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Sample records for alfa activated duloxetine

  1. The Combination of Antidepressant Duloxetine with Piracetam in Mice does not Produce Enhancement of Nootropic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Pravin Popatrao; Sarkar, Amrita; Patel, Sonam; Savai, Jay

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong association between depression and memory impairment. The present study aims to assess the nootropic activity of duloxetine and piracetam combination. Male Swiss Albino mice were divided randomly into 4 groups. Treatment of normal saline (10 ml/kg), duloxetine (10 mg/kg), piracetam (100 mg/kg), and duloxetine (5 mg/kg) plus piracetam (50 mg/kg) were given through intra-peritoneal route to group I-IV, respectively. Transfer latency in elevated plus maze (EPM) and time spent in target quadrant in Morris water maze (MWM) were recorded. Estimation of brain monoamines in hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and whole brain were done using HPLC with fluorescence detector. Piracetam treated group showed significant decrease in transfer latency in EPM and increase in time spent in target quadrant recorded in MWM. Combination treated group failed to produce statistically significant nootropic effect in both EPM and MWM. Combination treated group failed to increase brain monoamine levels when compared against duloxetine and piracetam treated groups, separately. But there was exception of significant increase in norepinephrine levels in hippocampi when compared against duloxetine treated group. Results indicate no cognitive benefits with piracetam plus duloxetine combination. These findings can be further probed with the aim of understanding the interaction between duloxetine and piracetam as a future endeavor. PMID:25258569

  2. Drotrecogin alfa (activated)...a sad final fizzle to a roller-coaster party.

    PubMed

    Angus, Derek C

    2012-01-01

    Following the failure of PROWESS-SHOCK to demonstrate efficacy, Eli Lilly and Company withdrew drotrecogin alfa (activated) from the worldwide market. Drotrecogin was initially approved after the original trial, PROWESS, was stopped early for overwhelming efficacy. These events prompt consideration of both the initial approval decision and the later decision to withdraw. It is regrettable that the initial decision was made largely on a single trial that was stopped early. However, the decision to approve was within the bounds of normal regulatory practice and was made by many approval bodies around the world. Furthermore, the overall withdrawal rate of approved drugs remains very low. The decision to withdraw was a voluntary decision by Eli Lilly and Company and likely reflected key business considerations. Drotrecogin does have important biologic effects, and it is probable that we do not know how best to select patients who would benefit. Overall, there may still be a small advantage to drotrecogin alfa, even used non-selectively, but the costs of determining such an effect with adequate certainty are likely prohibitive, and the point is now moot. In the future, we should consider ways to make clinical trials easier and quicker so that more information can be available in a timely manner when considering regulatory approval. At the same time, more sophisticated selection of patients seems key if we are to most wisely test agents designed to manipulate the septic host response. PMID:22309988

  3. Drotrecogin alfa (activated)...a sad final fizzle to a roller-coaster party.

    PubMed

    Angus, Derek C

    2012-01-01

    Following the failure of PROWESS-SHOCK to demonstrate efficacy, Eli Lilly and Company withdrew drotrecogin alfa (activated) from the worldwide market. Drotrecogin was initially approved after the original trial, PROWESS, was stopped early for overwhelming efficacy. These events prompt consideration of both the initial approval decision and the later decision to withdraw. It is regrettable that the initial decision was made largely on a single trial that was stopped early. However, the decision to approve was within the bounds of normal regulatory practice and was made by many approval bodies around the world. Furthermore, the overall withdrawal rate of approved drugs remains very low. The decision to withdraw was a voluntary decision by Eli Lilly and Company and likely reflected key business considerations. Drotrecogin does have important biologic effects, and it is probable that we do not know how best to select patients who would benefit. Overall, there may still be a small advantage to drotrecogin alfa, even used non-selectively, but the costs of determining such an effect with adequate certainty are likely prohibitive, and the point is now moot. In the future, we should consider ways to make clinical trials easier and quicker so that more information can be available in a timely manner when considering regulatory approval. At the same time, more sophisticated selection of patients seems key if we are to most wisely test agents designed to manipulate the septic host response.

  4. Dornase Alfa

    MedlinePlus

    ... and to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis. It breaks down the thick secretions in the ... your doctor.Dornase alfa is used to treat cystic fibrosis but does not cure it. Continue to use ...

  5. Recombinant interferon alfa-2a, an active agent in advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bunn, P A; Ihde, D C; Foon, K A

    1987-01-01

    The cutaneous T-cell lymphomas including mycosis fungoides and the Sézary syndrome, are indolent lymphomas with early systemic dissemination. Like the indolent B-cell lymphomas, they cannot be cured by currently available systemic chemotherapy so new systemic therapies need to be developed. A study of very high-dose recombinant interferon alfa-2a was, therefore, initiated in 20 patients with advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (5 in stage II, 2 in stage III and 13 in stage IV). All patients were refractory to at least 2 standard therapies, including topical nitrogen mustard (18 patients), psoralens and ultraviolet A light (12 patients), total skin electron irradiation (14 patients) and systemic chemotherapy (16 patients). Nine out of 20 patients (45%; 95% confidence interval 25-69%) had either objective partial or complete responses within 3 months of starting treatment. Maximal response, however, often did not occur for at least one year. The median duration of response was 5.5 months and all complete responses lasted more than 2 years. Response frequencies were equal at both cutaneous and extracutaneous sites and in patients with or without prior chemotherapy. Toxicity was exhibited primarily as a flu-like syndrome consisting of fever, malaise, fatigue, anorexia and weight loss which necessitated dose reductions in all patients. Transient elevations in liver function and decreases in renal function and granulocyte counts occurred in some patients. It is concluded that interferon alfa-2a is highly active against advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and that it should be studied in its early stages. It should also be evaluated in combination with other biological agents and with chemotherapy.

  6. The anti-inflammatory activity of duloxetine, a serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, prevents kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal death in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Soo; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Hong, Seongkweon; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2015-11-15

    Duloxetine (DXT), a potent serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is widely used in the treatment of major depressive disorder. In the present study, we examined the effects of DXT treatment on seizure behavior and excitotoxic neuronal damage in the mouse hippocampal CA3 region following intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) injection. DXT treatment showed no effect on KA-induced behavioral seizure activity. However, treatment with 10mg/kg DXT reduced KA-induced neuronal death in the hippocampal CA3 region at 72h after KA administration, and treatment with 20 and 40mg/kg DXT showed a noticeable neuroprotection in the hippocampal CA3 region after KA injection. In addition, KA-induced activations of microglia and astrocytes as well as KA-induced increases of TNF-α and IL-1β levels were also suppressed by DXT treatment. These results indicate that DXT displays the neuroprotective effect against KA-induced excitotoxic neuronal death through anti-inflammatory action. PMID:26453128

  7. Duloxetine-related panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Sabljić, Vladimir; Rakun, Radmir; Ružić, Klementina; Grahovac, Tanja

    2011-03-01

    Side-effects arising on the grounds of antidepressant administration pose as a substantial obstacle hindering successful depressive disorder treatment. Side-effects, especially those severe or those manifested through dramatic clinical presentations such as panic attacks, make the treatment far more difficult and shake patients' trust in both the treatment and the treating physician. This case report deals with a patient experiencing a moderately severe depressive episode, who responded to duloxetine treatment administered in the initial dose of 30 mg per day with as many as three panic attacks in two days. Upon duloxetine withdrawal, these panic attacks ceased as well. The patient continued tianeptine and alprazolam treatment during which no significant side-effects had been seen, so that she gradually recovered. Some of the available literature sources have suggested the possibility of duloxetine administration to the end of generalised anxiety disorder and panic attack treatment. However, they are outnumbered by the contributions reporting about duloxetine-related anxiety, aggressiveness and panic attacks. In line with the foregoing, further monitoring of each and every duloxetine-administered patient group needs to be pursued so as to be able to evaluate treatment benefits and weigh them against risks of anxiety or panic attack onset.

  8. Duloxetine: a review of its use in the management of major depressive disorder in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Sohita

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine (Cymbalta(®)) is a selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor indicated for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). This article reviews the therapeutic efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine in older adults with MDD and summarizes its pharmacological properties. Treatment with duloxetine significantly improved several measures of cognition, depression, anxiety, pain and health-related quality-of-life (HR-QOL) in older adults with MDD in two 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. However, no significant improvements in measures of depression were observed at week 12 (primary endpoint) of a 24-week, double-blind trial, although symptoms of depression did improve significantly at earlier timepoints. Benefit of treatment was also observed during continued therapy in the 24-week study (i.e. after the 12-week primary endpoint) and in an open-label, 52-week study, with improvements being observed in some measures of depression, pain and HR-QOL. Duloxetine was generally well tolerated in these studies, with nausea, dizziness and adverse events reflecting noradrenergic activity (e.g. dry mouth, constipation) being the most common treatment-emergent adverse events during treatment for up to 52 weeks. Duloxetine therapy had little effect on cardiovascular parameters and bodyweight. Although further well designed and long-term studies in this patient population are required to confirm the efficacy of duloxetine and to compare it with that of other antidepressants, current evidence suggests that treatment with duloxetine may be beneficial in older adults with MDD.

  9. Duloxetine for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Beth A; Hammonds, Cara L; Boomershine, Chad S

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a widespread pain condition associated with a wide range of additional symptoms including fatigue, insomnia, depression, anxiety and stiffness. Duloxetine is one of three medications currently FDA approved for use in FMS management. Duloxetine is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that functions by increasing central nervous system levels of serotonin and norepinephrine. This review is a primer on use of duloxetine in FMS management and includes information on pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, a review of the three duloxetine FMS treatment trials currently in publication, a discussion of the safety and tolerability of duloxetine, and patient-focused perspectives on duloxetine use in FMS management. Duloxetine has proven efficacy in managing pain and mood symptoms in adult FMS patients with and without major depressive disorder. However, due to side effects, duloxetine must be used with caution in patients with fatigue, insomnia, gastrointestinal complaints, headache, cardiovascular disease, bleeding-risk, and in those 24 years of age and younger due to risk of suicidality. Duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with liver disease or alcoholics. As with all medications, duloxetine is best used as part of an individualized regimen that includes nonpharmacologic modalities of exercise, education and behavioral therapies. PMID:21197298

  10. Duloxetine versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Koesters, Markus; Furukawa, Toshi A; Nosè, Michela; Purgato, Marianna; Omori, Ichiro M; Trespidi, Carlotta; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    versus escitalopram and two versus fluoxetine), four studies (overall 1978 participants) comparing duloxetine with a newer antidepressants (three with venlafaxine and one with desvenlafaxine, respectively) and one study (overall 453 participants) comparing duloxetine with an antipsychotic drug which is also used as an antidepressive agent, quetiapine. No studies were found comparing duloxetine with tricyclic antidepressants. The pooled confidence intervals were rather wide and there were no statistically significant differences in efficacy when comparing duloxetine with other antidepressants. However, when compared with escitalopram or venlafaxine, there was a higher rate of drop out due to any cause in the patients randomised to duloxetine (odds ratio (OR) 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 2.62 and OR 1.56; 95% CI 1.14 to 2.15, respectively). There was also some weak evidence suggesting that patients taking duloxetine experienced more adverse events than paroxetine (OR 1.24; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.55). Authors’ conclusions Duloxetine did not seem to provide a significant advantage in efficacy over other antidepressive agents for the acute-phase treatment of major depression. No differences in terms of efficacy were found, even though duloxetine was worse than some SSRIs (most of all, escitalopram) and newer antidepressants (like venlafaxine) in terms of acceptability and tolerability. Unfortunately, we only found evidence comparing duloxetine with a handful of other active antidepressive agents and only a few trials per comparison were found (in some cases we retrieved just one trial). This limited the power of the review to detect moderate, but clinically meaningful differences between the drugs. As many statistical tests have been used in the review, the findings from this review are better thought of as hypothesis forming rather than hypothesis testing and it would be very comforting to see the conclusions replicated in future trials. Most of included studies

  11. Duloxetine for the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cheryl L; Mist, Scott D; Ross, Rebecca L; Jones, Kim D

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief review of the physiologic abnormalities seen in fibromyalgia, current theories of widespread pain, and treatment options, including emerging therapeutics, with a focus on the use of duloxetine to manage fibromyalgia symptoms. Major clinical trials that examine the efficacy and effectiveness of duloxetine to date are reviewed, and safety issues are discussed. PMID:20828282

  12. Darbepoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells) in people with chronic kidney failure ( ... alfa cannot be used in place of a red blood cell transfusion to treat severe anemia and ...

  13. Peginterferon Alfa-2a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... alfa-2a is also used to treat chronic hepatitis B infection (swelling of the liver caused by a ... the amount of hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the body. Peginterferon alfa-2a ...

  14. Short-term duloxetine administration affects neural correlates of mood-congruent memory.

    PubMed

    Tendolkar, Indira; van Wingen, Guido; Urner, Maren; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown how antidepressants reverse mood-congruent memory bias, a cognitive core factor causing and maintaining depression. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design, we investigated the effect of a short-term treatment (14 days) with the dual reuptake inhibitor duloxetine on neural correlates of mood-congruent and mood-incongruent memory formation and retrieval in healthy volunteers who underwent a sad mood induction procedure. Duloxetine did not affect acute mood state or memory performance, but interacted with brain processes mediating mood-congruent memory. It decreased activity related to successful memory formation for mood-congruent and -incongruent items in a set of brain regions comprising the putamen and the middle frontal gyrus, as well as the middle and the anterior cingulate cortex. Duloxetine specifically increased amygdala activity related to successful memory retrieval for mood-incongruent items. Here we show that short-term administration of duloxetine affects the neural correlates of emotional memory formation and retrieval in a set of brain regions whose processing is related to affective state and its regulation. While duloxetine suppressed the neural correlates of emotional memory formation in general, it specifically enhanced amygdala processes associated with mood-incongruent memory retrieval. This pattern of results shows how an antidepressant may reduce emotional memory formation and reverse mood-congruent processing biases at retrieval.

  15. Antidepressant drugs in convulsive seizures: Pre-clinical evaluation of duloxetine in mice.

    PubMed

    Santana-Coelho, Danielle; Souza-Monteiro, José Rogerio; Paraense, Ricardo S O; Busanello, Guilherme L; Arrifano, Gabriela P F; Mendonça, Jackson R; Silveira-Junior, Mauro E P; Royes, Luiz Fernando F; Crespo-López, Maria Elena

    2016-10-01

    Convulsive seizures (CS) are deleterious consequences of acute cerebral insults and prejudicial events in epilepsy, affecting more than 50 million people worldwide. Molecular mechanisms of depression and epilepsy include an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission provoking oxidative stress (OS). OS is intimately linked to the origin and evolution of CS and is modulated by antidepressant and anticonvulsant drugs. Although newer antidepressants have exhibited a possible protective role in CS, studies analyzing serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors merit to be further investigated. Thus, this study challenged the traditional model of pentylenetetrazol-induced CS, with only one administration of duloxetine. Male Swiss mice were treated with duloxetine (dose corresponding to the therapeutic range for human depression or greater, by allometric calculation; 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg), 30 min before pentylenetetrazol. Behavioral and electroencephalographic alterations were monitored. Lipid peroxidation, nitrites and catalase and superoxidase activities were measured in cortex. Behavioral and electroencephalographic results suggested a possible biphasic effect of duloxetine on CS, with anticonvulsant actions at therapeutic doses and a proconvulsant effect at higher doses. Duloxetine (20 mg/kg) also prevented lipid peroxidation and decreased catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in the cerebral cortex, with no influence on nitrites levels. These data demonstrated an anticonvulsant effect of duloxetine in CS for the first time. This extra anticonvulsant effect may allow the doses of anticonvulsants to be reduced, causing fewer side effects and possibly decreasing morbidity and mortality due to drug interactions in polytherapy.

  16. Short-term Treatment With Interferon Alfa Diminishes Expression of HIV-1 and Reduces CD4+ T-Cell Activation in Patients Coinfected With HIV and Hepatitis C Virus and Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Morón-López, Sara; Gómez-Mora, Elisabet; Salgado, Maria; Ouchi, Dan; Puertas, Maria C; Urrea, Víctor; Navarro, Jordi; Jou, Antoni; Pérez, Mercedes; Tural, Cristina; Clotet, Bonaventura; Montaner, Luis J; Blanco, Julià; Crespo, Manuel; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2016-03-15

    Long-term treatment with interferon (IFN) alfa plus ribavirin decreases the proviral human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) DNA level. However, the short-term impact of IFN alfa on persistent HIV and its effects on immune activation after antiretroviral therapy remain unknown. Our study showed that the cell-associated HIV RNA level and CD4(+) T-cell activation decreased in the IFN group (n = 10). No changes were detected in levels of residual plasma viremia, replication-competent reservoirs, proviral DNA, or 2-long-terminal repeat circles, although APOBEC3G, TRIM5α, BST2, and TRIM22 were upregulated in the IFN group. These data suggest that short-term treatment with IFN alfa combined with RBV decreases HIV expression, in part through inhibition of HIV transcription by TRIM22 and decrease in T-cell activation. PMID:26525407

  17. Effects of duloxetine and WAY100635 on pudendal inhibition of bladder overactivity in cats.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jeremy; Xiao, Zhiying; Schwen, Zeyad; Matsuta, Yosuke; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed at determining the effect of duloxetine (a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) on pudendal inhibition of bladder overactivity. Cystometrograms were performed on 15 cats under α-chloralose anesthesia by infusing saline and then 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to induce bladder overactivity. To inhibit bladder overactivity, pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at 5 Hz was applied to the right pudendal nerve at two and four times the threshold (T) intensity for inducing anal twitch. Duloxetine (0.03-3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously to determine the effect on PNS inhibition. AA irritation significantly (P < 0.01) reduced bladder capacity to 27.9 ± 4.6% of saline control capacity. PNS alone at both 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited bladder overactivity and increased bladder capacity to 83.6 ± 7.6% and 87.5 ± 7.7% of saline control, respectively. Duloxetine at low doses (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction in PNS inhibition without changing bladder capacity. However, at high doses (1-3 mg/kg) duloxetine significantly increased bladder capacity but still failed to enhance PNS inhibition. WAY100635 (N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide; a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, 0.5-1 mg/kg i.v.) reversed the suppressive effect of duloxetine on PNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) increased the inhibitory effect of duloxetine on bladder overactivity but did not enhance the effect of PNS. These results indicate that activation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors on the serotonergic neurons in the raphe nucleus may suppress duloxetine and PNS inhibition, suggesting that the coadministration of a 5-HT1A antagonist drug might be useful in enhancing the efficacy of duloxetine alone and/or the additive effect of PNS-duloxetine combination for the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. PMID:24667547

  18. Safety and clinical activity of elosulfase alfa in pediatric patients with Morquio A syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) less than 5 y

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Simon A.; Bialer, Martin; Parini, Rossella; Martin, Ken; Wang, Hui; Yang, Ke; Shaywitz, Adam J.; Harmatz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that elosulfase alfa has a favorable efficacy/safety profile in Morquio A patients aged ≥5 y. This study evaluated safety and impact on urine keratan sulfate (uKS) levels and growth velocity in younger patients. Methods: Fifteen Morquio A patients aged <5 y received elosulfase alfa 2.0 mg/kg/week for 52 wk during the primary treatment phase of a phase II, open-label, multinational study. Primary endpoint was safety and tolerability; secondary endpoints were change in uKS and growth velocity over 52 wk. Results: All 15 patients completed the primary treatment phase. Six of 743 infusions (0.8%) administered led to adverse events (AEs) requiring infusion interruption and medical intervention. Eleven patients (73.3%) had ≥1 study drug-related AE, mostly infusion-associated reactions. Mean z-score growth rate per year numerically improved from −0.6 at baseline to −0.4 at week 52. Comparison to untreated subjects of similar age in the Morquio A Clinical Assessment Program study showed a smaller decrease in height z-scores for treated than for untreated patients. Mean percent change from baseline in uKS was −30.2% at 2 wk and −43.5% at 52 wk. Conclusion: Early intervention with elosulfase alfa is well-tolerated and produces a decrease in uKS and a trend toward improvement in growth. PMID:26331768

  19. Duloxetine

    MedlinePlus

    ... a long-lasting condition that may cause pain, muscle stiffness and tenderness, tiredness, and difficulty falling asleep ... is also used to treat ongoing bone or muscle pain such as lower back pain or osteoarthritis ( ...

  20. Asfotase alfa therapy for children with hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Madson, Katherine L.; Phillips, Dawn; Reeves, Amy L.; McAlister, William H.; Yakimoski, Amy; Mack, Karen E.; Hamilton, Kim; Kagan, Kori; Fujita, Kenji P.; Thompson, David D.; Moseley, Scott; Odrljin, Tatjana; Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is caused by loss-of-function mutation(s) of the gene that encodes the tissue-nonspecific isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). Consequently, cell-surface deficiency of TNSALP phosphohydrolase activity leads to extracellular accumulation of inorganic pyrophosphate, a natural substrate of TNSALP and inhibitor of mineralization. Children with HPP can manifest rickets, skeletal pain, deformity, fracture, muscle weakness, and premature deciduous tooth loss. Asfotase alfa is a recombinant, bone-targeted, human TNSALP injected s.c. to treat HPP. In 2012, we detailed the 1-year efficacy of asfotase alfa therapy for the life-threatening perinatal and infantile forms of HPP. Methods. Here, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of asfotase alfa treatment administered to children 6–12 years of age at baseline who were substantially impaired by HPP. Two radiographic scales quantitated HPP skeletal disease, including comparisons to serial radiographs from similarly affected historical control patients. Results. Twelve children receiving treatment were studied for 5 years. The 6-month primary endpoint was met, showing significant radiographic improvement. Additional significant improvements included patient growth, strength, motor function, agility, and quality of life, which for most patients meant achieving normal values for age- and sex-matched peers that were sustained at 5 years of treatment. For most, pain and disability resolved. Mild to moderate injection-site reactions were common and were sometimes associated with lipohypertrophy. Low anti–asfotase alfa antibody titers were noted in all patients. No evidence emerged for clinically important ectopic calcification or treatment resistance. Conclusions. Asfotase alfa enzyme replacement therapy has substantial and sustained efficacy with a good safety profile for children suffering from HPP. Trial Registration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00952484 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show

  1. Asfotase alfa therapy for children with hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Madson, Katherine L.; Phillips, Dawn; Reeves, Amy L.; McAlister, William H.; Yakimoski, Amy; Mack, Karen E.; Hamilton, Kim; Kagan, Kori; Fujita, Kenji P.; Thompson, David D.; Moseley, Scott; Odrljin, Tatjana; Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is caused by loss-of-function mutation(s) of the gene that encodes the tissue-nonspecific isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). Consequently, cell-surface deficiency of TNSALP phosphohydrolase activity leads to extracellular accumulation of inorganic pyrophosphate, a natural substrate of TNSALP and inhibitor of mineralization. Children with HPP can manifest rickets, skeletal pain, deformity, fracture, muscle weakness, and premature deciduous tooth loss. Asfotase alfa is a recombinant, bone-targeted, human TNSALP injected s.c. to treat HPP. In 2012, we detailed the 1-year efficacy of asfotase alfa therapy for the life-threatening perinatal and infantile forms of HPP. Methods. Here, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of asfotase alfa treatment administered to children 6–12 years of age at baseline who were substantially impaired by HPP. Two radiographic scales quantitated HPP skeletal disease, including comparisons to serial radiographs from similarly affected historical control patients. Results. Twelve children receiving treatment were studied for 5 years. The 6-month primary endpoint was met, showing significant radiographic improvement. Additional significant improvements included patient growth, strength, motor function, agility, and quality of life, which for most patients meant achieving normal values for age- and sex-matched peers that were sustained at 5 years of treatment. For most, pain and disability resolved. Mild to moderate injection-site reactions were common and were sometimes associated with lipohypertrophy. Low anti–asfotase alfa antibody titers were noted in all patients. No evidence emerged for clinically important ectopic calcification or treatment resistance. Conclusions. Asfotase alfa enzyme replacement therapy has substantial and sustained efficacy with a good safety profile for children suffering from HPP. Trial Registration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00952484 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show

  2. Duloxetine Inhibits Microglial P2X4 Receptor Function and Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Shota; Zhang, Jiaming; Kometani, Miho; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Kohno, Keita; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptors (P2X4R) are a family of ATP-gated non-selective cation channels. We previously demonstrated that activation of P2X4R in spinal microglia is crucial for neuropathic pain, a highly debilitating chronic pain condition, suggesting that P2X4R is a potential therapeutic target for treating neuropathic pain. Thus, the identification of a compound that has a potent inhibitory effect on P2X4R is an important clinical challenge. In the present study, we screened a chemical library of clinically approved drugs and show for the first time that duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, has an inhibitory effect on rodent and human P2X4R. In primary cultured microglial cells, duloxetine also inhibited P2X4R-, but not P2X7R-, mediated responses. Moreover, intrathecal administration of duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain produced a reversal of nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia, a cardinal symptom of neuropathic pain. In rats that were pretreated with a serotonin-depleting agent and a noradrenaline neurotoxin, the antiallodynic effect of duloxetine was reduced, but still remained. Based on these results, we suggest that, in addition to duloxetine’s primary inhibitory action on serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, an inhibitory effect on P2X4R may be involved at least in part in an antiallodynic effect of intrathecal duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain. PMID:27768754

  3. ALFA: Automated load forecasting assistant

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbour, K.; Riveros, J.F.V.; Landsbergen, D.; Meyer, W.

    1988-08-01

    ALFA, an expert system for forecasting short term demand for electricity is presented. ALFA is in operation at the new Energy Management System center at Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation in Upstate New York, generating the real time hourly load forecasts up to 48 hours in advance. ALFA uses an extensive 10 year historical data base of hourly observations of 12 weather variables and load, and a rule base that takes into account daily, weekly, and seasonal variations of load, as well as holidays, special events, and load growth. A satellite interface for the real-time acquisition of weather data, and the machine-operator interface are also discussed.

  4. Effects of Duloxetine Treatment on Brain Response to Painful Stimulation in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    López-Solà, Marina; Pujol, Jesus; Hernández-Ribas, Rosa; Harrison, Ben J; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Deus, Joan; Ortiz, Héctor; Menchón, José M; Vallejo, Julio; Cardoner, Narcís

    2010-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a constellation of affective, cognitive, and somatic symptoms associated with functional abnormalities in relevant brain systems. Painful stimuli are primarily stressful and can trigger consistent responses in brain regions highly overlapping with the regions altered in MDD patients. Duloxetine has proven to be effective in treating both core emotional symptoms and somatic complaints in depression. This study aimed to assess the effects of duloxetine treatment on brain response to painful stimulation in MDD patients. A total of 13 patients and a reference group of 20 healthy subjects were assessed on three occasions (baseline, treatment week 1, and week 8) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during local application of painful heat stimulation. Treatment with duloxetine was associated with a significant reduction in brain responses to painful stimulation in MDD patients in regions generally showing abnormally enhanced activation at baseline. Clinical improvement was associated with pain-related activation reductions in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, right prefrontal cortex, and pons. Pontine changes were specifically related to clinical remission. Increased baseline activations in the right prefrontal cortex and reduced deactivations in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex predicted treatment responders at week 8. This is the first fMRI study addressed to assess the effect of duloxetine in MDD. As a novel approach, the application of painful stimulation as a basic neural stressor proved to be effective in mapping brain response changes associated with antidepressant treatment and brain correlates of symptom improvement in regions of special relevance to MDD pathophysiology. PMID:20668437

  5. Comparison of neurogenic effects of fluoxetine, duloxetine and running in mice

    PubMed Central

    Marlatt, Michael W.; Lucassen, Paul J.; van Praag, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis can be regulated by extrinsic factors, such as exercise and antidepressants. While there is evidence that the serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (Prozac) enhances neurogenesis, the new dual serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine has not been evaluated in this context. In addition, it is unclear whether effects of antidepressants and running on cell genesis and behavior are of similar magnitude in mice. Here,we assessed neurogenesis and open field behavior in 2 month old female C57Bl/6 mice after 28 days of treatment with either fluoxetine (18 mg/kg), duloxetine (2, 6 or 18 mg/kg) or exercise. New cell survival, as measured by 5-bromo-2´-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled cells, was enhanced by 200% in the running group only. Both running and fluoxetine, but not duloxetine, increased the percentage of new cells that became neurons. In the open field test, animals treated with either drug spent less time in the center than controls and runners. In addition, fluoxetine treatment resulted in reduced locomotor activity. Together, these data not only show that the neurogenic response to exercise is much stronger than to antidepressants, but also imply a low likelihood that reported effects of these two drugs on anxiety are mediated by adult neurogenesis in C57Bl/6 mice. PMID:20381469

  6. The role of duloxetine in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Carano, Alessandro; Scali, Marco; Valchera, Alessandro; Campanella, Daniela; D'Albenzio, Alessandro; Di Giuseppe, Berardo; Moschetta, Francesco Saverio; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Ferro, Filippo Maria

    2008-10-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are the most common type of psychiatric disorders, with a mean incidence of 18.1% and a lifetime prevalence of 28.8%. Pharmacologic options studied for treating ADs may include benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), noradrenergic and specific serotonergic drug (NaSSA) and dual-reuptake inhibitors of serotonin and norepinephrine (SNRIs). In this context, the development of SNRIs (venlafaxine and duloxetine) has been particularly useful. As a dual-acting intervention that targets two neurotransmitter systems, these medications would appePar promising for the treatment of ADs. The purpose of this review was to elucidate current facts and views about the role of duloxetine in the treatment of ADs. In February 2007, duloxetine was approved by FDA for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The results of trials evaluating the use duloxetine in the treatment of GAD are supportive on its efficacy even if further studies on long-term use are needed. Apart from some interesting case reports, no large studies are, to date, present in literature about duloxetine and other ADs such as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and the relative good tolerability of duloxetine may be further investigated to widen the therapeutic spectrum of ADs. PMID:19183783

  7. The safety of duloxetine during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-12-01

    Depression is common in women, especially during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Untreated depression is associated with many adverse gestational outcomes. It is therefore important to know about the safety of different antidepressant drugs during pregnancy and lactation so that informed decisions can be made regarding treatment. This article summarizes published literature on the subject with regard to duloxetine, an antidepressant with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibition properties. In general, it appears that the use of duloxetine during pregnancy is associated with an increase in the risk of spontaneous abortion, but no increase in other adverse outcomes, such as major fetal malformations. Late-pregnancy exposure to duloxetine may be associated with poor neonatal adaptation syndrome, but the magnitude of this risk is not known. Infant exposure to duloxetine in breast milk is less than 1% of the maternal weight-adjusted dose, suggesting that duloxetine can be safely administered to a woman who is breastfeeding her infant. In general, the very limited data available on the subject do not uncover a signal that the use of duloxetine during pregnancy or lactation increases the risk of adverse outcomes.

  8. Velaglucerase alfa in the treatment of Gaucher disease type 1.

    PubMed

    Burrow, Thomas A; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2011-02-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessively inherited lysosomal storage disease that results from the defective activity of the enzyme acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase). Velaglucerase alfa was recently developed and approved as an alternative form to imiglucerase enzyme therapy. Despite differences in primary structure and glycosylation patterns, recent preclinical and clinical trials of the preparation have shown similar efficacy and safety profiles to those of imiglucerase. The development of alternative therapies, such as velaglucerase alfa for Gaucher disease, is providing clinicians with a larger armamentarium of therapies, allowing for a more personalized approach to patient care. PMID:21927713

  9. Safety and efficacy of velaglucerase alfa in Gaucher disease type 1 patients previously treated with imiglucerase.

    PubMed

    Zimran, Ari; Pastores, Gregory M; Tylki-Szymanska, Anna; Hughes, Derralynn A; Elstein, Deborah; Mardach, Rebecca; Eng, Christine; Smith, Laurie; Heisel-Kurth, Margaret; Charrow, Joel; Harmatz, Paul; Fernhoff, Paul; Rhead, William; Longo, Nicola; Giraldo, Pilar; Ruiz, Juan A; Zahrieh, David; Crombez, Eric; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2013-03-01

    Velaglucerase alfa is a glucocerebrosidase produced by gene activation technology in a human fibroblast cell line (HT-1080), and it is indicated as an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for the treatment of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1). This multicenter, open-label, 12-month study examined the safety and efficacy of velaglucerase alfa in patients with GD1 previously receiving imiglucerase. Eligible patients, ≥2 years old and clinically stable on imiglucerase therapy, were switched to velaglucerase alfa at a dose equal to their prior imiglucerase dose. Infusion durations were 1 hr every other week. Forty patients received velaglucerase alfa (18 male, 22 female; four previously splenectomized; age range 9-71 years). Velaglucerase alfa was generally well tolerated with most adverse events (AEs) of mild or moderate severity. The three most frequently reported AEs were headache (12 of 40 patients), arthralgia (9 of 40 patients), and nasopharyngitis (8 of 40 patients). No patients developed antibodies to velaglucerase alfa. There was one serious AE considered treatment-related: a grade 2 anaphylactoid reaction within 30 min of the first infusion. The patient withdrew; this was the only AE-related withdrawal. Hemoglobin concentrations, platelet counts, and spleen and liver volumes remained stable through 12 months. In conclusion, adult and pediatric patients with GD1, previously treated with imiglucerase, successfully transitioned to velaglucerase alfa, which was generally well tolerated and demonstrated efficacy over 12 months' treatment consistent with that observed in the velaglucerase alfa phase 3 clinical trial program. PMID:23339116

  10. Visual hallucinations during duloxetine treatment in a patient with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Tetsu; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Kaneko, Sunao

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine is a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor that is effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic pain. The safety of duloxetine has been shown by many previous studies. We report a patient who experienced visual hallucinations after taking duloxetine. The patient experienced insomnia and chronic somatic pain. He began taking duloxetine after a diagnosis of MDD and developed visual hallucinations after the duloxetine dose was increased. The hallucinations disappeared after the duloxetine dose was decreased and then stopped; the dose of quetiapine was increased as an alternative. The specific cause of the duloxetine-induced hallucinations is unclear. In addition to other prescription medications and possible interactions with duloxetine, increasing dopamine by blocking noradrenaline transporters or serotonergic neurotransmission function may contribute to the occurrence of hallucinations.

  11. Duloxetine-bupropion combination for treatment-resistant atypical depression: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Michele; Martino, Matteo; Mattei, Chiara; Prestia, Davide; Vinciguerra, Valentina; De Berardis, Domenico; De Pasquale, Concetta; Iasevoli, Felice; Mungo, Sergio; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2014-08-01

    The efficacy, safety, and tolerability of combined bupropion versus placebo using duloxetine as active reference drug, in patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depression with atypical features and a history of treatment resistance, were evaluated in this preliminary six-week study. Patients (n=46) had a baseline Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) ≥14 and were randomly assigned to 150/300 mg/day bupropion vs. placebo, which was added to 60 to 120 mg/day duloxetine depending on baseline depression severity. Atypical features of depression were assessed using the additional eight-item module of the Structured Interview Guide for the HAM-D with the Atypical Depression Supplement. By week 6, only five (21.7%) patients receiving duloxetine+placebo vs. six (26.1%) patients on the bupropion combination achieved response. No significant difference in final HAM-D scores between the two groups was observed between those patients achieving response. The presence of a higher number of atypical features significantly predicted non-response, with the relevant binary logistic regression model correctly classifying 17 out 22 (77.3%) of non-responders [Exp(B)=0.294; p=0.016] vs. 17 out 23 (73.9%) [Exp(B)=0.353; p=0.028] non-responder cases in the "+placebo" and "+bupropion" groups, respectively. In those patients receiving bupropion, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to withdrawal were more common among those receiving lower doses of the combination drug, and no life-threating dangers were noted. Additional studies, including an adequate course of duloxetine trial, are nonetheless aimed to allow a firm conclusion about the usefulness of the combination of duloxetine and bupropion for treatment-resistant cases of major depression with atypical features.

  12. Duloxetine-bupropion combination for treatment-resistant atypical depression: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Michele; Martino, Matteo; Mattei, Chiara; Prestia, Davide; Vinciguerra, Valentina; De Berardis, Domenico; De Pasquale, Concetta; Iasevoli, Felice; Mungo, Sergio; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2014-08-01

    The efficacy, safety, and tolerability of combined bupropion versus placebo using duloxetine as active reference drug, in patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depression with atypical features and a history of treatment resistance, were evaluated in this preliminary six-week study. Patients (n=46) had a baseline Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) ≥14 and were randomly assigned to 150/300 mg/day bupropion vs. placebo, which was added to 60 to 120 mg/day duloxetine depending on baseline depression severity. Atypical features of depression were assessed using the additional eight-item module of the Structured Interview Guide for the HAM-D with the Atypical Depression Supplement. By week 6, only five (21.7%) patients receiving duloxetine+placebo vs. six (26.1%) patients on the bupropion combination achieved response. No significant difference in final HAM-D scores between the two groups was observed between those patients achieving response. The presence of a higher number of atypical features significantly predicted non-response, with the relevant binary logistic regression model correctly classifying 17 out 22 (77.3%) of non-responders [Exp(B)=0.294; p=0.016] vs. 17 out 23 (73.9%) [Exp(B)=0.353; p=0.028] non-responder cases in the "+placebo" and "+bupropion" groups, respectively. In those patients receiving bupropion, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to withdrawal were more common among those receiving lower doses of the combination drug, and no life-threating dangers were noted. Additional studies, including an adequate course of duloxetine trial, are nonetheless aimed to allow a firm conclusion about the usefulness of the combination of duloxetine and bupropion for treatment-resistant cases of major depression with atypical features. PMID:24842649

  13. Early effects of duloxetine on emotion recognition in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Susan; Penton-Voak, Ian; Pinkney, Verity; Baldwin, David S; Munafò, Marcus R; Garner, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine is an effective treatment for major depression and generalised anxiety disorder. Neuropsychological models of antidepressant drug action suggest therapeutic effects might be mediated by the early correction of maladaptive biases in emotion processing, including the recognition of emotional expressions. Sub-chronic administration of duloxetine (for two weeks) produces adaptive changes in neural circuitry implicated in emotion processing; however, its effects on emotional expression recognition are unknown. Forty healthy participants were randomised to receive either 14 days of duloxetine (60 mg/day, titrated from 30 mg after three days) or matched placebo (with sham titration) in a double-blind, between-groups, repeated-measures design. On day 0 and day 14 participants completed a computerised emotional expression recognition task that measured sensitivity to the six primary emotions. Thirty-eight participants (19 per group) completed their course of tablets and were included in the analysis. Results provide evidence that duloxetine, compared to placebo, may reduce the accurate recognition of sadness. Drug effects were driven by changes in participants' ability to correctly detect subtle expressions of sadness, with greater change observed in the placebo relative to the duloxetine group. These effects occurred in the absence of changes in mood. Our preliminary findings require replication, but complement recent evidence that sadness recognition is a therapeutic target in major depression, and a mechanism through which SNRIs could resolve negative biases in emotion processing to achieve therapeutic effects. PMID:25759400

  14. Early effects of duloxetine on emotion recognition in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Susan; Penton-Voak, Ian; Pinkney, Verity; Baldwin, David S; Munafò, Marcus R; Garner, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine is an effective treatment for major depression and generalised anxiety disorder. Neuropsychological models of antidepressant drug action suggest therapeutic effects might be mediated by the early correction of maladaptive biases in emotion processing, including the recognition of emotional expressions. Sub-chronic administration of duloxetine (for two weeks) produces adaptive changes in neural circuitry implicated in emotion processing; however, its effects on emotional expression recognition are unknown. Forty healthy participants were randomised to receive either 14 days of duloxetine (60 mg/day, titrated from 30 mg after three days) or matched placebo (with sham titration) in a double-blind, between-groups, repeated-measures design. On day 0 and day 14 participants completed a computerised emotional expression recognition task that measured sensitivity to the six primary emotions. Thirty-eight participants (19 per group) completed their course of tablets and were included in the analysis. Results provide evidence that duloxetine, compared to placebo, may reduce the accurate recognition of sadness. Drug effects were driven by changes in participants' ability to correctly detect subtle expressions of sadness, with greater change observed in the placebo relative to the duloxetine group. These effects occurred in the absence of changes in mood. Our preliminary findings require replication, but complement recent evidence that sadness recognition is a therapeutic target in major depression, and a mechanism through which SNRIs could resolve negative biases in emotion processing to achieve therapeutic effects.

  15. Velaglucerase alfa: a new option for Gaucher disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Zimran, A

    2011-07-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD) results from inherited β-glucocerebrosidase gene mutations, leading to anemia, thrombocytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and skeletal disease. Velaglucerase alfa is a β-glucocerebrosidase produced by gene activation in a human cell line, and indicated for type 1 GD. A phase I/II clinical trial (TKT025; N = 12), its ongoing extension (TKT025EXT) and three phase III trials (total N = 82), showed that velaglucerase alfa is generally well tolerated in adult and pediatric patients. Many disease-related parameters improved significantly in two phase III trials in treatment-naïve patients, and were successfully maintained in imiglucerase-experienced patients in a phase II/III switch study. Ten adults in TKT025EXT sustained improvements through 5 years, including bone mineral density. Comparison with imiglucerase shows that velaglucerase alfa is an effective, generally well-tolerated alternative enzyme replacement therapy. In vitro data suggest velaglucerase alfa may be internalized into cells more efficiently and have a lower rate of seroconversion. However, these results do not necessarily correlate with clinical efficacy. PMID:22013559

  16. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... powder at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).It is best to inject peginterferon alfa-2b solution in vials or injection pens immediately after mixing. If necessary, vials or injection pens containing prepared peginterferon alfa-2b solution may be stored ...

  17. ALFA: Automated Line Fitting Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.

    2015-12-01

    ALFA fits emission line spectra of arbitrary wavelength coverage and resolution, fully automatically. It uses a catalog of lines which may be present to construct synthetic spectra, the parameters of which are then optimized by means of a genetic algorithm. Uncertainties are estimated using the noise structure of the residuals. An emission line spectrum containing several hundred lines can be fitted in a few seconds using a single processor of a typical contemporary desktop or laptop PC. Data cubes in FITS format can be analysed using multiple processors, and an analysis of tens of thousands of deep spectra obtained with instruments such as MUSE will take a few hours.

  18. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  19. Multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine increases frontal cortical oscillations unlike escitalopram and duloxetine – a quantitative EEG study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leiser, S C; Pehrson, A L; Robichaud, P J; Sanchez, C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose EEG studies show that 5-HT is involved in regulation of sleep–wake state and modulates cortical oscillations. Vortioxetine is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7, and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B partial agonist, 5-HT1A agonist, and 5-HT transporter inhibitor. Preclinical (animal) and clinical studies with vortioxetine show positive impact on cognitive metrics involving cortical function. Here we assess vortioxetine's effect on cortical neuronal oscillations in actively awake rats. Experimental Approach Telemetric EEG recordings were obtained with the following treatments (mg·kg−1, s.c.): vehicle, vortioxetine (0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 10), 5-HT1A agonist flesinoxan (2.5), 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron (0.30), 5-HT7 antagonist SB-269970-A (10), escitalopram (2.0), duloxetine (10) and vortioxetine plus flesinoxan. Target occupancies were determined by ex vivo autoradiography. Key Results Vortioxetine dose-dependently increased wakefulness. Flesinoxan, duloxetine, ondansetron, but not escitalopram or SB-269970-A increased wakefulness. Quantitative spectral analyses showed vortioxetine alone and with flesinoxan increased θ (4–8 Hz), α (8–12 Hz) and γ (30–50 Hz) power. Duloxetine had no effect on θ and γ, but decreased α power, while escitalopram produced no changes. Ondansetron and SB-269970 (≈31–35% occupancy) increased θ power. Flesinoxan (≈41% occupancy) increased θ and γ power. Conclusions and Implications Vortioxetine increased wakefulness and increased frontal cortical activity, most likely because of its 5-HT7 and 5-HT3 antagonism and 5-HT1A agonism. Vortioxetine differs from escitalopram and duloxetine by increasing cortical θ, α and γ oscillations. These preclinical findings suggest a role of vortioxetine in modulating cortical circuits known to be recruited during cognitive behaviours and warrant further investigation as to their clinical impact. PMID:24846338

  20. Epoetin alfa: into the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Adamson, J W

    1998-06-01

    First used successfully to correct the anemia associated with chronic renal failure, epoetin alfa has been shown to be highly effective in many patients with either hematologic or nonhematologic malignancies. Multiple studies have demonstrated effective response rates, with increases in hemoglobin concentration and reduction or elimination of transfusion requirements in up to 75% or 80% in such patients. Nevertheless, as clinical experience has grown, several issues have arisen. First, not all cancer patients respond to epoetin alfa and, consequently, it is important to identify those patients most likely to respond to make early clinical decisions regarding dose adjustment or drug withdrawal. Second, experience in patients with renal failure has revealed a state of "functional iron deficiency" and, thus, highlighted the importance of iron supplementation to optimize the response to epoetin alfa. Does "functional iron deficiency" complicate epoetin alfa therapy of patients with the anemia of cancer, and could such patients benefit from iron supplementation? Finally, some hematologic malignancies, especially myelodysplastic syndromes, can be resistant to epoetin alfa monotherapy. Can the effective response rates in such patients be improved by combining epoetin alfa therapy with the administration of other hematopoietic growth factors? Epoetin alfa has made substantial contributions to the care of patients with cancer and, with time, additional uses for this very valuable drug will become apparent.

  1. Duloxetine in the treatment of depression: an overview.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Francesco; Caputo, Mariella; Tecce, Mario Felice; Capasso, Anna

    2011-09-01

    Depression is a disorder that can be classified in the categories of non-organic psychiatric disorders and mood disorders. Mood tone is an important psychic function involved in the adaptation to both our internal and external world. It is flexible, that is, it goes up when we are in positive and favorable conditions, but it goes down when we are in negative and unpleasant states. We can define depression as a condition when mood tone loses its flexibility, it goes down and it's no longer influenced by favorable external events. In fact, depression is characterized by changes in the way how the affected individual thinks, feels and acts. Even if this change occurs gradually, a depressed subject is not the same as before. For example, a brilliant student could be persuaded to be not able to finish his studies; an affectionate mother could start to neglect her sons; an enterprising worker could lose every interest for his activity. Moreover, a depressed person doesn't care of his aspect or of himself. The surviving instinct could leave place to the desire to stop his own life. The most evident characteristic of depression in the adulthood is a sad mood, a gloomy solitary and apathetic attitude. A depressed subject could cry also with no apparent reason, he could have difficulty falling asleep or he could wake up very early in the morning and no longer returns to sleep. Or, instead, he could sleep more than usually and he could feel tired persistently. He could lose appetite and weight, or, in some cases, he could eat much more than usually and he could gain weight. Typically, a depressed person feels himself in a extremely negative way, he could think to be hopeless and helpless and he often condemns himself for small guilty. A depressed subject is pessimistic about himself and his own future; he loses interest in all what happens around him and he gets no satisfaction from the activities that before were pleasant. Some persons can be depressed also if they don

  2. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also available as a different product (PEG-Intron) that is used to treat chronic hepatitis C ( ... to remove it. If you are using Peg-Intron, read the monograph entitled Peginterferon alfa-2b (PEG- ...

  3. Elosulfase Alfa: a review of its use in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome).

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2014-10-01

    Elosulfase alfa (Vimizim(®)) is a recombinant form of the human lysosomal enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) that is lacking in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome). It is the first, and currently only, disease-specific treatment option for this very rare, progressively degenerative, autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder. Enzyme replacement therapy with elosulfase alfa aims to restore GALNS activity, thereby preventing the accumulation of keratan sulfate (KS) and chondroitin-6-sulfate in lysosomal compartments of cells that results in the clinical manifestations of MPS IVA. In clinical trials in children and adults with MPS IVA, intravenous elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg/week provided significant and sustained improvements in urinary levels of KS (a pharmacodynamic biomarker for the disease). In the key placebo-controlled, 24-week, phase 3 trial in patients with MPS IVA aged ≥5 years, elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg/week significantly improved endurance [least squares mean placebo-adjusted change from baseline in 6-min walk test distance 22.5 m (95 % CI 4.0-40.9)]. Infusion-associated reactions, the primary tolerability issue associated with elosulfase alfa, are generally mild to moderate in severity, self-limiting, and manageable. In the absence of a cure, GALNS enzyme replacement therapy with elosulfase alfa is an important achievement in the treatment of MPS IVA.

  4. An assessment of drug-drug interactions: the effect of desvenlafaxine and duloxetine on the pharmacokinetics of the CYP2D6 probe desipramine in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Patroneva, Albena; Connolly, Sandra M; Fatato, Penny; Pedersen, Ron; Jiang, Qin; Paul, Jeffrey; Guico-Pabia, Christine; Isler, Jennifer A; Burczynski, Michael E; Nichols, Alice I

    2008-12-01

    A number of antidepressants inhibit the activity of the cytochrome P450 2D6 enzyme system, which can lead to drug-drug interactions. Based on its metabolic profile, desvenlafaxine, administered as desvenlafaxine succinate, a new serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is not expected to have an impact on activity of CYP2D6. This single-center, randomized, open-label, four-period, crossover study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of multiple doses of desvenlafaxine (100 mg/day, twice the recommended therapeutic dose for major depressive disorder in the United States) and duloxetine (30 mg b.i.d.) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a single dose of desipramine (50 mg). A single dose of desipramine was given first to assess its PK. Desvenlafaxine or duloxetine was then administered, in a crossover design, so that steady-state levels were achieved; a single dose of desipramine was then coadministered. The geometric least-square mean ratios (coadministration versus desipramine alone) for area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) and peak plasma concentrations (C(max)) of desipramine and 2-hydroxydesipramine were compared using analysis of variance. Relative to desipramine alone, increases in AUC and C(max) of desipramine associated with duloxetine administration (122 and 63%, respectively) were significantly greater than those associated with desvenlafaxine (22 and 19%, respectively; P < 0.001). Duloxetine coadministered with desipramine was also associated with a decrease in 2-hydroxydesipramine C(max) that was significant compared with the small increase seen with desvenlafaxine and desipramine (-24 versus 9%; P < 0.001); the difference between changes in 2-hydroxydesipramine AUC did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.054). Overall, desvenlafaxine had a minimal impact on the PK of desipramine compared with duloxetine, suggesting a lower risk for CYP2D6-mediated drug interactions.

  5. Scientific Organization of the ALFA Legacy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    The ALFA Legacy Surveys are organized as a partnership between NAIC and the community of interested and involved academic researchers. NAIC has committed a large fraction of the time on the Arecibo telescope to the ALFA surveys for the next 5 or more years in return for which the ALFA Consortia are making a large commitment of personnel resources in conducting the surveys, writing the needed software, and archiving the data for use by others. The surveys are facilitated by means of commensal observations--simultaneous observations made by two or more Consortia each processing the same received signal using different spectrometers designed for different scientific applications. The spectrometer specifications are set by the Consortia, and the hardware is built by NAIC under contract to university-based instrumentation groups. The NAIC vision of its partnership with the ALFA consortia: (1) Is necessary to the success of the ALFA legacy surveys; (2) Provides the opportunity to re-establish an effective partnership between the national observatory and the academic research community; (3) Reflects the maturity of 50 years of research in radio astronomy. NAIC is operated by Cornell University under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  6. Retrospective chart review of duloxetine and pregabalin in the treatment of painful neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Manoj; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Mummaneni, Reddiah B; Khan, Saud; McVey, April; Saperstein, David; Herbelin, Laura; Ridings, Larry; Wang, Yunxia; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2011-09-01

    The primary aims of our study were to compare pregabalin and duloxetine in a neuromuscular clinic for diabetic neuropathic pain (DPN) and to study the effect of these medications in cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy. We performed a retrospective chart review of 143 patients who were started on pregabalin or duloxetine during a 10-month period in a tertiary neuromuscular outpatient center for neuropathic pain. Duloxetine and pregabalin were started in 103 and 91 patients, respectively. Ninety-two patients tried only one of the two medications while both medications were used at different time periods in 51 patients. Follow-up was available for 87 patients on pregabalin and 89 patients on duloxetine. More patients with neuropathic pain reported an improvement with pregabalin (33%) than duloxetine (21%). Duloxetine (38%) had a higher frequency of side effects compared to pregabalin (30%). However, these differences between pregabalin and duloxetine were not statistically significant. Despite the study's limitations of retrospective design, these findings suggest that both pregabalin and duloxetine are probably effective for neuropathic pain, secondary to diabetes or cryptogenic sensory peripheral neuropathy in a tertiary care academic neuromuscular center. Prospective randomized controlled comparative effectiveness studies are required for both drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  7. Retrospective Chart Review of Duloxetine and Pregabalin in the Treatment of Painful Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manoj; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Mummaneni, Reddiah B.; Khan, Saud; McVey, April; Saperstein, David; Herbelin, Laura; Ridings, Larry; Wang, Yunxia; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The primary aims of our study were to compare pregabalin and duloxetine in a neuromuscular clinic for diabetic neuropathic pain (DPN) and to study the effect of these medications in cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy. We performed a retrospective chart review of 143 patients who were started on pregabalin or duloxetine during a 10-month period in a tertiary neuromuscular outpatient center for neuropathic pain. Duloxetine and pregabalin were started in 103 and 91 patients, respectively. Ninety-two patients tried only one of the two medications while both medications were used at different time periods in 51 patients. Follow-up was available for 87 patients on pregabalin and 89 patients on duloxetine. More patients with neuropathic pain reported an improvement with pregabalin (33%) than duloxetine (21%). Duloxetine (38%) had a higher frequency of side effects compared to pregabalin (30%). However, these differences between pregabalin and duloxetine were not statistically significant. Despite the study’s limitations of retrospective design, these findings suggest that both pregabalin and duloxetine are probably effective for neuropathic pain, secondary to diabetes or cryptogenic sensory peripheral neuropathy in a tertiary care academic neuromuscular center. Prospective randomized controlled comparative effectiveness studies are required for both drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:21671841

  8. Duloxetine-induced hyponatremia in an elderly patient treated with thiazide diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Miyu; Koide, Tetsuro; Imanishi, Yoshinori; Matsui, Yuriyo; Matsuda, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a known adverse effect of duloxetine, and it can lead to potentially life-threatening complications. Administration of thiazide diuretics also has been the cause of hyponatremia. We report a case of duloxetine-induced hyponatremia in an elderly patient treated with thiazide diuretics. An 86-year-old woman treated with the trichlormethiazide was admitted for vertebral compression fracture with disorientation and nausea on the 6th day of treatment with duloxetine. Laboratory findings revealed hyponatremia, hypo-osmolality, concentrated urine, and increased urine sodium. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone was considered, therefore, duloxetine, and trichlormethiazide was discontinued and treated with fluid restriction, furosemide and sodium chloride administered orally. Disorientation and nausea were improved after correction of hyponatremia. Health care practitioners should be aware of the possibility of duloxetine-induced hyponatremia, particularly in patients treated with thiazide diuretics. PMID:25538343

  9. Efmoroctocog Alfa: A Review in Haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2016-09-01

    Efmoroctocog alfa (Elocta(®), Eloctate(®), Eloctate™), a first-in-class recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc), has an extended half-life compared with conventional factor VIII (FVIII) preparations, including recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) products. It is approved for the treatment and prophylaxis of bleeding in patients with haemophilia A in multiple countries worldwide. Data accumulated from pivotal phase III studies (A-LONG in adults and adolescents aged ≥12 years; Kids A-LONG in children aged <12 years) and their ongoing extension study (ASPIRE) have demonstrated the long-term effectiveness of efmoroctocog alfa for the treatment of acute bleeding episodes, perioperative management and routine prophylaxis in previously treated males with severe haemophilia A. Among patients on individualized efmoroctocog alfa prophylaxis who had previously received FVIII prophylaxis, all but one of those aged ≥12 years and three-quarters of those aged <12 years reduced their injection frequency compared with their pre-study regimen. FVIII replacement therapy with efmoroctocog alfa was generally well tolerated in previously treated patients, with no evidence of increased immunogenicity. The safety and efficacy of FVIII replacement therapy with efmoroctocog alfa in previously untreated males aged <6 years with severe haemophilia A are currently being evaluated. Although there are no direct, head-to-head studies, the available clinical trial evidence indicates that efmoroctocog alfa provides an effective alternative to conventional FVIII preparations (including rFVIIIs) for the management of haemophilia A. Moreover, by reducing the frequency of injections required, it has the potential to reduce treatment burden, and hence improve adherence to prophylaxis. PMID:27487799

  10. ALFA: an automated line fitting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.

    2016-03-01

    I present the automated line fitting algorithm, ALFA, a new code which can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary wavelength coverage and resolution, fully automatically. In contrast to traditional emission line fitting methods which require the identification of spectral features suspected to be emission lines, ALFA instead uses a list of lines which are expected to be present to construct a synthetic spectrum. The parameters used to construct the synthetic spectrum are optimized by means of a genetic algorithm. Uncertainties are estimated using the noise structure of the residuals. An emission line spectrum containing several hundred lines can be fitted in a few seconds using a single processor of a typical contemporary desktop or laptop PC. I show that the results are in excellent agreement with those measured manually for a number of spectra. Where discrepancies exist, the manually measured fluxes are found to be less accurate than those returned by ALFA. Together with the code NEAT, ALFA provides a powerful way to rapidly extract physical information from observations, an increasingly vital function in the era of highly multiplexed spectroscopy. The two codes can deliver a reliable and comprehensive analysis of very large data sets in a few hours with little or no user interaction.

  11. Duloxetine-induced Sleep Bruxism in Fibromyalgia Successfully Treated With Amitriptyline.

    PubMed

    Şahin Onat, S; Malas, F Ü

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman, who was suffering from widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and sleep disorder, was diagnosed as fibromyalgia. There was no apparent organic disease. Duloxetine therapy was introduced with a dose of 60 mg/day at bedtime. A few days later her husband noted severe teeth clenching and associated loud grinding noises during sleep. Then, duloxetine dosage was reduced to 30 mg/day. The bruxism continued with this dosage, thus the therapy was discontinued. The bruxism resolved after cessation. Three weeks later, duloxetine therapy was restarted at the dosage of 60 mg/day. On the third day of the therapy, bruxism started again and amitriptyline therapy at the dosage of 10 mg/day was added to duloxetine therapy. The dosage of amitriptyline was incrementally adjusted to 25 mg/ day. On the fourth day of the combined therapy, bruxism symptoms improved. Two months later, the bruxism symptoms were resolved and the complaints for fibromyalgia were under control. Although bruxism has been reported due to venlafaxine use, there is only one duloxetine-induced bruxism case in the literature which was treated with buspirone. However, we report duloxetine-induced bruxism treated successfully with amitriptyline in a patient with fibromyalgia. Tricyclic antidepressants have a suppression effect on the REM phase of the sleep cycle; this may help to cease the bruxism symptoms appearing in that phase of the sleep cycle. This is the first reported case of fibromyalgia with duloxetine-induced sleep bruxism successfully treated with amitriptyline.

  12. Introduction to ALFA and the GALFA Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.

    2004-12-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of the ALFA instrument, a 7 element focal plane array on the Arecibo 305m telescope, which covers the frequency range 1225 to 1525 MHz. Each pixel observes two orthogonal linear polarizations. There are several spectrometers for different types of observations. For Galactic astronomy, a FFT spectrometer has been developed by D. Werthimer and colleagues, which has 8192 channels covering 7 MHz ( 1500 km/s at 0.2 km/s resolution) along with 256 channels covering 100 MHz intended for measuring and removing spectral baselines. ALFA test observations have been underway since August 2004, and astronomical observations should be ramping up through Fall 2004 and be in full swing by early 2005. The GALFA consortium is comprised of individuals interested in using the ALFA system for galactic astronomy. It is divided by interest into subconsortia, focusing on a number of the outstanding problems which can be addressed by ALFA on the Arecibo telescope, with 8-10 K/Jy gain, 3.5' beamwidth, and 30-35 K system temperature. One subconsortium is planning to carry out a survey of 21cm continuum radiation from the Milky Way, focusing on mapping the polarized emission in order to perform Faraday tomography of the magnetic field distribution. Radio recombination lines are the focus of another subconsortium; the ALFA system will be able to observe multiple RRLs that fall within its bandpass. HI emission and absorption will be utilized by a number of consortia, but applied to different problems, including the Galactic plane, high latitude clouds, high velocity clouds, turbulence, and the relationship of the atomic and molecular components of the ISM. Each subconsortium is making plans, starting with relatively small-scale projects, and working towards large-scale projects. Commensal (GALFA together with extragalactic or pulsar observations) are anticipated, using multiple signal processing systems simultaneously.

  13. Duloxetine: new drug. For stress urinary incontinence: too much risk, too little benefit.

    PubMed

    2005-12-01

    (1) The first-line treatment for women with stress urinary incontinence consists of pelvic floor exercises, which are risk-free and effective in two-thirds to three-quarters of cases. (2) Duloxetine, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is the first drug to be marketed in France for the treatment of moderate to severe stress urinary incontinence, after receiving European marketing authorization. (3) A dose-ranging study and three placebo-controlled trials lasting no more than three months showed that duloxetine reduced the frequency of stress incontinence by a median of one episode a day as compared with placebo. The tangible impact of duloxetine on quality of life is doubtful, with a maximum gain of five points on a 100-point scale. (4) A trial lasting 36 weeks showed that duloxetine was no more effective than placebo. (5) One trial compared a combination of physiotherapy and duloxetine versus each treatment alone and placebo. The published report of this trial is restricted to the duloxetine-placebo comparison, which raises doubts as to the possible benefit of the combination of duloxetine and physiotherapy. (6) About one-quarter of patients enrolled in clinical trials stopped taking duloxetine after less than three months because of adverse effects. More than 40 different types of adverse effects have been reported, including suicide attempts and potentially severe hepatic disorders. (7) Duloxetine is metabolised by the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes CYP 1A2 and CYP 2D6, creating a risk of interactions with other drugs that follow these metabolic pathways. (8) In practice, purely symptomatic treatments that have no documented efficacy but many adverse effects should not be used, especially when there is an alternative treatment with a positive risk-benefit balance.

  14. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa

    PubMed Central

    Orimo, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal), perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa) was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change treatments and prognosis of HPP. PMID:27274262

  15. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa.

    PubMed

    Orimo, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal), perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa) was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change treatments and prognosis of HPP. PMID:27274262

  16. Successful Within-patient Dose Escalation of Olipudase Alfa in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, Melissa P.; Jones, Simon A.; Soran, Handrean; Diaz, George A.; Lippa, Natalie; Thurberg, Beth L.; Culm-Merdek, Kerry; Shamiyeh, Elias; Inguilizian, Haig; Cox, Gerald F.; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Olipudase alfa, a recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), is an investigational enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for patients with ASM deficiency [ASMD; Niemann-Pick Disease (NPD) A and B]. This open-label phase 1b study assessed the safety and tolerability of olipudase alfa using within-patient dose escalation to gradually debulk accumulated sphingomyelin and mitigate the rapid production of metabolites, which can be toxic. Secondary objectives were pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and exploratory efficacy. Methods Five adults with nonneuronopathic ASMD (NPD B) received escalating doses (0.1 to 3.0 mg/kg) of olipudase alfa intravenously every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Results All patients successfully reached 3.0 mg/kg without serious or severe adverse events. One patient repeated a dose (2.0 mg/kg) and another had a temporary dose reduction (1.0 to 0.6 mg/kg). Most adverse events (97%) were mild and all resolved without sequelae. The most common adverse events were headache, arthralgia, nausea and abdominal pain. Two patients experienced single acute phase reactions. No patient developed hypersensitivity or anti-olipudase alfa antibodies. The mean circulating half-life of olipudase alfa ranged from 20.9 to 23.4 hours across doses without accumulation. Ceramide, a sphingomyelin catabolite, rose transiently in plasma after each dose, but decreased over time. Reductions in sphingomyelin storage, spleen and liver volumes, and serum chitotriosidase activity, as well as improvements in infiltrative lung disease, lipid profiles, platelet counts, and quality of life assessments, were observed. Conclusions This study provides proof-of-concept for the safety and efficacy of within-patient dose escalation of olipudase alfa in patients with nonneuronopathic ASMD. PMID:26049896

  17. Duloxetine and 8-OH-DPAT, but not fluoxetine, reduce depression-like behaviour in an animal model of chronic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Doods, Henri; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Ceci, Angelo

    2016-04-21

    The current study assessed whether antidepressant and/or antinociceptive drugs, duloxetine, fluoxetine as well as (±)-8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino] tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), are able to reverse depression-like behaviour in animals with chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats was selected as neuropathic pain model. Mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery by "electronic algometer" and forced swimming test (FST), which measured the time of immobility, and active behaviours climbing and swimming. The selective noradrenergic and serotonergic uptake blocker duloxetine (20mg/kg) and the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.5mg/kg) significantly reversed both mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour in CCI animals. Duloxetine significantly reversed depression-like behaviour in CCI rats by increasing the time of climbing and swimming, while 8-OH-DPAT attenuated depression-like behaviour mainly by increasing the time of swimming. However, the selective serotonergic uptake blocker fluoxetine (20mg/kg) failed to attenuate mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour, possibly due to confounding pro-nociceptive actions at 5-HT3 receptors. These data suggest to target noradrenergic and 5-HT1A receptors for treatment of chronic pain and its comorbidity depression.

  18. Duloxetine and 8-OH-DPAT, but not fluoxetine, reduce depression-like behaviour in an animal model of chronic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Doods, Henri; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Ceci, Angelo

    2016-04-21

    The current study assessed whether antidepressant and/or antinociceptive drugs, duloxetine, fluoxetine as well as (±)-8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino] tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), are able to reverse depression-like behaviour in animals with chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats was selected as neuropathic pain model. Mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery by "electronic algometer" and forced swimming test (FST), which measured the time of immobility, and active behaviours climbing and swimming. The selective noradrenergic and serotonergic uptake blocker duloxetine (20mg/kg) and the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.5mg/kg) significantly reversed both mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour in CCI animals. Duloxetine significantly reversed depression-like behaviour in CCI rats by increasing the time of climbing and swimming, while 8-OH-DPAT attenuated depression-like behaviour mainly by increasing the time of swimming. However, the selective serotonergic uptake blocker fluoxetine (20mg/kg) failed to attenuate mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour, possibly due to confounding pro-nociceptive actions at 5-HT3 receptors. These data suggest to target noradrenergic and 5-HT1A receptors for treatment of chronic pain and its comorbidity depression. PMID:26987721

  19. Arecibo Pulsar and Transient Surveys Using ALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.

    2008-02-01

    A large scale survey for pulsars and transients is being conducted at the Arecibo Observatory using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA). Data acquisition so far has been with correlation spectrometers that analyze a 0.1 GHz bandwidth at 1.4 GHz. The 256 frequency channels limit dispersion smearing to 1.2 ms at DMmax = 103 pc cm-3 while the sampling interval of 64 μs equals the dispersion smearing at DM~54 pc cm-3, providing high sensitivity to millisecond pulsars with standard periods out to implied distances of several kpc at low Galactic latitudes. In early 2008, we will use a new set of polyphase filter bank systems that provide the same time and frequency resolutions but over ALFA's full 0.3 GHz bandwidth. Currently the survey covers sky positions within 5° of the Galactic plane that are reachable with Arecibo. Preliminary results are given for some of the discoveries made so far, which include millisecond pulsars, a relativistic binary pulsar, a likely counterpart of a Compton GRO/EGRET gamma-ray source, and transient pulsars (including `RRATs''). We discuss the methodology of the survey, which includes archival of raw survey data at the Cornell Center for Advanced Computing and processing at distributed sites. The survey and follow up observations, which include timing observations, multiwavelength searches for orbital companions in the case of binary pulsars, etc. are organized through the Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) Consortium. We expect the Galactic plane survey to continue until at least 2010, most likely involving multiple passes on each sky position to optimize detection of variable sources. The ALFA system will also be used to survey intermediate Galactic latitudes for millisecond pulsars, relativistic binaries with large systemic velocities, and runaway pulsars that will escape the Galaxy.

  20. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Duloxetine for Central Pain in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Slee, April

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Duloxetine has a potential therapeutic role in treating MS-related pain. Methods: Thirty-eight MS patients were randomized 1:1 to receive duloxetine (n = 18) or matched placebo (n = 20). The dosing regimen was 30 mg daily for 1 week, then 60 mg daily for 5 weeks. The primary outcome measure was change in worst pain for week 6 relative to baseline recorded on a daily pain diary. Results: Of 38 randomized patients, 14 (78%) patients randomized to duloxetine and 18 (90%) randomized to placebo completed treatment per protocol. These participants had an average age of 55.5 years, 25% were male, and 66% had relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Baseline characteristics were similar. Discontinuations were due primarily to drug intolerance. Among those who completed treatment, worst pain at 6 weeks was reduced by 29% (±20%) for duloxetine versus 12% (±18%) for placebo (P = .016). Average daily pain at 6 weeks was reduced by 39% (±29%) in the duloxetine group compared to 10% (±18.8%) in the placebo group (P = .002). There were no significant changes (week 6 vs. baseline) or between-group differences for subject global impression, Beck Depression Inventory, 36-item Short Form Health Status Survey (SF-36), or sleep quality score. Conclusions: Fewer patients could tolerate duloxetine compared to placebo. Among patients who completed 6 weeks of treatment, there were significant reductions in average and worst daily pain scores with duloxetine compared to placebo. This study suggests that duloxetine has a direct pain-relieving effect in MS. PMID:25892978

  1. Augmentation of antidepressant effects of duloxetine and bupropion by caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kale, Pravin Popatrao; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu

    2014-09-01

    There is an unmet need in the treatment of depression suggesting requirement of new therapeutic approaches having better efficacy and safety profile. Patients receiving antidepressant therapy generally consume caffeine in the form of tea or coffee. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the augmentation of antidepressant effects of duloxetine and/or bupropion with caffeine. Male Swiss Albino mice received treatment of normal saline (10 ml/kg), 'caffeine alone' (10mg/kg), 'duloxetine alone' (10mg/kg), 'bupropion alone' (10mg/kg), caffeine+duloxetine (5mg/kg, each), bupropion+caffeine (5mg/kg, each), and bupropion+duloxetine (5mg/kg, each) through the intra-peritoneal route. The immobility period was analyzed 30 min after the treatment in forced swim and tail suspension tests. Norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin levels were analyzed in hippocampus, cerebral cortex and whole brain using HPLC with fluorescence detector. Euthanasia was performed 1h after treatment. Comparison between vehicle treated group and other groups showed significant decrease in immobility in all drug treated groups in both antidepressant models. Caffeine plus duloxetine treated group was better among the combination treated groups in terms of decrease in immobility and increase in norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin levels in hippocampi, cerebral cortices, and whole brain when compared to their respective monotherapy treated groups. These combination approaches may help in reducing the dose of duloxetine/bupropion, and consequently lower the associated side/adverse effects.

  2. Non-fatal overdose of duloxetine in combination with other antidepressants and benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Menchetti, Marco; Gozzi, Beatrice Ferrari; Saracino, Maria Addolorata; Mercolini, Laura; Petio, Carmine; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2009-01-01

    The pharmaco-toxicological profile of duloxetine, a novel SNRI antidepressant, is still not completely known; in particular, intoxication cases have been scarcely studied. Here a duloxetine overdose case, in combination with other antidepressants and benzodiazepines, is reported and the chemical-clinical correlations discussed; this is probably the first detailed report of such a case. The patient referred to have ingested nine tablets of Cymbalta (more than 500 mg of duloxetine) and high amounts of four other drugs (venlafaxine, trazodone, sertraline and clonazepam). The patient was dozy and confused and some electrolyte imbalances were found. After gastrolavage, toxicological analyses revealed high plasma levels of duloxetine (384 ng/ml) and low levels of the other supposedly involved drugs. The overdose resulted to be not fatal and the outcome was relatively benign, also thanks to the fast emergency assistance. This case suggests that clinicians should be alerted to the possibility of toxic effects caused by simultaneous overdoses of duloxetine and other antidepressants and that caution should be used when prescribing more than one of these drugs to patients at risk of suicide.

  3. Real-world treatment patterns and opioid use in chronic low back pain patients initiating duloxetine versus standard of care

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jeffrey Scott; Wu, Ning; Chen, Shih-Yin; Yu, Xia; Peng, Xiaomei; Novick, Diego

    2013-01-01

    To describe the use of pain medications in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) after initiating duloxetine or standard of care (SOC [muscle relaxants, gabapentin, pregabalin, venlafaxine, and tricyclic antidepressants]) for pain management, pharmacy and medical claims from Surveillance Data, Inc (SDI) Health were analyzed. Adult patients with CLBP who initiated duloxetine or SOC between November 2010 and April 2011 were identified. Treatment initiation was defined as no pill coverage for duloxetine or SOC in the previous 90 days. Included patients had no opioid use in the 90 days before initiation. Propensity score matching was used to select patients with similar baseline demographic and clinical characteristics for duloxetine and SOC cohorts. Compliance with index medication was assessed via medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC) for 6 months after initiation. The proportion of patients receiving opioids and days on opioids after index date were assessed, and regression models were estimated to compare opioid use between cohorts. A total of 766 patients initiated duloxetine and 6,206 patients initiated SOC. After matching, 743 patients were selected for the duloxetine (mean age 57 years; female 74%) and SOC (mean age 57 years; female 75%) cohorts, respectively. Of the duloxetine cohort, 92% started on or below recommended daily dose (≤60 mg). The duloxetine cohort had significantly higher MPR (0.78 versus [vs] 0.60) and PDC (0.50 vs 0.31), were less likely to use opioids (45% vs 61%), and had fewer days on opioids (median 0 vs 7 days) than the SOC cohort (all P < 0.001). After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, the duloxetine cohort initiated opioids later than the SOC cohort (hazard ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.89). CLBP patients initiating duloxetine had better compliance with initiated medication and were less likely to use opioids than those initiating SOC. PMID:24379695

  4. Characterization of IXINITY® (Trenonacog Alfa), a Recombinant Factor IX with Primary Sequence Corresponding to the Threonine-148 Polymorph

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Dougald M.; Jenny, Richard J.; Van Cott, Kevin E.; Saward, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to extensively characterize the first recombinant FIX therapeutic corresponding to the threonine-148 (Thr-148) polymorph, IXINITY (trenonacog alfa [coagulation factor IX (recombinant)]). Gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and gel filtration were used to determine purity and confirm structure. Chromatographic and mass spectrometry techniques were used to identify and quantify posttranslational modifications. Activity was assessed as the ability to activate factor X (FX) both with and without factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) and in a standard clotting assay. All results were consistent across multiple lots. Trenonacog alfa migrated as a single band on Coomassie-stained gels; activity assays were normal and showed <0.002 IU of activated factor IX (FIXa) per IU of FIX. The molecule has >97%  γ-carboxylation and underwent the appropriate structural change upon binding calcium ions. Trenonacog alfa was activated normally with factor XIa (FXIa); once activated it bound to FVIIIa and FXa. When activated to FIXa, it was inhibited efficiently by antithrombin. Glycosylation patterns were similar to plasma-derived FIX with sialic acid content consistent with the literature reports of good pharmacokinetic performance. These studies have shown that trenonacog alfa is a highly pure product with a primary sequence and posttranslational modifications consistent with the common Thr-148 polymorphism of plasma-derived FIX. PMID:26997955

  5. Duloxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder: safety and tolerability associated with dose escalation.

    PubMed

    Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Mallinckrodt, Craig H; Prakash, Apurva; Watkin, John G; Carter, William P

    2007-01-01

    Duloxetine has demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) at a dose of 60 mg/day (given once daily). Whereas the target dose for the majority of patients is 60 mg/day, higher duloxetine doses (up to 120 mg/day) have been studied using a twice-daily dosing schedule. To further investigate the pharmacological profile of duloxetine within a once-daily dosing regimen at doses above 60 mg, we examined the safety and tolerability of duloxetine during a dose escalation from 60 mg/day to 120 mg/day. This single-arm, non-placebo-controlled study incorporated a 7-week dose escalation phase, in which patients and investigators were blinded as to timing of dose increases, followed by an open-label extension phase of up to 2 years duration. Patients (age >or=18 years) meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD (n=128) received placebo for 1 week, followed by duloxetine (60 mg/day) titrated after 1 week to 90 mg/day, and after a further week to 120 mg/day. The dose of 120 mg/day was then maintained for 4 weeks. The extension phase comprised an initial 6-week dose stabilization period, during which duloxetine was tapered to the lowest effective dose, followed by continuation therapy at the stabilized dose. We assessed safety using spontaneously reported treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), changes in vital signs, electrocardiograms (ECGs), laboratory analytes, and visual analogue scales (VAS) for gastrointestinal (GI) disturbance. Efficacy measures included the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-17) total score, the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) and Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) scales, and VAS assessments of pain severity and interference. The rate of discontinuation due to adverse events during the acute phase of the study was 15.6%. The most frequently reported TEAEs were nausea, headache, dry mouth, dizziness, and decreased appetite. The majority of TEAEs were associated with initial duloxetine

  6. Inhibition of bladder overactivity by duloxetine in combination with foot stimulation or WAY-100635 treatment in cats.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Zeyad; Matsuta, Yosuke; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether duloxetine [a serotonin (5-HT)-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor] combined with transcutaneous foot stimulation or WAY-100635 (a 5-HT1A antagonist) can enhance inhibition of bladder overactivity in cats. Cystometrograms were performed on eight cats under α-chloralose anesthesia by infusing saline and then 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to induce bladder overactivity. To inhibit bladder overactivity, foot stimulation (5 Hz) was applied via transcutaneous pad electrodes to the right hindfoot at two and four times the threshold intensity for inducing a toe twitch. Duloxetine (0.003-3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously to determine the effect of combination treatment. After the 3 mg/kg dose of duloxetine, WAY-100635 (0.5 mg/kg) was given intravenously. AA irritation significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced bladder capacity to 42.7 ± 7.4% of the saline control capacity. Foot stimulation alone at both two and four times the threshold intensity significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited bladder overactivity and increased bladder capacity to 66.7 ± 6.3% and 85.7 ± 6.5% of the saline control, respectively. Duloxetine alone dose dependently inhibited bladder overactivity and completely restored bladder capacity to the saline control (109 ± 15.5%) at 3 mg/kg. Although duloxetine combined with foot stimulation did not further enhance inhibition, WAY-100635 (0.5 mg/kg) given after 3 mg/kg duloxetine further increased (P = 0.008) bladder capacity to 162.2 ± 22.5% of the saline control. Although duloxetine and foot stimulation independently inhibited bladder overactivity, combined treatment did not enhance inhibition. Duloxetine combined with WAY-100635, however, synergistically enhanced bladder inhibition, indicating a potential novel treatment for overactive bladder if duloxetine is combined with a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist drug. PMID:24154699

  7. Duloxetine in the treatment of chronic pain due to fibromyalgia and diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Alan; Luedtke, Kyle E; VanDenBerg, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Duloxetine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia and painful diabetic neuropathy at doses of 60 mg daily. Duloxetine has been shown to significantly improve the symptoms of chronic pain associated with these disorders, as measured by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory scores, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, and other various outcome measures in several placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, multicenter studies. Symptom improvement generally began within the first few weeks, and continued for the duration of the study. In addition, the efficacy of duloxetine was found to be due to direct effects on pain symptoms rather than secondary to improvements in depression or anxiety. Adverse events including nausea, constipation, dry mouth, and insomnia, were mild and transient and occurred at relatively low rates. In conclusion, duloxetine, a selective inhibitor for the serotonin and norepinephrine transporters, is efficacious in the treatment of chronic pain associated with fibromyalgia or diabetic neuropathy, and has a predictable tolerability profile, with adverse events generally being mild to moderate. PMID:21386950

  8. Agomelatine-induced akathisia with concomitant duloxetine medication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Imboden, C; Hatzinger, M

    2012-06-01

    A 29-year-old depressed, otherwise healthy female patient was treated with agomelatine and duloxetine. She developed subsequent akathisia, which subsided after cessation of agomelatine. As a cause we suggest a pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction leading to noradrenergic overstimulation. We recommend only gradual dose titration when combining the 2 substances to minimize the risk for side effects. PMID:22290205

  9. Duloxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder: comparisons of safety and efficacy.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Rahn K.; Mallinckrodt, Craig H.; Wohlreich, Madelaine M.; Watkin, John G.; Plewes, John M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pooled data from double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were utilized to compare the safety and efficacy of duloxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in African-American and Caucasian patients. METHODS: Efficacy and safety data were pooled from seven double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of duloxetine. Patients (aged > or =18 years) meeting DSM-IV criteria for MDD received duloxetine (40-120 mg/day; African Americans, N=69; Caucasians, N=748) or placebo (African Americans, N=59; Caucasians, N=594) for up to nine weeks. Efficacy measures included the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17) total score, the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) and Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) scales, and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) for pain. Safety was assessed using discontinuation rates, spontaneously reported treatment-emergent adverse events, vital signs and laboratory analyses, RESULTS: Based upon mean changes in HAMD17, CGI-S and PGI-I scales, the magnitude of duloxetine's treatment effects did not differ significantly between African-American and Caucasian patients. Discontinuation rates due to adverse events among duloxetine-treated patients were 13.0% for African Americans and 17.0% for Caucasians. No adverse event led to discontinuation in more than one African-American patient. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events in both ethnic groups included nausea, headache, constipation, dizziness and insomnia. The rate of occurrence of these events did not differ significantly between African-American and Caucasian patients. Mean changes from baseline for pulse, blood pressure, weight and laboratory analytes were small and showed no significant differences between African-American and Caucasian patients. CONCLUSION: In this analysis of data from seven clinical trials, no convincing evidence was found to suggest that the overall safety and tolerability profile or the efficacy profile

  10. Differential inhibition of cardiac and neuronal Na(+) channels by the selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors duloxetine and venlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Stoetzer, Carsten; Papenberg, Bastian; Doll, Thorben; Völker, Marc; Heineke, Joerg; Stoetzer, Marcus; Wegner, Florian; Leffler, Andreas

    2016-07-15

    Duloxetine and venlafaxine are selective serotonin-norepinephrine-reuptake-inhibitors used as antidepressants and co-analgesics. While venlafaxine rather than duloxetine induce cardiovascular side-effects, neither of the substances are regarded cardiotoxic. Inhibition of cardiac Na(+)-channels can be associated with cardiotoxicity, and duloxetine was demonstrated to block neuronal Na(+)-channels. The aim of this study was to investigate if the non-life threatening cardiotoxicities of duloxetine and venlafaxine correlate with a weak inhibition of cardiac Na(+)-channels. Effects of duloxetine, venlafaxine and amitriptyline were examined on endogenous Na(+)-channels in neuroblastoma ND7/23 cells and on the α-subunits Nav1.5, Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 with whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Tonic block of the cardiac Na(+)-channel Nav1.5 and rat-cardiomyocytes (CM) revealed a higher potency for duloxetine (Nav 1.5 IC50 14±1µM, CM IC50 27±3µM) as compared to venlafaxine (Nav 1.5 IC50 671±26µM, CM IC50 452±34µM). Duloxetine was as potent as the cardiotoxic antidepressant amitriptyline (IC50 13±1µM). While venlafaxine almost failed to induce use-dependent block on Nav1.5 and cardiomyocytes, low concentrations of duloxetine (1, 10µM) induced prominent use-dependent block similar to amitriptyline. Duloxetine, but not venlafaxine stabilized fast and slow inactivation and delayed recovery from inactivation. Duloxetine induced an unselective inhibition of neuronal Na(+)-channels (IC50 ND7/23 23±1µM, Nav1.7 19±2µM, Nav1.8 29±2). Duloxetine, but not venlafaxine inhibits cardiac Na(+)-channels with a potency similar to amitriptyline. These data indicate that an inhibition of Na(+)-channels does not predict a clinically relevant cardiotoxicity. PMID:27130441

  11. Enzyme replacement therapy with taliglucerase alfa: 36-month safety and efficacy results in adult patients with Gaucher disease previously treated with imiglucerase.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Shankar, Suma P; Petakov, Milan; Giraldo, Pilar; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Amato, Dominick J; Szer, Jeffrey; Chertkoff, Raul; Brill-Almon, Einat; Zimran, Ari

    2016-07-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is the first available plant cell-expressed human recombinant therapeutic protein. It is indicated for treatment of patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD) in adult and pediatric patients in several countries. Study PB-06-002 examined the safety and efficacy of taliglucerase alfa for 9 months in patients who previously received imiglucerase. The results of adult patients from Study PB-06-002 who continued receiving taliglucerase alfa in extension Study PB-06-003 for up to 36 months are reported here. Eighteen patients received at least one dose of taliglucerase alfa in Study PB-06-003; 10 patients completed 36 total months of therapy, and four patients who transitioned to commercial drug completed 30-33 months of treatment. In patients who completed 36 total months of treatment, mean percent (±standard error) changes from baseline/time of switch to taliglucerase alfa to 36 months were as follows: hemoglobin concentration, -1.0% (±1.9%; n = 10); platelet count, +9.3% (±9.8%; n = 10); spleen volume measured in multiples of normal (MN), -19.8% (±9.9%; n = 7); liver volume measured in MN, +0.9% (±5.4%; n = 8); chitotriosidase activity, -51.5% (±8.1%; n = 10); and CCL18 concentration, -36.5 (±8.0%; n = 10). Four patients developed antidrug antibodies, including one with evidence of neutralizing activity in vitro. All treatment-related adverse events were mild or moderate and transient. The 36-month results of switching from imiglucerase to taliglucerase alfa treatment in adults with GD provide further data on the clinical safety and efficacy of taliglucerase alfa beyond the initial 9 months of the original study. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00705939. Am. J. Hematol. 91:661-665, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27102949

  12. Erythropoietin, the biology of erythropoiesis and epoetin alfa. An overview.

    PubMed

    Bieber, E

    2001-05-01

    Erythropoietin, a glycoprotein hormone, is synthesized predominantly in the kidney and secreted by renal cortical interstitial cells in response to tissue hypoxia. Erythropoietin is the main regulator of the production of red blood cells. It functions in the recruitment and differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells and aids in their maintenance and survival. Erythropoietin also stimulates the synthesis of hemoglobin. In the last 15 years, the ready availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO, epoetin alfa) has permitted the clinical investigation and application of this hormone to the treatment of anemia in various patient populations. Epoetin alfa has been shown to accelerate erythropoiesis and reduce allogeneic blood transfusion in major elective, noncardiac, nonvascular surgery and in certain anemic patients with chronic renal failure, nonmyeloid malignancies and human immunodeficiency virus infection. In addition to improving hematologic parameters, epoetin alfa therapy can enhance health-related quality of life in these patients. The success of epoetin alfa in treating anemia in other surgical populations suggests that it may be of benefit in treating the perioperative anemia that is highly prevalent in gynecologic surgery patients. Further investigation of the use of epoetin alfa in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery would increase awareness of its benefits for this patient population.

  13. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration's approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age.

  14. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration's approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age. PMID:27366102

  15. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age. PMID:27366102

  16. Laboratory trend analyses and proactive adjustments to minimize the need for holding epoetin alfa doses.

    PubMed

    Breiterman-White, Randee; Reznicek, Jacci

    2008-01-01

    Holding doses of epoetin alfa (Epogen) alters the balance between red blood cell production and death rates, and leads to a decrease in hemoglobin (Hb) levels. Although clinical circumstances sometimes require that epoetin alfa doses be held, this can be minimized by monitoring longitudinal trends, predicting the probable future course of Hb, and intervening to proactively adjust epoetin alfa doses before holding is required.

  17. An evidence-based review of the potential benefits of taliglucerase alfa in the treatment of patients with Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Hollak, Carla EM

    2012-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, characterized by deficient activity of glucocerebrosidase leading to storage of glucocerebroside in tissue macrophages. Type I disease, the most prevalent form, lacks central nervous system involvement but presents primarily with variable degrees of hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, and bone disease. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy can reverse these manifestations. In addition to the two enzymes currently authorized for use, the newest enzyme, taliglucerase alfa, is at the late stages of clinical development. Taliglucerase alfa is a unique product, as it is the first plant cell–based recombinant enzyme therapy. This review considers the existing evidence for therapeutic efficacy of taliglucerase alfa in the treatment of the non-neuronopathic manifestations of Gaucher disease. Clinical studies encompass one phase I trial in healthy volunteers, one phase III trial, and preliminary results from both an extension study and a switch study. In the 9-month, randomized, double-blind phase III trial, treatment-naïve patients with type I Gaucher disease were treated with either 30 or 60 U/kg every 2 weeks. Dose-dependent improvements were achieved after 6 and 9 months of therapy, with reductions in spleen and liver volumes and improvements in hemoglobin levels. Platelet counts improved initially only in the higher-dose group, but preliminary results from the extension study also show significant increases in the lower-dose group. Bone marrow involvement, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, improved in almost all patients. Taliglucerase alfa has shown a good safety profile, with few patients experiencing hypersensitivity reactions and developing antibodies. An additional enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher disease would enable the treatment of more patients and would provide backup for unexpected production problems. Furthermore, it is expected that this new treatment would reduce the costs of

  18. Spectrofluorimetric Method for Determination of Duloxetine Hydrochloride in Bulk and Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms

    PubMed Central

    Prabu, S. L.; Shahnawaz, S.; Kumar, C. Dinesh; Shirwaikar, A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple accurate, sensitive and reproducible spectrofluorimetric method was developed for the analysis of duloxetine hydrochloride in pure and pharmaceutical dosage form. Duloxetine hydrochloride showed strong native fluorescence in 0.05 M acetic acid having excitation at 225 nm and emission at 340 nm. Effect of different solvents were thoroughly investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range from 0.020 to 0.400 μg/ml. The proposed method was statistically validated and successfully applied for analysis of capsule dosage forms. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were found to be 0.003 μg/ml and 0.010 μg/ml, respectively. The percentage recovery was found to be in the range of 98.71% to 99.17%. PMID:20046780

  19. Spectrofluorimetric method for determination of duloxetine hydrochloride in bulk and pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Prabu, S L; Shahnawaz, S; Kumar, C Dinesh; Shirwaikar, A

    2008-01-01

    A simple accurate, sensitive and reproducible spectrofluorimetric method was developed for the analysis of duloxetine hydrochloride in pure and pharmaceutical dosage form. Duloxetine hydrochloride showed strong native fluorescence in 0.05 M acetic acid having excitation at 225 nm and emission at 340 nm. Effect of different solvents were thoroughly investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range from 0.020 to 0.400 mug/ml. The proposed method was statistically validated and successfully applied for analysis of capsule dosage forms. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were found to be 0.003 mug/ml and 0.010 mug/ml, respectively. The percentage recovery was found to be in the range of 98.71% to 99.17%. PMID:20046780

  20. Epoetin alfa. A review of its clinical efficacy in the management of anaemia associated with renal failure and chronic disease and its use in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, C J; Wagstaff, A J

    1995-08-01

    Epoetin alfa is a recombinant form of erythropoietin, a glycoprotein hormone which stimulates red blood cell production by stimulating the activity of erythroid progenitor cells. This review discusses the use of the drug in the management of anaemia in diseases often associated with advancing age [renal failure, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other chronic diseases, and the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)] and in surgical patients. Intravenous and subcutaneous therapy with epoetin alfa raises haematocrit and haemoglobin levels, and reduces transfusion requirements, in anaemic patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. The drug is also effective in the correction of anaemia in patients with chronic renal failure not yet requiring dialysis and does not appear to affect renal haemodynamics adversely or to precipitate the onset of end-stage renal failure. Response rates of 32 to 82% with epoetin alfa therapy have been reported in patients with anaemia associated with cancer or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Limited data in patients with anaemia associated with RA show correction of anaemia after epoetin alfa treatment. Response rates to the drug of 0 to 56% have been noted in patients with MDS. Epoetin alfa also reduces anaemia, increases the capacity for autologous blood donation and reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion in patients scheduled to undergo surgery. Hypertension occurs in 30 to 35% of patients with end-stage renal failure who receive epoetin alfa, but this can be managed successfully with correction of fluid status and antihypertensive medication where necessary, and is minimised by avoiding rapid increases in haematocrit. Although vascular access thrombosis has not been conclusively linked to therapy with the drug, increased heparinisation may be required when it is administered to patients on haemodialysis. Epoetin alfa does not appear to exert any direct cerebrovascular adverse effects. Thus

  1. ALFA: The new ALICE-FAIR software framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Turany, M.; Buncic, P.; Hristov, P.; Kollegger, T.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lindenstruth, V.; Manafov, A.; Richter, M.; Rybalchenko, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Winckler, N.

    2015-12-01

    The commonalities between the ALICE and FAIR experiments and their computing requirements led to the development of large parts of a common software framework in an experiment independent way. The FairRoot project has already shown the feasibility of such an approach for the FAIR experiments and extending it beyond FAIR to experiments at other facilities[1, 2]. The ALFA framework is a joint development between ALICE Online- Offline (O2) and FairRoot teams. ALFA is designed as a flexible, elastic system, which balances reliability and ease of development with performance using multi-processing and multithreading. A message- based approach has been adopted; such an approach will support the use of the software on different hardware platforms, including heterogeneous systems. Each process in ALFA assumes limited communication and reliance on other processes. Such a design will add horizontal scaling (multiple processes) to vertical scaling provided by multiple threads to meet computing and throughput demands. ALFA does not dictate any application protocols. Potentially, any content-based processor or any source can change the application protocol. The framework supports different serialization standards for data exchange between different hardware and software languages.

  2. Comparative clinical profile of mirtazapine and duloxetine in practical clinical settings in Japan: a 4-week open-label, parallel-group study of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Kei; Kishi, Taro; Moriwaki, Masatsugu; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Hirano, Shigeki; Yamanouchi, Yoshio; Funahashi, Toshihiko; Iwata, Nakao

    2013-01-01

    No studies have compared mirtazapine with duloxetine in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Fifty-six patients were nonrandomly assigned to a 4-week treatment with either 15 to 45 mg/day of mirtazapine (n = 22) or 20 to 60 mg/day of duloxetine (n = 34). The primary efficacy measurements were the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) and the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression 6-point Rating Scale (MADRS) scores. The second efficacy measurements were the response and remission rates of treatment. Tolerability assessments were also performed. Fifty-six patients (43 male; age, 43.6 years) were recruited. There was no significant difference in the discontinuation rate between the mirtazapine and duloxetine treatment groups (P = 0.867). Both mirtazapine and duloxetine significantly improved the HRSD and MADRS scores from baseline (P < 0.0001–0.0004). While mirtazapine was superior to duloxetine in the reduction of HRSD scores (P = 0.0421), there was no significant change in MADRS scores in terms of between-group differences (P = 0.171). While more somnolence was observed with mirtazapine (P = 0.0399), more nausea was associated with duloxetine (P = 0.0089). No serious adverse events were observed for either antidepressant. Mirtazapine and duloxetine were safe and well-tolerated treatments for Japanese patients with MDD. Double-blind controlled studies are needed to further explore the efficacy and safety of mirtazapine and duloxetine in Japanese patients with MDD. PMID:23766648

  3. Real-world comparison of health care utilization between duloxetine and pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, X; Sun, P; Novick, D; Andrews, J; Sun, S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare health care utilization of duloxetine initiators and pregabalin initiators among fibromyalgia patients in a real-world setting. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted based on a US national commercial health claims database (2006–2009). Fibromyalgia patients who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2008, aged 18–64 years, and who maintained continuous health insurance coverage 1 year before and 1 year after initiation were assigned to duloxetine or pregabalin cohorts on the basis of their initiated agent. Patients who had pill coverage of the agents over the course of 90 days preceding the initiation were excluded. The two comparative cohorts were constructed using propensity score greedy match methods. Descriptive analysis and paired t-test were performed to compare health care utilization rates in the postinitiation year and the changes of these rates from the preinitiation year to the postinitiation year. Results Both matched cohorts (n=1,265 pairs) had a similar mean initiation age (49–50 years), percentage of women (87%–88%), and prevalence of baseline comorbid conditions (neuropathic pain other than diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, low back pain, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, headache or migraine, and osteoarthritis). In the preinitiation year, both cohorts had similar inpatient, outpatient, and medication utilization rates (inpatient, 15.7%–16.1%; outpatient, 100.0%; medication, 97.9%–98.7%). The utilization rates diverged in the postinitiation year, with the pregabalin cohort using more fibromyalgia-related inpatient care (3.2% versus 2.2%; P<0.05), any inpatient care (19.3% versus 16.8%; P<0.05), and fibromyalgia-related outpatient care (62.1% versus 51.8%; P<0.05). From the preinitiation period to the postinitiation period, the duloxetine cohort experienced decreases in certain utilization rates, whereas the pregabalin cohort had increases (percentage of patients with a fibromyalgia

  4. Asfotase Alfa Treatment Improves Survival for Perinatal and Infantile Hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl; Ozono, Keiichi; Riese, Richard; Moseley, Scott; Melian, Agustin; Thompson, David D.; Bishop, Nicholas; Hofmann, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism that, in its most severe perinatal and infantile forms, results in 50–100% mortality, typically from respiratory complications. Objectives: Our objective was to better understand the effect of treatment with asfotase alfa, a first-in-class enzyme replacement therapy, on mortality in neonates and infants with severe HPP. Design/Setting: Data from patients with the perinatal and infantile forms of HPP in two ongoing, multicenter, multinational, open-label, phase 2 interventional studies of asfotase alfa treatment were compared with data from similar patients from a retrospective natural history study. Patients: Thirty-seven treated patients (median treatment duration, 2.7 years) and 48 historical controls of similar chronological age and HPP characteristics. Interventions: Treated patients received asfotase alfa as sc injections either 1 mg/kg six times per week or 2 mg/kg thrice weekly. Main Outcome Measures: Survival, skeletal health quantified radiographically on treatment, and ventilatory status were the main outcome measures for this study. Results: Asfotase alfa was associated with improved survival in treated patients vs historical controls: 95% vs 42% at age 1 year and 84% vs 27% at age 5 years, respectively (P < .0001, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test). Whereas 5% (1/20) of the historical controls who required ventilatory assistance survived, 76% (16/21) of the ventilated and treated patients survived, among whom 75% (12/16) were weaned from ventilatory support. This better respiratory outcome accompanied radiographic improvements in skeletal mineralization and health. Conclusions: Asfotase alfa mineralizes the HPP skeleton, including the ribs, and improves respiratory function and survival in life-threatening perinatal and infantile HPP. PMID:26529632

  5. Development of chiral methodologies by capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet and mass spectrometry detection for duloxetine analysis in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Elena; Montealegre, Cristina; Marina, María Luisa; Crego, Antonio L

    2014-10-10

    Two chiral methodologies were developed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with UV and mass spectrometry (MS) detection to ensure the quality control of the drug duloxetine, commercialized as a pure enantiomer. Both methods were optimized to achieve a high baseline enantioresolution (Rs>2) and an acceptable precision (RSD values <5% for instrumental repeatability and <10% for intermediate precision). In addition to allow the unequivocal identification of duloxetine enantiomers, the CE-MS method improved the sensitivity with respect to the use of CE-UV (LOD 200 ng/mL by CE-UV and 20 ng/mL by CE-MS) enabling to detect 0.02% of duloxetine enantiomeric impurity. This is the lowest LOD value ever reported for this drug, being this work the first one enabling to accomplish with the ICH guidelines requirements. The developed methods were validated and applied for the first time to the analysis of four pharmaceutical formulations. The content of R-duloxetine in all these samples was below the detection limit and the amount of S-duloxetine was in good agreement with the labeled content, obtaining results by the two methods that did not differ significantly (p-values >0.05).

  6. Demonstrating the stability of albinterferon alfa-2b in the presence of silicone oil.

    PubMed

    Auge, Kristin B; Blake-Haskins, Angela W; Devine, Sean; Rizvi, Sophia; Li, Yi-Ming; Hesselberg, Mark; Orvisky, Eduard; Affleck, Richard P; Spitznagel, Thomas M; Perkins, Melissa D

    2011-12-01

    Silicone oil is often used to decrease glide forces in prefilled syringes and cartridges, common primary container closures for biopharmaceutical products. Silicone oil has been linked to inducing protein aggregation (Diabet Med 1989;6:278; Diabet Care 1987;10:786-790), leading to patient safety and immunogenicity concerns. Because of the silicone oil application process (Biotech Adv 2007;25:318-324), silicone oil levels tend to vary between individual container closures. Various silicone oil levels were applied to a container closure prior to filling and lyophilization of an albumin and interferon alfa-2b fusion protein (albinterferon alfa-2b). Data demonstrated that high silicone oil levels in combination with intended and stress storage conditions had no impact on protein purity, higher order structure, stability trajectory, or biological activity. Subvisible particulate analysis (1-10 µm range) from active and placebo samples from siliconized glass barrels showed similar particle counts. Increases in solution turbidity readings for both active and placebo samples correlated well with increases in silicone oil levels, suggesting that the particles in solution are related to the presence of silicone oil and not large protein aggregates. Results from this study demonstrate that silicone oil is not always detrimental to proteins; nevertheless, assessing the impact of silicone oil on a product case-by-case basis is still recommended. PMID:21780119

  7. Macroscale production of crystalline interferon alfa-2b in microgravity on STS-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabhushan, Tattanahalli L.; Reichert, Paul; Long, Marianna M.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    Macroscale crystallization of zinc interferon alfa-2b was achieved on STS-52 in October 1992 in the Protein Crystallization Facility. Conditions for crystallization were established by adapting a microscale vapor diffusion method to a macroscale temperature induction method. A series of earth based pilot experiments established conditions to reproducibly crystallize zinc interferon alfa-2b in high yield and under cleanroom conditions. As a control for the STS-52 mission, a ground experiment was run simultaneously and in the same configuration as the flight experiment. Greater than 95% of the available protein crystallized in both the ground and flight experiments. Using a battery of physical, biochemical and biological characterization assays, demonstrated that sample processing, polysulfone bottle confinement and the conditions used for crystallization did not have a negative effect on protein integrity. Redissolved crystals from the flight and ground experiments showed full biological activity in a cytopathic effect inhibition assay as compared to an interferon control standard. Morphometric analysis comparing the overall length and width of the derived crystals showed a 2.4 fold increase in the length and width of the space grown crystals as compared to earth grown crystals. Space grown crystals have remained a stable free flowing suspension for over 2 years. Based on these results, further experiments are envisioned to investigate macroscale crystallization of biologically active macromolecules in microgravity.

  8. Alfa-one antitrypsin phenotypes and inhalatory pulmonary pathology.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Marques, R; Avila, R; Geada, H; Cochito, M L; Manso, C; Villar, T G

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twenty nine workers in the cork industry, 69 rural workers, 66 carpet makers, 58 workers in a granite quarry and 51 workers in a rice husking factory were studied from an epidemiologic point of view. All were submitted to a standard questionnaire planned to detect respiratory disease due to inhalatory causes. They were submitted to a clinical examination, summary ventilatory function tests, a 70 mm microradiograph, and blood was taken to determine alfa-one antitrypsin and its phenotypes and, in the cork industry workers and rice husking workers, the level of IgA, IgG and IgM. The results are presented and an attempt is made to correlate the various parameters among themselves, and namely alfa-one AT phenotypes with the existence of respiratory pathology. Finally the results are discussed.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of pharmaceutical surfactant templated mesoporous silica: Its application to controlled delivery of duloxetine

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Ganesh; Pushparaj, Hemalatha; Peng, Mei Mei; Muthiahpillai, Palanichamy; Udhumansha, Ubaidulla; Jang, Hyun Tae

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Usefulness of dual pharmaceutical surfactants in silica synthesis was evaluated. • Effects of concentration of secondary template (Tween-40) were studied. • Effects of fixed solvothermal condition on mesostructure formation were studied. • Duloxetine drug loading capability was studied. • Sustained release of duloxetine was evaluated. - Abstract: A new group of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were synthesized using combination pharmaceutical surfactants, Triton X-100 and Tween-40 as template and loaded with duloxetine hydrochloride (DX), for improving the sustained release of DX and patterns with high drug loading. Agglomerated spherical silica MSNs were synthesized by sol–gel and solvothermal methods. The calcined and drug loaded MSNs were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Braunner–Emmett–Teller (BET), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), diffuse reflectance ultraviolet–visible (DRS-UV–vis) spectroscopy. MSNs with high surface area and pore volume were selected and studied for their DX loading and release. The selected MSNs can accommodate a maximum of 34% DX within it. About 90% was released at 200 h and hence, the synthesized MSNs were capable of engulfing DX and sustain its release. Further form the Ritger and Peppas, Higuchi model for mechanism drug release from all the MSN matrices follows anomalous transport or Non-Fickian diffusion with the ‘r’ and ‘n’ value 0.9 and 0.45 < n < 1, respectively. So, from this study it could be concluded that the MSNs synthesized using pharmaceutical templates were better choice of reservoir for the controlled delivery of drug which requires sustained release.

  10. Enhanced antitumor reactivity of tumor-sensitized T cells by interferon alfa

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Woude, D.L.; Wagner, P.D.; Shu, S.; Chang, A.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Tumor-draining lymph node cells from mice bearing the methylcholanthrene-induced MCA 106 tumors can be sensitized in vitro to acquire antitumor reactivity. We examined the effect of interferon alfa on the function of cells that underwent in vitro sensitization in adoptive immunotherapy. Interferon alfa increased the antitumor reactivity of in vitro sensitized cells in the treatment of MCA 106 pulmonary metastases. This effect was evident in irradiated mice, indicating that a host response to the interferon alfa was not required. Interferon alfa treatment increased class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on tumor cells and increased their susceptibility to lysis by in vitro sensitized cells. These results suggest that interferon alfa enhancement of adoptive immunotherapy was mediated by its effect on tumor cells. Interferon alfa may be a useful adjunct to the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  11. Impact of epoetin alfa in chemotherapy-associated anemia.

    PubMed

    Jilani, S M; Glaspy, J A

    1998-10-01

    Anemia associated with cancer and cytotoxic chemotherapy contributes adversely to the quality of life (QOL) of these patients. RBC transfusions have been the traditional treatment, but due to the associated risks, they are not routinely used to treat mild and moderate degrees of anemia Therapy with recombinant human erythropoietin ([EPO] epoetin alfa) in these patients has been effective for both prevention and treatment of anemia, and in decreasing transfusion requirements. More importantly, studies have shown that the addition of epoetin alfa therapy to the treatment of patients receiving cancer chemotherapy is associated with a significant increase in energy level, functional status, and overall QOL. Further studies will be required to define the most efficient and cost-effective dose and schedule of epoetin alfa during cancer chemotherapy, so that its benefits will be available to as many patients as possible. The most important studies will be focused on defining the relationship of dose to response, identifying early predictors of response, and determining cost-effectiveness.

  12. Impact of potential pregabalin or duloxetine drug–drug interactions on health care costs and utilization among Medicare members with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jeffrey J; Sadosky, Alesia B; Ten Eyck, Laura L; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Brown, Courtney R; Suehs, Brandon T; Parsons, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the impact of newly initiated pregabalin or duloxetine treatment on fibromyalgia (FM) patients’ encounters with potential drug–drug interactions (DDIs), the health care cost and utilization consequences of those interactions, and the impact of treatment on opioid utilization. Patients and methods Subjects included those with an FM diagnosis, a pregabalin or duloxetine prescription claim (index event), ≥1 inpatient or ≥2 outpatient medical claims, and ≥12 months preindex and ≥6 postindex enrollment. Propensity score matching was used to help balance the pregabalin and duloxetine cohorts on baseline demographics and comorbidities. Potential DDIs were defined based on Micromedex 2.0 software and were identified by prescription claims. Results No significant differences in baseline characteristics were found between matched pregabalin (n=794) and duloxetine cohorts (n=794). Potential DDI prevalence was significantly greater (P<0.0001) among duloxetine subjects (71.9%) than among pregabalin subjects (4.0%). There were no significant differences in all-cause health care utilization or costs between pregabalin subjects with and without a potential DDI. By contrast, duloxetine subjects with a potential DDI had higher mean all-cause costs ($9,373 versus $7,228; P<0.0001) and higher mean number of outpatient visits/member (16.0 versus 13.0; P=0.0009) in comparison to duloxetine subjects without a potential DDI. There was a trend toward a statistically significant difference between pregabalin and duloxetine subjects in their respective pre- versus post-differences in use of ≥1 long-acting opioids (1.6% and 3.4%, respectively; P=0.077). Conclusion The significantly higher prevalence of potential DDIs and potential cost impact found in FM duloxetine subjects, relative to pregabalin subjects, underscore the importance of considering DDIs when selecting a treatment. PMID:25339847

  13. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre

  14. Epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa for the treatment of chemotherapy-related anemia in cancer patients in Sweden: comparative analysis of drug utilization, costs, and hematologic response.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ulf; Borg, Sixten; Jansson, Sandra; Ekman, Tor; Franksson, Lars; Friesland, Signe; Larsson, Anna-Maria

    2005-01-01

    A retrospective chart review was performed at 3 Swedish hospitals to evaluate the utilization, outcomes, and cost of using epoetin alfa or darbepoetin alfa to treat cancer patients with chemotherapy-related anemia. Data on dosage, duration of treatment, hematologic response, red blood cell transfusions, and healthcare resource consumption were collected and analyzed at various time points following the initiation of drug therapy. A significantly faster hematologic response and increase in hemoglobin were observed in patients treated with epoetin alfa. Dosages used in clinical practice appeared to be lower than those recommended by Swedish treatment guidelines. There were no significant differences in resource utilization or healthcare costs between the 2 treatment groups. By day 112, the mean treatment cost per patient, in Swedish kronors (SEK), was SEK74,701 (approximately US$9800 or approximately 8300) with epoetin alfa and SEK85,285 (approximately US$11,000 or approximately 9500) with darbepoetin alfa. Drug acquisition and administration accounted for 81% and 67% of the total cost of epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa therapy, respectively; the remainder of the total cost was for hospitalization and transfusions.

  15. A multicenter, open-label extension study of velaglucerase alfa in Japanese patients with Gaucher disease: Results after a cumulative treatment period of 24months.

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akemi; Matsubayashi, Tomoko; Murayama, Kei; Hongo, Teruaki; Lee, Hak-Myung; Mellgard, Björn

    2016-07-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with exogenous glucocerebrosidase is indicated to treat symptomatic Gaucher disease (GD), a rare, inherited metabolic disorder. ERT with velaglucerase alfa, which is produced in a human cell line using gene activation technology, was studied in a 12-month phase III trial in Japanese patients with type 1 or 3 GD who were switched from imiglucerase ERT (n=6); the current, open-label, 12-month extension study was designed to assess longer-term safety and efficacy. Two adult and three pediatric patients (aged <18years) were enrolled into the extension study. Every-other-week intravenous infusions were administered for 63-78weeks at average doses between 51.5 and 60.7units/kg. Three non-serious adverse events were considered related to velaglucerase alfa treatment, but no patient discontinued from the study. Six serious but non-drug-related adverse events were reported. No patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Hemoglobin concentrations, platelet counts, and liver and spleen volumes (normalized to body weight) in these patients were generally stable over a cumulative 24-month period from the baseline of the parent trial. The data suggest that velaglucerase alfa was well tolerated and maintained clinical stability in Japanese GD patients over 2years after switching from imiglucerase. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01842841. PMID:27241455

  16. Development of anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies in clinical trial-treated patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Turkia, Hadhami Ben; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Ida, Hiroyuki; Tantawy, Azza A G; Qin, Yulin; Qiu, Yongchang; Dinh, Quinn; Zimran, Ari

    2016-07-01

    Anti-drug antibodies may develop with biological therapies, possibly leading to a reduction of treatment efficacy and to allergic and other adverse reactions. Patients with Gaucher disease were tested for anti-drug antibodies every 6 or 12weeks in clinical studies of velaglucerase alfa enzyme replacement therapy, as part of a range of safety endpoints. In 10 studies between April 2004 and March 2015, 289 patients aged 2-84years (median 43years) were assessed for the development of anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Sixty-four patients were treatment-naïve at baseline and 225 patients were switched to velaglucerase alfa from imiglucerase treatment. They received velaglucerase alfa treatment for a median of 36.4weeks (interquartile range 26.4-155.4weeks). Four patients (1.4%) became positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa IgG antibodies, two of whom had antibodies that were neutralizing in vitro, but there were no apparent changes in patients' platelet counts, hemoglobin levels or levels of CCL18 and chitotriosidase, suggestive of clinical deterioration after anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies were detected, and no infusion-related adverse events were reported. Less than 2% of patients exposed to velaglucerase alfa tested positive for antibodies and there was no apparent correlation between anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies and adverse events or pharmacodynamic or clinical responses. PMID:27282565

  17. Cost-effectiveness of epoetin alfa therapy for anemia of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, L J; Carey, P; Johnson, C A

    1992-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of epoetin alfa therapy for anemia in 20 patients with end-stage renal disease was retrospectively studied. Ten patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) were given subcutaneous epoetin alfa as part of a multicenter, protocol-controlled study of the efficacy of epoetin alfa. Ten patients on in-center hemodialysis were given intravenous epoetin alfa as part of their routine clinical care. Change in hematocrit was used as the measure of effectiveness of epoetin alfa. Medication, laboratory, and transfusion costs were monitored for the six months preceding the initiation of epoetin alfa and the first six months of treatment. The cost of therapy increased for all patients by an average of $2722 +/- 1118; transfusion costs decreased, whereas medication and laboratory costs increased. Laboratory costs were significantly greater in CAPD patients than in hemodialysis patients during epoetin alfa therapy; no significant differences in medication costs or transfusion costs were noted between the groups. The mean increase in hematocrit for all patients was 7.4 volume percent. Following the initial change in hematocrit, further therapeutic response did not appear to be determined by increasing expenditures. Epoetin alfa was shown to be effective in treating anemia in patients with end-stage renal disease, but it was associated with higher costs of therapy.

  18. Assessment of functional outcomes by Sheehan Disability Scale in patients with major depressive disorder treated with duloxetine versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, David V.; Mancini, Michele; Wang, Jianing; Berggren, Lovisa; Cao, Haijun; Dueñas, Héctor José

    2016-01-01

    Objective We compared functional impairment outcomes assessed with Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) after treatment with duloxetine versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with major depressive disorder. Methods Data were pooled from four randomized studies comparing treatment with duloxetine and SSRIs (three double blind and one open label). Analysis of covariance, with last‐observation‐carried‐forward approach for missing data, explored treatment differences between duloxetine and SSRIs on SDS changes during 8 to 12 weeks of acute treatment for the intent‐to‐treat population. Logistic regression analysis examined the predictive capacity of baseline patient characteristics for remission in functional impairment (SDS total score ≤ 6 and SDS item scores ≤ 2) at endpoint. Results Included were 2193 patients (duloxetine n = 1029; SSRIs n = 835; placebo n = 329). Treatment with duloxetine and SSRIs resulted in significantly (p < 0.01) greater improvements in the SDS total score versus treatment with placebo. Higher SDS (p < 0.0001) or 17‐item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale baseline scores (p < 0.01) predicted lower probability of functional improvement after treatment with duloxetine or SSRIs. Female gender (p ≤ 0.05) predicted higher probability of functional improvement after treatment with duloxetine or SSRIs. Conclusions Treatment with SSRIs and duloxetine improved functional impairment in patients with major depressive disorder. Higher SDS or 17‐item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale baseline scores predicted less probability of SDS improvement; female gender predicted better improvement in functional impairment at endpoint. © 2015 The Authors. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26331440

  19. Efficacy of Duloxetine in the Early Management of Urinary Continence after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Cabir; Eren, Ali E.; Ersay, Ahmet R.; Kocoglu, Hasan; Basturk, Gokhan; Demirci, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the efficacy of early duloxetine therapy in stress urinary incontinence occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP). Material and Method Patients that had RP were randomly divided into 2 groups following the removal of the urinary catheter. Group A patients (n = 28) had pelvic floor exercise and duloxetine therapy. Group B patients (n = 30) had only pelvic floor exercise. The incontinence status of the patients and number of pads were recorded and 1-hour pad test and Turkish validation of International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form test were applied to the patients at the follow-up. Results When the dry state of the patients was evaluated, 5, 17, 3, and 2 of 28 Group A patients stated that they were completely dry in the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th month respectively and pad use was stopped. There was no continence in 30 Group B in the first 3 months. Twelve, 6, and 8 patients stated that they were completely dry in the 6th, 9th and 12th month, respectively. But 3 of 4 patients in whom dryness could not be provided were using a mean of 7.6 pads in the first day and a mean of 1.3 pads after 1 year. When pad use of the patients was evaluated, the mean monthly number of pad use was determined to be 6.2 (4-8) in the initial evaluation, 2.7 (0-5) in the in 3rd month, 2 (0-3) in the 6th month and 1.6 (0-2) pad/d in the 9th month in the group taking medicine. The mean monthly number of pads used was determined to be 5.8 (4-8) in the initial evaluation, 4.3 (3-8) in the 3rd month, 3 (0-6) in the 6th month and 1.6 (0-6) pad/d in the 9th month in the group not taking medicine. Conclusion According to the results, early duloxetine therapy in stress urinary incontinence that occurred after RP provided early continence. PMID:26195963

  20. Functioning in patients with major depression treated with duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Diego; Montgomery, William; Haro, Josep Maria; Moneta, Maria Victoria; Zhu, Gang; Yue, Li; Hong, Jihyung; Dueñas, Héctor; Brugnoli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess and compare the levels of functioning in patients with major depressive disorder treated with either duloxetine with a daily dose of ≤60 mg or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) as monotherapy for up to 6 months in a naturalistic setting in East Asia. In addition, this study examined the impact of painful physical symptoms (PPS) on the effects of these treatments. Patients and methods Data for this post hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month prospective observational study involving 1,549 patients with major depressive disorder without sexual dysfunction. The present analysis focused on a subgroup of patients from East Asia (n=587). Functioning was measured using the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). Depression severity was assessed using the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report. PPS were rated using the modified Somatic Symptom Inventory. A mixed model with repeated measures was fitted to compare the levels of functioning between duloxetine-treated (n=227) and SSRI-treated (n=225) patients, adjusting for baseline patient characteristics. Results The mean SDS total score was similar between the two treatment cohorts (15.46 [standard deviation =6.11] in the duloxetine cohort and 16.36 [standard deviation =6.53] in the SSRI cohort, P=0.077) at baseline. Both descriptive and regression analyses confirmed improvement in functioning in both groups during follow-up, but duloxetine-treated patients achieved better functioning. At 24 weeks, the estimated mean SDS total score was 4.48 (standard error =0.80) in the duloxetine cohort, which was statistically significantly lower (ie, better functioning) than that of 6.76 (standard error =0.77) in the SSRI cohort (P<0.001). This treatment difference was more apparent in the subgroup of patients with PPS at baseline. Similar patterns were also observed for SDS subscores (work, social life, and family life). Conclusion Depressed patients treated with duloxetine achieved

  1. DNA segregation by the bacterial actin AlfA during Bacillus subtilis growth and development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Eric; Herrera, Nick C; Gunderson, Felizza Q; Derman, Alan I; Dance, Amber L; Sims, Jennifer; Larsen, Rachel A; Pogliano, Joe

    2006-12-13

    We here identify a protein (AlfA; actin like filament) that defines a new family of actins that are only distantly related to MreB and ParM. AlfA is required for segregation of Bacillus subtilis plasmid pBET131 (a mini pLS32-derivative) during growth and sporulation. A 3-kb DNA fragment encoding alfA and a downstream gene (alfB) is necessary and sufficient for plasmid stability. AlfA-GFP assembles dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that rapidly turn over (t(1/2)< approximately 45 s) in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. A point mutation (alfA D168A) that completely inhibits AlfA subunit exchange in vivo is strongly defective for plasmid segregation, demonstrating that dynamic polymerization of AlfA is necessary for function. During sporulation, plasmid segregation occurs before septation and independently of the DNA translocase SpoIIIE and the chromosomal Par proteins Soj and Spo0J. The absence of the RacA chromosome anchoring protein reduces the efficiency of plasmid segregation (by about two-fold), suggesting that it might contribute to anchoring the plasmid at the pole during sporulation. Our results suggest that the dynamic polymerization of AlfA mediates plasmid separation during both growth and sporulation.

  2. New insights into erythropoietin and epoetin alfa: mechanisms of action, target tissues, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Mitchell J

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa) has proven beneficial for the treatment of various anemias. The mechanism of action of endogenous erythropoietin and the therapeutic use of epoetin alfa to stimulate red blood cell production and improve the quality of life in cancer patients are reviewed here. Epoetin alfa may also attenuate the cognitive dysfunction associated with cancer therapy. Interestingly, functional endogenous erythropoietin receptor signaling pathways have been demonstrated in numerous nonerythropoietic tissues. Of particular importance, epoetin alfa confers neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in cultured neurons and in several animal models for neurologic disease. In one clinical trial, epoetin alfa appeared to limit functional and histologic damage in patients with stroke. Therefore, in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, the beneficial effects of epoetin alfa could be mediated not only through enhanced erythrocyte production but also via direct effects on the nervous system. Further investigation into the nonerythropoietic effects of epoetin alfa could broaden its clinical utility for patients with cancer and also provide new therapies for various neurologic disorders.

  3. DNA segregation by the bacterial actin AlfA during Bacillus subtilis growth and development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Eric; Herrera, Nick C; Gunderson, Felizza Q; Derman, Alan I; Dance, Amber L; Sims, Jennifer; Larsen, Rachel A; Pogliano, Joe

    2006-12-13

    We here identify a protein (AlfA; actin like filament) that defines a new family of actins that are only distantly related to MreB and ParM. AlfA is required for segregation of Bacillus subtilis plasmid pBET131 (a mini pLS32-derivative) during growth and sporulation. A 3-kb DNA fragment encoding alfA and a downstream gene (alfB) is necessary and sufficient for plasmid stability. AlfA-GFP assembles dynamic cytoskeletal filaments that rapidly turn over (t(1/2)< approximately 45 s) in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. A point mutation (alfA D168A) that completely inhibits AlfA subunit exchange in vivo is strongly defective for plasmid segregation, demonstrating that dynamic polymerization of AlfA is necessary for function. During sporulation, plasmid segregation occurs before septation and independently of the DNA translocase SpoIIIE and the chromosomal Par proteins Soj and Spo0J. The absence of the RacA chromosome anchoring protein reduces the efficiency of plasmid segregation (by about two-fold), suggesting that it might contribute to anchoring the plasmid at the pole during sporulation. Our results suggest that the dynamic polymerization of AlfA mediates plasmid separation during both growth and sporulation. PMID:17139259

  4. Evaluating the transport layer of the ALFA framework for the Intel® Xeon Phi™ Coprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santogidis, Aram; Hirstius, Andreas; Lalis, Spyros

    2015-12-01

    The ALFA framework supports the software development of major High Energy Physics experiments. As part of our research effort to optimize the transport layer of ALFA, we focus on profiling its data transfer performance for inter-node communication on the Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessor. In this article we present the collected performance measurements with the related analysis of the results. The optimization opportunities that are discovered, help us to formulate the future plans of enabling high performance data transfer for ALFA on the Intel Xeon Phi architecture.

  5. Fast radio burst discovered in the Arecibo pulsar ALFA survey

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, L. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Wharton, R. S.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; and others

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm{sup –3}, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = –0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  6. Potential of epoetin alfa in patients in autologous blood donation programs for orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    McClelland, B

    1996-04-01

    The ability of epoetin alfa to increase hematopoiesis in a dose-dependent manner when administered by the intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) route has been demonstrated in pharmacokinetic studies in healthy volunteers. Epoetin alfa may therefore be a useful adjunct to autologous blood (AB) donation. By facilitating AB donation, the use of allogeneic blood could be reduced. In patients scheduled to undergo orthopedic surgery, i.v. administration of epoetin alfa 600 IU/kg twice weekly for 3 weeks prior to surgery (in conjunction with oral iron supplementation) significantly increased the number of AB units and total red blood cell (RBC) volume donated and increased the number of patients able to donate > or = 4 AB units. However, there was no difference between epoetin alfa and placebo groups with respect to allogeneic blood exposure.

  7. Mortality Risk of Darbepoetin Alfa versus Epoetin Alfa in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm-Leen, Emilee R.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Epoetin alfa (EPO) and darbepoetin alfa (EPO) are erythropoiesis-stimulating agents that are widely and interchangeably used for the treatment of anemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. No studies have specifically compared the risks of hard study outcomes between EPO and DPO, including mortality. Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature (PubMed, CENTRAL, SCOPUS, and EMBASE, all years) as well as of industry resources to identify all randomized trials comparing EPO versus DPO for the treatment of anemia in adult patients with chronic kidney disease including those requiring dialysis. We then summarized key characteristics and findings of these trials and performed a random effects meta-analysis of trials with at least 3 months duration to identify the summary odds ratio of mortality between patients randomized to DPO versus EPO. Results We identified 9 trials that met stated inclusion criteria. Overall, 2024 patients were included in the meta-analysis, of whom 126 died during follow up, which ranged from 20 to 52 weeks. We found no significant difference in mortality between patients randomized to DPO versus EPO (OR=1.33; 95% CI 0.88-2.01). No treatment heterogeneity across studies was detected (Q-statistic = 4.60; P=0.80). Conclusions Few trials directly comparing DPO and EPO have been conducted and follow-up was limited. In aggregate, no effect of specific erythropoiesis-stimulating agent on mortality was identified, but the confidence limits were wide and remained compatible with considerable harm from DPO. Absent adequately-powered randomized trials, observational post-marketing comparative effectiveness studies comparing these erythropoiesis-stimulating agents are required to better characterize the long-term safety profiles of these agents. PMID:25636816

  8. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory

  9. Charging properties of cassiterite (alfa-SnO2) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, L.; Cummings, Peter T; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-01-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite (alfa-SnO2) surfaces at 10 50 C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH-range 4.0 to 4.5 at all conditions and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH2 group is more acidic than the bridging Sn2OH group, with protonation constants (log KH) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural alfa-TiO2 (rutile), apparently due to the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na+ and Rb+, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, while adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable amounts of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na+ between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on surface charge density (pH), while the distribution of adsorbed Rb+ is almost independent of pH. A Surface Complexation Model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD predicted speciation of adsorbed Na+/Rb+ was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH-0.40) and the protonated bridging group (Sn2OH+0.36) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH-range (2.7 10), illustrating the ability of positively and negatively charged surface groups to coexist. Complexation of the medium cations

  10. Comparative efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine, pregabalin, and milnacipran for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine, pregabalin, and milnacipran at the recommended doses in patients with fibromyalgia. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the efficacy and safety of duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, pregabalin 150 mg, milnacipran 200 mg, and milnacipran 100 mg compared to placebo in patients with fibromyalgia were included in this Bayesian network meta-analysis. Nine RCTs including 5140 patients met the inclusion criteria. The proportion of patients with >30 % improvement from baseline in pain was significantly higher in the duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg groups than in the placebo group [pairwise odds ratio (OR) 2.33, 95 % credible interval (CrI) 1.50-3.67; OR 1.68, 95 % CrI 1.25-2.28; OR 1.62, 95 % CrI 1.16-2.25; and OR 1.61; 95 % CrI 1.15-2.24, respectively]. Ranking probability based on the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) indicated that duloxetine 60 mg had the highest probability of being the best treatment for achieving the response level (SUCRA = 0.9431), followed by pregabalin 300 mg (SUCRA = 0.6300), milnacipran 100 mg (SUCRA = 0.5680), milnacipran 200 mg (SUCRA = 0.5617), pregabalin 150 mg (SUCRA = 0.2392), and placebo (SUCRA = 0.0580). The risk of withdrawal due to adverse events was lower in the placebo group than in the pregabalin 300 mg, duloxetine 60 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg groups. However, there was no significant difference in the efficacy and tolerability between the medications at the recommended doses. Duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg were more efficacious than placebo. However, there was no significant difference in the efficacy and tolerability between the medications at the recommended doses. PMID:27000046

  11. A review of the clinical utility of duloxetine in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    King, Jordan B; Schauerhamer, Marisa B; Bellows, Brandon K

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a world-wide epidemic with many long-term complications, with neuropathy being the most common. In particular, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP), can be one of the most distressing complications associated with diabetes, leading to decreases in physical and mental quality of life. Despite the availability of many efficient medications, DPNP remains a challenge to treat, and the optimal sequencing of pharmacotherapy remains unknown. Currently, there are only three medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration specifically for the management of DPNP. Duloxetine (DUL), a selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is one of these. With the goal of optimizing pharmacotherapy use in DPNP population, a review of current literature was conducted, and the clinical utility of DUL described. Along with early clinical trials, recently published observational studies and pharmacoeconomic models may be useful in guiding decision making by clinicians and managed care organizations. In real-world practice settings, DUL is associated with decreased or similar opioid utilization, increased medication adherence, and similar health care costs compared with current standard of care. DUL has consistently been found to be a cost-effective option over short time-horizons. Currently, the long-term cost-effectiveness of DUL is unknown. Evidence derived from randomized clinical trials, real-world observations, and economic models support the use of DUL as a first-line treatment option from the perspective of the patient, clinician, and managed care payer. PMID:26309404

  12. Perioperative epoetin alfa increases red blood cell mass and reduces exposure to transfusions: results of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, M A

    1997-07-01

    To avoid the inherent risk of complications associated with perioperative allogeneic transfusion, preoperative autologous blood donation (PAD) is frequently employed by patients undergoing major elective surgical procedures. However, many patients are unable to donate a sufficient quantity of blood prior to surgery. Recent studies have shown that epoetin alfa (Procrit; Ortho-Biotech, Raritan, NJ) effectively increases red blood cell (RBC) mass when administered preoperatively and decreases the requirement for allogeneic transfusion. These studies also demonstrated that patients with baseline hemoglobin levels ranging from 10 to 13 g/dL have the highest risk for requiring allogeneic transfusions and appear to achieve the greatest benefit from epoetin alfa treatment. We evaluated several dosing regimens and schedules for perioperative epoetin alfa administration. In our initial study, the comparative efficacy of three different epoetin alfa regimens was assessed by hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, and absolute reticulocyte counts. In addition, we analyzed the effect of accelerated erythropoiesis on iron indices and individual RBC hemoglobin content. Our study demonstrated that epoetin alfa is safe and effective in increasing RBC mass; however, iron stores considered sufficient for basal erythropoiesis may not optimally support the accelerated RBC production associated with epoetin alfa therapy. In a subsequent randomized multicenter trial, we compared weekly epoetin alfa dosing to daily dosing in patients undergoing elective major orthopedic surgery. The results of this study indicated that administering epoetin alfa on a weekly schedule for several weeks prior to surgery may be at least as effective and more convenient than perioperative daily epoetin alfa dosing.

  13. Efficacy and safety of duloxetine in the treatment of older adult patients with generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Alaka, Karla J; Noble, William; Montejo, Angel; Dueñas, Héctor; Munshi, Autar; Strawn, Jeffrey R; Lenox-Smith, Alan; Ahl, Jonna; Bidzan, Leszek; Dorn, Brita; Ball, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective This was a flexible-dosed study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of duloxetine 30–120 mg once daily in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in older adult patients. Methods Patients with GAD, who were at least 65 years of age, were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment with either duloxetine (N = 151) or placebo (N = 140). The primary efficacy measure was the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) total score, and the primary endpoint was at week 10. Global functioning was assessed by the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). Safety and tolerability was assessed by the occurrence of treatment-emergent adverse events, serious adverse events, laboratory analyses, and vital signs. Analyses were conducted on an intent-to-treat basis. Results The overall baseline mean HAM-A total score was 24, and SDS global score was 14. Completion rates were 75% for placebo and 76% for duloxetine. At week 10, duloxetine was superior to placebo on mean changes from baseline in HAM-A total scores (−15.9 vs. −11.7, p < 0.001) and in SDS global scores (−8.6 vs. −5.4, p < 0.001). Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in ≥5% of duloxetine-treated patients and twice the rate than with placebo including constipation (9% vs. 4%, p = 0.06), dry mouth (7% vs. 1%, p = 0.02), and somnolence (6% vs. 2%, p = 0.14). Conclusion Duloxetine treatment was efficacious in the improvement of anxiety and functioning in older adult patients with GAD, and the safety profile was consistent with previous GAD studies. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Key points Treatment with duloxetine versus placebo can significantly reduce symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder and was associated with improved global function and increased enjoyment and satisfaction with life in patients 65 years and older. The safety and tolerability profile for duloxetine in this older adult patient population

  14. Taliglucerase alfa for the treatment of Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Haddley, K

    2012-08-01

    Gaucher's disease is a rare inherited inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, GBA. Glucocerebrosidase is involved in the metabolism of the lipid metabolism-derived substrate, glucocerebroside. Accumulation of glucocerebroside substrate in macrophages, as a result of loss of enzyme function, leads to the formation of Gaucher cells causing hypertrophy of the spleen and liver, hematological disorders, skeletal malformations and the neurological symptoms characteristic of Gaucher's disease. The disease is subdivided into three types that differ in their symptoms, severity and prognosis. Patients of any age can be affected but those of a younger age have a poor prognosis often dying in infancy. As a genetic disorder the incidence of the disease is variable on a global scale. Enzyme replacement therapy is the therapy of choice and has demonstrated good efficacy in treating the visceral and skeletal symptoms of Gaucher's disease. A cost-effective plant-cell-derived human recombinant glucocerebrosidase, taliglucerase alfa, has been developed that demonstrated a promising safety and efficacy profile in phase I clinical trials and is currently in phase III and IV trials for the treatment of pediatric and adult patients with Gaucher's disease. PMID:22916340

  15. [The purification of the protein alternative to alfa-fetoprotein].

    PubMed

    Poltoranina, V S; Kuprina, N I; Eraĭzer, T L; Karamova, E R; Abelev, G I

    2007-01-01

    The subject of the study was the unidentified protein Ag A2/3, which is found in some cells of rat hepatoma McA RH7777 and their clones. The feature of this protein is that its expression is alternative to alfa-fetoprotein (AFP), i.e. Ag A2/3 is not found in cells and cell clones containing AFP, and vice versa. Ag A2/3 proved to be a cell stress protein--it was induced by heavy metal salts (Pb2+ and Cd2+) in the liver of adult rats and AFP+/A2/3(-) clones of hepatomas; the attenuation of AFP synthesis occurred simultaneously. This paper describes the preparation of Ag A2/3 for sequence analysis, and the scheme of Ag A2/3 purification. When trying to obtain a blot for sequencing it proved to be impossible to reveal the protein using McAb to Ag A2/3 after the transfer of separated proteins on PVDF. The reactivity of the antigen determinant was reestablished with blot processing on PVDF membrane with methanol and Twin 80. PMID:18084830

  16. Velaglucerase alfa enzyme replacement therapy compared with imiglucerase in patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Barton, Norman W; Zimran, Ari; Kabra, Madhulika; Lukina, Elena A; Giraldo, Pilar; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Bavdekar, Ashish; Ben Dridi, Marie-Françoise; Gupta, Neerja; Kishnani, Priya S; Sureshkumar, E K; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Bhirangi, Kiran; Mehta, Atul

    2013-03-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher disease (GD) has been available since 1991. This study compared the efficacy and safety of velaglucerase alfa with imiglucerase, the previous standard of care. A 9-month, global, randomized, double-blind, non-inferiority study compared velaglucerase alfa with imiglucerase (60 U/kg every other week) in treatment-naïve patients aged 3-73 years with anemia and either thrombocytopenia or organomegaly. The primary endpoint was the difference between groups in mean change from baseline to 9 months in hemoglobin concentration. 35 patients were randomized: 34 received study drug (intent-to-treat: 17 per arm), 20 were splenectomized. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. The per-protocol population included 15 patients per arm. The mean treatment difference for hemoglobin concentration from baseline to 9 months (velaglucerase alfa minus imiglucerase) was 0.14 and 0.16 g/dL in the intent-to-treat and per-protocol populations, respectively. The lower bound of the 97.5% one-sided confidence interval in both populations lay within the pre-defined non-inferiority margin of -1.0 g/dL, confirming that velaglucerase alfa is non-inferior to imiglucerase. There were no statistically significant differences in the secondary endpoints. Most adverse events were mild to moderate. No patient receiving velaglucerase alfa developed antibodies to either drug, whereas four patients (23.5%) receiving imiglucerase developed IgG antibodies to imiglucerase, which were cross-reactive with velaglucerase alfa in one patient. This study demonstrates the efficacy and safety of velaglucerase alfa compared with imiglucerase in adult and pediatric patients with GD clinically characterized as Type 1. Differences in immunogenicity were also observed. PMID:23400823

  17. Taliglucerase alfa: an enzyme replacement therapy using plant cell expression technology.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Gregory A; Golembo, Myriam; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a rare, genetic lysosomal storage disorder caused by functional defects of acid β-glucosidase that results in multiple organ dysfunction. Glycosylation of recombinant acid human β-glucosidase and exposure of terminal mannose residues are critical to the success of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for the treatment of visceral and hematologic manifestations in GD. Three commercially available ERT products for treatment of GD type 1 (GD1) include imiglucerase, velaglucerase alfa, and taliglucerase alfa. Imiglucerase and velaglucerase alfa are produced in different mammalian cell systems and require production glycosylation modifications to expose terminal α-mannose residues, which are needed for mannose receptor-mediated uptake by target macrophages. Such modifications add to production costs. Taliglucerase alfa is a plant cell-expressed acid β-glucosidase approved in the United States and other countries for ERT in adults with GD1. A plant-based expression system, using carrot root cell cultures, was developed for production of taliglucerase alfa and does not require additional processing for postproduction glycosidic modifications. Clinical trials have demonstrated that taliglucerase alfa is efficacious, with a well-established safety profile in adult, ERT-naïve patients with symptomatic GD1, and for such patients previously treated with imiglucerase. These included significant improvements in organomegaly and hematologic parameters as early as 6months, and maintenance of achieved therapeutic values in previously treated patients. Ongoing clinical trials will further characterize the long-term efficacy and safety of taliglucerase alfa in more diverse patient populations, and may help to guide clinical decisions for achieving optimal outcomes for patients with GD1. PMID:24630271

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of turoctocog alfa and N8-GP in haemophilia A dogs.

    PubMed

    Agersø, H; Stennicke, H R; Pelzer, H; Olsen, E N; Merricks, E P; Defriess, N A; Nichols, T C; Ezban, M

    2012-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of the new recombinant FVIII compound turoctocog alfa and a Glyco-PEGylated FVIII derivative thereof (N8-GP) in Haemophilia A dogs. Six haemophilic dogs divided into two groups were included in the study. Each dog was administered a dose of 125 U kg(-1) , blood samples were collected at predetermined time points for both pharmacokinetic (FVIII measured by one-stage aPTT assay) and pharmacodynamic [whole blood clotting time (WBCT)] evaluations. After intravenous administration to haemophilic dogs, the plasma concentration at the first sampling point was comparable for turoctocog alfa and N8-GP, and the clearance was estimated to be 6.5 and 3.9 mL h(-1) kg(-1) for turoctocog alfa and N8-GP respectively. Both turoctocog alfa and N8-GP were able to reduce the WBCT time to normal levels (<20 min), however, the reduced clearance was reflected in the WBCT, which returned to baseline at a later time point for N8-GP as compared with dogs dosed with turoctocog alfa. The clearance was 40% reduced for N8-GP as compared with turoctocog alfa. Simulations of a multiple dosing regimen in dogs, suggest that to maintain WBCT <20 min N8-GP can be dosed at reduced intervals, e.g. with 4 days between doses, whereas turoctocog alfa will have to be dosed with 2½ day between doses. Data thereby supports N8-GP as an alternative to standard rFVIII replacement therapy, with a more convenient dosing regimen.

  19. Does early improvement in depressive symptoms predict subsequent remission in patients with depression who are treated with duloxetine?

    PubMed Central

    Sueki, Akitsugu; Suzuki, Eriko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Ishigooka, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this prospective study, we examined whether early reduction in depressive symptoms predicts later remission to duloxetine in the treatment of depression, as monitored using the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Patients and methods Among the 106 patients who were enrolled in this study, 67 were included in the statistical analysis. A clinical evaluation using the MADRS was performed at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 after commencing treatment. For each time point, the MADRS total score was separated into three components: dysphoria, retardation, and vegetative scores. Results Remission was defined as an MADRS total score of ≤10 at end point. From our univariate logistic regression analysis, we found that improvements in both the MADRS total score and the dysphoria score at week 4 had a significant interaction with subsequent remission. Furthermore, age and sex were significant predictors of remission. There was an increase of approximately 4% in the odds of remission for each unit increase in age, and female sex had an odds of remission of 0.318 times that of male sex (remission rate for men was 73.1% [19/26] and for women 46.3% [19/41]). However, in the multivariate model using the change from baseline in the total MADRS, dysphoria, retardation, and vegetative scores at week 4, in which age and sex were included as covariates, only sex retained significance, except for an improvement in the dysphoria score. Conclusion No significant interaction was found between early response to duloxetine and eventual remission in this study. Sex difference was found to be a predictor of subsequent remission in patients with depression who were treated with duloxetine, with the male sex having greater odds of remission. PMID:27307739

  20. Collaborative study for the validation of an improved HPLC assay for recombinant IFN-alfa-2.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, K H; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H; Terao, E

    2016-01-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) texts for Interferon (IFN)-alfa-2 include a nonspecific photometric protein assay using albumin as calibrator and a highly variable cell-based assay for the potency determination of the protective effects. A request was expressed by the Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) for improved methods for the batch control of recombinant interferon alfa-2 bulk and market surveillance testing of finished products, including those formulated with Human Serum Albumin (HSA). A HPLC method was developed at the Medical Products Agency (MPA, Sweden) for the testing of IFN-alfa-2 products. An initial collaborative study run under the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP; study code BSP039) revealed the need for minor changes to improve linearity of the calibration curves, assay reproducibility and robustness. The goal of the collaborative study, coded BSP071, was to transfer and further validate this improved HPLC method. Ten laboratories participated in the study. Four marketed IFN-alfa-2 preparations (one containing HSA) together with the Ph. Eur. Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) for IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b, and in-house reference standards from two manufacturers were used for the quantitative assay. The modified method was successfully transferred to all laboratories despite local variation in equipment. The resolution between the main and the oxidised forms of IFN-alfa-2 was improved compared to the results from the BSP039 study. The improved method even allowed partial resolution of an extra peak after the principal peak. Symmetry of the main IFN peak was acceptable for all samples in all laboratories. Calibration curves established with the Ph. Eur. IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b CRSs showed excellent linearity with intercepts close to the origin and coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. Assay repeatability, intermediate precision and reproducibility varied with the tested sample within acceptable

  1. Collaborative study for the validation of an improved HPLC assay for recombinant IFN-alfa-2.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, K H; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H; Terao, E

    2016-01-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) texts for Interferon (IFN)-alfa-2 include a nonspecific photometric protein assay using albumin as calibrator and a highly variable cell-based assay for the potency determination of the protective effects. A request was expressed by the Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) for improved methods for the batch control of recombinant interferon alfa-2 bulk and market surveillance testing of finished products, including those formulated with Human Serum Albumin (HSA). A HPLC method was developed at the Medical Products Agency (MPA, Sweden) for the testing of IFN-alfa-2 products. An initial collaborative study run under the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP; study code BSP039) revealed the need for minor changes to improve linearity of the calibration curves, assay reproducibility and robustness. The goal of the collaborative study, coded BSP071, was to transfer and further validate this improved HPLC method. Ten laboratories participated in the study. Four marketed IFN-alfa-2 preparations (one containing HSA) together with the Ph. Eur. Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) for IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b, and in-house reference standards from two manufacturers were used for the quantitative assay. The modified method was successfully transferred to all laboratories despite local variation in equipment. The resolution between the main and the oxidised forms of IFN-alfa-2 was improved compared to the results from the BSP039 study. The improved method even allowed partial resolution of an extra peak after the principal peak. Symmetry of the main IFN peak was acceptable for all samples in all laboratories. Calibration curves established with the Ph. Eur. IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b CRSs showed excellent linearity with intercepts close to the origin and coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. Assay repeatability, intermediate precision and reproducibility varied with the tested sample within acceptable

  2. Early Treatment with Alglucosidase Alfa Prolongs Long Term Survival of Infants with Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kishnani, Priya S.; Corzo, Deya; Leslie, Nancy D.; Gruskin, Daniel; van der Ploeg, Ans; Clancy, John P.; Parini, Rosella; Morin, Gilles; Beck, Michael; Bauer, Mislen S.; Jokic, Mikael; Tsai, Chen-En; Tsai, Brian W.H.; Morgan, Claire; O’Meara, Tara; Richards, Susan; Tsao, Elisa C.; Mandel, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    In a previous 52-week trial, treatment with alglucosidase alfa markedly improved cardiomyopathy, ventilatory function, and overall survival among 18 children <7 months old with infantile-onset Pompe disease. Sixteen of the 18 patients enrolled in an extension study, where they continued to receive alglucosidase alfa at either 20 mg/kg biweekly (n=8) or 40 mg/kg biweekly (n=8), for up to a total of 3 years. These children continued to exhibit the benefits of alglucosidase alfa at the age of 36 months. Cox regression analyses showed that over the entire study period, alglucosidase alfa treatment reduced the risk of death by 95%, reduced the risk of invasive ventilation or death by 91%, and reduced the risk of any type of ventilation or death by 87%, as compared to an untreated historical control group. Cardiomyopathy continued to improve and 11 patients learned and sustained substantial motor skills. No significant differences in either safety or efficacy parameters were observed between the 20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg biweekly doses. Overall, long-term alglucosidase alfa treatment markedly extended survival as well as ventilation-free survival, and improved cardiomyopathy. PMID:19542901

  3. Dornase alfa is well tolerated: data from the epidemiologic registry of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, S G; Chowdhury, S; Strandvik, B; Hodson, M E

    2007-10-01

    After closure of the Epidemiologic Registry of Cystic Fibrosis (ERCF), a comprehensive safety analysis of dornase alfa was performed. A planned subanalysis focused on children under 5 years old. Reported serious adverse events (SAEs) were assigned a preferred term and ascribed to a specific organ system. Possible serious adverse reactions to dornase alfa (SADRs) were identified by reporting clinics. Twenty-eight of 15,865 SAEs (0.18%), occurring in 26 of 6,829 patients ever treated with dornase alfa (0.38%), and no deaths were reported as possible SADRs: most were typical complications of cystic fibrosis (CF). There was no evidence of any unrecognized risk of treatment. During 24,586 patient-years of follow-up (FU) of ever-treated patients, SAEs (mostly typical respiratory complications of CF) were more frequent on-treatment (0.4999/patient-year; 95% CI 0.4921-0.5076) than off-treatment (0.3889; 0.3787-0.3992). This was likely caused by within-patient prescription bias. During 655 patient-years of FU in 328 ever-treated patients under 5 years old, SAEs (mostly pulmonary exacerbations of CF) were slightly less frequent during treatment: 0.2911 (0.2367-0.3455) versus 0.3563 (0.3086-0.4040; ns). Results confirm the safety of dornase alfa in CF patients of all ages. Children under 5 years old tolerate dornase alfa at least as well as older patients.

  4. Reversing anticoagulant effects of novel oral anticoagulants: role of ciraparantag, andexanet alfa, and idarucizumab

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tiffany Y; Vaidya, Vaibhav R; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly used in clinical practice, but lack of commercially available reversal agents is a major barrier for mainstream use of these therapies. Specific antidotes to NOACs are under development. Idarucizumab (aDabi-Fab, BI 655075) is a novel humanized mouse monoclonal antibody that binds dabigatran and reverses its anticoagulant effect. In a recent Phase III study (Reversal Effects of Idarucizumab on Active Dabigatran), a 5 g intravenous infusion of idarucizumab resulted in the normalization of dilute thrombin time in 98% and 93% of the two groups studied, with normalization of ecarin-clotting time in 89% and 88% patients. Two other antidotes, andexanet alfa (PRT064445) and ciraparantag (PER977) are also under development for reversal of NOACs. In this review, we discuss commonly encountered management issues with NOACs such as periprocedural management, laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation, and management of bleeding. We review currently available data regarding specific antidotes to NOACs with respect to pharmacology and clinical trials. PMID:26937198

  5. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; Nambo, M J; García, E L

    1998-08-01

    We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy. One hundred and thirty-five patients (stage IIIB-IV B) were initially treated with EBVD (epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine). IF CR was achieved they were randomly assigned to receive either maintenance therapy with IFN 5.0 MU three times a week for one year or no further treatment (control group). Clinical and laboratory characteristics at diagnosis were quite similar in both groups. After a median follow-up of 74.3 months (range 49 to 108), 61 out of 68 patients (91%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 76% to 97%) remain in first complete remission in the IFN-treated group compared to 38 out of 67 (58%; 95% CI: 49% to 71%) in the control group (p<.01). Overall survival was also better in the IFN treated group: 62 patients (92%; 95% CI: 82% to 97%) are alive free of disease at 7-years compared to 40 patients (67%, 95%: 55% to 76%) in the control group (p<.01). Toxicity secondary to IFN administration was mild and no dose modification was necessary during treatment. All patients received the planned dose of IFN. This was not an intent-to treat analysis. IFN administration as maintenance therapy was appears to be the only cause of improvement in outcome in these patients. We feel that IFN should be considered as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease because this treatment improves the final outcome without the excessive toxicities of more aggressive therapeutic approaches such as bone marrow transplantation during first CR. We hope that IFN will be considered in future randomized clinical trials in order to define it's role in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. PMID:9711927

  6. Epoetin alfa plus autologous blood donation in patients with a low hematocrit scheduled to undergo orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tryba, M

    1996-04-01

    A low predonation hematocrit (Hct) can preclude the collection of sufficient autologous blood (AB) to meet the transfusion requirements of patients scheduled for orthopedic surgery. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of epoetin alfa, in conjunction with intravenous (i.v.) iron supplementation, has proved effective for the facilitation of AB donation by such patients. Compared with untreated controls and patients treated with i.v. iron alone, epoetin alfa 50 to 150 IU/kg SC plus i.v. iron twice weekly for 3 weeks prior to surgery significantly increased total red blood cell (RBC) production (P < .01) and the volume of RBCs donated (P < .05). Epoetin alfa was particularly effective in females and patients with a predicted blood volume (PBV) less than 5 L. Treatment with epoetin alfa led to an increase (albeit nonsignificant) in the number of AB units predonated compared with i.v. iron alone. However, in patients with a PBV less than 5 L, a substantially greater percentage of epoetin alfa-treated patients donated > or = 4 AB units (80% v 30%). Allogeneic blood requirements were reduced, albeit not significantly (P = .051), in patients treated with epoetin alfa. However, in comparison with untreated controls, there was a significant reduction in the mean volume of allogeneic blood transfused per transfused patient in the epoetin alfa groups. The optimum s.c. dose of epoetin alfa in patients with a low predonation Hct scheduled for orthopedic surgery appears to be between 100 and 150 IU/kg twice weekly for 3 weeks.

  7. Epoetin alfa increases frataxin production in Friedreich's ataxia without affecting hematocrit.

    PubMed

    Saccà, Francesco; Piro, Raffaele; De Michele, Giuseppe; Acquaviva, Fabio; Antenora, Antonella; Carlomagno, Guido; Cocozza, Sergio; Denaro, Alessandra; Guacci, Anna; Marsili, Angela; Perrotta, Gaetano; Puorro, Giorgia; Cittadini, Antonio; Filla, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    Objective of the study was to test the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of two single doses of Epoetin alfa in patients with Friedreich's ataxia. Ten patients were treated subcutaneously with 600 IU/kg for the first dose, and 3 months later with 1200 IU/kg. Epoetin alfa had no acute effect on frataxin, whereas a delayed and sustained increase in frataxin was evident at 3 months after the first dose (+35%; P < 0.05), and up to 6 months after the second dose (+54%; P < 0.001). The treatment was well tolerated and did not affect hematocrit, cardiac function, and neurological scale. Single high dose of Epoetin alfa can produce a considerably larger and sustained effect when compared with low doses and repeated administration schemes previously adopted. In addition, no hemoglobin increase was observed, and none of our patients required phlebotomy, indicating lack of erythropoietic effect of single high dose of erythropoietin.

  8. Health-related quality of life in patients with depression treated with duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in a naturalistic outpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jihyung; Novick, Diego; Montgomery, William; Moneta, Maria Victoria; Dueñas, Héctor; Peng, Xiaomei; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the levels of quality of life (QoL) in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients treated with either duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) as monotherapy for up to 6 months in a naturalistic clinical setting mostly in the Middle East, East Asia, and Mexico. Patients and methods Data for this post hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month prospective observational study involving 1,549 MDD patients without sexual dysfunction. QoL was measured using the EQ-5D instrument. Depression severity was measured using the Clinical Global Impression of Severity and the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR16), while pain severity was measured using the pain items of the Somatic Symptom Inventory. Regression analyses were performed to compare the levels of QoL between duloxetine-treated (n=556) and SSRI-treated (n=776) patients, adjusting for baseline patient characteristics. Results These MDD patients, on average, had moderately impaired QoL at baseline, and the level of QoL impairment was similar between the duloxetine and SSRI groups (EQ-5D score of 0.46 [SD =0.32] in the former and 0.47 [SD =0.33] in the latter, P=0.066). Both descriptive and regression analyses confirmed QoL improvements in both groups during follow-up, but duloxetine-treated patients achieved higher QoL. At 24 weeks, the estimated mean EQ-5D score was 0.90 in the duloxetine cohort, which was statistically significantly higher than that of 0.83 in the SSRI cohort (P<0.001). Notably, pain severity at baseline was also statistically significantly associated with poorer QoL during follow-up (P<0.001). In addition, this association was observed in the subgroup of SSRI-treated patients (P<0.001), but not in that of duloxetine-treated patients (P=0.479). Conclusion Depressed patients treated with duloxetine achieved higher QoL, compared to those treated with SSRIs, possibly in part due to its moderating effect on the link between pain and

  9. Altruism, personal benefit, and anxieties: a phenomenological study of healthy volunteers' experiences in a placebo‐controlled trial of duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Kwakye, Isaac N.; Garner, Matthew; Baldwin, David S.; Bamford, Susan; Pinkney, Verity

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to develop an in‐depth understanding of healthy volunteers' experiences of mental health trials. Methods A qualitative study was nested within a healthy volunteer placebo‐controlled trial of duloxetine, a psychotropic drug used for treating patients with major depression and generalized anxiety disorder. Eight participants were interviewed, and data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results Interviewees described volunteering for the trial because they were interested in research, wanted the monetary incentive, wanted to help researchers, and wanted to be part of something. On entering the trial, participants considered the possible risks and described feeling anxious, excited, and determined; they had some clear expectations and some loosely held hopes about what would happen. During the trial, participants were curious about whether they were taking duloxetine or placebo, self‐monitored their bodies' reactions, and guessed which treatment they received. On being un‐blinded to treatment allocation after completing the trial, some participants' guesses were confirmed, but others were surprised, and a few were disappointed. Conclusions Small changes to advertising/consent materials to reflect volunteers' motivations could improve recruitment rates to similar trials; “active” placebos might be particularly useful for maintaining blinding in healthy volunteer trials; and sensitive procedures are needed for un‐blinding participants to treatment allocation. © 2016 The Authors. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27378326

  10. Development of sensitive spectrofluorimetric and spectrophotometric methods for the determination of duloxetine in capsule and spiked human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sagirli, Olcay; Toker, Sıdıka Erturk; Önal, Armağan

    2014-12-01

    A new, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of duloxetine (DLX) in capsule and spiked human plasma. DLX, as a secondary amine compound, reacts with 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzofurazon (NBD-Cl), a highly sensitive fluorogenic and chromogenic reagent used in many investigations. The method is based on the reaction between the drug and NBD-Cl in borate buffer at pH 8.5 to yield a highly fluorescent derivative that is measured at 523 nm after excitation at 478 nm. The fluorescence intensity was directly proportional to the concentration over the range 50-250 ng/mL. The reaction product was also measured spectrophotometrically. The relation between the absorbance at 478 nm and the concentration is rectilinear over the range 1.0-12.0 µg/mL. The methods were successfully applied for the determination of this drug in pharmaceutical dosage form. The spectrofluorimetric method was also successfully applied to the determination of duloxetine in spiked human plasma. The suggested procedures could be used for the determination of DLX in pure form, capsules and human plasma being sensitive, simple and selective.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Arecibo Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) survey. IV. (Lazarus+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, P.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Swiggum, J.; Zhu, W. W.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Ferdman, R.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Arecibo Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) survey observations have been restricted to the two regions of the Galactic plane (|b|<5°) visible from the Arecibo observatory, the inner Galaxy (32°<~l<~77°), and the outer Galaxy (168°<~l<~214°). Integration times are 268s and 180s for inner and outer Galaxy observations, respectively. Observations conducted with the 7-beam Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver of the Arecibo Observatory William E. Gordon 305m Telescope have a bandwidth of 322MHz centered at 1375MHz. PALFA survey data have been recorded with the Mock spectrometers since 2009. (2 data files).

  12. Therapeutic strategies for Gaucher disease: miglustat (NB-DNJ) as a pharmacological chaperone for glucocerebrosidase and the different thermostability of velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase.

    PubMed

    Abian, Olga; Alfonso, Pilar; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Giraldo, Pilar; Pocovi, Miguel; Sancho, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GlcCerase) activity, due to conformationally or functionally defective variants, resulting in progressive deposition of glycosylceramide in macrophages. The glucose analogue, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ, miglustat), is an inhibitor of the ceramide-specific glycosyltransferase, which catalyzes the first step of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and is currently approved for the oral treatment of type 1 GD. In a previous work, we found a GlcCerase activity increase in cell cultures in the presence of NB-DNJ, which could imply that this compound is not only a substrate reducer but also a pharmacological chaperone or inhibitor for GlcCerase degradation. In this work we compare imiglucerase (the enzyme currently used for replacement therapy) and velaglucerase alfa (a novel therapeutic enzyme form) in terms of conformational stability and enzymatic activity, as well as the effect of NB-DNJ on them. The interaction between these enzymes and NB-DNJ was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry. Our results reveal that, although velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase exhibit very similar activity profiles, velaglucerase alfa shows higher in vitro thermal stability and is less prone to aggregation/precipitation, which could be advantageous for storage and clinical administration. In addition, we show that at neutral pH NB-DNJ binds to and enhances the stability of both enzymes, while at mildly acidic lysosomal conditions it does not bind to them. These results support the potential role of NB-DNJ as a pharmacological chaperone, susceptible of being part of pharmaceutical formulation or combination therapy for GD in the future. PMID:21988669

  13. Therapeutic strategies for Gaucher disease: miglustat (NB-DNJ) as a pharmacological chaperone for glucocerebrosidase and the different thermostability of velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase.

    PubMed

    Abian, Olga; Alfonso, Pilar; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Giraldo, Pilar; Pocovi, Miguel; Sancho, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GlcCerase) activity, due to conformationally or functionally defective variants, resulting in progressive deposition of glycosylceramide in macrophages. The glucose analogue, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ, miglustat), is an inhibitor of the ceramide-specific glycosyltransferase, which catalyzes the first step of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and is currently approved for the oral treatment of type 1 GD. In a previous work, we found a GlcCerase activity increase in cell cultures in the presence of NB-DNJ, which could imply that this compound is not only a substrate reducer but also a pharmacological chaperone or inhibitor for GlcCerase degradation. In this work we compare imiglucerase (the enzyme currently used for replacement therapy) and velaglucerase alfa (a novel therapeutic enzyme form) in terms of conformational stability and enzymatic activity, as well as the effect of NB-DNJ on them. The interaction between these enzymes and NB-DNJ was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry. Our results reveal that, although velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase exhibit very similar activity profiles, velaglucerase alfa shows higher in vitro thermal stability and is less prone to aggregation/precipitation, which could be advantageous for storage and clinical administration. In addition, we show that at neutral pH NB-DNJ binds to and enhances the stability of both enzymes, while at mildly acidic lysosomal conditions it does not bind to them. These results support the potential role of NB-DNJ as a pharmacological chaperone, susceptible of being part of pharmaceutical formulation or combination therapy for GD in the future.

  14. Peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin for treating chronic hepatitis C virus infection: analysis of Mexican patients included in a multicenter international clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Trejo-Estrada, Rafael; Campollo-Rivas, Octaivio; Cortez-Hernández, Carlos; Dehesa-Violante, Margarita; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor; Pérez-Gómez, Rául; Cabrera-Valdespino, Armando

    2003-01-01

    Treatment with polyethylene glycol-modified interferon alfa-2a (peginterferon) alone produces significantly higher sustained antiviral responses than treatment with interferon alfa-2a alone in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We compared the efficacy and safety of peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin, interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin, and peginterferon alfa-2a alone in the initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Thirty-two patients were randomly assigned to treatment, and received at least one dose of medication consisting of 180 microg of peginterferon alfa-2a once weekly plus daily ribavirin (1,000 or 1,200 mg, depending on body weight) (n = 14), weekly peginterferon alfa-2a plus daily placebo (n = 6), or three million units of interferon alfa-2b thrice weekly plus daily ribavirin for 48 weeks (n = 12). More patients who received peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin had a sustained virologic response (defined as the absence of detectable HCV RNA 24 weeks after cessation of therapy) than patients who received interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin (7/14 vs. 4/12) or peginterferon alfa-2a plus placebo (0/6). The overall safety profiles of the three treatment regimens were similar. In conclusion, for patients with chronic hepatitis C, once-weekly peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin was tolerated as well as interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin and produced significant improvements in the rate of sustained viral reduction compared with interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin or peginterferon alfa-2a alone. PMID:15115965

  15. Coding of adverse events of suicidality in clinical study reports of duloxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder: descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Lundh, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of coding and coding conventions on summaries and tabulations of adverse events data on suicidality within clinical study reports. Design Systematic electronic search for adverse events of suicidality in tables, narratives, and listings of adverse events in individual patients within clinical study reports. Where possible, for each event we extracted the original term reported by the investigator, the term as coded by the medical coding dictionary, medical coding dictionary used, and the patient’s trial identification number. Using the patient’s trial identification number, we attempted to reconcile data on the same event between the different formats for presenting data on adverse events within the clinical study report. Setting 9 randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine for major depressive disorder submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval. Data sources Clinical study reports obtained from the EMA in 2011. Results Six trials used the medical coding dictionary COSTART (Coding Symbols for a Thesaurus of Adverse Reaction Terms) and three used MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities). Suicides were clearly identifiable in all formats of adverse event data in clinical study reports. Suicide attempts presented in tables included both definitive and provisional diagnoses. Suicidal ideation and preparatory behaviour were obscured in some tables owing to the lack of specificity of the medical coding dictionary, especially COSTART. Furthermore, we found one event of suicidal ideation described in narrative text that was absent from tables and adverse event listings of individual patients. The reason for this is unclear, but may be due to the coding conventions used. Conclusion Data on adverse events in tables in clinical study reports may not accurately represent the underlying patient data because of the medical dictionaries and coding conventions used. In clinical study reports, the

  16. The Synchrony and Diachrony of Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Adjectival Long-Form Allomorphy (ALFA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, James Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS), the gentive (G) and dative/locative (DL) cases exhibit adjectival long-form allomorphy (ALFA). The genitive -"og" -"oga" and the DL -"om" -"ome" -"omu" stand in free variation, inasmuch as when one form is substituted for another the truth value of an utterance remains unchanged. Some sociolinguists (particularly…

  17. Treatment of cancer-related anemia with epoetin alfa: a review.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Erminia; Ferrari, Leonardo; Bidoli, Paolo; De Candis, Daniela; Del Vecchio, Michele; De Dosso, Sara; Buzzoni, Roberto; Bajetta, Emilio

    2004-10-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a hematopoietic growth hormone that regulates survival, proliferation, and differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells. A reduction in tissue oxygenation stimulates EPO production, through a complex feedback mechanism. Patients with cancer-related anemia have an inadequate EPO response that is further impaired by cancer treatments such as chemotherapy. Cancer-related anemia substantially impairs patient functioning and may contribute to poor treatment outcomes. A significant number of studies demonstrates that treatment of anemia in cancer patients using recombinant human EPO (rHuEPO, epoetin alfa) significantly increases haemoglobin (Hb) levels, reduces transfusion requirements, and improves quality of life, particularly by relieving fatigue. Recent data also show that epoetin alfa therapy may improve cognitive function in patients receiving chemotherapy. In addition, the correction of anemia may prolong survival by enhancing tumor oxygenation, thus increasing tumor sensitivity to chemotherapy or radiation. The indicated dose of epoetin alfa is 150-300 IU/kg three times per week, but it is commonly dosed at 40,000-60,000 IU once weekly based on trial data and extensive clinical use. Determining the timing of initiation of epoetin alfa is a clinical judgement; however, data suggest that patient functioning declines and the risk of transfusion increases when the Hb level falls under 12 g/dL.

  18. Asfotase alfa: enzyme replacement for the treatment of bone disease in hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, C; Seefried, L; Jakob, F

    2016-05-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, TNSALP) gene. HPP causes a multisystemic syndrome with a predominant bone phenotype. The clinical spectrum ranges from high lethality in early onset (<6 months) HPP to mild late-onset syndromes. HPP management so far has been only supportive. Subcutaneous asfotase alfa, a first-in-class bone-targeted human TNAP enzyme replacement therapy, is the first compound to be approved for long-term treatment of bone manifestations in pediatric-onset HPP. In noncomparative clinical trials (treatment up to 7 years), this treatment was associated with skeletal, respiratory and functional improvement in perinatal, infantile and childhood-onset HPP. Compared with age-matched historical controls, patients with life-threatening perinatal and infantile HPP treated with asfotase alfa had substantially improved bone mineralization, survival and ventilation-free survival. In childhood HPP, asfotase alfa improved growth, gross motor function, strength and agility and decreased pain. The compound was well tolerated and most adverse events were of mild to moderate intensity. To date, data and experience concerning its efficacy and safety in long-term treatment are not yet available. Further studies to evaluate risks and benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with asfotase alfa in adults are in progress and are also strongly needed. PMID:27376160

  19. Switch from epoetin to darbepoetin alfa in hemodialysis: dose equivalence and hemoglobin stability

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, Javier; Moina, Iñigo; Molina, José; Gallardo, Isabel; Muñiz, María Luisa; Robledo, Carmen; García, Oscar; Vidaur, Fernando; Muñoz, Rosa Inés; Iribar, Izaskun; Aguirre, Román; Maza, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Aim The objective of the study reported here was to describe dose equivalence and hemoglobin (Hb) stability in a cohort of unselected hemodialysis patients who were switched simultaneously from epoetin alfa to darbepoetin alfa. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, retrospective study in patients aged ≥18 years who switched from intravenous (IV) epoetin alfa to IV darbepoetin alfa in October 2007 (Month 0) and continued on hemodialysis for at least 24 months. The dose was adjusted to maintain Hb within 1.0 g/dL of baseline. Results We included 125 patients (59.7% male, mean [standard deviation (SD)] age 70.4 [13.4] years). No significant changes were observed in Hb levels (mean [SD] 11.9 [1.3] g/dL, 12.0 [1.5], 12.0 [1.5], and 12.0 [1.7] at Months −12, 0, 12 and 24, respectively, P=0.409). After conversion, the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) dose decreased significantly (P<0.0001), with an annual mean of 174.7 (88.7) international units (IU)/kg/week for epoetin versus 95.7 (43.4) (first year) and 91.4 (42.7) IU/kg/week (second year) for darbepoetin (65% and 64% reduction, respectively). The ESA resistance index decreased from 15.1 (8.5) IU/kg/week/g/dL with epoetin to 8.1 (3.9) (first year) and 7.9 (4.0) (second year) with darbepoetin (P<0.0001). The conversion rate was 354:1 in patients requiring high (>200 IU/kg/week) doses of epoetin and 291:1 in patients requiring low doses. Conclusion In patients on hemodialysis receiving ESAs, conversion from epoetin alfa to darbepoetin alfa was associated with an approximate and persistent reduction of 65% of the required dose. To maintain Hb stability, a conversion rate of 300:1 seems to be appropriate for most patients receiving low doses of epoetin alfa (≤200 IU/kg/week), while 350:1 would be better for patients receiving higher doses. PMID:25336984

  20. Treatment of major depressive disorders with generic duloxetine and paroxetine: a multi-centered, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Zhiyang; XU, Xiufeng; TAN, Qingrong; LI, Keqing; MA, Cui; XIE, Shiping; GAO, Chengge; WANG, Gang; LI, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    Background This study is a pre-registration trial of generic duloxetine that was approved by the China Food and Drug Administration (approval number: 2006L01603). Aims Compare the treatment efficacy and safety of generic duloxetine to that of paroxetine in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). Methods This was a double-dummy, double-blind, multicenter, positive drug (paroxetine), parallel randomized controlled clinical trial. The 299 patients with MDD recruited for the study were randomly assigned to use duloxetine (n=149; 40–60 mg/d) or paroxetine (n=150; 20 mg/d) for 8 weeks. The Hamilton Depression rating scale (HAMD-17) was administered at baseline and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after starting treatment. Remission was defined as a HAMD-17 score below 8 at the end of the trial, and treatment effectiveness was defined as a decrease in baseline HAMD-17 score of at least 50% by the end of the trial. Safety was assessed based on the reported prevalence and severity of side effects and changes in laboratory and electrocardiographic findings. Three patients in the duloxetine group dropped out before starting medication, so results were analyzed using a modified intention-to-treat (ITT) method with 146 in the experimental group and 150 in the control group. Results Both groups experienced 29 dropouts during the 8-week trial. HAMD-17 scores decreased significantly from baseline throughout the trial in both groups. Based on the ITT analysis, at the end of the trial there was no significant difference between the duloxetine group and the paroxetine group in effectiveness (67.1% v. 71.3%, X2=0.62 p=0.433), remission rate (41.1% v. 51.3%, X2=3.12, p=0.077), or in the incidence of side effects (56.8% v. 54.7%, X2=0.14, p=0.705). Conclusions Generic duloxetine is as effective and safe as paroxetine in the acute treatment of patients with MDD who seek care at psychiatric outpatient departments in China. PMID:26549959

  1. Stress degradation studies on duloxetine hydrochloride and development of an RP-HPLC method for its determination in capsule formulation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V R; Kumria, R; Bhinge, J R

    2009-08-01

    Duloxetine hydrochloride (HCl) is an antidepressant drug prescribed for major depressive disorders, pain related to diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and stress urinary incontinence. In the present study, degradation behavior of duloxetine HCl was studied by subjecting the drug to various International Conference on Harmonization-recommended stress conditions. Also, a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method was established for analysis of the drug in the presence of various degradation products. An acceptable separation of the drug and its degradation products was achieved on a C-8 column at 40 degrees C using a mobile phase comprised of phosphate buffer (pH 2.5)-methanol-tetrahydrofuran in the ratio of 50:40:10 at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The detection wavelength was 232 nm. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, selectivity, specificity, and robustness. The method was found to be linear over a concentration range of 1-100 microg/mL (n = 6). The value of slope was found to be 85.735 mV/s ppm with correlation coefficient of 0.9994 and relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.87%. RSD values ranged from 0.20% to 0.82% in the case of intra-day precision studies, whereas the values ranged from 0.63% to 1.57% in the case of inter-day precision. The drug was found to be stable on exposure of 30% H(2)O(2) for 48 h. It was found to be highly unstable in acidic conditions, as 41.35% degradation was observed in 0.01N HCl at 40 degrees C after 8 h. Degradation was also observed in alkaline and neutral conditions (2.83% and 42.75%, respectively) on refluxing the drug for 1 h. The drug was stable under photolytic and thermal stress on exposure in solid form but showed considerable degradation in solution form.

  2. Andexanet Alfa for Acute Major Bleeding Associated with Factor Xa Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Stuart J; Milling, Truman J; Eikelboom, John W; Gibson, C Michael; Curnutte, John T; Gold, Alex; Bronson, Michele D; Lu, Genmin; Conley, Pamela B; Verhamme, Peter; Schmidt, Jeannot; Middeldorp, Saskia; Cohen, Alexander T; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Albaladejo, Pierre; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Goodman, Shelly; Leeds, Janet; Wiens, Brian L; Siegal, Deborah M; Zotova, Elena; Meeks, Brandi; Nakamya, Juliet; Lim, W Ting; Crowther, Mark

    2016-09-22

    Background Andexanet alfa (andexanet) is a recombinant modified human factor Xa decoy protein that has been shown to reverse the inhibition of factor Xa in healthy volunteers. Methods In this multicenter, prospective, open-label, single-group study, we evaluated 67 patients who had acute major bleeding within 18 hours after the administration of a factor Xa inhibitor. The patients all received a bolus of andexanet followed by a 2-hour infusion of the drug. Patients were evaluated for changes in measures of anti-factor Xa activity and were assessed for clinical hemostatic efficacy during a 12-hour period. All the patients were subsequently followed for 30 days. The efficacy population of 47 patients had a baseline value for anti-factor Xa activity of at least 75 ng per milliliter (or ≥0.5 IU per milliliter for those receiving enoxaparin) and had confirmed bleeding severity at adjudication. Results The mean age of the patients was 77 years; most of the patients had substantial cardiovascular disease. Bleeding was predominantly gastrointestinal or intracranial. The mean (±SD) time from emergency department presentation to the administration of the andexanet bolus was 4.8±1.8 hours. After the bolus administration, the median anti-factor Xa activity decreased by 89% (95% confidence interval [CI], 58 to 94) from baseline among patients receiving rivaroxaban and by 93% (95% CI, 87 to 94) among patients receiving apixaban. These levels remained similar during the 2-hour infusion. Four hours after the end of the infusion, there was a relative decrease from baseline of 39% in the measure of anti-factor Xa activity among patients receiving rivaroxaban and of 30% among those receiving apixaban. Twelve hours after the andexanet infusion, clinical hemostasis was adjudicated as excellent or good in 37 of 47 patients in the efficacy analysis (79%; 95% CI, 64 to 89). Thrombotic events occurred in 12 of 67 patients (18%) during the 30-day follow-up. Conclusions On the basis of a

  3. Ovulation induction with minimal dose of follitropin alfa: a case series study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gonadotropins are used in ovulation induction (OI) for patients with anovulatory infertility. Pharmacologic OI is associated with risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancy. Treatment protocols that minimize these risks by promoting monofollicular development are required. A starting dose of 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa has been used in OI, particularly among women at high risk of multifollicular development and multiple pregnancy. A retrospective case series study was performed to evaluate rates of monofollicular development and singleton pregnancy following standard treatment with 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa. Methods Spanish centers that had performed at least five OI cycles during 2008 using 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa as a starting dose were invited to participate. Data could be provided from any cycle performed in 2008 (up to a maximum of 12 consecutive cycles per site). Case report forms were collected during April-November 2009 and reviewed centrally. Descriptive statistics were obtained from all cases, and follicular development and clinical pregnancy rates assessed. Potential associations of age and body mass index with follicular development and clinical pregnancy were assessed using univariate correlation analyses. Results Thirty centers provided data on 316 cycles of OI using a starting dose of 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa. Polycystic ovary syndrome was the cause of anovulatory infertility in 217 (68.7%) cases. Follitropin alfa at 37.5 IU/day was sufficient to achieve ovarian stimulation in 230 (72.8%) cycles. A single follicle ≥16 mm in diameter developed in 193 cycles (61.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 55.7-66.4%). Seventy-eight women (24.7%; 95% CI 19.9-29.5%) became pregnant: 94.9% singleton and 5.1% twin pregnancies. Fourteen started cycles (4.4%) were cancelled, mainly due to poor response. Univariate correlation analyses detected weak associations. Conclusions Monofollicular growth rate was comparable with

  4. Comparison of the effectiveness of duloxetine in depressed patients with and without a family history of affective disorders in first-degree relatives

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Shiliang; QIAN, Mincai; ZHONG, Hua; SONG, Guohua; LU, Meijuan; FENG, Rui; ZHANG, Lei; NI, Jianliang; CHEN, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains unclear whether or not a positive family history of affective disorders predicts the effectiveness of antidepressant treatment of depression. Aims Assess the relationship of a family history of affective disorders to the efficacy of duloxetine in the treatment of depressive disorder. Methods Seventy-seven patients with depressive disorder (as defined by the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases, ICD-10) were enrolled in the study and treated with standard doses of duloxetine for 12 weeks. Among these patients 37 had a family history of affective disorder in first-degree relatives and 40 did not. The Hamilton Depression rating scale (HAMD-17), Hamilton Anxiety rating scale (HAMA), Side Effects Rating Scale (SERS), Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and 12th week after enrollment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to analyze the association between a family history of affective disorders and the efficacy of duloxetine. Results Patients with a positive family history of affective disorders had an earlier age of onset, a longer duration of illness, a higher level of psychic anxiety, and more prominent anhedonia. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant improvement in the severity of depression over the 12 weeks but no differences in the magnitude or speed of improvement between the two groups. Treatment was considered effective (i.e., drop in baseline HAMD-17 total score of ≥50%) in 75.7% of those with a family history of affective disorders and in 77.5% of those without a family history (X2=0.04, p=0.850). Conclusions Family history of affective disorders is not associated with the effectiveness of duloxetine in the acute treatment of depressive disorder. PMID:26549960

  5. Effectiveness of Duloxetine Monotherapy Compared to Combination Therapy with Other Antidepressants in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Short-Term, Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Lee, Young-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare duloxetine monotherapy to combination therapy with other antidepressants in patients with major depressive disorder in a clinical, real world setting. Methods An eight-week, retrospective, multi-center study of outpatients with major depressive disorder was undertaken. After screening 415 patients, enrolled in this study from July 2009 to June 2014 were 82 patients from among three centers who had been taking duloxetine with or without other antidepressant and not administered with atypical antipsychotics. We compared the mean changes of the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) as a primary measure and the discontinuation rate as a secondary measure between the duloxetine monotherapy group (n=36, 43.9%) and the combination therapy with other antidepressants group (n=46, 56.1%) at baseline, one, two, four and eight weeks. Results There were no significant differences across the demographic characteristics between two groups. There was, however, a statistically greater improvement on the CGI-S at weeks 2, 4 and 8 in the combination group compared with the monotherapy group. There were no significant differences in discontinuation rate and adverse events between two groups. No serious adverse events were reported in both groups during the study period. Conclusion This result suggests that the duloxetine combination therapy with other antidepressants could improve effectiveness and have comparable tolerability with the monotherapy in the treatment of outpatients with major depressive disorders in a naturalistic setting. Adequately powered, well-controlled clinical trials are strongly warranted to confirm our findings due to methodological shortcomings. PMID:27482247

  6. The peripheral innervation of the gill of the marine mollusc demonstrated by the aluminium-formaldehyde (ALFA) histofluorescence method.

    PubMed

    Catapane, E J

    1982-01-01

    The aluminium-formaldehyde (ALFA) histofluorescence method was used to study the innervation of the gill of the marine bivalve mollusc Mytilus edulis and the results were contrasted with those obtained with the standard formaldehyde-induced-fluorescence (FIF) method. The ALFA method produced more fluorescing structures than the FIF method, thus revealing fine branches of the branchial nerve running beneath the gill epithelium which previously remained undetected. This study of marine invertebrates. PMID:7105160

  7. Does Duloxetine Improve Cognitive Function Independently of Its Antidepressant Effect in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Subjective Reports of Cognitive Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tracy L.; Sunderajan, Prabha; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Kurian, Benji T.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cognitive deficits are commonly reported by patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Duloxetine, a dual serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, may improve cognitive deficits in MDD. It is unclear if cognitive improvements occur independently of antidepressant effects with standard antidepressant medications. Methods. Thirty participants with MDD who endorsed cognitive deficits at screening received 12-week duloxetine treatment. Twenty-one participants completed treatment and baseline and posttreatment cognitive testing. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery was used to assess the following cognitive domains: attention, visual memory, executive function/set shifting and working memory, executive function/spatial planning, decision making and response control, and verbal learning and memory. Results. Completers showed significant cognitive improvements across several domains on tasks assessing psychomotor function and mental processing speed, with additional improvements in visual and verbal learning and memory, and affective decision making and response control. Overall significance tests for executive function tasks were also significant, although individual tasks were not, perhaps due to the small sample size. Most notably, cognitive improvements were observed independently of symptom reduction on all domains except verbal learning and memory. Conclusions. Patients reporting baseline cognitive deficits achieved cognitive improvements with duloxetine treatment, most of which were independent of symptomatic improvement. This trial is registered with NCT00933439. PMID:24563781

  8. Validated spectrophotometric method for the determination, spectroscopic characterization and thermal structural analysis of duloxetine with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar; Elmali, Fikriye Tuncel

    2012-03-01

    A novel, selective, sensitive and simple spectrophotometric method was developed and validated for the determination of the antidepressant duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation. The method was based on the reaction of duloxetine hydrochloride with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate (NQS) in alkaline media to yield orange colored product. The formation of this complex was also confirmed by UV-visible, FTIR, 1H NMR, Mass spectra techniques and thermal analysis. This method was validated for various parameters according to ICH guidelines. Beer's law is obeyed in a range of 5.0-60 μg/mL at the maximum absorption wavelength of 480 nm. The detection limit is 0.99 μg/mL and the recovery rate is in a range of 98.10-99.57%. The proposed methods was validated and applied to the determination of duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation. The results were statistically analyzed and compared to those of a reference UV spectrophotometric method.

  9. Darbepoietin-alfa has comparable erythropoietic stimulatory effects to recombinant erythropoietin whilst preserving the bone marrow microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Dewamitta, Sita R.; Russell, Megan R.; Nandurkar, Harshal; Walkley, Carl R.

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoiesis stimulating agents are widely used for the treatment of anemia. Recently, we reported erythroid expansion with impaired B lymphopoiesis and loss of trabecular bone in C57BL/6 mice following ten days of treatment with low-dose short acting recombinant human erythropoietin. We have assessed erythropoietin against longer-acting darbepoietin-alfa at a comparable erythroid stimulatory dosage regime. Darbepoietin-alfa and erythropoietin induced similar in vivo erythropoietic expansion. Both agents induced an expansion of the colony-forming unit-erythroid populations. However, unlike erythropoietin, darbepoietin-alfa did not impair bone marrow B lymphopoiesis. Strikingly the bone loss observed with erythropoietin was not apparent following darbepoietin-alfa treatment. This analysis demonstrates that whilst darbepoietin-alfa has similar in vivo erythropoietic potency to erythropoietin, it preserves the bone marrow microenvironment. Thus erythropoietin and darbepoietin-alfa manifest different action showing that erythropoiesis stimulating agents have differential non-erythroid effects dependent on their duration of action. PMID:23242598

  10. Modeling viral and drug kinetics: hepatitis C virus treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2b.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kimberly A; Dixit, Narendra M; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Golia, Preeti; Talal, Andrew H; Perelson, Alan S

    2003-01-01

    Administration of peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin results in an early hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay followed by an increase as the drug concentration declines between doses. Upon administration of the next dose 1 week later, the same pattern is observed. We have incorporated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis into a model of viral dynamics to describe the effect that changes in drug concentration and effectiveness can have on viral levels. To illustrate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and viral dynamics, we fit the model to data from four HCV/human immunodeficiency virus co-infected patients, and obtained good agreement with the measured serum HCV RNA levels. We were able to account for the observed increases in HCV RNA, and estimate virion and drug half-lives that are in agreement with previous reports. Models incorporating pharmacokinetics are needed to correctly interpret viral load changes and estimate drug effectiveness in treatment protocols using peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:12934163

  11. Epoetin alfa for protection of metabolic and exercise capacity in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Daneryd, Peter

    2002-06-01

    A controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the use of epoetin alfa in cachectic patients with solid tumors who were not receiving chemotherapy to determine if increasing hemoglobin (Hb) resulted in increased exercise capacity, metabolism, and energy efficiency during a maximum work load. The randomized, prospective study included 108 patients who received oral indomethacin 50 mg twice daily (n = 58; control group), or oral indomethacin 50 mg twice daily with epoetin alfa 4,000 to 10,000 IU by subcutaneous injection 3 times weekly (n = 50; study group). Patients randomized to the study group received epoetin alfa only when Hb decreased below 12.8 g/dL for men and 12.0 g/dL for women. Mean Hb levels in the study group were significantly (P <.0001) improved overall compared with the control group, with significant differences seen between groups after 2 to 4 months (P <.003), 6 to 8 months (P <.01), and 10 to 30 months (P <.01). Mean inflammatory variables including serum albumin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein were significantly (P <.02) changed in the study group compared with the control group (ie, the control group had more inflammation). Significantly lower mean body weight (P <.05) and resting energy expenditure (P <.007) were recorded for patients in the control group versus the study group. The study group showed significantly greater mean exercise capacity (P <.0001), mean oxygen uptake (P <.01), mean CO(2) production (P <.009), and respiration (P <.03). These results demonstrate that early use of epoetin alfa prevents anemia in patients with progressive cancer who are not receiving chemotherapy. Normalization of Hb levels resulted in improved whole-body metabolism and energy efficiency, which is associated with greater exercise capacity and better daily quality of life.

  12. Cost-effectiveness impact of iron dextran on hemodialysis patients' use of epoetin alfa and blood.

    PubMed

    Driver, P S

    1998-12-15

    The cost-effectiveness impact of iron dextran administration on the use of epoetin alfa and blood in hemodialysis patients was studied. Subjects were ambulatory hemodialysis patients who had been receiving hemodialysis for at least six months before the start of an iron dextran protocol and who had been given epoetin alfa for at least four of those six months. Clinical data were collected for six months before and six months after the protocol was implemented. Successful treatment was defined as a hematocrit of 33-36%, a transferrin saturation of >10%, a ferritin concentration of >100 ng/mL, and no blood use except for acute blood loss. A total of 33 patients completed the study. Fifty units of blood were used in the first six months and nine units in the second six months. There was significant improvement in mean hematocrit, ferritin, and transferrin saturation values after the protocol began. Average epoetin alfa doses did not change significantly. There was significant improvement in success rates for ferritin and blood use and in the overall success rate. Ten patients met all success criteria in the preprotocol period, versus 27 in the postprotocol period. Monthly cost-effectiveness analysis for the preprotocol and postprotocol periods indicated costs of $1350 and $526, per successful treatment, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness of iron dextran was $42 per successful treatment. Iron dextran improved iron indices and reduced the need for blood transfusions but did not reduce the average dose of epoetin alfa. The additional cost of therapy per month seemed justified by the clinical benefits.

  13. Epoetin alfa. A bloodless approach for the treatment of perioperative anemia.

    PubMed

    Faris, P M; Ritter, M A

    1998-12-01

    Under normal physiologic conditions the level of circulating red blood cells is regulated precisely by the glycoprotein erythropoietin. In major elective surgery, patients who are participating in preoperative autologous blood donation or who are anemic may not have the capacity to manufacture sufficient red blood cells in response to increases in endogenous erythropoietin that is sufficient to avoid perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion. In these patients pharmacologic doses of recombinant human erythropoietin (Epoetin alfa) have been shown to accelerate erythropoiesis, thereby increasing preoperative red blood cell production, hematocrit level, and hemoglobin concentration and reducing exposure to allogeneic blood transfusion. In four large multicenter studies, 869 patients undergoing major elective surgery were treated with a daily regimen (300 or 100 IU/kg x 14 or 15 doses) or a weekly regimen (600 IU/kg x 4 doses) of subcutaneous Epoetin alfa beginning either 2 or 3 weeks before surgery, respectively. Although all Epoetin alfa regimens were effective at accelerating erythropoiesis and increasing red blood cell production, the weekly regimen was the most patient friendly, cost effective regimen for treating preoperative anemia and minimizing patient risk of allogeneic blood transfusion.

  14. Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype and the clinical responses to duloxetine treatment or plasma levels of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol and homovanillic acid in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Atake, Kiyokazu; Yoshimura, Reiji; Hori, Hikaru; Katsuki, Asuka; Nakamura, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationships among the plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites, the clinical response to duloxetine treatment, and Val158Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene. Subjects and methods Sixty-four patients and 30 healthy control subjects were recruited. Major depressive episodes were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria. The severity of depression was evaluated using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17). Patients whose HAMD17 scores were 15 or greater were enrolled in the study. Blood sampling and clinical evaluation were performed at week 0 and week 8. The levels of plasma catecholamine metabolites were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Genotyping was performed using direct sequencing. Results Thirty of 45 patients (67%) responded to duloxetine treatment during the 8 weeks of treatment. The baseline plasma levels of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), but not homovanillic acid (HVA), were lower in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who had the Val/Val genotype than in patients who were Met-carriers. Patients with MDD and the Val/Val genotype, but not Met carriers, had increased plasma levels of MHPG after 8 weeks of duloxetine treatment. The baseline plasma MHPG levels in healthy control subjects with the Val/Val genotype were significantly higher than those in patients with MDD. Among the subjects in the MDD group with the Val/Val genotype, the plasma MHPG levels increased to the same degree as in the healthy control subjects with the Val/Val genotype after 8 weeks of duloxetine treatment. Conclusion The relationship among the COMT Val158Met polymorphism, plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites, and responses to duloxetine is complex. Nevertheless, our results suggest that patients with MDD and the

  15. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3–62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2–4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. Am. J. Hematol. 90:584–591, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25801797

  16. Cost of managing anemia with and without prophylactic epoetin alfa therapy in breast cancer patients receiving combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meadowcroft, A M; Gilbert, C J; Maravich-May, D; Hayward, S L

    1998-09-15

    The cost of managing anemia with prophylactic epoetin alfa therapy versus blood transfusions in breast cancer patients receiving combination chemotherapy was studied. A retrospective study of anemia in breast cancer patients treated with four cycles of cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin with fluorouracil (CAF) or without fluorouracil (CA) was conducted. For each cycle of chemotherapy, patients were assessed for fatigue, subsequent blood transfusions administered, and potential response to and adverse effects of blood transfusions. Transfusions were given at the prescriber's discretion rather than in accordance with standard guidelines. The lowest hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit of each patient per cycle were reported. Data on these patients, along with data from published studies of prophylactic use of epoetin alfa, were used in a decision analysis of the costs associated with using epoetin alfa versus red blood cell transfusions to manage anemia. The charts of 50 patients were reviewed. In the study group, the percentage of patients with anemia and the frequency of fatigue rose with each chemotherapy cycle. In general, blood transfusions were not used. The cost of using epoetin alfa prophylactically for all four cycles was estimated at $6483 per patient for the literature-based group versus $169 for the study group. The cost of managing anemia in breast cancer patients was substantially lower when blood transfusions were used than when epoetin alfa was given prophylactically throughout four cycles of therapy with CAF or CA; the absence of standard guidelines for transfusion might have exaggerated the difference in costs.

  17. Characterization of stress degradation products of duloxetine hydrochloride employing LC-UV/PDA and LC-MS/TOF studies.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Renu; Bali, Alka; Bansal, Gulshan

    2016-03-20

    Duloxetine HCl was subjected to forced degradation under conditions of hydrolysis (neutral, acidic and alkaline), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress, as suggested in the ICH guideline Q1A(R2). The drug showed significant degradation under acidic, alkaline and aqueous hydrolytic as well as photolytic conditions. The drug remained stable under thermal and oxidative stress conditions. In total, seventeen degradation products (I-XVII) were formed under varied conditions, which could be separated by chromatography of respective degraded solutions on C18 (250 mm×4.6 mm; 5 μ, Nulceodur) column using isocratic elution method. Detection wavelength was selected as 290 nm. MS/TOF accurate mass studies were carried out to establish the complete fragmentation pathway of the drug and degradation products, which, in turn, was utilized in characterization of the products. The degradation pathway of the drug leading to generation of fifteen products I-X, XII-XIII, XV-XVII was postulated and this has not been reported so far. PMID:26775018

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatment with peginterferon-alfa-2a versus peginterferon-alfa-2b for patients with chronic hepatitis C under the public payer perspective in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C affects approximately 170 million people worldwide, and thus being one of the main causes of chronic liver disease. About 20% of patients with chronic hepatitis C will develop cirrhosis over 20 years, and present an increased risk of developing hepatic complications. Sustained virological response (SVR) is associated with a better prognosis compared to untreated patients and treatment failures. The objective of this analysis was to compare treatment costs and outcomes of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a versus pegylated interferon-alfa-2b, both associated with ribavirin, in the therapeutic scheme of 24 weeks and 48 week for hepatitis C genotypes 2/3 and genotype 1, respectively, under the Brazilian Public Health System (SUS) scenario. Methods To project disease progression, a Markov model was built based on clinical stages of chronic disease. A Delphi panel was conducted to evaluate medical resources related to each stage, followed by costing of related materials, services, procedures and pharmaceutical products. The evaluation was made from a public payer perspective. The source used for costing was government reimbursement procedures list (SAI/SIH–SUS). Drug acquisition costs were obtained from the Brazilian Official Gazette and “Banco de Preços em Saúde” (government official source). It was assumed a mean patient weight of 70 kg. Costs were reported in 2011 Brazilian Reais (US$1 ≈ $Brz1.80). A systematic review followed by a meta-analysis of the 7 identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which compared pegylated interferons, was conducted for obtaining relative efficacy of both drugs: for genotype 2/3, mean rate of SVR was 79.2% for peginterferon-alfa-2a and 73.8% for peginterferon-alfa-2b. For genotype 1, SVR mean rate was 42.09% versus 33.44% (peginterferon-alfa-2a and peginterferon-alfa-2b respectively). Time horizon considered was lifetime. Discount rate for costs and outcomes was 5%, according to Brazilian

  19. Taliglucerase alfa leads to favorable bone marrow responses in patients with type I Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    van Dussen, L; Zimran, A; Akkerman, E M; Aerts, J M F G; Petakov, M; Elstein, D; Rosenbaum, H; Aviezer, D; Brill-Almon, E; Chertkoff, R; Maas, M; Hollak, C E M

    2013-03-01

    Taliglucerase alfa (Protalix Biotherapeutics, Israel) is a carrot-cell-expressed recombinant human beta-glucocerebrosidase recently approved in the United States for the treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease (GD). As bone disease is one of the most debilitating features of GD, quantification of bone marrow involvement is important for monitoring the response to treatment. Therefore, bone marrow fat fraction (Ff) measured by quantitative chemical shift imaging (QCSI) was included as exploratory parameter to evaluate bone marrow response in treatment naïve GD patients participating in a double-blind, randomized phase III study. Eight GD patients with intact spleens were treated with 30 or 60U/kg biweekly. Ff results were compared to outcomes in 15 untreated Dutch GD patients with a follow-up interval of 1year. Five taliglucerase alfa treated patients had a Ff below the threshold that relates to complication risk (<0.23) at baseline (median (n=8) 0.19, range 0.11-0.35). Ff significantly increased compared to baseline (p=0.012) and compared to untreated patients (p=0.005), already after 1year of follow-up with further improvement up to 36months. In four patients with the lowest Ff, the higher dose resulted in increases above 0.23 within 1year. All patients had sustained improvements in all other parameters. There was no influence of antibodies on response parameters. Treatment with taliglucerase alfa results in significant increases in lumbar spine fat fractions, which indicates clearance of Gaucher cells from the bone marrow. PMID:23199589

  20. Unmasking of myasthenia gravis during pegylated Alfa 2 a interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ayesha

    2016-05-01

    Over last few decades, hepatitis C has emerged as a serious infection that has threatened the health and budgets of millions in the world. The objective of health professionals to treat it with recommended therapy of Alfa interferon and Ribavirin combination presents certain risks. One of the alarms is the ability of interferon to stimulate the production of autoantibodies in the body resulting in expression of autoimmune diseases in few who develop these antibodies. The case presented here is about unmasking of myasthenia gravis in a patient who received alfa interferon therapy for her chronic hepatitis C. Alfa interferon probably plays an important role in manifestation of the diseases in susceptible patients and all autoimmune diseases cannot be taken as mere side effects of the therapy. Clinicians need to be alert to pick up these diseases earlier so that the prompt management is possible. PMID:27183950

  1. Effectiveness of corifollitropin alfa used for ovarian stimulation of poor responder patients

    PubMed Central

    Selman, Helmy; Rinaldi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficiency and efficacy of corifollitropin alfa (follicle-stimulating hormone–carboxy terminal peptide) in the treatment of poor responder patients. Methods A total of 85 poor responder patients with a mean age 40.2±3.9 years entered our assisted fertilization program. The patients were prospectively randomized into two groups based on the ovarian stimulation regimen used: group A (study group) (n=42) received clomiphene citrate and corifollitropin alfa for the first 7 days of stimulation followed by recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol, and group B (control group) (n=43) received clomiphene citrate and a daily injection of rFSH in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol. We analyzed the stimulation outcome, the number of retrieved oocytes, cleaving embryos, and pregnancy and implantation rates as well. Results Comparable results were observed between the two groups in terms of demographic data, stimulation outcome, and the number of canceled cycles. There were no differences evident between groups A and B with respect to the number of retrieved oocytes (3.0±0.8 and 2.7±0.7, respectively) and the number of cleaving embryos (1.8±0.6 and 1.7±0.7, respectively). Higher, though not statistically significant, differences were observed in favor of group A compared to group B in terms of pregnancy rate per cycle (19% and 16.3%, respectively), pregnancy rate per transfer (21.6% and 17.9%, respectively), and implantation rate (14.7% and 13.4%, respectively). Also, miscarriage rate was similar between patients treated with corifollitropin alfa and those treated with daily rFSH injection (12.5% and 14.2%, respectively). Conclusion The results show that ovarian stimulation with corifollitropin alfa appears to be as efficacious and efficient as daily injection rFSH regimen to treat patients with poor ovarian response. PMID:27799826

  2. A Patient Friendly Corifollitropin Alfa Protocol without Routine Pituitary Suppression in Normal Responders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huai-Ling; Lai, Hsing-Hua; Chuang, Tzu-Hsuan; Shih, Yu-Wei; Huang, Shih-Chieh; Lee, Meng-Ju; Chen, Shee-Uan

    2016-01-01

    The release of corifollitropin alfa simplifies daily injections of short-acting recombinant follicular stimulating hormone (rFSH), and its widely-used protocol involves short-acting gonadotropins supplements and a fixed GnRH antagonist regimen, largely based on follicle size. In this study, the feasibility of corifollitropin alfa without routine pituitary suppression was evaluated. A total of 288 patients were stimulated by corifollitropin alfa on cycle day 3 following with routine serum hormone monitoring and follicle scanning every other day after 5 days of initial stimulation, and a GnRH antagonist (0.25 mg) was only used prophylactically when the luteinizing hormone (LH) was ≧ 6 IU/L (over half of the definitive LH surge). The incidence of premature LH surge (≧ 10 IU/L) was 2.4% (7/288) before the timely injection of a single GnRH antagonist, and the elevated LH level was dropped down from 11.9 IU/L to 2.2 IU/L after the suppression. Two hundred fifty-one patients did not need any antagonist (87.2% [251/288]) throughout the whole stimulation. No adverse effects were observed regarding oocyte competency (fertilization rate: 78%; blastocyst formation rate: 64%). The live birth rate per OPU cycle after the first cryotransfer was 56.3% (161/286), and the cumulative live birth rate per OPU cycle after cyrotransfers was 69.6% (199/286). Of patients who did and did not receive GnRH antagonist during stimulation, no significant difference existed in the cumulative live birth rates (78.4% vs. 68.3%, p = 0.25). The results demonstrated that the routine GnRH antagonist administration is not required in the corifollitropin-alfa cycles using a flexible and hormone-depended antagonist regimen, while the clinical outcome is not compromised. This finding reveals that the use of a GnRH antagonist only occasionally may be needed. PMID:27100388

  3. Duloxetine and care management treatment of older adults with comorbid major depressive disorder and chronic low back pain: results of an open-label pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jordan F.; Weiner, Debra K.; Dew, Mary A.; Begley, Amy; Miller, Mark D.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In older adults, major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) are common and mutually exacerbating. We predicted that duloxetine pharmacotherapy and Depression and Pain Care Management (DPCM) would result in (1) significant improvement in MDD and CLBP and (2) significant improvements in health-related quality of life, anxiety, disability, self-efficacy, and sleep quality. Design and Intervention: Twelve week open-label study using duloxetine up to 120 mg/day + DPCM. Setting: Outpatient late-life depression research clinic. Patients: Thirty community-dwelling adults >60 years old. Outcome Measures: Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF). Results: 46.7% (n = 14) of the sample had a depression remission. All subjects who met criteria for the depression remission also had a pain response. 93.3% (n = 28) had a significant pain response. Of the subjects who met criteria for a low back pain response, 50% (n = 14) also met criteria for the depression remission. The mean time to depression remission was 7.6 (SE = 0.6) weeks. The mean time to pain response was 2.8 (SE = 0.5) weeks. There were significant improvements in mental health-related quality of life, anxiety, sleep quality, somatic complaints, and both self-efficacy for pain management and for coping with symptoms. Physical health-related quality of life, back pain-related disability, and self-efficacy for physical functioning did not improve. Conclusions: Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors like duloxetine delivered with DPCM may be a good choice to treat these linked conditions in older adults. Treatments that target low self-efficacy for physical function and improving disability may further increase response rates. PMID:19750557

  4. Epoetin alfa improves survival after chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer: Final results of a prospective observational study

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Tribius, Silke; Yekebas, Emre F.; Bahrehmand, Roia; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Kilic, Ergin; Muellerleile, Ulrich; Gross, Eberhard; Schild, Steven E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective, nonrandomized study evaluates the effectiveness of epoetin alfa to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to14 g/dL (optimal range for tumor oxygenation) during chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer and its impact on overall survival (OS), metastatic-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients were included. Forty-two patients received epoetin alfa (150 IU/kg, 3 times a week) during radiotherapy, which was started at hemoglobin less than 13 g/dL and stopped at 14 g/dL or higher. Hemoglobin levels were measured weekly during RT. Results: Both groups were balanced for age, sex, performance status, tumor length/location, histology, grading, T-stage/N-stage, chemotherapy, treatment schedule, and hemoglobin before RT. Median change of hemoglobin was +0.3 g/dL/wk with epoetin alfa and -0.5 g/dL/wk without epoetin alfa. At least 60% of hemoglobin levels were 12 to 14 g/dL in 64% and 17% of the patients, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who received epoetin alfa had better OS (32% vs. 8% at 2 years, p = 0.009) and LC (67% vs. 15% at 2 years, p = 0.001). MFS was not significantly different (42% vs. 18% at 2 years, p = 0.09). Conclusions: The findings suggest that epoetin alfa when used to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to 14 g/dL can improve OS and LC of Stage III esophageal cancer patients.

  5. ARECIBO PULSAR SURVEY USING ALFA: PROBING RADIO PULSAR INTERMITTENCY AND TRANSIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Deneva, J. S.; Cordes, J. M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Edel, S.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Nice, D. J.; Crawford, F.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.

    2009-10-01

    We present radio transient search algorithms, results, and statistics from the ongoing Arecibo Pulsar ALFA (PALFA) survey of the Galactic plane. We have discovered seven objects through a search for isolated dispersed pulses. All of these objects are Galactic and have measured periods between 0.4 and 4.7 s. One of the new discoveries has a duty cycle of 0.01%, smaller than that of any other radio pulsar. We discuss the impact of selection effects on the detectability and classification of intermittent sources, and compare the efficiencies of periodicity and single-pulse (SP) searches for various pulsar classes. For some cases we find that the apparent intermittency is likely to be caused by off-axis detection or a short time window that selects only a few bright pulses and favors detection with our SP algorithm. In other cases, the intermittency appears to be intrinsic to the source. No transients were found with DMs large enough to require that they originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Accounting for the on-axis gain of the ALFA system, as well as the low gain but large solid-angle coverage of far-out sidelobes, we use the results of the survey so far to place limits on the amplitudes and event rates of transients of arbitrary origin.

  6. Immunotherapy with imiquimod and interferon alfa for metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, R.U.; Braunschweig, T.; Ghassemi, A.; Rübben, A.

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (mcc) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin. Remission rates are high with chemotherapy in patients with metastasis, but without any improvement in overall survival. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with facial mcc. After radiation and surgery, the mcc recurred with widespread cutaneous and regional lymph node metastases. The metastases were treated with weekly intralesional injections of 1–2×106 IU interferon alfa-2a, accompanied by topical imiquimod 5% cream 3 times weekly. After partial regression, subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2b was added at a dose of 30 μg weekly, which was then increased to 50 μg weekly. At 4 months after the start of immunotherapy, all cutaneous metastases and the intralesionally treated lymph node metastases receded. Interruption or reduction of systemic interferon application resulted in locoregional relapses that were successfully treated with surgery or intralesional interferon injections. The patient remains alive 30 months after initiation of immunotherapy, suggesting that locally metastasized mcc might be able to be controlled with local and systemic immunotherapy. PMID:27122984

  7. Novel treatment options for lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: critical appraisal of sebelipase alfa

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kim; Donaldson, Emma; Sharma, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D) is a rare disorder of cholesterol metabolism with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The absence or deficiency of the LAL enzyme gives rise to pathological accumulation of cholesterol esters in various tissues. A severe LAL-D phenotype manifesting in infancy is associated with adrenal calcification and liver and gastrointestinal involvement with characteristic early mortality. LAL-D presenting in childhood and adulthood is associated with hepatomegaly, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and premature atherosclerosis. There are currently no curative pharmacological treatments for this life-threatening condition. Supportive management with lipid-modifying agents does not ameliorate disease progression. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a curative measure in infantile disease has mixed success and is associated with inherent risks and complications. Sebelipase alfa (Kanuma) is a recombinant human LAL protein and the first enzyme replacement therapy for the treatment of LAL-D. Clinical trials have been undertaken in infants with rapidly progressive LAL-D and in children and adults with later-onset LAL-D. Initial data have shown significant survival benefits in the infant group and improvements in biochemical parameters in the latter. Sebelipase alfa has received marketing authorization in the United States and Europe as long-term therapy for all affected individuals. The availability of enzyme replacement therapy for this rare and progressive disorder warrants greater recognition and awareness by physicians. PMID:27799810

  8. Immunotherapy with imiquimod and interferon alfa for metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R U; Braunschweig, T; Ghassemi, A; Rübben, A

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (mcc) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin. Remission rates are high with chemotherapy in patients with metastasis, but without any improvement in overall survival. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with facial mcc. After radiation and surgery, the mcc recurred with widespread cutaneous and regional lymph node metastases. The metastases were treated with weekly intralesional injections of 1-2×10(6) IU interferon alfa-2a, accompanied by topical imiquimod 5% cream 3 times weekly. After partial regression, subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2b was added at a dose of 30 μg weekly, which was then increased to 50 μg weekly. At 4 months after the start of immunotherapy, all cutaneous metastases and the intralesionally treated lymph node metastases receded. Interruption or reduction of systemic interferon application resulted in locoregional relapses that were successfully treated with surgery or intralesional interferon injections. The patient remains alive 30 months after initiation of immunotherapy, suggesting that locally metastasized mcc might be able to be controlled with local and systemic immunotherapy. PMID:27122984

  9. Longer-term Outcomes of Darbepoetin Alfa Versus Epoetin Alfa in Patients With ESRD Initiating Hemodialysis: A Quasi-experimental Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Chang, Tara I.; Mitani, Aya A.; Wilhelm-Leen, Emilee R.; Ding, Victoria; Chertow, Glenn M.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Goldstein, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Adequately-powered studies directly comparing hard clinical outcomes of darbepoetin alfa (DPO) versus epoetin alfa (EPO) in patients undergoing dialysis are lacking. Study Design Observational, registry-based, retrospective cohort study; we mimicked a cluster-randomized trial by comparing mortality and cardiovascular events in US patients initiating hemodialysis in facilities (almost) exclusively using DPO versus EPO. Setting & Participants Non-chain US hemodialysis facilities; each facility switching from EPO to DPO (2003–2010) was matched on location, profit status, and facility type with one EPO facility. Patients subsequently initiating hemodialysis in these facilities were assigned their facility-level exposure. Intervention DPO versus EPO. Outcomes All-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality; composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and non-fatal stroke. Measurements Unadjusted and adjusted HRs from Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results Of 508 dialysis facilities that switched to DPO, 492 were matched with a similar EPO facility; 19,932 (DPO: 9465 [47.5%]; EPO: 10,467 [52.5%]) incident hemodialysis patients were followed up for 21,918 person-years during which 5550 deaths occurred. Almost all baseline characteristics were tightly balanced. The demographics-adjusted mortality HR for DPO (versus EPO) was 1.06 (95% CI, 1.00–1.13) and remained materially unchanged after adjustment for all other baseline characteristics (HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.99–1.12). Cardiovascular mortality did not differ between groups (HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.94–1.16). Non-fatal outcomes were evaluated among 9455 patients with fee-for-service Medicare: 4542 (48.0%) in DPO and 4913 (52.0%) in EPO facilities. Over 10,427 and 10,335 person-years, 246 strokes and 370 MIs were recorded, respectively. We found no differences in adjusted stroke or MI rates, or their composite with cardiovascular death (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.96–1

  10. A novel approach using a minimal number of injections during the IVF/ICSI cycle: Luteal half-dose depot GnRH agonist following corifollitropin alfa versus the corifollitropin alfa with a GnRH-antagonist cycle

    PubMed Central

    Haydardedeoğlu, Bülent; Kılıçdağ, Esra Bulgan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Corifollitropin alfa is a good choice for assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles because fewer injections are needed than with other agents. In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed luteal injected half-dose depot gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist cycles in women who received corifollitropin alfa and those who underwent a conventional corifollitropin alfa cycle with a GnRH antagonist. Material and Methods In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed luteal injected half-dose depot GnRH agonist cycles in women who received corifollitropin alfa and those who underwent a conventional corifollitropin alfa cycle with a GnRH antagonist at the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and IVF Unit, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Başkent University School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey, from March 2014 to August 2015. The patient’s baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Forty-five patients underwent the long protocol, in which a half-dose of depot GnRH agonist was administered on day 21 of the preceding cycle. Forty-nine patients underwent the GnRH-antagonist protocol. Corifollitropin alfa was administered on the menstrual cycle day 3. Results The mean ages of the two groups were similar (32.77±5.55 vs. 34.2±4.51 years [“for the long- and antagonist-protocol groups, respectively”]). The total number of retrieved oocytes, the fertilization rate, and the number of transferred embryos were similar between the two groups. The only significant difference between the two protocols was the number of injections during the controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) cycle, which included the depot-agonist injection in the long-protocol group (4.46±1.64 vs. 5.71±2.51, p=0.006). The clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were similar in the two protocols (16/45 [35.6%] vs. 16/49 [32.7%] for the intention to treat and 32.5±6.82% vs. 36.25±8.58%, respectively). Conclusion Our results show that ART cycles could be

  11. A novel approach using a minimal number of injections during the IVF/ICSI cycle: Luteal half-dose depot GnRH agonist following corifollitropin alfa versus the corifollitropin alfa with a GnRH-antagonist cycle

    PubMed Central

    Haydardedeoğlu, Bülent; Kılıçdağ, Esra Bulgan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Corifollitropin alfa is a good choice for assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles because fewer injections are needed than with other agents. In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed luteal injected half-dose depot gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist cycles in women who received corifollitropin alfa and those who underwent a conventional corifollitropin alfa cycle with a GnRH antagonist. Material and Methods In this retrospective cohort, we analyzed luteal injected half-dose depot GnRH agonist cycles in women who received corifollitropin alfa and those who underwent a conventional corifollitropin alfa cycle with a GnRH antagonist at the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and IVF Unit, Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Başkent University School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey, from March 2014 to August 2015. The patient’s baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. Forty-five patients underwent the long protocol, in which a half-dose of depot GnRH agonist was administered on day 21 of the preceding cycle. Forty-nine patients underwent the GnRH-antagonist protocol. Corifollitropin alfa was administered on the menstrual cycle day 3. Results The mean ages of the two groups were similar (32.77±5.55 vs. 34.2±4.51 years [“for the long- and antagonist-protocol groups, respectively”]). The total number of retrieved oocytes, the fertilization rate, and the number of transferred embryos were similar between the two groups. The only significant difference between the two protocols was the number of injections during the controlled ovarian stimulation (COH) cycle, which included the depot-agonist injection in the long-protocol group (4.46±1.64 vs. 5.71±2.51, p=0.006). The clinical pregnancy and implantation rates were similar in the two protocols (16/45 [35.6%] vs. 16/49 [32.7%] for the intention to treat and 32.5±6.82% vs. 36.25±8.58%, respectively). Conclusion Our results show that ART cycles could be

  12. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods.

    PubMed

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Wilkinson, A G; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Boardman, James P

    2016-01-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases 'uniformly' distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course. PMID:27010238

  13. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods

    PubMed Central

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Wilkinson, A. G.; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases ‘uniformly’ distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course. PMID:27010238

  14. Prophylactic recombinant epoetin alfa markedly reduces the need for blood transfusion in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with biochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wolchok, J D; Klimek, V M; Williams, L; Chapman, P B

    1999-12-01

    Treatment of metastatic melanoma with biochemotherapy results in the rapid onset of anemia, requiring blood transfusion in 9 of 13 (69%) patients. Prophylactic use of weekly subcutaneous recombinant epoetin alfa eliminated the need for transfusion in all but 1 of 21 (5%) patients.

  15. Molecular design and downstream processing of turoctocog alfa (NovoEight), a B-domain truncated factor VIII molecule.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Haleh; Hansen, Ernst B; Faber, Johan H; Sejergaard, Lars; Karlsson, Johan; Bolt, Gert; Hansen, Jens J; Thim, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Turoctocog alfa (NovoEight) is a third-generation recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) with a truncated B-domain that is manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary cells. No human or animal-derived materials are used in the process. The aim of this study is to describe the molecular design and purification process for turoctocog alfa. A five-step purification process is applied to turoctocog alfa: protein capture on mixed-mode resin; immunoaffinity chromatography using a unique, recombinantly produced anti-FVIII mAb; anion exchange chromatography; nanofiltration and size exclusion chromatography. This process enabled reduction of impurities such as host cell proteins (HCPs) and high molecular weight proteins (HMWPs) to a very low level. The immunoaffinity step is very important for the removal of FVIII-related degradation products. Manufacturing scale data shown in this article confirmed the robustness of the purification process and a reliable and consistent reduction of the impurities. The contribution of each step to the final product purity is described and shown for three manufacturing batches. Turoctocog alfa, a third-generation B-domain truncated rFVIII product is manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary cells without the use of animal or human-derived proteins. The five-step purification process results in a homogenous, highly purified rFVIII product.

  16. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Wilkinson, A. G.; MacNaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases ‘uniformly’ distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course.

  17. Repeated ovarian stimulation with corifollitropin alfa in patients in a GnRH antagonist protocol: no concern for immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Robert J.; Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando; Salle, Bruno S.; Elbers, Jolanda; Heijnen, Esther; Marintcheva-Petrova, Maya; Mannaerts, Bernadette

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND One injection of corifollitropin alfa replaces the first seven daily FSH injections in controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) cycles. Repeated treatment with therapeutic proteins may cause immune responses or hypersensitivity reactions. We assessed the immunogenicity and safety of corifollitropin alfa treatment in up to three COS cycles. METHODS In this multicentre, phase III uncontrolled trial, patients (>60 kg) started treatment with one injection of 150 µg corifollitropin alfa on cycle Day 2 or 3 of menses and 0.25 mg ganielix on stimulation Day 5 or 6. Primary outcome measures were antibody formation against corifollitropin alfa (using highly sensitive radioimmunoprecipitation assay), hypersensitivity reactions, local tolerance and adverse events (AEs). RESULTS First, second and third COS cycles were started by 682, 375 and 198 patients, respectively. No clinically relevant immunogenicity or drug-related hypersensitivity was observed. For 192 patients undergoing their third cycle a post-treatment blood sample was negative in the anti-corifollitropin antibody assay, resulting in an upper limit of the one-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.5%. Most frequent AEs were procedural pain (17.7%, 95% CI: 14.9–20.8%), headache (9.1%, 95% CI: 7.0–11.5%) and pelvic pain (7.6%, 95% CI: 5.7–9.9%). Cumulative ongoing pregnancy rate after three cycles, including frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles and spontaneous pregnancies, was 61% (95% CI: 56–65%) after censoring for patients who discontinued. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with corifollitropin alfa can safely and effectively initiate and sustain ovarian stimulation during the first 7 days of COS in normal responder patients undergoing up to three treatment cycles, without concerns of immunogenicity. The trial was registered under ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00696878. PMID:21622693

  18. A Randomized Controlled Study of Weekly and Biweekly Dosing of Epoetin Alfa in CKD Patients With Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gartenberg, Gary; Fu, Min; Wolfson, Marsha; Rao, Sudhakar; Bowers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: In clinical practice, physicians often use once-weekly (QW) and biweekly (Q2W) dosing of epoetin alfa to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although the literature supports this practice, previous studies were limited by short treatment duration, lack of randomization, or absence of the approved three times per week (TIW) dosing arm. This randomized trial evaluated extended dosing regimens of epoetin alfa, comparing QW and Q2W to TIW dosing in anemic CKD subjects. The primary objective was to show that treatment with epoetin alfa at QW and Q2W intervals was not inferior to TIW dosing. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: 375 subjects with stage 3 to 4 CKD were randomized equally to the three groups and treated for 44 wk; to explore the impact of changing from TIW to QW administration on hemoglobin (Hb) control and adverse events, subjects on TIW switched to QW after 22 wk. The Hb was measured weekly, and the dose of epoetin alfa was adjusted to achieve and maintain an Hb level of 11.0 to 11.9 g/dl. Results: Both the QW and Q2W regimens met the primary efficacy endpoint. More subjects in the TIW group than in the QW and Q2W groups exceeded the Hb ceiling. Adverse events were similar across treatment groups and consistent with the morbidities of CKD patients. Conclusions: Administration of epoetin alfa at QW and Q2W intervals are potential alternatives to TIW dosing for the treatment of anemia in stage 3 to 4 CKD subjects. PMID:19808215

  19. Nanomedicines in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection in Asian patients: optimizing use of peginterferon alfa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Hua; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Asia is endemic for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which is the leading cause of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation worldwide. HCV has six major genotypes and each HCV genotype has its specific geographic distribution. HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 6 are common in Asia. The aim of HCV treatment is to eradicate the virus by effective therapeutic agents; viral clearance is durable after long-term post-treatment follow-up. In most Asian countries, peginterferon alfa (PEG-IFN α) in combination with ribavirin remains the standard of care, and the overall sustained viral response (SVR) rate in Asian HCV patients is higher than that in Western patients. The differences are most significant in patients with HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1) infection, which is attributed to the higher frequency of IFN-responsive or favorable interleukin-28B (IL-28B) genotype in Asian populations than in other ethnic populations. In addition, the introduction of response-guided therapy, where the optimized treatment duration is based on the early viral kinetics during the first 12 weeks of treatment, increases the SVR rate. Recently, telaprevir or boceprevir-based triple therapy was found to further improve the SVR rate in treated and untreated HCV-1 patients and has become the new standard of care in Western and some Asian countries. Many novel direct-acting antiviral agents, either in combination with PEG-IFN α plus ribavirin or used as IFN-free regimens are under active investigation. At the time of this writing, simeprevir and sofosbuvir have been approved in the US. Because the SVR rates in Asian HCV patients receiving PEG-IFN α plus ribavirin therapy are high, health care providers should judiciously determine the clinical usefulness of these novel agents on the basis of treatment duration, anticipated viral responses, patient tolerance, financial burdens, and drug accessibility. PMID:24812506

  20. Home treatment of attacks with conestat alfa in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Henriette; Csuka, Dorottya; Veszeli, Nóra; Zotter, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Erika; Varga, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Conestat alfa, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1-INH) is a novel therapeutic option for the acute treatment of hereditary angioedema due to C1-INH (HAE-C1-INH) deficiency. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and safety profile of conestat alfa in patients with HAE-C1-INH, under real-life conditions. We analyzed 65 edematous episodes requiring acute treatment and occurring in two female HAE-C1-INH patients. The patients were treated at home with rhC1-INH per occasion. They recorded the time of rhC1-INH administration, the time to the onset of improvement, and time to the complete resolution of symptoms, as well as the side effects. Symptom severity and patient satisfaction were measured with a visual analog scale (VAS). Thirty-three HAE attacks occurred in submucosal tissue, 17 in subcutaneous tissue, and 15 had mixed locations. After the administration of rhC1-INH, clinical symptoms improved within 0.50 (0.17-4.50 hours) hours and resolved completely within 9.00 (1.67-58.75 hours) hours. The time between the onset of the attack and the administration of rhC1-INH was correlated with the time when the symptoms stopped worsening (R = 0.3212; p = 0.0096) and the time to complete resolution of the symptoms (R = 0.4774; p < 0.0001). The time to response to the drug differed with attack location. The efficacy and safety of rhC1-INH persisted after repeated use. None of the patients experienced a recurrence of the HAE attack or drug-related systemic adverse events. The mean VAS score of patient satisfaction was 93.14. Home treatment with rhC1-INH was an effective and well-tolerated therapy for all types of HAE attacks.

  1. Durability of responses to interferon alfa-2b in advanced hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ratain, M J; Golomb, H M; Bardawil, R G; Vardiman, J W; Westbrook, C A; Kaminer, L S; Lembersky, B C; Bitter, M A; Daly, K

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that significant hematologic improvement occurs in the majority of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) treated with partially purified or recombinant interferon (IFN). Fifty-three patients received IFN alfa-2b for at least 3 months in a dose of 2 X 10(6) U/m2 subcutaneously thrice weekly. Of the 49 patients evaluable for response (at least 6 months of IFN therapy), there were ten complete responses and 29 partial responses for a total response rate of 80%. The peripheral blood counts and bone marrow continued to improve over the course of a full year of therapy. IFN was well tolerated, with no patients discontinuing therapy because of toxicity. Transient myelosuppression occurred in most patients during the first 1 to 2 months of therapy, occasionally precipitating a transfusion requirement. After IFN treatment was discontinued, there was a marked decrease in normal marrow elements and a relative increase in marrow hairy cells. This was associated with a transient increase in normal elements in the peripheral blood. Only one of 24 patients followed after receiving IFN for a median of 8.5 months (range, 3 to 16 months) has required further therapy. We conclude that low-dose IFN alfa-2b is highly effective in advanced HCL; responding patients should be treated for at least 1 year. The decision to initiate a second course of IFN therapy should be based primarily on peripheral blood counts and the clinical status of the patient rather than on the bone marrow. PMID:3814819

  2. Suicidal Thoughts and Reasons for Living in Hospitalized Patients With Severe Depression: Post-Hoc Analyses of a Double-Blind Randomized Trial of Duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Desaiah, Durisala; Raskin, Joel; Cairns, Victoria; Brecht, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate suicidal thoughts in relationship to depressive symptom severity and reasons for living in patients hospitalized for major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: A post hoc analysis was conducted of a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial involving hospitalized patients with MDD (DSM-IV criteria) who received duloxetine 60 mg once daily or duloxetine 60 mg twice daily for 8 weeks. After 4 weeks, the dose for nonresponders receiving 60 mg once daily could be increased to 60 mg twice daily (double-blind). The study was conducted between February 9, 2007, and August 26, 2008 at 43 centers in 4 countries across Europe and South Africa. Suicidal thoughts were assessed with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) item 10, depression severity was assessed with the 6-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impressions–Severity of Illness scale, and protective factors were assessed with the patient-rated Reasons for Living Inventory (RFL) assessing 6 domains. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and linear regression analysis were performed. Results: At baseline, patients (N = 336) had varying severity of suicidal thoughts: 18% had a score ≥ 4. The proportion of patients with a score ≥ 4 decreased to 7% at week 1 and 1% at week 8 of treatment. The RFL scores at baseline were lower in patients with higher baseline suicidal thoughts and increased significantly during treatment (P < .0001). A regression model revealed that only 16% of variance in baseline total RFL score is explained by the different MADRS items. Eight patients had suicidal behavior or ideation recorded as an adverse event during the study; no consistent pattern was found in the different psychometric scores either at baseline or at the visit preceding the suicidal behavior/ideation. Conclusions: Suicidality rapidly decreased in hospitalized patients with severe depression treated with duloxetine. The RFL scores were low at baseline but

  3. A Randomized Study of Peginterferon Lambda-1a Compared to Peginterferon Alfa-2a in Combination with Ribavirin and Telaprevir in Patients with Genotype-1 Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Flisiak, Robert; Shiffman, Mitchell; Arenas, Juan; Cheinquer, Hugo; Nikitin, Igor; Dong, Yuping; Rana, Khurram; Srinivasan, Subasree

    2016-01-01

    Background A randomized, double-blind, multinational, phase 3 study was conducted comparing the efficacy and safety of peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda)/ribavirin (RBV)/telaprevir (TVR) vs. peginterferon alfa-2a (Alfa)/RBV/TVR in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype-1 (GT-1) infection. Methods Patients (treatment-naïve or relapsers on prior Alfa/RBV treatment) were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive Lambda/RBV/TVR or Alfa/RBV/TVR. Total duration of treatment was either 24 or 48 weeks (response-guided treatment), with TVR administered for the first 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved a sustained virologic response at post treatment week 12 (SVR12), which was tested for noninferiority of Lambda/RBV/TVR. Results A total of 838 patients were enrolled, and 617 were treated; 411 and 206 patients received Lambda/RBV/TVR and Alfa/RBV/TVR, respectively. The majority of patients were treatment-naïve, with HCV GT-1b and a high baseline viral load (≥800,000 IU/mL). Less than 10% of patients had cirrhosis (Lambda, 7.5%; Alfa, 6.8%). Lambda/RBV/TVR did not meet the criterion for noninferiority (lower bound of the treatment difference interval was -12.3%); the SVR12 in all patients (modified intent-to-treat) was 76.2% in the Lambda arm and 82.0% in the Alfa arm. Overall, the frequency of adverse events in each arm was comparable (Lambda, 91.7%; Alfa, 97.1%). As expected based on the safety profile of the 2 interferons, there were more hepatobiliary events observed in the Lambda arm and more hematologic events in the Alfa arm. Conclusions In this comparison of Lambda/RBV/TVR and Alfa/RBV/TVR in patients who were treatment-naïve or had relapsed on prior Alfa/RBV treatment, Lambda failed to demonstrate noninferiority based on SVR12 results. Treatment with Lambda/RBV/TVR was associated with a higher incidence of relapse. More patients discontinued Lambda/RBV/TVR treatment during the first 4 weeks of study treatment

  4. Maintenance treatment of renal anaemia in haemodialysis patients with methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta versus darbepoetin alfa administered monthly: a randomized comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Fernando; Lok, Charmaine E.; de Francisco, Angel; Locatelli, Francesco; Mann, Johannes F.E.; Canaud, Bernard; Kerr, Peter G.; Macdougall, Iain C.; Besarab, Anatole; Villa, Giuseppe; Kazes, Isabelle; Van Vlem, Bruno; Jolly, Shivinder; Beyer, Ulrich; Dougherty, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Several studies with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents claim that maintenance therapy of renal anaemia may be possible at extended dosing intervals; however, few studies were randomized, results varied, and comparisons between agents were absent. We report results of a multi-national, randomized, prospective trial comparing haemoglobin maintenance with methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta and darbepoetin alfa administered once monthly. Methods. Haemodialysis patients (n = 490) on stable once-weekly intravenous darbepoetin alfa were randomized to methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta once monthly or darbepoetin alfa every 2 weeks for 26 weeks, with dose adjustment for individual haemoglobin target (11–13 g/dL; maximum decrease from baseline 1 g/dL). Subsequently, patients entered a second 26-week period of once-monthly methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta and darbepoetin alfa. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who maintained average haemoglobin ≥10.5 g/dL, with a decrease from baseline ≤1 g/dL, in Weeks 50–53; the secondary endpoint was dose change over time. The trial is registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00394953. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. One hundred and fifty-seven of 245 patients treated with methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta and 99 of 245 patients with darbepoetin alfa met the response definition (64.1% and 40.4%; P < 0.0001). Doses increased by 6.8% with methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta and 58.8% with darbepoetin alfa during once-monthly treatment. Death rates were equal between treatments (5.7%). Most common adverse events included hypertension, procedural hypotension, nasopharyngitis and muscle spasms, with no differences between groups. Conclusions. Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta maintained target haemoglobin more successfully than darbepoetin alfa at once-monthly dosing intervals despite dose increases with darbepoetin alfa

  5. Effects of Duloxetine Treatment on Cognitive Flexibility and BDNF Expression in the mPFC of Adult Male Mice Exposed to Social Stress during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Fan; Yuan, San-na; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Early stress is a significant risk factor for the onset of mood disorders such as depression during adulthood. Impairments in cognitive flexibility mediated by prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction are increasingly recognized as important etiological and pathological factors in the development of depression. Our previous study demonstrated that social defeat stress during early adolescence produced delayed deficits in cognitive flexibility in adult mice. The potential molecular mechanisms underlying these long-term consequences remain unclear. One candidate molecule is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which plays a vital role in neural development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we initially examined the effects of adolescent social stress on cognitive flexibility and PFC BDNF expression within a week after the last stress exposure and 6 weeks later during adulthood. Adolescent (PND 28) male mice were subjected to stress or control manipulation for 10 days. The attentional set-shifting task (AST) was used to assess cognitive flexibility. Levels of BDNF mRNA and protein in the PFC were examined after behavioral testing. The results demonstrated that previously stressed mice exhibited delayed extra-dimensional set-shifting deficits in AST when tested as adults but not when tested as adolescents. Consistent with the cognitive alterations, adolescent stress induced dynamic alterations in BDNF expression in the medial PFC (mPFC), with a transient increase observed shortly after the stress, followed by a decrease 6 weeks later during adulthood. Next, we further determined the effects of chronic treatment with the antidepressant duloxetine during early adulthood on cognitive and molecular alterations induced by adolescent stress. Compared with the controls, duloxetine treatment reversed the cognitive deficits and increased the BDNF protein expression in the mPFC during adulthood in previously stressed mice. These findings demonstrated that BDNF expression

  6. [Experience of use of allokin-alfa in the treatment of genitourinary infections complicated by excretory-toxic infertility].

    PubMed

    Akimov, O V; Kostromeev, S A; Dyshkovets, A A

    2013-01-01

    The results of the examination and treatment of 67 patients aged 18 to 45 years are presented. Patients suffered from chronic prostatitis, chronic prostatovesiculitis, chronic uretroprostatitis complicated by excretory-toxic infertility. Pathogens, including sexually transmitted infections (STIs), were identified in all patients. The control group received conventional therapy (causative agents, a-adrenoblockers, enzyme therapy). In the study group, patients received allokin alpha in addition to conventional therapy. The use of allokin-alfa promoted more rapid and complete eradication of STI pathogens, and normalization of the spermogram. The results of this study allow to recommend allokin-alfa for the combined treatment of patients with infectious and inflammatory diseases of the genitourinary system, complicated by excretory-toxic infertility.

  7. Safety and efficacy results of switch from imiglucerase to velaglucerase alfa treatment in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Elstein, Deborah; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn A; Giraldo, Pilar; Charrow, Joel; Smith, Laurie; Shankar, Suma P; Hangartner, Thomas N; Kunes, Yune; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-07-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a lysosomal storage disorder; symptomatic patients with type 1 GD need long-term disease-specific therapy of which the standard of care has been enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Thirty-eight of 40 patients (aged 9-71 years) clinically stable on ERT with imiglucerase, safely switched to a comparable dose of velaglucerase alfa (units/kg) during TKT034, a 12-month, open-label clinical study, and for 10-50 months in an extension study. The most common adverse events (AEs) judged to be drug-related in the extension were fatigue and bone pain. No drug-related serious AEs were reported. No AEs led to study withdrawal. At 24 months from baseline (baseline being TKT034 week 0), patients had generally stable hemoglobin, platelet, spleen, liver, and bone density parameters. Nevertheless, dose adjustment based on the achievement of therapeutic goals was permitted, and 10 patients, including seven patients who had platelet counts <100 × 10(9) /L at baseline, were given at least one 15 U/kg-dose increase during the extension. Trends indicative of improvement in platelet count and spleen volume, and decreasing levels of GD biomarkers, chitotriosidase and CCL18, were observed. Immunogenicity was seen in one patient positive for anti-imiglucerase antibodies at baseline. This patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies in TKT034, with low antibody concentrations, and throughout the extension study; however, the patient continued to receive velaglucerase alfa without clinical deterioration. In conclusion, clinically stable patients can be switched from imiglucerase to velaglucerase alfa ERT and maintain or achieve good therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25776130

  8. Detection of DNA-recombinant human epoetin-alfa as a pharmacological ergogenic aid.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Randall L

    2002-01-01

    The use of DNA-recombinant human epoetin-alfa (rhEPO) as a pharmacological ergogenic aid for the enhancement of aerobic performance is estimated to be practised by at least 3 to 7% of elite endurance sport athletes. rhEPO is synthesised from Chinese hamster ovary cells, and is nearly identical biochemically and immunologically to endogenous epoetin-alfa (EPO). In a clinical setting, rhEPO is used to stimulate erythrocyte production in patients with end-stage renal disease and anaemia. A limited number of human studies have suggested that rhEPO provides a significant erythropoietic and ergogenic benefit in trained individuals as evidenced by increments in haemoglobin, haematocrit, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and exercise endurance time. The purpose of this review is to summarise the various technologies and methodologies currently available for the detection of illicit use of rhEPO in athletes. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) banned the use of rhEPO as an ergogenic aid in 1990. Since then a number of methods have been proposed as potential techniques for detecting the illegal use of rhEPO. Most of these techniques use indirect markers to detect rhEPO in blood samples. These indirect markers include macrocytic hypochromatic erythrocytes and serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfr) concentration. Another indirect technique uses a combination of 5 markers of enhanced erythropoiesis (haematocrit, reticulocyte haematocrit, percentage of macrocytic red blood cells, serum EPO, sTfr) to detect rhEPO. The electrophoretic mobility technique provides a direct measurement of urine and serum levels of rhEPO, and is based on the principle that the rhEPO molecule is less negatively charged versus the endogenous EPO molecule. Isoelectric patterning/focusing has emerged recently as a potential method for the direct analysis of rhEPO in urine. Among these various methodologies, the indirect technique that utilises multiple markers of enhanced erythropoiesis appears to

  9. Detection of DNA-recombinant human epoetin-alfa as a pharmacological ergogenic aid.

    PubMed

    Wilber, Randall L

    2002-01-01

    The use of DNA-recombinant human epoetin-alfa (rhEPO) as a pharmacological ergogenic aid for the enhancement of aerobic performance is estimated to be practised by at least 3 to 7% of elite endurance sport athletes. rhEPO is synthesised from Chinese hamster ovary cells, and is nearly identical biochemically and immunologically to endogenous epoetin-alfa (EPO). In a clinical setting, rhEPO is used to stimulate erythrocyte production in patients with end-stage renal disease and anaemia. A limited number of human studies have suggested that rhEPO provides a significant erythropoietic and ergogenic benefit in trained individuals as evidenced by increments in haemoglobin, haematocrit, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and exercise endurance time. The purpose of this review is to summarise the various technologies and methodologies currently available for the detection of illicit use of rhEPO in athletes. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) banned the use of rhEPO as an ergogenic aid in 1990. Since then a number of methods have been proposed as potential techniques for detecting the illegal use of rhEPO. Most of these techniques use indirect markers to detect rhEPO in blood samples. These indirect markers include macrocytic hypochromatic erythrocytes and serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfr) concentration. Another indirect technique uses a combination of 5 markers of enhanced erythropoiesis (haematocrit, reticulocyte haematocrit, percentage of macrocytic red blood cells, serum EPO, sTfr) to detect rhEPO. The electrophoretic mobility technique provides a direct measurement of urine and serum levels of rhEPO, and is based on the principle that the rhEPO molecule is less negatively charged versus the endogenous EPO molecule. Isoelectric patterning/focusing has emerged recently as a potential method for the direct analysis of rhEPO in urine. Among these various methodologies, the indirect technique that utilises multiple markers of enhanced erythropoiesis appears to

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Novel Plant Cell-Expressed Taliglucerase Alfa in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Richat; Park, Glen; Damle, Bharat; Chertkoff, Raul; Alon, Sari

    2015-01-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is a beta-glucocerebrosidase enzyme replacement therapy approved in the United States, Israel, and other countries for treatment of Type 1 Gaucher disease in adults, and is the first approved plant cell—expressed recombinant protein. In this report, taliglucerase alfa pharmacokinetics were assessed in adult and pediatric patients with Gaucher disease from separate multicenter trials of 30 Units/kg and 60 Units/kg doses infused every 2 weeks. Serial blood samples were obtained from adult patients following single-dose administration on day 1 (n = 26) and multiple doses at week 38 (n = 29), and from pediatric patients following administration of multiple doses of taliglucerase alfa for 10–27 months (n = 10). In both adult and pediatric patients, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to last measureable concentration (AUC0-t), and from time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) were higher after 60 Units/kg dose than 30 Units/kg dose. No tendency for accumulation or change in taliglucerase alfa pharmacokinetic parameters over time from day 1 to week 38 was observed with repeated doses of 30 or 60 Units/kg in adults. After multiple doses, mean (range) dose-normalized pharmacokinetic parameters were similar for adult versus pediatric patients receiving 60 Units/kg: Cmax expressed in ng/mL/mg was 42.4 (14.5–95.4) in adults and 46.6 (34.4–68.4) in pediatric patients, AUC0 t expressed in ng•h/mL/mg was 63.4 (26.3–156) in adults and 63.9 (39.8–85.1) in pediatric patients, t1/2 expressed in minutes was 34.8 (11.3–104) in adults and 31.5 (18.0–42.9) in pediatric patients and total body clearance expressed in L/h was 19.9 (6.25–37.9) in adults and 17.0 (11.7–24.9) in pediatric patients. These pharmacokinetic data extend the findings of taliglucerase alfa in adult and pediatric patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT00376168 (in adults); NCT01411228 (in children) PMID

  11. Cholangiolocellular carcinoma with rapid progression initially showing abnormally elevated serum alfa-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yoh, Tomoaki; Kato, Tatsushi; Hirohata, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yuya; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiolocellular carcinoma (CoCC) is a rare malignant liver tumor derived from hepatic progenitor cells, which exist in the canals of Hering. We encountered a case of CoCC with an extremely poor clinical course, initially showing abnormally elevated serum alfa-fetoprotein (AFP). A 72-year-old male presented with a liver tumor and abnormally elevated serum AFP levels (16,399 ng/ml). We preoperatively diagnosed hepatocellular carcinoma and performed extended right hepatectomy, after which the serum AFP levels remarkably decreased to 97 ng/ml. Postoperatively, the disease was pathologically diagnosed as CoCC. Furthermore, immunohistochemical pathological findings were alcian blue negative, cytokeratin (CK) 7 partially positive, CK19 positive, hepatocyte paraffin-1 negative, membranous negative for epithelial membrane antigen, and AFP negative. Fifty-five days later, intra- and extrahepatic recurrence developed, and the patient died 65 days after surgery. Although CoCCs show favorable outcomes, these characteristics of our case were not previously reported. It is necessary to accumulate more information on CoCC. PMID:27363839

  12. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; García, E L; Talavera, A; Guzmán, R

    1992-11-01

    Forty-eight consecutive patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. The maintenance therapy was a random either nothing or interferon alfa 2b (IFN) 5.0 MU three times a week for one year. The median duration of CR in the patients treated with IFN has not been reached. After five years 60% of patients remain in CR compared to the control group who had a median CR of 40 months (p < 0.001). Actuarial five-years survival in the IFN treated patients was 88% compared to 42% in the control group (p < 0.001). Maintenance therapy with IFN has been beneficial in patients with DLCL with improvement of duration of CR and survival without the excessive toxicity of most common third generation regimen chemotherapy. We felt that IFN could be explored in most controlled clinical trials in patients with DLCL in CR after conventional chemotherapy. PMID:1487412

  13. [Switch of methoxy-polyethylene-glycol-epoetin beta to darbepoetin alfa in 263 dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Rieger, J; Krummel, T; Petitjean, P; Chantrel, F; Dimitrov, Y

    2016-01-01

    In early 2012, due to national supply disruption, the methoxy-polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta (CERA) was no longer available and has been replaced by darbepoetin alfa (DA) in all dialysis patients. Official recommendations for the replacement of one by the other is missing or unclear. On this occasion, we wanted to examine how the shift from CERA to DA was done in terms of dose conversion factor and the other factors that could have influenced the dose of DA prescribed (hemoglobin, patient weight, dose of CERA). This retrospective multicenter open conducted in six dialysis centers in Alsace is the first large study (n=263) that evaluated the switch from CERA to DA in all chronic hemodialysis patients. We found that the instantaneous ratio of dose adjustment is close to 1 and that nephrologists are mainly based on the dose of CERA for determining the DA dose, before hemoglobin and weight. However, establishing a true dose-response ratio between the two molecules requires a long term prospective study.

  14. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Extended Dosing of Epoetin Alfa in Anemic Patients Who Have Chronic Kidney Disease and Are Not on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Tracy; Vaccaro, Nicole M.; Beaver, Jessica S.; Massarella, Joseph; Wolfson, Marsha

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Emerging evidence suggests that epoetin alfa can be administered at extended intervals of up to 4 wk. This open-label, randomized study was performed to characterize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of four dosing regimens of epoetin alfa administered subcutaneously in anemic patients who had chronic kidney disease and were not on dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Thirty-eight patients, enrolled from nine centers in the United States, were ≥18 yr of age and had hemoglobin <11.0 g/dl and GFR 12 to 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Patients received one of four epoetin alfa dosing regimens: 50 IU/kg three times per week, 10,000 IU once weekly, or 20,000 IU every 2 wk for 36 d or 40,000 IU every 4 wk for 64 d. Each regimen provided a similar dosage of epoetin alfa over 4 wk. Dosage adjustments were not permitted. Results: Drug exposure to epoetin alfa over 4 wk, based on area under the curve, was somewhat higher with the extended interval regimens compared with the three-times-weekly regimen. Mean change in hemoglobin during the study period was similar for all regimens. No patients were transfused. Three patients experienced five serious adverse events, none of which was considered treatment related. Conclusions: Extended dosing interval regimens of epoetin alfa yielded modest pharmacokinetic differences but a similar pharmacodynamic response, suggesting that less frequent, higher dosages of epoetin alfa may be as effective as the current three-times-weekly regimen in anemic patients who have chronic kidney disease and are not on dialysis. PMID:18417741

  15. Characterization of gene-activated human acid-β-glucosidase: Crystal structure, glycan composition, and internalization into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Brumshtein, Boris; Salinas, Paul; Peterson, Brian; Chan, Victor; Silman, Israel; Sussman, Joel L; Savickas, Philip J; Robinson, Gregory S; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-01-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disease, can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), in which defective acid-β-glucosidase (GlcCerase) is supplemented by a recombinant, active enzyme. The X-ray structures of recombinant GlcCerase produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells (imiglucerase, Cerezyme®) and in transgenic carrot cells (prGCD) have been previously solved. We now describe the structure and characteristics of a novel form of GlcCerase under investigation for the treatment of Gaucher disease, Gene-ActivatedTM human GlcCerase (velaglucerase alfa). In contrast to imiglucerase and prGCD, velaglucerase alfa contains the native human enzyme sequence. All three GlcCerases consist of three domains, with the active site located in domain III. The distances between the carboxylic oxygens of the catalytic residues, E340 and E235, are consistent with distances proposed for acid–base hydrolysis. Kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase, as well as their specific activities, are similar. However, analysis of glycosylation patterns shows that velaglucerase alfa displays distinctly different structures from imiglucerase and prGCD. The predominant glycan on velaglucerase alfa is a high-mannose type, with nine mannose units, while imiglucerase contains a chitobiose tri-mannosyl core glycan with fucosylation. These differences in glycosylation affect cellular internalization; the rate of velaglucerase alfa internalization into human macrophages is at least 2-fold greater than that of imiglucerase. PMID:19741058

  16. Intravenous C.E.R.A. maintains stable haemoglobin levels in patients on dialysis previously treated with darbepoetin alfa: results from STRIATA, a randomized phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Canaud, Bernard; Mingardi, Giulio; Braun, Johann; Aljama, Pedro; Kerr, Peter G.; Locatelli, Francesco; Villa, Giuseppe; Van Vlem, Bruno; McMahon, Alan W.; Kerloëguen, Cécile; Beyer, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background. Extending the administration interval of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) represents an opportunity to improve the efficiency of anaemia management in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, effective haemoglobin (Hb) maintenance can be challenging with epoetin alfa and epoetin beta administered at extended intervals. C.E.R.A., a continuous erythropoietin receptor activator, has a unique pharmacologic profile and long half-life (∼130 h), allowing administration at extended intervals. Phase III results have demonstrated that C.E.R.A. administered once every 4 weeks effectively maintains stable Hb levels in patients with CKD on dialysis. Methods. STRIATA (Stabilizing haemoglobin TaRgets in dialysis following IV C.E.R.A. Treatment for Anaemia) was a multicentre, open-label randomized phase III study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous C.E.R.A. administered once every 2 weeks (Q2W) for Hb maintenance following direct conversion from darbepoetin alfa (DA). Adult patients on dialysis receiving stable intravenous DA once weekly (QW) or Q2W were randomized (1:1) to continue their current DA regimen (n = 156) or receive intravenous C.E.R.A. Q2W (n = 157) for 52 weeks. Doses were adjusted to maintain Hb levels within ± 1.0 g/dl of baseline and between 10.0 and 13.5 g/dl. The primary endpoint was the mean Hb change between baseline and the evaluation period (weeks 29–36). Results. Most patients (>80%) received DA QW before randomization. The mean (95% CI) difference between C.E.R.A. and DA in the primary endpoint was 0.18 g/dl (−0.05, 0.41), within a pre-defined non-inferiority limit. C.E.R.A. was clinically non-inferior to DA (P < 0.0001) in maintaining Hb levels. Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusions. Stable Hb levels were successfully maintained in patients on haemodialysis directly converted to Q2W intravenous C.E.R.A. from DA. PMID:18586762

  17. Patient evaluation of the use of follitropin alfa in a prefilled ready-to-use injection pen in assisted reproductive technology: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Self-administration of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) can be performed using injection pen devices by women undergoing assisted reproductive technology procedures. The objective of this study was to explore the use of the prefilled follitropin alfa pen in routine assisted reproductive technology procedures in Germany. Methods This prospective, observational study was conducted across 43 German IVF centres over a period of 1.75 years. Patients who had used the prefilled follitropin alfa pen in the current or a previous cycle of controlled ovarian stimulation completed a questionnaire to assess their opinions of the device. Results A total of 5328 patients were included in the study. Of these, 2888 reported that they had previous experience of daily FSH injections. Significantly more patients reported that less training was required to use the prefilled follitropin alfa pen than a syringe and lyophilized powder (1997/3081 [64.8%]; p < 0.001 'less' versus 'more' training). Significantly more patients rated the prefilled follitropin alfa pen as easier in terms of use (2321/3206, 72.4%; p < 0.001 'much more easy' versus 'less easy') and daily injection (2384/3262, 73.1%; p < 0.001 'much more easy' versus 'less easy') than existing injection methods. Approximately one third of respondents rated the prefilled follitropin alfa pen as easier to use than the follitropin beta pen with reloadable cartridges. The majority (3378/4024, 83.9%) of patients had a general preference for the prefilled follitropin alfa pen over other injection methods. Conclusions In this questionnaire-based survey, routine use of the prefilled follitropin alfa pen was well accepted and associated with favourable patient perceptions. Users of the pen found it easier to initially learn how to use, and subsequently use, than other injection methods. In general, the prefilled follitropin alfa pen was the preferred method for self-administration of gonadotrophins

  18. Direct site-specific glycoform identification and quantitative comparison of glycoprotein therapeutics: imiglucerase and velaglucerase alfa.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongping; Hill, John; Gucinski, Ashley C; Boyne, Michael T; Buhse, Lucinda F

    2015-03-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal metabolic disorder, can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Recombinant human glucocerebrosidase imiglucerase (Cerezyme(®)), produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, has been used for ERT of Gaucher disease for 20 years. Another recombinant glucocerebrosidase velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV), expressed in a human fibroblast cell line, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2010. The amino acid sequence difference at residue 495 of these two products is well documented. The overall N-linked qualitative glycan composition of these two products has also been reported previously. Herein, employing our recently developed approach utilizing isobaric tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and an LTQ Orbitrap XL electron transfer dissociation (ETD) hybrid mass spectrometer, the site-specific glycoforms of these products were identified with ETD and collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra. The quantitative comparison of site-specific glycans was achieved utilizing higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) spectra with a NanoMate used as both a fraction collector and a sample introduction device. From the trypsin-digested mixture of these two products, over 90 glycopeptides were identified by accurate mass matching. In addition to those previously reported, additional glycopeptides were detected with moderate abundance. The relative amount of each glycoform at a specific glycosylation site was determined based on reporter signal intensities of the TMT labeling reagents. This is the first report of site-specific simultaneous qualitative and quantitative comparison of glycoforms for Cerezyme(®) and VPRIV. The results demonstrate that this method could be utilized for biosimilarity determination and counterfeit identification of glycoproteins. PMID:25501675

  19. Peginesatide for Maintenance Treatment of Anemia in Hemodialysis and Nondialysis Patients Previously Treated with Darbepoetin Alfa

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Simon D.; Martin, Edouard; Runyan, Grant; O’Neil, Janet; Qiu, Ping; Locatelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Peginesatide (Omontys) is a novel, synthetic, PEGylated, peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) that is designed to specifically stimulate the erythropoietin receptor. This study evaluated maintenance of hemoglobin levels in patients after conversion from darbepoetin alfa to once-monthly peginesatide. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This open-label, multicenter study included 101 CKD patients, 52 of whom were receiving dialysis. The duration of the study was 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the mean change in hemoglobin from baseline to the evaluation period (weeks 19–24). The study was conducted during the period from September 22, 2008 to December 24, 2009. Results The mean change among hemodialysis patients was –0.42 g/dl (95% confidence interval, –0.65 to –0.19) and the mean change among CKD nondialysis patients was 0.49 g/dl (95% confidence interval, 0.26–0.71). The percentages of patients who maintained hemoglobin levels within ±1.0 g/dl of baseline values were as follows: 80.0% for hemodialysis and 68.1% for nondialysis, and73.3% for hemodialysis and 68.1% for nondialysis within the target range of 10.0–12.0 g/dl. Few patients received red blood cell transfusions (hemodialysis, 5.8%; nondialysis, 2.0%). Seventy-nine patients experienced adverse events, the majority of which were mild or moderate in severity. There were 40 serious adverse events and 2 deaths reported. Conclusions In this study, once-monthly peginesatide resulted in a slight decrease in mean hemoglobin levels in individuals on hemodialysis and a small increase in individuals with CKD who were not on dialysis. PMID:23243269

  20. Maintenance Therapy with Interferon Alfa 2b Improves Outcome in Aggressive Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; García, E L; Nambo, M J

    1998-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with malignant lymphoma on complete response after conventional chemotherapy we start a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and seventy patients were randomized to received either IFN 5.0 MU three time at week by one year or no further treatment, as control group. At a median follow-up of 9.0 years (range 4.3 to 11 years) median freedom from relapse (FFR) has not been reached in patients who received IFN, it is statistically significant to patients in control group with a median FFR of 60 months (p <.001). Actuarial curves show that at 10-years, 58 patients (66%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 53% to 79%) remain in first remission, statistical different to control group 33 patients (40%, 95% Cl: 33% to 57%) (p <.001). Event free survival (EFS) shown that a 10-years 63 patients (71%, 95% CI: 59% to 81%) are alive free of disease in the IFN arm compared to only 38 patients (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 57%) in the control group (p <.001). Toxicity was mild, 81 patients received the planned doses of IFN on time and 6 patients had transitory delay secondary to hematological toxicity (grade 1 or 2) and completed the treatment on 13 months. No late side effects has been observed. After a long term follow-up we confirm that IFN used as maintenance therapy improves outcome in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma who were in complete remission after conventional chemotherapy without excessive toxicity. We feld that IFN will be consider in controlled clinical trials to define the role of this therapeutic option. PMID:27414082

  1. Benefits and harms in clinical trials of duloxetine for treatment of major depressive disorder: comparison of clinical study reports, trial registries, and publications

    PubMed Central

    Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Lundh, Andreas; Schroll, Jeppe; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine, using research on duloxetine for major depressive disorder as an example, if there are inconsistencies between protocols, clinical study reports, and main publicly available sources (journal articles and trial registries), and within clinical study reports themselves, with respect to benefits and major harms. Design Data on primary efficacy analysis and major harms extracted from each data source and compared. Setting Nine randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine (total 2878 patients) submitted to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for marketing approval for major depressive disorder. Data sources Clinical study reports, including protocols as appendices (total 13 729 pages), were obtained from the EMA in May 2011. Journal articles were identified through relevant literature databases and contacting the manufacturer, Eli Lilly. Clinicaltrials.gov and the manufacturer’s online clinical trial registry were searched for trial results. Results Clinical study reports fully described the primary efficacy analysis and major harms (deaths (including suicides), suicide attempts, serious adverse events, and discontinuations because of adverse events). There were minor inconsistencies in the population in the primary efficacy analysis between the protocol and clinical study report and within the clinical study report for one trial. Furthermore, we found contradictory information within the reports for seven serious adverse events and eight adverse events that led to discontinuation but with no apparent bias. In each trial, a median of 406 (range 177-645) and 166 (100-241) treatment emergent adverse events (adverse events that emerged or worsened after study drug was started) in the randomised phase were not reported in journal articles and Lilly trial registry reports, respectively. We also found publication bias in relation to beneficial effects. Conclusion Clinical study reports contained extensive data on major harms that were

  2. Clearance of Hepatic Sphingomyelin by Olipudase Alfa Is Associated With Improvement in Lipid Profiles in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thurberg, Beth L; Wasserstein, Melissa P; Jones, Simon A; Schiano, Thomas D; Cox, Gerald F; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD; Niemann-Pick disease type A and B) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by abnormal intracellular sphingomyelin (SM) accumulation. Prominent liver involvement results in hepatomegaly, fibrosis/cirrhosis, abnormal liver chemistries, and a proatherogenic lipid profile. Olipudase alfa (recombinant human ASM) is in clinical development as an investigational enzyme replacement therapy for the non-neurological manifestations of ASMD. In a phase 1b study conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of within-patient dose escalation with olipudase alfa, measurement of SM levels in liver biopsies was used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of substrate burden. Five adult patients with non neuronopathic ASMD received escalating doses of olipudase alfa every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Liver biopsies obtained at baseline and 26 weeks after treatment were evaluated for SM storage by histomorphometric analysis, biochemistry, and electron microscopy. Biopsies were also assessed for inflammation and fibrosis, and for the association of SM levels with liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles. At baseline, SM storage present in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes ranged from 9.8% to 53.8% of the microscopic field. After 26 weeks of treatment, statistically significant reductions in SM (P<0.0001) measured by morphometry were seen in 4 patients with evaluable liver biopsies. The 26-week biopsy of the fifth patient was insufficient for morphometric quantitation. Posttreatment SM levels ranged from 1.2% to 9.5% of the microscopic field, corresponding to an 84% to 92% relative reduction from baseline. Improvements in liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles were also observed. This study illustrates the utility of SM assessment by liver biopsy as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of disease burden in these patients. PMID:27340749

  3. Clearance of Hepatic Sphingomyelin by Olipudase Alfa Is Associated With Improvement in Lipid Profiles in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, Melissa P.; Jones, Simon A.; Schiano, Thomas D.; Cox, Gerald F.; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD; Niemann-Pick disease type A and B) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by abnormal intracellular sphingomyelin (SM) accumulation. Prominent liver involvement results in hepatomegaly, fibrosis/cirrhosis, abnormal liver chemistries, and a proatherogenic lipid profile. Olipudase alfa (recombinant human ASM) is in clinical development as an investigational enzyme replacement therapy for the non-neurological manifestations of ASMD. In a phase 1b study conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of within-patient dose escalation with olipudase alfa, measurement of SM levels in liver biopsies was used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of substrate burden. Five adult patients with non neuronopathic ASMD received escalating doses of olipudase alfa every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Liver biopsies obtained at baseline and 26 weeks after treatment were evaluated for SM storage by histomorphometric analysis, biochemistry, and electron microscopy. Biopsies were also assessed for inflammation and fibrosis, and for the association of SM levels with liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles. At baseline, SM storage present in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes ranged from 9.8% to 53.8% of the microscopic field. After 26 weeks of treatment, statistically significant reductions in SM (P<0.0001) measured by morphometry were seen in 4 patients with evaluable liver biopsies. The 26-week biopsy of the fifth patient was insufficient for morphometric quantitation. Posttreatment SM levels ranged from 1.2% to 9.5% of the microscopic field, corresponding to an 84% to 92% relative reduction from baseline. Improvements in liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles were also observed. This study illustrates the utility of SM assessment by liver biopsy as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of disease burden in these patients. PMID:27340749

  4. Mapping Hydrogen in the Galaxy, Galactic Halo, and Local Group with ALFA: The GALFA-H I Survey Starting with TOGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. J.; Douglas, K. A.; Heiles, C.; Korpela, E. J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Putman, M. E.; Stanimirović, S.

    2008-08-01

    Radio observations of gas in the Milky Way and Local Group are vital for understanding how galaxies function as systems. The unique sensitivity of Arecibo's 305 m dish, coupled with the 7-beam Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFA), provides an unparalleled tool for investigating the full range of interstellar phenomena traced by the H I 21 cm line. The GALFA (Galactic ALFA) H I Survey is mapping the entire Arecibo sky over a velocity range of -700 to +700 km s-1 with 0.2 km s-1 velocity channels and an angular resolution of 3.4'. We present highlights from the TOGS (Turn On GALFA Survey) portion of GALFA-H I, which is covering thousands of square degrees in commensal drift scan observations with the ALFALFA and AGES extragalactic ALFA surveys. This work is supported in part by the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, operated by Cornell University under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  5. [Alfa-blockade with doxazosin vs tamsulozin in combination of intermittent androgen blockade in patients with prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Muradian, A A

    2005-03-01

    We have studied the efficacy of Alfa-blockade with Doxazosin vs Tamsulozin in combination with Intermittent Androgen Blockade (IAB) in patients with low grade prostate cancer. Our clinical trial included: I group (n=15) of patients who received doxazosin with IAB and flutamide; II group (n=13) of patients who received tamsulozin in combination with IAB and flutamide and III (n=33) group with flutamid monotherapy alone. Our results have shown that the combination of doxasozin and IAB with the flutamide leads to the better improvement of uroflowmetry and IPSS parameters, whereas the tamsulozin and IAB with flutamide combination induce those improvements for the longer period during the disease remission.

  6. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) on switching from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta: what are the implications?

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, José; Vinhas, José

    2008-01-01

    We report the development of antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a 63-year-old man with end-stage renal disease following a switch from darbepoetin alfa to epoetin beta. Haemoglobin levels began to decrease 6 months after the switch. Increasing the epoetin beta dose produced no response and regular blood transfusions were required; PRCA was confirmed and epoetin beta was discontinued. The patient responded positively to immunosuppression; after 2 months on prednisone and cyclophosphamide, haemoglobin levels stabilized and no further transfusions were required. This case highlights the difficulty in establishing a cause-effect relationship where more than one erythropoiesis-stimulating agent is involved. PMID:25983889

  7. Efficacy of corifollitropin alfa followed by recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol for Korean women undergoing assisted reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Young; Lee, Min Young; Jeong, Hyo Young; Rho, Yong Sook; Song, Sang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol using corifollitropin alfa in women undergoing assisted reproduction. Methods Six hundred and eighty-six in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles were analyzed. In 113 cycles, folliculogenesis was induced with corifollitropin alfa and recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH), and premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surges were prevented with a GnRH antagonist. In the control group (573 cycles), premature LH surges were prevented with GnRH agonist injection from the midluteal phase of the preceding cycle, and ovarian stimulation was started with rFSH. The treatment duration, quality of oocytes and embryos, number of embryo transfer (ET) cancelled cycles, risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), and the chemical pregnancy rate were evaluated in the two ovarian stimulation protocols. Results There were no significant differences in age and infertility factors between treatment groups. The treatment duration was shorter in the corifollitropin alfa group than in the control group. Although not statistically significant, the mean numbers of matured (86.8% vs. 85.1%) and fertilized oocytes (84.2% vs. 83.1%), good embryos (62.4% vs. 60.3%), and chemical pregnancy rates (47.2% vs. 46.8%) were slightly higher in the corifollitropin alfa group than in the control group. In contrast, rates of ET cancelled cycles and the OHSS risk were slightly lower in the corifollitropin alfa group (6.2% and 2.7%) than in the control group (8.2% and 3.5%), although these differences were also not statistically significant. Conclusion Although no significant differences were observed, the use of corifollitropin alfa seems to offer some advantages to patients because of its short treatment duration, safety, lower ET cancellation rate and reduced risk of OHSS. PMID:26161335

  8. Vibrational distributions of AlF(a /sup 3/Pi) produced by crossed-beam collisions of Al and F/sub 2/ at two kinetic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, T.; Parson, J.M.

    1983-11-01

    Chemiluminescent spectra of AlF(a /sup 3/Pi) produced in the reaction of Al with an F/sub 2/ nozzle beam are reported at two different nozzle temperatures. From spectral simulations treating AlF(a /sup 3/Pi) in the intermediate case between Hund's cases (a) and (b), it is found that the peak position of the derived vibrational distribution is shifted to a higher vibrational state for the higher temperature case. Both vibrational distributions give linear surprisal plots with nearly the same highly negative slope. In order to explain the shift of the vibrational distribution, a collinear model calculation for multiple nonadiabatic processes is proposed.

  9. The influence of a polymorphism in the gene encoding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) on treatment outcomes in late-onset Pompe patients receiving alglucosidase alfa.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rena C; Palmer, Rachel; Pomponio, Robert J; Lu, Yuefeng; Ma, Xiwen; McVie-Wylie, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype (I/I, I/D, D/D), disease severity at baseline and response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) were assessed in the Pompe disease Late-Onset Treatment Study (LOTS). No correlations were observed between ACE genotype and disease severity at baseline. However, D/D patients appeared to have a reduced response to alglucosidase alfa treatment than I/I or I/D patients, suggesting that ACE polymorphisms may influence the response to alglucosidase alfa treatment and warrants further investigation. PMID:27489778

  10. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model-Based Comparability Assessment of a Recombinant Human Epoetin Alfa and the Biosimilar HX575

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Lowe, Philip J.; Fink, Martin; Berghout, Alexander; Balser, Sigrid; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an integrated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model and assess the comparability between epoetin alfa HEXAL/Binocrit (HX575) and a comparator epoetin alfa by a model-based approach. PK/PD data—including serum drug concentrations, reticulocyte counts, red blood cells, and hemoglobin levels—were obtained from 2 clinical studies. In sum, 149 healthy men received multiple intravenous or subcutaneous doses of HX575 (100 IU/kg) and the comparator 3 times a week for 4 weeks. A population model based on pharmacodynamics-mediated drug disposition and cell maturation processes was used to characterize the PK/PD data for the 2 drugs. Simulations showed that due to target amount changes, total clearance may increase up to 2.4-fold as compared with the baseline. Further simulations suggested that once-weekly and thrice-weekly subcutaneous dosing regimens would result in similar efficacy. The findings from the model-based analysis were consistent with previous results using the standard noncompartmental approach demonstrating PK/PD comparability between HX575 and comparator. However, due to complexity of the PK/PD model, control of random effects was not straightforward. Whereas population PK/PD model-based analyses are suited for studying complex biological systems, such models have their limitations (statistical), and their comparability results should be interpreted carefully. PMID:22162538

  11. Baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF)

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, John J.V.; Anand, Inder S.; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P.; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Albizem, Moetaz; Cheng, Sunfa; Scarlata, Debra; Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B.; Amuchastegui, M.; Belziti, C.; Bluguermann, J.; Caccavo, M.; Cartasegna, L.; Colque, R.; Cuneo, C.; Fernandez, A.; Gabito, A.; Goicochea, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Gorosito, V.; Grinfeld, L.; Hominal, M.; Kevorkian, R.; Litvak Bruno, M.; Llanos, J.; Mackinnon, I.; Manuale, O.; Marzetti, E.; Nul, D.; Perna, E.; Riccitelli, M.; Sanchez, A.; Santos, D.; Schygiel, P.; Toblli, J.; Vogel, D.; Aggarwal, A.; Amerena, J.; De Looze, F.; Fletcher, P.; Hare, D.; Ireland, M.; Krum, H.; Lattimore, J.; Marwick, T.; Sindone, A.; Thompson, P.; Waites, J.; Altenberger, J.; Ebner, C.; Lenz, K.; Pacher, R.; Poelzl, G.; Charlier, F.; de Ceuninck, M.; De Keulenaer, G.; Dendale, P.; Maréchal, P.; Mullens, W.; Thoeng, J.; Vanderheyden, M.; Vanhaecke, J.; Weytjens, C.; Wollaert, B.; Albuquerque, D.; Almeida, D.; Aspe y Rosas, J.; Bocchi, E.; Bordignon, S.; Clausell, N.; Kaiser, S.; Leaes, P.; Martins Alves, S.; Montera, M.; Moura, L.; Pereira de Castro, R.; Rassi, S.; Reis, A.; Saraiva, J.; Simões, M.; Souza Neto, J.; Teixeira, M.; Benov, H.; Chompalova, B.; Donova, T.; Georgiev, P.; Gotchev, D.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Guenova, D.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Ivanov, D.; Kostova, E.; Manolova, A.; Marchev, S.; Nikolov, F.; Popov, A.; Raev, D.; Tzekova, M.; Czarnecki, W.; Giannetti, N.; Haddad, H.; Heath, J.; Huynh, T.; Lepage, S.; Liu, P.; Lonn, E.; Ma, P.; Manyari, D.; Moe, G.; Parker, J.; Pesant, Y.; Rajda, M.; Ricci, J.; Roth, S.; Sestier, F.; Sluzar, V.; Sussex, B.; Vizel, S.; Antezana, G.; Bugueno, C.; Castro, P.; Conejeros, C.; Manriquez, L.; Martinez, D.; Potthoff, S.; Stockins, B.; Vukasovic, J.; Gregor, P.; Herold, M.; Jerabek, O.; Jirmar, R.; Kuchar, R.; Linhart, A.; Podzemska, B.; Soucek, M.; Spac, J.; Spacek, R.; Vodnansky, P.; Bronnum-Schou, J.; Clemmensen, K.; Egstrup, K.; Jensen, G.; Kjoller-Hansen, L.; Kober, L.; Markenvard, J.; Rokkedal, J.; Skagen, K.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Tuxen, C.; Videbak, L.; Laks, T.; Vahula, V.; Harjola, V.; Kettunen, R.; Kotila, M.; Bauer, F.; Cohen Solal, A.; Coisne, D.; Davy, J.; De Groote, P.; Dos Santos, P.; Funck, F.; Galinier, M.; Gibelin, P.; Isnard, R.; Neuder, Y.; Roul, G.; Sabatier, R.; Trochu, J.; Anker, S.; Denny, S.; Dreykluft, T.; Flesch, M.; Genth-Zotz, S.; Hambrecht, R.; Hein, J.; Jeserich, M.; John, M.; Kreider-Stempfle, H.; Laufs, U.; Muellerleile, K.; Natour, M.; Sandri, M.; Schäufele, T.; von Hodenberg, E.; Weyland, K.; Winkelmann, B.; Tse, H.; Yan, B.; Barsi, B.; Csikasz, J.; Dezsi, C.; Edes, I.; Forster, T.; Karpati, P.; Kerekes, C.; Kis, E.; Kosa, I.; Lupkovics, G.; Nagy, A.; Preda, I.; Ronaszeki, A.; Tomcsanyi, J.; Zamolyi, K.; Agarwal, D.; Bahl, V.; Bordoloi, A.; Chockalingam, K.; Chopda, M.; Chopra, V.; Dugal, J.; Ghaisas, N.; Ghosh, S.; Grant, P.; Hiremath, S.; Iyengar, S.; Jagadeesa Subramania, B.; Jain, P.; Joshi, A.; Khan, A.; Mullasari, A.; Naik, S.; Oomman, A.; Pai, V.; Pareppally Gopal, R.; Parikh, K.; Patel, T.; Prakash, V.; Sastry, B.; Sathe, S.; Sinha, N.; Srikanthan, V.; Subburamakrishnan, P.; Thacker, H.; Wander, G.; Admon, D.; Katz, A.; Klainman, E.; Lewis, B.; Marmor, A.; Moriel, M.; Mosseri, M.; Shotan, A.; Weinstein, J.; Zimlichman, R.; Agostoni, P.; Albanese, M.; Alunni, G.; Bini, R.; Boccanelli, A.; Bolognese, L.; Campana, C.; Carbonieri, E.; Carpino, C.; Checco, L.; Cosmi, F.; D'Angelo, G.; De Cristofaro, M.; Floresta, A.; Fucili, A.; Galvani, M.; Ivleva, A.; Marra, S.; Musca, G.; Peccerillo, N.; Perrone Filardi, P.; Picchio, E.; Russo, T.; Scelsi, L.; Senni, M.; Tavazzi, L.; Erglis, A.; Jasinkevica, I.; Kakurina, N.; Veze, I.; Volans, E.; Bagdonas, A.; Berukstis, E.; Celutkiene, J.; Dambrauskaite, A.; Jarasuniene, D.; Luksiene, D.; Rudys, A.; Sakalyte, G.; Sliaziene, S.; Aguilar-Romero, R.; Cardona-Muñoz, E.; Castro-Jimenez, J.; Chavez-Herrera, J.; Chuquiure Valenzuela, E.; De la Pena, G.; Herrera, E.; Leiva-Pons, J.; Lopez Alvarado, A.; Mendez Machado, G.; Ramos-Lopez, G.; Basart, D.; Buijs, E.; Cornel, J.; de Leeuw, M.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Dunselman, P.; Freericks, M.; Hamraoui, K.; Lenderlink, T.; Linssen, G.; Lodewick, P.; Lodewijks, C.; Lok, D.; Nierop, P.; Ronner, E.; Somsen, A.; van Dantzig, J.; van der Burgh, P.; van Kempen, L.; van Vlies, B.; Voors, A.; Wardeh, A.; Willems, F.; Dickstein, K.; Gundersen, T.; Hole, T.; Thalamus, J.; Westheim, A.; Dabrowski, M.; Gorski, J.; Korewicki, J.; Kuc, K.; Miekus, P.; Musial, W.; Niegowska, J.; Piotrowski, W.; Podolec, P.; Polonski, L.; Ponikowski, P.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Szelemej, R.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Ujda, M.; Wojciechowski, D; Wysokinski, A.; Camacho, A.; Fonseca, C.; Monteiro, P.; Apetrei, E.; Bruckner, I.; Carasca, E.; Coman, I.; Datcu, M.; Dragulescu, S.; Ionescu, P.; Iordachescu-Petica, D.; Manitiu, I.; Popa, V.; Pop-Moldovan, A.; Radoi, M.; Stamate, S.; Tomescu, M.; Vita, I.; Aroutiounov, G.; Ballyuzek, M.; Bart, B.; Churina, S.; Glezer, M.; Goloshchekin, B.; Ivleva, A.; Kobalava, Z.; Kostenko, V.; Lopatin, Y.; Martynov, A.; Orlov, V.; Semernin, E.; Shogenov, Z.; Sidorenko, B.; Skvortsov, A.; Storzhakov, G.; Sulimov, V.; Talibov, O.; Tereshenko, S.; Tsyrline, V.; Zadionchenko, V.; Zateyshchikov, D.; Dzupina, A.; Hranai, M.; Kmec, J.; Micko, K.; Murin, J.; Pella, D.; Sojka, G.; Spisak, V.; Vahala, P.; Vinanska, D.; Badat, A.; Bayat, J.; Dawood, S.; Delport, E.; Ellis, G.; Garda, R.; Klug, E.; Mabin, T.; Naidoo, D.; Pretorius, M.; Ranjith, N.; Van Zyl, L.; Weich, H.; Anguita, M.; Berrazueta, J.; Bruguera i Cortada, J.; de Teresa, E.; Gómez Sánchez, M.; González Juanatey, J.; Gonzalez-Maqueda, I.; Jordana, R.; Lupon, J.; Manzano, L.; Pascual Figal, D.; Pulpón, L.; Recio, J.; Ridocci Soriano, F.; Rodríguez Lambert, J.; Roig Minguell, E.; Roig Minguell, E.; Romero, J.; Valdovinos, P.; Klintberg, L.; Kronvall, T.; Lycksell, M.; Morner, S.; Rydberg, E.; Swedberg, K.; Timberg, I.; Wikstrom, G.; Moccetti, T.4; Ashok, J.; Banerjee, P.; Carr-White, G.; Cleland, J.; Connolly, E.; Francis, M.; Greenbaum, R.; Kadr, H.; Lindsay, S.; McMurray, J.; Megarry, S.; Memon, A.; Murdoch, D.; Senior, R.; Squire, I.; Tan, L.; Witte, K.; Adams, K.; Adamson, P.; Adler, A.; Altschul, L.; Altschuller, A.; Amirani, H.; Anand, I.; Andreou, C.; Ansari, M.; Antonishen, M.; Banchs, H.; Banerjee, S.; Banish, D.; Bank, A.; Barbagelata, A.; Barnard, D.; Bellinger, R.; Benn, A.; Berk, M.; Berry, B.; Bethala, V.; Bilazarian, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bleyer, F.; Blum, M.; Boehmer, J.; Bouchard, A.; Boyle, A.; Bozkurt, B.; Brown, C.; Burlew, B.; Burnham, K.; Butler, J.; Call, J.; Cambier, P.; Cappola, T.; Carlson, R.; Chandler, B.; Chandra, R.; Chandraratna, P.; Chernick, R.; Colan, D.; Colfer, H.; Colucci, W.; Connelly, T.; Costantini, O.; Dadkhah, S.; Dauber, I.; Davis, J.; Davis, S.; Denning, S.; Drazner, M.; Dunlap, S.; Egbujiobi, L.; Elkayam, U.; Elliott, J.; El-Shahawy, M.; Essandoh, L.; Ewald, G.; Fang, J.; Farhoud, H.; Felker, G.; Fernandez, J.; Festin, R.; Fishbein, G.; Florea, V.; Flores, E.; Floro, J.; Gabris, M.; Garg, M.; Gatewood, R.; Geller, M.; Ghali, J.; Ghumman, W.; Gibbs, G.; Gillespie, E.; Gilmore, R.; Gogia, H.; Goldberg, L.; Gradus-Pizlo, I.; Grainger, T.; Gudmundsson, G.; Gunawardena, D.; Gupta, D.; Hack, T.; Hall, S.; Hamroff, G.; Hankins, S.; Hanna, M.; Hargrove, J.; Haught, W.; Hauptman, P.; Hazelrigg, M.; Herzog, C.; Heywood, J.; Hill, T.; Hilton, T.; Hirsch, H.; Hunter, J.; Ibrahim, H.; Imburgia, M.; Iteld, B.; Jackson, B.; Jaffrani, N.; Jain, D.; Jain, A.; James, M.; Jimenez, J.; Johnson, E.; Kale, P.; Kaneshige, A.; Kapadia, S.; Karia, D.; Karlsberg, R.; Katholi, R.; Kerut, E.; Khoury, W.; Kipperman, R.; Klapholz, M.; Kosinski, E.; Kozinn, M.; Kraus, D.; Krueger, S.; Krum, H.; Kumar, S.; Lader, E.; Lee, C.; Levy, W.; Lewis, E.; Light-McGroary, K.; Loh, I.; Lombardi, W.; Machado, C.; Maislos, F.; Mancini, D.; Markus, T.; Mather, P.; McCants, K.; McGrew, F.; McLaurin, B.; McMillan, E.; McNamara, D.; Meyer, T.; Meymandi, S.; Miller, A.; Minami, E.; Modi, M.; Mody, F.; Mohanty, P.; Moscoso, R.; Moskowitz, R.; Moustafa, M.; Mullen, M.; Naz, T.; Noonan, T.; O'Brien, T.; Oellerich, W.; Oren, R.; Pamboukian, S.; Pereira, N.; Pitt, W.; Porter, C.; Prabhu, S.; Promisloff, S.; Ratkovec, R.; Richardson, R.; Ross, A.; Saleh, N.; Saltzberg, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schmedtje, J.; Schneider, R.; Schuyler, G.; Shanes, J.; Sharma, A.; Siegel, C.; Siegel, R.; Silber, D.; Singh, V.; Singh, N.; Singh, J.; Sklar, J.; Small, R.; Smith, A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smull, D.; Sotolongo, R.; Staniloae, C.; Stapleton, D.; Steele, P.; Stehlik, J.; Stein, M.; Tang, W.; Thadani, U.; Torre-Amoine, G.; Trichon, B.; Tsai, C.; Tummala, R.; Van Bakel, A.; Vicari, R.; Vijay, N.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Vittorio, T.; Vossler, M.; Wagoner, L.; Wallis, D.; Ward, N.; Widmer, M.; Wight, J.; Wilkins, C.; Williams, C.; Williams, G.; Winchester, M.; Winkel, E.; Wittmer, B.; Wood, D.; Wormer, D.; Wright, R.; Xu, Z.; Yasin, M.; Zolty, R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims This report describes the baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF) which is testing the hypothesis that anaemia correction with darbepoetin alfa will reduce the composite endpoint of death from any cause or hospital admission for worsening heart failure, and improve other outcomes. Methods and results Key demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings, along with baseline treatment, are reported and compared with those of patients in other recent clinical trials in heart failure. Compared with other recent trials, RED-HF enrolled more elderly [mean age 70 (SD 11.4) years], female (41%), and black (9%) patients. RED-HF patients more often had diabetes (46%) and renal impairment (72% had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Patients in RED-HF had heart failure of longer duration [5.3 (5.4) years], worse NYHA class (35% II, 63% III, and 2% IV), and more signs of congestion. Mean EF was 30% (6.8%). RED-HF patients were well treated at randomization, and pharmacological therapy at baseline was broadly similar to that of other recent trials, taking account of study-specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Median (interquartile range) haemoglobin at baseline was 112 (106–117) g/L. Conclusion The anaemic patients enrolled in RED-HF were older, moderately to markedly symptomatic, and had extensive co-morbidity. PMID:23329651

  12. Dornase alfa in the treatment of cystic fibrosis in Europe: a report from the Epidemiologic Registry of Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hodson, M E; McKenzie, S; Harms, H K; Koch, C; Mastella, G; Navarro, J; Strandvik, B

    2003-11-01

    Dornase alfa (Pulmozyme) treatment for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been shown to improve pulmonary function and reduce exacerbations of infection in a number of placebo-controlled double-blind studies. Data in the Epidemiologic Registry of Cystic Fibrosis (ERCF) in November 1998 were used to assess the long-term effectiveness in routine clinical practice of dornase alfa in terms of pulmonary function and frequency of acute pulmonary exacerbations in CF. At that time, the ERCF contained data on 13,684 CF patients, with a mean observation period of 2.3 years. To be included in the analysis, patients had to have 2 years of data in the Registry in appropriate detail. Overall, untreated patients showed a decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec over a 2-year period of -2.3% predicted, but treated patients were stable, showing a change of 0.3% predicted, i.e., a treatment benefit of 2.5%. Compared to untreated patients, there were 25 fewer exacerbations per 100 treated patients per year. The analysis suggested that younger patients were likely to benefit more from treatment. The findings of randomized clinical trials were supported by the data collected in routine clinical practice.

  13. Arecibo pulsar survey using ALFA. III. Precursor survey and population synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Swiggum, J. K.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Bates, S. D.; Senty, T. R.; Champion, D. J.; Lazarus, P.; Ransom, S. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Nice, D. J.; Ellis, J.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; and others

    2014-06-01

    The Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) Survey uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° ≲ ℓ ≲ 77° and 168° ≲ ℓ ≲ 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| ≲ 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA survey is sensitive to sources fainter and more distant than have previously been seen because of Arecibo's unrivaled sensitivity. In this paper we detail a precursor survey of this region with PALFA, which observed a subset of the full region (slightly more restrictive in ℓ and |b| ≲ 1°) and detected 45 pulsars. Detections included 1 known millisecond pulsar and 11 previously unknown, long-period pulsars. In the surveyed part of the sky that overlaps with the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey (36° ≲ ℓ ≲ 50°), PALFA is probing deeper than the Parkes survey, with four discoveries in this region. For both Galactic millisecond and normal pulsar populations, we compare the survey's detections with simulations to model these populations and, in particular, to estimate the number of observable pulsars in the Galaxy. We place 95% confidence intervals of 82,000 to 143,000 on the number of detectable normal pulsars and 9000 to 100,000 on the number of detectable millisecond pulsars in the Galactic disk. These are consistent with previous estimates. Given the most likely population size in each case (107,000 and 15,000 for normal and millisecond pulsars, respectively), we extend survey detection simulations to predict that, when complete, the full PALFA survey should have detected 1000{sub −230}{sup +330} normal pulsars and 30{sub −20}{sup +200} millisecond pulsars. Identical estimation techniques predict that 490{sub −115}{sup +160} normal pulsars and 12{sub −5}{sup +70} millisecond pulsars would be detected by the beginning of 2014; at the time, the PALFA survey had detected 283 normal pulsars and 31 millisecond pulsars, respectively. We attribute the deficiency in normal pulsar detections

  14. Arecibo Pulsar Survey Using ALFA. III. Precursor Survey and Population Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiggum, J. K.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Bates, S. D.; Champion, D. J.; Ransom, S. M.; Lazarus, P.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Nice, D. J.; Ellis, J.; Senty, T. R.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A. G.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) Survey uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° <~ l <~ 77° and 168° <~ l <~ 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| <~ 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA survey is sensitive to sources fainter and more distant than have previously been seen because of Arecibo's unrivaled sensitivity. In this paper we detail a precursor survey of this region with PALFA, which observed a subset of the full region (slightly more restrictive in l and |b| <~ 1°) and detected 45 pulsars. Detections included 1 known millisecond pulsar and 11 previously unknown, long-period pulsars. In the surveyed part of the sky that overlaps with the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey (36° <~ l <~ 50°), PALFA is probing deeper than the Parkes survey, with four discoveries in this region. For both Galactic millisecond and normal pulsar populations, we compare the survey's detections with simulations to model these populations and, in particular, to estimate the number of observable pulsars in the Galaxy. We place 95% confidence intervals of 82,000 to 143,000 on the number of detectable normal pulsars and 9000 to 100,000 on the number of detectable millisecond pulsars in the Galactic disk. These are consistent with previous estimates. Given the most likely population size in each case (107,000 and 15,000 for normal and millisecond pulsars, respectively), we extend survey detection simulations to predict that, when complete, the full PALFA survey should have detected 1000^{+330}_{-230} normal pulsars and 30^{+200}_{-20} millisecond pulsars. Identical estimation techniques predict that 490^{+160}_{-115} normal pulsars and 12^{+70}_{-5} millisecond pulsars would be detected by the beginning of 2014; at the time, the PALFA survey had detected 283 normal pulsars and 31 millisecond pulsars, respectively. We attribute the deficiency in normal pulsar detections predominantly to the radio frequency interference

  15. Ropeginterferon alfa-2b, a novel IFNα-2b, induces high response rates with low toxicity in patients with polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Zagrijtschuk, Oleh; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Thaler, Josef; Schloegl, Ernst; Gastl, Guenther A.; Wolf, Dominik; Kralovics, Robert; Gisslinger, Bettina; Strecker, Karin; Egle, Alexander; Melchardt, Thomas; Burgstaller, Sonja; Willenbacher, Ella; Schalling, Martin; Them, Nicole C.; Kadlecova, Pavla; Klade, Christoph; Greil, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In this prospective, open-label, multicenter phase 1/2 dose escalation study, we used a next-generation, mono-pegylated interferon (IFN) α-2b isoform, ropeginterferon alfa-2b. The unique feature of ropeginterferon alfa-2b is a longer elimination half-life, which allows administration every 2 weeks. We present data from 51 polycythemia vera patients. The main goal was to define the maximum tolerated dose and to assess safety and efficacy. A dose range of 50 to 540 µg was tested without the appearance of dose-limiting toxicities. All drug-related adverse events were known toxicities associated with IFN-α. The cumulative overall response rate was 90%, comprising complete response in 47% and partial response in 43% of patients; the best individual molecular response level was a complete response in 21% of patients and partial response in 47%. Notably, we did not observe any correlation between the dose level and the response rate or response duration, suggesting that already low levels of ropeginterferon alfa-2b are sufficient to induce significant hematologic and molecular responses. These data suggest promising efficacy and safety of ropeginterferon alfa-2b and support the development of the drug in a randomized phase 3 clinical trial. The study was disclosed at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01193699 before including the first patient. PMID:26261238

  16. Long-term effectiveness of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement in Fabry disease: A Fabry Outcome Survey analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michael; Hughes, Derralynn; Kampmann, Christoph; Larroque, Sylvain; Mehta, Atul; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Ramaswami, Uma; West, Michael; Wijatyk, Anna; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Outcomes from 5 years of treatment with agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease in patients enrolled in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were compared with published findings for untreated patients with Fabry disease. Data were extracted from FOS, a Shire-sponsored database, for comparison with data from three published studies. Outcomes evaluated were the annualized rate of change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and left ventricular mass indexed to height (LVMI) as well as time to and ages at a composite morbidity endpoint and at death. FOS data were extracted for 740 treated patients who were followed for a median of ~ 5 years. Compared with no treatment, patients treated with agalsidase alfa demonstrated slower decline in renal function and slower progression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Treated male patients with baseline eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) had a mean (standard error of the mean [SEM]) annualized change in eGFR of - 2.86 (0.53) mL/min/1.73 m(2)/y compared with - 6.8 (1.5) in the published untreated cohort. The mean (SEM) rate of LVMI increase with treatment was 0.33 (0.10) g/m(2.7)/y in males and 0.48 (0.09) in females, compared with 4.07 (1.03) in untreated males and 2.31 (0.81) in untreated females. Morbidity occurred later in treated patients, with ~ 16% risk of a composite morbidity event (26% in males) after 24 months with ERT versus ~ 45% without treatment, with first events and deaths also occurring at older ages in patients administered ERT (e.g., estimated median survival in treated males was 77.5 years versus 60 years in untreated males). Findings from these retrospective comparisons of observational data and published literature support the long-term benefits of ERT with agalsidase alfa for Fabry disease in slowing the progression of renal impairment and cardiomyopathy. Treatment also appeared to delay the onset of morbidity and mortality. Interpretation of these findings should take

  17. Sebelipase alfa over 52 weeks reduces serum transaminases, liver volume and improves serum lipids in patients with lysosomal acid lipase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Malinova, Vera; Honzík, Tomas; Balwani, Manisha; Breen, Catherine; Deegan, Patrick B.; Enns, Gregory M.; Jones, Simon A.; Kane, John P.; Stock, Eveline O.; Tripuraneni, Radhika; Eckert, Stephen; Schneider, Eugene; Hamilton, Gavin; Middleton, Michael S.; Sirlin, Claude; Kessler, Bruce; Bourdon, Christopher; Boyadjiev, Simeon A.; Sharma, Reena; Twelves, Chris; Whitley, Chester B.; Quinn, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency is an autosomal recessive enzyme deficiency resulting in lysosomal accumulation of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. LAL-CL04, an ongoing extension study, investigates the long-term effects of sebelipase alfa, a recombinant human lysosomal acid lipase. Methods Sebelipase alfa (1 mg/kg or 3 mg/kg) was infused every-other-week to eligible subjects. Safety and tolerability assessments, including liver function, lipid profiles and liver volume assessment, were carried out at regular intervals. Results 216 infusions were administered to eight adult subjects through Week 52 during LAL-CL04. At Week 52, mean alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were normal with mean change from baseline of −58% and −40%. Mean change for low density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein were −60%, −39%, −36%, and +29%, respectively. Mean liver volume by magnetic resonance imaging and hepatic proton density fat fraction decreased (12% and 55%, respectively). Adverse events were mainly mild and unrelated to sebelipase alfa. Infusion-related reactions were uncommon: three events of moderate severity were reported in two subjects; one patient's event was suggestive of hypersensitivity-like reaction, but additional testing did not confirm this, and the subject has successfully re-started sebelipase alfa. Of samples tested to date, no anti-drug antibodies have been detected. Conclusions Long-term dosing with sebelipase alfa in Lysosomal Acid Lipase-Deficient patients is well tolerated and produces sustained reductions in transaminases, improvements in serum lipid profile and reduction in hepatic fat fraction. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial in children and adults is underway (ARISE: NCT01757184). PMID:24993530

  18. Balapiravir plus peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD)/ribavirin in a randomized trial of hepatitis C genotype 1 patients(◆)

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David R.; Zeuzem, Stefan; Andreone, Pietro; Ferenci, Peter; Herring, Robert; Jensen, Donald M.; Marcellin, Patrick; Pockros, Paul J.; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Rustgi, Vinod K.; Sepe, Thomas; Sulkowski, Mark; Thomason, Isaac R.; Yoshida, Eric M.; Chan, Anna; Hill, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Balapiravir (R1626, RG1626) is the prodrug of a nucleoside analogue inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (R1479, RG1479). This phase 2, double-blind international trial evaluated the optimal treatment regimen of balapiravir plus peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD)/ribavirin. Material and methods Treatment-naive genotype 1 patients (N = 516) were randomized to one of seven treatment groups in which they received balapiravir 500, 1,000, or 1,500 mg twice daily, peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD) 180 or 90 μg/week and ribavirin 1,000/1,200 mg/day or peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD)/ribavirin. The planned treatment duration with balapiravir was reduced from 24 to 12 weeks due to safety concerns. Results The percentage of patients with undetectable HCV RNA was consistently higher in all balapiravir groups from week 2 to 12. However, high rates of dose modifications and discontinuations of one/all study drugs compromised the efficacy assessment and resulted in similar sustained virological response rates in the balapiravir groups (range 32-50%) and the peginterferon alfa-2a (40KD)/ribavirin group (43%). Balapiravir was discontinued for safety reasons in 28-36% of patients (most often for lymphopenia) and the percentage of patients with serious adverse events (especially hematological, infection, ocular events) was dose related. Serious hematological adverse events (particularly neutropenia, lymphopenia) were more common in balapiravir recipients. Two deaths in the balapiravir/peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin combination groups were considered possibly related to study medication. Conclusion Further development of balapiravir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C has been halted because of the unacceptable benefit to risk ratio revealed in this study (www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00517439). PMID:22166557

  19. Impact of severe haemophilia A on patients' health status: results from the guardian(™) 1 clinical trial of turoctocog alfa (NovoEight(®) ).

    PubMed

    Ozelo, M; Chowdary, P; Regnault, A; Busk, A K

    2015-07-01

    Haemophilia and its treatment interfere with patients' life and may affect adherence to treatment. This study explored the impact of severe haemophilia A on patients' health status, especially in young adults (YA), using data from guardian(™) 1, a multinational, open-label, non-controlled phase 3 trial investigating safety and efficacy of turoctocog alfa (NovoEight(®) ) in previously treated patients aged 12 years and older with severe haemophilia A (FVIII ≤ 1%). Health status was assessed using the EuroQoL-5 dimensions (EQ-5D-3L), covering 5 dimensions of health (mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression), and a visual analogue scale (VAS) measuring self-rated overall health status. EQ-5D was administered pretreatment (screening/baseline) and posttreatment (end-of-trial). Baseline responses to the EQ-5D dimensions and VAS were described overall and by age and compared to reference values from UK general population. Guardian(™) 1 included 150 patients (16 adolescents, 83 YA aged 16-29 and 51 adults aged 30+). All five dimensions of patients' health status were impacted at baseline. The percentage of haemophilia patients reporting problems was consistently significantly greater than age-matched general population reference values. Likewise, for all age groups mean baseline EQ-5D VAS score was significantly lower for haemophilia patients (YA: 78.0) than for the general population (YA aged 18-29: 87.3). The health status of patients with severe haemophilia A entering guardian(™) 1 was markedly poorer than that of the general population, particularly regarding mobility and pain. YA patients reported better health status than older patients, but considerably lower than that of the general YA population.

  20. Long-term endurance and safety of elosulfase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Morquio A syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hendriksz, Christian J; Parini, Rossella; AlSayed, Moeenaldeen D; Raiman, Julian; Giugliani, Roberto; Solano Villarreal, Martha L; Mitchell, John J; Burton, Barbara K; Guelbert, Norberto; Stewart, Fiona; Hughes, Derralynn A; Berger, Kenneth I; Slasor, Peter; Matousek, Robert; Jurecki, Elaina; Shaywitz, Adam J; Harmatz, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Long-term efficacy and safety of elosulfase alfa enzyme replacement therapy were evaluated in Morquio A patients over 96weeks (reaching 120weeks in total from pre-treatment baseline) in an open-label, multi-center, phase III extension study. During this extension of a 24-week placebo-controlled phase III study, all patients initially received 2.0mg/kg elosulfase alfa either weekly or every other week, prior to establishment of 2.0mg/kg/week as the recommended dose, at which point all patients received weekly treatment. Efficacy measures were compared to baseline of the initial 24-week study, enabling analyses of changes over 120weeks. In addition to performing analyses for the entire intent-to-treat (ITT) population (N=173), analyses were also performed for a modified per-protocol (MPP) population (N=124), which excluded patients who had orthopedic surgery during the extension study or were non-compliant with the study protocol (as determined by ≥20% missed infusions). Six-minute walk test (6MWT) was the primary efficacy measure; three-minute stair climb test (3MSCT) and normalized urine keratan sulfate (uKS) were secondary efficacy measures. Mean (SE) change from baseline to Week 120 in 6MWT distance was 32.0 (11.3)m and 39.9 (10.1)m for patients receiving elosulfase alfa at 2.0mg/kg/week throughout the study (N=56) and 15.1 (7.1)m and 31.7 (6.8)m in all patients combined, regardless of dosing regimen, for the ITT and MPP populations, respectively. Further analyses revealed that durability of 6MWT improvements was not impacted by baseline 6MWT distance, use of a walking aid, or age. Mean (SE) change at Week 120 in the 3MSCT was 5.5 (1.9) and 6.7 (2.0)stairs/min for patients receiving elosulfase alfa at 2.0mg/kg/week throughout the study and 4.3 (1.2) and 6.8 (1.3)stairs/min in all patients combined, regardless of dosing regimen, for the ITT and MPP populations, respectively Across all patients, mean (SE) change at Week 120 in normalized uKS was -59.4 (1.8)% and

  1. The economic impact of epoetin alfa therapy on delaying time to dialysis in elderly patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Patrick; Duh, Mei Sheng; Mody, Samir H; Bookhart, Brahim; Piech, Catherine Tak

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of epoetin alfa (EPO) therapy on delaying progression to renal dialysis and quantify the associated medical cost savings in elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Elderly (>/=65 years) dialysis patients who had >/=1 hemoglobin (Hb) value and >/=1 glomerular filtration rate (GFR) value of <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were identified using health claims and laboratory data from the period January 1999 to February 2005. Exclusion criteria included: organ transplantation, blood transfusion, use of darbepoetin alfa, and dialysis for reasons other than CKD. Each EPO patient was matched by Hb and GFR to one control patient. The time from when matched patients had the same GFR value to dialysis was compared. The economic impact of EPO on delaying dialysis was monetized using standardized health plan payments, and adjusted to 2005 United States dollars. Sixty-eight patients (34 EPO and 34 matched controls) formed the study population. The average time to dialysis was 156 days longer for the EPO group compared to the matched control group (p = 0.003). Analysis by CKD severity revealed that EPO therapy in less severe CKD patients offered a greater delay in time to dialysis (Stage 4: 213 days difference, p = 0.003; Stage 5: 104 days difference, p = 0.160). EPO treatment resulted in cost savings of $43,374-$59,222 per patient compared to non-EPO matched controls. This retrospective matched cohort study suggests that EPO therapy has a beneficial impact on delaying progression to dialysis in elderly CKD patients, especially in those with less severe CKD.

  2. Daclatasvir vs telaprevir plus peginterferon alfa/ribavirin for hepatitis C virus genotype 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Ira; Zeuzem, Stefan; Flisiak, Robert; Knysz, Brygida; Lueth, Stefan; Zarebska-Michaluk, Dorota; Janczewska, Ewa; Ferenci, Peter; Diago, Moises; Zignego, Anna Linda; Safadi, Rifaat; Baruch, Yaacov; Abdurakhmanov, Dzhamal; Shafran, Stephen; Thabut, Dominique; Bruck, Rafael; Gadano, Adrian; Thompson, Alexander James; Kopit, Justin; McPhee, Fiona; Michener, Tracy; Hughes, Eric A; Yin, Philip D; Noviello, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate daclatasvir vs telaprevir, each combined with peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin (pegIFN/RBV), in treatment-naive hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (GT) 1-infected patients. METHODS: In this phase 3, randomized, open-label, noninferiority study, 602 patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to daclatasvir vs telaprevir, stratified by IL28B rs12979860 host genotype (CC vs non-CC), cirrhosis status (compensated cirrhosis vs no cirrhosis), and HCV GT1 subtype (GT1a vs GT1b). Patients were selected by study inclusion criteria from a total of 793 enrolled patients. Patients received daclatasvir 60 mg once daily or telaprevir 750 mg 3 times daily plus pegIFN/RBV. Daclatasvir recipients received 24 wk of daclatasvir plus pegIFN/RBV; those without an extended rapid virologic response (eRVR; undetectable HCV-RNA at weeks 4 and 12) received an additional 24 wk of pegIFN/RBV. Telaprevir-treated patients received 12 wk of telaprevir plus pegIFN/RBV followed by 12 (with eRVR) or 36 (no eRVR) wk of pegIFN/RBV. The primary objective was to compare for noninferiority of sustained virologic response rates at posttreatment week 12 (SVR12) in GT1b-infected patients. Key secondary objectives were to demonstrate that the rates of anemia (hemoglobin < 10 g/dL) and rash-related events, through week 12, were lower with daclatasvir + pegIFN/RBV than with telaprevir + pegIFN/RBV among GT1b-infected patients. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing of the NS5A region for all patients at baseline, and for patients with virologic failure or relapse and HCV-RNA ≥ 1000 IU/mL, to investigate any link between NS5A polymorphisms associated with daclatasvir resistance and virologic outcome. RESULTS: Patient demographics and disease characteristics were generally balanced across treatment arms; however, there was a higher proportion of black/African Americans in the daclatasvir groups (6.0% and 8.2% in the GT1b and GT1a groups, respectively) than in the

  3. Phase 2, single-arm trial to evaluate the effectiveness of darbepoetin alfa for correcting anaemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilove, Janice; Paquette, Ronald; Lyons, Roger M; Mushtaq, Chaudhry; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Tomita, Dianne; Dreiling, Lyndah

    2008-01-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) often develop anaemia resulting in frequent transfusions and fatigue. Darbepoetin alfa is an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) approved for treating chemotherapy-induced anaemia. This single-arm, phase 2 study examined the efficacy of darbepoetin alfa 500 μg every 3 weeks (Q3W) for treating anaemia in low-risk MDS patients (after 6 weeks, poor responders received darbepoetin alfa 500 μg every 2 weeks). The primary end-point was the incidence of erythroid responses (International Working Group criteria) after 13 weeks of therapy. Secondary end-points included the incidence of erythroid responses at weeks 28 and 55, [or weeks 27 and 53 for dose escalations to every two weeks (Q2W)], and safety parameters. Analyses were stratified by the patient's previous ESA therapy status [ESA-naïve (n = 144) vs. prior ESA-treated (n = 62)]. After 13 weeks of therapy, 49% of ESA-naïve patients and 26% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved a major erythroid response. After 53/55 weeks, 59% of ESA-naïve patients and 34% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved a major erythroid response; 82% of ESA-naïve patients and 55% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved target haemoglobin of 110 g/l. Thromboembolic or related adverse events occurred in 2% of patients; no pulmonary embolisms were reported. In conclusion, darbepoetin alfa, 500 μg Q3W appeared well tolerated and increased haemoglobin levels in low-risk MDS patients. PMID:18540943

  4. A Saudi Gastroenterology Association Position Statement on the Use of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alfa Antagonists for the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Mahmoud H.; Al-Harbi, Othman; Feagan, Brian G.; Almadi, Majid A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this position statement from the Saudi Gastroenterology Association is to guide gastroenterologists on the use of tumor necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-α) antagonists for the treatment of the idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. In this article, we summarize the relevant literature regarding the safety and efficacy of TNF-α antagonists, highlight relevant safety concerns specific to the environment in Saudi Arabia, and provide specific recommendations for the use of these agents. PMID:26228361

  5. Influence of wool and thermo-binder fibers relative fractions on the adhesion of non-woven Alfa fibers reinforced unsaturated polyester hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Omri, Med; Triki, A.; Ben Hassen, Med; Arous, M.; Bulou, A.

    2016-10-01

    Alfa/wool/thermo-binder fibers hybrid composites were investigated in order to analyze adhesion state. Bearing in mind the chemical structure of wool and thermo-binder fibers, this study revealed a good compatibility between the reinforcement and the matrix. Dielectric measurements revealed the presence of two dielectric relaxations in the composite. The first relaxation was attributed to the α mode relaxation and the second one was associated with the conductivity noted for high temperature. This study allowed the analysis of the interfacial polarization effect using the Havrilliak-Negami model in the electric modulus formalism. The lowness of this relaxation intensity revealed a good adhesion of the fibers in the matrix. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) showed a slow decrease of the Tg glass transition temperature compared to the matrix, which could be explained by the existence of interactions between the fibers and the matrix. Vibrational analysis, based on FTIR measurements, showed a less hydrophilic character of Alfa fibers owing to a basic dissociation that occurs between the wool fibers and the water molecules associated with Alfa fibers. Furthermore, adhesion mechanism in the composite material was established by covalent and hydrogen bonds. Tensile testing performed on this composite confirmed that such adhesion was improved by increasing the thermo-binder fibers relative fraction.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Danoprevir-Ritonavir plus Peginterferon Alfa-2a–Ribavirin in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Prior Null Responders

    PubMed Central

    Rouzier, Régine; Wiercinska-Drapalo, Alicja; Larrey, Dominique G.; Morcos, Peter N.; Brennan, Barbara J.; Le Pogam, Sophie; Nájera, Isabel; Petric, Rosemary; Tran, Jonathan Q.; Kulkarni, Rohit; Zhang, Ying; Smith, Patrick; Yetzer, Ellen S.; Shulman, Nancy S.

    2014-01-01

    Danoprevir (DNV) is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor that achieves high sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in combination with peginterferon alfa-2a–ribavirin in treatment-naive HCV genotype 1 (G1)-infected patients. This study explored the efficacy and safety of ritonavir-boosted DNV (DNVr) plus peginterferon alfa-2a–ribavirin in G1-infected prior peginterferon-ribavirin null responders. Null responders (<2-log10 reduction in HCV RNA level at week 12) were given an open-label combination of 100 mg of ritonavir and 100 mg of DNV (100/100 mg DNVr) every 12 h (q12h) plus peginterferon alfa-2a–ribavirin for 12 weeks. All patients achieving an early virologic response (EVR; ≥2-log10 decrease in HCV RNA by week 12) continued treatment with peginterferon alfa-2a–ribavirin; those without an EVR discontinued all study drugs. Twenty-four prior null responders were enrolled; 16 patients (67%) were infected with HCV G1b, and 8 (33%) were infected with G1a. Ninety-six percent of patients had an IL28B non-CC genotype. A sustained virologic response at 24 weeks posttreatment (SVR24) was achieved in 67% of patients, with a higher rate in G1b-infected (88%) than G1a-infected (25%) patients. Resistance-related breakthrough occurred in 4/8 G1a and 1/16 G1b patients through the DNV resistance-associated variant (RAV) NS3 R155K. NS3 R155K was also detected in 2/2 G1a patients who relapsed. Treatment was well tolerated. Two patients withdrew prematurely from study medications due to adverse events. Two serious adverse events were reported; both occurred after completion of DNVr therapy and were considered unrelated to treatment. No grade 3 or 4 alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevations were observed. DNVr plus peginterferon alfa-2a–ribavirin demonstrated high SVR24 rates in HCV G1b-infected prior null responders and was well tolerated. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01185860.) PMID:24295986

  7. Biological modifiers (etretinate (changed from etetrinate) and alfa 2a) in the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Guzmán, R; García, E L; Díaz-Maqueo, J C

    1996-02-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of biological modifiers in combination etetrinate, 0.8 mg/kg/day, po and interferon alfa 2a 9.0 MU, three times at week) in the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTLC) we began a clinical study on 12 heavily treated patients. After 1 year on treatment 10/12 patients (83%) achieved complete response. Two patients were considered failures with disease progression. After a median follow-up of 3 years, seven patients (56%) remained in complete remission. Toxicity was mild. All patients received 93% of the planned dose of etetrinate and interferon. We feel that biological modifiers, as etetrinate and interferons, are agents with limited hematological toxicity even in higher doses. The combination of two agents, with different mechanisms of action, could improve the outcome in patients with refractory CTCL. Controlled trials are necessary to define the roles of this type of therapy as first line of treatment. PMID:10851517

  8. Efficacy and safety of vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), 15 and 20 mg/day: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, duloxetine-referenced study in the acute treatment of adult patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Loft, Henrik; Olsen, Christina Kurre

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy, tolerability and safety of vortioxetine versus placebo in adults with recurrent major depressive disorder. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study included 608 patients [Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score≥26 and Clinical Global Impression – Severity score≥4]. Patients were randomly assigned (1 : 1 : 1 : 1) to vortioxetine 15 mg/day, vortioxetine 20 mg/day, duloxetine 60 mg/day or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline in MADRS total score at week 8 (mixed model for repeated measurements). Key secondary endpoints were: MADRS responders; Clinical Global Impression – Improvement scale score; MADRS total score in patients with baseline Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale ≥20; remission (MADRS≤10); and Sheehan Disability Scale total score at week 8. On the primary efficacy endpoint, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo, with a mean difference to placebo (n=158) of −5.5 (vortioxetine 15 mg, P<0.0001, n=149) and −7.1 MADRS points (vortioxetine 20 mg, P<0.0001, n=151). Duloxetine (n=146) separated from placebo, thus validating the study. In all key secondary analyses, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo. Vortioxetine treatment was well tolerated; common adverse events (incidence≥5%) were nausea, headache, diarrhea, dry mouth and dizziness. No clinically relevant changes were seen in clinical safety laboratory values, weight, ECG or vital signs parameters. Vortioxetine was efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24257717

  9. Co-treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and entecavir for hepatitis D: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaigham; Memon, Mohammad Sadik; Umer, Muhammad Amir; Abbas, Minaam; Shazi, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of pegylated interferon alfa (PEG-IFNα) therapy with and without entecavir in patients with chronic hepatitis D. METHODS: Forty hepatitis D virus (HDV) RNA positive patients were randomized to receive either PEG-IFNα-2a 180 μg weekly in combination with entecavir 0.5 mg daily (n = 21) or PEG-IFNα alone (n =19). Patients who failed to show 2 log reduction in HDV RNA level at 24 wk of treatment, or had detectable HDV RNA at 48 wk of therapy were considered as treatment failure. Treatment was continued for 72 wk in the rest of the patients. All the patients were followed for 24 wk post treatment. Intention to treat analysis was performed. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 26.7 ± 6.8 years, 31 were male. Two log reduction in HDV RNA levels at 24 wk of therapy was achieved in 9 (43%) patients receiving combination therapy and 12 (63%) patients receiving PEG-IFNα alone (P = 0.199). Decline in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels was insignificant. At the end of treatment, HDV RNA was negative in 8 patients (38%) receiving combination therapy and 10 patients (53%) receiving PEG-IFNα-2a alone. Virological response persisted in 7 (33%) and 8 (42%) patients, respectively at the end of the 24 wk follow-up period. One responder patient in the combination arm lost HBsAg and became hepatitis B surface antibody positive. Six out of 14 baseline hepatitis B e antigen reactive patients seroconverted and four of these seroconverted patients had persistent HDV RNA clearance. CONCLUSION: Administration of PEG-IFNα-2a with or without entecavir, resulted in persistent HDV RNA clearance in 37% of patients. The addition of entecavir did not improve the overall response. PMID:27190579

  10. Interferon Stimulated Gene Expression in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients Treated with Nitazoxanide/Peginterferon-Alfa-2a and Ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Tess; Lee, Yu-Jin; Osinusi, Anu; Amorosa, Valerianna K; Wang, Crystal; Kang, Minhee; Matining, Roy; Zhang, Xiao; Dou, Diana; Umbleja, Triin; Kottilil, Shyam; Peters, Marion G

    2016-07-01

    A combination of nitazoxanide (NTZ), peginterferon (PegIFN), and ribavirin (RBV) may result in higher sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in hepatitis C virus (HCV) monoinfected patients. This study evaluated the effect of NTZ on interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in vitro and in vivo among HIV/HCV genotype-1 (GT-1) treatment-naive patients. The ability of NTZ to enhance host response to interferon (IFN) signaling using the HCV cell culture system was initially evaluated. Second, ISG expression in 53 patients with treatment outcomes [21 SVR and 32 nonresponders (NR)] in the ACTG A5269 trial, a phase-II study (4-week lead in of NTZ 500 mg daily followed by 48 weeks of NTZ, PegIFN, and weight-based RBV), was assessed. The relative expression of 48 ISGs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured at baseline, week 4, and week 8 of treatment in a blinded manner. In vitro NTZ produced a direct and additive antiviral effect with IFN-alfa, with pretreatment of NTZ resulting in maximal HCV suppression. NTZ augmented IFN-mediated ISG induction in PBMCs from relapsers and SVRs (p < 0.05), but not NR. In ACTG A5269, baseline expression of most ISGs was similar between NR and SVR. NTZ minimally induced 17 genes in NR and 13 genes in SVR after 4 weeks of therapy. However, after initiation of PegIFN and RBV, ISG induction was predominantly observed in the SVR group and not NR group. NTZ treatment facilitates IFN-induced suppression of HCV replication. Inability to achieve SVR with IFN-based therapy in this clinical trial is associated with diminished ISG response to therapy that is refractory to NTZ. PMID:26974581

  11. Therapeutic and routine prophylactic properties of rFactor VIII Fc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) in hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Pratima; Fosbury, Emma; Riddell, Anne; Mathias, Mary

    2016-01-01

    rFVIIIFc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) is an extended half-life (EHL) factor VIII licensed for use in patients with hemophilia A for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding and surgical episodes. Pharmacokinetic studies in adults have shown a mean 1.5-fold increase in half-life compared to full-length factor VIII. When compared to adults, the half-life is decreased by 8% in adolescents between 12 and 17 years, by 18% in children 6 to <12 years, and by 33% in children between the ages of 2 and <6 years. There is a considerable interindividual variation in the prolongation of the half-life particularly in children and across the age groups, the range extending from no increase to a 2.5-fold increase. In addition to age, von willebrand factor (VWF) antigen level has demonstrated a significant impact on rFVIIIFc half-life, with higher VWF levels associated with greater prolongation of half-life. The pivotal and pediatric clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of rFVIIIFc for use in regular prophylaxis and in management of bleeds and surgery. In these studies, just under half the participants showed a zero annualized bleed rate (ABR), and the median ABR (1.6 in the pivotal study for the individualized prophylaxis arm) showed a further decrease in the extension study. On average, the patients required fewer infusions (reduced by at least a third), and the mean weekly consumption seems to be in keeping with standard recombinant factor VIII. EHL rFVIIIFc has made decreased infusion frequency a possibility. However, the interindividual variability in dose and infusion frequency highlights the need for a personalized approach based on individual patient’s half-life and/or response to treatment.

  12. Hepatitis B surface antigen clearance in inactive hepatitis B surface antigen carriers treated with peginterferon alfa-2a

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Hui; Xie, Yao; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Yao; Shen, Ge; Wu, Shu-Ling; Chang, Min; Mu, Cai-Qin; Hu, Lei-Ping; Hua, Wen-Hao; Song, Shu-Jing; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Cheng, Jun; Xu, Dao-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association between interferon (IFN) therapy and loss of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in inactive HBsAg carriers. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study in inactive HBsAg carriers, who were treatment-naive, with a serum HBsAg level < 100 IU/mL and an undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level (< 100 IU/mL). All the 20 treated patients received subcutaneous PEG-IFN alfa-2a 180 μg/wk for 72 wk and were then followed for 24 wk. There were 40 untreated controls matched with 96 wk of observation. Serum HBsAg, HBV DNA, and alanine aminotransferases were monitored every 3 mo in the treatment group and every 3-6 mo in the control group. RESULTS: Thirteen (65.0%) of 20 treated patients achieved HBsAg loss, 12 of whom achieved HBsAg seroconversion. Mean HBsAg level in treated patients decreased to 6.69 ± 13.04 IU/mL after 24 wk of treatment from a baseline level of 26.22 ± 33.00 IU/mL. Serum HBV DNA level remained undetectable (< 100 IU/mL) in all treated patients during the study. HBsAg level of the control group decreased from 25.72 ± 25.58 IU/mL at baseline to 17.11 ± 21.62 IU/mL at week 96 (P = 0.108). In the control group, no patient experienced HBsAg loss/seroconversion, and two (5.0%) developed HBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: IFN treatment results in HBsAg loss and seroconversion in a considerable proportion of inactive HBsAg carriers with low HBsAg concentrations. PMID:27239256

  13. An Open Label Comparison of Calfactant and Poractant Alfa Administration Traits and Impact on Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Resources

    PubMed Central

    Gerdes, Jeffrey S.; Seiberlich, William; Sivieri, Emidio M.; Marsh, Wallace; Varner, Dwight L.; Turck, Charles J; York, John M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare calfactant (CA) and poractant alfa (PA) administration traits, short-term clinical responses, and resource use in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) setting. METHODS An open label series of 277 (213 PA and 64 CA) infants was evaluated for 445 administrations. Registered respiratory therapists collected patient, surfactant administration, and postadministration clinical data. Economic analysis involved labor costs of surfactant administration and usage, wastage, and product average wholesale price. Analysis utilized the Mann-Whitney rank sum test for differences in administration time and either the chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. RESULTS PA had a statistically lower bedside administration time than CA (3.8 minutes vs. 5.3 minutes; P = .006) and a higher percentage of doses administered in less than five minutes (58.9% vs. 4.3%; P < .001). Doses administered per patient were similar (1.67 vs. 1.72). PA and CA were similar in time to recovery (81.4% vs. 74.3%), percent desaturation (24.8% vs. 26.7%), and bradycardia (3.8% vs. 8.5%). Reflux was significantly higher (13.2% vs. 3.5%; P < .001) with CA. Economic analyses found total administration costs per dose were $2.21 for PA and $3.08 for CA. Mean wastage costs were $141.21 for PA and $337.34 for CA (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS PA appeared to utilize fewer neonatal intensive care unit resources than CA due to reduced administration time and less wastage of drug product. Future studies should more closely evaluate time, resource, wastage, and post-administrative clinical effects to fully assess the impact of surfactant products in this setting. PMID:23118647

  14. Therapeutic and routine prophylactic properties of rFactor VIII Fc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) in hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Pratima; Fosbury, Emma; Riddell, Anne; Mathias, Mary

    2016-01-01

    rFVIIIFc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) is an extended half-life (EHL) factor VIII licensed for use in patients with hemophilia A for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding and surgical episodes. Pharmacokinetic studies in adults have shown a mean 1.5-fold increase in half-life compared to full-length factor VIII. When compared to adults, the half-life is decreased by 8% in adolescents between 12 and 17 years, by 18% in children 6 to <12 years, and by 33% in children between the ages of 2 and <6 years. There is a considerable interindividual variation in the prolongation of the half-life particularly in children and across the age groups, the range extending from no increase to a 2.5-fold increase. In addition to age, von willebrand factor (VWF) antigen level has demonstrated a significant impact on rFVIIIFc half-life, with higher VWF levels associated with greater prolongation of half-life. The pivotal and pediatric clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of rFVIIIFc for use in regular prophylaxis and in management of bleeds and surgery. In these studies, just under half the participants showed a zero annualized bleed rate (ABR), and the median ABR (1.6 in the pivotal study for the individualized prophylaxis arm) showed a further decrease in the extension study. On average, the patients required fewer infusions (reduced by at least a third), and the mean weekly consumption seems to be in keeping with standard recombinant factor VIII. EHL rFVIIIFc has made decreased infusion frequency a possibility. However, the interindividual variability in dose and infusion frequency highlights the need for a personalized approach based on individual patient’s half-life and/or response to treatment. PMID:27695377

  15. Benefit of Treatment Individualization in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Receiving Peginterferon Alfa-2a and Ribavirin in a Large Noninterventional Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Wolf Peter; Mauss, Stefan; Lutz, Thomas; Schober, Andreas; Böker, Klaus; Moog, Gero; Baumgarten, Axel; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Alshuth, Ulrich; Hüppe, Dietrich; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P.; Schott, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Individualization of treatment with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C showed benefit in controlled trials and was implemented in treatment guidelines to increase response rates and to reduce side effects and costs. However, it is unknown whether individualization was adopted in routine daily practice and whether it translated into improved outcomes. Methods From a large noninterventional cohort study, clinical and virologic response data of 10,262 HCV patients who received peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011 were analyzed. To account for treatment individualization, a matched-pair analysis (2,997 matched pairs) was performed. Variation in treatment duration and dosing of ribavirin were analyzed as indicators for individualization. Results Sustained virological response (SVR) rates were similar between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011 (62.0% vs. 63.7%). Patients with comorbidities were more abundant in the later period, (44.3% vs. 57.1%). The subsequent matched-pair analysis demonstrated higher SVR rates in the 2008-2011 period (64.3%) than in the 2003-2007 period (61.2%, p=0.008). More patients received abbreviated or extended treatment regimens in the later than the earlier period as an indicator of treatment individualization. To the same end, ribavirin doses were higher in the later period (12.6 versus 11.6 mg/kg/day). Factors independently associated with SVR included HCV genotype, low baseline viral load, younger age, route of infection, absence of concomitant diseases, lower APRI score, normal gamma-GT, higher ribavirin doses, no substitution for drug abuse, treatment duration, and treatment in the 2008-2011 period. Conclusions Treatment individualization with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin was implemented in daily routine between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011, SVR rates improved in the same period. These findings may be most relevant in resource-limited settings. PMID:26230998

  16. Seven‐year safety and efficacy with velaglucerase alfa for treatment‐naïve adult patients with type 1 Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Ogg, Carol; Crombez, Eric; Cohn, Gabriel M.; Elstein, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Velaglucerase alfa is a human β‐glucocerebrosidase approved for Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) treatment. This report summarizes the 7‐year experience of the now‐completed phase I/II and extension studies of adult GD1 patients who received velaglucerase alfa. Ten patients who completed the 9‐month, phase I/II study entered the extension trial TKT025EXT, of which eight completed this study. Doses were reduced after a cumulative treatment period of 15 to 18 months. Although all patients experienced ≥1 adverse event, no patient withdrew due to a drug‐related adverse event or required premedication. No patient developed anti‐drug antibodies, compliance remained high (median 98%), and seven of eight eligible patients transitioned to home infusions under supervision by healthcare professionals. Statistically significant improvements were observed for efficacy parameters: mean percentage changes from baseline (95% confidence intervals) were 18% (12%, 24%) for hemoglobin concentration, 115% (66%, 164%) for platelet counts, and −42% (−53%, −31%) and −78% (−94%, −62%) for liver and spleen volumes, respectively. Improvements were also observed for secondary endpoints chitotriosidase and CCL18 levels and exploratory endpoints (bone mineral density [BMD], bone marrow burden [BMB] scores). Normalization to near‐normalization of individuals' hemoglobin concentrations, platelet counts, liver volumes, and BMB scores was observed, and there were marked improvements in spleen volumes, biomarkers, and BMD. TKT025EXT represents the longest, prospective clinical trial for GD1 treatment to date and suggests that, despite dose reduction within 18 months of initiating therapy, velaglucerase alfa was generally well tolerated and was associated with marked improvement, including near normalization and/or normalization of key GD1 disease parameters. Am. J. Hematol. 90:577–583, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology published by Wiley Periodicals

  17. HBcrAg Identifies Patients Failing to Achieve HBeAg Seroconversion Treated with Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hui; Yang, Rui-Feng; Li, Xiao-He; Jin, Qian; Wei, Lai

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of serum hepatitis B virus core-related antigens (HBcrAg) for predicting hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion in HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients treated with conventional interferon (IFN) alfa-2b or pegylated IFN. Methods: Fifty-eight patients were enrolled: 29 for the training group and 29 for the validating group. HBcrAg was measured at baseline, week 12, end of the treatment, and 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Sixteen patients in the training group were enrolled in the long-term follow-up (LTFU), during which time the dynamics of the HBcrAg was monitored. Results: The serum HBcrAg level gradually declined during treatment among the HBeAg seroconversion patients of the training group (from baseline, week 12, end of the treatment, 12-week follow-up to 24-week follow-up were 110,245 kU/ml, 3760 kU/ml, 7410 kU/ml, 715 kU/ml, 200 kU/ml, respectively). HBcrAg <19,565 kU/ml at week 24, HBcrAg <34,225 kU/ml at 12-week follow-up, and HBcrAg decrease ≥0.565 log10 kU/ml from the baseline to the end of treatment (EOT) had negative predictive values (NPVs) of 100% for HBeAg seroconversion at the end of follow-up, whereas the positive predictive values (PPVs) were 30.77%, 26.67%, and 25.00%, respectively. The patients with HBeAg seroconversion at the end of 24-week follow-up remained in seroconversion during the LTFU, during which time their serum HBcrAg levels steadily declined or even became undetectable, ranging from 0 to 2.1 kU/ml. Conclusions: Effective antiviral treatment can decrease HBcrAg levels in the serum. The NPVs of HBcrAg for predicting HBeAg seroconversion at 24-week follow-up was 100%, but the PPVs were not satisfactory (all <31%). The serum HBcrAg levels of the patients with HBeAg seroconversion at the end of the 24-week follow-up steadily declined or even became undetectable during the LTFU. PMID:27625094

  18. The H I mass function and velocity width function of void galaxies in the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal M.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Hoyle, Fiona; Pan, Danny C.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    We measure the H I mass function (HIMF) and velocity width function (WF) across environments over a range of masses, 7.2ALFA (ALFALFA) Survey, located in the region of sky where ALFALFA and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data Release 7) North overlap. We divide our galaxy sample into those that reside in large-scale voids (void galaxies) and those that live in denser regions (wall galaxies). We find the void HIMF to be well fitted by a Schechter function with normalization Φ* = (1.37 ± 0.1) × 10-2y h3 Mpc-3, characteristic mass log(M_{H {I}^*/M_{⊙}) + 2 log h70 = 9.86 ± 0.02, and low-mass-end slope α = -1.29 ± 0.02. Similarly, for wall galaxies, we find best-fitting parameters Φ* = (1.82 ± 0.03) × 10-2 h3 Mpc-3, log(M_{H I}^*/M_{⊙}) + 2 log h70 = 10.00 ± 0.01, and α = -1.35 ± 0.01. We conclude that void galaxies typically have slightly lower H I masses than their non-void counterparts, which is in agreement with the dark matter (DM) halo mass function shift in voids assuming a simple relationship between DM mass and H I mass. We also find that the low-mass slope of the void HIMF is similar to that of the wall HIMF suggesting that there is either no excess of low-mass galaxies in voids or there is an abundance of intermediate H I mass galaxies. We fit a modified Schechter function to the ALFALFA void WF and determine its best-fitting parameters to be Φ* = 0.21 ± 0.1 h3 Mpc-3, log (W*) = 2.13 ± 0.3, α = 0.52 ± 0.5, and high-width slope β = 1.3 ± 0.4. For wall galaxies, the WF parameters are Φ* = 0.022 ± 0.009 h3 Mpc-3, log (W*) = 2.62 ± 0.5, α = -0.64 ± 0.2, and β = 3.58 ± 1.5. Because of large uncertainties on the void and wall WFs, we cannot conclude whether the WF is dependent on the environment.

  19. A Phase 3, multicenter, open-label, switchover trial to assess the safety and efficacy of taliglucerase alfa, a plant cell-expressed recombinant human glucocerebrosidase, in adult and pediatric patients with Gaucher disease previously treated with imiglucerase.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Petakov, Milan; Giraldo, Pilar; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Szer, Jeffrey; Deegan, Patrick B; Amato, Dominick J; Mengel, Eugen; Tan, Ee Shien; Chertkoff, Raul; Brill-Almon, Einat; Zimran, Ari

    2014-12-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is a β-glucosidase enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) approved in the US and other countries for the treatment of Gaucher disease (GD) in adults and is approved in pediatric and adult patients in Australia and Canada. It is the first approved plant cell-expressed recombinant human protein. A Phase 3, multicenter, open-label, 9-month study assessed safety and efficacy of switching to taliglucerase alfa in adult and pediatric patients with GD treated with imiglucerase for at least the previous 2years. Patients with stable disease were offered taliglucerase alfa treatment using the same dose (9-60U/kg body weight) and regimen of administration (every 2weeks) as imiglucerase. This report summarizes results from 26 adult and 5 pediatric patients who participated in the trial. Disease parameters (spleen and liver volumes, hemoglobin concentration, platelet count, and biomarker levels) remained stable through 9months of treatment in adults and children following the switch from imiglucerase. All treatment-related adverse events were mild or moderate in severity and transient in nature. Exploratory parameters of linear growth and development showed positive outcomes in pediatric patients. These findings provide evidence of the efficacy and safety profile of taliglucerase alfa as an ERT for GD in patients previously treated with imiglucerase. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as # NCT00712348. PMID:24950666

  20. A Phase 3, multicenter, open-label, switchover trial to assess the safety and efficacy of taliglucerase alfa, a plant cell-expressed recombinant human glucocerebrosidase, in adult and pediatric patients with Gaucher disease previously treated with imiglucerase.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Petakov, Milan; Giraldo, Pilar; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Szer, Jeffrey; Deegan, Patrick B; Amato, Dominick J; Mengel, Eugen; Tan, Ee Shien; Chertkoff, Raul; Brill-Almon, Einat; Zimran, Ari

    2014-12-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is a β-glucosidase enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) approved in the US and other countries for the treatment of Gaucher disease (GD) in adults and is approved in pediatric and adult patients in Australia and Canada. It is the first approved plant cell-expressed recombinant human protein. A Phase 3, multicenter, open-label, 9-month study assessed safety and efficacy of switching to taliglucerase alfa in adult and pediatric patients with GD treated with imiglucerase for at least the previous 2years. Patients with stable disease were offered taliglucerase alfa treatment using the same dose (9-60U/kg body weight) and regimen of administration (every 2weeks) as imiglucerase. This report summarizes results from 26 adult and 5 pediatric patients who participated in the trial. Disease parameters (spleen and liver volumes, hemoglobin concentration, platelet count, and biomarker levels) remained stable through 9months of treatment in adults and children following the switch from imiglucerase. All treatment-related adverse events were mild or moderate in severity and transient in nature. Exploratory parameters of linear growth and development showed positive outcomes in pediatric patients. These findings provide evidence of the efficacy and safety profile of taliglucerase alfa as an ERT for GD in patients previously treated with imiglucerase. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as # NCT00712348.

  1. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to assess the efficacy and safety of three dosing schedules of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D A; Deegan, P B; Milligan, A; Wright, N; Butler, L H; Jacobs, A; Mehta, A B

    2013-07-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that the currently approved dosing interval of agalsidase alfa (0.2 mg/kg/2 weeks) for Fabry disease treatment is too long. This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study investigated three altered dosing intervals. 18 Fabry patients received three agalsidase alfa dosing schedules, each for four weeks (A: 0.2 mg/kg∗2 weeks, B: 0.1 mg/kg/week, C: 0.2 mg/kg/week). Health state, pain levels, sweat volume and latency and plasma and urinary globotriaosylceramide levels were recorded throughout the study. No significant differences were found among the schedules for the primary efficacy outcome of self-assessed health state, or for pain scores. A trend toward increased sweat volume on QSART testing, and reduced urine globotriaosylceramide concentration were seen with treatment schedule C. Agalsidase alfa was safe and well tolerated with all schedules. In conclusion, the primary analyses did not find weekly infusions of agalsidase alfa to be statistically better than the approved dosing schedule however the data indicates that further studies with more patients over a longer period are required to more accurately determine the optimum dose and schedule. PMID:23702393

  2. A review of the suitability of duloxetine and venlafaxine for use in patients with depression in primary care with a focus on cardiovascular safety, suicide and mortality due to antidepressant overdose

    PubMed Central

    Lenox-Smith, Alan; Bradley, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders are among the most common disorders treated by general practitioners (GPs) in the UK. Since both disorders are associated with a significantly increased risk of suicide, including with antidepressant overdose, the safety of antidepressants in overdose is of paramount importance. Numerous updates relating to antidepressant safety have been issued by regulators in the UK which may have eroded GP confidence in antidepressants. Venlafaxine, a serotonin nor adrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) had primary care prescribing restrictions placed on it in 2004 due to concerns about cardiotoxicity and mortality in overdose. Although a review of the evidence led to a reversal of the majority of restrictions in 2006, evidence suggests GPs may still be cautious in their prescribing of venlafaxine and possibly other SNRI antidepressants for patients with depression and anxiety disorders. This paper reviews the evidence pertaining to the safety of SNRI antidepressants from a perspective of cardiovascular safety and overdose. The currently available evidence suggests a marginally higher toxicity of venlafaxine in overdose compared with another SNRI duloxetine and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), although this may be related to differential patterns of prescribing in high-risk patients. Based on this review SNRIs have a positive risk benefit profile in the treatment of depression and generalized anxiety disorder in primary care, especially as second-line agents to SSRIs. PMID:24167687

  3. [Epoetin alfa in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Trodella, L; Balducci, M; Gambacorta, M A; Mantini, G

    1998-01-01

    Sixty per cent of oncologic patients need radiation therapy for cure or palliation. In fact, in most neoplastic diseases, a better local control positively impacts on disease-free survival and overall survival. The efficacy of radiotherapy depends on several factors: while some are tumor-related, others are host-related. Radiobiological phenomena are also important: ionizing radiation is responsible for cell damage (double rupture of DNA chains), mostly an indirect mechanism with the formation of free radicals. Their toxic action is enhanced by the oxygen partial pressure at the cellular level. A number of studies have confirmed that good tissue oxygenation is a function of a high hemoglobin level in the peripheral blood (Hb > or = 13 g/dL). Unfortunately, these values are rarely present in oncologic patients due to the disease-related toxicosis as well as to the therapy induced hematologic toxicity. The treatment of anemia is free of risk for the recent developments in technology which with gene cloning and the technique of recombinant DNA has allowed the production of human recombinant erythropoietin. Erythropoietin is produced by the interstitial cells of renal tubules in response to hypoxia. It prevents apoptosis and promotes erythroid proliferation and differentiation with consequent reticulocyte release and hemoglobin synthesis. It is not completely understood whether the efficacy of radiotherapy depends on hemoglobin values present at the start of irradiation (often less than 12-13 g/dL) or on the higher ones observed during and at the end of radiotherapy. Therefore, preventive systemic erythropoietin therapy in non anemic patients in terms of costs/benefits is at present non sustainable. To the contrary, in patients undergoing radiotherapy to extended fields or aggressive multimodal treatments, for the higher risk of anemia, the early use of this treatment can be hypothesized in case of initial anemia to improve therapy compliance and prevent negative conditioning of results. Keeping in mind that grade 1 minimum toxicity for red cells, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) is equal to 11 gHb/dL we think that this value can be considered as cutoff to start erythropoietin therapy. PMID:10083890

  4. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... vials. The multidose vials contain benzyl alcohol, a preservative that may be harmful to babies, so epoetin ... your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting ...

  5. A first-year dornase alfa treatment impact on clinical parameters of patients with cystic fibrosis: the Brazilian cystic fibrosis multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Tatiana; Silva, Fernando Antônio A. e; Santana, Maria Angélica; Adde, Fabíola Villac; Mendes, Rita Heloisa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical impact of the first year treatment with dornase alfa, according to age groups, in a cohort of Brazilian Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. METHODS: The data on 152 eligible patients, from 16 CF reference centers, that answered the medical questionnaires and performed laboratory tests at baseline (T0), and at six (T2) and 12 (T4) months after dornase alfa initiation, were analyzed. Three age groups were assessed: six to 11, 12 to 13, and >14 years. Pulmonary tests, airway microbiology, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, emergency and routine treatments were evaluated. Student's t-test, chi-square test and analysis of variance were used when appropriated. RESULTS: Routine treatments were based on respiratory physical therapy, regular exercises, pancreatic enzymes, vitamins, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and antibiotics. In the six months prior the study (T0 phase), hospitalizations for pulmonary exacerbations occurred in 38.0, 10.0 and 61.4% in the three age groups, respectively. After one year of intervention, there was a significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits in the six to 11 years group. There were no significant changes in forced expiratory volume in one second (VEF1), in forced vital capacity (FVC), in oxygen saturation (SpO2), and in Tiffenau index for all age groups. A significant improvement in Shwachman-Kulczychi score was observed in the older group. In the last six months of therapy, chronic or intermittent colonization by P. aeruginosa was detected in 75.0, 71.4 and 62.5% of the studied groups, respectively, while S. aureus colonization was identified in 68.6, 66.6 and 41.9% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: The treatment with dornase alfa promoted the maintenance of pulmonary function parameters and was associated with a significant reduction of emergency room visits due to pulmonary exacerbations in the six to 11 years age group, with better clinical scores in the >14 age group, one year after the

  6. Rare Form of Erdheim-Chester Disease Presenting with Isolated Central Skeletal Lesions Treated with a Combination of Alfa-Interferon and Zoledronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bulycheva, E. N.; Baykov, V. V.; Zaraĭskiĭ, M. I.; Salogub, G. N.

    2015-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) represents a clonal non-Langerhans histiocytosis, which manifests under an extensive variety of clinical symptoms. This creates a challenge for the physician, who is required to recognize and diagnose the disease in the early stages. Despite this considerable challenge, in the last decade there has been a dramatic increase in ECD diagnoses, in most part due to an increasing awareness of this rare disorder. Involvement of the axial skeleton is exclusively uncommon with no official recommendations for the treatment of the bone lesions. Here, we present a case report of a young male patient with isolated lesions of the spine, ribs, and pelvis, who was successfully treated with a combination therapy of alfa-interferon and zoledronic acid. PMID:25949835

  7. Vinblastine fails to improve response of renal cancer to interferon alfa-n1: high response rate in patients with pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, J A; Anderson, S A; Harris, J E; Rinehart, J J; Laszlo, J; Dexeus, F H; Einhorn, L H; Trump, D L; Benedetto, P W; Tuttle, R L

    1991-05-01

    One hundred sixty-five patients were randomized to receive either interferon alfa-n1 (Wellferon; Burroughs Wellcome Co, Research Triangle Park, NC) alone or with vinblastine. An initial six-cycle induction treatment consisted of interferon given at daily doses of 3, 5, 20, 20, and 20 x 10(6) U/m2 every 2 weeks. Vinblastine at a dose of 10 mg/m2 (later decreased to 5 mg/m2) was given on day 1 of alternate cycles. Toxicities were generally well tolerated. The overall response rate was 10% with no significant difference between treatment arms. Survival was also not significantly different for the arms. A small subset of patients (16) with metastases only to the lungs had a high complete response (CR) and partial response (PR) rate of 44%. Responses were durable, and overall survival of this group was much better than that of the other patients. PMID:2016626

  8. Multicenter, noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study to evaluate dosing of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone using the redesigned follitropin alfa pen in women undergoing ovulation induction

    PubMed Central

    Nawroth, Frank; Tandler-Schneider, Andreas; Bilger, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study evaluated doses of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) using the redesigned follitropin alfa pen in women who were anovulatory or oligomenorrheic and undergoing ovulation induction (OI) alone or OI with intrauterine insemination. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved monofollicular or bifollicular development (defined as one or two follicles ≥15 mm). Secondary endpoints included characteristics of ovulation stimulation treatment, such as mean total and mean daily r-hFSH doses. Data were analyzed for 3,193 patients from 30 German fertility centers. The proportion of patients with monofollicular or bifollicular development was 71.1% (n=2,270 of a total of 3,193 patients; intent-to-treat population). The mean±standard deviation total and daily doses of r-hFSH were 696.9±542.5 IU and 61.7±29.4 IU, respectively. The three doses prescribed most frequently were: 37.5 IU (n=703 from N=3,189; 22.0%), 50.0 IU (n=1,056 from N=3,189; 33.1%), and 75.0 IU (n=738 from N=3,189; 23.1%) on the first day of stimulation; and 37.5 IU (n=465 from N=3,189; 14.6%), 50.0 IU (n=922 from N=3,189; 28.9%), and 75.0 IU (n=895 from N=3,189; 28.1%) on the last day of stimulation. This noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study found that monofollicular or bifollicular development was achieved in 71% of patients studied and the small dose increment (12.5 IU) of the redesigned follitropin alfa pen allowed individualized treatment of women undergoing OI. PMID:25926755

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  10. Action of propranolol in the reaction of smooth musculature of tracheal rings induced with acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin (5-HT) and prostaglandin (PGF2-alfa) in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Islami, Hilmi; Bexheti, Sadi; Ahmetaj, Halil; Sukalo, Aziz; Manxhuka, Suzana; Nuraj, Bajram; Kamberi, Xhevat; Krasniqi, Shaip; Qorraj, Hasime; Kastrati, Bashkim; Disha, Mentor

    2009-05-01

    Actions of acetylcholine (ACh), histamines, serotonins (5-HT) and prostaglandins (PGF2-alfa) in concentrations of 10(-4), 10(-3), 10(-2) and 10(-1) mol/dm(3) were analyzed in vitro conditions in isolated specimens of tracheas of 24 pigs, 7 guinea pigs, and dead persons for different reasons (8), in the presence and without presence of propranolol. Whilst, research regarding actions of aerosolized histamines (10 mg, 1%, 2 min), in the presence and without the presence of aerosolized propranolol (20 mg, 2%, 2 min) was done in vivo in 6 healthy persons. Study results show that propranolol does not emphasize contraction of the airways smooth musculature as induced by ACh, histamine, 5-HT and PGF2-alfa in vitro conditions (p>0,1). Also, in vivo we found a non-significance of tracheal smooth musculature constriction (p>0,1).

  11. Low-dose fludarabine with or without darbepoetin alfa in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and comorbidity: primary results of the CLL9 trial of the German CLL Study Group.

    PubMed

    Goede, Valentin; Busch, Raymonde; Bahlo, Jasmin; Chataline, Viktoria; Kremers, Stephan; Müller, Lothar; Reschke, Daniel; Schlag, Rudolf; Schmidt, Burkhard; Vehling-Kaiser, Ursula; Wedding, Ulrich; Stilgenbauer, Stefan; Hallek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study was planned as a phase 3 trial to investigate low-dose fludarabine with or without darbepoetin alfa in older patients with previously untreated or treated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and comorbidity. Due to slow recruitment, the study was terminated prematurely after accrual of 97 patients who, on average, were 74 years old and had a cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS) total score of 5. We report toxicity and efficacy of the study treatment. Grade 3-5 neutropenia and infection were observed in 25% and 10% of patients, respectively. Response was seen in 73% (5% complete remissions). Median event-free and overall survival was 12.2 and 44.8 months, respectively. No differences in outcome were found for patients treated with versus without darbepoetin alfa. In subjects with progressive/recurrent CLL during or after study treatment, overall survival was similar for patients receiving chemotherapy versus chemoimmunotherapy as salvage treatment. PMID:26293380

  12. An open-label clinical trial of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in children with Fabry disease who are naïve to enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Longo, Nicola; McDonald, Marie; Shankar, Suma P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Chang, Peter; Shen, Yinghua; Pano, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a drug manufacturing process change, safety/efficacy of agalsidase alfa were evaluated in enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)-naïve children with Fabry disease. Methods In an open-label, multicenter, Phase II study (HGT-REP-084; Shire), 14 children aged ≥7 years received 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase alfa every other week for 55 weeks. Primary endpoints: safety, changes in autonomic function (2-hour Holter monitoring). Secondary endpoints: estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), midwall fractional shortening, pharmacodynamic parameters, and patient-reported quality-of-life. Results Among five boys (median 10.2 [range 6.7, 14.4] years) and nine girls (14.8 [10.1, 15.9] years), eight patients experienced infusion-related adverse events (vomiting, n=4; nausea, n=3; dyspnea, n=3; chest discomfort, n=2; chills, n=2; dizziness, n=2; headache, n=2). One of these had several hypersensitivity episodes. However, no patient discontinued for safety reasons and no serious adverse events occurred. One boy developed immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralizing antidrug antibodies. Overall, no deterioration in cardiac function was observed in seven patients with low/abnormal SDNN (standard deviation of all filtered RR intervals; <100 ms) and no left ventricular hypertrophy: mean (SD) baseline SDNN, 81.6 (20.9) ms; mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) change from baseline to week 55, 17.4 (2.9, 31.9) ms. Changes in SDNN correlated with changes in LVMI (r=−0.975). No change occurred in secondary efficacy endpoints: mean (95% CI) change from baseline at week 55 in LVMI, 0.16 (−3.3, 3.7) g/m2.7; midwall fractional shortening, −0.62% (−2.7%, 1.5%); estimated glomerular filtration rate, 0.15 (−11.4, 11.7) mL/min/1.73 m2; urine protein, −1.8 (−6.0, 2.4) mg/dL; urine microalbumin, 0.6 (−0.5, 1.7) mg/dL; plasma globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), −5.71 (−10.8, −0.6) nmol/mL; urinary Gb3, −1,403.3 (−3,714.0, 907.4) nmol/g creatinine

  13. Impact of Epoetin Alfa on LV Structure, Function, and Pressure-Volume Relations as Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance – The Heart Failure Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFPEF) Anemia Trial

    PubMed Central

    Green, Philip; Babu, Benson A.; Teruya, Sergio; Helmke, Stephen; Prince, Martin; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anemia, a common co-morbidity in older adults with heart failure and a preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is associated with worse outcomes. We quantified the effect of anemia treatment on left ventricular (LV) structure and function as measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Methods Prospective, randomized single blind clinical trial (NCT NCT00286182) comparing the safety and efficacy of epoetin alfa versus placebo for 24 weeks in which a sub-group (n=22) had cardiac MRI at baseline and after 3 and 6 months to evaluate changes in cardiac structure and function. Pressure volume (PV) indices were derived from MRI measures of ventricular volume coupled with sphygmomanometer-measured pressure and Doppler estimates of filling pressure. The end-systolic and end-diastolic PV relations and the area between them as a function of end-diastolic pressure, the isovolumic PV area (PVAiso), were calculated Results Subjects (75±10 years, 64% female) with HFPEF (EF=63±15%) with average hemoglobin of 10.3±1.1 gm/dl were treated with epoetin alfa using a dose adjusted algorithm that increased hemoglobin compared to placebo (p<0.0001). As compared to baseline, there were no significant changes in end diastolic (−7±8 vs. −3±8 ml, p=0.81) or end systolic (−0.4±2 vs. −0.7±5 ml, p= 0.96) volumes at 6 month follow-up between epoetin alfa compared with placebo. LV function as measured based on EF (−1.5±1.6% vs.−2.6±3.3%, p= 0.91) and pressure volume indices (PVa-iso-EDP at 30 mm Hg, −5071±4308 vs. −1662±4140 p=0.58) did not differ between epoetin alfa and placebo. Conclusion Administration of epoetin alfa to older adult patients with HFPEF resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin, without evident change in LV structure, function, or pressure volume relationships as measured quantitatively using CMR. PMID:23517485

  14. A comparison of interferon alfa-2a and podophyllin in the treatment of primary condylomata acuminata. The Condylomata International Collaborative Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--to compare the response to treatment and recurrence rate of condylomata accuminata using subcutaneous injection of interferon alfa 2a 1.5 million units three times weekly for four weeks, or podophyllin resin 25% applied to lesions twice weekly for up to six weeks. DESIGN--Randomised open study. SETTING--Multicentre European study in genitourinary medicine, dermatovenereology, and gynaecology departments. PATIENTS--87 males and 67 females with condylomata acuminata for less than six months and no history of previous treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Complete clearance of lesions and evidence of recurrence at three months and nine months after treatment commenced. RESULTS--A complete response was achieved at three months in 15 of 64 (23%) in the interferon treated group, and 31 of 69 (45%) in the podophyllin treated group (p = 0.003). At nine months 10 of 13 patients in the interferon group and 22 of 30 patients in the podophyllin group remained completely clear of lesions. PMID:1743712

  15. Quantification of EVI1 transcript levels in acute myeloid leukemia by RT-qPCR analysis: A study by the ALFA Group.

    PubMed

    Smol, Thomas; Nibourel, Olivier; Marceau-Renaut, Alice; Celli-Lebras, Karine; Berthon, Céline; Quesnel, Bruno; Boissel, Nicolas; Terré, Christine; Thomas, Xavier; Castaigne, Sylvie; Dombret, Hervé; Preudhomme, Claude; Renneville, Aline

    2015-12-01

    EVI1 overexpression confers poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Quantification of EVI1 expression has been mainly assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) based on relative quantification of EVI1-1D splice variant. In this study, we developed a RT-qPCR assay to perform quantification of EVI1 expression covering the different splice variants. A sequence localized in EVI1 exons 14 and 15 was cloned into plasmids that were used to establish RT-qPCR standard curves. Threshold values to define EVI1 overexpression were determined using 17 bone marrow (BM) and 31 peripheral blood (PB) control samples and were set at 1% in BM and 0.5% in PB. Samples from 64 AML patients overexpressing EVI1 included in the ALFA-0701 or -0702 trials were collected at diagnosis and during follow-up (n=152). Median EVI1 expression at AML diagnosis was 23.3% in BM and 3.6% in PB. EVI1 expression levels significantly decreased between diagnostic and post-induction samples, with an average variation from 21.6% to 3.56% in BM and from 4.0% to 0.22% in PB, but did not exceed 1 log10 reduction. Our study demonstrates that the magnitude of reduction in EVI1 expression levels between AML diagnosis and follow-up is not sufficient to allow sensitive detection of minimal residual disease.

  16. A new approach for ovarian stimulation in IVF using Corifollitropin Alfa in combination with GnRH analogues to trigger final oocyte maturation. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Meganck, G.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A pilot study of 10 patients undergoing IVF stimulation, using the new combination of Corifollitropin Alfa with highly purified hMG and GnRH antagonists has been performed, whereas final oocyte maturation was induced by GnRH analogues. The hormonal profiles were analyzed, as well as the clinical outcome. All patients were recruited between March 1st 2013 and June 30th 2013. They were all younger than 38 years, had a normal BMI (between 18,0 and 32,0) and did not have more than three previous IVF stimulations. The combination of long acting FSH with hphMG, and under protection of GnRH antagonists against spontaneous LH-surge, provided a normal hormonal profile for estradiol, progesterone, LH, and FSH. The average oocyte quality and embryo quality were excellent, which resulted in four pregnancies out of ten. We conclude that the described combination is a safe, efficient, and patient friendly alternative for the classical IVF stimulation. PMID:25374659

  17. A randomized controlled trial comparing darbepoetin alfa doses in red blood cell transfusion-dependent patients with low- or intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Ho; Harada, Hironori; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Shimazaki, Ryutaro; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Sawada, Kenichi; Mitani, Kinuko

    2015-10-01

    Darbepoetin alfa (DA) is a standard treatment for anemia in lower-risk MDS. However, to date there has been no comparative study to investigate the initial dosage. We, thus, conducted a randomized controlled trial to elucidate the optimal initial dosage of DA. International Prognostic Scoring System low or intermediate-1 risk MDS patients with hemoglobin levels ≤9.0 g/dL, serum erythropoietin levels ≤500 mIU/mL, and red blood cell transfusion dependency were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive DA either at 60, 120, or 240 μg/week for 16 weeks followed by continuous administration with dose adjustment up to 48 weeks. Of 17, 18, and 15 patients in the 60, 120, and 240 μg DA groups included in the efficacy analysis, 64.7, 44.4, and 66.7 %, respectively, achieved the primary endpoint (major or minor erythroid response), while 17.6, 16.7, and 33.3 % achieved major erythroid responses in the initial 16-week period. No clinically significant safety concerns were identified. DA reduced the transfusion requirements effectively and safely in transfusion-dependent, lower-risk MDS patients. Given the highest achievement rate of the major erythroid response in the 240 μg group and the absence of dose-dependent adverse events, 240 μg weekly is the optimal initial dosage. PMID:26323997

  18. Determination of conformational and spectroscopic features of ethyl trans-alfa-cyano-3-indole-acrylate compound: an experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Mehmet; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2013-03-01

    The optimized geometrical structure, vibrational and electronic transitions, chemical shifts and non-linear optical properties of ethyl trans-alfa-cyano-3-indole-acrylate (C(14)H(12)N(2)O(2)) compound were presented in this study. The ground state geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers were carried out by using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) as basis set. The vibrational spectra of title compound were recorded in solid state with FT-IR and FT-Raman in the range of 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-10 cm(-1), respectively. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The (1)H, (13)C and DEPT NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution, and gauge-invariant atomic orbitals (GIAO) method was used to predict the isotropic chemical shifts. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the compound were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm in various solvents of different polarity (acetone, benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroform, DMSO, ethanol, methanol and toluene). Solvent effects were calculated using TD-DFT and CIS method. To investigate the non-linear optical properties, the polarizability, anisotropy of polarizability and molecular first hyperpolarizability were computed. A detailed description of spectroscopic behaviors of compound was given based on the comparison of experimental measurements and theoretical computations. PMID:23274474

  19. HCV quasispecies evolution during treatment with interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin in two children coinfected with HCV and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Quesnel-Vallières, Mathieu; Lemay, Mireille; Lapointe, Normand; Martin, Steven R; Soudeyns, Hugo

    2008-10-01

    Two children who acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection by mother-to-child transmission were monitored during interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin treatment. In Patient C1, CD4(+) T cell counts were within normal range and HIV-1 viral load was undetectable. HCV viral load declined slightly following treatment initiation while novel variants rapidly emerged, indicative of quasispecies diversification. In Patient C2, CD4(+) T cell counts were low and HIV-1 replication was not fully controlled by antiretroviral therapy. HCV viral load rose during treatment and a striking conservation of the variant spectrum was observed. In both cases, there was no decline in quasispecies complexity following treatment initiation and sustained virological response was not achieved. These results suggest that reduction in quasispecies complexity, which is observed in adult responders following interferon treatment, may be mechanistically unrelated with evolution of the variant profile and/or selective pressure exerted on HCV. PMID:18707918

  20. Long-term follow-up in 51 patients with mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome treated by interferon-alfa.

    PubMed

    Jumbou, O; N'Guyen, J M; Tessier, M H; Legoux, B; Dréno, B

    1999-03-01

    Although interferon-alfa (IFN-alpha) has proved effective in treating epidermotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (ECTL), few studies have considered the follow-up of treated patients and whether complete remission was maintained. We studied 51 patients (one stage Ia, seven stage Ib, one stage IIa, 30 stage IIb, 11 stage III (Sézary syndrome) and one stage IV) who received low-dose IFN-alpha as monotherapy for ECTL (mean daily dose of IFN-alpha 2.7 x 106 units for 14.9 months), giving special consideration to the significance of My7 (CD13) antigen expression by epidermal basal cells in predicting the maintenance of complete remission. For a mean follow-up period of 43.4 months, the results showed 21 complete remissions, 13 partial remissions and 17 patients with stable or progressive disease. Twelve patients died during the follow-up (3-52 months). IFN-alpha led to an improved response in the early stages, with a greater number of complete remissions (P = 0.03) and partial remissions (P = 0.01). The mean time to complete remission was 4 months, regardless of clinical stage (P = 0.1). Of 21 patients in complete remission, 57% had a relapse within a mean period of 7.5 months. For patients maintained in complete remission, the mean period of response was 31 months. The length of complete remission was independent of clinical stage, and My7 antigen expression was not predictive of complete remission.

  1. Gaucher disease: transcriptome analyses using microarray or mRNA sequencing in a Gba1 mutant mouse model treated with velaglucerase alfa or imiglucerase.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Nupur; Xu, You-Hai; Oh, Sunghee; Sun, Ying; Jia, Li; Keddache, Mehdi; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease type 1, an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in GBA1 leading to defective glucocerebrosidase (GCase) function and consequent excess accumulation of glucosylceramide/glucosylsphingosine in visceral organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with the biosimilars, imiglucerase (imig) or velaglucerase alfa (vela) improves/reverses the visceral disease. Comparative transcriptomic effects (microarray and mRNA-Seq) of no ERT and ERT (imig or vela) were done with liver, lung, and spleen from mice having Gba1 mutant alleles, termed D409V/null. Disease-related molecular effects, dynamic ranges, and sensitivities were compared between mRNA-Seq and microarrays and their respective analytic tools, i.e. Mixed Model ANOVA (microarray), and DESeq and edgeR (mRNA-Seq). While similar gene expression patterns were observed with both platforms, mRNA-Seq identified more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (∼3-fold) than the microarrays. Among the three analytic tools, DESeq identified the maximum number of DEGs for all tissues and treatments. DESeq and edgeR comparisons revealed differences in DEGs identified. In 9V/null liver, spleen and lung, post-therapy transcriptomes approximated WT, were partially reverted, and had little change, respectively, and were concordant with the corresponding histological and biochemical findings. DEG overlaps were only 8-20% between mRNA-Seq and microarray, but the biological pathways were similar. Cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, heme metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction were most altered with the Gaucher disease process. Imig and vela differentially affected specific disease pathways. Differential molecular responses were observed in direct transcriptome comparisons from imig- and vela-treated tissues. These results provide cross-validation for the mRNA-Seq and microarray platforms, and show differences between the molecular effects of two highly structurally similar ERT biopharmaceuticals

  2. [Critical amino acids of ornitin decarboxylase degron: the presence and C-terminal arrangement is insufficient for alfa-fetoprotein degradation].

    PubMed

    Morozov, A V; Timofeev, A V; Morozov, V A; Karpov, V L

    2011-01-01

    Mouse ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) degrades in proteasome in an ubiquitin-independent manner with an averagehalf-life of 2 h. The 37 amino acid long C-terminal fragment known as a degradation signal (degron) is responsible for the effective degradation of ODC. Recently, amino acids being critical for degradation in the ODC-degron have been mapped. Mutations of Cys441 and Ala442 led to protein stabilization, while a substitution of other amino acids composing ODC-degron had almost no effect on the protein turnover; whereas insertions or deletions in region between Ala442 and ODC C-terminus diminished greatly rate of protein degradation, e.g. positioning of the key amino acids from the C-terminus was shown to be crucial. Using these data we introduced both key amino acids into the alfa-fetoprotein with truncated exportation signal (deltaAFP), at the same distance from the C-terminus as they being in the ODC (deltaAFPCAG and deltaAFPLCAG). Removal of N-terminal exportation signal prevented secretion of modified proteins. Using in silico approach we demonstrated no significant difference in hydrophobicity or secondary structure between C-terminus of deltaAFP and mutated proteins. The degradation kinetics of deltaAFP, deltaAFPCAG, deltaAFPLCAG in cyloheximide-chase and proteasome inhibition assay (using MG132) was identical. Obtained results suggest that introduced substitutions are insufficient for effective recognition of mutated deltaAFP by26S proteasome. We assume thatadditional amino aci ds composing ODC-degron or their combine action could also affect degradation. Besides that, one cannot exclude that conformation of the mutated deltaAFP limits its C-terminus accessibility to proteasome. PMID:21790016

  3. Corifollitropin alfa followed by hpHMG in GnRH agonist protocols. Two prospective feasibility studies in poor ovarian responders.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Corona, Roberta; Van De Vijver, Arne; Blockeel, Christophe; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Vloeberghs, Veerle; De Vos, Michel; Camus, Michel; Humaidan, Peter; Tournaye, Herman

    2015-01-01

    In two prospective uncontrolled feasibility trials, we examined the effect of corifollitropin alfa (CFA) followed by highly purified human menopausal gonadotrophin (hpHMG) in a short flare-up gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and a long GnRH agonist protocol for women with poor ovarian response. Overall, 45 patients were treated with short flare-up and 47 patients with the long agonist protocol. All patients received a single dose of 150 μg CFA, followed by 300 IU hpHMG 7 days later, triggering with 10 000 IU hCG, CSI and day 3 embryo transfer. Ongoing pregnancy rates (OPRs) did not differ between the short 15.6% and the long 17% agonist protocol (p = 0.85). Among patients treated with the short flare-up protocol, OPRs were 20% for younger patients (<40 years old) and 12% in older women (≥40 years old), p = 0.68. Similarly, in patients treated with the long agonist protocol younger women had an OPR of 26.7% versus 12.5% in older women, p = 0.23. Among patients treated with the short flare-up, live births rate were 15% and 4.3% for younger (<40 years old) and older patients (≥40 years old), respectively, p = 0.32. Similarly, in patients treated with the long agonist protocol, live births rate were 25% and 12.9% for younger (<40 years old) and older patients (≥40 years old), respectively, p = 0.41. None of the patients reported any serious adverse event related to treatment. According to our results, CFA followed by hpHMG in a short flare-up or long GnRH agonist protocol appears to be a feasible option for poor ovarian responders. Large phase III trials are mandatory prior to introduction in clinical practice. PMID:26172925

  4. Multicenter phase II trial of adjuvant therapy for resected pancreatic cancer using cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and interferon-alfa-2b–based chemoradiation: ACOSOG Trial Z05031

    PubMed Central

    Picozzi, V. J.; Abrams, R. A.; Decker, P. A.; Traverso, W.; O'Reilly, E. M.; Greeno, E.; Martin, R. C.; Wilfong, L. S.; Rothenberg, M. L.; Posner, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The American College of Surgeons Oncology Group sought to confirm the efficacy of a novel interferon-based chemoradiation regimen in a multicenter phase II trial. Patients and methods: Patients with resected (R0/R1) adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head were treated with adjuvant interferon-alfa-2b (3 million units s.c. on days 1, 3, and 5 of each week for 5.5 weeks), cisplatin (30 mg/m2 i.v. weekly for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 175 mg·m2/day for 38 days) concurrently with external-beam radiation (50.4 Gy). Chemoradiation was followed by two 6-week courses of continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg·m2/day). The primary study end point was 18-month overall survival from protocol enrollment (OS18); an OS18 ≥65% was considered a positive study outcome. Results: Eighty-nine patients were enrolled. Eighty-four patients were assessable for toxicity. The all-cause grade ≥3 toxicity rate was 95% (80 patients) during therapy. No long-term toxicity or toxicity-related deaths were noted. At 36-month median follow-up, the OS18 was 69% [95% confidence interval (CI) 60% to 80%]; the median disease-free survival and overall survival were 14.1 months (95% CI 11.0–20.1 months) and 25.4 months (95% CI 23.4–34.1 months), respectively. Conclusions: Notwithstanding promising multi-institutional efficacy results, further development of this regimen will require additional modifications to mitigate toxic effects. PMID:20670978

  5. Assessment of the impact of treatment on quality of life of patients with haemophilia A at different ages: insights from two clinical trials on turoctocog alfa.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, E; Lentz, S R; Busk, A K; Regnault, A; Iorio, A

    2014-07-01

    Haemophilia and its treatment interfere with patients' life, so health-related quality of life (HRQoL) should be assessed when evaluating treatments. This study investigated the HRQoL of patients with haemophilia A treated prophylactically with a new recombinant factor VIII. Two phase 3 trials investigated turoctocog alfa in patients with severe haemophilia A: one in children, one in adults and adolescents. HRQoL was a secondary endpoint assessed by the HAEMO-QOL age-specific, self-administered questionnaires. Parent-completed versions were also included for parents of children and adolescents. All HAEMO-QOL questionnaires allow the calculation of domain-specific and total scores ranging from 0 to 100, lower scores indicating better HRQoL. Mean change in all scores was described for 25 children aged 4-7 years, 21 children aged 8-12 years, 18 adolescents aged 13-18 years and 129 adults, overall, and according to the treatment regimen received prior to the study (on-demand; prophylaxis; mixed). Mean changes in HAEMO-QOL total score were 1.4 for children aged 4-7 years, -2.6 for children aged 8-12 years, -5.8 for adolescents and -1.6 for adults. In parent-completed versions, mean changes in total score were -6.0 for children aged 4-7 years, -4.7 for children aged 8-12 years, and -10.0 for adolescents. Patients receiving on-demand treatment before the trial showed greater improvement in HRQoL scores than patients already on prophylaxis. HRQoL of patients remained fairly stable over the course of the trials. However, improvements were observed for adolescents. Switching to prophylaxis was identified as a potential driver of improvement of HRQoL in patients with haemophilia A.

  6. Phase II trial of fluorouracil and recombinant interferon alfa-2a in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Wadler, S; Lembersky, B; Atkins, M; Kirkwood, J; Petrelli, N

    1991-10-01

    In a pilot clinical trial, treatment of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma with the combination of fluorouracil (5FU) and recombinant interferon alfa-2a (IFN) resulted in objective tumor regression in 62% of patients. To confirm these findings in a multiinstitutional setting, a phase II clinical trial was initiated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in 1989. The treatment regimen was identical to that used in the earlier study: 5FU 750 mg/m2/d for 5 days as a continuous infusion followed by weekly outpatient bolus therapy and IFN 9MU subcutaneously beginning day 1 and administered three times per week. Doses were modified for gastrointestinal, hematologic, and neurologic toxicity and for fatigue, similarly to those used in the previous pilot trial. Thirty-eight patients were registered; 36 are evaluable for response (one lost to follow-up and one with nonmeasurable disease). All patients had metastatic or locally recurrent disease beyond the scope of resection; 31 of 38 had liver metastases, and 20 of 38 had two or more sites of involvement. Eight patients had grade 4 toxicities, including sepsis (nonneutropenic) (one), watery diarrhea (two), and granulocytopenia (six). Grade 3 neurologic toxicities were observed in two (5%) patients and included slurred speech and gait disturbance. Objective response was 42% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 27% to 58%), including one clinical complete responder and 14 partial responders. Among the responding patients, the median time to treatment failure was 8 months. Two patients remain on treatment at 10+ and 16+ months: median survival has not been reached. The results of this multiinstitutional trial suggest that the addition of IFN to 5FU enhances the objective response rates achieved in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma and that the toxicities of this regimen are acceptable. PMID:1919631

  7. Mericitabine and Either Boceprevir or Telaprevir in Combination with Peginterferon Alfa-2a plus Ribavirin for Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 1 Infection and Prior Null Response: The Randomized DYNAMO 1 and DYNAMO 2 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Heiner; Forns, Xavier; Hézode, Christophe; Lee, Samuel S.; Scalori, Astrid; Voulgari, Athina; Le Pogam, Sophie; Nájera, Isabel; Thommes, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection who have had a previous null response (<2-log10 reduction in HCV RNA by treatment week 12) to peginterferon/ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV) do not achieve a sustained virological response (SVR) when re-treated with a first-generation HCV protease inhibitor (PI) administered in combination with PegIFN/RBV. We studied the incremental benefits associated with adding mericitabine (nucleoside analog inhibitor of HCV polymerase) to PI plus PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV-based therapy in two double-blind randomized multicenter phase 2 trials (with boceprevir in DYNAMO 1, and with telaprevir in DYNAMO 2). The primary endpoint in both trials was SVR, defined as HCV RNA <25 IU/mL 12 weeks after the end of treatment (SVR12). Overall, the addition of mericitabine to PI plus PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy resulted in SVR12 rates of 60–70% in DYNAMO 1 and of 71–96% in DYNAMO 2. SVR12 rates were similar in patients infected with HCV genotype 1a and 1b in both trials. The placebo control arms in both studies were stopped because of high rates of virological failure. Numerically lower relapse rates were associated with longer treatment with mericitabine (24 versus 12 weeks), telaprevir-containing regimens, and regimens that included 48 weeks of PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy. No mericitabine resistance mutations were identified in any patient in either trial. The addition of mericitabine did not add to the safety burden associated with either telaprevir or boceprevir-based regimens. These studies demonstrate increased SVR rates and reduced relapse rates in difficult-to-treat patients when a nucleoside polymerase inhibitor with intermediate antiviral potency is added to regimens containing a first-generation PI. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01482403 and ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01482390 PMID:26752189

  8. Gas-rich Galaxies in the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA) -- From HI Dwarfs to Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Making use of HI 21 cm line measurements from the ALFALFA survey (α.40) and photometry from the SDSS and GALEX, we investigate the global scaling relations linking stars and gas for 9417 common galaxies (α.40-SDSS-GALEX). Stellar masses (M*) and SFRs are derived from fitting the UV-optical SEDs. 96% of the α.40-SDSS-GALEX galaxies belong to the blue cloud, with the average gas fraction MHI/M* > 1.5. A transition in star formation (SF) properties is found whereby below M* > 109.5M⊙, the slope of the SF sequence changes, the dispersion in the specific star formation rate (SSFR) distribution increases, and the star formation efficiency (SFE) mildly increases with M*. The evolutionary track in the SSFR-M* diagram, as well as that in the CMD, is linked to the HI content; below this transition mass, the SF is regulated strongly by the HI. Comparison of HI and optically selected samples shows that the HI-selected population is less evolved and has overall higher SFR and SSFR at a given M*, but lower SFE and extinction, suggesting either that a bottleneck exists in the HI-to-H2 conversion, or that the very HI-dominated galaxies obey an low efficiency SF law. We show that for a given M*, high gas fraction galaxies reside preferentially in dark matter halos with high spin parameters. In addition, we closely studied 229 low MHI ALFALFA dwarfs with reprocessed GALEX photometry. Many of them are currently undergoing active SF, relative to the past-averaged level, so that the widely used standard formulae calibrated for a continuous SF history systematically overestimate the M* and SFR. Currently, we are gathering multi-wavelength data for the High HI Mass, HI-rich (HIghMass) galaxies identified by the ALFALFA (MHI>1010M⊙ and gas fraction more than 1σ above the mean given their M*). They may be in an arrested stage of evolution, or their huge HI disks may reflect recent baryon accretion. Most of the HIghMass galaxies exhibit strong color gradient and have higher Hα EWs

  9. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week. HBV, inject the medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week usually for 16 weeks. hairy cell leukemia, inject ...

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a, Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Aripiprazole, AT-7519, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Besifloxacin hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Budesonide/formoterol fumarate; CAIV-T, Carisbamate, Casopitant mesylate, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone, CTCE-9908; Dalcetrapib, Darunavir, Deferasirox, Desloratadine, Disitertide, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTA-H19, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Eribulin mesilate, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, EUR-1008, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide; Fampridine, Fluticasone furoate, Formoterol fumarate/fluticasone propionate, Fosamprenavir calcium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GS-7904L; HPV-6/11/16/18, Human Secretin, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Indacaterol maleate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ixabepilone; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Loratadine/montelukast sodium, Lutropin alfa; MeNZB, Mepolizumab, Micafungin sodium, Morphine hydrochloride; Nabiximols, Nikkomycin Z; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Perifosine, PF-489791, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; QAX-576; Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Rasagiline

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: A-007, A6, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, AllerVax Ragweed, amphora, anakinra, angiotensin-(1-7), anidulafungin, apomine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, avanafil; BAL-8557, becatecarin, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, CG-0070, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, cryptophycin 52, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darapladib, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, deferasirox, desloratadine, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DMF, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol valerate/dienogest, eszopiclone, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gefitinib, gestodene, GYKI-16084; Hyaluronic acid, hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine; Juzen-taiho-to; Lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, L-BLP-25, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lexatumumab, lidocaine/prilocaine, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; MAb-14.18, mitoquidone; Natalizumab, neridronic acid, neuradiab; Olpadronic acid sodium salt, omalizumab; p53-DC vaccine, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, prasterone, prasugrel, PRO-2000

  13. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  14. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The material presented is designed to help students explore geometric patterns involving Fibonnaci numbers and the golden ratio, and to aid in review of basic geometry skills. Worksheet masters intended for duplication are provided. Suggestions are made of possible classroom extensions to the initial activities. (MP)

  15. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Active-Reference, Double-Blind, Flexible-Dose Study of the Efficacy of Vortioxetine on Cognitive Function in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mahableshwarkar, Atul R; Zajecka, John; Jacobson, William; Chen, Yinzhong; Keefe, Richard SE

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, active-referenced (duloxetine 60 mg), parallel-group study evaluated the short-term efficacy and safety of vortioxetine (10–20 mg) on cognitive function in adults (aged 18–65 years) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) who self-reported cognitive dysfunction. Efficacy was evaluated using ANCOVA for the change from baseline to week 8 in the digit symbol substitution test (DSST)–number of correct symbols as the prespecified primary end point. The patient-reported perceived deficits questionnaire (PDQ) and physician-assessed clinical global impression (CGI) were analyzed in a prespecified hierarchical testing sequence as key secondary end points. Additional predefined end points included the objective performance-based University of San Diego performance-based skills assessment (UPSA) (ANCOVA) to measure functionality, MADRS (MMRM) to assess efficacy in depression, and a prespecified multiple regression analysis (path analysis) to calculate direct vs indirect effects of vortioxetine on cognitive function. Safety and tolerability were assessed at all visits. Vortioxetine was statistically superior to placebo on the DSST (P<0.05), PDQ (P<0.01), CGI-I (P<0.001), MADRS (P<0.05), and UPSA (P<0.001). Path analysis indicated that vortioxetine's cognitive benefit was primarily a direct treatment effect rather than due to alleviation of depressive symptoms. Duloxetine was not significantly different from placebo on the DSST or UPSA, but was superior to placebo on the PDQ, CGI-I, and MADRS. Common adverse events (incidence ⩾5%) for vortioxetine were nausea, headache, and diarrhea. In this study of MDD adults who self-reported cognitive dysfunction, vortioxetine significantly improved cognitive function, depression, and functionality and was generally well tolerated. PMID:25687662

  16. Demonstrating the Role of Anticholinergic Activity in a Mood Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hori, Koji; Konishi, Kimiko; Hanashi, Takahiro; Tani, Masayuki; Tomioka, Hiroi; Kitajima, Yuka; Akashi, Norihisa; Inamoto, Atsuko; Kurosawa, Kenzo; Hasegawa, Sayaka; Izuno, Takuji; Kikuchi, Nodoka; Hosoi, Misa; Hachisu, Mitsugu

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 54-year-old woman presenting with amnesia, apathy, work-related difficulties and mental stress. At presentation, her Mini-Mental State Examination score was 27 and her serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) was positive without medication or recent physical illnesses. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging revealed mild atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, with a relatively intact hippocampus. Consequently, we diagnosed mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease and prescribed a cholinesterase inhibitor (donepezil, 10 mg/day); her SAA fully disappeared and clinical symptoms partially resolved. Addition of duloxetine coupled with environmental adjustments caused her cognitive function to return to a normal level, so we diagnosed pseudodementia due to depression. In this case, we believe that the simultaneous cholinergic burden and mental stress led to positive SAA, which made it reasonable to prescribe a cholinesterase inhibitor to ameliorate the associated acetylcholine hypoactivity. We believe that it is essential to recognize the importance of prescribing a cholinesterase inhibitor for specific patients, even those with pseudodementia, to control their clinical symptoms. Moreover, SAA might be a useful biomarker for identifying this subgroup of patients. We propose that anticholinergic activity appears endogenously in mood disorders (depression and bipolar disorder) and set out our rationalization for this hypothesis. PMID:26138496

  17. HBsAg seroconversion after pegylated interferon alfa 2a rescue in a lamivudine-resistant patient with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B and favourable IL28-B genotype.

    PubMed

    Stanzione, Maria; Stornaiuolo, Gianfranca; Rizzo, Viviana; Pontarelli, Agostina; Gaeta, Giovanni Battista

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) seroconversion to anti-HBs antibody is the best final objective for all available chronic hepatitis B (CHB) treatments. Unfortunately, this goal is rarely achieved with the currently applied therapeutic approaches. Here we describe the case of an anti-HBe-positive CHB patient who was successfully treated with a particular therapeutic schedule. The patient was initially treated with lamivudine (LAM) for nine years. Breakthrough was observed after eight years of LAM therapy. HBV-DNA was 3x10E4 IU/mL and LAM resistance mutations were present. Subcutaneous pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) alfa 2a, 180 mcg/week, was added to LAM and after 4 weeks LAM was discontinued and PEG-IFN alone was continued up to week 52. HBV-DNA became undetectable at week 4 of therapy; serum HBsAg started to decline from week 4 and became undetectable at week 36, with the subsequent appearance of anti-HBs antibodies. IL28-B was genotyped at the polymorphic site rs12979860 and the CC allele was detected. Rescue therapy with Peg-IFN may be an option for selected patients with resistance to nucleos(t)ide analogues. PMID:27367326

  18. Triple combination of thymalfasin, peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C who have failed prior interferon and ribavirin treatment: 24-week interim results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Avila, F; Kershenobich, D; García-Samper, X; Gongora, J; Uribe, M

    2004-12-01

    Despite steady progress in antiviral treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), many patients still have detectable serum HCV RNA levels by the end of interferon-based treatment and are known as virological non-responders. Re-treatment of these patients not responding to previous therapy remains challenging. Studies of the dynamics of the HCV population show a marked decline in new cases since 1996; however, the relative proportion of non-responders is expected to increase over time and, similarly, the number of patients eligible for first-line treatment is expected to decrease. The current standard of care for treatment involves the use of pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. However, many difficult-to-treat groups still have low response rates. Newer combinations are being investigated to optimize chances of attaining a sustained response in these groups: one such triple therapy regimen is peginterferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and thymalfasin, which was given to 23 previously non-responder patients. Viral response was 60.8% at week 12 and 47.8% at week 24. These preliminary results encourage further evaluation of this promising combination. PMID:15546256

  19. Triple combination of thymalfasin, peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C who have failed prior interferon and ribavirin treatment: 24-week interim results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Avila, F; Kershenobich, D; García-Samper, X; Gongora, J; Uribe, M

    2004-12-01

    Despite steady progress in antiviral treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV), many patients still have detectable serum HCV RNA levels by the end of interferon-based treatment and are known as virological non-responders. Re-treatment of these patients not responding to previous therapy remains challenging. Studies of the dynamics of the HCV population show a marked decline in new cases since 1996; however, the relative proportion of non-responders is expected to increase over time and, similarly, the number of patients eligible for first-line treatment is expected to decrease. The current standard of care for treatment involves the use of pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. However, many difficult-to-treat groups still have low response rates. Newer combinations are being investigated to optimize chances of attaining a sustained response in these groups: one such triple therapy regimen is peginterferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and thymalfasin, which was given to 23 previously non-responder patients. Viral response was 60.8% at week 12 and 47.8% at week 24. These preliminary results encourage further evaluation of this promising combination. PMID:15641210

  20. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Protect Lymphoma B-cells from Rituximab-Induced Apoptosis and Targeting Integrin alfa-4-beta-1 (VLA-4) with Natalizumab can Overcome this Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mraz, Marek; Zent, Clive S.; Church, Amy K.; Jelinek, Diane F.; Wu, Xiaosheng; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ansell, Stephen M.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S.

    2011-01-01

    Rituximab improves the outcome of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but does not completely eradicate residual B-cell populations in the microenvironment of the bone marrow and lymph nodes. Adhesion to stromal cells can protect B-cells from apoptosis induced by chemotherapy drugs (cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance; CAM-DR). A similar mechanism of resistance to rituximab has not, to our knowledge, been described. We tested the hypothesis that the microenvironment protects malignant B-cells from rituximab-induced apoptosis, and that blocking these interactions with natalizumab, an antibody targeting VLA-4 (integrin alfa-4-beta-1/CD49d), can overcome this protection. VLA-4 is an adhesion molecule constitutively expressed on malignant B-cells and is important for pro-survival signalling in the bone marrow and lymph node microenvironment. The human bone marrow stromal cell line HS-5 was shown to strongly protect B-cell lymphoma cells from rituximab cytotoxicity, suggesting the existence of a stromal cell adhesion-mediated antibody resistance (CAM-AR) mechanism analogous to CAM-DR. Natalizumab decreased B-lymphocyte adherence to fibronectin by 75-95% and partially overcame stromal protection against rituximab and cytotoxic drugs. These pre-clinical findings suggest that the addition of stromal adhesion-disruptive drugs to rituximab-containing therapy could improve treatment efficacy. PMID:21749361

  1. Comportamiento de la cromósfera solar en la línea H-alfa durante el período enero/05-agosto/06

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missio, H.; Davoli, D.; Aquilano, R.

    Using the instrument at Observatorio Astronómico Municipal de Rosario (OAMR), we analyze the solar chromospheric activity during the period January/05-August/06. The instrument is a Carl Zeiss refractor telescope of 150 mm aperture and 2250 mm of focal distance with a monochromatic filter in the H-alpha line. We take as proxy for the solar activity the area covered by chromospheric ``plages''. The measurements are done using photographic registers. We describe our technique and the results obtained. We observe a decrease of solar activity that corresponds to the end of cycle 23. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Activated protein C concentrate, Ad-CD154, Adeno-Interferon gamma, alemtuzumab, APC-8024, 9-aminocamptothecin, aprepitant, l-arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, asimadoline; O6-Benzylguanine, bevacizumab, Bi-20, binodenoson, biphasic insulin aspart, bivatuzumab, 186Re-bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, bryostatin 1; Carboxy- amidotriazole, caspofungin acetate, CB-1954, CC-4047, CDP-860, cerivastatin sodium, clevidipine, CTL-102; 3,4-DAP, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, desloratadine, DHA-paclitaxel, duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, eniluracil, ENMD-0997, eplerenone, eplivanserin, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, FR-901228, FTY-720; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, iodine (I131) tositumomab, ISV-205, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, linezolid, liposomal NDDP, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-156735; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, magnesium sulfate, maxacalcitol, meclinertant, melagatran, melatonin, MENT, mepolizumab, micafungin sodium, midostaurin, motexafin gadolinium; Nesiritide, NS-1209, NSC-601316, NSC-683864; Osanetant; Palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegylated OB protein, pemetrexed disodium, perillyl alcohol, picoplatin, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plevitrexed

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate; ACP-103, Ad.Egr.TNF.11 D, adalimumab, AF-IL 12, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, alefacept, alemtuzumab, a-Galactosylceramide, ALVAC vCP 1452, alvimopan hydrate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, antarelix, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic sulfide, asoprisnil, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BrachySil, brivudine; Caffeine, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, capsaicin for injection, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, cetuximab, CGP-36742, clofazimine, CpG-7909, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, dimethylfumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GPI-0100; hA 20, HTU-PA, human insulin, HuOKT 3 gamma 1(Ala 234-Ala 235), hyaluronic acid; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, INKP-100, INKP-102, iodine (I131) tositumomab, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, lenalidomide, lidocaine/tetracaine, linezolid, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Maribavir, morphine glucuronide, MVA-5 T

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com.This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-263, AC-2307, Aclidinium bromide, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anakinra, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, ASM-8, Atiprimod hydrochloride, AVE-0277, AVE-1642, AVE-8062, Axitinib, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BI-2536, Biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-387032, BMS-663513, Bortezomib, BQ-123, Brivanib alaninate, BSI-201; Caspofungin acetate, CDX-110, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, CR-011, Cypher; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Dexlansoprazole, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, Dovitinib, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hibvaccine, DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, Emtricitabine, Endothelin, Entecavir, Eplivanserin fumarate, Escitalopram oxalate, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farletuzumab, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fibrin sealant (human), Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Glufosfamide, GSK-1562902A; Hib-TT; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-11F8, Imidazoacridinone, IMP-321, INCB-18424, Indiplon, Indisulam, INNO-406, Irinotecan hydrochloride/Floxuridine, ITF-2357, Ixabepilone; KRN-951; Lasofoxifene tartrate; Lenalidomide, LGD-4665, Lonafarnib, Lubiprostone, Lumiliximab; MDX-1100, Melan-A/MART-1/gp100/IFN-alfa, Methyl-CDDO, Metreleptin, MLN-2704, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Na-ASP-2, Naproxcinod, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NPI-2358; Oblimersen sodium, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, PAN-811, Panobinostat, PBI-1402, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa

  5. Phase III, Randomized Study of the Effects of Parenteral Iron, Oral Iron, or No Iron Supplementation on the Erythropoietic Response to Darbepoetin Alfa for Patients With Chemotherapy-Associated Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Steensma, David P.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Dalton, Robert; Kahanic, Stephen P.; Prager, Diane J.; Stella, Philip J.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Novotny, Paul J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Functional iron deficiency may impair response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in iron-replete patients with chemotherapy-associated anemia (CAA). This study evaluated whether coadministration of parenteral iron improves ESA efficacy in patients with CAA. Patients and Methods This prospective, multicenter, randomized trial enrolled 502 patients with hemoglobin (Hb) less than 11 g/dL who were undergoing chemotherapy for nonmyeloid malignancies. All patients received darbepoetin alfa once every 3 weeks and were randomly assigned to receive either ferric gluconate 187.5 mg intravenously (IV) every 3 weeks, oral daily ferrous sulfate 325 mg, or oral placebo for 16 weeks. Results There was no difference in the erythropoietic response rate (ie, proportion of patients achieving Hb ≥12 g/dL or Hb increase ≥ 2 g/dL from baseline): 69.5% (95% CI, 61.9% to 76.5%) of IV iron-treated patients achieved an erythropoietic response compared with 66.9% (95% CI, 59.1% to 74.0%) who received oral iron and 65.0% (95% CI, 57.2% to 72.3%) who received oral placebo (P = .75). There were also no differences in the proportion of patients requiring red cell transfusions, changes in quality of life, or the dose of darbepoetin administered. Adverse events (AEs) tended to be more common in the IV iron arm: grade 3 or higher AEs occurred in 54% (95% CI, 46% to 61%) of patients receiving IV iron compared with 44% (95% CI, 36% to 52%) who received oral iron and 46% (95% CI, 38% to 54%) who received oral placebo (P = .16). Conclusion In patients with CAA, addition of IV ferric gluconate to darbepoetin failed to provide additional benefit compared with oral iron or oral placebo. PMID:21098317

  6. Comparative efficacy, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic activity, and interferon stimulated gene expression of different interferon formulations in HIV/HCV genotype-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Osinusi, Anu; Bon, Dimitra; Nelson, Amy; Lee, Yu-Jin; Poonia, Seerat; Shivakumar, Bhavana; Cai, Shu Yi; Wood, Brad; Haagmans, Bart; Lempicki, Richard; Herrmann, Eva; Sneller, Michael; Polis, Michael; Masur, Henry; Kottilil, Shyam

    2014-02-01

    The effect of different formulations of interferon on therapeutic response in patients coinfected with HIV and HCV is unclear. In this study, the safety, tolerability, viral kinetics (VK) modeling and host responses among HIV/HCV coinfected patients treated with pegylated-IFN or albinterferon alfa-2b (AlbIFN) with weight-based ribavirin were compared. Three trials treated 57 HIV/HCV coinfected genotype-1 patients with PegIFN alfa-2b (1.5 µg/kg/week) (n = 30), PegIFN alfa-2a (180 µg/week) (n = 10), and AlbIFN (900 µg/q2week) (n = 17) in combination with weight-based ribavirin (RBV). HCV RNA, safety labs, and interferon stimulated gene expression (ISG) was evaluated. Adverse events were documented at all study visits. HCV viral kinetics using a full pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was also evaluated. Baseline patient characteristics were similar across the three studies. All three formulations exhibited comparable safety and tolerability profiles and efficacy. VK/PK/PD parameters for all three studies as measured by mean efficiency and rate of infected cell loss were similar between the three groups. Host responses (ISG expression and immune activation markers) were similar among the three groups. All three regimens induced significant ISG at week 4 (P < 0.05) and ISG expression strongly correlated with therapeutic response (r = 0.65; P < 0.01). In summary, a comprehensive analysis of responses to three different interferon formulations in HIV/HCV coinfected patients demonstrated similar effects. Notably, interferon-based therapy results in a blunted host response followed by modest antiviral effect in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. This suggests that future treatment options that do not rely on host immune responses such as direct antiviral agents would be particularly beneficial in these difficult to treat patients. PMID:24166150

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, ademetionine, agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, AMG-162, androgel, anidulafungin, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bazedoxifene acetate, bevacizumab, bosentan; Caldaret hydrate, canfosfamide hydrochloride, choriogonadotropin alfa, ciclesonide, combretastatin A-4 phosphate, CY-2301; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, degarelix acetate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, enclomiphene citrate, eplerenone, epratuzumab, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, ezetimibe; Fingolimod hydrochloride, FP-1096; HMR-3339A, HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy, human insulin, HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); Idursulfase, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, InnoVax C insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, irofulven; Labetuzumab, lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, LyphoDerm, Lyprinol; Magnesium sulfate, metelimumab, methylphenidate hydrochloride; Natalizumab, NO-aspirin; OROS(R); PC-515, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, posaconazole, pregabalin, PT-141, pyridoxamine; R-744, ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rebimastat, repinotan hydrochloride, rhC1, rhGAD65, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Sardomozide, solifenacin succinate; Tadalafil, taxus, telavancin, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, testosterone transdermal patch, tetomilast, tirapazamine, torcetrapib; Valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vildagliptin; Yttrium Y90 epratuzumab; Ziprasidone hydrochloride.

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-11-01

    Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil, AN-2728, Apixaban, Aripiprazole, Armodafinil, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Atrasentan, Azacitidine, Bevacizumab, Blinatumomab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Carfilzomib, Caspofungin acetate, Cediranib, Cetuximab, Choriogonadotropin alfa, Clevudine, Clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, Clofarabine, Daidzeol, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Dexlansoprazole, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Elacytarabine, Enfuvirtide, Enoxaparin, Entecavir, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Ezetimibe/simvastatin, Forodesine hydrochloride, Fosamprenavir calcium, Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Golimumab, Imatinib mesylate, Imetelstat, Insulin gl'argine, Insulin glulisine, Interferon alfa-2b XL, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Lintuzumab, Liposomal adriamycin, Liposomal belotecan, Liposome-encapsulated fentanyl, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lutropin alfa, LY-207320, Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MKC-253, MP-470, NGR-TNF, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate, PAN-811, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, PF-734200, Phentermine/topiramate, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Pregabalin, Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Ranibizumab, Recombinant Bet V1, Recombinant human insulin, Regadenoson, rhITF, Romidepsin, Rosuvastatin calcium, Ruboxistaurin hydrochloride, Rufinamide, Sapropterin dihydrochloride Saracatinib, SB-73, SC-599, Seliciclib, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate, Tadalafil, Tanespimycin, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tegaserod maleate, Telbivudine, Tenofovir

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-chTNT; Abatacept, adalimumab, alemtuzumab, APC-8015, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bortezomib, bosentan, buserelin; Caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, ChAGCD3, ciclesonide, clopidogrel, curcumin, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, dapoxetine hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, denosumab, DMXB-Anabaseine, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edodekin alfa, efaproxiral sodium, elaidic acid-cytarabine, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etonogestrel/testosterone decanoate, exenatide; Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, glycine, GVS-111; Homoharringtonine; ICC-1132, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, i.v. gamma-globulin; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, lintuzumab, liposomal nystatin, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Manitimus, mapatumumab, melatonin, micafungin sodium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Oblimersen sodium, OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), pasireotide, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranolazine, rosuvastatin calcium, rubitecan, rupatadine fumarate; Sardomozide, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, talactoferrin alfa, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, testosterone transdermal patch, TH-9507, tigecycline, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tocilizumab, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vandetanib

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, ademetionine, agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, AMG-162, androgel, anidulafungin, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bazedoxifene acetate, bevacizumab, bosentan; Caldaret hydrate, canfosfamide hydrochloride, choriogonadotropin alfa, ciclesonide, combretastatin A-4 phosphate, CY-2301; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, degarelix acetate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, enclomiphene citrate, eplerenone, epratuzumab, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, ezetimibe; Fingolimod hydrochloride, FP-1096; HMR-3339A, HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy, human insulin, HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); Idursulfase, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, InnoVax C insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, irofulven; Labetuzumab, lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, LyphoDerm, Lyprinol; Magnesium sulfate, metelimumab, methylphenidate hydrochloride; Natalizumab, NO-aspirin; OROS(R); PC-515, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, posaconazole, pregabalin, PT-141, pyridoxamine; R-744, ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rebimastat, repinotan hydrochloride, rhC1, rhGAD65, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Sardomozide, solifenacin succinate; Tadalafil, taxus, telavancin, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, testosterone transdermal patch, tetomilast, tirapazamine, torcetrapib; Valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vildagliptin; Yttrium Y90 epratuzumab; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:15672123

  12. The use of recombinant activated factor VII in patients with acquired haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Andreas; Amano, Kagehiro; Ma, Alice; Arkhammar, Per; El Fegoun, Soraya Benchikh; Rosholm, Anders; Seremetis, Stephanie; Baudo, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Acquired haemophilia (AH) is a rare, often severe bleeding disorder characterised by autoantibodies to coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Observational studies offer crucial insight into the disease and its treatment. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, eptacog alfa activated) was available on an emergency and compassionate use basis from 1988 to 1999 at sites in Europe and North America. In 1996, rFVIIa was approved in Europe for the treatment of AH; it was licensed for this indication in the United States in 2006. Recombinant activated FVII is approved for first-line treatment of bleeding episodes and prevention of bleeding in surgical/invasive procedures in patients with AH. This review provides an up-to-date summary of the haemostatic efficacy of rFVIIa in patients with AH, from the first emergency and compassionate use programmes, to patient registries and a post-marketing surveillance study. In acute bleeding episodes, rFVIIa provided high and consistent rates of control, and available data showed that acute bleed control rates were higher for first-line rFVIIa versus salvage rFVIIa. In surgical procedures, rFVIIa also provided high rates of control. In patients with AH, rFVIIa has a high rate of haemostatic efficacy in acute and surgical bleeding episodes. PMID:26073365

  13. Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin (MAP) Plus Maintenance Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b Versus MAP Alone in Patients With Resectable High-Grade Osteosarcoma and Good Histologic Response to Preoperative MAP: First Results of the EURAMOS-1 Good Response Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bielack, Stefan S.; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Whelan, Jeremy S.; Marina, Neyssa; Jovic, Gordana; Hook, Jane M.; Krailo, Mark D.; Gebhardt, Mark; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Meyer, James; Nadel, Helen; Randall, R. Lor; Deffenbaugh, Claudia; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Brennan, Bernadette; Letson, G. Douglas; Teot, Lisa A.; Goorin, Allen; Baumhoer, Daniel; Kager, Leo; Werner, Mathias; Lau, Ching C.; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Gelderblom, Hans; Meyers, Paul; Gorlick, Richard; Windhager, Reinhard; Helmke, Knut; Eriksson, Mikael; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Schomberg, Paula; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Kühne, Thomas; Jürgens, Heribert; van den Berg, Henk; Böhling, Tom; Picton, Susan; Renard, Marleen; Reichardt, Peter; Gerss, Joachim; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Morris, Carol; Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W.; Seddon, Beatrice; Calaminus, Gabriele; Michelagnoli, Maria; Dhooge, Catharina; Sydes, Matthew R.; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EURAMOS-1, an international randomized controlled trial, investigated maintenance therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) in patients whose osteosarcoma showed good histologic response (good response) to induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods At diagnosis, patients age ≤ 40 years with resectable high-grade osteosarcoma were registered. Eligibility after surgery for good response random assignment included ≥ two cycles of preoperative MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, and cisplatin), macroscopically complete surgery of primary tumor, < 10% viable tumor, and no disease progression. These patients were randomly assigned to four additional cycles MAP with or without IFN-α-2b (0.5 to 1.0 μg/kg per week subcutaneously, after chemotherapy until 2 years postregistration). Outcome measures were event-free survival (EFS; primary) and overall survival and toxicity (secondary). Results Good response was reported in 1,041 of 2,260 registered patients; 716 consented to random assignment (MAP, n = 359; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 357), with baseline characteristics balanced by arm. A total of 271 of 357 started IFN-α-2b; 105 stopped early, and 38 continued to receive treatment at data freeze. Refusal and toxicity were the main reasons for never starting IFN-α-2b and for stopping prematurely, respectively. Median IFN-α-2b duration, if started, was 67 weeks. A total of 133 of 268 patients who started IFN-α-2b and provided toxicity information reported grade ≥ 3 toxicity during IFN-α-2b treatment. With median follow-up of 44 months, 3-year EFS for all 716 randomly assigned patients was 76% (95% CI, 72% to 79%); 174 EFS events were reported (MAP, n = 93; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 81). Hazard ratio was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.61 to 1.12; P = .214) from an adjusted Cox model. Conclusion At the preplanned analysis time, MAP plus IFN-α-2b was not statistically different from MAP alone. A considerable proportion of patients never started IFN-α-2b or stopped

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AeroDose albuterol inhaler, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anidulafungin, anthrax vaccine, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, ceftobiprole, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, cilansetron; Darbepoetin alfa, degarelix acetate, dimethylfumarate, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, eletriptan, entecavir, esomeprazole magnesium, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fontolizumab; Gefitinib, gepirone hydrochloride; Human insulin; IDEA-070, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab; Lanthanum carbonate, lubiprostone; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, melatonin; NC-531, nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid, nolatrexed dihydrochloride; Oral insulin; Palifermin, parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranibizumab, renzapride hydrochloride, RSD-1235; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, semapimod hydrochloride, Semax, SHL-749; Tegaserod maleate, tenatoprazole, tetrodotoxin, tolevamer sodium, trabectedin, travoprost, travoprost/timolol; Valdecoxib, visilizumab, Xcellerated T cells, XP-828L; Zoledronic acid monohydrate.

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-chlorotoxin; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, albumin interferon alfa, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, AR-C126532, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cangrelor tetrasodium, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, collagen-PVP, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, dasatinib, denosumab, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (lung cancer), dexrazoxane, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, eel calcitonin, efalizumab, entecavir, etoricoxib; Falciparum merozoite protein-1/AS02A, fenretinide, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, ghrelin (human); hLM609; Icatibant acetate, imatinib mesylate, ipsapirone, irofulven; LBH-589, LE-AON, levocetirizine, LY-450139; Malaria vaccine, mapatumumab, motexafin gadolinium, muraglitazar, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; nab-paclitaxel, nelarabine; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, orbofiban acetate; Panitumumab, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, pleconaril, prasterone, pregabalin; Ranolazine, rebimastat, recombinant malaria vaccine, rosuvastatin calcium; SQN-400; Taxus, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, troxacitabine; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Val-Tyr sardine peptidase, VNP-40101M, vorinostat. PMID:16845450

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AeroDose albuterol inhaler, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anidulafungin, anthrax vaccine, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, ceftobiprole, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, cilansetron; Darbepoetin alfa, degarelix acetate, dimethylfumarate, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, eletriptan, entecavir, esomeprazole magnesium, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fontolizumab; Gefitinib, gepirone hydrochloride; Human insulin; IDEA-070, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab; Lanthanum carbonate, lubiprostone; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, melatonin; NC-531, nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid, nolatrexed dihydrochloride; Oral insulin; Palifermin, parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranibizumab, renzapride hydrochloride, RSD-1235; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, semapimod hydrochloride, Semax, SHL-749; Tegaserod maleate, tenatoprazole, tetrodotoxin, tolevamer sodium, trabectedin, travoprost, travoprost/timolol; Valdecoxib, visilizumab, Xcellerated T cells, XP-828L; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:16082427

  17. Analysis of microseismic activity detected by the WIZARD array, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenstra, J. P.; Roecker, S. W.; Thurber, C. H.; Lord, N.; O'Brien, G.; Pesicek, J. D.; Townend, J.; Bannister, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    A primary goal for the UW-Madison-RPI WIZARD array is the characterization of background seismicity around the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) site on the Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand. The WIZARD array consists of 20 stations, half broadband, deployed for a planned 2-year period around the Whataroa Valley DFDP-2 drill site. Two neighboring arrays, SAMBA (Victoria University of Wellington) to the southwest and ALFA'12 (GNS Science) to the northeast, along with several GeoNet permanent stations, provide broad coverage of the region. The earthquakes that are detected will (1) help to define the geometry of the Alpine Fault and other active faults at depth, (2) provide data for seismic imaging, focal mechanisms, and shear-wave splitting analysis, and (3) enable the assessment of possible changes in seismic activity induced by future fault zone drilling. We are currently analyzing data from the first 2 months of the deployment. Dozens of nearby earthquakes (S-P time of up to a few seconds) have been detected, far more than are in the New Zealand GeoNET catalog. This is expected because the magnitude completion level of the GeoNet seismometer network is around 2.5 in the Whataroa region, due to a relatively sparse station coverage. In this presentation, we report on earthquake location results for 8 months of WIZARD data, along with focal mechanisms for selected larger events.

  18. Low ADAMTS-13 activity during hemorrhagic events with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Yoshiaki; Kuroda, Junya; Ohshiro, Muneo; Shimura, Yuji; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Sasaki, Nana; Nakayama, Ryuko; Kiyota, Miki; Yamamoto-Sugitani, Mio; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Horiike, Shigeo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2013-04-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a life-threatening complication, and its control is essential for therapeutic success. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin alfa (rTM) is a novel therapeutic agent for DIC. The efficacy of rTM in the treatment of DIC is reportedly superior to that of conventional anti-DIC treatments, such as unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin, but hemorrhagic events occasionally interfere with the therapeutic benefits of rTM. We assessed the clinical features of 20 consecutive patients who were given rTM for DIC associated with various hematologic disorders. Eight patients achieved remission of both primary disease and DIC, eight died due to progression of the primary disease, and four died of various hemorrhagic complications. Assessment of 16 biomarkers for coagulation showed that the four patients who died of hemorrhagic complications despite remission of their primary disease showed lower ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin Type 1 motif, member 13) plasma activity than other patients (P = 0.016). The optimal cut-off level of ADAMTS-13 for predicting risk of hemorrhagic complications was 42 % (P = 0.007). Plasma ADAMTS-13 activity determined at diagnosis of DIC may help predict the risk of hemorrhagic events during and/or following DIC treatment with hematologic disorders.

  19. [Spatio-Temporal Bioelectrical Brain Activity Organization during Reading Syntagmatic and Paradigmatic Collocations by Students with Different Foreign Language Proficiency].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, L V; Cherkasova, A S

    2015-01-01

    Texts or words/pseudowords are often used as stimuli for human verbal activity research. Our study pays attention to decoding processes of grammatical constructions consisted of two-three words--collocations. Russian and English collocation sets without any narrative were presented to Russian-speaking students with different English language skill. Stimulus material had two types of collocations: paradigmatic and syntagmatic. 30 students (average age--20.4 ± 0.22) took part in the study, they were divided into two equal groups depending on their English language skill (linguists/nonlinguists). During reading brain bioelectrical activity of cortex has been registered from 12 electrodes in alfa-, beta-, theta-bands. Coherent function reflecting cooperation of different cortical areas during reading collocations has been analyzed. Increase of interhemispheric and diagonal connections while reading collocations in different languages in the group of students with low knowledge of foreign language testifies of importance of functional cooperation between the hemispheres. It has been found out that brain bioelectrical activity of students with good foreign language knowledge during reading of all collocation types in Russian and English is characterized by economization of nervous substrate resources compared to nonlinguists. Selective activation of certain cortical areas has also been observed (depending on the grammatical construction type) in nonlinguists group that is probably related to special decoding system which processes presented stimuli. Reading Russian paradigmatic constructions by nonlinguists entailed increase between left cortical areas, reading of English syntagmatic collocations--between right ones.

  20. Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b in Treating Patients With Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  1. ALF--a simulation framework for genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Dalquen, Daniel A; Anisimova, Maria; Gonnet, Gaston H; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2012-04-01

    In computational evolutionary biology, verification and benchmarking is a challenging task because the evolutionary history of studied biological entities is usually not known. Computer programs for simulating sequence evolution in silico have shown to be viable test beds for the verification of newly developed methods and to compare different algorithms. However, current simulation packages tend to focus either on gene-level aspects of genome evolution such as character substitutions and insertions and deletions (indels) or on genome-level aspects such as genome rearrangement and speciation events. Here, we introduce Artificial Life Framework (ALF), which aims at simulating the entire range of evolutionary forces that act on genomes: nucleotide, codon, or amino acid substitution (under simple or mixture models), indels, GC-content amelioration, gene duplication, gene loss, gene fusion, gene fission, genome rearrangement, lateral gene transfer (LGT), or speciation. The other distinctive feature of ALF is its user-friendly yet powerful web interface. We illustrate the utility of ALF with two possible applications: 1) we reanalyze data from a study of selection after globin gene duplication and test the statistical significance of the original conclusions and 2) we demonstrate that LGT can dramatically decrease the accuracy of two well-established orthology inference methods. ALF is available as a stand-alone application or via a web interface at http://www.cbrg.ethz.ch/alf.

  2. What level of estrogenic activity determined by in vitro assays in municipal waste waters can be considered as safe?

    PubMed

    Jarošová, Barbora; Bláha, Luděk; Giesy, John P; Hilscherová, Klára

    2014-03-01

    In vitro assays are broadly used tools to evaluate the estrogenic activity in Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) effluents and their receiving rivers. Since potencies of individual estrogens to induce in vitro and in vivo responses can differ it is not possible to directly evaluate risks based on in vitro measures of estrogenic activity. Estrone, 17beta-estradiol, 17alfa-ethinylestradiol and to some extent, estriol have been shown to be responsible for the majority of in vitro estrogenic activity of municipal WWTP effluents. Therefore, in the present study safe concentrations of Estrogenic Equivalents (EEQs-SSE) in municipal WWTP effluents were derived based on simplified assumption that the steroid estrogens are responsible for all estrogenicity determined with particular in vitro assays. EEQs-SSEs were derived using the bioassay and testing protocol-specific in vitro potencies of steroid estrogens, in vivo predicted no effect concentration (PNECs) of these compounds, and their relative contributions to the overall estrogenicity detected in municipal WWTP effluents. EEQs-SSEs for 15 individual bioassays varied from 0.1 to 0.4ng EEQ/L. The EEQs-SSEs are supposed to be increased by use of location-specific dilution factors of WWTP effluents entering receiving rivers. They are applicable to municipal wastewater and rivers close to their discharges, but not to industrial waste waters.

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, acyline, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, AEE-788, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, AK-602, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, alprazolam, amdoxovir, AMG-162, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, aminophylline hydrate, anakinra, anecortave acetate, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, APC-8015, aripiprazole, aspirin, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin calcium, atrasentan, AVE-5883, AZD-2171; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, bimatoprost, biphasic human insulin (prb), bortezomib, BR-A-657, BRL-55730, budesonide, busulfan; Calcipotriol, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, calcium folinate, capecitabine, capravirine, carmustine, caspofungin acetate, cefdinir, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, chlorambucil, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cisplatin, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clozapine, co-trimoxazole, CP-122721, creatine, CY-2301, cyclophosphamide, cypher, cytarabine, cytolin; D0401, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DASB, desipramine hydrochloride, desloratadine, desvenlafaxine succinate, dexamethasone, didanosine, diquafosol tetrasodium, docetaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecallantide, efalizumab, efavirenz, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, enoxaparin sodium, estramustine phosphate sodium, etanercept, ethinylestradiol, etonogestrel, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoposide, exenatide; Famciclovir, fampridine, febuxostat, filgrastim, fludarabine phosphate, fluocinolone acetonide, fluorouracil, fluticasone propionate

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Moral, M A; Tomillero, A

    2008-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-Chlorotoxin, 423557; Abatacept, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, Adalimumab, AE-941, Ambrisentan, AMR-001, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate; BAY-639044, Bazedoxifene acetate, Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam, Bucindolol hydrochloride; Carfilzomib, Carisbamate, CCX-282, CD20Bi, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, CF-101, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cypher; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Degarelix acetate, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexlansoprazole, Dexverapamil, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Efalizumab, EPs-7630, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib; Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium; Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir, HIV gp120/NefTat/AS02A, HPV-6/11/16/18; INCB-18424, Incyclinide, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir; KNS-760704, KW-0761; Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Levetiracetam, Licofelone, Lidocaine/prilocaine; mAb 216, MEDI-528, Men ACWY, Meningococcal C-CRM197 vaccine, Methylnaltrexone bromide; Nemifitide ditriflutate, Nicotine conjugate vaccine, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Octaparin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pegaptanib octasodium, Pitrakinra, Prasterone, Pregabalin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine, Rimonabant, RTS,S/AS02D; Sarcosine, Sitaxentan sodium, Solifenacin succinate, Sunitinib malate; Taranabant, Taxus, Teduglutide, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Travoprost, TRU-015; USlipristal acetate, Urocortin 2; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; YM-155, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zanolimumab, Zoledronic acid monohydrate, Zotarolimus

  5. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  6. [Psychometric properties of the spanish version of the "Barriers to Being Active Quiz" among university students in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Henao, Rubén Fernando; Correa, Jorge Enrique; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2015-04-01

    Objetivo: El cuestionario Barriers to Being Active Quiz (BBAQ), indaga las barreras para ser físicamente activo. El cuestionario fue traducido al español por el mismo equipo que desarrolló la versión inglésa original, pero carece de estudios de validez en la versión española. El objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar las propiedades psicométricas del BBAQ (en la versión completa de 21 ítems), centrándose en la fiabilidad y validez. Material y métodos: Un total de 2.634 (1.462 mujeres y 1.172 varones; 18-30 años de edad) estudiantes universitarios completaron el cuestionario BBAQ-21. El alfa de Crombach se estimó como indicador de consistencia interna. El coeficiente de correlación intra-clase (CCI) y el grado de acuerdo se calcularon para evaluar la estabilidad temporal con un periodo de 7 días entre ambas administraciones como estimadores de la reproducibilidad. Se aplicó un análisis factorial exploratorio (AFE) y confirmatorio (AFC) para analizar la validez del BBAQ-21 ítems. Resultados: El BBAQ-21 mostró valores de un alfa de Cronbach entre 0,812 y 0,844 y un CCI entre el 0,46 y 0,87. El porcentaje de acuerdo por todos los conceptos individuales varió de 45 a 80%. El AFE determinó cuatro factores que explicaron el 52,90% de la varianza y el AFC mostró moderadas cargas factoriales. Conclusiones: Los resultados obtenidos en este cuestionario avalan la utilización de este instrumento con este tipo de muestra, desde el punto de vista de la fiabilidad y validez. El BBAQ-21 está disponible para evaluar las barreras para la actividad física en América Latina.

  7. Activated protein C suppresses adrenomedullin and ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypotension.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Akanksha; Berg, David T; Gerlitz, Bruce; Richardson, Mark A; Galbreath, Elizabeth; Syed, Samreen; Sharma, Avadhesh C; Lowry, Stephen F; Grinnell, Brian W

    2007-10-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is an important modulator of vascular function that has antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Studies in humans have shown modulation of endotoxin-induced hypotension by recombinant human APC, drotrecogin alfa (activated), however, the mechanism for this effect is unclear. We have found that APC suppresses the induction of the potent vasoactive peptide adrenomedullin (ADM) and could downregulate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ADM messenger RNA (mRNA) and nitrite levels in cell culture. This effect was dependent on signaling through protease-activated receptor 1. Addition of 1400W, an irreversible inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, inhibited LPS-induced ADM mRNA, suggesting that ADM induction is NO mediated. Furthermore, in a rat model of endotoxemia, APC (100 microg/kg, i.v.) prevented LPS (10 mg/kg, i.v.)-induced hypotension, and suppressed ADM mRNA and protein expression. APC also inhibited iNOS mRNA and protein levels along with reduction in NO by-products (NOx). We also observed a significant reduction in iNOS-positive leukocytes adhering to vascular endothelium after APC treatment. Moreover, we found that APC inhibited the expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), a potent activator of iNOS. In a human study of LPS-induced hypotension, APC reduced the upregulation of plasma ADM levels, coincident with protection against the hypotensive response. Overall, we demonstrate that APC blocks the induction of ADM, likely mediated by IFN-gamma and iNOS, and suggests a mechanism that may account for ameliorating LPS-induced hypotension. Furthermore, our data provide a new understanding for the role of APC in modulating vascular response to insult.

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-04-01

    (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, [(123)I]-BZA, 9-Aminocamptothecin; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, Ambrisentan, Amsilarotene, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Apricitabine, Aripiprazole, Arsenic trioxide, Atazanavir sulfate, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Atrasentan, Azacitidine; Banoxantrone, Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bromfenac; Cachectin, Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Canakinumab, Carfilzomib, CAT-354, CCX-282, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, Clevudine, Clofarabine, CNTO-328, Corifollitropin alfa, Crofelemer; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Emtricitabine, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Epoetin zeta, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farglitazar, Febuxostat, Fosamprenavir calcium, FX-06; Gabapentin enacarbil, Gefitinib; HIVIS DNA; Imatinib mesylate, INCB- 18424, Indacaterol, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Insulin detemir; JNJ-26854165; Lacosamide, Landiolol, Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, L-NAME, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lumiracoxib; Maraviroc, Mepolizumab, Methoxy polyethylene glycol- epoetin-beta, Miglustat, MK-0493, MVA-CMDR, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, Nepafenac, Neratinib, Neridronic acid, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel poliglumex, Palifermin, Patupilone, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, PHA-848125, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Povidone-iodine liposome complex, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Prucalopride; Raltegravir potassium, Retigabine, Revaprazan hydrochloride, rhFSH, Rilpivirine, Rivaroxaban, Romidepsin

  9. [Conservative treatment of urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Soljanik, I; Schorsch, I; Stanislaus, P; Bauer, R; Mayer, M; Hocaoglu, Y; Becker, A; May, F

    2007-09-20

    Urinary incontinence can be treated with medicinal products in addition to active pelvic floor muscle training and electrostimulation. A local hormone therapy should be first discussed with the gynaecologist. The active substance duloxetine has been used for a few years for treating stress incontinence. Several older and newer active substances are available for treating irritable bladder and stress incontinence.

  10. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors in cancer: mechanisms involved in anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors (PIs) based on evidences reported in the published literature. Methods: We extensively reviewed the literature concerning nelfinavir (NFV) as an off target anti-cancer drug and other PIs. A classification of PIs based on anti-cancer mode of action was proposed. Controversies regarding nelfinavir mode of action were also addressed. Conclusions: The two main mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity are endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response pathway and Akt inhibition. However there are many other effects, partially dependent and independent of those mentioned, that may be useful in cancer treatment, including MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibition, down-regulation of CDK-2, VEGF, bFGF, NF-kB, STAT-3, HIF-1 alfa, IGF, EGFR, survivin, BCRP, androgen receptor, proteasome, fatty acid synthase (FAS), decrease in cellular ATP concentration and upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5, Bax, increased radiosensitivity, and autophagy. The end result of all these effects is slower growth, decreased angiogenesis, decreased invasion and increased apoptosis, which means reduced proliferation and increased cancer cells death. PIs may be classified according to their anticancer activity at clinically achievable doses, in AKT inhibitors, ER stressors and Akt inhibitors/ER stressors. Beyond the phase I trials that have been recently completed, adequately powered and well-designed clinical trials are needed in the various cancer type settings, and specific trials where NFV is tested in association with other known anti-cancer pharmaceuticals should be sought, in order to find an appropriate place for NFV in cancer treatment. The analysis of controversies on the molecular mechanisms of NFV hints to the possibility that NFV works in a different way in tumor cells and in hepatocytes and adipocytes. PMID:26097685

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-06-01

    (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Agalsidase beta, Alemtuzumab, Alglucosidase alfa, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Aripiprazole, Atrasentan, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bilastine, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Caspofungin acetate, CG-100649, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Clindamycin phosphate/ benzoyl peroxide; Dasatinib, Denosumab, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride, Dutasteride/tamsulosin; Ecogramostim, Eculizumab, Eltrombopag olamine, EndoTAG-1, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; FAHF-2, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Golimumab; HEV-239, HSV-TK; Imatinib mesylate, Indium 111 ((111)In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza vaccine(surface antigen, inactivated, prepared in cell culture), Insulin glargine; Kisspeptin-54; Lidocaine/prilocaine, Lomitapide; Maraviroc, Mirodenafil hydrochloride, MK-8141, MVA-Ag85A; Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pitavastatin calcium, Prasugrel; Recombinant human relaxin H2, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium, RRz2; Sagopilone, Salinosporamide A, SB-509, Serlopitant, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, TG-4010, Tositumomab/iodine (I131) tositumomab; Velusetrag Hydrochloride; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan. PMID:19649342

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-09-01

    Aclidinium bromide, AE-37, Alemtuzumab, AMA1-C1/ISA 720, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Arachidonic acid, Arbaclofen placarbil, Aripiprazole, ARQ-621, Azelnidipine, Azilsartan medoxomil potassium; Bevacizumab, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib; Choriogonadotropin alfa, CTS-1027; Dapagliflozin, Dasatinib, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denufosol tetrasodium, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dronedarone hydrochloride, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Etaracizumab, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Ferric carboxymaltose, Fludarabine, Foretinib; Gefitinib, GFT-505, GSK-256066; HPV-6/11/16/18, HuM195/rGel, HyperAcute-Lung cancer vaccine; I5NP, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ivabradine hydrochloride; L2G7, Lacosamide, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Lidocaine/prilocaine, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide, Lixivaptan; Meningococcal (groups A, C, Y and W-135) oligosaccharide diphtheria CRM197 conjugate vaccine, Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-β, Mirabegron, Morphine/oxycodone, MR Vaccine, MSC-1936369B, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Narlaprevir, N-Desmethylclozapine; Ocriplasmin, Olaparib, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/azelnidipine, ONO-5334, ONO-8539; Palifermin, Panitumumab, Pardoprunox hydrochloride, PCV7, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pexelizumab, PF-337210, Pitavastatin calcium; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant interleukin-7, Regadenoson, Reniale, Roflumilast, Rosuvastatin calcium; Safinamide mesilate, SB-1518, SCH-527123, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talaporfin sodium, Tanespimycin, Technosphere/Insulin, Telaprevir, Telatinib, Telcagepant, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Teriparatide, Testosterone transdermal gel, TH-302, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Trabedersen, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Visilizumab, Voreloxin, Vorinostat. PMID

  13. Active turbulence in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, S. P.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Dense, active systems show active turbulence, a state characterised by flow fields that are chaotic, with continually changing velocity jets and swirls. Here we review our current understanding of active turbulence. The development is primarily based on the theory and simulations of active liquid crystals, but with accompanying summaries of related literature.

  14. Activity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerpelman, Larry C.; Weiner, Michael J.

    This twenty-four item scale assesses students' actual and desired political-social activism in terms of physical participation, communication activities, and information-gathering activities. About ten minutes are required to complete the instrument. The scale is divided into two subscales. The first twelve items (ACT-A) question respondents on…

  15. Proteasome Activators

    PubMed Central

    Stadtmueller, Beth M.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Proteasomes degrade a multitude of protein substrates in the cytosol and nucleus, and thereby are essential for many aspects of cellular function. Because the proteolytic sites are sequestered in a closed barrel-shaped structure, activators are required to facilitate substrate access. Structural and biochemical studies of two activator families, 11S and Blm10, have provided insights to proteasome activation mechanisms, although the biological functions of these factors remain obscure. Recent advances have improved our understanding of the third activator family, including the 19S activator, which targets polyubiquitylated proteins for degradation. PMID:21211719

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-10-01

    [Methoxy-11c]PD-153035; Afamelanotide, Agalsidase beta, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Anecortave acetate, Apixaban, Aripiprazole, Atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate, Brivudine; Canakinumab, Cetuximab, Chlorotoxin, Cinaciguat; Dapagliflozin, Decitabine, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Elagolix sodium, Eplerenone, Eritoran tetrasodium, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Ezetimibe; Fospropofol disodium; G-207, Gabapentin enacarbil, Gefitinib, Golimumab; Human plasmin; Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Insulin glargine, Insulin glulisine, Istaroxime, Ixabepilone; KLH; Levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone; Miglustat, Mitumprotimut-T, MP-470; Oblimersen sodium, Olmesartan medoxomil; P53-SLP, PAN-811, Patupilone, Pazopanib hydrochloride, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pegylated arginine deiminase 20000, Pemetrexed disodium, Plitidepsin, Pregabalin; Rasagiline mesilate, Rotigotine; SCH-697243, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sumatriptan succinate/naproxen sodium, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tapentadol hydrochloride, TMC-207; V-211, Valganciclovir hydrochloride; Zolpidem tartrate.

  17. [Conservative therapy of female urinary incontinence--potential and effect].

    PubMed

    Horcicka, L; Chmel, R; Novácková, M

    2005-01-01

    Non-surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence is not as effective as surgical methods but it is very successful in indicated cases. Rehabilitation of the pelvic floor muscles (Kegel exercises, vaginal cones, and electrostimulation of the pelvic floor muscles), drug treatment (alfa-mimetics, tricyclic antidepressives, estrogens, duloxetin), pessarotherapy and uretral obturator devices represent possibilities of conservative therapy of the stress incontinence. Conservative therapy is the method of choice in the treatment of urge incontinence. The most successful are anticholinergic drugs but they have very frequent serious side effects (dryness of the mucous membranes, accommodation disorders, constipation). Spasmolytics, estrogens and tricyclic antidepressives are the other popular used drugs. Life style modification, bladder training and electrostimulation represent very important parts of the conservative treatment. Effectiveness of the non-surgical treatment of both urge and stress urinary incontinence can not reach 100 percent but it helps very much in the quality of life improvement of incontinent women.

  18. Oral Migalastat HCl Leads to Greater Systemic Exposure and Tissue Levels of Active α-Galactosidase A in Fabry Patients when Co-Administered with Infused Agalsidase

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G.; Bichet, Daniel G.; Holida, Myrl; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Nicholls, Kathy; Thomas, Mark; Eyskens, Francois; Shankar, Suma; Adera, Mathews; Sitaraman, Sheela; Khanna, Richie; Flanagan, John J.; Wustman, Brandon A.; Barth, Jay; Barlow, Carrolee; Valenzano, Kenneth J.; Lockhart, David J.; Boudes, Pol; Johnson, Franklin K.

    2015-01-01

    Migalastat HCl (AT1001, 1-Deoxygalactonojirimycin) is an investigational pharmacological chaperone for the treatment of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) deficiency, which leads to Fabry disease, an X-linked, lysosomal storage disorder. The currently approved, biologics-based therapy for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with either agalsidase alfa (Replagal) or agalsidase beta (Fabrazyme). Based on preclinical data, migalastat HCl in combination with agalsidase is expected to result in the pharmacokinetic (PK) enhancement of agalsidase in plasma by increasing the systemic exposure of active agalsidase, thereby leading to increased cellular levels in disease-relevant tissues. This Phase 2a study design consisted of an open-label, fixed-treatment sequence that evaluated the effects of single oral doses of 150 mg or 450 mg migalastat HCl on the PK and tissue levels of intravenously infused agalsidase (0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg) in male Fabry patients. As expected, intravenous administration of agalsidase alone resulted in increased α-Gal A activity in plasma, skin, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to baseline. Following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase, α-Gal A activity in plasma was further significantly increased 1.2- to 5.1-fold compared to agalsidase administration alone, in 22 of 23 patients (95.6%). Importantly, similar increases in skin and PBMC α-Gal A activity were seen following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase. The effects were not related to the administered migalastat HCl dose, as the 150 mg dose of migalastat HCl increased α-Gal A activity to the same extent as the 450 mg dose. Conversely, agalsidase had no effect on the plasma PK of migalastat. No migalastat HCl-related adverse events or drug-related tolerability issues were identified. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01196871 PMID:26252393

  19. Active ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Costanzo, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze self-propelling organisms, or active particles, in a periodic asymmetric potential. Unlike standard ratchet effect for Brownian particles requiring external forcing, in the case of active particles asymmetric potential alone produces a net drift speed (active ratchet effect). By using theoretical models and numerical simulations we demonstrate the emergence of the rectification process in the presence of an asymmetric piecewise periodic potential. The broken spatial symmetry (external potential) and time symmetry (active particles) are sufficient ingredients to sustain unidirectional transport. Our findings open the way to new mechanisms to move in directional manner motile organisms by using external periodic static fields.

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-09-01

    12B75, 274150; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Abatacept, Ad2/HIF-1alpha, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, AGN-201904-Z, AIDSVAX, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amlodipine besylate/Olmesartan medoxomil, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Amodiaquine, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Arsenic trioxide, Artesunate/Amodiaquine, Ascorbic acid, Atazanavir sulfate, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Atrigel-Leuprolide, Axitinib; Bevacizumab, Binodenoson, Bortezomib, Bovine lactoferrin; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Carisbamate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, Conivaptan hydrochloride, CP-690550, CP-751871, Cypher; Dapivirine, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, del-1 Genemedicine, Denosumab, Desloratadine, Dexlansoprazole, DiabeCell, Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, DTaP-HepB-IPV, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Eldecalcitol, Eletriptan, Emtricitabine, Entecavir, Eritoran tetrasodium, Ertapenem sodium, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Estradiol acetate, Eszopiclone, ETEC vaccine, Etoricoxib, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fluticasone furoate, Fosmidomycin, Fosmidomycin/clindamycin; Glutamine; Heat Shock Protein 10, Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HIV vaccine, Hochuekki-to, Human Albumin, Human papillomavirus vaccine; Immune globulin subcutaneous [human], IMP-321, Interferon omega, ISIS-301012, Istaroxime; Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine; Latanoprost/timolol maleate, Lenalidomide, Linaclotide acetate, Lumiracoxib, LY-517717; Malaria vaccine, MAS-063D, Meningitis B vaccine, Mepolizumab, Methylnaltrexone bromide, Micafungin sodium, MK-0822A, Morphine glucuronide, Morphine hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, Nesiritide, Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol, NT-201; Oblimersen sodium, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, Omalizumab, Otamixaban; Paclitaxel nanoparticles

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-10-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, (S)-Tenatoprazole sodium salt monohydrate 19-28z, Acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate, ADV-TK, AE-37, Aflibercept, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Asenapine maleate, Axitinib; Bavituximab, Becatecarin, beta-1,3/1,6-Glucan, Bevacizumab, Bremelanotide; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Casopitant mesylate, Catumaxomab, CDX-110, Cediranib, CMD-193, Cositecan; Darinaparsin, Denosumab, DP-b99, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E75, Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, EMD-273063, EndoTAG-1, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Eribulin mesilate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, Febuxostat, Fenretinide; Ghrelin (human); I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, I-131-3F8, Iclaprim, Iguratimod, Iloperidone, Imatinib mesylate, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Ipilimumab, Iratumumab, Ispinesib mesylate, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Laquinimod sodium, Larotaxel dehydrate, Linezolid, LOR-2040; Mapatumumab, MKC-1, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NK-012; Olanzapine pamoate, Oncolytic HSV, Ortataxel; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Paliperidone palmitate, Panitumumab, Patupilone, PCV-9, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pimecrolimus, Plerixafor hydrochloride, PM-02734, Poly I:CLC, PR1, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Progesterone caproate, Prucalopride, Pumosetrag hydrochloride; RAV-12, RB-006, RB-007, Recombinant human erythropoietin alfa, Rimonabant, Romidepsin; SAR-109659, Satraplatin, Sodium butyrate; Tadalafil, Talampanel, Tanespimycin, Tarenflurbil, Tariquidar

  4. Astronomy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid

    This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's…

  5. Faculty Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academe, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Blending scholarship and activism, whether domestic or international, takes some real work. Two scholar-activists reflect on why and how activism can be more than academic labor in this feature of the "Academe" journal. This feature includes the following brief reflections on political work, both local and global that demonstrates how on campus…

  6. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  7. Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

    Twenty-four activities suitable for outdoor use by elementary school children are outlined. Activities designed to make children aware of their environment include soil painting, burr collecting, insect and pond water collecting, studies of insect galls and field mice, succession studies, and a model of natural selection using dyed toothpicks. A…

  8. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  9. Integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion is important for development, immune responses, hemostasis and wound healing. Integrins also function as signal transducing receptors that can control intracellular pathways that regulate cell survival, proliferation, and cell fate. Conversely, cells can modulate the affinity of integrins for their ligands a process operationally defined as integrin activation. Analysis of activation of integrins has now provided a detailed molecular understanding of this unique form of “inside-out” signal transduction and revealed new paradigms of how transmembrane domains (TMD) can transmit long range allosteric changes in transmembrane proteins. Here, we will review how talin and mediates integrin activation and how the integrin TMD can transmit these inside out signals. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 655-659] PMID:25388208

  10. Active Cytokinins

    PubMed Central

    Mornet, René; Theiler, Jane B.; Leonard, Nelson J.; Schmitz, Ruth Y.; Moore, F. Hardy; Skoog, Folke

    1979-01-01

    Four series of azidopurines have been synthesized and tested for cytokinin activity in the tobacco callus bioassay: 2- and 8-azido-N6-benzyladenines, -N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenines, and -zeatins, and N6-(2- and 4-azidobenzyl)adenines. The compounds having 2-azido substitution on the adenine ring are as active as the corresponding parent compounds, while those with 8-azido substitution are about 10 or more times as active. The 8-azidozeatin, which is the most active cytokinin observed, exhibited higher than minimal detectable activity at 1.2 × 10−5 micromolar, the lowest concentration tested. The shape of the growth curve indicates that even a concentration as low as 5 × 10−6 micromolar would probably be effective. By comparison, the lowest active concentration ever reported for zeatin has been 5 × 10−5 micromolar, representing a sensitivity rarely attained. All of the azido compounds have been submitted to photolysis in aqueous ethanol, and the photoproducts have been detected and identified by low and high resolution mass spectrometry. They are rationalized as products of abstraction and insertion reactions of the intermediate nitrenes. The potential of the major released products as cytokinins was also assessed by bioassay. 2-Azido-N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine competed with [14C]kinetin for the cytokinin-binding protein isolated from wheat germ. When the azido compound was photolysed in the presence of this protein, its attachment effectively blocked the binding of [14C]kinetin. PMID:16661017

  11. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  12. Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  13. Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Frances R.

    This pamphlet suggests activities that may be used in the elementary school classroom. Chapter I lists various short plays that children can easily perform which encourage their imagination. Chapter II details a few quiet classroom games such as "I Saw,""Corral the Wild Horse,""Who Has Gone from the Room," and "Six-Man-Football Checkers." A number…

  14. Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Tom, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a flow chart for naming inorganic compounds. Although it is not necessary for students to memorize rules, preliminary skills needed before using the chart are outlined. Also presents an activity in which the mass of an imaginary atom is determined using lead shot, Petri dishes, and a platform balance. (JN)

  15. Leaf Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    Leaf activities can provide a means of using basic concepts of outdoor education to learn in elementary level subject areas. Equipment needed includes leaves, a clipboard with paper, and a pencil. A bag of leaves may be brought into the classroom if weather conditions or time do not permit going outdoors. Each student should pick a leaf, examine…

  16. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifting small weights – you can even use bottled water or cans of food as weights Watch these videos for muscle strengthening exercises to do at home or at the gym. If you do muscle-strengthening activities with weights, check out the do’s and don’ ...

  17. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  18. Glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Filipski, Kevin J; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Stevens, Benjamin D

    2012-07-01

    In this review we highlight recently disclosed progress in the field of small-molecule activators of the human glucokinase enzyme. Several of the reported chemotypes possess structural features that diverge from known leads; some of these modifications appear to be specifically designed to modulate tissue selectivity or discrete parameters of enzyme function (e.g., S0.5 v Vmax). This review will inform the reader of the extent of continued effort being directed toward discovery of a first-in-class drug for Type II diabetes mellitus that functions through this target. Patents were selected from those published in December 2009 up to November 2011; foreign filings were translated where possible to understand the claims and biological techniques utilized to characterize the reported glucokinase activators. Overall, there appears to be a recent trend leading to reduced patent filings for small-molecule glucokinase activators. There are many possible explanations for this trend; however, it is likely that the field has reached maturity and that the downturn of new disclosures represents the transition of many of these programs to the clinic.

  19. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time.

  20. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time. PMID:26803804

  1. Active tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This study is part of a series of Studies in Geophysics that have been undertaken for the Geophysics Research Forum by the Geophysics Study Committee. One purpose of each study is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such assessments is an evaluation of the adequacy of current geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of current research programs as a source of information required for those decisions. The study addresses our current scientific understanding of active tectonics --- particularly the patterns and rates of ongoing tectonic processes. Many of these processes cannot be described reasonably using the limited instrumental or historical records; however, most can be described adequately for practical purposes using the geologic record of the past 500,000 years. A program of fundamental research focusing especially on Quaternary tectonic geology and geomorphology, paleoseismology, neotectonics, and geodesy is recommended to better understand ongoing, active tectonic processes. This volume contains 16 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database.

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, adalimumab, AERx morphine sulphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, amprenavir, aripiprazole, atenolol, atorvastatin calcium; BSYX-A110; Cantuzumab mertansine, capravirine, CDP-571, CDP-870, celecoxib; Delavirdine mesilate, docetaxel, dofetilide, donepezil hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride, dydrogesterone; Efavirenz, emtricitabine, enjuvia, enteryx, epristeride, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etanercept, etonogestrel, etoricoxib; Fesoterodine, finasteride, flt3ligand; Galantamine hydrobromide, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, genistein, gepirone hydrochloride; Indinavir sulfate, infliximab; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, leteprinim potassium, levetiracetam, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, losartan potassium; MCC-465, MRA; Nebivolol, nesiritide, nevirapine; Olanzapine, OROS(R)-Methylphenidate hydrochloride; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, Pimecrolimus, polyethylene glycol 3350, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Risedronate sodium, risperidone, ritonavir, rituximab, rivastigmine tartrate, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium; Saquinavir mesilate, Stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride, telmisartan, tomoxetine hydrochloride, treprostinil sodium, trimegestone, trimetrexate; Valdecoxib, venlafaxine hydrochloride; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:12616965

  3. DAVIC activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    DAVIC (Digital Audio Visual Council) is the defacto standardization organization established in Mar. 1994, based on international consensus for digital audio visual services. After completion of MPEG2 standardization, the broadcasting industry, the communication industry, the computer industry, and consumer electronics industry have started development of concrete services and products. Especially the interactive digital audio visual services, such as Video On Demand (VOD) or Near Video On Demand (NVOD), have become hot topics all over the world. Such interactive digital audio visual services are combined technologies of multi-media coding, digital transmission and computer networking. Therefore more than 150 organizations from all industry sectors have participated in DAVIC and are contributing from their own industrial contexts. DAVIC's basic policy is to use the available technologies specified by the other standards bodies as much as possible. So DAVIC's standardization activities have close relationship with ISO IEC/JTC1/SC29, ITU-T SG 9, ATM-Forum, IETF, IMA, DVB, etc. DAVIC is trying to specify Applications, Reference Models, Security, Usage Information Control, and the interfaces and protocols among the Content Provider, the Server, the core network, the access network, and the Set Top Unit. DAVIC's first goal is to specify DAVIC1.0 based on CFP1 (Call for Proposal) and CFP2 by Dec. 1995, and the next direction is under preparation for further progress based on CFP3 and CFP4.

  4. Serotonin Syndrome in a Patient on Trazodone and Duloxetine Who Received Fentanyl following a Percutaneous Liver Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Ryan R.; Schreibman, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction resulting from the use or overuse of serotonergic medications alone or in combination. Mild symptoms, overlapping features with similar conditions and clinician lack of awareness are the major reasons for an often missed diagnosis. Not surprisingly, this condition is significantly underreported as a potential complication of endoscopy if serotonergic medications are used periprocedurally for sedation and analgesia. Here we report the case of a patient with relapsed chronic hepatitis C on antidepressant medications who developed signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome after a percutaneous liver biopsy. Review of the patient's medication list suggested a possible interaction between her home antidepressants and the post-procedure use of fentanyl for abdominal pain. The patient required monitoring in the medical intensive care unit and stabilized after the administration of benzodiazepines and temporary discontinuation of her home medications. We propose that clinicians need to be aware of the increased risk of serotonin syndrome in the outpatient endoscopy setting, particularly with the wider use of serotonergic antidepressants now available and the repeated number of liver biopsies being performed for management of patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:26078731

  5. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Vestergaard, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension.

  6. IASS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.; Ibragimova, Elvira M.

    2015-08-01

    It’s well known, astronomy in Uzbekistan has ancient roots and traditions (e.g., Mirzo Ulugh Beg, Abū al-Rayhān al-Bīrūnī, Abū ‘Abdallāh al-Khwārizmī) and astronomical heritage carefully preserved. Nowadays uzbek astronomers play a key role in scientific research but also in OAD and Decadal Plan activity in the Central Asia region. International Aerospace School (IASS) is an amazing and wonderful event held annually about 30 years. IASS is unique project in the region, and at the beginning we spent the Summer and Winter Schools. At present in the summer camp we gather about 50 teenage and undergraduate students over the country and abroad (France, Malaysia, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Russia, etc.). They are selected on the basis of tests of astronomy and space issues. During two weeks of IASS camp the invited scientists, cosmonauts and astronauts as well as other specialists give lectures and engage in practical exercises with IASS students in astronomy, including daily observations of the Sun and night sky observations with meniscus telescope, space research and exploration, aerospace modelling, preparation and presentation of original projects. This is important that IASS gives not theoretical grounds only but also practically train the students and the hands-on training is the major aims of IASS. Lectures and practice in the field of astronomy carried out with the direct involvement and generous assistance of Uranoscope Association (Paris, France). The current 26-th IASS is planned to held in July 2015.

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Aclidinium bromide, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Apilimod mesylate, Aripiprazole, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Berberine iodide, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bryostatin 1; Calcipotriol/hydrocortisone, Carglumic acid, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cixutumumab, Coumarin, Custirsen sodium; Darbepoetin alfa, Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Denibulin hydrochloride, Denosumab, Diacetylmorphine, Dulanermin, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Escitalopram oxalate, Esomeprazole sodium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fenofibrate/pravastatin sodium, Ferric carboxymaltose, Flavangenol, Fondaparinux sodium; Glutamine, GSK-1024850A; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Hib-MenC, HIV-LIPO-5; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indacaterol maleate, Indibulin, Indium 111 (¹¹¹In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glulisine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Leucovorin/UFT; Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MMR-V, Morphine hydrochloride, Morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium, Natalizumab; Oncolytic HSV; Paliperidone, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Rilpivirine

  8. Activation Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  9. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fitness. Your fitness routine should include aerobic and strength-training activities, and may also include stretching activities. Aerobic ... Examples include walking, jogging, bicycling, swimming, and tennis. Strength-training activities These activities increase the strength and endurance ...

  10. Interleukin-12 Followed by Interferon Alfa in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Infection and inflammation in patients on dialysis: an underlying contributor to anemia and epoetin alfa hyporesponse.

    PubMed

    Breiterman-White, Randee

    2006-01-01

    Acute or chronic infections or inflammatory conditions can exacerbate anemia in patients on dialysis. The primary goal is to identify and treat the underlying disorder, while minimizing the impact on hemoglobin (Hb) levels. Nurses can be instrumental in minimizing the impact of these conditions by monitoring the longitudinal trends in Hb levels, proactively assessing patients for inflammatory or infectious conditions, and intervening to resolve causative conditions and minimize the impact on anemia.

  12. Differential Dynamics of CALR Mutant Allele Burden in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms during Interferon Alfa Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Holmström, Morten O.; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Pallisgaard, Niels; Larsen, Thomas S.; de Stricker, Karin; Skov, Vibe; Hasselbalch, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of somatic mutations in the calreticulin gene (CALR) has identified a subgroup of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) with separate haematological characteristics and prognosis. CALR mutations serve as novel markers both of diagnostic value and as targets for monitoring molecular responses during therapy. Interferon-α (IFN) selectively targets the malignant clone in a subset of MPN patients and can induce both haematological and molecular remissions in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients. We investigated the response to IFN in a cohort of 21 CALR mutated MPN patients including ET, prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis (pre-PMF), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) with a median follow-up of 31 months. For evaluation of a molecular response, we developed highly sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for monitoring the mutant allele burden of the two most prevalent CALR mutations (type 1 and type 2). Thirteen patients (62%) experienced a decrease in the mutant allele burden with a median decline of 29% from baseline. However, only four patients, including patients with ET, pre-PMF, and PMF diagnosis, achieved molecular responder (MR) status with >50% reduction in mutant allele burden according to European LeukemiaNet (ELN) guidelines. MR patients displayed significant differences in the dynamics of the CALR mutant load with regard to time to response and dynamics in mutant allele burden after discontinuation of IFN treatment. Furthermore, we highlight the prognostic value of the CALR mutant allele burden by showing a close association with leucocyte- and platelet counts, hemoglobin concentration, in addition to plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) irrespective of molecular response and treatment status. PMID:27764253

  13. Interleukin-2 Plus Interferon Alfa in Treating Adults With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-10

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. HI Absorption Lines Detected from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong-zu, Wu; Martha P, Haynes; Riccardo, Giovanelli; Ming, Zhu; Ru-rong, Chen

    2015-10-01

    We present some preliminary results of an on-going study of HI 21-cm absorption lines based on the 40% survey data released by the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA). (1) Ten HI candidate absorbers have been detected. Five of them are previously published in the literature, and the rest of them are new detections that need further confirmation. (2) For those sources with no detected absorptions, we have calculated the upper limit of their foreground HI column density NHI. The statistical result of the NHI distribution indicates that the ratio Ts/f between the averaged spin temperature and coverage factor for DLAs (the damped Lyα systems) might be larger than 500 K. The radio frequency interference (RFI) and standing wave are the main factors affecting the detection of HI absorption lines, which have been analyzed and discussed as well in order to find a method of solution. Our study can serve as a pathfinder for the future large-scale search of HI 21-cm absorption lines using the Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), which is an Arecibo-type radio telescope currently under construction in China with greatly increased sensitivity, bandwidth, and observational sky area. As prospects, we have discussed two types of observational studies of HI absorption lines toward extragalactic sources using the FAST telescope.

  15. Epoetin Alfa in Treating Anemia in Patients Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Anemia; Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Drug/Agent Toxicity by Tissue/Organ; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. [Alfa and beta diversity of reptilian assemblages in Zapatosa wetland complex, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Medina-Rangel, Guido Fabián

    2011-06-01

    Diversity is a property of community that can described, characterized, and understood according to the functioning of ecosystems. To study the richness and local abundance and species replacement between habitats around the Zapatosa's wetland complex (El Cesar Department), I carried out four field trips between November of 2006 and October of 2007. A total of 640 sampling hours/man analyzed five habitat types chasmophyte forest, dry forest, riparian forest, palm-grove and tree-lined savanna; with the exception of the palm-grove sampled at its 75%, the others were sampled up to their 80%. I found 847 reptiles that were distributed in 48 species. The group with the highest number of species was Colubridae with 14, followed by Gekkonidae with five. Five endemic species and eight with some conservation threat grade at a national level are reported. The riparian forest was the richest and most abundant habitat with 34 species and 196 individuals. For each habitat, Colubridae had the highest number of species, followed by the families Polychrotidae, Gekkonidae and Teiidae, in that order. The reptile species composition was not different between the tree-lined savanna and the chasmophyte forest, but differed among the tree-lined savanna and the riparian forest, palm-grove and dry forest habitats. The most important differences in the species composition among almost all the habitats were influenced by the species Anolis tropidogaster and Gonatodes albogularis, and the higher occurrence of Stenocercus erythrogaster in the chasmophyte forest. The species replacement had an average value of 50%; the biggest amounts of shared species were the lizards, while the snake Leptodeira septentrionalis was the only one present in all habitat types. The forest grows-among-rocks showed the biggest complementarity and number of unique species compared to the other habitats. The wetland complex provides two thirds of the reptile's species reported until now for the Caribbean region, and more than 80% of those reported for the El Cesar department. This wetland complex seems to behave as a center for low land species concentration as it hosts a high proportion of species from those places.

  17. Dinamica numerica di microsonde verso Alfa Centauri con impulsi LASER su vele spaziali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-05-01

    Starshot project aims to reach alpha Centauri at 4.4 light years in 24 years, by accelerating to velocity 0.2 c with collimated LASER light pressure for 1000s several grams-scale microprobes with space sails. The energetics and dynamical equations are solved numerically on a worksheet and discussed.

  18. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey: The Galaxy Population Detected by ALFALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle

    2012-09-01

    Making use of H I 21 cm line measurements from the ALFALFA survey (α.40) and photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we investigate the global scaling relations and fundamental planes linking stars and gas for a sample of 9417 common galaxies: the α.40-SDSS-GALEX sample. In addition to their H I properties derived from the ALFALFA data set, stellar masses (M *) and star formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fitting the UV-optical spectral energy distributions. 96% of the α.40-SDSS-GALEX galaxies belong to the blue cloud, with the average gas fraction f H I ≡ M H I /M * ~ 1.5. A transition in star formation (SF) properties is found whereby below M * ~ 109.5 M ⊙, the slope of the star-forming sequence changes, the dispersion in the specific star formation rate (SSFR) distribution increases, and the star formation efficiency (SFE) mildly increases with M *. The evolutionary track in the SSFR-M * diagram, as well as that in the color-magnitude diagram, is linked to the H I content; below this transition mass, the SF is regulated strongly by the H I. Comparison of H I and optically selected samples over the same restricted volume shows that the H I-selected population is less evolved and has overall higher SFR and SSFR at a given stellar mass, but lower SFE and extinction, suggesting either that a bottleneck exists in the H I-to-H2 conversion or that the process of SF in the very H I-dominated galaxies obeys an unusual, low-efficiency SF law. A trend is found that, for a given stellar mass, high gas fraction galaxies reside preferentially in dark matter halos with high spin parameters. Because it represents a full census of H I-bearing galaxies at z ~ 0, the scaling relations and fundamental planes derived for the ALFALFA population can be used to assess the H I detection rate by future blind H I surveys and intensity mapping experiments at higher redshift. Based on observations made with the Arecibo Observatory. The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968) and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana and the Universities Space Research Association.

  19. [Adapting physical activities for an active retirement].

    PubMed

    Renaudie, François

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of doing adapted physical exercise for elderly people have been proven. For more than thirty years, the French Federation for an Active Retirement has been striving to help people age well by proposing multiple activities to remain in good health after the age of 50. Doctors, activity leaders and federal instructors are attentive to each individual's capacities. PMID:27449307

  20. Learning as Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrates contemporary theories of learning into a theory of learning as activity. Explains ecological psychology, changes in understanding of learning, activity systems and activity theory (including the integration of consciousness and activity), and activity structure; and discusses learning as a cognitive and social process. (LRW)

  1. Physical Activity Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

  2. Facts about Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  3. Sofosbuvir (Sovaldi°). Active against hepatitis C virus, but evaluation is incomplete .

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    About 50% of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection have a sustained virological response to a 48-week course of the peginterferon alfa + ribavirin combination. Adding a viral protease inhibitor to this combination for 12 to 32 weeks enhances antiviral effects but increases the risk of serious adverse effects. Between 70% and 80% of patients with HCV genotype 2 or 3 infection have a sustained virological response to a 24-week course of the peginterferon alfa + ribavirin combination. Sofosbuvir, a nucleotide inhibitor of viral (or HCV) NS5B RNA polymerase,has been authorised in the European Union for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, in combination with other drugs. Despite the inclusion of several clinical trials, initial evaluation of sofosbuvir provides only a minimal picture of the harm-benefit balance. Sofosbuvir has not been compared directly with viral protease inhibitors in randomised clinical trials. In a trial involving 121 patients with HCV genotype 1 infection, the sustained viral response rate was 90% when sofosbuvir was added to the peginterferon alfa + ribavirin combination for 12 weeks, versus about 60% with peginterferon alfa + ribavirin alone. In a randomised, unblinded, noninferiority trial in 527 previously untreated patients with HCV genotype 2 or 3 infection, sofosbuvir + ribavirin combination therapy given for 12 weeks had virological efficacy similar to peginterferon alfa-2a + ribavirin combination therapy given for 24 weeks. However, there were signs that sofosbuvir might be less effective against HCV genotype 3. In an uncontrolled study of 114 patients with HCV genotype 1 infection who could not receive peginterferon alfa, the sofosbuvir + ribavirin combination yielded sustained virological responses in about 75% of cases. Similar results were obtained in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 280 patients with HCV genotype 2 or 3 infection. Too few cases of HCV genotype 4, 5 or 6 infection were included

  4. Spinal mechanism of standard analgesics: evaluation using mouse models of allodynia.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Mina; Kiso, Tetsuo; Shimoshige, Yukinori; Aoki, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Nobuya

    2010-05-25

    Spinal neurotransmission plays an important role in the perception of pain signaling. In the present study, we investigated the spinal anti-nociceptive mechanism of current standard analgesics in mouse models of tactile allodynia induced by intrathecal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and bicuculline. NMDA-induced allodynia is induced by postsynaptic NMDA receptor activation, while PGE2-induced allodynia is triggered by the enhancement of presynaptic glutamate release via EP1 receptor activation. In contrast, bicuculline induces allodynia by the blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated inhibitory system. As the clinically available analgesics, pregabalin (alpha2delta-subunit calcium channel ligand), ziconotide (N-type calcium channel blocker), mexiletine (sodium channel blocker), and duloxetine (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) were evaluated in these neurochemically-induced allodynia models. Pregabalin almost completely alleviated NMDA-, PGE2-, and bicuculline-induced allodynia. Despite being classified as an agent with a similar molecular target mechanism, ziconotide could only alleviate PGE2-induced allodynia, but not NMDA- or bicuculline-induced allodynia, as did mexiletine and duloxetine. These results taken together suggest that ziconotide, mexiletine, and duloxetine suppress spinal hyperactivity via the presynaptic site mechanism. In contrast, pregabalin could suppress via the downstream step during spinal hyperactivation such as postsynaptic NMDA activation or dysfunction of GABAergic control in addition to presynaptic mechanism. In conclusion, present findings provide implication that the spinal anti-nociceptive mechanistic site of pregabalin is different from that of ziconotide, mexiletine, and duloxetine, and pregabalin could have a broader anti-nociceptive mechanism other than N-type calcium channel blockade. PMID:20188724

  5. Brain Connectivity Predicts Placebo Response across Chronic Pain Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tétreault, Pascal; Mansour, Ali; Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Schnitzer, Thomas J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2016-01-01

    Placebo response in the clinical trial setting is poorly understood and alleged to be driven by statistical confounds, and its biological underpinnings are questioned. Here we identified and validated that clinical placebo response is predictable from resting-state functional magnetic-resonance-imaging (fMRI) brain connectivity. This also led to discovering a brain region predicting active drug response and demonstrating the adverse effect of active drug interfering with placebo analgesia. Chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain patients (n = 56) underwent pretreatment brain scans in two clinical trials. Study 1 (n = 17) was a 2-wk single-blinded placebo pill trial. Study 2 (n = 39) was a 3-mo double-blinded randomized trial comparing placebo pill to duloxetine. Study 3, which was conducted in additional knee OA pain patients (n = 42), was observational. fMRI-derived brain connectivity maps in study 1 were contrasted between placebo responders and nonresponders and compared to healthy controls (n = 20). Study 2 validated the primary biomarker and identified a brain region predicting drug response. In both studies, approximately half of the participants exhibited analgesia with placebo treatment. In study 1, right midfrontal gyrus connectivity best identified placebo responders. In study 2, the same measure identified placebo responders (95% correct) and predicted the magnitude of placebo’s effectiveness. By subtracting away linearly modeled placebo analgesia from duloxetine response, we uncovered in 6/19 participants a tendency of duloxetine enhancing predicted placebo response, while in another 6/19, we uncovered a tendency for duloxetine to diminish it. Moreover, the approach led to discovering that right parahippocampus gyrus connectivity predicts drug analgesia after correcting for modeled placebo-related analgesia. Our evidence is consistent with clinical placebo response having biological underpinnings and shows that the method can also reveal that active

  6. Enzyme activities in activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Hui; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2007-12-01

    This study quantified the activities of enzymes in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and in pellets. Seven commonly adopted extraction schemes were utilized to extract from aerobic flocs the contained EPS, which were further categorized into loosely bound (LB) and tightly bound (TB) fractions. Ultrasonication effectively extracted the EPS from sludge flocs. Enzyme assay tests showed that the protease activity was localized mainly on the pellets, alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase activities were largely bound with LB-EPS, and few protease, alpha-amylase, or alpha-glucosidase activities were associated with the TB-EPS fraction. There exists no correlation between the biochemical compositions of EPS and the distribution of enzyme activities in the sludge matrix. The 44-65% of alpha-amylase and 59-100% of alpha-glucosidase activities noted with the LB-EPS indicate heterogeneous hydrolysis patterns in the sludge flocs with proteins and carbohydrates.

  7. Effects of different crops and soil managements on runoff for hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, F.; Pieri, L.; Gaspari, N.; Rossi Pisa, P.

    2003-04-01

    Runoff and soil erosion are natural phenomena strongly influenced by agricultural activities. Their main consequences are soil degradation, declining soil fertility, limiting infiltration capacity and water storage and have a strong negative feed-back on agriculture. Runoff prevention and soil conservation on agricultural land have also beneficial effects in reducing flood risk, especially against a background of climate change. In order to limit soil degradation a deep knowledge of all the factors taking part in the runoff process is necessary due to the fact that it occurs under very diverse conditions, depending on interactions between land use, climate, soils and topography. In particular in this study we have focalised our attention on two aspects: firstly we compared various use of agricultural soil, choosing between the most common crops of our region; secondly we studied different hydrological management in order to control the soil loss. The trial was carried out in Ozzano (Bo), Italy, (44^o25'N, 11^o28'E, 200 m a.s.l.) in plots with different slopes (from 0.65% to 17,9%) and tillage directions. Selected crops were wheat, sorghum and alfa alfa, whose rotation allowed the study of increasing vegetation densities, from bare soil, during the wheat-sorghum season, to the alfa alfa complete coverage. In addition we considered also a plot with cherry wood trees situated by the trial site. We examined five years of data with the aim of underlining relationships among vegetation density, plot slope, runoff and rainfall quantity - intensity - erosivity. The first findings show that: the values of runoff in alfa alfa are one order of magnitude lower than in sorghum and wheat, even with high erosive rainfall events. Cherry wood trees covered soil yields runoff amount lower than alfa alfa, since leaves interception of rain drops and the presence of brushwood retard the runoff, confirming the importance of forest cover to limit erosion processes.

  8. Active commuting to school

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declines in physical activity levels have coincided with increasing rates of obesity in children. This is problematic because physical activity has been shown to attenuate weight gain in children. Active commuting to school is one way of increasing children's physical activity. However, given the hi...

  9. Home Activities for Fours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson-Florissant School District, Ferguson, MO.

    These home learning activity guides have been developed for parents to use with their 4-year-old children. Most of the activities require only household items that are often thrown away and can be recycled for learning activities. Some require no materials at all. The guides frequently begin with a discussion of home activities; progress through…

  10. [Positive Activities Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This packet contains four pamphlets that are part of a campaign to encourage adults to provide and promote positive activities for youth and to serve as role models for young people. "Positive Activities: A Campaign for Youth" includes information on what positive activities are, how to get involved in helping to provide positive activities for…

  11. Comparison of mechanical allodynia and the affective component of inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Boyce-Rustay, Janel M; Zhong, Chengmin; Kohnken, Rebecca; Baker, Scott J; Simler, Gricelda H; Wensink, Erica J; Decker, Michael W; Honore, Prisca

    2010-02-01

    Most animal models of pain cannot separate the sensory and affective components of pain. One model that has been used to assess affective pain is the place escape avoidance paradigm (PEAP). The aim of the current study is two-fold. First, validate PEAP with Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation for the assessment of the affective component of pain using the reference analgesics celecoxib, diclofenac and duloxetine; fluoxetine and scopolamine were tested as negative controls. Secondly, determine if there is a difference in efficacy in PEAP in comparison to the effects of the same compounds on von Frey-evoked mechanical allodynia in CFA animals. All compounds were tested in mechanical allodynia, place escape/avoidance, and for potentially confounding side effects in locomotor activity. Results show that celecoxib, diclofenac, and duloxetine significantly increased the time spent on the side associated with stimulation of the injured paw, whereas fluoxetine and scopolamine had no effect. Higher doses of celecoxib, diclofenac, duloxetine, and fluoxetine were required to attenuate von Frey-evoked mechanical allodynia. In the side effect assays, only fluoxetine decreased locomotor activity at doses used in PEAP. These results show that in inflammatory pain induced by CFA injection, PEAP is more sensitive to the effects of pain relieving compounds than mechanical allodynia. Fluoxetine showed efficacy in the mechanical allodynia test, but not PEAP, whereas duloxetine showed efficacy in mechanical allodynia and PEAP. These studies show that methods other than reflex based measures of pain such as affective pain models could be more predictive of efficacy/potency in the clinic.

  12. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-labetuzumab; Abacavir sulfate, abatacept, adalimumab, ademetionine, adjuvanted influenza vaccine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, amlodipine, amphotericin B, anakinra, aripiprazole, aspirin, axitinib; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123; Calcium folinate, canertinib dihydrochloride, carboplatin, carmustine, cetirizine hydrochloride, cetuximab, cholecalciferol, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clofazimine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CpG-7909; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DB-289, desloratadine, Dexamet, dicycloverine hydrochloride, dimethyl fumarate, docetaxel, dolastatin 10, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, edotecarin, efaproxiral sodium, enalapril maleate, epoetin beta, epoprostenol sodium, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol, etanercept; Fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil; Gefitinib, gemcitabine, Ghrelin (human), glibenclamide, glimepiride, GTI-2040; Haloperidol, human insulin, hydrocortisone probutate; Imatinib mesylate, indisulam, influenza vaccine, inhaled insulin, insulin aspart, insulin glulisine, insulin lispro, irinotecan, ispronicline; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, lapatinib, letrozole, levocetirizine, lomustine, lonafarnib, lumiracoxib;Magnesium sulfate, MD-1100, melphalan, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metoclopramide hydrochloride, mitiglinide calcium hydrate, monophosphoryl lipid A, montelukast sodium, motexafin gadolinium

  14. Virucidal activity of an activated sludge supernatant.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Y; Schwartzbrod, L

    1993-09-01

    The virucidal activity of the activated sludge aqueous phase was studied from the time of initial inoculation with a poliovirus type 1 suspension and for durations of three and nine days. The mixtures were incubated in presence of a nutritive medium at 26 degrees C and samples were drawn at regular intervals of time for viral titration. The activated sludge supernatant (ASS) caused an important decrease of the titer of the poliovirus type 1 suspension especially after nine days of incubation. There was an average reduction of the viral titer of 79% after three days and 97% after nine days. When incubating the ASS with a nutritive medium before inoculating it, the viral decrease was much greater than when incubating without nutritive medium. When sterilizing the ASS before incubation and then inoculating it, no significant virucidal activity was observed (0% to 6%). Furthermore, when the ASS was subjected to a sterilization by filtration after incubation and was then inoculated, there existed a lower but not negligible viral inactivation (53% to 64%). The virucidal activity potentiality of the ASS is therefore due to microorganisms acting both directly as a support for viral particles adsorption and indirectly via the synthesis of substances with virucidal activity. When freezing and thawing the incubated ASS, and then sterilizing it by filtration before inoculation, the viral decrease reached 87% to 94%. This proves that the virucidal substances are only partly excreted by the microorganisms.

  15. Chronic effects of antidepressants on serotonin release in rat raphe slice cultures: high potency of milnacipran in the augmentation of serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Nagayasu, Kazuki; Kitaichi, Maiko; Nishitani, Naoya; Asaoka, Nozomi; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2013-11-01

    Most clinically-used antidepressants acutely increase monoamine levels in synaptic clefts, while their therapeutic effects often require several weeks of administration. Slow neuroadaptive changes in serotonergic neurons are considered to underlie this delayed onset of beneficial actions. Recently, we reported that sustained exposure of rat organotypic raphe slice cultures containing abundant serotonergic neurons to selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (citalopram, fluoxetine and paroxetine) caused the augmentation of exocytotic serotonin release. However, the ability of other classes of antidepressants to evoke a similar outcome has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the sustained actions of two tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine and desipramine), one tetracyclic antidepressant (mianserin), three 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (milnacipran, duloxetine and venlafaxine) and one noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (mirtazapine) on serotonin release in the slice cultures. For seven of nine antidepressants, sustained exposure to the agents at concentrations of 0.1-100 μ m augmented the level of increase in extracellular serotonin. The rank order of their potency was as follows: milnacipran>duloxetine>citalopram>venlafaxine>imipramine>fluoxetine>desipramine. Neither mirtazapine nor mianserin caused any augmentation. The highest augmentation by sustained exposure to milnacipran was partially attenuated by an α 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, benoxathian, while the duloxetine-, venlafaxine- and citalopram-mediated increases were not affected. These results suggest that inhibition of the 5-HT transporter is required for the enhancement of serotonin release. Furthermore, the potent augmentation by milnacipran is apparently due to the accompanied activation of the α 1-adrenoceptor.

  16. Inhibition of Cytochrome P450 by Propolis in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Oh, Soo Jin; Oh, Jung Min; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Lee, Sang Yoon; Chae, Jung-woo; Kwon, Kwang-il; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2016-01-01

    Although propolis is one of the most popular functional foods for human health, there have been no comprehensive studies of herb-drug interactions through cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition. The purpose of this study was to determine the inhibitory effects of propolis on the activities of CYP1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1 and 3A4 using pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs). Propolis inhibited CYP1A2, CYP2E1 and CYP2C19 with an IC50 value of 6.9, 16.8, and 43.1 μg/mL, respectively, whereas CYP2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 were unaffected. Based on half-maximal inhibitory concentration shifts between microsomes incubated with and without nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, propolis-induced CYP1A2, CYP2C19, and CYP2E1 inhibition was metabolism-independent. To evaluate the interaction potential between propolis and therapeutic drugs, the effects of propolis on metabolism of duloxetine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, were determined in HLMs. CYP1A2 and CYP2D6 are involved in hydroxylation of duloxetine to 4-hydroxy duloxetine, the major metabolite, which was decreased following propolis addition in HLMs. These results raise the possibility of interactions between propolis and therapeutic drugs metabolized by CYP1A2. PMID:27437087

  17. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  18. Preschoolers’ Physical Activity Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Jennifer D.; He, Meizi; Bouck, L. Michelle Sangster; Tucker, Patricia; Pollett, Graham L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand parents’ perspectives of their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours. Methods A maximum variation sample of 71 parents explored their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours through 10 semi-structured focus group discussions. Results Parents perceived Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines for Children as inadequate; that their preschoolers get and need more than 30–90 minutes of activity daily; and that physical activity habits must be established during the preschool years. Nine barriers against and facilitators toward adequate physical activity were proposed: child’s age, weather, daycare, siblings, finances, time, society and safety, parents’ impact, and child’s activity preferences. Discussion The need for education and interventions that address current barriers are essential for establishing physical activity as a lifestyle behaviour during early childhood and, consequently, helping to prevent both childhood and adulthood obesity. PMID:16625802

  19. Balance Food and Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Health Professionals Tools and Resources Promotional Materials Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ... Training For Health Professionals Tools & Resources Promotional ... Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ...

  20. Population Education. Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Deborah E.

    1990-01-01

    Described are awareness activities that deal with human population growth, resources, and the environment. Activities include simulations, mathematical exercises, and discussions of the topic. Specific examples of what individuals can do to help are listed. (KR)

  1. Major operations and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development.

  2. Active Fire Mapping Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS ... Data Web Services Latest Detected Fire Activity Other MODIS Products Frequently Asked Questions About Active Fire Maps ...

  3. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  4. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 593 - List of Vehicles Determined to be Eligible for Importation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2012 55 Alfa Romeo 164 1989 196 Alfa Romeo 164 1991 76 Alfa Romeo 164 1994 156 Alfa Romeo Spider 1992... Ferrari 348 TS 1992 161 Ferrari 360 2001 376 Ferrari 360 Spider & Coupe 2003 410 Ferrari 360...

  5. Green Schools Activity Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacramento Tree Foundation, CA.

    This collection of interdisciplinary hands-on activities covers a variety of topics related to trees and conservation. Twenty-four activities integrate the subjects of social studies, fine arts, science, language arts, math, geography, and music. Although activity instructions are not consistent they usually contain details on objectives and…

  6. Activity Sheets. Draft Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke Power Company, Educational Services Dept., Charlotte, NC.

    This document consists of energy vocabulary activities, three games, worksheets, laboratory activities/exercises, and an introductory classroom exercise designed to introduce energy concepts to students. Vocabulary activities focus on coal and energy consumption. The three games (with instructions) focus on various aspects of energy and energy…

  7. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Provides on-task activities to fill in unexpected extra moments in elementary classes. The activities require little preparation and take 5-15 minutes to complete. There are activities for math, language arts, social science, science, critical thinking, and computer. An outer space board game is also included. (SM)

  8. Climate Change: An Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Garry

    1995-01-01

    Presents a segment of the Geoscience Education booklet, Climate Change, that contains information and activities that enable students to gain a better appreciation of the possible effects human activity has on the Earth's climate. Describes the Terrace Temperatures activity that leads students through an investigation using foraminifera data to…

  9. Active Learning Crosses Generations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Diane K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of intergenerational programs, highlighting a child care program that offers age-appropriate and mutually beneficial activities for children and elders within a nearby retirement community. The program has adopted High/Scope's active learning approach to planning and implementing activities that involve both generations. The…

  10. Activity Theory and Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peim, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to re-examine Yrio Engestrom's activity theory as a technology of knowledge designed to enable positive transformations of specific practices. The paper focuses on a key paper where Engestrom defines the nature and present state of activity theory. Beginning with a brief account of the relations between activity theory and…

  11. Highlights of 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of NASA's 1981 activities are presented, including the results of the two flights of the space shuttle Columbia and the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn. Accomplishments in the areas of space transportation operations; space science; aeronautical, energy, and space research and development; as well as space tracking, international activities, and 1981 launch activities are discussed.

  12. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  13. FL Activities & Festivals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

    A collection of student, class, and school foreign language activities suggests a variety of projects and describes three specific school efforts. The suggested activities include: (1) individual student efforts such as writing to pen-pals; (2) group activities such as a foreign language auction or sing-along; (3) group projects for the school…

  14. Technology Learning Activities I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Technology Education Association, Reston, VA.

    This guide contains 30 technology learning activities. Activities may contain all or some of the following: an introduction, objectives, materials and equipment, challenges, limitations, notes and investigations, resources and references used, and evaluation ideas. Activity titles are: (1) Occupations in Construction Technology; (2) Designing a…

  15. Woodsy Owl Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide offers teachers and after-school group leaders 12 fun and engaging activities. Activities feature lessons on trees, water, wind, the earth, food, and waste. The activities are designed to help children aged 5-8 become more aware of the natural environment and fundamental conservation principles. Titles of children's books are embedded…

  16. Tea enhances insulin activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Richard A; Polansky, Marilyn M

    2002-11-20

    The most widely known health benefits of tea relate to the polyphenols as the principal active ingredients in protection against oxidative damage and in antibacterial, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, and antimutagenic activities, but polyphenols in tea may also increase insulin activity. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin-enhancing properties of tea and its components. Tea, as normally consumed, was shown to increase insulin activity >15-fold in vitro in an epididymal fat cell assay. Black, green, and oolong teas but not herbal teas, which are not teas in the traditional sense because they do not contain leaves of Camellia senensis, were all shown to increase insulin activity. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of tea extracts utilizing a Waters SymmetryPrep C18 column showed that the majority of the insulin-potentiating activity for green and oolong teas was due to epigallocatechin gallate. For black tea, the activity was present in several regions of the chromatogram corresponding to, in addition to epigallocatechin gallate, tannins, theaflavins, and other undefined compounds. Several known compounds found in tea were shown to enhance insulin with the greatest activity due to epigallocatechin gallate followed by epicatechin gallate, tannins, and theaflavins. Caffeine, catechin, and epicatechin displayed insignificant insulin-enhancing activities. Addition of lemon to the tea did not affect the insulin-potentiating activity. Addition of 5 g of 2% milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity one-third, and addition of 50 g of milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity approximately 90%. Nondairy creamers and soy milk also decreased the insulin-enhancing activity. These data demonstrate that tea contains in vitro insulin-enhancing activity and the predominant active ingredient is epigallocatechin gallate. PMID:12428980

  17. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  18. Physical Activity and Albuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Emily S.; Fisher, Naomi D.; Forman, John P.; Curhan, Gary C.

    2010-01-01

    Higher urinary albumin excretion predicts future cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. Physical activity improves endothelial function so activity may reduce albuminuria. Among diabetics, physical activity decreases albuminuria. In nondiabetics, prior studies have shown no association. The authors explored the cross-sectional association between physical activity and albuminuria in 3,587 nondiabetic women in 2 US cohorts, the Nurses’ Health Study I in 2000 and the Nurses’ Health Study II in 1997. Physical activity was expressed as metabolic equivalents per week. The outcome was the top albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) decile. Multivariate logistic regression was used. Secondary analyses explored the ACR association with strenuous activity and walking. The mean age was 58.6 years. Compared with women in the lowest physical activity quintile, those in the highest quintile had a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for the top ACR decile of 0.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46, 0.93). The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for the top ACR decile for those with greater than 210 minutes per week of strenuous activity compared with no strenuous activity was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.37, 0.99), and for those in the highest quintile of walking compared with the lowest quintile, it was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.47, 1.02). Greater physical activity is associated with a lower ACR in nondiabetic women. PMID:20133515

  19. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  20. Physiologic activities of the contact activation system.

    PubMed

    Schmaier, Alvin H

    2014-05-01

    The plasma contact activation (CAS) and kallikrein/kinin (KKS) systems consist of 4 proteins: factor XII, prekallikrein, high molecular weight kininogen, and the bradykinin B2 receptor. Murine genetic deletion of factor XII (F12(-/-)), prekallikrein (Klkb1(-/-)), high molecular weight kininogen (Kgn1(-/-)) and the bradykinin B2 receptor (Bdkrb2(-/-)) yield animals protected from thrombosis. With possible exception of F12(-/-) and Kgn1(-/-) mice, the mechanism(s) for thrombosis protection is not reduced contact activation. Bdkrb2(-/-) mice are best characterized and they are protected from thrombosis through over expression of components of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) leading to elevated prostacyclin with vascular and platelet inhibition. Alternatively, prolylcarboxypeptidase, a PK activator and degrader of angiotensin II, when deficient in the mouse leads to a prothrombotic state. Its mechanism for increased thrombosis also is mediated in part by components of the RAS. These observations suggest that thrombosis in mice of the CAS and KKS are mediated in part through the RAS and independent of reduced contact activation. PMID:24759141

  1. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  2. Lightning Activities and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2016-04-01

    The lightning activity is one of the key parameters to understand the atmospheric electric fields and/or currents near the Earth's surface as well as the lithosphere-atmosphere coupling during the earthquake preparation period. In this study, to see whether or not lightning activities are related to earthquakes, we statistically examine lightning activities 30 days before and after 78 land and 230 sea M>5.0 earthquakes in Taiwan during the 12-year period of 1993-2004. Lightning activities versus the location, depth, and magnitude of earthquakes are investigated. Results show that lightning activities tend to appear around the forthcoming epicenter and are significantly enhanced a few, especially 17-19, days before the M>6.0 shallow (depth D< 20 km) land earthquakes. Moreover, the size of the area around the epicenter with the statistical significance of lightning activity enhancement is proportional to the earthquake magnitude.

  3. Thermally Activated Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Murray, Robert C.; Walsh, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    Space-qualified, precise, large-force, thermally activated driver (TAD) developed for use in space on astro-physics experiment to measure abundance of rare actinide-group elements in cosmic rays. Actinide cosmic rays detected using thermally activated driver as heart of event-thermometer (ET) system. Thermal expansion and contraction of silicone oil activates driver. Potential applications in fluid-control systems where precise valve controls are needed.

  4. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  5. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  6. Active unilateral condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Luz, J G; de Rezende, J R; de Araújo, V C; Chilvarquer, I

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of active unilateral condylar hyperplasia which were treated with condylectomy alone are presented. The first case was an adult form and the other a juvenile form. Both were classified as active by using 99Tc bone scintigraphy. Clinical and radiographic features of both cases conformed to the hemimandibular hypertrophy type. Satisfactory facial symmetry and dental occlusion were achieved. Histopathological data confirmed the activity of the articular cartilage layers. PMID:8181091

  7. Activity in distant comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1992-01-01

    Activity in distant comets remains a mystery in the sense that we still have no complete theory to explain the various types of activity exhibited by different comets at large distances. This paper explores the factors that should play a role in determining activity in a distant comet, especially in the cases of comet P/Tempel 2, comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, and 2060 Chiron.

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-10-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, [188Re]-P2045, 12B75, 89-12; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Abatacept, Abiraterone acetate, ABT-869, Adalimumab, Ad-rh Endostatin, AI-700, Alemtuzumab, Alvimopan hydrate, Amrubicin hydrochloride, AP-12009, Apomab 7.3, Arformoterol tartrate, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bevacizumab, BHT-3009, Biapenem, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bremelanotide; CA9-SCAN, Calcitonin gene-related peptide, Canertinib dihydrochloride, Cannabidiol, Carboxyamidotriazole, Caspofungin acetate, Celgosivir, Certolizumab pegol, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Clevudine, CP-751871, Curcumin, Cx-401, Cypher; Darunavir, Decitabine, Deforolimus, Dexamet, Dipyridamole/prednisolone, Drospirenone, Drospirenone/estradiol, DTPw-HepB-Hib, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone; Ferumoxtran-10, Ferumoxytol, Fondaparinux sodium, Fosaprepitant dimeglumine; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, Gefitinib, Genistein, Ghrelin (human), Gimatecan, GM-CSF PMED, Golimumab, gp100 PMED; Imatinib mesylate, Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), IV Gamma-globulin; LA-419, Laropiprant, L-BLP-25, Levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, Lidocaine/prilocaine, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lumiracoxib, LY-2076962; Mepolizumab, Methylnaltrexone bromide, Mitiglinide calcium hydrate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt, Myristyl nicotinate; Natalizumab, Nesiritide, Niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, Ozarelix; Palonosetron hydrochloride, Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pazopanib hydrochloride, Pegaptanib octasodium, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa- 2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pexelizumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, PRO-1762, Progesterone caproate, Prulifloxacin; Ramelteon, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Reparixin, Rosuvastatin calcium; Rotigotine; Satraplatin, Sertraline, Sipuleucel-T, SLIT-cisplatin, SNDX-275

  9. Crew activities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluford, G. S., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    One of the mission requirements of the Space Shuttle is to serve as a working platform for experiments in space. Many of these experiments will be performed by crewmembers (mission specialists and payload specialists) in a general purpose laboratory called Spacelab. All nonexperiment-related activities or housekeeping activities will be done in the Orbiter, while most of the mission-related activities (experiments) will be done in Spacelab. In order for experimenters to design their experiments to best utilize the capabilities of the Orbiter, the Spacelab, and the crew, the working environment in the Orbiter and in Spacelab is described. In addition, the housekeeping activities required of the crew are summarized.

  10. Physical Activity and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of scientists, ranging from experts in basic biological science to those with expertise in community behavioral interventions to increase physical activity. This combination of scientists and expertise will ...

  11. NASA metrication activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlannes, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's organization and policy for metrification, history from 1964, NASA participation in Federal agency activities, interaction with nongovernmental metrication organizations, and the proposed metrication assessment study are reviewed.

  12. The Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship of Mixed Serotonin, Norepinephrine and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengming; Yang, Ji; Skolnick, Phil

    The evolution of antidepressants over the past four decades has involved the replacement of drugs with a multiplicity of effects (e.g., TCAs) by those with selective actions (i.e., SSRIs). This strategy was employed to reduce the adverse effects of TCAs, largely by eliminating interactions with certain neurotransmitters or receptors. Although these more selective compounds may be better tolerated by patients, selective drugs, specifically SSRIs, are not superior to older drugs in treating depressed patients as measured by response and remission rates. It may be an advantage to increase synaptic levels of both serotonin and norepinephrine, as in the case of dual uptake inhibitors like duloxetine and venlafaxine. An important recent development has been the emergence of the triple-uptake inhibitors (TUIs/SNDRIs), which inhibit the uptake of the three neurotransmitters most closely linked to depression: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that a drug inhibiting the reuptake of all three of these neurotransmitters could produce more rapid onset of action and greater efficacy than traditional antidepressants. This review will detail the medicinal chemistry involved in the design, synthesis and discovery of mixed serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine transporter uptake inhibitors.

  13. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  14. Activity Book: Ocean Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a collection of activities to help elementary students study ocean ecology. The activities have students investigate ocean inhabitants, analyze animal adaptations, examine how temperature and saltiness affect ocean creatures, and learn about safeguarding the sea. Student pages offer reproducible learning sheets. (SM)

  15. [Field Learning Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center, Reading, PA.

    Seventy field activities, pertinent to outdoor, environmental studies, are described in this compilation. Designed for elementary and junior high school students, the activities cover many discipline areas--science, social studies, language arts, health, history, mathematics, and art--and many are multidisciplinary in use. Topics range from soil…

  16. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  17. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labour Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Seven articles on International Labour Organization (ILO) activities cover study groups at ILO headquarters, a Philippine rural workers seminar, women's participation in Central American union activities, worksite courses in India, and seminars and symposia in Cape Verde, Mauritius, and Sierra Leone. (SK)

  18. Active Students in Webinars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolås, Line; Nordseth, Hugo; Yri, Jørgen Sørlie

    2015-01-01

    To ensure student activity in webinars we have defined 10 learning tasks focusing on production and communication e.g. collaborative writing, discussion and polling, and investigated how the technology supports the learning activities. The three project partners in the VisPed-project use different video-conferencing systems, and we analyzed how it…

  19. The Activity of Trypsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.; Holzman, Tom

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that illustrates the following points concerning the experimental determination of trypsin activity: (1) there is a difference in basing enzyme concentration on weight, absorbance, or active sites; and (2) the method of expressing enzyme concentration determines the value of specific, molecular, and catalytic center…

  20. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  1. Games and Word Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Games and word activities give children another way to integrate their learning and reinforce their literacy skills. They provide different and enjoyable contexts in which children can apply what they are learning. This booklet offers activities which provide a sampling of "fun" ways for tutors to support and supplement their tutees' classroom…

  2. Active Healthy Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Eloise

    2005-01-01

    Summer break is almost here for most elementary teachers and students. Warmer weather and additional free time to make choices create more opportunities to be physically active, whether home alone or out with friends and family. This article describes ways by which physical education specialists can encourage students' physical activity by…

  3. Coordinating Shared Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  4. Reflections on Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhurst, David

    2009-01-01

    It is sometimes suggested that activity theory represents the most important legacy of Soviet philosophy and psychology. But what exactly "is" activity theory? The canonical account in the West is given by Engestrom, who identifies three stages in the theory's development: from Vygotsky's insights, through Leontiev's articulation of the…

  5. Obesity, Physical Activity - Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    Childhood obesity starts at a very early age, and preventive measures taken early enough may retard the development of fat cells. It appears that physical activity plays an important role in reducing obesity. The activity program must start early, in preschool days. It is felt that screening children for obesity when they first enter school and…

  6. Science World Activities Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, Madison.

    This document consists of three sections. Section I contains 19 activities developed by master teachers for the Science World '84 summer science program. These activities focus on studies involving airplane controls, trash bag kites, computers, meteorology, compass orienteering, soils, aquatic ecosystems, bogs, and others. Objectives, materials…

  7. Peak Longevity Physical Activity

    Cancer.gov

    People who engage in three to five times the recommended minimum level of leisure-time physical activity derive the greatest benefit in terms of mortality reduction when compared with people who do not engage in leisure-time physical activity.

  8. ZOOMsci Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Meredith

    This activity guide is based on the Public Broadcasting System's (PBS) program "ZOOM." It is designed for educators with activities that are categorized into three themes: (1) Things That Go, which includes "Air" which explores air pressure, "Rubber Bands" which discovers the potential energy of rubber bands, "Baking Soda and Vinegar" which…

  9. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  10. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  11. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  12. Curriculum Activities on Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmall, Vicki L.; Benge, Nancy

    This paper contains learning activities on aging for use with elementary, high school, and university students in health, family relationships, social studies, and art courses. The activities are intended to help youth develop a more realistic understanding of the aging process and to become aware of both the problems and benefits associated with…

  13. Nutrition Activities Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Special Education.

    The resource guide suggests activities to help special education students make appropriate choices about their nutritional habits. It is explained that the activities can be infused into other curriculum areas. The guide consists of five themes and includes performance objectives for each: foods eaten at school (planning a school lunch, keeping a…

  14. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  15. Learning Activities for Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Suggests activities to help toddlers develop skills in the four important areas of self-help, creativity, world mastery, and coordination. Activities include hand washing, button practice, painting, movement and music, bubble making, creation of a nature mural, and a shoe print trail. (TJQ)

  16. Active and Healthy Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…

  17. Calculator-Active Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.; Harris, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This journal contains brief descriptions of calculator-active materials that were found using Resource Finder, the searchable online catalog of curriculum resources from the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC). It features both the calculators themselves and the activity books that are used with them. Among the calculators included are those…

  18. Activating Event Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or…

  19. Bonus Activity Book. Peacemakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Betsy Blizard

    1992-01-01

    Activity book helps elementary students learn about peace and see themselves as peacemakers and peacekeepers. Students are introduced to literary and historical figures who have worked for peace and won the Nobel Peace Prize. Activities teach students that peace means more than calm situations or absence of war. (SM)

  20. Vegetable Soup Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Mary; Shepard, Ray

    Vegetable Soup is a new children's television series whose purpose is to counter the negative and destructive effects of racial isolation. This manual gives detailed instructions for discussion of activities that are presented during the television series such as: crafts, games, recipes, language activities, and children's questions. A list of…

  1. Student Activities. Managing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Barbara; And Others

    This monograph suggests ways that college or university administrations can undertake a systematic and careful review of the risks posed by students' activities. Its purpose is to provide guidance in integrating the risk management process into a school's existing approaches to managing student organizations and activities. It is noted that no…

  2. Untangling occupation and activity.

    PubMed

    Pierce, D

    2001-01-01

    Activity and occupation are two core concepts of occupational therapy that are in need of differentiation. Occupation is defined here as a person's personally constructed, one-time experience within a unique context. Activity is defined as a more general, culturally shared idea about a category of action. The ways in which subjectivity and context are handled within the concepts of occupation and activity are keys to disentangling them. The proposed untangling of the two concepts into distinct definitions is congruent with their historical origins as well as with current definitional trends. Once occupation and activity are recognized as two separate and equally valuable concepts, they offer a rich set of theoretical relations for exploration. The clarity that will result from differentiating occupation and activity will enhance disciplinary discourse and research as well as enhance the intervention efficacy, moral surety, and political strength of the profession.

  3. Active element pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1994-08-01

    This review article will discuss the use of the active element pattern for prediction of the scan performance of large phased array antennas. The introduction and application of the concept of the active element pattern goes back at least 30 years (1) -(6) , but the subject is generally not covered in modern antenna engineering textbooks or handbooks, and many contemporary workers are unfamiliar with this simple but powerful idea. In addition, early references on this subject do not provide a rigorous discussion or derivation of the active element pattern, relying instead on a more qualitative interpretation. The purpose of this communication is to make the technique of active element patterns more accessible to antenna engineers, and to provide a new derivation of the basic active element pattern relations in terms of scattering parameters.

  4. B7H6-derived peptides trigger TNF-α-dependent immunostimulatory activity of lymphocytic NK92-MI cells.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mariana; Romeo, Francesca; Bitsaktsis, Constantine; Sabatino, David

    2016-09-01

    The rise of biologics that can stimulate immune responses towards the eradication of tumors has led to the evolution of cancer-based immunotherapy. Representatively, B7H6 has been recently identified as a protein ligand on tumor cells that binds specifically to the NKp30 receptor and triggers NK cell-derived cytokine production, which ultimately leads to tumor cell lysis and death. In an effort to develop effective immunotherapy approaches, the rational design of a novel class of immunostimulatory peptides (IPs) derived from the binding interface of B7H6:NKp30 is described in this study. The IPs comprised the B7H6 active site sequence for NKp30 binding and immunostimulatory activity. An aminohexanoic acid linker was also introduced at the N-terminus of the peptides for FITC-labeling by Fmoc-solid phase peptide synthesis. The peptides were characterized by LCMS to confirm identities and purities >95%. The secondary structures of the peptides were examined by CD spectroscopy in H2 O, PBS and a H2 O:TFE mixture which demonstrated versatile peptide structures which transitioned from random coil (H2 O) to α-helical (PBS) and turn-type (H2 O:TFE) conformations. Their biological properties were then evaluated by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and cell death assays. The occupancy of the synthetic peptides to a human NK cell line demonstrated comparable binding relative to the natural NKp30 ligand, B7H6, and the human anti-NKp30 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in a concentration dependent manner. A competitive binding assay between the human anti-NKp30 mAb or B7H6, and the synthetic peptides, demonstrated partial displacement of the ligands upon anti-NKp30 mAb treatment, suggesting NKp30 receptor specificities by the synthetic peptides. Moreover, the immunostimulatory activity of B7H6 was demonstrated by the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the human NK cell line. The

  5. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  6. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  7. Active touch sensing

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Tony J.; Diamond, Mathew E.; Wing, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Active sensing systems are purposive and information-seeking sensory systems. Active sensing usually entails sensor movement, but more fundamentally, it involves control of the sensor apparatus, in whatever manner best suits the task, so as to maximize information gain. In animals, active sensing is perhaps most evident in the modality of touch. In this theme issue, we look at active touch across a broad range of species from insects, terrestrial and marine mammals, through to humans. In addition to analysing natural touch, we also consider how engineering is beginning to exploit physical analogues of these biological systems so as to endow robots with rich tactile sensing capabilities. The different contributions show not only the varieties of active touch—antennae, whiskers and fingertips—but also their commonalities. They explore how active touch sensing has evolved in different animal lineages, how it serves to provide rapid and reliable cues for controlling ongoing behaviour, and even how it can disintegrate when our brains begin to fail. They demonstrate that research on active touch offers a means both to understand this essential and primary sensory modality, and to investigate how animals, including man, combine movement with sensing so as to make sense of, and act effectively in, the world. PMID:21969680

  8. Biological activity of purpurogallin.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Y; Muro, C; Sajima, E; Katagiri, M; Okamoto, Y; Tanaka, H; Sakagami, Y; Tsujibo, H

    1997-05-01

    Purpurogallin showed antibacterial activity toward gram-positive bacteria. Strong activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against methicillin of 1600 micrograms/ml] was found, with MIC of 11.0 micrograms/ml. Purpurogallin inhibited the growth of all tested plants and decreased the chlorophyll content in the cotyledons of Brassica campestris subsp. rapa. It showed potent inhibitory activity against prolyl endopeptidase (the 50% inhibitory concentration was 1.6 x 10(-5) M), unlike its analogues, hinokitiol and tropolone.

  9. Algorithm-development activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.

    1994-01-01

    The task of algorithm-development activities at USF continues. The algorithm for determining chlorophyll alpha concentration, (Chl alpha) and gelbstoff absorption coefficient for SeaWiFS and MODIS-N radiance data is our current priority.

  10. Microglial Activation & Chronic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lull, Melinda E.; Block, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, have long been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence points to activated microglia as a chronic source of multiple neurotoxic factors, including TNFα, NO, IL1-β, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), driving progressive neuron damage. Microglia can become chronically activated by either a single stimulus (ex. LPS or neuron damage) or multiple stimuli exposures to result in cumulative neuronal loss over time. While the mechanisms driving these phenomena are just beginning to be understood, reactive microgliosis (the microglial response to neuron damage) and ROS have been implicated as key mechanisms of chronic and neurotoxic microglial activation, particularly in the case of Parkinson’s Disease. Here, we review the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with chronic microglial activation and discuss the role of neuronal death and microglial ROS driving the chronic and toxic microglial phenotype. PMID:20880500

  11. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) techniques, singly and in combination with passive hearing protectors, offer the potential for increased sound protection, enhanced voice communications and improved wearability features for personnel exposed to unacceptable noise conditions. An enhanced closed loop active noise reduction system was miniaturized and incorporated into a standard Air Force flight helmet (HGU-26/P). This report describes the theory of design and operation, prototype configuration and operation, and electroacoustic performance and specifications for the ANR system. This system is theoretically capable of producing in excess of 30 decibels of active noise reduction. Electroacoustic measurements on a flat plate coupler demonstrated approximately 20 decibels of active noise reduction with the prototype unit. A performance evaluation of the integrated ANR unit will be conducted under laboratory and field conditions by government personnel to determine the feasibility of the system for use in military applications.

  12. Activities in Teaching Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonn, Martin

    1977-01-01

    Presented is a unit composed of activities for teaching weather. Topics include cloud types and formation, simple weather instruments, and the weather station. Illustrations include a weather chart and instruments. A bibliography is given. (MA)

  13. Island Watershed Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Rod

    2003-01-01

    Describes a 90-minute "Island Watershed" activity to help earth science students understand the concept of the water cycle. Introduces a surface waters unit appropriate for students in grades 7-10. Includes watershed project guidelines. (Author/KHR)

  14. Authentic Listening Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Don; Roberts, Jon

    1981-01-01

    Discusses use of authentic listening experiences in second language classroom so that students will become involved in listening process demanded in authentic listening situations. Gives examples of sample classroom activities. (BK)

  15. French space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanc, R.

    1982-01-01

    The four main points of research and development of space programs by France are explained. The National Center of Space Studies is discussed, listing the missions of the Center and describing the activities of the staff.

  16. Creating Art Appreciation Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidt, Ann H.

    1986-01-01

    The experiences of college students enrolled as majors in elementary education in designing art appreciation activities for use in elementary classrooms are described. The college students had no art background. (RM)

  17. Active terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate planar terahertz metamaterial devices enabling actively controllable transmission amplitude, phase, or frequency at room temperature via carrier depletion or photoexcitation in the semiconductor substrate or in semiconductor materials incorporated into the metamaterial structure.

  18. Planning activities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kai-Hsiung

    1987-01-01

    Three aspects of planning activities in space are presented. These include generating plans efficiently, coordinating actions among multiple agents, and recovering from plan execution errors. Each aspect is discussed separately.

  19. A Big Gulp Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Explains how to implement an activity in which students measure the volume of their oral cavities. Enables students to develop skills in estimation, measurement, connections, statistics, applying concepts and procedures, and communication. (DDR)

  20. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  1. Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikle, Graham

    How do activists use the Internet? This article maps a wide range of activist practice and research by applying and developing Tim Berners-Lee's concept of ‘intercreativity' (1999). It identifies four dimensions of Net activism: intercreative texts, tactics, strategies and networks. It develops these through examples of manifestations of Net activism around one cluster of issues: support campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers.

  2. RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: RMS active damping augmentation; potential space station assembly benefits to CSI; LaRC/JSC bridge program; control law design process; draper RMS simulator; MIMO acceleration control laws improve damping; potential load reduction benefit; DRS modified to model distributed accelerations; accelerometer location; Space Shuttle aft cockpit simulator; simulated shuttle video displays; SES test goals and objectives; and SES modifications to support RMS active damping augmentation.

  3. Information Activities in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Takeyoshi

    The last few years have seen an explosive growth in database and computer networking activities in Australia. At present there are six major information networks in Australia, which carry more than 400 locally produced databases and many others from overseas. AUSINET databases are exemplified. MIDAS (Multi-mode International Data Aquisition System) provides lower cost access to overseas databases than before. The paper also gives brief outline of various bodies which relate to information and library policy in Australia and regional cooperative activities.

  4. RAVEN Quality Assurance Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    This report discusses the quality assurance activities needed to raise the Quality Level of Risk Analysis in a Virtual Environment (RAVEN) from Quality Level 3 to Quality Level 2. This report also describes the general RAVEN quality assurance activities. For improving the quality, reviews of code changes have been instituted, more parts of testing have been automated, and improved packaging has been created. For upgrading the quality level, requirements have been created and the workflow has been improved.

  5. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  6. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  7. Tinnitus activities treatment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Richard S; Gogel, Stephanie A; Gehringer, Anne K

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus Activities Treatment includes counseling of the whole person, and considers individual differences and needs. We consider four areas: thoughts and emotions, hearing and communication, sleep, and concentration. We typically use Partial Masking Sound Therapy, with a noise or music set to the lowest level that provides relief. A picture-based approach facilitates engagement of the patient, and provides thorough and structured counseling. We engage the patient by including homework and activities to demonstrate understanding and facilitate progress. PMID:17956807

  8. Phytase activity in lichens.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Niall F; Crittenden, Peter D

    2015-10-01

    Phytase activity was investigated in 13 lichen species using a novel assay method. The work tested the hypothesis that phytase is a component of the suite of surface-bound lichen enzymes that hydrolyse simple organic forms of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) deposited onto the thallus surface. Hydrolysis of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6 , the substrate for phytase) and appearance of lower-order inositol phosphates (InsP5 -InsP1 ), the hydrolysis products, were measured by ion chromatography. Phytase activity in Evernia prunastri was compared among locations with contrasting rates of N deposition. Phytase activity was readily measurable in epiphytic lichens (e.g. 11.3 μmol InsP6 hydrolysed g(-1)  h(-1) in Bryoria fuscescens) but low in two terricolous species tested (Cladonia portentosa and Peltigera membranacea). Phytase and phosphomonoesterase activities were positively correlated amongst species. In E. prunastri both enzyme activities were promoted by N enrichment and phytase activity was readily released into thallus washings. InsP6 was not detected in tree canopy throughfall but was present in pollen leachate. Capacity to hydrolyse InsP6 appears widespread amongst lichens potentially promoting P capture from atmospheric deposits and plant leachates, and P cycling in forest canopies. The enzyme assay used here might find wider application in studies on plant root-fungal-soil systems.

  9. Physical activity and obesity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, A

    1999-04-01

    The regular practice of physical activity promotes metabolic adaptations that facilitate the regulation of energy and fat balance. These effects are important for a better control of body weight in the obese individual and should enable him or her to involve adipose tissue to a lesser extent in this regulation. Physical activity favours a negative energy and fat balance, particularly if activities are prolonged and vigorous. The achievement of a negative energy and fat balance with physical activity also strongly depends on the nutritional context in which it is performed. In the long term, an active lifestyle and low-fat food habits are expected to induce a substantial body weight loss in the obese. This weight loss is progressively attenuated over time, presumably because of the decreased impact of a reduced adipose tissue mass on the regulation of energy and fat balance. For the obese individual complying with an activity programme and healthy food habits, a body weight loss of 10% is a realistic goal before the occurrence of resistance to further loss of body fat.

  10. ABB: active bandwidth broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kason; Law, Eddie

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss a novel design on the policy-based management for the Internet. This design deploys the concept of active networking. As opposed to the traditional network design, active network empowers network node with the ability to manipulate data and program code in packets, and configure the network properties according to the needs of different applications. The policy-based management can control network routers in order to realize end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS), such as differentiated and integrated services, across the Internet. For the moment, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has defined the framework of the policy-based management. It employs a simple client/server model that uses Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to facilitate policy management and control. Our design of Active Bandwidth Broker (ABB) belongs to an active application. Our goals are to distribute centralized workload of the policy-based management over multiple active nodes in the active networks, introduce mobility of the bandwidth brokers, and allows load sharing to the policy-based management. This results a network-wide intelligent, highly available, and consistent QoS control that allows performance protection for voice, video and Internet business application while reducing costs for growing networks.

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-06-01

    (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, (R)-Etodolac; Abatacept, ABT-510, Adalimumab, Agatolimod sodium, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Aripiprazole, AS01B, AS02B, AS02V, Azacitidine; Becatecarin, Bevacizumab, Bevirimat, Bortezomib, Bremelanotide; CAIV-T, Canfosfamide hydrochloride, CHR-2797, Ciclesonide, Clevidipine; Darbepoetin alfa, Decitabine, Degarelix acetate, Dendritic cell-based vaccine, Denosumab, Desloratadine, DMXB-Anabaseine, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Eletriptan, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Ferumoxytol, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, GM-CSF DNA, GSK-690693; H5N1 avian flu vaccine, Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Human Fibroblast Growth Factor 1, Hypericin-PVP; Icatibant acetate, Iclaprim, Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Ipilimumab, ISS-1018; L19-IL-2, Lapuleucel-T, Laropiprant, Liposomal doxorubicin, LP-261, Lumiracoxib, LY-518674; MDV-3100, MGCD-0103, Mirabegron, MyoCell; NASHA/Dx, Niacin/laropiprant; O6-Benzylguanine, Ocrelizumab, Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab; P-276-00, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Padoporfin, Paliperidone, PAN-811, Pegaptanib octasodium, Pegfilgrastim, Pemetrexed disodium, PF-00299804, Pimecrolimus, Prasugrel, Pregabalin; Reolysin, Rimonabant, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium; Satraplatin, SCH-697243,Selenite sodium, Silodosin, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Talarozole, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Tocilizumab, Tolevamer potassium sodium, Tremelimumab, TTP-889; Uracil; V-260, Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Varenicline tartrate, Varespladib, Vitespen, Voclosporin, VX-001; Xience V; Zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:18806898

  12. Antimutagenic activity of spearmint.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian-Wei; Xu, Meirong; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2004-01-01

    The antimutagenic activity of spearmint (Mentha spicata), a popular food flavoring agent, was studied in the Salmonella assay. Spearmint leaves were brewed in hot water for 5 min at concentrations up to 5% (w/v), and the water extracts were tested against the direct-acting mutagens 4-nitro-1,2-phenylenediamine (NPD) and 2-hydroxyamino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (N-OH-IQ) using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. Nontoxic concentrations of spearmint extract inhibited the mutagenic activity of N-OH-IQ in a concentration-dependent fashion, but had no effect against NPD. These experiments by design focused on the water extract consumed commonly as an herbal tea, but chloroform and methanol extracts of spearmint also possessed antimutagenic activity against N-OH-IQ. Water extract of spearmint inhibited the mutagenic activity of the parent compound, 2-amino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), in the presence of rat liver S9; however, the concentration for 50% inhibition (IC50) against IQ was approximately 10-fold higher than in assays with N-OH-IQ minus S9. At concentrations similar to those used in the Salmonella assays, spearmint extract inhibited two of the major enzymes that play a role in the metabolic activation of IQ, namely, cytochromes P4501A1 and 1A2, based on ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase assays in vitro. In vivo, rats were given spearmint water extract (2%; w/v) as the sole source of drinking fluid before, during, and after 2-week treatment with IQ; colonic aberrant crypt foci were inhibited significantly at 8 weeks (P < 0.05, compared with rats given IQ alone). Collectively, these findings suggest that spearmint tea protects against IQ and possibly other heterocyclic amines through inhibition of carcinogen activation and via direct effects on the activated metabolite(s).

  13. Walkability and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rodrigo Siqueira; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Kerr, Jacqueline; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence from developing countries is limited on how income level for a given neighborhood is related to physical activity among its residents. Purpose The goal of the study was to examine the association between walkability and physical activity outcomes, and the effect of income on the relationship between walkability and physical activity in adults. Methods The Spaces for Physical Activity in Adults Study (ESPACOS Project) took place in Curitiba, Brazil. Data were collected in 2010 in 32 census tracts selected to vary in income and walkability, as measured by GIS. Participants were 697 individuals aged 18–65 years (52.0% were women) randomly sampled from the selected neighborhoods. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to measure physical activity. All analyses were conducted in 2012. Results The proportion of those who walked for transportation for ≥150 minutes/week was 21.1% in low-walkability areas, and ranged from 33.5% to 35.0% in high-walkability areas. A total of 12.6% of residents were found to walk for leisure for ≥150 minutes/week; this result did not vary across quadrants of walkability and income level. The prevalence of leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was 7.1–10.5 percentage points higher in high-compared to low-walkability areas. After adjusting for all individual confounders, walkability showed an independent association with walking for transport (OR=2.10, 95% CI=1.31, 3.37, p=0.002) and leisure-time MVPA (OR=1.57; 95% CI=1.06, 2.32; p=0.024). Neighborhood income level was independently associated with leisure-time MVPA (OR=1.70; 95% CI=1.06, 2.74, p=0.029). No association was found between walkability and walking for leisure. No interaction was found between walkability and neighborhood income level. Conclusions This study, among adults living in Curitiba, Brazil, confirms findings from studies of high-income countries showing that walkability is positively associated with

  14. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality.

  15. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  16. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality. PMID:26390078

  17. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  18. [Physical activity and obesity].

    PubMed

    Winkler, S; Hebestreit, A; Ahrens, W

    2012-01-01

    One reason for the high prevalence of overweight and obesity might be the differences in lifestyle compared to earlier decades, called the "obesogenic environment." With this, the decline in physical activity (PA) in favor of a sedentary lifestyle is assumed to play an important role. Physical activity or inactivity has a major impact on the development of overweight and obesity as well as on certain metabolic disorders. This review summarizes current scientific knowledge regarding the association between PA and overweight/obesity. The term "physical activity" is defined and different methods of its assessment are introduced. In addition, certain methods for the evaluation/operationalization of collected PA data are described. Finally, some epidemiological studies dealing with the associations between PA and overweight/obesity in children/adolescents as well as in adults are presented.

  19. Shared Activity Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Barrett, Anthony C.

    2003-01-01

    Interacting agents that interleave planning and execution must reach consensus on their commitments to each other. In domains where agents have varying degrees of interaction and different constraints on communication and computation, agents will require different coordination protocols in order to efficiently reach consensus in real time. We briefly describe a largely unexplored class of real-time, distributed planning problems (inspired by interacting spacecraft missions), new challenges they pose, and a general approach to solving the problems. These problems involve self-interested agents that have infrequent communication but collaborate on joint activities. We describe a Shared Activity Coordination (SHAC) framework that provides a decentralized algorithm for negotiating the scheduling of shared activities in a dynamic environment, a soft, real-time approach to reaching consensus during execution with limited communication, and a foundation for customizing protocols for negotiating planner interactions. We apply SHAC to a realistic simulation of interacting Mars missions and illustrate the simplicity of protocol development.

  20. Stochastic optical active rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Shin, Yongdae; Kim, Sun Taek; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a stochastic based method for performing active rheology using optical tweezers. By monitoring the displacement of an embedded particle in response to stochastic optical forces, a rapid estimate of the frequency dependent shear moduli of a sample is achieved in the range of 10-1-103 Hz. We utilize the method to probe linear viscoelastic properties of hydrogels at varied cross-linker concentrations. Combined with fluorescence imaging, our method demonstrates non-linear changes of bond strength between T cell receptors and an antigenic peptide due to force-induced cell activation.

  1. SCOR announces new activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Edward R., Jr.

    Roger Revelle had many good ideas during his long and productive career. One of them came to fruition in 1957 in the form of the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), which the International Council for Science created as its first interdisciplinary body, to promote international activities in oceanography. Revelle served as SCOR's first president from 1957 to 1960. SCOR offers opportunities for scientists from different countries to cooperate in planning and executing international programs in ocean sciences. Over its 44 years in existence, SCOR has sponsored 120 working groups and has actively participated in many of the major international oceanographic projects. Thirty-six nations presently participate as SCOR members.

  2. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  3. Cosmogenic activation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amare, J.; Beltran, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Garcia, E.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Luzon, G.; Martinez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedon, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J.A.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.

    2005-09-08

    The problem of cosmogenic activation produced at sea level in materials typically used in underground experiments looking for rare events is being studied. Several nuclear data libraries have been screened looking for relevant isotope production cross-sections and different codes which can be applied to activation studies have been reviewed. The excitation functions for some problems of interest like production of 60Co and 68Ge in germanium and production of 60Co in tellurium have been obtained taking into account both measurements and calculations and a preliminary estimate of the corresponding rates of production at sea level has been performed.

  4. Optical activity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Khasanov, M M; Gladyshev, G P

    1980-09-01

    It is noted that the chemical reactions occurring in rarefied cosmic clouds (molecular concentration less than or approximately to 10(2) cm-3) differ from similar laboratory reactions by the much greater effect on the outcome of external force fields. In this light it is hypothesized that the synthesis of optically active substances may occur in the outer space under the conjoint stereospecific effect of a magnetic and other molecule-orienting field. It is further conjectured that the optically active substances of the Solar System had been produced in the course of its formation out of the primal rarefield cloud.

  5. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  6. Inflammasomes and Their Activation

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sonal; Luc, Nancy; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune system relies on the recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors as a first line of defense and to initiate the adaptive immune response. Substantial progress has been made in defining the role of Nod (nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain)-like receptors and AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) as pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammasomes in macrophages. Inflammasomes are protein platforms essential for the activation of inflammatory caspases and subsequent maturation of their pro-inflammatory cytokine substrates and induction of pyroptosis. This paper summarizes recent developments regarding the function of Nod-like receptors in immunity and disease. PMID:21083527

  7. Space construction activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado at Boulder was established in 1988 as a University Space Engineering Research Center. The mission of the Center is to conduct interdisciplinary engineering research which is critical to the construction of future space structures and systems and to educate students who will have the vision and technical skills to successfully lead future space construction activities. The research activities are currently organized around two central projects: Orbital Construction and Lunar Construction. Summaries of the research projects are included.

  8. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  9. [Adolescents' physical activity].

    PubMed

    Pagaeva, E K; Misho, P -A; Zhanin, A; Chanturishvili, T P; Pagaeva, K I

    2006-01-01

    The paper defines the parameters reflecting the physical activity of adolescents and their correlation with health and a risk of behavioral disorders, bad habits, and cravings. A total of 9499 Georgian adolescents aged 14-18 years, the senior (9th-llth-form) pupils, selected through two-step cluster sampling were surveyed. The pupils anonymously filled in special questionnaires. This yielded the parameters reflecting the intensity of physical activity of the adolescents and the latter's going in for sports. The parameters were shown to have a beneficial effect on health, including mental health, and on the magnitude of unhealthy behavior.

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3,4-DAP; Adefovir dipivoxil, ADL-10-0101, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alosetron hydrochloride, ALT-711, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab, atvogen; Bortezomib; CETP vaccine, clevudine, crofelemer; DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DX-9065a; E-7010, edodekin alfa, emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlosamide, erlotinib hydrochloride, everolimus, exenatide; Fondaparinux sodium, frovatriptan, fulvestrant; Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gestodene; Homoharringtonine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, indium 111 (111In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, inhaled insulin, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, ivabradine hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, lapatinib, LAS-34475, levetiracetam, liraglutide, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melagatran, micafungin sodium; Natalizumab, NSC-640488; Oblimersen sodium; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, pleconaril, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, prucalopride; rAHF-PFM, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rDNA insulin, recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, rhGM-CSF, roxifiban acetate, RSD-1235, rubitecan, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; SC-51, squalamine; Tegaserod maleate, telbivudine, tesaglitazar, testosterone gel, tezosentan disodium, tipranavir; Vatalanib succinate; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:14671684

  11. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  12. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  13. Antifungal activity of diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Allerberger, F; Reisinger, E C; Söldner, B; Dierich, M P

    1989-10-01

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC) was evaluated for its ability to combat four different species of fungi in vitro. Using a microtiter-broth-dilution method we were able to demonstrate an antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor mucedo in doses achievable by intravenous administration in man.

  14. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labour Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the Workers' Education Branch of the ILO (International Labour Organisation), which has been developing workers' education activities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America for the purpose of assisting rural workers' organizations in identifying and developing plans to overcome their own major organizational and financial problems. (CT)

  15. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enevoldsen, Niels; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A series of articles reviews educational activities of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), including international seminars on workers' education, a study of women workers, trade union training courses at the ILO Turin Centre, and the importance of information dissemination to trade unions. (SK)

  16. Valuing Families. Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glashagel, Jerry; Glashagel, Char

    Developed as a resource for family life education, this activity guide can be used to lead experiential learning situations for intergenerational groups by a counselor, in a course, in a family organization like the YMCA, or in the home. The goals of this guide are to increase the self-esteem of each person and to strengthen the family as a human…

  17. Classroom Speaking Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuying, Yang

    1999-01-01

    Because most language teaching in China is focused on national tests, language is treated as a knowledge subject and development of communicative abilities is often ignored. This article describes activities that one English-as-a-Foreign-Language teacher used to teach oral English to university students in China. (Author/VWL)

  18. Ocean Drilling Simulation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telese, James A.; Jordan, Kathy

    The Ocean Drilling Project brings together scientists and governments from 20 countries to explore the earth's structure and history as it is revealed beneath the oceans' basins. Scientific expeditions examine rock and sediment cores obtained from the ocean floor to learn about the earth's basic processes. The series of activities in this…

  19. Physical Education Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Letty P.

    1978-01-01

    Described are three physical activity games designed to help young children develop a sense of mastery over their bodies: (which will in turn improve their self concepts): a poem to be acted out, Simon Says, and a story play to be acted out. (DLS)

  20. Sexual activity and aging.

    PubMed

    Ni Lochlainn, Mary; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2013-08-01

    Sexuality is an important component of emotional and physical intimacy that men and women experience throughout their lives. Research suggesting that a high proportion of men and women remain sexually active well into later life refutes the prevailing myth that aging and sexual dysfunction are inexorably linked. Age-related physiological changes do not render a meaningful sexual relationship impossible or even necessarily difficult. Many of these physiological changes are modifiable. There are various therapeutic options available to patients to achieve maximum sexual capacity in old age. This article reviews the prevalence of sexual activity among older adults, the problems these adults encounter with sexual activity, and the role of the health care professional in addressing these problems. The physiological sex-related changes that occur as part of the normal aging process in men and women are reviewed, as well as the effect of age-related physical and psychological illness on sexual function. The attitudes and perceptions of the media and general public toward sexual activity and aging are summarized. An understanding of the sexual changes that accompany the aging process may help general practitioners and other doctors to give practical and useful advice on sexuality as well as refute the misconception that aging equates to celibacy. A thorough awareness of this aspect of older people's quality of life can raise meaningful expectations for aging patients. PMID:23540950