rearing of individual larvae to adults. A diagnosis for the genus and species is provided. Descriptions of the egg, larva and pupa and redescriptions of the male and female are completed. Eggs of A. gloriosus are the first described for Tanyderidae. Natural history characteristics for this species, including microhabitat, copulatory behavior and oviposition, are discussed.

  1. The Neotropical tanyderid Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) (Diptera, Tanyderidae), with description of the egg, larva and pupa, redescription of adults, and notes on natural history.

    PubMed

    Madriz, R Isaí; Courtney, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Larvae, pupae and adults of Araucoderus gloriosus (Alexander) were collected during fieldwork in Chilean Patagonia, December 2013 and January 2014. Eggs were obtained from females that oviposited in captivity. Association of all life stages is based on co-occurrence and rearing of individual larvae to adults. A diagnosis for the genus and species is provided. Descriptions of the egg, larva and pupa and redescriptions of the male and female are completed. Eggs of A. gloriosus are the first described for Tanyderidae. Natural history characteristics for this species, including microhabitat, copulatory behavior and oviposition, are discussed. PMID:27615889

  2. Correlation of Emkuckfaw Group metagraywackes with the Wedowee Group, Northern Piedmont, Alabama: Implications for the interpretation of the Alexander City fault

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, D.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Recent field studies to clarify stratigraphic relationships between the Elkahatchee Quartz Diorite Gneiss and the Brevard zone lead to the interpretation that part of the Emuckfaw Group is correlative with, and probably structurally continuous with, part of the Wedowee Group. The Josie Leg formation of Bieler and Deininger (1987) is a sequence of metagraywackes and interbedded metapelites; it is here interpreted as a coarse submarine fan facies. The northwestern contact of the unit, frequently mapped as the Alexander City fault, maps into the Wadley Line in the New Site and Daviston quadrangles. The southeastern contact is a sheared contact with structurally overlying migmatitic rocks that include quartzites and calcsilicates. The Josie Leg and Wedowee rocks form a southwesterly plunging synform in which the Elkahatchee lies. Where the contact between the units is gently dipping it is mapped as the Wadley line. Where the contact has been folded and dips steeply, it is highly sheared and is mapped as the Alexander City fault. It is impossible to determine at this time how much the section has been attenuated during the shearing. Although the contact has been interpreted as structural, the data are not unambiguous. The Josie Leg/Wedowee contact may be a stratigraphic contact with the apparent structural discordance reflecting the different mechanical behavior of the contrasting lithologies.

  3. [Researchers training in the context of the collaborative projects: experiences of Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humbolt", Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia].

    PubMed

    Gotuzzo, Eduardo; González, Elsa; Verdonck, Kristien

    2010-09-01

    Research is a main element for human and social development. Under this point of view, it involves particular challenges and opportunities for the so-called "developing countries". An approach for those challenges and opportunities comes from the analysis of two interrelated activities; the training of new researchers and the research development with institutions or researchers which are external to the institution ("collaborative research"). Both activities are essential for the consolidation, widening and updating of the institutional capabilities for scientific production. We present here the experiences of the Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Alexander von Humboldt" of the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, in relation to the training of new researchers, we discuss the four elements we consider key for this process; the promotion of stimulating environments for research, the proactive identification of fellows, the complementary advice and networks consolidation; and we analyze three successful models of international collaboration for the training of new researchers under different institutional approaches.

  4. Post-traumatic stress reactions before the advent of post-traumatic stress disorder: potential effects on the lives and legacies of Alexander the Great, Captain James Cook, Emily Dickinson, and Florence Nightingale.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, Philip A; Batten, Sonja V

    2008-12-01

    Evidence is presented that Alexander the Great, Captain James Cook, Emily Dickinson, and Florence Nightingale each developed symptoms consistent with post-traumatic stress disorder in the aftermath of repeated potentially traumatizing events of differing character. Their case histories also varied with respect to background, premorbid personality style, risk factors, clinical presentation, and course of the illness, illustrating the pleomorphic character of the disorder, as well as the special problems in diagnosing it in historical figures.

  5. Post-traumatic stress reactions before the advent of post-traumatic stress disorder: potential effects on the lives and legacies of Alexander the Great, Captain James Cook, Emily Dickinson, and Florence Nightingale.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, Philip A; Batten, Sonja V

    2008-12-01

    Evidence is presented that Alexander the Great, Captain James Cook, Emily Dickinson, and Florence Nightingale each developed symptoms consistent with post-traumatic stress disorder in the aftermath of repeated potentially traumatizing events of differing character. Their case histories also varied with respect to background, premorbid personality style, risk factors, clinical presentation, and course of the illness, illustrating the pleomorphic character of the disorder, as well as the special problems in diagnosing it in historical figures. PMID:19149331

  6. The question of sign-language and the utility of signs in the instruction of the deaf: two papers by Alexander Graham Bell (1898).

    PubMed

    Bell, Alexander Graham

    2005-01-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is often portrayed as either hero or villain of deaf individuals and the Deaf community. His writings, however, indicate that he was neither, and was not as clearly definite in his beliefs about language as is often supposed. The following two articles, reprinted from The Educator (1898), Vol. V, pp. 3-4 and pp. 38-44, capture Bell's thinking about sign language and its use in the classroom. Contrary to frequent claims, Bell does not demand "oral" training for all deaf children--even if he thinks it is the superior alternative--but does advocate for it for "the semi-deaf" and "the semi-mute." "In regard to the others," he writes, "I am not so sure." Although he clearly voices his support for oral methods and fingerspelling (the Rochester method) over sign language, Bell acknowledges the use and utility of signing in a carefully-crafted discussion that includes both linguistics and educational philosophy. In separating the language used at home from that in school and on the playground, Bell reveals a far more complex view of language learning by deaf children than he is often granted. (M. Marschark). PMID:15778208

  7. The question of sign-language and the utility of signs in the instruction of the deaf: two papers by Alexander Graham Bell (1898).

    PubMed

    Bell, Alexander Graham

    2005-01-01

    Alexander Graham Bell is often portrayed as either hero or villain of deaf individuals and the Deaf community. His writings, however, indicate that he was neither, and was not as clearly definite in his beliefs about language as is often supposed. The following two articles, reprinted from The Educator (1898), Vol. V, pp. 3-4 and pp. 38-44, capture Bell's thinking about sign language and its use in the classroom. Contrary to frequent claims, Bell does not demand "oral" training for all deaf children--even if he thinks it is the superior alternative--but does advocate for it for "the semi-deaf" and "the semi-mute." "In regard to the others," he writes, "I am not so sure." Although he clearly voices his support for oral methods and fingerspelling (the Rochester method) over sign language, Bell acknowledges the use and utility of signing in a carefully-crafted discussion that includes both linguistics and educational philosophy. In separating the language used at home from that in school and on the playground, Bell reveals a far more complex view of language learning by deaf children than he is often granted. (M. Marschark).

  8. Generalized rainbows and unfolded glories of oblate drops: organization for multiple internal reflections and extension of cusps into Alexander's dark band.

    PubMed

    Marston, P L; Kaduchak, G

    1994-07-20

    Oblate drops of water can produce caustics where, unlike a simple Airy caustic, more than two rays merge. We extend previous treatments of generalized primary rainbows based on catastrophe optics [Opt. Lett. 10, 588 (1985); Proc. R. Soc. (London) A 438, 397 (1992)] to rays having (p - 1) = 2 to 5 internal reflections. The analysis is for a horizontally illuminated ellipsoid with a vertical symmetry axis. Aspect ratios causing a vanishing of the vertical curvature at the equator for the outgoing wave front are found from generalized ray tracing. In response to infinitesimal deformation, the axial caustic of real glory rays unfolds producing cusps. Laboratory observations with laser illumination demonstrate that cusps resulting from rays with five internal reflections extend into Alexander's dark band when the drop's aspect ratio is near 1.08. The evolution of this p = 6 scattering pattern as cusps meet the quinary rainbow is suggestive of an E(6) catastrophe. For ellipsoids of varying aspect ratio and refractive index N, there is an organizing singularity associated with an exceptionally flat outgoing wave front from spheres with N = p. PMID:20935841

  9. Public information needs after the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko with polonium-210 in London: cross sectional telephone survey and qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Page, Lisa; Morgan, Oliver; Pinder, Richard J; Riley, Paul; Hatch, Stephani; Maguire, Helen; Catchpole, Mike; Simpson, John; Wessely, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To identify public perceptions of the risk to health after the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko with polonium-210 (210Po) in London and to assess the impact of public health communications. Design Cross sectional telephone survey and qualitative interviews. Setting London, United Kingdom. Participants 1000 people completed the cross sectional survey and 86 potentially exposed people completed the qualitative interviews. Main outcome measures Perception of risk to personal health after the 210Po incident. Qualitative interviews were analysed with an emphasis on information needs. Results 11.7% of the survey sample (n=117) perceived their health to be at risk. Aside from personal variables the main predictors of perceived risk to health were believing that the incident was related to terrorism (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 4.6) rather than to espionage, that it was targeted at the wider public rather than one person (5.9, 3.2 to 10.9), and that it could affect people who had not been in the contaminated area (3.2, 2.1 to 5.1). Participants in the qualitative interviews were generally satisfied with the information they had received, although they would have preferred more information about their individual risk of exposure, the results of their urine tests, and the health implications of the incident. Conclusions Perceptions of the public that the 210Po incident in London in 2006 was related to espionage helped to reassure them that the risks to personal health were low. In the event of future incidents it is important to ensure that detailed, comprehensible information about the risks of any exposure is available. PMID:17975252

  10. Observatoriya imeni russkogo astronoma v dalekoj Brazilii. K 100-letiyu so diya rozhdeniya Aleksandra Ivanovicha Postoeva (1900 - 1976) %t An observatory in distant Brazil named after a Russian astronomer (dedicated to Alexander Postoyev (1900 - 1976) centennial anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques Dos Santos, P.; Matsuura, O. T.

    This is a biographical note on the life of Dr. Alexander Postoyev, a victim of Stalin's purge of Soviet astronomers in 1936 - 1937. Together with his family, he left the Soviet Union in 1943 and lived in Germany as a refugee and a "displaced person" until 1952, when he moved to Brazil. There, he started the second part of his professional career. Thanks to his efforts, the Astronomical and Geophysical Institute (IAG) of the University of Sao Paulo (USP) was for the first time included in programs of international cooperation, thus contributing to the institutional consolidation of IAG/USP as a leading center of astronomical research and teaching in Brazil now.

  11. Evaluating return on investment in a school based health promotion and prevention program: the investment multiplier for the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden National Program.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Simon; Dawber, James; Yeatman, Heather; Quinsey, Karen; Morris, Darcy

    2014-08-01

    Successful health promotion and disease prevention strategies in complex community settings such as primary schools rely on acceptance and ownership across community networks. Assessing multiplier impacts from investment on related community activity over time are suggested as key alongside evidence of program health effects on targeted groups of individuals in gauging community network engagement and ownership, dynamic impacts, and program long term success and return on investment. An Australian primary school based health promotion and prevention strategy, the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden National Program (SAKGNP), which has been providing garden and kitchen classes for year 3-6 students since 2008, was evaluated between 2011 and 2012. Returns on Australian Federal Government investment for school infrastructure grants up to $60,000 are assessed up to and beyond a two year mutual obligation period with: (i) Impacts on student lifestyle behaviours, food choices and eating habits surveyed across students (n = 491 versus 260) and parents (n = 300 versus 234) in 28 SAKGNP and 14 matched schools, controlling for school and parent level confounders and triangulated with SAKGNP pre-post analysis; (ii) Multiplier impacts of investment on related school and wider community activity up to two years; and (iii) Evidence of continuation and program evolution in schools observed beyond two years. SAKGNP schools showed improved student food choices (p = 0.024) and kitchen lifestyle behaviour (p = 0.019) domains compared to controls and in pre-post analysis where 20.0% (58/290) reported eating fruit and vegetables more often and 18.6% (54/290) preparing food at home more often. No significant differences were found in case control analysis for eating habits or garden lifestyle behaviour domains, although 32.3% of children helped more in the garden (91/278) and 15.6% (45/289) ate meals together more often in pre-post analysis. The multiplier impact on total

  12. Evaluating return on investment in a school based health promotion and prevention program: the investment multiplier for the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden National Program.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Simon; Dawber, James; Yeatman, Heather; Quinsey, Karen; Morris, Darcy

    2014-08-01

    Successful health promotion and disease prevention strategies in complex community settings such as primary schools rely on acceptance and ownership across community networks. Assessing multiplier impacts from investment on related community activity over time are suggested as key alongside evidence of program health effects on targeted groups of individuals in gauging community network engagement and ownership, dynamic impacts, and program long term success and return on investment. An Australian primary school based health promotion and prevention strategy, the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden National Program (SAKGNP), which has been providing garden and kitchen classes for year 3-6 students since 2008, was evaluated between 2011 and 2012. Returns on Australian Federal Government investment for school infrastructure grants up to $60,000 are assessed up to and beyond a two year mutual obligation period with: (i) Impacts on student lifestyle behaviours, food choices and eating habits surveyed across students (n = 491 versus 260) and parents (n = 300 versus 234) in 28 SAKGNP and 14 matched schools, controlling for school and parent level confounders and triangulated with SAKGNP pre-post analysis; (ii) Multiplier impacts of investment on related school and wider community activity up to two years; and (iii) Evidence of continuation and program evolution in schools observed beyond two years. SAKGNP schools showed improved student food choices (p = 0.024) and kitchen lifestyle behaviour (p = 0.019) domains compared to controls and in pre-post analysis where 20.0% (58/290) reported eating fruit and vegetables more often and 18.6% (54/290) preparing food at home more often. No significant differences were found in case control analysis for eating habits or garden lifestyle behaviour domains, although 32.3% of children helped more in the garden (91/278) and 15.6% (45/289) ate meals together more often in pre-post analysis. The multiplier impact on total

  13. Obituary: Alexander Dalgarno (1928 - 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, Tom; Babb, James F. Babb; Loeb, Avi

    Alex Dalgarno's major contributions to the understanding of fundamental atomic and molecular processes enabled him to develop diagnostics of the physical conditions of atmospheres and astrophysical sources and to elucidate the roles of such processes in controlling those environments. He greatly influenced the research of physicists, chemists, atmospheric scientists, and astronomers, leading Sir David Bates to write, "There is no greater figure than Alex in the history of atomic physics and its applications." Alex was born and grew up in London. As a child, he enjoyed mathematical puzzles and did well at sports. He was invited to try out for the Tottenham Hotspur soccer team, but his professional sporting career ended due to an injury, which did not prevent Alex playing tennis and squash into his ninth decade. In 1945 Alex began to study Mathematics at University College London (UCL). In 1947 Sir Harrie Massey invited him to work for a PhD in Physics and suggested that Alex investigate collisions of metastable helium atoms in helium gas to determine the cross sections for excitation transfer. Richard Buckingham was Alex's immediate supervisor. After completing his graduate study in 1951, Alex became a member of staff in Applied Mathematics at the Queen's University of Belfast (QUB). He served as the Director of the Computational Laboratory after a 1954 visit to MIT, which had an electronic computer, led Alex to persuade colleagues that QUB needed one. In 1957, the poet Philip Larkin was the best man at the marriage of Alex to Barbara Kane. They had four children, Fergus, Penelope, Piers, and Rebecca, but the marriage dissolved after ten years. Alex's important work during the 1950s on the quantitative evaluation of long-range interactions underpinned his collaborations on precise scattering calculations relevant to ultra-cold collisions and the formation of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates over four decades later. He investigated the theory of atomic and molecular collisions and calculated charge transfer cross sections. Some of these proved later to be important for forming the spectra of diffuse astronomical matter surrounding high mass stars and 100 million solar mass black holes at the centers of active galaxies. In the early 1950s David Bates stimulated Alex's interest in the study of quantum processes occurring in the upper terrestrial atmosphere. Together they considered the sources of the nightglow and dayglow features and concluded that the altitudes previously inferred for them from observations were up to several hundred kilometers too large. Experiments carried on V2 rockets, like those seen by Alex in wartime London, proved him and David to be right. Alex felt that though many theorists believe that "physics is embodied in its equations," it is instead "to be found in the solutions to the equations." He was a master at developing and applying methods that simplified calculations leading to reliable solutions. Exploiting the contemporary advances in electronic computation, by the 1960s Alex and his colleagues were able to address atomic and molecular processes of increasing complexity. Their development and early applications of the S-matrix theory of molecular rotational excitation by particle impact triggered major advances in molecular physics and theoretical chemistry and in the understanding of processes important in many environments, including a wide variety of astrophysical sources. In 1967 Alex became a professor in the Harvard Department of Astronomy and a member of the staff of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. He was a team member for several Atmosphere Explorer satellite missions, which elucidated the roles of atoms and ions in the upper atmosphere and paved the way for further applications to the other planets. By 1969 Alex was publishing papers on molecular hydrogen (H2) radiative processes, including photodissociation, in which the foundations of molecular astrophysics began to emerge. H2 is the most abundant astrophysical molecule and the main constituen

  14. Obituary: Alexander Dalgarno (1928 - 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, Tom; Babb, James F. Babb; Loeb, Avi

    Alex Dalgarno's major contributions to the understanding of fundamental atomic and molecular processes enabled him to develop diagnostics of the physical conditions of atmospheres and astrophysical sources and to elucidate the roles of such processes in controlling those environments. He greatly influenced the research of physicists, chemists, atmospheric scientists, and astronomers, leading Sir David Bates to write, "There is no greater figure than Alex in the history of atomic physics and its applications." Alex was born and grew up in London. As a child, he enjoyed mathematical puzzles and did well at sports. He was invited to try out for the Tottenham Hotspur soccer team, but his professional sporting career ended due to an injury, which did not prevent Alex playing tennis and squash into his ninth decade. In 1945 Alex began to study Mathematics at University College London (UCL). In 1947 Sir Harrie Massey invited him to work for a PhD in Physics and suggested that Alex investigate collisions of metastable helium atoms in helium gas to determine the cross sections for excitation transfer. Richard Buckingham was Alex's immediate supervisor. After completing his graduate study in 1951, Alex became a member of staff in Applied Mathematics at the Queen's University of Belfast (QUB). He served as the Director of the Computational Laboratory after a 1954 visit to MIT, which had an electronic computer, led Alex to persuade colleagues that QUB needed one. In 1957, the poet Philip Larkin was the best man at the marriage of Alex to Barbara Kane. They had four children, Fergus, Penelope, Piers, and Rebecca, but the marriage dissolved after ten years. Alex's important work during the 1950s on the quantitative evaluation of long-range interactions underpinned his collaborations on precise scattering calculations relevant to ultra-cold collisions and the formation of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates over four decades later. He investigated the theory of atomic and molecular collisions and calculated charge transfer cross sections. Some of these proved later to be important for forming the spectra of diffuse astronomical matter surrounding high mass stars and 100 million solar mass black holes at the centers of active galaxies. In the early 1950s David Bates stimulated Alex's interest in the study of quantum processes occurring in the upper terrestrial atmosphere. Together they considered the sources of the nightglow and dayglow features and concluded that the altitudes previously inferred for them from observations were up to several hundred kilometers too large. Experiments carried on V2 rockets, like those seen by Alex in wartime London, proved him and David to be right. Alex felt that though many theorists believe that "physics is embodied in its equations," it is instead "to be found in the solutions to the equations." He was a master at developing and applying methods that simplified calculations leading to reliable solutions. Exploiting the contemporary advances in electronic computation, by the 1960s Alex and his colleagues were able to address atomic and molecular processes of increasing complexity. Their development and early applications of the S-matrix theory of molecular rotational excitation by particle impact triggered major advances in molecular physics and theoretical chemistry and in the understanding of processes important in many environments, including a wide variety of astrophysical sources. In 1967 Alex became a professor in the Harvard Department of Astronomy and a member of the staff of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. He was a team member for several Atmosphere Explorer satellite missions, which elucidated the roles of atoms and ions in the upper atmosphere and paved the way for further applications to the other planets. By 1969 Alex was publishing papers on molecular hydrogen (H2) radiative processes, including photodissociation, in which the foundations of molecular astrophysics began to emerge. H2 is the most abundant astrophysical molecule and the main constituent of the regions where stars form. Interstellar H2 was first detected directly in the following year, and data for interstellar H2 began to become abundant in 1973. Alex was well prepared and led efforts to interpret these data, from which he was able to infer the physical properties of diffuse interstellar molecular clouds. At nearly the same time he was involved in work on the ionization and energy deposition in H2 by nearly relativistic and relativistic particles called cosmic rays. The work has relevance to emission in the atmospheres of the giant planets, as well as for conditions in interstellar molecular clouds. Cosmic ray induced ionization initiates much of the basic chemistry in star forming regions, and the emissions of the product molecules control the temperatures and allow the diagnosis of the physical conditions and dynamics of the stellar nurseries. For more than four decades Alex elucidated the chemical networks governing the molecular abundances in a wide variety of astrophysical sources including star forming regions, supernova ejecta, the pregalactic universe, and extreme environments like those in the vicinities of X-ray sources powered by accretion onto black holes. The refinement of the models led to calculations predicting the existence of subsequently discovered negative ions in giant molecular clouds. One of his astrophysical interests that intrigued him late in his career was the emission of soft X-rays by comets and in the heliosphere due to charge transfer with solar wind particles, and he also worked on related processes occurring in the atmospheres of the giant planets. Alex remained very active in fundamental atomic and molecular physics, as well as for its applications to astrophysics and to terrestrial and extraterrestrial planetary atmospheres. Ultra-cold collisions and ultra-cold chemistry were major interests for Alex for much of the latest phase of his career, most recently with pioneering work on atom-molecule collisions. In the early 1980s Alex had concerns about the future of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics in the United States, where it was inadequately funded and somewhat out of fashion in many of the physics departments providing most of the physicists who became university faculty. Alex played a key role in efforts to address this issue and led a proposal to the National Science Foundation that resulted in the founding on 1 November 1988 of the Institute of Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics (ITAMP) at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Alex served for five years as the first ITAMP director. A number of the former ITAMP students and postdoctoral researchers have become leading AMO physicists, and its visitor program and workshops have led to the identification and stimulation of the leading areas of AMO physics. Alex was a Fellow of the Royal Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a member (Honorary) of the Royal Irish Academy. He received many medals, including the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics, the Royal Society's Hughes Medal, the Royal Astronomical Society's Gold Medal, the American Geophysical Society's Fleming Medal, and the Royal Society of Chemistry's Spiers Medal. He served as the editor of the Astrophysical Journal Letters for nearly thirty years starting in 1973, as the Chair of the Harvard Department of Astronomy from 1971 to 1976, and as the Acting Director of Harvard College Observatory and then the Acting Director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics from 1971 to 1973 during a critical period of its existence. Alex was a gifted mentor who spoke and wrote with pride of his former students and postdoctoral researchers. He was able to match projects very well with the abilities of the students. He made availability to students a special priority, and despite his supply of problems would encourage students as they developed their own. Alex was very supportive of junior scientists as they developed their careers, and in addition to writing many letters of recommendation he made many visits to colleagues as they were establishing themselves elsewhere. Furthermore, Alex very graciously hosted a number of his former students when they visited. He combined quiet modesty with a confidence that reassured others, and his humor was dry, interactive, and friendly. Alex passed away peacefully on 9 April 2015 in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the company of Fern Creelan, who was his partner for 30 years.

  15. Tamara Shapiro Ledley Receives 2013 Excellence in Geophysical Education Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledley, Tamara Shapiro

    2014-01-01

    The meaning of "interdisciplinary" has evolved over my career. When I started my science research career, it meant bridging atmospheric and ocean science and embracing the science of the Earth system and its interacting components. Thus, I found a home at AGU submitting science abstracts to atmospheric science, oceanography, or hydrology sessions. In fact, my first research paper appeared in Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Atmospheres, and a letter to the editor and response appeared in JGR-Oceans. It also meant getting scientists in these disciplines talking to each other. I organized a seminar series at Rice University under the umbrella of an Earth Systems Institute that included the Departments of Space Physics and Astronomy, Geology and Geophysics, Biology, and Hydrology. I also began working with Dr. Patricia Reiff, a space physicist with a passion for science education.

  16. Alexander Hollaender Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship Program:

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Based on the information provided by the laboratories, ORAU developed and distributed program literature. The program brochure includes a brief program description, eligibility and selection criteria, program benefits and obligations, programs and research areas of OHER, participating laboratories, and other application information. The program description booklet gives more detail on these areas and also includes a biography of Dr. Hollaender and the laboratory descriptions submitted by the participating laboratories. Copies of the brochure and booklet are given in Appendix A. Appendix B includes a listing of promotional activities as well as some examples of program advertisements, press releases, and journal or newspaper articles. Program promotion resulted in the submission of 93 applications during the first cycle of program operation. The 93 applicants received their doctoral degrees from 53 universities in 28 states and from eight universities in six foreign countries. All but three applicants held or expected to receive a PhD degree;two had MDs;one had a DVM degree. The applicants, with more than 40 different academic majors, represent the full range of disciplines in the life, biomedical, and environmental sciences. Appendix C gives detailed information about each applicant.

  17. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks...

  18. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks...

  19. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks...

  20. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks...

  1. 27 CFR 9.53 - Alexander Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Then east-southeasterly 2,400 feet in a straight line to the top of a peak identified as Chalk Hill; (30) Then south from said peak, in a straight line, approximately 0.2 mile to the point where Chalk..., approximately 1.3 miles, along the roadbed of Chalk Hill Road to the point near the confluence of Brooks...

  2. Alexander Graham Bell in Professional Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol; Hampton, Leonard A.

    1976-01-01

    The University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education and the School of Pharmacy developed and presented, as a pilot project, a series of four telelectures at 10 locations throughout the State. Participating pharmacists were receptive to the approach and reported favorable reactions in the evaluation. (LH)

  3. Alexander Fleming: the spectrum of penicillin.

    PubMed

    Sternbach, G; Varon, J

    1992-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin was directly linked to the inhibition by that agent of the growth of colonies of staphylococcus. However, subsequent resistance by this organism to penicillin as well as to a number of other agents has marked the history of staphylococcus in the antibiotic era. One of the most important mechanisms of this resistance has been the production of penicillinase, an enzyme that inactivates penicillin and related antibiotics. Penicillinase is currently termed beta-lactamase, and it is now recognized that there are several types of beta-lactamases produced by various organisms. The ability of staphylococci to produce this enzyme has been countered by the development of penicillinase-resistant agents and the addition of beta-lactamase inhibitors to antibiotics.

  4. Review Symposium of Alexander Astin's "Four Critical Years."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, J. Bruce; And Others

    1978-01-01

    (NOTE: See HE 512 216 for journal name change information.) The findings, methodology, and policy implications presented in Astin's longitudinal study of college students, are reviewed by four higher education scholars. These include J. Bruce Francis, Gerald Gurin, Arthur W. Chickering, and G. Lester Anderson. (SF)

  5. Alexander Nikolaevich Scriabin (1872-1915): Enlightenment or illness?

    PubMed

    Witztum, Eliezer; Lerner, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    The similarity between psychotic symptoms and aspects of mystical experiences is well known. It has long been recognized that there are similarities between mystical and spiritual and psychotic experiences. The content of an experience alone usually does not determine whether an individual is psychotic. The Russian composer Scriabin (1872-1915) was among the most famous artists of his time. Scriabin infused his music with mysticism, evolving a modernistic idiom through which he created a musical counterpart to the Symbolist literature of that period. In this paper, we discuss the question that arises from perusing Scriabin's life is whether the composer was a mystic genius or whether he suffered from affective psychopathology with psychotic features.

  6. The big ideas of Edgar Alexander Pask (1912-66).

    PubMed

    Conacher, I D

    2010-02-01

    Edgar Pask worked before, during and after World War II with the anaesthetist Robert Macintosh. Both were ranking officers and engaged in work with the Royal Air Force Physiological Laboratories at Farnborough, then in the charge of Dr Bryan Matthews. Pask submitted as a Doctorate Thesis a compilation of much of the experimental work in which he was the main subject, most of the data being acquired while he was unconscious. Experiments in which the Farnborough Team were engaged form a central core to the Thesis and relate to the development of life jackets. The information is well known and has been widely publicized, along with most of the biography of Pask. However, some extreme physiological experiments, again with Pask as the test subject and which probably were not conducted at Farnborough, are less well known but in their own way even more extraordinary. The theme in common is Pask's ideas to use the anaesthetized state and the properties of anaesthetic agents as surrogates to the extreme situations Royal Air Force pilots were subject to in modern warfare. There is no purpose to detract from Pask's ideas and selfless heroism by digressions into parallel processes conducted by the opposing Oberkommando der Luftwaffe (OKL) research establishments, but it is evident these were known and had shocked the Farnborough Team (including Pask) before revelation at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials.

  7. The Intellectual Background of Alexander Bain's "Models of Discourse."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harned, Jon

    1985-01-01

    Explores the discourse modes put forth in Bain's nineteenth century college textbook "English Composition and Rhetoric." Discusses his rationale for shifting from the previous belletristic schemes to the forms of description, narration, exposition, persuasion, and poetry. (HTH)

  8. Bioanalysis young investigator: Alexander Medina-Remón.

    PubMed

    Medina-Remón, Alexander; Raventós, Rosa Maria Lamuela

    2011-07-01

    Supervisor's supporting comments Alex Medina joined my research group, Natural Antioxidants, in January 2006 to start his PhD program. He has been working intensively and efficiently on several projects; initially for his thesis he developed a new bioanalytical methodology to quantify phenols in urine (Medina-Remón A et al. 2009) to correlate with the hypertension prevention in the PREDIMED study ( www.predimed.org ). Thanks to this new bioanalytical method, we are currently starting collaboration projects with different research centers. In addition, he has been working on other research projects on tomatoes, grapes, citric fruits and wine. Medina is helpful whenever needed and efficient. He has shown himself to be responsible, well-prepared, intelligent, organized and to have very good teaching skills. Moreover, he is patient and able to solve problems calmly, but at the same time, he is enthusiastic about what he does and can transmit this enthusiasm to his colleagues. He is really a thoughtful scientist. I have now contracted him as a Postdoctoral researcher. His responsibilities include leading several master's students and he is writing several papers on the health effects of polyphenols using his method.

  9. Postglacial vegetation history of Mitkof Island, Alexander Archipelago, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ager, T.A.; Carrara, P.E.; Smith, Jody L.; Anne, V.; Johnson, J.

    2010-01-01

    An AMS radiocarbon-dated pollen record from a peat deposit on Mitkof Island, southeastern Alaska provides a vegetation history spanning ???12,900??cal yr BP to the present. Late Wisconsin glaciers covered the entire island; deglaciation occurred > 15,400??cal yr BP. The earliest known vegetation to develop on the island (???12,900??cal yr BP) was pine woodland (Pinus contorta) with alder (Alnus), sedges (Cyperaceae) and ferns (Polypodiaceae type). By ???12,240??cal yr BP, Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) began to colonize the island while pine woodland declined. By ???11,200??cal yr BP, mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) began to spread across the island. Sitka spruce-mountain hemlock forests dominated the lowland landscapes of the island until ???10,180??cal yr BP, when western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) began to colonize, and soon became the dominant tree species. Rising percentages of pine, sedge, and sphagnum after ???7100??cal yr BP may reflect an expansion of peat bog habitats as regional climate began to shift to cooler, wetter conditions. A decline in alders at that time suggests that coastal forests had spread into the island's uplands, replacing large areas of alder thickets. Cedars (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, Thuja plicata) appeared on Mitkof Island during the late Holocene.

  10. Howard Florey, Alexander Fleming and the fairy tale of penicillin.

    PubMed

    Goldsworthy, Peter D; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2002-02-18

    The public myth of the discovery of penicillin is an archetypal "quest story" of the type common to every human culture. But the real story of the discovery, testing and refinement of penicillin is a complex tale of accident, serendipity, oversight, conflict, the pressure of war, idiosyncratic personalities and even--the invention of history.

  11. John Alexander Sinton, MD FRS VC (1884-1956).

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    2016-05-01

    Brigadier John Sinton is the only individual in history to have been both awarded the Victoria Cross and also elected to the Royal Society. He qualified at Belfast and afterwards joined the Indian Medical Service (IMS). Serving before and during the Great War (1914-18), he was first posted to the North-West Frontier province, and afterwards as a captain in the Indian Expeditionary force in Mesopotamia (now Iraq). It was there in 1916 that, shot in both arms during an engagement and under heavy gunfire, he remained steadfastly at his post; for this bravery he received the Victoria Cross. Following the war he carried out major researches into malaria in India, and became Director of the Malaria Survey of India Both there and shortly afterwards, Sinton published about 200 papers on various aspects of malaria and leishmaniasis. In England, he later worked at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the Ministry of Health's laboratory at Horton, Epsom. In 1946, he was elected to the Royal Society for his researches into malaria and kala-azar, and following retirement he underwent another distinguished career in Northern Ireland. PMID:24833542

  12. Learning to See the Ball Using the Alexander Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Gaynelle

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a personal anecdote from the author, for whom childhood P.E. classes were exercises in frustration and humiliation largely because she could not master the coordination needed to catch, throw, or hit a ball. She could not keep her eye on the ball despite well-meaning instruction from coaches, friends, and family members.…

  13. A Measurement of "g" Using Alexander's Diving Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiroga, M.; Martinez, S.; Otranto, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a very simple exercise using an inverted test tube pushed straight down into a column of water to determine the free-fall acceleration "g". The exercise employs the ideal gas law and only involves the measurement of the displacement of the bottom of the "diving bell" and the water level inside the tube with respect to the…

  14. Postglacial vegetation history of Mitkof Island, Alexander Archipelago, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, Thomas A.; Carrara, Paul E.; Smith, Jane L.; Anne, Victoria; Johnson, Joni

    2010-03-01

    An AMS radiocarbon-dated pollen record from a peat deposit on Mitkof Island, southeastern Alaska provides a vegetation history spanning ˜12,900 cal yr BP to the present. Late Wisconsin glaciers covered the entire island; deglaciation occurred > 15,400 cal yr BP. The earliest known vegetation to develop on the island (˜12,900 cal yr BP) was pine woodland ( Pinus contorta) with alder ( Alnus), sedges (Cyperaceae) and ferns (Polypodiaceae type). By ˜12,240 cal yr BP, Sitka spruce ( Picea sitchensis) began to colonize the island while pine woodland declined. By ˜11,200 cal yr BP, mountain hemlock ( Tsuga mertensiana) began to spread across the island. Sitka spruce-mountain hemlock forests dominated the lowland landscapes of the island until ˜10,180 cal yr BP, when western hemlock ( Tsuga heterophylla) began to colonize, and soon became the dominant tree species. Rising percentages of pine, sedge, and sphagnum after ˜7100 cal yr BP may reflect an expansion of peat bog habitats as regional climate began to shift to cooler, wetter conditions. A decline in alders at that time suggests that coastal forests had spread into the island's uplands, replacing large areas of alder thickets. Cedars ( Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, Thuja plicata) appeared on Mitkof Island during the late Holocene.

  15. A Measurement of g Using Alexander's Diving Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga, M.; Martínez, S.; Otranto, S.

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a very simple exercise using an inverted test tube pushed straight down into a column of water to determine the free-fall acceleration g. The exercise employs the ideal gas law and only involves the measurement of the displacement of the bottom of the "diving bell" and the water level inside the tube with respect to the water column surface. The experiment is ideal for students in introductory physics courses.

  16. Young, Black, Mathematically Gifted, and Stereotyped

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Ebony

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I describe the academic dilemma experienced by Tamara (pseudonym), a mathematically high-achieving high school sophomore. Raised in an economically strapped neighborhood, Tamara had the opportunity to attend a prestigious private high school, tuition free. Confronted by being viewed as an affirmative action student Tamara uses this…

  17. Finding Support Online: Parents are Finding Comfort and Support in Virtual Hugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Janice

    2006-01-01

    When Tamara learned that she and her husband were expecting a baby girl, Tamara remembers the doctor telling her "the odds were high" her daughter would inherit her bipolar disorder. As it turned out, her daughter, Lindsay was also formally diagnosed with bipolar disorder after her 11th birthday. Tamara turned to Internet to find someone who…

  18. Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bell! September 29, 2016 The 2016 Legacy of Innovation Gala Visit the new AG Bell Gala website ... deaf children can do! our community Legacy of Innovation Gala Registration Open! Your Letters Evan Mercer provided ...

  19. Alexander v. Gardner-Denver: A Threat to Title VII Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Richard F.

    1975-01-01

    An examination of the decision on the rights of an employee, who has unsuccessfully pursued a race or sex discrimination claim through arbitration, to "relitigate" the claim under Title VII, Civil Rights Act of 1964. Conclusion: the decision endangers Title VII rights by granting too much weight to prior arbitration awards. (JT)

  20. 77 FR 35028 - Bill Alexander, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    .... Leslie, 68 FR 15227, 15230 (2003). I ``may rely on any one or a combination of factors and may give each.... Medicine Shoppe-Jonesborough, 73 FR 363, 387 (2008). In this matter, I have considered all of the factors... authorities] with respect to the handling of controlled substances.'' Mortimer B. Levin, 55 FR 8209,...

  1. Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symposium! Celebrating 125 Years AG Bell Legacy of Innovation Gala In an unforgettable sold-out evening, AG ... association in grand style at the Legacy of Innovation Gala. Support AG Bell - Shop on AmazonSmile! Giving ...

  2. Collaborating with Alexander Scriabine and the Miles Institute for Preclinical Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Janis, Ronald A

    2015-11-15

    This article represents a timely opportunity to express my affection, admiration and gratitude to Professor David Triggle. David was my Ph.D. advisor as well as a key consultant in the 1980s and early 1990s for research programs at Miles Institute for Preclinical Pharmacology in West Haven, CT, the U.S. research operation of Bayer AG, in the areas of Ca(2+) and K(+) channel ligands. The binding methodology developed in his laboratory was used to search for an endogenous ligand for L-type Ca(2+) channels. We did not find the substance that we were searching for, a genetically-determined, competitive inhibitor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine binding site, but instead isolated the endogenous ligand for the brain's own marijuana, anandamide. Devane, Mechoulam and coworkers first discovered that this compound was the endogenous ligand for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active substance in cannabis. The endogenous endocannabinoid system is now the target of many exciting new approaches to drug discovery. PMID:26119821

  3. Feldenkrais Method, Alexander Technique, and yoga--body awareness therapy in the performing arts.

    PubMed

    Schlinger, Marcy

    2006-11-01

    The three disciplines described are practiced by many individuals for a myriad of reasons. Depending upon ability and depth of study, teachers of all three disciplines may have specific competencies with which to analyse, instruct, and interact with students/clients. In the author's experience, persons who seek out these practices and incorporate them into their daily lives and expressions of physical activity often are motivated to maintain or establish an optimal state of well-being and function. Physicians and therapists who work with performing artists are in a position to encourage such positive direction in patients, provide information on local resources, and consider the practices as collaborative and adjunctive to medical care.

  4. Measuring the World: How theory follows observation (Alexander von Humboldt Medal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2015-04-01

    I started my professional career as a hydrologist working for the government of Mozambique. I was responsible for overseeing the hydrological network, the operational hydrology and answering specific questions related to water resources availability and the occurrence of floods. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the use of telecommunication and computers was still very limited. We had to work with handbooks, lecture notes and consultancy reports, but mostly with our brains. The key to answering a specific question was to go into the field and observe. We measured as much as we could to understand the processes that we observed. I didn't know it at the time, but this perfectly fits in the tradition of Von Humboldt. During my time in Mozambique I surveyed during and after extreme floods, such as the 1984 flood caused by the tropical cyclone Demoina. I surveyed the geometry, hydraulics and salt intrusion of 4 major Mozambican estuaries. And I measured the quality and the quantity of the flows draining onto these estuaries. Having only limited access to the literature, it was a survey without much theoretical guidance. This maybe slowed us down a bit, and sometimes led to inefficient approaches, but scientifically it was a gold mine. Not being biased by established theories is a great advantage. One does not follow onto the well-trodden, but sometimes erroneous, paths of others. After working for 6 years in Mozambique I joined an international consultant, for whom I worked for 6 years in many different countries in Asia, Africa and South America. Although the access to literature and other people's experience was better, I continued the practice of observing before believing. These 12 years of doing hydrology in practice formed the basis for the development of my own theories on hydrological processes, salt intrusion in estuaries, tidal hydraulics and even atmospheric moisture recycling. So when I started on my PhD at the age of 38, I made a completely different start from what has become normal nowadays. It was the first time I really had the opportunity to study the literature and to confront my own theory with the work of others. How different is this from how we guide our PhD students today. In my Von Humboldt lecture I shall give examples of how field observation was crucial in developing new insights and new theories. I shall present highlights of my theories on: salt intrusion and tidal dynamics in estuaries; atmospheric moisture recycling; landscape based hydrological modeling; and the sizing of root zone storage capacity. I shall emphasise the use of analytical approaches and of the need to develop hypotheses and conceptual models based on field experience, observations and perceptions of how nature works.

  5. A Darwinian mystery: fluctuations in runoff from the la Plata basin (Alexander von Humboldt Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, R. T.

    2012-04-01

    During the voyage of HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin sailed in a small boat along the River Paraná, a major tributary of the la Plata drainage system. He wrote about the occurrence of severe droughts (the latest of which had been termed the "gran seco") alternating with periods of severe flooding. From reports received, he concluded that these events appeared to be cyclic with a period "of about fifteen years". Because extended periods of low flow in Brazilian rivers are of immense economic importance, the presentation describes a search for the material which led Darwin to this conclusion. A prolonged period of low flow in another la Plata tributary - the River Paraguay - not unlike the "gran seco" reported by Darwin, has occurred more recently; if such low flows were to recur in the future, the consequences would be severe for a region where more than 70% of energy is supplied by hydropower. A priori considerations suggest the use of statistical long-memory models for predicting River Paraguay water-levels, and some preliminary results from their use are presented.

  6. Alexander Disease and Megalencephalic Leukoencephalopathy with Subcortical Cysts: Leukodystrophies Arising from Astrocyte Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorospe, J. Rafael; Maletkovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Disorders of white matter are some of the most commonly encountered conditions in the practice of child neurology. For a child presenting with evidence of neurological impairment, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is usually performed and often proves informative in suggesting the diagnosis. Traditionally, primary white matter…

  7. Vortex modeling for rotor aerodynamics - The 1991 Alexander A. Nikolsky Lecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robin B.

    1992-01-01

    The efforts toward realistic vortex modeling for rotary wings which began under the guidance of professor A. A. Nikolsky of Princeton University in 1955-1956 are discussed. Attention is given to Nikolsky's flow-visualization studies and major theoretical considerations for vortex modeling. More recent efforts by other researchers have led to models of increasing complexity. The neglect of compressibility and viscous effects in the classical approach is noted to be a major limiting factor in full-scale rotor applications of the classical vortex theory; it has nevertheless been valuable for the delineation of problem areas and the guiding of both experimental and theoretical investigations.

  8. Review Symposium on "Culture and Pedagogy: International Comparisons in Primary Education," by Robin Alexander.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadfoot, Patricia; Little, Angela W.

    2003-01-01

    Two reviews of an ambitious comparative study of elementary classroom practices and realities in the United States (Michigan), England, France, Russia, and India. There is no single definition of best practice in education, for both means and ends are culturally specific. Recent English educational policy emphasizing a generic definition and…

  9. 78 FR 53630 - Airworthiness Directives; Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. Segelflugzeugbau Sailplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... on the availability of this material at the FAA, call (816) 329-4148. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... Register on May 23, 2013 (78 FR 30791), and proposed to supersede AD 64-07-05, Amendment 701 (29 FR 3227... elevator control connection, presumably caused by an incorrect repair or damage at the tail-plane-area....

  10. Conversations with Four Highly Productive Educational Psychologists: Patricia Alexander, Richard Mayer, Dale Schunk, and Barry Zimmerman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson-Hazley, Melissa; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the questions: Who are the most productive and influential educational psychologists? What factors characterize these educational psychologists? And, what advice might they pass along to budding scholars? To determine the top educational psychologists, we surveyed the membership of Division 15 (Educational Psychology)…

  11. Alexander Meets Michotte: A Simulation Tool Based on Pattern Programming and Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basawapatna, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Simulation and modeling activities, a key point of computational thinking, are currently not being integrated into the science classroom. This paper describes a new visual programming tool entitled the Simulation Creation Toolkit. The Simulation Creation Toolkit is a high level pattern-based phenomenological approach to bringing rapid simulation…

  12. The controversy between Alexander Friedmann and Albert Einstein about the possibility of a non-static world (German Title: Die Kontroverse zwischen Alexander Friedmann und Albert Einstein um die Möglichkeit einer nichtstatischen Welt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Georg

    Einstein's treatment of the cosmological problem as well as his unshakeable adherence to his own static solution of the complete field equations was throughout determined by Ernst Mach's idea of relativity of inertia. Friedmann, however, like Eddington, Weyl and others did not consider Mach's principle to be a part of general relativity, and so he regarded a time dependent developing spatial geometry as being consistent with world matter at relative rest. In his final statement to the controversy, Einstein acknowledged just formal correctness of Friedmann's results. Actually his criticism was not due ``to a miscalculation'', as he was ready to admit, but was owed to a fundamental fixed idea which continued to exist and which was the cause of his disavowal of physical significance of dynamical solutions.

  13. Eponymous doctors associated with Edinburgh, Part 2--David Bruce, John Cheyne, William Stokes, Alexander Monro Secundus, Joseph Gamgee.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D

    2006-12-01

    This, the second in a three-paper series with this title, looks at famous doctors who trained in Edinburgh and their eponyms. With one possible exception, none seems to have sought the eponym, nor awarded it to themselves, nor used it for self-promotion. Unlike those in the first paper, all eponyms in this paper are still in use and their brevity is in contrast to the lengthy description needed if the eponym is not used. Examples are Cheyne-Stokes respiration, Stokes-Adam attacks, Brucellosis and Gamgee dressing. Monro Secundus is included because of his vehement defence of his professional reputation and research findings when he suspected others of trying to detract credit from him, a characteristic seldom reported for the others. PMID:17526135

  14. Is research on soil erosion hazard and mitigation in the Global South still needed? (Alexander von Humbold Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poesen, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion represents a geomorphological and geological hazard that may cause environmental damage (land degradation), property damage, loss of livelihoods and services as well as social and economic disruption. Erosion not only lowers the quality of our soils on site, resulting in a drastic reduction of their ecosystem functions that play a vital role in daily life, but causes also significant sediment-related problems off site. To curb soil erosion problems, a range of soil conservation techniques and strategies have been designed and are being applied. Worldwide, ca. 62 000 research papers on soil erosion and 116 000 on soil conservation have been published (Web of Science, Dec. 2015). The number of such papers dealing with the Global South represents less than 20 % of all papers, despite the fact that many regions in this part of the world face significant soil erosion problems, aggravated by a rapidly growing population and major environmental changes. Given the large number of research papers on this topic, one might therefore conclude that we now know almost everything about the various soil erosion processes and rates, their factors and consequences as well as their control so that little new knowledge can still be added to the vast amount of available information. We refute this conclusion by pointing to some major research gaps that still need to be addressed if we want to use our soils in a more sustainable way. More specifically the following topics need more research attention: 1) improved understanding of both natural and anthropogenic soil erosion processes and their interactions, 2) scaling up soil erosion processes and rates in space and time, and 3) innovative techniques and strategies to prevent or reduce erosion rates. This will be illustrated with case studies from the Global South. If future research focuses on these research gaps, we will 1) better understand processes and their interactions operating at a range of spatial and temporal scales, their rates as well as their on-site and off-site impacts, which is crucial for better targeting erosion control measures and which is academically spoken rewarding, and 2) we will also be in a better position to select the most appropriate and effective soil erosion control techniques and strategies which are badly needed for a sustainable use of our soils in the Anthropocene and for the improvement of environmental conditions worldwide.

  15. Native Agency and the Making of "The North American Indian": Alexander B. Upshaw and Edward S. Curtis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamir, Shamoon

    2007-01-01

    The twenty volumes of ethnographic text and pictorial photography and the twenty portfolios of large, finely printed photogravures that together comprise "The North American Indian" were the product of an extraordinary labor by Edward S. Curtis, an extensive and shifting team of co-workers, and the participation of hundreds of Native Americans. By…

  16. 78 FR 63997 - Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Interagency Coordinating Committee; Urology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Interagency Coordinating Committee; Urology Subcommittee Workshop SUMMARY: The Urology Subcommittee of the Kidney, Urologic.... Tamara Bavendam, Co-Chair, Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Interagency Coordinating...

  17. Identifying developmental vascular disruptor compounds using a predictive signature and alternative toxicity models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying Developmental Vascular Disruptor Compounds Using a Predictive Signature and Alternative Toxicity Models Presenting Author: Tamara Tal Affiliation: U.S. EPA/ORD/ISTD, RTP, NC, USA Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide...

  18. Did Alexander Really Ask, "Do I Appear to You to Be a Bastard?": Using Ancient Texts to Improve Pupils' Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Beth; Mastin, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Beth Baker and Steven Mastin make the case for teaching ancient history in the post-14 curriculum. Pointing out the damaging messages that could be conveyed by assuming that ancient history is not worthy of higher-level and demanding study, they also show the opportunities that are missed if pupils do not return to it when they are able to apply…

  19. The Potential of Expanded Arbitration in Resolving Title VII Claims in Light of Alexander v. Gardner-Denver and New Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Laura G.

    1976-01-01

    Potential Title VII financial liability, not only for lawyer's fees and court costs, but also for back pay awards, should provide the needed stimulus for union and management to accept altered arbitration as a method of resolving employment discrimination claims. Altered arbitration would be an effective way to limit their financial liability.…

  20. A new species of Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 crane flies (Diptera: Pediciidae) from north-central Mongolia with first description of the larva for the genus.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Podeniene, Virginija; Gelhaus, Jon

    2014-01-01

    A new species of Pediciidae, Heterangaeus mongolicus is described from specimens collected during the fieldwork of the Mongolian Aquatic Insect Survey Project in north-central Mongolia, Tov Aimag (district). Descriptions and illustrations of the distinguishing morphological features are provided. Habitat information is presented. Female ovipositor and larvae of Heterangaeus are described and illustrated for the first time. This discovery of Heterangaeus in Mongolia represents a 1700 kilometer extension of the known distribution for the genus.

  1. Identifying Unique Ethical Challenges of Indigenous Field-Workers: A Commentary on Alexander and Richman's "Ethical Dilemmas in Evaluations Using Indigenous Research Workers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nick L.

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with nonindigenous workers, to what extent do unique ethical problems arise when indigenous field-workers participate in field studies? Three aspects of study design and operation are considered: data integrity issues, risk issues, and protection issues. Although many of the data quality issues that arise with the use of indigenous…

  2. Duemmler, Kerstin; Nagel, Alexander-Kenneth: governing religious diversity: top-down and bottom-up initiatives in Germany and Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Duemmler, Kerstin; Nagel, Alexander-Kenneth

    2013-06-01

    In recent years religious pluralization has become a significant policy issue in Western societies as a result of a new awareness of religion and of religious minorities articulating themselves and becoming more visible. The article explores the variety of social and political reactions to religious diversity in urban areas and in doing so it brings together theoretical concepts of political and cultural sociology. The notion of diversity governance as joint endeavour of state and societal actors managing societies is linked to the notion of boundary work as interplay of state and/or societal actors maintaining or modifying boundaries between religious traditions. Based on two case studies the article illustrates two idealtypical settings of diversity governance: The first case from the German Ruhr Area stands for a bottom-up approach which is based on civic self-organization of interreligious activities whereas the second case from the Swiss canton of Lucerne exhibits a model of top-down governance based on state interventions in religious instruction at schools. Drawing on semi-structured interviews and participant observation the authors show how different governance settings shape the construction and blurring of boundaries in the religious field. Both approaches operate differently when incorporating religious diversity and rendering former homogenous notions of we-groups more heterogeneous. Despite of the approaches initial aim of inclusion, patterns of exclusion are equally reproduced since the idea of 'legitimate religion' rooted in Christian majority culture is present.

  3. Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Gordon's Slough Bridge, At ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Gordon's Slough Bridge, At the confluence of Alexander's Bridge Road and Gordon's Slough, southeast of Alexander's Bridge, Fort Oglethorpe, Catoosa County, GA

  4. Oil City PREP: Putting Positive Principles into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenman, Jessica; Barnhill, Rachelle; Riley, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Tamara Shepard from Southwest Behavioral Health Management (SBHM) proposed a plan to schools in Venango County, Pennsylvania. School districts would collaborate with mental health agencies to create a school-based integrated classroom model that would combine education and behavioral health interventions in one setting. When she initially…

  5. 75 FR 45166 - Draft Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... through the NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS). Because your comments will... Standards for Fuels and Material Facilities.'' ] FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tamara D. Powell, U.S... Criticality Safety Standards for Fuels and Material Facilities,'' is temporarily identified by its task...

  6. 76 FR 189 - Final Regulatory Guide: Issuance, Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... are located in the NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System under Accession Number... Standards for Fuels and Material Facilities.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tamara D. Powell, U.S... Criticality Safety Standards for Fuels and Material Facilities,'' was issued with a temporary...

  7. STS-52 Mission Specialist (MS) Jernigan during food planning session at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist (MS) Tamara E. Jernigan sips a beverage from a plastic container using a straw. She appears to be pondering what beverages she would like to have on her 10-day flight this coming autumn. Other crewmembers joined Jernigan for this food planning session conducted by JSC's Man-Systems Division.

  8. 78 FR 78451 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board; Notice of Designation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... (June 24, 2013), 78 FR 39048. \\4\\ See letters to Elizabeth M. Murphy, Secretary, Commission, from Tamara.... Cohen, Managing Director, Associate General Counsel, Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, dated July 18, 2013; Roger Michaud, Chairman, College Savings Foundation, dated July 19,...

  9. 75 FR 74700 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License.... Date Filed: October 26, 2010. d. Applicant: Grand River Dam Authority. e. Name of Project: Markham.... 791(a)-825(r). h. Applicant Contact: Tamara E. Jahnke, Grand River Dam Authority, P.O. Box 409,...

  10. 75 FR 16090 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License.... Date Filed: March 11, 2010, supplemented on March 17, 2010. d. Applicant: Grand River Dam Authority. e.... 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Ms. Tamara E. Jahnke, Assistant General Council, Grand Dam...

  11. Liquid Nitrogen Dewar Loading at KSC for STS-71 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen dewar loading at Kennedy Space Center for STS-71 flight with Stan Koszelak (right), University of California at Riverside, adn Tamara Chinareva (left), Russian Spacecraft Coporation-Energia. The picture shows Koszelak removing the insert from the transportation dewar.

  12. STS-40 MS Jernigan in EMU listens as Pilot Gutierrez looks on in JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist (MS) Tamara E. Jernigan (right), wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and communi- cations carrier assembly (CCA), listens to technician's instructions during communications equipment test. STS-40 Pilot Sidney M. Gutierrez (left) looks on. Jernigan is preparing for an contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility Bldg 29.

  13. IFLA General Conference, 1991. Division of Management and Technology: Section of Conservation; Section of Information Technology; Section of Library Buildings and Equipment; Section of Statistics; Management of Library Associations. Booklet 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The eight papers in this collection were presented at five sections of the Division of Management and Technology: (1) "The State Conservation Programme (Concept Approach)" (Tamara Burtseva and Zinaida Dvoriashina, USSR); (2) "La communication a distance de banques d'images pour le grand public (Public Access to Image Databases via…

  14. Irish Studies Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregor, Keith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This collection of papers includes the following: "Preface" (Keith Gregor); "Cultural Nationalism and the Irish Literary Revival" (David Pierce); "Transitions in Irish Miscellanies between 1923 and 1940" (Malcom Ballin); "Born into the Troubles: Deirdre Madden's 'Hidden Symptoms'" (Tamara Benito de la Iglesia); "'Reading in the Dark': The…

  15. STS-80 Post Flight Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The flight crew of STS-80, Cmdr. Kenneth D. Cockrell, Pilot Kent V. Rominger, Mission Specialists, Tamara E. Jernigan, Thomas D. Jones, and F. Story Musgrave give a post flight presentation of their mission. This presentation is divided into two parts first a slide presentation of still shots, and the second is a video presentation.

  16. 75 FR 69158 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Jerome P. Auger Judy Ann Auyang William C. Azhar Shariq Azrieli Stephanie Joyce Bachman Mary Arnold... Mary Cook Dennis Eugene Corbett Meryle Lynn Corbin Tamara Diane Costelo Michael Philip Costelo... Gorr Marc-Andrew George Grace John S. Graf Robert Henri Grau Joachim Gray Laurence Brian Gray...

  17. 77 FR 30518 - Grand River Dam Authority; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ...: Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 791(a)-825(r). h. Applicant Contact: Ms. Tamara E. Jahnke, Assistant General.... The east side wave attenuator would be eight feet by 150 feet and the west side would be eight feet...

  18. Jernigan and Wolf in Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts Tamara Jernigan (#1) and David Wolf (#2) are training in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at Marshall Space Flight center with an exercise for International Space Station Alpha. The NBS provided the weightless environment encountered in space needed for testing and the practices of Extravehicular Activities (EVA).

  19. Personnel Pitfalls in Cyberworld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Thomas E., III

    2007-01-01

    In May 2006 administrators in the Austin, Texas, Independent School District learned that Tamara Hoover, an art teacher at Austin High School, was the subject of several explicit photographs that had been posted on Flickr, a public photograph-sharing website. Purportedly these photographs were posted on Flickr by the teacher's partner without her…

  20. Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals. Hisham A. El-Masri1, Nicole C. Klienstreur2, Linda Adams1, Tamara Tal1, Stephanie Padilla1, Kristin I...

  1. AOP Knowledge Base/Wiki Tool Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals. Hisham A. El-Masri1, Nicole C. Klienstreur2, Linda Adams1, Tamara Tal1, Stephanie Padilla1, Kristin Is...

  2. Developing an Experimental Model of Vascular Toxicity in Embryonic Zebrafish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing an Experimental Model of Vascular Toxicity in Embryonic Zebrafish Tamara Tal, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA Background: There are tens of thousands of chemicals that have yet to be fully evaluated for their toxicity by validated in vivo testing ...

  3. A Culturally Responsive Counter-Narrative of Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gist, Conra D.

    2014-01-01

    How do you recognize an effective teacher's sociocultural consciousness? Tamara Wallace's and Brenda Brand's argument that sociocultural consciousness is the "brain" of effective culturally responsive instruction for students of color comes at a time when the system of teacher evaluation is being overhauled nationwide.…

  4. Women and Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons. A Report of the Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar (6th, Washington, D.C., November 16-18, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Leonard G., Ed.; Arneson, Kathaleen C., Ed.

    This publication contains five action papers, as well as reaction to them, from a seminar on women and rehabilitation. The papers consider women both as professionals in the field of rehabilitation and as consumers of rehabilitation services. In the first two papers, Carolyn L. Vash, Martha M. Carrick, and Tamara Bibb explore the employment status…

  5. North & South Elevations and Bridge Plan Chickamauga National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North & South Elevations and Bridge Plan - Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Gordon's Slough Bridge, At the confluence of Alexander's Bridge Road and Gordon's Slough, southeast of Alexander's Bridge, Fort Oglethorpe, Catoosa County, GA

  6. Site Plan and Transverse Section Chickamauga National Military Park ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Site Plan and Transverse Section - Chickamauga National Military Park Tour Roads, Gordon's Slough Bridge, At the confluence of Alexander's Bridge Road and Gordon's Slough, southeast of Alexander's Bridge, Fort Oglethorpe, Catoosa County, GA

  7. Constructivism. Clip and Save.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Provides background information on constructivism. Focuses on Alexander Calder and includes teaching activities. Offers a reproduction of Alexander Calder's work "Flamingo," information on Calder's life and career as an artist, and details of the featured sculpture. (CMK)

  8. Rejoinder to Craig A. Cunningham, David Granger, Jane Fowler Morse, Barbara Stengel, and Terri Wilson, "Dewey, Women, and Weirdoes"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Terry

    2010-01-01

    It is good to see Cunningham et al. including F. Matthias Alexander in their list of positive influences in John Dewey's life. However, I believe Cunningham's essay, "Shared explorations of body-mind: the reciprocal influences of Dewey and F.M. Alexander", falls short in its acknowledgement of Alexander and in one important aspect is incorrect. In…

  9. Antocha crane flies from Taiwan (Diptera: Limoniidae: Limoniinae).

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Young, Chen W

    2015-01-01

    Taiwanese species of the crane fly subgenus Antocha (Antocha) Osten Sacken, 1860, are reviewed. Antocha (Antocha) taiwanensis, new species, is described and figured. Previously known species, Antocha (A.) bifida Alexander, 1924a and Antocha (A.) styx Alexander, 1930 are redescribed and illustrated. Antocha (A.) javanensis Alexander, 1915 is removed from the list of Taiwanese crane flies. Antocha (A.) gracillima Alexander, 1924b and species close to Antocha (A.) streptocera Alexander, 1949 are listed for the first time in Taiwan. Identification key for all Taiwanese Antocha species is given.

  10. Southeastern Alaska tectonostratigraphic terranes revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Brew, D.A.; Ford, A.B.

    1985-04-01

    The presence of only three major tectonostratigraphic terranes (TSTs) in southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia (Chugach, Wrangell, and Alexander) is indicated by critical analysis of available age, stratigraphic, and structural data. A possible fourth TST (Stikine) is probably an equivalent of part or all of the Alexander. The Yakutat block belongs to the Chugach TST, and both are closely linked to the Wrangell and Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs; the Gravina TST is an overlap assemblage. THe Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs is subdivided on the basis of age and facies. The subterranes within it share common substrates and represent large-scale facies changes in a long-lived island-arc environment. The Taku TSTs is the metamorphic equivalent of the upper part (Permian and Upper Triassic) of the Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs with some fossil evidence preserved that indicates the age of protoliths. Similarly, the Tracy Arm TST is the metamorphic equivalent of (1) the lower (Ordovician to Carboniferous) Alexander TST without any such fossil evidence and (2) the upper (Permian to Triassic) Alexander(-Stikine) with some newly discovered fossil evidence. Evidence for the ages of juxtaposition of the TSTs is limited. The Chugach TST deformed against the Wrangell and Alexander TSTs in late Cretaceous. Gravina rocks were deformed at the time and also earlier. The Wrangell TST was stitched to the Alexander(-Stikine) by middle Cretaceous plutons but may have arrived before its Late Jurassic plutons were emplaced. The Alexander(-Stikine) and Cache Creek TSTs were juxtaposed before Late Triassic.

  11. Gender, ethnicity, and career trajectories: a comment on Woodward (2010).

    PubMed

    Cherry, Frances; Unger, Rhoda; Winston, Andrew S

    2012-05-01

    Woodward (2010) argued that Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina, Eugenia Hanfmann, and Tamara Dembo constituted a group of Jewish emigré psychologists who received substantial help in America from a "Jewish network" of patronage. This comment focuses on the historiographic problems and pitfalls of essentialized ethnic identification. There was no evidence that Maria Rickers-Ovsiankina was a Jew or that Eugenia Hanffman, raised Russian Orthodox, identified herself as a Jew, in contrast to Tamara Dembo, who did so. We argue that these women were part of an active network of Gestaltists, topologists, and Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues leaders, and that any help that they received may be explained by the shared theoretical and disciplinary outlook of these groups as opposed to a "Jewish network."

  12. STS-96 Astronauts Adjust Unity Hatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), astronauts Rick D. Husband and Tamara E. Jernigan adjust the hatch for the U.S. built Unity node. The task was part of an overall effort of seven crew members to prepare the existing portion of the International Space Station (ISS). Launched on May 27, 1999, aboard the Orbiter Discovery, the STS-96 mission was the second ISS assembly flight and the first shuttle mission to dock with the station.

  13. STS-40 MS Jernigan, working at SLS-1 Rack 1, examines Pilot Gutierrez's ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Mission Specialist (MS) Tamara E. Jernigan stationed in front of the Spacelab Life Sciences 1 (SLS-1) module Rack 1 workbench examines Pilot Sidney M. Gutierrez's ear. To silence the cries of her patient, Jernigan has secured tape over Gutierrez's mouth. In the background is the SLS-1 module hatch and spacelab (SL) tunnel that lead to Columbia's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102's, crew compartment.

  14. Five new species of Geranomyia Haliday, 1833 (Diptera, Limoniidae) from China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Zehua; Yang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    The following five new species of the genus Geranomyia from China are described and illustrated: G. baisensis sp. nov., G. degenerata sp. nov., G. longispina sp. nov., G. maculata sp. nov. and G. nigra sp. nov.. Three known species, G. apicifasciata (Alexander, 1930), G. radialis (Alexander, 1930) and G. sparsiguttata (Alexander, 1937), are listed with new distribution data. A key to the species of the genus Geranomyia from China is presented. PMID:27615830

  15. Can strain magnetize light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Strain in photonic structures can induce pseudomagnetic fields and Landau levels. Nature Photonics spoke to Mordechai Segev, Mikael Rechtsman, Alexander Szameit and Julia Zeuner about their unique approach.

  16. Expedition 35/36 Crew Departs Star City

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 35 Flight Enginners Chris Cassidy, Pavel Vinogradov and Alexander Misurkin participated in traditional ceremonies at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia outside Mo...

  17. 78 FR 21411 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... Dunavant Cotton Manufacturing Company, 109 E. Fleming Dr., Morganton, 13000227 Haywood County Francis Grist... River Grasslands MPS), Address Restricted, Alexander, 13000233 32MZ422, (Native American Occupation...

  18. 77 FR 18252 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-4980, collman..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: May 23, 2012, 8:30...

  19. 77 FR 48164 - National Institute Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Research and Education; 93.894, Resources and Manpower Development in the Environmental Health Sciences; 93... Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m....

  20. 75 FR 19981 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle... Health Sciences, 615 Davis Dr., KEY615/ 3112, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (919) 541-4980, collman..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: May 13, 2010,...

  1. 76 FR 6146 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Open: February 17, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Agenda..., Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709....

  2. Organizations in Transition. Symposium 41. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on organizations in transition that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "Human Resource Development in an Industry in Transition: The Case of the Russian Banking Sector" (Alexander Ardichvili, Alexander Gasparishvili) reports on a study documenting issues…

  3. 1. COPY OF A LATE 19TH CENTURY BUSINESS CARD FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. COPY OF A LATE 19TH CENTURY BUSINESS CARD FOR A. ALEXANDER & SON FLOURING MILLS. CARD OWNED BY THOMAS R. WILSON. Photographer: Berni Rich, Score Photographers, September 1986. - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. Systems Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christakis, Alexander; Hammond, Debora; Jackson, Michael; Laszlo, Alexander; Mitroff, Ian; Snowden, Dave; Troncale, Len; Carr-Chellman, Alison; Spector, J. Michael; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of systems science were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Alexander Christakis, Debora Hammond, Michael Jackson, Alexander Laszlo, Ian Mitroff, Dave…

  5. Teacher Candidates' Epistemological Beliefs, Dispositions, and Views on Teaching as Persuasion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinatra, Gale M.; Kardash, CarolAnne M.

    2004-01-01

    Alexander and her colleagues proposed "teaching as persuasion" as a guiding metaphor for conceptual change pedagogy (Alexander, Fives, Buehl, & Mulhern, 2002). However, there is reason to suspect that the term persuasion can have negative connotations for some individuals ( Dole & Sinatra, 1999; Murphy, 2001). Therefore, we examined 182 primarily…

  6. Education Law Texts Usage: Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kathleen A.; Zirkel, Perry A.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies the textbooks professors use in education law courses, based on a survey of 110 members of the Education Law Association during 1996-97. Almost half preferred Alexander and Alexander's "American School Law," with McCarthy and Caqmbron-McCabe's "Public School Law" a close second. Only 44% required or suggested additional nontextbook…

  7. New species of subgenus Tipula (Sivatipula) from China, with redescription of T. (S.) parvauricula and a key to all known species of the Oriental Region (Diptera, Tipulidae, Tipula)

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Guo-Xi; Men, Qiu-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Species of Tipula (Sivatipula) biprocessa sp. n. from Guangxi, China is described and illustrated as new in the subgenus Tipula (Sivatipula) Alexander, 1964. Tipula (Sivatipula) parvauricula Alexander, 1941 is redescribed and illustrated based on additional morphological characters. Semen pump of this subgenus is discussed. A key to all described species in this group is compiled. PMID:27047238

  8. Prompting Students to Contemplate Effective Communication with a Visible Speech Chart from the 1870s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this article, director of Educational Outreach at the Library of Congress Lee Ann Potter describes a classroom activity that focuses on an 1876 single-page circular published in Salem, Massachusetts about Alexander Melville Bell's Visible Speech. A. M. Bell's son, Alexander Graham Bell described "Visible Speech" as "a…

  9. Results and Recommendations from the 2009 National Surveys of Randomly Selected and Highly Successful Middle Level Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwin, C. Kenneth; Greene, Melanie W.

    2010-01-01

    While a number of studies have yielded useful information regarding the status of middle level schools in the United States, four linked national surveys provide a longitudinal perspective on the degree of implementation of key middle grades programs and practices. These studies were conducted in 1968 (Alexander, 1968), 1988 (Alexander & McEwin,…

  10. Instructional Strategies to Accommodate a Team-Teaching Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaytan, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The concept of team teaching is attributed to William Alexander, known as the "father of the American middle school," who delivered a presentation at a 1963 conference held at Cornell University. Alexander's main idea was to establish teams of three to five middle school teachers who would be in charge of team teaching content to large groups of…

  11. Vengeance without Justice, Injustice without Retribution: The Afro-American Council's Struggle against Racial Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Shawn Leigh

    2007-01-01

    On January 19, 1901, just one week after Leavenworth, Kansas, witnessed the burning of Fred Alexander, a twenty-two-year-old black Spanish-American war veteran, the "Wichita Searchlight" called for armed self-defense. The brutal murder of Alexander horrified many African Americans throughout the region, who decided that it was time to stand up and…

  12. Author! Author! A Wonderful, Marvelous, So Good, Very Incredible Author: Judith Viorst

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a brief biography of Judith Viorst, best known for her children's picture books and poetry. Viorst's well-known and most unforgettable character Alexander was based on her youngest son. Alexander was featured by name in the title of three of Viorst's picture books. In fact, Viorst often has used her family life to provide…

  13. Community Education: The Making of an Empowering Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Charlie, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Alexander); "Preface" (McConnell); "Editorial Introduction" (McConnell); "People Power" (Gibson); "Community Education within the Context of Reorganisation of Local Government" (Hughes); "The Challenge of Change" (Alexander Report); "Professional Education and Training for Community Education"…

  14. 75 FR 57280 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... Toxicology. Place: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W...: Nat. Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander..., Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Conference Rooms 101 A, B, and C, Research Triangle...

  15. HISTORIA Alexandri Magni: Astronomy, Astrology and Tradition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, M.

    A popular text on the birth, life and death of Alexander the Great is that attributed to Pseudo-Callisthenes. According to this Byzantine text Alexander is the son of the last king of Egypt, the Pharao Nectanebo, who left his country and following Apollo's oracle visited Macedonia. Nectanebo was famous for his astronomical, astrological and magical knowledge which he used to prevent Alexander's birth for some hours until a favoured time comes. In only one manuscript (Paris. gr. 1711, 11th century) of this work there is a unique passage in which astronomical information is given regarding the positions of the Sun, the Moon, and the five planets at the time of Alexander's birth. In this paper I attempt a study of all information related to the astronomical instruments and their use as mentioned in the text as well as of the astronomical information regarding Alexander's birth.

  16. A culturally responsive counter-narrative of effective teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gist, Conra D.

    2014-12-01

    How do you recognize an effective teacher's sociocultural consciousness? Tamara Wallace's and Brenda Brand's argument that sociocultural consciousness is the "brain" of effective culturally responsive instruction for students of color comes at a time when the system of teacher evaluation is being overhauled nationwide. Teacher observation tools are being piloted to develop a common language of effective instruction but often there is little attention given to sociocultural consciousness in these frameworks. This article develops a culturally responsive counter-narrative to explore the complexity of a teacher's racial consciousness during a teaching episode.

  17. STS-96 FD Highlights and Crew Activities Report: Flight Day 09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On this ninth day of the STS-96 Discovery mission, the flight crew, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev are seen as they prepare to depart from the International Space Station. After the undocking of the spacecraft, Husband navigated the spacecraft around the International Space Station. Images of the crew removing centerline cameras, tracking the solar arrays and beautiful panoramic views of the Station above the Earth are seen.

  18. STS-96 Crew Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The training for the crew members of the STS-96 Discovery Shuttle is presented. Crew members are Kent Rominger, Commander; Rick Husband, Pilot; Mission Specialists, Tamara Jernigan, Ellen Ochoa, and Daniel Barry; Julie Payette, Mission Specialist (CSA); and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, Mission Specialist (RSA). Scenes show the crew sitting and talking about the Electrical Power System; actively taking part in virtual training in the EVA Training VR (Virtual Reality) Lab; using the Orbit Space Vision Training System; being dropped in water as a part of the Bail-Out Training Program; and taking part in the crew photo session.

  19. STS-96 FD Highlights and Crew Activities Report: Flight Day 01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On this first day of the STS-96 Discovery mission, the flight crew, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev are seen performing pre-launch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew is readied in the 'white room' for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters.

  20. Official STS-67 preflight crew portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Official STS-67 preflight crew portrait. In front are astronauts (left to right) Stephen S. Oswald, mission commander; Tamara E. Jernigan, payload commander; and William G. Gregory, pilot. In the back are (left to right) Ronald A. Parise, payload specialist; astronauts Wendy B. Lawrence, and John Grunsfeld, both mission specialists; and Samuel T. Durrance, payload specialist. Dr. Durrance is a research scientist in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Parise is a senior scientist in the Space Observatories Department, Computer Sciences Corporation, Silver Spring, Maryland. Both payload specialists flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia for STS-35/ASTRO-1 mission in December 1990.

  1. Period Determination of Asteroid Targets Observed at Hunters Hill Observatory: May 2009 - September 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, David

    2011-01-01

    Lightcurves for 27 asteroids were obtained at the Hunters Hill Observatory (HHO) from 2009 May through 2010 September: 308 Polyxo, 326 Tamara, 369 Aeria, 504 Cora, 822 Lalage, 1164 Kobolda, 1619 Ueta, 1625 The NORC, 1685 Toro, 2189 Zaragoza, 2287 Kalmykia, 2639 Planman, 3695 Fiaia, 4786 Tatianina, 5333 Kanaya, (5452) 1937 NN, 6170 Levasseur, 7741 Fedoseev, 14815 Rutberg, 15724 Zille, 16525 Shumarinaiko, (21996) 1993 XP31, (29729) 1999 BY1, (35404) 1997 YV5, (39087) 2000 VN50, (66146) 1998 TU3, and (101769) 1999 FF52.

  2. People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    INTERVIEW Lightning strikes in Boston Michael Alexander, the director of public programs at the Boston Museum of Science, talks to David Smith about how to deal with issues and subjects that are difficult to present using more traditional museum methods.

  3. Nineteenth-Century Psychology and the Teaching of Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, William F.

    1985-01-01

    Explores some features of early psychology that are implicit in early methods of writing instruction. Includes varieties of early psychology, the Scottish Commonsense philosophy, Alexander Bain's associationist psychology, William James's functionalist psychology, and composition teaching after 1900. (HTH)

  4. 3. COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE CATARACT MILLS, NEWBURGH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE CATARACT MILLS, NEWBURGH, OHIO. Date unknown. Photographer: Berni Rich, Score Photographers, September 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. Expedition 27 Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA astronaut Ron Garan and Russian cosmonauts Andrey Borisenko and Alexander Samokutyaev launch in their Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on April 4, 2011 (April...

  6. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 10, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 10, 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION (Copied from student's drawing, Dept. of Architecture, Armour Institute of Technology. Chicago) - Keating House, U.S. Highway 430, Fayville, Alexander County, IL

  7. Mission, Science, and Race in South Africa; AW Roberts of Lovedale 1883-1938

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I.S.

    2016-02-01

    Book Review: Biography of Alexander William Roberts. Noted educator, variable star observer and politician who represented South African "natives" in the parliament of the Union of South Africa at a time when they had no other representation.

  8. 77 FR 5308 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... CARDONA SUSAN CERRONE GABRIEL M CHAN VIVIENNE W CHANG PAMELA Y CHANG RAYMOND S CHANTRE ALEXANDER......... ECKES CHATEAU BEATRICE CHENG NICOLE MIU YEE CHENG RAYMOND SHU SHING CHIU MAN KEI ELAINE CHIU MICHAEL...

  9. What Is Ethics in Research and Why Is It Important?

    MedlinePlus

    ... finite amount of time. Promoting Ethical Conduct in Science M ost academic institutions in the US require ... Services USA.gov National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences 111 T.W. Alexander Drive Research Triangle Park, ...

  10. Curriculum and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    Paper presented at the Summer Meeting of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf held in Philadelphia, June 24-27, 1970. Discussed are concepts of curriculum development, cognitive development, and educational methods with implications for the handicapped. (CB)

  11. Communist purges of Soviet Academy of Sciences members and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomilin, Konstantin A.

    The author is investigating the corelation between the intansity of Communsit purges under Members of the Academy of Sciences of USSR and Solar Activity, based on previous researches by Alexander Leonidovich Chizhevskij (1897-1964).

  12. 79. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, ca. 1890, #741.) ALEXANDER RAMSEY HOUSE, ca. 1890 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  13. Listen to Data: Video 3 Ulysses

    NASA Video Gallery

    This clip contains audified data from the joint European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA Ulysses satellite gathered on October 26, 1995. The participant in Alexander's study was able to detect artifici...

  14. Pollen

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common grasses that can cause allergies are: Bermuda grass Johnson grass Kentucky bluegrass Orchard grass Sweet ... Health Sciences 111 T.W. Alexander Drive Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27709 Last Reviewed: July 14, ...

  15. New Expedition 27 Trio Docks to Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The International Space Station welcomed three new flight engineers when they docked Wednesday April 6, 2011 at 7:09 p.m. EDT in the Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft. Flight Engineers Ron Garan, Alexander S...

  16. Ten Years of ODAS in Retrospect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Arthur B.

    1974-01-01

    Reviewed are growth, activities, and changes of the Oral Deaf Adults Section (ODAS) of the Alexander Graham Bell Association since its establishment in 1964 to aid adjustment of the deaf to society. (MC)

  17. Research on Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Collette

    1970-01-01

    Paper presented at the Summer Meeting of the Alexander Graham Bell Association (Philadelphia, June 24-27, 1970) in which the author reviews the research supported by The Deafness Research Foundation. (RD)

  18. 11. View underside of draw span, with fender in foreground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View underside of draw span, with fender in foreground and concrete deck spans and pile visible at rear, looking northeast - Colonel Alexander Scammell Memorial Bridge, Spanning Bellamy River at U.S. Route 4, Dover, Strafford County, NH

  19. Electrocautery Superior to Topical Treatments for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulrike Wieland, MD, of the University of Cologne, Germany, and Alexander Kreuter, MD, of HELIOS St. Elisabeth Klinik in Oberhausen, Germany, in an accompanying editorial . Based on the trial’s ...

  20. PREFACE: Conference Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    ORGANISING COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov - Chairman, Kiril Blagoev - Vice-Chairman, Margarita Grozeva - Scientific secretary, Kostadinka Gesheva, Anna Szekeres, Hassan Chamati, Diana Nesheva, Peter Rafailov, Yordan Marinov, Emilia Dimova, Tatyana Ivanova, Radostina Kamburova, Ekaterina Iordanova, Julia Genova, Alexander Donkov, Emilia Vlaikova SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov, Bulgaria; Nikola Sabotinov, Bulgaria; Kiril Blagoev, Bulgaria; Nicholay Tonchev, Bulgaria; Hassan Chamati, Bulgaria; Marin Gospodinov, Bulgaria; Peter Rafailov, Bulgaria; Emil Vlakhov, Bulgaria; Kostadinka Gesheva, Bulgaria; Anna Szekeres, Bulgaria; Diana Nesheva, Bulgaria; Albena Paskaleva, Bulgaria; Tatyana Ivanova, Bulgaria; Alexander Dreischuh, Bulgaria; Evgenia Valcheva, Bulgaria; Miglena Nikolaeva-Dimitrova, Bulgaria; Sanka Gateva, Bulgaria; Frank Hamelmann, Germany; Nicola Scaramuzza, Italy; G.M.W. Kroesen, Netherlands; Jan van Dijk Netherlands; Andrzej Szewczyk, Poland; Henryk Szymczak, Poland; Krzistof Rogacki, Poland; Ion Mihailescu, Romania; Claes-Goran Granqvist, Sweden; Mikael Jonsson, Sweden; Andrew Livingston, UK; Ludmila Peeva, UK

  1. Expedition 28 Crew Lands Safely

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 28 Commander Andrey Borisenko and Flight Engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Ron Garan land their Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft in Kazakhstan. Russian recovery teams were on hand to help the c...

  2. 78 FR 39342 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... receipt and availability of this application was previously published in the Federal Register (78 FR 29390... Commission. Alexander Adams, Jr., Chief, Research and Test Reactors Licensing Branch, Division of Policy...

  3. 78 FR 73897 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... of Production and Utilization Facilities,'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 29390) on May 20, 2013. On... Commission. Alexander Adams, Jr., Chief, Research and Test Reactors Licensing Branch, Division of Policy...

  4. Arbitration in partner disputes.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R

    1989-09-22

    Partnership disputes are not uncommon. Settlement in the courts is expensive and may bring unwelcome publicity. Dr Alexander has acted as arbitrator between GPs and commends arbitration as a cheaper, more private, alternative.

  5. 21. CLOSEUP VIEW OF THE HEADGATES, FOLLOWING TEMPORARY DRAINING OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF THE HEADGATES, FOLLOWING TEMPORARY DRAINING OF THE CANAL IN JULY 1986. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. Psychology in the Service of Education--The Work of A. R. Luria, 1902-77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Joan

    1986-01-01

    This article covers both the life and the work of Alexander Luria, the Soviet psychologist, and constitutes a comprehensive introduction to the subject. A substantial bibliography of Luria's publications in English is included in the article. (CT)

  7. 14. AERIAL VIEW OF POOL AND STRUCTURES Photocopy of photocopy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. AERIAL VIEW OF POOL AND STRUCTURES Photocopy of photocopy of 1931 rendering by Alexander, Becker and Schoeppe, architects and engineers - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

  8. Hearing or speech impairment - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - hearing or speech impairment ... The following organizations are good resources for information on hearing impairment or speech impairment: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing -- www.agbell. ...

  9. Special Issue: The AWIRS and Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooden, Mark; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "AWIRS (Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey) and Productivity" (Wooden); "Workplace Productivity and Joint Consultation" (Alexander, Green); "Impact of Unions on Workplace Productivity in Australia" (Crockett et al.); and "AWIRS and Workplace Performance" (Drago, Wooden). (SK)

  10. Genetics Home Reference: deafness and myopia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorder KidsHealth: Your Child's Vision Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center MalaCards: deafness and myopia My Baby's ... 5 links) Alexander Graham Bell Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing March of Dimes: Hearing ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines

    MedlinePlus

    ... 7 links) Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing: Types of Hearing Loss American Heart Association American Society for Deaf Children Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation National Organization for Rare ...

  12. 78 FR 59042 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... and projects conducted by the NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES, including... Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research...

  13. 77 FR 61771 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee. Date: November 15... Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander...

  14. 77 FR 26300 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... and projects conducted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, including.... Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Building 101, Rodbell Auditorium, 111 T. W. Alexander...

  15. 33 CFR 159.303 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... more passengers operating in the waters of the Alexander Archipelago and the navigable waters of the United States within the State of Alaska and within the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve....

  16. 33 CFR 159.303 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... more passengers operating in the waters of the Alexander Archipelago and the navigable waters of the United States within the State of Alaska and within the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve....

  17. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Oct. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer. Oct. 1937. (d) Ext- Detail of Entrance (East) Front. - Colonel Alexander Field House, 280 Longmeadow Street, Longmeadow, Hampden County, MA

  18. 75 FR 26845 - Unblocking of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons Pursuant to Executive Order 12978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...) (``IEEPA''), issued Executive Order 12978 (60 FR 54579, October 24, 1995) (the ``Order''). In the Order... pursuant to the Order: 1. RIOS LOZANO, Alexander, Carrera 42 No. 5B-81, Cali, Colombia; Carrera 8N No....

  19. An A. S. Neill/Summerhill Chronology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthias, William

    1980-01-01

    This chronology of the life of Alexander Sutherland Neill, headmaster of Summerhill School, details each year of his life from 1883 to 1973. The author of 21 books, Neill did not espouse a return to "basics" in education. (JN)

  20. Next Station Crew in Kazakhstan for Soyuz Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 35/36 Soyuz Commander Pavel Vinogradov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, NASA Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy and Russian Flight Engineer Alexander Misurkin arrive at the Baikonur Cosmo...

  1. Celebrate Picasso!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Gives instructions for student art projects inspired by the work of five famous artists: Pablo Picasso, Alexander Calder, Henri Matisse, Jackson Pollock, and Michelangelo. Directions for making art smocks and a display kiosk are also included. (ME)

  2. Correction: The impact of doping rates on the morphologies of silver and gold nanowires grown in helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp; Knez, Daniel; Hauser, Andreas W; Steurer, Johannes; Grogger, Werner; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2016-01-28

    Correction for 'The impact of doping rates on the morphologies of silver and gold nanowires grown in helium nanodroplets' by Alexander Volk et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp06248a. PMID:26728840

  3. 76 FR 67434 - Combined Notice of Filings #3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    .... Description: Southwest Power Pool, Inc. submits tariff filing per 35.13(a)(2)(iii): 2261 Alexander Wind Farm..., November 14, 2011. Docket Numbers: ER12-183-000. Applicants: Georgia Power Company. Description:...

  4. 76 FR 66043 - Membership of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration's Performance Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    .... Vincent, Associate Administrator for Telecom Sciences and Director Institute for Telecom Sciences, Career..., ITA, Career SES. Department of Commerce, National Telecommunications and Information Administration Fiona M. Alexander, Associate Administrator, Office of International Affairs, Career SES, (New...

  5. An In Vivo Pharmacological Screen Identifies Cholinergic Signaling as a Therapeutic Target in Glial-Based Nervous System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L.; Messing, Albee

    2016-01-01

    The role that glia play in neurological disease is poorly understood but increasingly acknowledged to be critical in a diverse group of disorders. Here we use a simple genetic model of Alexander disease, a progressive and severe human degenerative nervous system disease caused by a primary astroglial abnormality, to perform an in vivo screen of 1987 compounds, including many FDA-approved drugs and natural products. We identify four compounds capable of dose-dependent inhibition of nervous system toxicity. Focusing on one of these hits, glycopyrrolate, we confirm the role for muscarinic cholinergic signaling in pathogenesis using additional pharmacologic reagents and genetic approaches. We further demonstrate that muscarinic cholinergic signaling works through downstream Gαq to control oxidative stress and death of neurons and glia. Importantly, we document increased muscarinic cholinergic receptor expression in Alexander disease model mice and in postmortem brain tissue from Alexander disease patients, and that blocking muscarinic receptors in Alexander disease model mice reduces oxidative stress, emphasizing the translational significance of our findings. We have therefore identified glial muscarinic signaling as a potential therapeutic target in Alexander disease, and possibly in other gliopathic disorders as well. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the urgent need for better treatments for neurological diseases, drug development for these devastating disorders has been challenging. The effectiveness of traditional large-scale in vitro screens may be limited by the lack of the appropriate molecular, cellular, and structural environment. Using a simple Drosophila model of Alexander disease, we performed a moderate throughput chemical screen of FDA-approved drugs and natural compounds, and found that reducing muscarinic cholinergic signaling ameliorated clinical symptoms and oxidative stress in Alexander disease model flies and mice. Our work demonstrates that small

  6. STS-96 Crew Training, Mission Animation, Crew Interviews, STARSHINE, Discovery Rollout and Repair of Hail Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage shows the crewmembers of STS-96, Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa, Tamara E. Jernigan, Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev during various training activities. Scenes include astronaut suit-up, EVA training in the Virtual Reality Lab, Orbiter space vision training, bailout training, and crew photo session. Footage also shows individual crew interviews, repair activities to the external fuel tank, and Discovery's return to the launch pad. The engineers are seen sanding, bending, and painting the foam used in repairing the tank. An animation of the deployment of the STARSHINE satellite, International Space Station, and the STS-96 Mission is presented. Footage shows the students from Edgar Allen Poe Middle School sanding, polishing, and inspecting the mirrors for the STARSHINE satellite. Live footage also includes students from St. Michael the Archangel School wearing bunny suits and entering the clean room at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  7. STS-67 mission highlights resource tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Chuck

    1995-05-01

    The Space Shuttle Mission, STS-67, is highlighted in this video. Flight crew (Stephen S. Oswald (Commander), William G. Gregory (Pilot), Tamara E. Jernigan, Wendy B. Lawrence, John M. Grunfeld (Mission Specialists), Samuel T. Durrance, and Ronald A. Parise (Payload Specialists)) prelaunch and launch activities, EVA activities with payload deployment and retrieval (ASTRO-2 and WUPPE (Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo Polarimeter Experiment)), spaceborne experiments (astronomical observation and data collection, protein crystal growth, and human physiological processes), and pre-reentry activities are shown. There are astronomical telescopic observation from the two telescopes in the payload, the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope and the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, of Io and of globular clusters, and their emission spectra is collected via a spectrometer. Earth view film and photography is shown, which includes lightning on terrestrial surfaces, cyclone activity, and cloud cover.

  8. STS-96 M.S. Payette and Pilot Husband try on gas masks as part of a TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 39B, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Pilot Rick Douglas Husband practice putting on oxygen gas masks as part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress traiing, simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. Scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., STS- 96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- led experiment.

  9. STS-96 M.S. Tokarev tries gas mask as part of a TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency, tries on an oxygen gas mask during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39B. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Other crew members taking part in the TCDT are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.) and Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency. Scheduled for liftoff on May 20 at 9:32 a.m., STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

  10. STS-80 CREW ANSWERS PRESS QUESTIONS AT PAD 39B DURING TERMINAL COUNTDOWN DEMONSTRATION TEST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-80 crew members participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch, talk to press representatives (off camera) and answer their questions at Launch Pad 39B. From left, are Mission Specialists Thomas D. Jones and Tamara E. Jernigan, Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell (with microphone), Pilot Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialist Story Musgrave. The STS-80 mission, the seventh and final Shuttle flight of 1996, will feature two spacewalks and the deployment, operation and retrieval of two scientific satellites, the Orbiting Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer- Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (ORFEUS-SPAS-2) and the Wake Shield Facility-3 (WSF-3). The mission will be conducted aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia.

  11. STS-67 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Chuck (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Mission, STS-67, is highlighted in this video. Flight crew (Stephen S. Oswald (Commander), William G. Gregory (Pilot), Tamara E. Jernigan, Wendy B. Lawrence, John M. Grunfeld (Mission Specialists), Samuel T. Durrance, and Ronald A. Parise (Payload Specialists)) prelaunch and launch activities, EVA activities with payload deployment and retrieval (ASTRO-2 and WUPPE (Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo Polarimeter Experiment)), spaceborne experiments (astronomical observation and data collection, protein crystal growth, and human physiological processes), and pre-reentry activities are shown. There are astronomical telescopic observation from the two telescopes in the payload, the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope and the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, of Io and of globular clusters, and their emission spectra is collected via a spectrometer. Earth view film and photography is shown, which includes lightning on terrestrial surfaces, cyclone activity, and cloud cover.

  12. STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-96 Commander Kent V. Rominger, holding his daughter, Kristen, exits the bus at the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip before boarding a plane for a return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Other crew members also returning are Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. After a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, the STS-96 crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC.

  13. STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    (Left to right) STS-96 Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.) and Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, leave the bus at the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip where they will board a plane to return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Other crew members also returning are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. After a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, the crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC.

  14. STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-96 Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), holding her son, Wilson Miles-Ochoa , leaves the bus at the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip. The STS-96 crew members are preparing to return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, after a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. The crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC. Other crew members also returning are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Tamara Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), Julie Payette (with the Canadian Space Agency) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (with the Russian Space Agency).

  15. STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, who is with the Canadian Space Agency, heads for a plane at the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip for her return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Other crew members also returning are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, with the Russian Space Agency. After a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, the STS-96 crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC.

  16. STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-96 crew members and their families exit the bus at the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip to return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. From left are Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (with the Russian Space Agency) and his wife, Irina; Sue Barry and Jennifer Barry, the wife and daughter, respectively, of Mission Specialist Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) (background); (foreground) Andrew Barry, son of Daniel; Pilot Rick D. Husband and his wife, Evelyn; and Ivan Tokarev, son of Valery. Other crew members also returning are Commander Kent V. Rominger and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), and Julie Payette (with the Canadian Space Agency). After a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, the crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC.

  17. STS-96 crew at Skid Strip to return to Houston

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Cape Canaveral Air Station Skid Strip, STS-96 crew members and their families board a plane to return to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. From left are the son, Ivan, and wife, Irina, of Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (carrying a duffel bag); and Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa, holding her son, Wilson Miles-Ochoa. Other crew members also returning are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick D. Husband, and Mission Specialists Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.) and Julie Payette (with the Canadian Space Agency). After a successful 10-day mission to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Discovery, the crew landed June 6 at 2:02:43 a.m. EDT, in the 11th night landing at KSC.

  18. STS-96 Crew Interview: Dan Barry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Daniel T. Barry is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Barry became an astronaut, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the logistics and supply mission, why it is important to send equipment to the International Space Station (ISS), and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC). Barry mentions Discovery's anticipated docking with the ISS, his scheduled space walk with Tamara E. Jernigan, plans for the supply and equipment transfers, and his responsibility during this transfer. A fly-around maneuver to take pictures of the ISS, and the deployment of the Student Tracked Atmospheric Research Satellite for Heuristic International Networking Equipment (STARSHINE) are also discussed.

  19. STS-96 Crew Interview: Ellen Ochoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Ochoa became an astronaut, the events that led to her interest, and her career path through research and engineering. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the logistics and supply mission, why it is important to send equipment to the International Space Station (ISS), and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC). Ochoa mentions Discovery's anticipated docking with the ISS, her role during the scheduled space walk with Tamara E. Jernigan and Daniel T. Barry, and plans for the supply and equipment transfers. Ochoa also discusses her involvement in a Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA) experiment to remove contaminants from the water, the undocking of the spacecraft from the ISS, and a fly-around maneuver to take pictures of the ISS.

  20. Fluoro-Jade: new fluorescent marker of Rosenthal fibers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenji F; Ochi, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Eiji; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro

    2006-10-23

    Rosenthal fibers are homogeneous eosinophilic masses found in astrocytes that are composed of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) aggregates along with chaperone proteins and other unknown components. Rosenthal fiber formation is a pathological hallmark of Alexander disease and its detection is diagnostically significant. However, the lack of a specific fluorescent marker has greatly limited the histochemical characterization of Rosenthal fibers. Here, we report for the first time a fluorescent marker of Rosenthal fibers called Fluoro Jade. Fluoro Jade-positive masses were seen in samples of Alexander disease brain, pilocytic astrocytoma, and in brain tissue from a mouse model of Alexander disease. Fluoro Jade co-labeled tissue samples stained with GFAP immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that Fluoro Jade labeled Rosenthal fibers, and that Rosenthal fibers could be labeled with antibodies of interest in combination with Fluoro Jade staining.

  1. International Program and Local Organizing Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    International Program Committee Dionisio Bermejo (Spain) Roman Ciurylo (Poland) Elisabeth Dalimier (France) Alexander Devdariani (Russia) Milan S Dimitrijevic (Serbia) Robert Gamache (USA) Marco A Gigosos (Spain) Motoshi Goto (Japan) Magnus Gustafsson (Sweden) Jean-Michel Hartmann (France) Carlos Iglesias (USA) John Kielkopf (USA) John C Lewis (Canada) Valery Lisitsa (Russia) Eugene Oks (USA) Christian G Parigger (USA) Gillian Peach (UK) Adriana Predoi-Cross (Canada) Roland Stamm (Germany) Local Organizing Committee Nikolay G Skvortsov (Chair, St Petersburg State University) Evgenii B Aleksandrov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St Petersburg) Vadim A Alekseev (Scientific Secretary, St Petersburg State University) Sergey F Boureiko (St.Petersburg State University) Yury N Gnedin (Pulkovo Observatory, St Petersburg) Alexander Z Devdariani (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Alexander P Kouzov (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Nikolay A Timofeev (St Petersburg State University)

  2. Water chemistry and biological sampling program in support of a watershed liming pilot study in western Maryland. Year 3 (1992-1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.P.; Gates, D.M.

    1993-11-01

    To test the efficiency of watershed liming in western Maryland to mitigate acidification, Alexander Run (a small, first-order Garrett County stream draining into the North Branch of the Casselman River) was selected. The effect of limestone application on water chemistry and the macroinvertebrate and fish community of Alexander Run was monitored from 1990. Pelletized limestone was applied to the watershed between 21 - 23 October 1991. Biological data collected from Little Bear Creek (macroinvertebrate and fishes), an unnamed tributary to Herrington Creek (macroinvertebrates), and Big Run (fishes) were employed to assess changes in stream biota in two Alexander Run stations (upper and lower). The objective of year three (1992-1993) was to continue post-liming monitoring through July 1993 in order to assess long-term effectiveness of watershed liming.

  3. Ambiguity and the image of the king.

    PubMed

    Mack, R T

    1994-01-01

    The following essay explores problems posed by a recently-published fresco (dated to the first century AD) that depicts Alexander the Great standing opposite an unknown female figure. The fresco is unusual in its use of conventional or codified figure types, in particular a widely-found statue type known as the "Alexander with the Lance," and for its placement of Alexander in anecdotal relation with a woman. While discussions of the picture thus far have tried to identify the scene depicted (by reference to histories of Alexander's life), the following analysis takes the difficulty of doing so itself as a motivated aspect of the image. I argue that the fresco's mode of representation is to bring together figure types whose conventional fields of meaning are in conflict with one another, and then to highlight this conflict in order to comment upon the fields (or figure types) themselves. In this case, the fresco's ambiguity in signification (the undecidability of its reference) enables a highly strategic critique of the "Alexander with the Lance" because the latter, as a prototypical "image of the king," depends upon the necessary and transparent extension of its signs. By virtue of the anecdotal relation between "Alexander" and the depicted female figure (an Aphrodite type) the fresco's critique reveals the close association between the claims for representation made by the image of the king and the patriarchal structures of power they seek to instantiate. The fresco thus offers remarkably direct data for understanding the intersection of representation and gender in the early Roman empire. I suggest in conclusion that because the image seems also to posit a specifically gendered (male) gaze, its critique is extended to the spectator and thereby provides data for understanding the intersection of the practice of representation (here, viewing) and gender.

  4. Introduction: Information and Musings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.

    The following sections are included: * Victor Frenkel * Background * The Accused * Alexander Leipunsky * Alexander Weissberg * Holodomor * The beginning of the Great Purge * Other foreigners at UPTI * The Ruhemanns * Tisza * Lange * Weisselberg * A detective story * Stalin's order * Yuri Raniuk * Giovanna Fjelstad * Giovanna's story * First time in the USSR * Fisl's humor * Houtermans and Pomeranchuk * Choices to make * Closing gaps * Houtermans and the Communist Party of Germany * Houtermans and von Ardenne * Houtermans' trip to Russia in 1941 * Why Houtermans had to flee from Berlin in 1945 * Houtermans in Göttingen in the 1940's * Denazification * Moving to Bern * Yuri Golfand, the discoverer of supersymmetry * Bolotovsky's and Eskin's essays * Moisei Koretz * FIAN * Additional recommended literature * References

  5. The Macedonian Calendar outside Macedonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, E.; Danezis, E.; Grammenos, Th.; Stathopoulou, M.

    The Macedonian calendar was the most widespread among the luni?solar Greek calendars, because Alexander the Great imposed the Macedonian Calendar on his conquests. As a result, it reached a number of big cities in Asia and Egypt as well and managed to survive among the local calendars for centuries after Alexander. Due to the intermeddling with the local calendars, the month correspondence has not been accurate in the use of the calendar outside Macedonia. In our paper we give the month correspondence of the Macedonian calendar with Egyptian and Babylonian ones and its course in the pass of the centuries.

  6. Putting the Teaching of American History and Civics Back in the Classroom. Hearing of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate. One Hundred Eighth Congress, First Session on Examining S. 504, To Establish Academies for Teachers and Students of American History and Civics and a National Alliance of Teachers of American History and Civics (April 10, 2003).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

    Statements by the following individuals were given at this hearing and are presented in this document: Hon. Lamar Alexander; David McCullough; Hon. Robert Byrd; Bruce Cole; Eugene W. Hickok; James H. Billington; Diane Ravitch; Hon. Christopher J. Dodd; and Russell Berg accompanied by Peter Sullivan and Blanche Deaderick. Additional material…

  7. Attracting and Compensating America's Teachers. Eighth Annual Yearbook of the American Education Finance Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern, Ed.; Monk, David H., Ed.

    Focusing on the classroom teacher as the key component in the educational process, this yearbook reviews recent school reform upheavals and their effects on teacher compensation, availability and quality of teachers, teacher retirement systems and related issues. After introductory observations on teachers' economic subsidies by Kern Alexander,…

  8. The war of the mushrooms: A Russian folktale revisited

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are numerous versions of a Russian folktale, War of the Mushrooms. The tale is indexed in standard folkloristic references as tale type 297B. Unfortunately, it is not included in the best known collection of Russian folktales translated into English, that of Alexander Afanesiev. It was first r...

  9. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin Crystals grown on Earth and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The major storage protein of leguminous plants and a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. It is studied in efforts to enhance nutritional value of proteins through protein engineerings. It is isolated from Jack Bean because of it's potential as a nutritional substance. Principal Investigator was Alexander McPherson.

  10. Murder with Radioactive Polonium Metal.

    PubMed

    Kato, T A; Wozniak, D E

    2014-07-01

    The physical and biological aspects of polonium-210, one of the most hazardous radioisotopes, are summarized. Although this radioisotope is naturally occurring and rare, it received quite a bit of attention after it was used in the 2006 assassination of former Russian Intelligence member Alexander Litvinenko in London. Recent reports on the suspected murder of Yasser Arafat with polonium-210 are also discussed.

  11. Heteroscedastic Tests Statistics for One-Way Analysis of Variance: The Trimmed Means and Hall's Transformation Conjunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luh, Wei-Ming; Guo, Jiin-Huarng

    2005-01-01

    To deal with nonnormal and heterogeneous data for the one-way fixed effect analysis of variance model, the authors adopted a trimmed means method in conjunction with Hall's invertible transformation into a heteroscedastic test statistic (Alexander-Govern test or Welch test). The results of simulation experiments showed that the proposed technique…

  12. 76 FR 82219 - Regional Haze: Revisions to Provisions Governing Alternatives to Source-Specific Best Available...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... Agency, 1st Floor, Building C, Room C111C, 109 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709... Interstate Transport of Fine Particulate Matter and Ozone, 76 FR 48208 (August 8, 2011). \\2\\ See Rule to... to Acid Rain Program; Revisions to the NO X SIP Call; Final Rule, 70 FR 25162 (May 12, 2005)....

  13. 11. VIEW OF HORIZONTAL MIXER (GedgeGray Co., Lockland, Ohio), LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF HORIZONTAL MIXER (Gedge-Gray Co., Lockland, Ohio), LOCATED IN THE BASEMENT, MIXED ANIMAL FEED TO ORDER. THE WATER-POWERED MIXER WAS SUPERSEDED BY TWO ELECTRIC-POWERED VERTICAL MIXERS, ADDED IN THE 1940S. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. A Standardised Method for Investigating Learning in Music Therapy. Occasional Paper Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, Dianne; Athanasou, James A.

    This paper outlines a method for professional assessment of music therapy students' learning and recall. The purpose of the assessment is to examine the Model of Domain Learning (P. Alexander, 1997) within an Australian context and to provide a professional assessment for application within music therapy education. Despite the music therapy…

  15. Current Issues in Chinese Higher Education. Education and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    The papers in this collection discuss the challenges and opportunities inherent in the fundamental reforms under way in the higher education sector in China. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction: Changing Patterns in University Management" (Thomas J. Alexander); (2) "What Is Facing Chinese Higher Education in the New Century?" (Gu Mingyuan); (3)…

  16. The Future of Soviet-American Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulam, Adam B.: And Others

    1981-01-01

    Presents a wide spectrum of views by scholars of Soviet Affairs regarding recent American policy and predictions for the future course of international relations between the two super powers. Experts are Adam B. Ulam (Harvard University), Robert F. Byrnes (Indiana University), Stephen F. Cohen (Princeton University), Alexander Yanov (University of…

  17. Making the Connection: Coordinating Education and Training for a Skilled Workforce. A Report on the Proceedings of the National Conference for State Leaders (Washington, D.C., July 8-10, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

    The following presentations are included in this document: "A Nation of Students" (Lamar Alexander); "Businesses Are Clamoring for Skilled Workers" (Betsy Brand); "We Need to Be Partners in Reality" (Roberts Jones); "The Value of a Working Parent as a Role Model" (JoAnne Barnhart); "Human Capital Is America's Most Natural and Vital Resource"…

  18. Re-Reading Ong: Literacy and Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniell, Beth

    In composition studies, the most influential statement of what Brian Street calls the autonomous model of literacy is the work of Walter Ong. Ong bases the foundation of this model on the research on cognitive development done by Alexander Luria, a student of Lev Vygotsky. Ong finds in this research, carried out among the Islamic people of…

  19. Not for Ourselves Alone: The Legacies of Two Pioneers of Black Higher Educational Institutions in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Hakim Jabez

    2010-01-01

    For over 200 years Black colleges and universities have been at the center of the African American community. The legacy of these institutions has been to equip African Americans with the skills needed to be successful leaders. The study considers the leadership of Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne of the Wilberforce University and Rev. Dr. Joseph…

  20. Why/How Does Classics Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartledge, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Classics is in the news--or on the screen: "Gladiator" a few years ago, "Troy" very recently, "Alexander" as I write. How significant is this current Hollywood fascination with the ancient Greeks and Romans? Or should we take far more seriously the decline of the teaching of the Classical languages in schools, a decline so grave as to prompt a…

  1. Kokes Awards for the 21st NAM Meeting (San Francisco, CA, 2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Alex

    2009-08-31

    The PI in this project Alexander Katz, UC Berkeley (askatz@berkeley.edu), in conjunction with the Kokes Awards subcommittee and conference organizing committee, used DOE grant DE-FG-02-08ER15993 to partially offset costs of attending the 21st North American Catalysis Society in San Francisco, California, for 30 graduate students from the United States

  2. The Growth of Education Revenues from 1998-2006: An Update on What Accounts for Differences among States and the District of Columbia in the Context of Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Nicola A.

    2012-01-01

    This article is an update of a previous study by the author which examined the growth of elementary and public school revenues for school years 1982-1983 through 1991-1992 (Alexander 1997). Using the same framework, this study provides an analysis of the factors accounting for changes in real per-pupil revenues across the 50 states and the…

  3. Why Did the Founding Fathers Write the Constitution of the United States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan

    1987-01-01

    Presents a mock dialogue among Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and Abigail Adams that questions whether the Founding Fathers wrote the U.S. Constitution as defenders of hard-won liberty or as self-serving aristocrats whose sole interest was in preserving their own economic and political positions. (BSR)

  4. Teaching about George Washington. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vontz, Thomas S.; Nixon, William A.

    No generation in U.S. history has matched that of the founding era for its array of talented and influential political thinkers and actors. These individuals (such as George Washington, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison) possessed traits of character and intellect that significantly shaped the…

  5. Information Dashboards

    SciTech Connect

    Shutkin, Amy; Shutkin, Amy; Shutkin, Amy

    2008-04-11

    "A dashboard is a visual interface that provides at-a-glance views into key measures relevant to a particular objective or business process." Key Attributes: Graphical to focus attention on key trends, comparisons and exceptions, Display only relevant data, Inherently contain predefined conclusions. Note: Collecting user requirements is KEYfrom'Excel 2007 Dashboards& Reports for Dummies' by Michael Alexander

  6. When Everything New Is Well-Forgotten Old: Vygotsky/Luria Insights in the Development of Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodrova, Elena; Leong, Deborah J.; Akhutina, Tatiana V.

    2011-01-01

    The concept of "extra-cortical organization of higher mental functions" proposed by Lev Vygotsky and expanded by Alexander Luria extends cultural-historical psychology regarding the interplay of natural and cultural factors in the development of the human mind. Using the example of self-regulation, the authors explore the evolution of this idea…

  7. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 2001: Numbers 23-45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document consists of articles 23-45 published in the electronic journal "Education Policy Analysis Archives" for the year 2001: (23) "La Participacion de las Minorias Nacionales dentro de Sistemas Educativas Pre-Modernos: El Caso de los Garifunas de Guatemala" (Carlos R. Ruano); (24) "'Alexander v. Sandoval': A Setback for Civil Rights"…

  8. Studies in Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Leah P., Ed.

    The 30 papers presented at Wake Forest University's 1997 Annual Research Forum (Winston-Salem, North Carolina) are as follows: "To Sprint or Crawl: The Effect of Classroom Activities on Student Behavior: (R. Allen); "Generating Good Grammar: Traditional and Whole Language Approaches" (D. Alexander); "Effective Teaching Methodologies for ESL…

  9. STS-79 Commander William Readdy in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-79 Commander William F. Readdy gets ready to climb into the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A. Assisting him are white room closeout crew members Travis Thompson (from left), Jean Alexander and Jim Davis.

  10. 78 FR 45188 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Protection Agency, T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; telephone number: (919) 541-2363...., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number for the Reading Room is 202-566... information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (iii) enhance the...

  11. A Functional Model for the Treatment of Primary Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sam; Book, Robert

    1983-01-01

    The present model, based upon Alexander and Barton's two-phase model for family therapy, was developed to provide the practicing school psychologist with an efficient, manageable program maximizing successful outcome. The program enables psychologists to adapt primary enuresis intervention strategies to suit their styles and the individual needs…

  12. Deweyan Prophetic Pragmatism, Poetry, and the Education of Eros.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the education of Eros and the allied powers of poetry and prophecy, and argues that poetic creativity and the capacity to prophesy students' best possibilities should be recognized as essential teaching competencies. The author identifies the theme of Eros and education in the work of John Dewey and explores Thomas Alexander's idea of…

  13. Qualitative Studies in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "What Is It Like To Be an Independent HRD Consultant?" (Alexander Ardishvili), reports on a phenomenological study that investigated the experience of being an independent HRD (human resource development) consultant through interviews with 10 successful HRD consultants. The study identified eight…

  14. Child Development Theory as a Mediator of Novice Teachers' Ethnotheories to Increase Learning and Justice in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardwell, Nancy Michele

    2014-01-01

    Many urban public schools use teaching methods that isolate and silence children to compel compliance (Schwebel, 2004; Saltman & Gabbard, 2003; Baumrind, 1991). In these contexts, black and brown children are disciplined more often and harshly than white, sent through the court system 70% of the time (Alexander, 2012). Novice teachers,…

  15. El teatro espanol del Siglo de Oro en Rusia durante la primera mitad del XIX (The Spanish Golden Age Theater in Russia During the Early Part of the Nineteenth Century)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Jack

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the popularity of Spanish Golden Age drama presented in printed form and stage productions in Russia during the reigns of Alexander I (1801-1825) and Nicholas I (1825-1855). Attributes the apparent widespread interest in Hispanic culture to common ideals shared during the Napoleonic wars. (DS)

  16. Dialogic Teaching: Talk in Service of a Dialogic Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Maureen Patricia; Markarian, William C.

    2011-01-01

    We consider what it means to be a dialogic teacher as characterized by Paulo Freire and Robin Alexander, and utilizing discourse analysis, we explicate how one elementary teacher's talk reflects these characteristics. We provide context for and analysis of a seven-minute discussion selected as a cumulative achievement the focal nine-year-olds are…

  17. The Authority of Truth: Religion and the John Peter Zenger Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, David Paul

    An appreciation of the religious milieu of the John Peter Zenger libel case of 1735 can help explain the nature of the Zenger defense as prepared by Alexander Hamilton, the meaning of the jury's verdict, and the ambiguous legacy of the trial for freedom of expression in the United States. In essence, the case was a disputation on "truth" and on…

  18. 8. VIEW OF 'TRIUMPH' CORN SHELLER (C. O. Bartlett & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF 'TRIUMPH' CORN SHELLER (C. O. Bartlett & Snow Co., Cleveland), LOCATED IN THE BASEMENT, USED TO REMOVE CORN KENNELS FROM THE COB. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  19. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    Pascal Richet, a faculty member of the Physique des Minéraux et des Magmas, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, has been selected as the recipient of a Humboldt Research Award. Given by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, this award is conferred in recognition of lifetime achievements in research.

  20. Chronicle of Higher Education. Volume 51, Number 26, March 4, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Chronicle of Higher Education" presents an abundant source of news and information for college and university faculty members and administrators. This March 4, 2005 issue of "Chronicle of Higher Education" includes the following articles: (1) "Advanced Symptoms of Advanced Degrees" (Douglas, Lawrence; George, Alexander); (2) "Mathematics and…

  1. Science: The Struggle for Survival, 1880 to 1894.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlstedt, Sally Gregory

    1980-01-01

    The history of the Journal "Science" is described as it relates to problems in publication, editors, financing and collaboration. The success of the journal is attributed to the backing by prominent patrons including two inventors, Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison. (SA)

  2. Constitutional Reform of School Finance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern, Ed.; Jordan, K. Forbis, Ed.

    This book contains conference papers by experts in educational administration, law, and economics. Six of the papers are devoted to a legal analysis of fiscal inequality among school attendance units, school districts, and States. These contributions are: (1) K. Forbis Jordan and Kern Alexander, "Constitutional Methods of Financing Public…

  3. The Alexandrian Library of Antiquity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Afton M.; Cranney, A. Garr

    This paper celebrates UNESCO's announcement of the re-establishment of the Alexandrian Library, citing the incentive the project provides to review the history of the famed library of antiquity, of the librarians who served it, and of the scholars who used it. After a brief history of the city of Alexandria, including its founding by Alexander,…

  4. New Format, Same Old Story?: An Analysis of Traditional and Digital U.S. History Textbook Accounts of Slavery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathan, Jamie L.

    2013-01-01

    While the distortions and omissions in traditional U. S. history textbook accounts of slavery have been well documented (Alexander, 2002; Brown & Brown, 2010; Banks, 1969; Council on Interracial Books for Children, 1977; Elson, 1964; Gordy & Pritchard, 1995; Kane, 1970; Kochlin, 1998; Washburn, 1997), no study has analyzed digital U. S.…

  5. "Good Indian": Charles Eastman and the Warrior as Civil Servant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopenzina, Drew

    2003-01-01

    Charles Alexander Eastman remains an enigmatic figure in the early days of American Indian activism--a man whose contributions, while unimpeachable in terms of devotion and good will, are often complicated by the lingering shadow of assimilationist values evident in his writings and his career as one of the so-called "red progressives." Eastman…

  6. Double the Benefits: Use Museum Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ory, Norma R.

    1984-01-01

    A project for elementary school children based on a museum's collection of Alexander Calder's art is described. After studying Calder's works of art, students created their own three-dimensional stabiles, molded clay into animals, and made circus figures from cork, fabric, yarn, and colored paper. (RM)

  7. Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education. Proceedings of the Annual Conference (9th, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, June 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Barbara Stolze, Ed.

    Among 17 French and 63 English papers are the following: "Case Study of the Convergence Model in Program Evaluation" (Alexander); "Nowlen's Approach to Continuing Professional Education" (Blanchard); "Challenge for Indigenous Approaches to Adult Education (AE) and Development" (Bonson); "Cultural and Social Transformation in the 1990s" (Dyson et…

  8. Women, Clerical Work, and Office Automation: Issues for Research. Report of a Conference Sponsored by the Women's Bureau in Cooperation with the Panel on Technology and Women's Employment National Research Council (Washington, D.C., October 19, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Panel on Technology and Women's Employment.

    These proceedings contain presentations (speeches, discussions, papers) from a conference on how office automation is affecting the work lives and employment future of clerical workers. They include a "Welcome to the [National] Academy [of Sciences]" (Roslyn Feldberg), "Opening Remarks" (Lenora Cole Alexander), and "Goals and Objectives" (Mary…

  9. Bypassing shake, rattle and roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Michele; Movchan, Alexander; Jones, Ian; McPhedran, Ross

    2013-05-01

    The Tacoma Narrows Bridge is perhaps the most famous example of a bridge that collapsed unexpectedly in response to external forces. But new "wave bypass" technology - similar to that underpinning invisibility cloaks - could help avoid such disasters, as Michele Brun, Alexander Movchan, Ian Jones and Ross McPhedran explain.

  10. State Formulas Don't Add Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1992-01-01

    Confronting state funding problems and the federal government's decreasing fiscal responsibility for education, the U.S. House Subcommittee on Elementary and Secondary Education heard compelling testimony last fall from Kern Alexander, who described the "coming apart of America." Pointing to profound inequalities within states, he urged Congress…

  11. A Hope for Education atop the In-Basket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1993-01-01

    The 1983 "education at risk" booklet pushed by Reagan-Bush regime left nothing but the timidly obedient Terrell Bell, the feisty, right-wing true believer Bill Bennett, the pitiful Lauro Cavazos, the self-centered Lamar Alexander, and monstrous national debt built on trickle-down economics. President Clinton's plan to "re-invent" America might…

  12. Thoughts of One's Own: Innovative Leadership in Institutional Research. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (23rd, Princeton, New Jersey, November 16-19, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings document is comprised of the 18 papers, panel presentations, and work shares presented at a 1996 conference on institutional research. The papers are: (1) "Using Cohort Analysis To Evaluate the Impact of a Support Program for Minority Students" (Hershel Alexander); (2) "The Institutional Researcher as Program Evaluator:…

  13. A Paediatrician Looks at Traditional Approaches to Emotional Development in Preschool and Primary Years. Foundation for Child and Youth Studies Selected Papers Number 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susi Erika

    This discussion of the emotional development of young children is structured upon Erik Erikson's schemata of psycho-social development. Stage 1, which involves trust versus mistrust, includes references to Erikson's theory and the work of Melanie Klein, Berry Brazelton, Stella Chess and Alexander Thomas, John Bowlby, Anthony Stevens, and D. W.…

  14. Relationship between Acceptable Noise Level and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyaldenhoven, Melinda C.; Nabelek, Anna K.; Tampas, Joanna W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between acceptable noise levels (ANLs) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB; R. M. Cox & G. C. Alexander, 1995). This study further examined the APHAB's ability to predict hearing aid use. Method: ANL and APHAB data were collected for 191 listeners with impaired hearing,…

  15. CAL Community School: An Invitation to Patrons To Participate. 1995-96 Report to the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAL Community School, Latimer, IA.

    This annual report provides information on the CAL Community School, a small K-12 school that serves the communities of Alexander, Coulter, and Latimer, Iowa. The mission of the school is to provide a positive educational environment, maintain high academic standards, and promote the value of life-long learning among students. In addition, the…

  16. Dalgarno receives Fleming Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Michael B.; Dalgarno, Alexander

    The John Adam Fleming Medal, given for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, and related sciences, was presented to Alexander Dalgarno at the AGU Spring Meeting Honor Ceremony on May 31 in Baltimore. The award citation and Dalgarno's response are given here.

  17. Dessler receives Fleming Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Thomas W.; Dessler, Alex

    Alexander J. Dessler was presented with the John Adam Fleming Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore last May. The award recognizes original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, and related sciences. The citation was delivered by Thomas W. Hill.

  18. The Role of Student Support Services in Encouraging Student Involvement and Its Impact on Student Perceptions and Academic Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley-Hall, Caren

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of Student Support Services (SSS) in encouraging student involvement and its impact on student perceptions and academic experiences in three technical colleges in upstate South Carolina. By examining Alexander Astin's theory of student involvement in the services provided by the program, a better…

  19. Thoughts on the Roots and Evolution of the Bill of Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Donald; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Considers how the Bill of Rights originated and has evolved. Reviews the political views of Alexander Hamilton and James Madison and the nature of their support for the Bill of Rights. Explains nineteenth-century classical liberalism and its revolutionary view that political power inhered in the individual rather than in property ownership. (CH)

  20. Stuck in the Middle: Career Progress, Motivation, and Engagement among Urban Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brogan, Deirdre T.

    2010-01-01

    The process of educational and vocational development does not occur at a single point in time. Many indicators of dropping out of high school, for example, are present by middle school (Alexander et al., 1997; Balfanz et al., 2007). Yet, research and practice focus almost exclusively on enriching the learning and work experiences of high school…

  1. Design Patterns for Complex Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohse, Shanta; Anderson, Terry

    2006-01-01

    A complex view of learning recognises that learning cannot be pre-determined by teaching, but is as much defined by circumstances and context as pre-defined learning objectives. Learning designs that accept uncertainty help us to envision classrooms and curricula that are open, dynamic and innovative. Architect Christopher Alexander's patterns and…

  2. Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Recommended activities include: (1) etymology exercises for elementary school students; (2) a search for information about Alexander the Great; (3) monthly inspections of the school yard to observe environmental changes; and (4) an art history unit on Cro-Magnon cave drawings. An interdisciplinary unit on transportation is included. (PP)

  3. Stories in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigenthaler, Jenny; Vihos, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    Presents four lesson plans that use paintings, illustrations, and photographs that tell a story. The lessons consider the use and characteristics of narrative. Includes work from, "The Book of Deeds of Alexander the Great," as well as the works of Georges de La Tour, Eileen Cowin, and Henry Ossawa Tanner. (MJP)

  4. [Abnormal movements. Historical notes].

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, P J

    Most of the knowledge about movement disorders comes from the last fifty years. However, the ancients made some remarkable neurological depictions. We still can find some neurological descriptions including Parkinson's disease in the Bible, and the ancient writings of Atreya and Susruta. In addition, classic tests provide us of valuable information on historical personages, including the dystonia of Alexander the Great.

  5. One Route to Success in Reading History: The Goal Frame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Mary Jane

    1987-01-01

    Identifies the "goal frame" as a method of text analysis which calls upon students to establish a purpose for reading. Provides an example in which students read a passage about Alexander the Great to determine his goals, plans, actions, and results. Concludes that this approach allows students to develop better comprehension and organizational…

  6. Great Explorers to the East.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rosalie F., Ed.; Baker, Charles F. III, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This issue of "Calliope," a world history magazine for young people is devoted to "Great Explorers of the East" and features articles on famous explorers of the eastern hemisphere. The following articles are included: "Ancient Egyptian Mariners"; "Alexander: The Great Reconciler"; "Marco Polo: Describing the World"; "By Water to India";…

  7. [Freud in the journals of the German speaking exile].

    PubMed

    May, Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    Freud and psychoanalysis figure frequently in exile journals. This paper documents two letters to the editor written by Alexander Freud who denied that his brother Sigmund had been a zionist, and the recollections of the sculptor Königsberger who had made a bust of Freud in 1920.

  8. Thomas E. Moore's "Sour Sofkee" in the Tradition of Muskogee Dialect Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petete, Timothy; Womack, Craig S.

    2006-01-01

    The Muskogee dialect letters provide one of the most interesting combinations of fictional viewpoints and political commentary in American Indian letters. This article features the life story of Thomas E. Moore. This article also presents the fictional literary works of Moore and compares his dialect writings to Alexander Posey. Moore is the most…

  9. Getting Connected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    When Alexander Johnson, a college freshman studying for a career in animation, began pondering colleges to attend, the opportunity to use modern computer technology tools in his classes played a major role in his consideration. Today, Johnson considers himself lucky to be among the students at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs)…

  10. 78 FR 58575 - Review of Experiments for Research Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Review of Experiments for Research Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION..., by email at Alexander.Adams@nrc.gov , Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear...

  11. Out of the Woods and into the Museum: Charles A. Eastman's 1910 Collecting Expedition across Ojibwe Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, David

    2008-01-01

    When "From the Deep Woods to Civilization" appeared in 1916, the Dakota writer and activist Charles Alexander Eastman (also known by his Dakota name, Ohiyesa) told of a rather unusual journey across northern Minnesota and Ontario, Canada. The purpose of the venture, which took place during the summer of 1910, was to "purchase rare curios and…

  12. Detection of anti-liver cell membrane antibody using a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo-Yeo, A.; McSorley, C.; McFarlane, B.M.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Mowat, A.P.; Vergani, D.

    1989-02-01

    A radioimmunometric technique for the detection of autoantibodies to liver membrane antigens has been developed using Alexander cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After incubation of Alexander cells with serum, antimembrane antibodies were detected by addition of /sup 125/I-labeled Protein A. Binding ratios in 15 children with uncontrolled autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and in seven children with primary sclerosing cholangitis were significantly higher than in 18 age-matched normal controls. Nine patients with inactive autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, 13 with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and five with fulminant hepatic failure had ratios similar to controls. In nine patients with Wilson's disease, there was a modest but significant increase in binding ratio. In four children with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, binding ratios fell during effective immunosuppressive therapy. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis gave normal results, excluding that binding derives from Fc-mediated immune complex capture. A positive correlation was found between Alexander cell binding values and anti-liver-specific protein antibody titers, suggesting that the two assays detect antibodies against shared antigenic determinants. The Alexander cell assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive technique to detect antibody to liver cell membrane antigens.

  13. An Economics Scrapbook: A Catalog of Resources for Graduate Students in the Department of Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Miles, Comp.; Gang, Ira, Comp.

    This catalog of resources entails, by definition, an incomplete listing of available materials in the Rutgers University Department of Economics, Alexander Library at Rutgers, data centers throughout Rutgers, and the Internet. Because of the changing nature of the field, this scrapbook is constantly being revised. This scrapbook contains seven…

  14. New Hires at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Forty-nine people joined the facility in September and October 2013. The National Cancer Institute welcomes… Aamir Akram Clarissa Alexander Robert Buckheit Brian Chan Kelly Dempsey Christopher Descalzi Ahmed Fahim Devikala Gurusamy Jaewoo Hong Rhushikesh Kulkarni James Shaum Dionysios Watson Yuheng Xi Yi Xiang Thomas Zengeya

  15. Cosmological interrelations in nature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszkiewicz, L. P.

    1996-06-01

    Modern cosmology came into existence in the 20-th century when Albert Einstein introduced the static Universe model (1917), and when Edwin Hubble published the observations of spectra of galaxies together with the Dopplerian redshift interpretations (1929). These observational data were in accordance with the hypotheses of Alexander Friedman.

  16. Early Education and Care: What Is the Federal Government's Role? Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Ninth Congress, First Session (April 20, 2005) S. Hrg. 109-116

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the federal role in improving the effectiveness and coordination of sixty-nine Federal programs that are designed to help parents help their young children with child care and early education. Opening statements were delivered by Subcommittee Chairman Senator Lamar Alexander, Tennessee; Ranking Member…

  17. 77 FR 72871 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The Agricultural Health Study: A Prospective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Reduction Act of 1995, for opportunity for public comment on proposed data collection projects, the National... obtain a copy of the data collection plans and instruments, contact: Jane Hoppin, Sc.D., Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, PO Box...

  18. 31. Photocopy of map. Insert from Master Plan Notes Prepared ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photocopy of map. Insert from Master Plan Notes Prepared by Environmental Planning and Design, Pittsburgh, Pa. Original at Missouri Botanical Garden. 1972 MASTER PLAN 32. 'THE TREE,' SCULPTURE BY ALEXANDER CALDER, 1966 - Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove Avenue, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  19. Recycling the Community School ESEA Title III Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walder, Leopold O.; And Others

    An evaluation of the "Recycling the Community School" program at Alexander Shepherd Elementary School in Washington, D.C. was conducted. The program's major objectives were: (1) initiation of the development of a multi-modal curriculum that focuses on raising of achievement of 80 percent of students in the essential skills as measured by a…

  20. Characteristics of Entering Black Freshmen in Predominately Black and Predominately White Institutions: A Normative Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astin, Helen S.; Cross, Patricia H.

    Data tables are compiled on the characteristics of black freshmen entering a representative sanple of 393 predominately black and predominately white academic institutions. Using a ten percent random subsample of original data compiled by Alexander W. Astin for the Cooperative Institutional Research program, the researchers present extensive…

  1. The Black Family: Are Our Youth At Risk? Transcript of a Legislative Hearing (Sacramento, California, October 6, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Legislature, Sacramento. Assembly.

    Members of the California State Legislature held a hearing on the black family to hear testimony on youth at risk. Following introductions, three witnesses appeared to speak on the juvenile justice system: (1) C. McDowell of the Department of the Youth Authority; (2) J. Alexander of VisionQuest; and (3) R. Johnson, Chief of Police from Inglewood…

  2. 7. VIEW OF BASEMENT, LOOKING NORTH ALONG EAST BASEMENT WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF BASEMENT, LOOKING NORTH ALONG EAST BASEMENT WALL TOWARD TURBINES. AT RIGHT IS A WATER-POWERED EAR CORN CRUSHER (manufacturer unknown), WHICH PERFORMED THE INITIAL COARSE GRINDING OF EAR CORN Photographer: Jet T. Lowe, 1985 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Debate on Ratification. Eighth Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Janet

    Students play the roles of delegates to the U.S. Constitutional convention in this grade 8 interdisciplinary history and language arts unit. After reviewing the activities of the men involved in the convention (Patrick Henry, George Mason, Luther Martin, Richard Henry Lee, John Jay, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton), participants prepare…

  4. Implementing Astin's I-E-O Model in the Study of Student Retention: A Multivariate Time Dependent Approach. AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Leonard J.

    A study used Alexander Astin's (1993) Input-Environment-Output (I-E-O) model to examine persistence at the United States Coast Guard Academy (Connecticut). Because the study was conducted in a controlled social environment, measures of social environmental influence were derived from multiple inputs, including adaptability polls wherein every…

  5. The Second Century: Our Vision for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Donna M.; Levinson, Ken

    1990-01-01

    This paper speculates on the coming century's opportunities and challenges for the Alexander Graham Bell Association. Medical advancements prolonging life and the subsequent increase in the elderly population are discussed, as are computer and telecommunications advances. Futurists' predictions of increasing disposable income and social conscience…

  6. Advances Underlying Spoken Language Development: A Century of Building on Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    This article compares Alexander Graham Bell's achievements in the areas of instruction and technology for the hearing impaired with contemporary techniques and devices, many of which stem from his work. Assessment techniques, cochlear implants, tactile devices and visual aids are discussed as well as other alternatives and supplements to residual…

  7. STATEMENT OF GEORGE W. FELLENDORF BEFORE THE MARYLAND COMMISSION TO STUDY EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF HANDICAPPED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FELLENDORF, GEORGE W.

    THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL ASSOCIATION FOR THE DEAF URGED THAT THE STATE OF MARYLAND CONTINUE TO INVESTIGATE NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE AREA OF EDUCATION OF THE HANDICAPPED. HE RECOMMENDED THAT CONTINUAL REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF NEEDS BE MADE BY REGIONAL SUBCOMMITTEES, PROGRAMS BE COORDINATED BY AN ADMINISTRATOR AT THE…

  8. Memoir Upon the Formation of a Deaf Variety of the Human Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Alexander Graham

    A compilation of data on the hereditary aspects of deafness presented at a conference in 1883 by Alexander Graham Bell, the document contains records of familial occurences of deafness and marriage statistics. Tables indicate that within schools for the deaf many students had the same family name; it was considered highly probable that a…

  9. The Legacy of Dr. Bell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breunig, H. Latham

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the family of Alexander Graham Bell, including research and therapeutic work in speech and hearing impairments spanning three generations. Bell's life and discoveries are discussed, including the formation of the American Association for the Promotion of Teaching of Speech to the Deaf, whose history and organization are…

  10. BIBLIOGRAPHY ON DEAFNESS, A SELECTED INDEX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FELLENDORF, GEORGE W.; AND OTHERS

    APPROXIMATELY 3,200 REFERENCES ARE LISTED BY AUTHOR AND GROUPED ACCORDING TO SUBJECT. ALL REFERENCES ARE ARTICLES FROM "THE VOLTA REVIEW," 1899 TO 1965, OR "THE AMERICAN ANNALS OF THE DEAF," 1847 TO 1965. AN AUTHOR INDEX IS INCLUDED. THIS DOCUMENT WAS PUBLISHED BY THE ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL ASSOCIATION FOR THE DEAF, INC., THE VOLTA BUREAU,…

  11. The Right to Be Heard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    The author cites research that casts doubt upon the use of total communication as a means of facilitating speech, communication between parent and child, academic achievement, and vocabulary development in hearing-impaired children. He states that the Alexander Graham Bell Association is not antimanual communication, but rather prospeech. (CL)

  12. STATEMENT OF VIEWS RELATING TO THE EDUCATION OF THE DEAF IN THE UNITED STATES--1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FELLENDORF, GEORGE W.

    REPRESENTATIVE OF THE VIEWS OF THE ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL ASSOCIATION FOR THE DEAF, THIS STATEMENT SETS FORTH THE PURPOSES OF THE BELL ASSOCIATION AND DISCUSSES THE FOLLOWING TOPICS ABOUT DEAF EDUCATION--(1) THEIR AMBITIONS FOR ALL DEAF CHILDREN, (2) A CRITIQUE ON THE EDUCATION OF THE DEAF IN THE UNITED STATES, (3) CONCERN FOR DEAF CHILDREN WHO ARE…

  13. Freedom through Speech: Every Child's Right.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northcott, Winifred H.

    1981-01-01

    The article focuses on the various dimensions of the auditory-oral track which features the auditory-oral method of instruction for hearing impaired children. The author stresses the Alexander Graham Bell Association's commitment to auditory-oral options for deaf children and youth. (SB)

  14. Council Membership Directory 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, Washington, DC.

    Information is provided on the purposes, goals, functions, membership, board of directors, calendar of events, publications, and names and addresses of the officers or executive committees of 19 national organizations serving the deaf. Organizations included are the Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, Alexander Graham Bell Association for…

  15. Leonard A. Kelton, 1923-2011: Biographical sketch, list of publications, described taxa, and patronyms names in his honor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A biographical sketch of the late heteropterist, Leonard Alexander Kelton (1923-2011), a former systematist at the Canadian National Collection in Ottawa, Canada, is presented. Also provided are lists of his 71 scientific publications, the new taxa he described, and the patronyms named in his honor....

  16. Vygotsky and Writing: Reflections from a Distant Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Michael

    For a specialist from the communication discipline, studying with Alexander Luria, who had been a colleague of Lev Vygotsky in the l920's, provided insights into the Soviet psychologist's ideas about mediation and mind and how writing fits into those ideas. According to Luria, Vygotsky was a methodologist who worried about what kinds of methods…

  17. Chickens on the Bus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anreus, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    In this article the author describes his first winter in Elizabeth, New Jersey with his family in 1972. His family included: his mother Margarita; his aunts Dinorah and Nereyda; the family matriarch, his grandmother Maria Otilia Anreus; and himself, an underweight and scrawny twelve-year-old named after the infamous anarchist, Alexander Berkman.…

  18. Education as Transformation: A Case of a Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wyk, M. M.; Alexander, G.; Moreeng, B. B.

    2010-01-01

    Alexander, Van Wyk, Bereng and November (2009) are of the opinion that the purpose of education is the development of human capital towards meeting and achieving the individual and psycho-social needs of learners and communities which should be brought about through a process of transformation. In essence, this would imply that any discourse with…

  19. Derivation of Building Energy Use Intensity Targets for ASHRAE Standard 100

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Terry R

    2014-06-01

    The steps to develop the building energy use intensity targets for American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 100, Energy Efficiency in Existing Buildings are outlined in this report. The analyses were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with the ASHRAE Standard 100 committee and Dr. Alexander Zhivov, the subcommittee chair responsible for targets development.

  20. Native American Studies in the Laboratory School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersey, Harry A., Jr.; And Others

    A study was undertaken to determine students' attitudes toward Native Americans before and after they took the Native American studies course developed through an ESEA Title IV-C Curriculum Development Grant by the Alexander D. Henderson University School (ADHUS), a laboratory school on the campus of Florida Atlantic University. To comply with…

  1. Head Start: Ensuring Dollars Benefit the Children. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Ninth Congress, First Session (April 5, 2005). Senate Hearing 109-119

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In his opening statement, Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), chairman, Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development, stated that one responsibility of Congress is to ensure that taxpayer dollars are being spent for the purposes intended and for the children intended. Between January 2003 and the first months of this year, there were…

  2. Quality in Education and Training. Aspects of Educational and Training Technology. Volume XXVI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Malcolm, Ed.; Roper, Eric, Ed.

    The 38 conference papers in this volume were chosen to exemplify different definitions of, and approaches to, quality, as they are applied in a wide range of educational and training contexts. The papers are: "Designing Organisations That Learn" (D. J. Dicks); "Quality Assurance in a European Context" (D. Alexander, J. Morgan); "'What's in It for…

  3. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 20, Number 4, July-August 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadowski, Michael, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) School-Based Coaching: A Revolution in Professional Development--or Just the Latest Fad? (Alexander Russo); (2) Fluency Tests Help Identify Struggling Readers Early (Clifford…

  4. The Ancient Origins of Sign Handshapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, George

    2002-01-01

    While much of the evidence is circumstantial, there is a clear evolutionary line from our primeval forbears in Africa, through imperial China and Rome, Celtic Druid lore, and medieval monks, to the one-hand "abecedario" first used in the education of Deaf children in Spain, the two-hand glove alphabet used by Alexander Graham Bell with deaf…

  5. 75 FR 39046 - Russell Brands, LLC, Fabrics Division, a Subsidiary of Fruit of the Loom, Including Employees...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Loom, Including Employees Working Off-Site In New York, Alexander City, AL; Amended Certification... occurred involving employees under the control of the subject firm working off- site in New York. The... published in the Federal Register on January 25, 2010 (75 FR 3930). At the request of the State agency,...

  6. The crane fly genus Libnotes Westwood, 1876 (Diptera: Limoniidae) for Korea including two new species and an identification key.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of crane flies, Libnotes (Libnotes) charlesyoungi n. sp. and L. (L.) jirisana n. sp. are described. Libnotes (Afrolimonia) plutonis (Alexander, 1924) is described for the first time on the Korean Peninsula. A key for all Korean Libnotes spp. is presented. PMID:27615875

  7. "M" to "Moonless": Lexical Databases in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beam, Paul; Huntley, Frank

    This paper describes the characteristics of lexicographic software programs used in a module on Alexander Pope's "The Rape of the Lock," a major component of a course on computer-assisted learning (CAL) at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Two of the databases are specific to that school and are small, individualized, and frequently…

  8. 14. Photocopy of engraving from History of Westchester County, Vol. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of engraving from History of Westchester County, Vol. 2, by L.E. Preston & Company, Philadelphia, 1886 ALEXANDER SMITH AND SONS CARPET COMPANY, DETAIL, SPINNING AND PRINT MILLS, - Moquette Row Housing, Moquette Row North & Moquette Row South, Yonkers, Westchester County, NY

  9. 13. Photocopy of engraving from History of Westchester County, Vol. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of engraving from History of Westchester County, Vol. 2, by J. Thomas Scharf, published by L.E. Preston & Company, Philadelphia, 1886 ALEXANDER SMITH AND SONS CARPET COMPANY, MOQUETTE MILLS, WEAVING MILLS, SPINNING AND PRINT MILLS - Moquette Row Housing, Moquette Row North & Moquette Row South, Yonkers, Westchester County, NY

  10. 15. Photocopy of engraving from History of Westchester County, Vol. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of engraving from History of Westchester County, Vol. 2, by J. Thomas Scharf, published by L.E. Preston ALEXANDER SMITH AND SONS CARPET COMPANY, DETAIL, MOQUETTE MILLS - Moquette Row Housing, Moquette Row North & Moquette Row South, Yonkers, Westchester County, NY

  11. Triangles: Shapes in Math, Science and Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Catherine Sheldrick

    This book examines everything having to do with the triangle. It begins with a basic definition of the triangle and continues with discussions on tetrahedrons, triangular prisms, and pyramid shapes. Some ideas addressed include how triangles are used to measure heights and distances, the importance of triangles to builders, Alexander Graham Bell's…

  12. A Study of Underprepared Students at One Community College: Assessing the Impact of Student and Institutional Input, Environmental, and Output Variables on Student Success. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Patricia N.; Amey, Marilyn J.

    This study identified input, environmental, and output variables accounting for differences between successful and unsuccessful groups of underprepared students at Johnson County Community College (Kansas). The study applied an adaptation of Alexander Astin's input-environment-output model of assessing student and institutional effectiveness.…

  13. Humboldt's Legacy and the Restoration of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Aaron

    1995-01-01

    Examines issues related to specialization in science in the context of the work of Alexander Von Humboldt, one of the first popular scientists in the 19th century and Charles Darwin's mentor. Chronicles the impacts of a science dominated by specialization and argues for increased emphasis on interdisciplinary environmental study. (LZ)

  14. 33 CFR 159.305 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Subpart 3.85 of this chapter. Conventional Pollutants—means the list of pollutants listed in 40 CFR 401.16... in 40 CFR 401.15. Sewage—means human body wastes and the wastes from toilets and other receptacles... Environmental Protection Agency. Applicable Waters of Alaska—means the waters of the Alexander Archipelago...

  15. 33 CFR 159.305 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart 3.85 of this chapter. Conventional Pollutants—means the list of pollutants listed in 40 CFR 401.16... in 40 CFR 401.15. Sewage—means human body wastes and the wastes from toilets and other receptacles... Environmental Protection Agency. Applicable Waters of Alaska—means the waters of the Alexander Archipelago...

  16. 33 CFR 159.305 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Subpart 3.85 of this chapter. Conventional Pollutants—means the list of pollutants listed in 40 CFR 401.16... in 40 CFR 401.15. Sewage—means human body wastes and the wastes from toilets and other receptacles... Environmental Protection Agency. Applicable Waters of Alaska—means the waters of the Alexander Archipelago...

  17. 33 CFR 159.305 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Subpart 3.85 of this chapter. Conventional Pollutants—means the list of pollutants listed in 40 CFR 401.16... in 40 CFR 401.15. Sewage—means human body wastes and the wastes from toilets and other receptacles... Environmental Protection Agency. Applicable Waters of Alaska—means the waters of the Alexander Archipelago...

  18. 45 CFR 670.29 - Designation of Antarctic Specially Protected Areas, Specially Managed Areas and Historic Sites...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Shetland Islands ASPA 113Litchfield Island, Arthur Harbour, Anvers Island, Palmer Archipelago ASPA... 146South Bay, Doumer Island, Palmer Archipelago ASPA 147Ablation Valley-Ganymede Heights, Alexander Island..., South Shetland Islands ASPA 153Eastern Dallmann Bay off Brabant Island, Palmer Archipelago...

  19. 45 CFR 670.29 - Designation of Antarctic Specially Protected Areas, Specially Managed Areas and Historic Sites...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Shetland Islands ASPA 113Litchfield Island, Arthur Harbour, Anvers Island, Palmer Archipelago ASPA... 146South Bay, Doumer Island, Palmer Archipelago ASPA 147Ablation Valley-Ganymede Heights, Alexander Island..., South Shetland Islands ASPA 153Eastern Dallmann Bay off Brabant Island, Palmer Archipelago...

  20. 33 CFR 159.305 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Subpart 3.85 of this chapter. Conventional Pollutants—means the list of pollutants listed in 40 CFR 401.16... in 40 CFR 401.15. Sewage—means human body wastes and the wastes from toilets and other receptacles... Environmental Protection Agency. Applicable Waters of Alaska—means the waters of the Alexander Archipelago...