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Sample records for alfa darifenacin hydrobromide

  1. Darifenacin

    MedlinePlus

    Darifenacin is used to treat an overactive bladder (a condition in which the bladder muscles contract uncontrollably and cause frequent urination, urgent need to urinate, and inability to control urination). ...

  2. 21 CFR 556.308 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to monitor for total residues of halofuginone hydrobromide in broilers and turkeys is parent....16 part per million and in turkeys of 0.13 part per million for parent halofuginone hydrobromide in... the uncooked edible tissues of broilers and turkeys are 0.1 part per million in muscle, 0.3 part...

  3. 21 CFR 556.308 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to monitor for total residues of halofuginone hydrobromide in broilers and turkeys is parent....16 part per million and in turkeys of 0.13 part per million for parent halofuginone hydrobromide in... the uncooked edible tissues of broilers and turkeys are 0.1 part per million in muscle, 0.3 part...

  4. 21 CFR 556.308 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to monitor for total residues of halofuginone hydrobromide in broilers and turkeys is parent....16 part per million and in turkeys of 0.13 part per million for parent halofuginone hydrobromide in... the uncooked edible tissues of broilers and turkeys are 0.1 part per million in muscle, 0.3 part...

  5. 21 CFR 556.308 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to monitor for total residues of halofuginone hydrobromide in broilers and turkeys is parent....16 part per million and in turkeys of 0.13 part per million for parent halofuginone hydrobromide in... the uncooked edible tissues of broilers and turkeys are 0.1 part per million in muscle, 0.3 part...

  6. 21 CFR 556.308 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to monitor for total residues of halofuginone hydrobromide in broilers and turkeys is parent....16 part per million and in turkeys of 0.13 part per million for parent halofuginone hydrobromide in... the uncooked edible tissues of broilers and turkeys are 0.1 part per million in muscle, 0.3 part...

  7. Dornase Alfa

    MedlinePlus

    ... to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis. It breaks down the thick secretions in the ... doctor.Dornase alfa is used to treat cystic fibrosis but does not cure it. Continue to use ...

  8. Dornase Alfa

    MedlinePlus

    ... and to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis. It breaks down the thick secretions in the ... your doctor.Dornase alfa is used to treat cystic fibrosis but does not cure it. Continue to use ...

  9. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of darifenacin in the mouse, rat, dog and man.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, K C; Cussans, N J; Nichols, D J; Smith, D A

    1998-01-01

    1. Following intravenous administration to animals at 2.5 mg/kg, darifenacin exhibited terminal plasma half-lifes < 2 h due to high plasma clearance (with respect to blood flow) and volumes of distribution greater than total body water. 2. Following oral administration to animals at doses > 4 mg/kg there was evidence of saturation of clearance since oral AUCs exceeded those expected from the high plasma clearances. In addition, terminal plasma half-lifes were greater than those estimated from intravenous administration. 3. In man, oral clearance was high with respect to liver blood flow. 4. Following oral administration of the radiolabelled drug to animals and man, unchanged darifenacin was only a minor component of the faecal radioactivity indicating that darifenacin was well absorbed from the gut. 5. Darifenacin was metabolized by three main routes in all species: monohydroxylation, oxidative dihydrobenzfuran ring opening and N-dealkylation. There were no marked species differences in the metabolism of darifenacin. PMID:9493320

  10. Dissolution Rate Enhancement, Design and Development of Buccal Drug Delivery of Darifenacin Hydroxypropyl β-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jagdale, Swati C.; Mohanty, Prachyasuman; Chabukswar, Aniruddha R.; Kuchekar, Bhanudas S.

    2013-01-01

    Darifenacin is a urinary antispasmodic. The oral absorption of darifenacin is poor due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability (15–19%). Darifenacin was complexed with hydroxylropyl beta-cyclodextrin (Hpβ-CD). The best results were obtained with the coevaporation that interacts in a 1 : 1 drug : cyclodextrin molar ratio. The solid inclusion complexes were found to be amorphous in the characterization. The dissolution rate of darifenacin from the Hpβ-CD solid inclusion complex was increased compared to the powdered drug. The controlled release buccoadhesive patches for the delivery of darifenacin were prepared using HPMC K100M CR and HPMC K15. The coevaporation complex of the drug was used in the formulation due to its increased saturation solubility and increased ease of dissolution. The patches were evaluated for their surface pH, folding endurance, swelling, mucoadhesive properties, in vitro residence time, vapour transmission test, and in vitro and ex vivo release studies. Formulations Hb2 (2%) and Pb4 (4%) were found to be optimized. These two formulations can be used for buccal delivery of darifenacin which avoids first pass effect and leads to increased bioavailability of darifenacin. PMID:26556003

  11. 21 CFR 558.265 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... articles containing 6 grams of halofuginone hydrobromide per kilogram. (b) Approvals. See No. 016592 in... use. (1) It is used in feed for broiler chickens as follows: (i) Amount. 2.72 grams per ton. (A... lakes, ponds, or streams. (ii) Amount per ton. Halofuginone 2.72 grams (0.0003 percent)...

  12. 21 CFR 558.265 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... articles containing 6 grams of halofuginone hydrobromide per kilogram. (b) Approvals. See No. 016592 in... use. (1) It is used in feed for broiler chickens as follows: (i) Amount. 2.72 grams per ton. (A... lakes, ponds, or streams. (ii) Amount per ton. Halofuginone 2.72 grams (0.0003 percent)...

  13. 21 CFR 558.265 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... articles containing 6 grams of halofuginone hydrobromide per kilogram. (b) Approvals. See No. 016592 in... use. (1) It is used in feed for broiler chickens as follows: (i) Amount. 2.72 grams per ton. (A... lakes, ponds, or streams. (ii) Amount per ton. Halofuginone 2.72 grams (0.0003 percent)...

  14. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to decrease the chance that blood transfusions (transfer of one person's blood to another person's body) ... wheezing difficulty breathing or swallowing hoarseness lack of energy dizziness fainting Epoetin alfa injection may cause other ...

  15. Darbepoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may tell you not to use darbepoetin alfa injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  16. Drotrecogin alfa Eli Lilly.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, E

    2002-04-01

    Drotrecogin alfa (Xigris, recombinant activated protein C) is an anticoagulant developed and launched by Eli Lilly & Co for the treatment of sepsis [333781], [339372], [430133], [436271]. The FDA and the EMEA accepted the brand name Xigris for drotrecogin alfa in June 2001. This trade name had been proposed by Lilly in place of the previous brand name, Zovant, which was deemed unacceptable by the EMEA due to concerns that the name could be confused with hospital-based drugs [412512]. Filings for sepsis were made in the US, EU and Australia in February 2001 [398514], [447870] and in March 2001, the US FDA assigned drotrecogin alfa Priority Review status [403435]. The FDA extended the action date from July 27 to October 27, 2001 for completion of its review of the biologics license application (BLA) for drotrecogin alfa to assess further supplementary data submitted by Lilly [412512]. At the October 16, 2001 meeting (postponed from September 12), the FDA Advisory Committee on Anti-Infective Drugs split 10 to 10 over whether to recommend approval [425873], [425940]. In late October 2001, Lilly received an approvable letter from the FDA for the treatment of severe sepsis. Approval was contingent upon successful negotiation of labeling, agreement on post-approval clinical trials, and successful completion of manufacturing inspections [427301]. In November 2001, the FDA approved drotrecogin alfa for the reduction of mortality in adult patients with severe sepsis who have a high risk of death [430133]; the product was launched onto the US market days later [436271]. Following the FDA committee's split decision in October 2001, Credit Suisse First Boston, which expected mid-2002 approval but with restrictive labeling, revised its predictions from $1.265 billion in 2004 sharply downwards to $543 million [425929]. PMID:15565519

  17. Assessment of the relative in vivo potency of the hydroxylated metabolite of darifenacin in its ability to decrease salivary flow using pooled population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic data

    PubMed Central

    Kerbusch, Thomas; Milligan, Peter A; Karlsson, Mats O

    2004-01-01

    Aims To describe the population pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic relationship between darifenacin (UK-88,525) and its hydroxylated metabolite (UK-148,993), and the reduction in salivary flow (SF, a M3-mediated response). This enabled an estimation of the in vivo potency of the metabolite to decrease SF relative to that of the parent drug. Methods A total of 262 individuals were pooled from 11 Phase 1 studies and one Phase 2 study. A comparison was made between a series of pharmacodynamic models (direct-effect, indirect-effect, link and binding model) using NONMEM. Results The binding model yielded the best description of the decrease in SF by fully accounting for the time course of the pharmacodynamic effect. An internal validation exercise demonstrated the robustness of this model. Covariate analysis identified a circadian rhythm in SF. This model, with confidence intervals (CI) determined by likelihood profiling, indicated that the relative potency of the metabolite to darifenacin to reduce SF was 11.1% (95% CI 3.8, 19.6). This implied that the metabolite was ninefold less potent than darifenacin in vivo. Accounting for the unbound fraction of darifenacin (2%) and its metabolite (13%), the in vivo protein binding-corrected relative potency was estimated to be 2.1%, indicating that the metabolite was 50-fold less potent than the parent drug. The model supported the assumption that no other metabolites contributing to the impairment of the SF were formed during first-pass, and that the development of sensitization or tolerance was not evident over time. The validation process indicated that the i.v.–oral crossover study was necessary for the estimation of the relative potency. Conclusions Population modelling of darifenacin and its hydroxylated metabolite yielded individual pharmacokinetic predictions that could be used to assess the in vivo potency of the metabolite to decrease SF relative to that of the parent drug. The metabolite had a negligible effect on SF

  18. Widespread hyoscine hydrobromide toxicity due to contract manufacturer malpractice : the travacalm episode.

    PubMed

    McEwen, John; Thompson, Barry R; Purcell, Patrick M; Kelly, Larry F; Krauss, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    An outbreak of hyoscine hydrobromide toxicity was detected through the Australian pharmacovigilance system. The unexpectedly wide variation in hyoscine hydrobromide content between individual tablets within single packets created difficulties in initially explaining the clinical experiences. Strict time requirements for review of incoming adverse drug reaction reports and close involvement of the highly skilled national drug regulatory laboratory resulted in early identification of the cause of the outbreak and led in turn to the identification of malpractice by the contract manufacturer. PMID:17472417

  19. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called interferons. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ... allergic to peginterferon alfa-2b injection (PegIntron, Sylatron), interferon alfa-2b (Intron), any other medications, or any ...

  20. Estrogenic profile on a water-soluble estrogen, estrazinol hydrobromide.

    PubMed

    Rassaert, C L; DiPasquale, G; Giannina, T; Manning, J P; Meli, A

    1973-01-01

    The estrogenic properties of estrazinol hydrobromide (EZ), a water-soluble estrogen, were compared with those of Premarin (PR), another water-soluble estrogen preparation consisting of conjugated equine estrogens. Estradiol-17beta, estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17beta-diol (E), and ethinyl estradiol, 17alpha-ethinyl-1,3,5 (10)-estratriene-3,17beta-diol (EE) were used as reference standards. Subcutaneous progesterone (400 mcg) given to rabbits primed with comparable subcutaneous doses of either E or EE produced full secretory changes of the endometrium, while such a transformation could not be elicited in orally primed animals regardless of the estrogen used. The biological profile or orally administered EZ was very similar to that of oral EE and different from oral PR. Howerver, the oral EZ-induced morphological changes of the rabbit endometrium appeared somewhat different from those produced by oral EE. The findings indicated that following oral administration, EZ-induced endometrial transformation is more "normal" and/or adequate than the changes produced by either EE or PR. PMID:4368700

  1. Thermoreversible nanoethosomal gel for the intranasal delivery of Eletriptan hydrobromide.

    PubMed

    Shelke, Santosh; Shahi, Sadhana; Jadhav, Kiran; Dhamecha, Dinesh; Tiwari, Roshan; Patil, Hemlata

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to formulate and characterize thermoreversible gel of Eletriptan Hydrobromide for brain targeting via the intranasal route. Ethosomes were prepared by 3(2) factorial design with two independent variables (concentration of soya lecithin and ethanol) and two response variables [percent entrapment efficiency and vesicle size (nm)] using ethanol injection method. Formulated ethosomes were evaluated for preliminary microscopic examination followed by percent drug entrapment efficiency, vesicle size analysis, zeta potential, polydispersibility index and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM confirms spherical morphology of ethosomes, whereas Malvern zeta sizer confirms that the vesicle size was in the range of 191 ± 6.55-381.3 ± 61.0 nm. Ethosomes were incorporated in gel using poloxamer 407 and carbopol 934 as thermoreversible and mucoadhesive polymers, respectively. Ethosomal gels were evaluated for their pH, viscosity, mucoadhesive strength, in vitro drug release and ex vivo drug permeation through the sheep nasal mucosa. Mucoadhesive strength and pH was found to be 4400 ± 45 to 5500 ± 78.10 dynes/cm(2) and 6.0 ± 0.3 to 6.2 ± 0.1, respectively. In-vitro drug release from the optimized ethosomal gel formulation (G4) was found to be almost 100 % and ex vivo permeation of 4980 µg/ml with a permeability coefficient of 11.94 ± 0.04 × 10(-5) cm/s after 24 h. Histopathological study of the nasal mucosa confirmed non-toxic nature of ethosomal gels. Formulated EH loaded ethosomal thermoreversible gel could serve as the better alternative for the brain targeting via the intranasal route which in turn could subsequently improve its bioavailability. PMID:27091045

  2. Pyridinium hydrobromide perbromide: a versatile catalyst for aziridination of olefins using Chloramine-T.

    PubMed

    Ali, S I; Nikalje, M D; Sudalai, A

    1999-09-01

    [reaction: see text] Pyridinium hydrobromide perbromide (Py x HBr3) catalyzes effectively the aziridination of electron-deficient as well as electron-rich olefins using Chloramine-T (N-chloro-N-sodio-p-toluenesulfonamide) as a nitrogen source to afford the corresponding aziridines in moderate to good yields. PMID:16118868

  3. ALFA: Automated Line Fitting Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.

    2015-12-01

    ALFA fits emission line spectra of arbitrary wavelength coverage and resolution, fully automatically. It uses a catalog of lines which may be present to construct synthetic spectra, the parameters of which are then optimized by means of a genetic algorithm. Uncertainties are estimated using the noise structure of the residuals. An emission line spectrum containing several hundred lines can be fitted in a few seconds using a single processor of a typical contemporary desktop or laptop PC. Data cubes in FITS format can be analysed using multiple processors, and an analysis of tens of thousands of deep spectra obtained with instruments such as MUSE will take a few hours.

  4. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... inject into your stomach if you are very thin. Use a different spot for each injection. Do not inject peginterferon alfa-2b into an area where the skin is sore, red, bruised, scarred, irritated, or infected; has stretch marks ...

  5. Scientific Organization of the ALFA Legacy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    The ALFA Legacy Surveys are organized as a partnership between NAIC and the community of interested and involved academic researchers. NAIC has committed a large fraction of the time on the Arecibo telescope to the ALFA surveys for the next 5 or more years in return for which the ALFA Consortia are making a large commitment of personnel resources in conducting the surveys, writing the needed software, and archiving the data for use by others. The surveys are facilitated by means of commensal observations--simultaneous observations made by two or more Consortia each processing the same received signal using different spectrometers designed for different scientific applications. The spectrometer specifications are set by the Consortia, and the hardware is built by NAIC under contract to university-based instrumentation groups. The NAIC vision of its partnership with the ALFA consortia: (1) Is necessary to the success of the ALFA legacy surveys; (2) Provides the opportunity to re-establish an effective partnership between the national observatory and the academic research community; (3) Reflects the maturity of 50 years of research in radio astronomy. NAIC is operated by Cornell University under cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  6. Efmoroctocog Alfa: A Review in Haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2016-09-01

    Efmoroctocog alfa (Elocta(®), Eloctate(®), Eloctate™), a first-in-class recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc), has an extended half-life compared with conventional factor VIII (FVIII) preparations, including recombinant FVIII (rFVIII) products. It is approved for the treatment and prophylaxis of bleeding in patients with haemophilia A in multiple countries worldwide. Data accumulated from pivotal phase III studies (A-LONG in adults and adolescents aged ≥12 years; Kids A-LONG in children aged <12 years) and their ongoing extension study (ASPIRE) have demonstrated the long-term effectiveness of efmoroctocog alfa for the treatment of acute bleeding episodes, perioperative management and routine prophylaxis in previously treated males with severe haemophilia A. Among patients on individualized efmoroctocog alfa prophylaxis who had previously received FVIII prophylaxis, all but one of those aged ≥12 years and three-quarters of those aged <12 years reduced their injection frequency compared with their pre-study regimen. FVIII replacement therapy with efmoroctocog alfa was generally well tolerated in previously treated patients, with no evidence of increased immunogenicity. The safety and efficacy of FVIII replacement therapy with efmoroctocog alfa in previously untreated males aged <6 years with severe haemophilia A are currently being evaluated. Although there are no direct, head-to-head studies, the available clinical trial evidence indicates that efmoroctocog alfa provides an effective alternative to conventional FVIII preparations (including rFVIIIs) for the management of haemophilia A. Moreover, by reducing the frequency of injections required, it has the potential to reduce treatment burden, and hence improve adherence to prophylaxis. PMID:27487799

  7. ALFA: an automated line fitting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, R.

    2016-03-01

    I present the automated line fitting algorithm, ALFA, a new code which can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary wavelength coverage and resolution, fully automatically. In contrast to traditional emission line fitting methods which require the identification of spectral features suspected to be emission lines, ALFA instead uses a list of lines which are expected to be present to construct a synthetic spectrum. The parameters used to construct the synthetic spectrum are optimized by means of a genetic algorithm. Uncertainties are estimated using the noise structure of the residuals. An emission line spectrum containing several hundred lines can be fitted in a few seconds using a single processor of a typical contemporary desktop or laptop PC. I show that the results are in excellent agreement with those measured manually for a number of spectra. Where discrepancies exist, the manually measured fluxes are found to be less accurate than those returned by ALFA. Together with the code NEAT, ALFA provides a powerful way to rapidly extract physical information from observations, an increasingly vital function in the era of highly multiplexed spectroscopy. The two codes can deliver a reliable and comprehensive analysis of very large data sets in a few hours with little or no user interaction.

  8. Introduction to ALFA and the GALFA Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.

    2004-12-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of the ALFA instrument, a 7 element focal plane array on the Arecibo 305m telescope, which covers the frequency range 1225 to 1525 MHz. Each pixel observes two orthogonal linear polarizations. There are several spectrometers for different types of observations. For Galactic astronomy, a FFT spectrometer has been developed by D. Werthimer and colleagues, which has 8192 channels covering 7 MHz ( 1500 km/s at 0.2 km/s resolution) along with 256 channels covering 100 MHz intended for measuring and removing spectral baselines. ALFA test observations have been underway since August 2004, and astronomical observations should be ramping up through Fall 2004 and be in full swing by early 2005. The GALFA consortium is comprised of individuals interested in using the ALFA system for galactic astronomy. It is divided by interest into subconsortia, focusing on a number of the outstanding problems which can be addressed by ALFA on the Arecibo telescope, with 8-10 K/Jy gain, 3.5' beamwidth, and 30-35 K system temperature. One subconsortium is planning to carry out a survey of 21cm continuum radiation from the Milky Way, focusing on mapping the polarized emission in order to perform Faraday tomography of the magnetic field distribution. Radio recombination lines are the focus of another subconsortium; the ALFA system will be able to observe multiple RRLs that fall within its bandpass. HI emission and absorption will be utilized by a number of consortia, but applied to different problems, including the Galactic plane, high latitude clouds, high velocity clouds, turbulence, and the relationship of the atomic and molecular components of the ISM. Each subconsortium is making plans, starting with relatively small-scale projects, and working towards large-scale projects. Commensal (GALFA together with extragalactic or pulsar observations) are anticipated, using multiple signal processing systems simultaneously.

  9. Crystal growth, structural and photoluminescence studies of L-tyrosine hydrobromide semi organic single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, P.; Vetrivel, S.; Jayavel, R.; Vedhi, C.; Ravi, G.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2012-11-01

    Nearly perfect single crystal of L-tyrosine hydrobromide (LTHB) has been grown at room temperature from the saturated solution prepared from the solvent with optimised normality (2N) using slow evaporation solution growth technique. Crystal system and lattice parameters have been estimated by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Prominent peeks of powder X-ray diffraction pattern have been indexed and diffraction data have been presented. The presence of various functional groups in LTHB has been identified by vibrational and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectral study. The crystalline nature and defect during the growth has been studied by obtaining high resolution X-ray diffraction curve (rocking curve) for the title crystal and detailed explanation is given in this paper. Cyclic voltammetric behaviour and photoluminescence properties of LTHB have also been investigated.

  10. Simultaneous high-pressure liquid chromatographic determination of acetaminophen, guaifenesin, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide in cough syrup.

    PubMed

    McSharry, W O; Savage, I V

    1980-02-01

    Acetaminophen (I), guaifenesin (II), and dextromethorphan hydrobromide (III) were separated and quantitated simultaneously in cough syrup by high-pressure liquid chromatography. A chemically bonded octadecylsilane stationary phase was used with a mobile phase of 48% (v/v) aqueous methanol. The mobile phase pH was stabilized to 4.2 by adding formic acid--ammonium formate buffer (approximately 0.4%). The internal standard was o-dinitrobenzene. Retention volumes were 4 ml for I, 6 ml for II, 11 ml for the internal standard, and 20 ml for III. Inactive syrup components did not interfere, permitting direct diluted sample injection. Results on active ingredients were essentially 100% of the claim, with standard deviations of +/- 1.5, 1.2, and 2.1% for I, II, and III, respectively. PMID:7359328

  11. The ALFA ZOA Deep Survey: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, T. P.; Henning, P. A.; Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Butcher, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The Arecibo L-band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Deep Survey is the deepest and most sensitive blind H i survey undertaken in the ZOA. ALFA ZOA Deep will cover about 300 square degrees of sky behind the Galactic Plane in both the inner (30^\\circ ≤slant l≤slant 75^\\circ ;b≤slant | 2^\\circ | ) and outer (175^\\circ ≤slant l≤slant 207^\\circ ;-2^\\circ ≤slant b≤slant +1^\\circ ) Galaxy, using the Arecibo Radio Telescope. First results from the survey have found 61 galaxies within a 15 square degree area centered on l=192^\\circ and b = -2°. The survey reached its expected sensitivity of rms = 1 mJy at 9 km s-1 channel resolution, and is shown to be complete above integrated flux, FHi = 0.5 Jy km s-1. The positional accuracy of the survey is 28″ and detections are found out to a recessional velocity of nearly 19,000 km s-1. The survey confirms the extent of the Orion and Abell 539 clusters behind the plane of the Milky Way and discovers expansive voids, at 10,000 and 18,000 km s-1. Twenty-six detections (43%) have a counterpart in the literature, but only two of these have known redshifts. Counterparts are 20% less common beyond vhel = 10,000 km s-1 and 33% less common at extinctions higher than AB = 3.5 mag. The ALFA ZOA Deep survey is able to probe large scale structure beyond redshifts that even the most modern wide-angle surveys have been able to detect in the ZOA at any wavelength.

  12. Effects of pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Sileno, A. P.; deMeireles, J. C.; Dua, R.; Pimplaskar, H. K.; Xia, W. J.; Marinaro, J.; Langenback, E.; Matos, F. J.; Putcha, L.; Romeo, V. D.; Behl, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of formulation pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide, the single most effective drug available for the prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by motion sickness. METHODS: Human subjects received scopolamine nasally at a dose of 0.2 mg/0.05 mL or 0.4 mg/0.10 mL, blood samples were collected at different time points, and plasma scopolamine concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS: Following administration of a 0.2 mg dose, the average Cmax values were found to be 262+/-118, 419+/-161, and 488+/-331 pg/ mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At the 0.4 mg dose the average Cmax values were found to be 503+/-199, 933+/-449, and 1,308+/-473 pg/mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At a 0.2 mg dose, the AUC values were found to be 23,208+/-6,824, 29,145+/-9,225, and 25,721+/-5,294 pg x min/mL for formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. At a 0.4 mg dose, the average AUC value was found to be high for pH 9.0 formulation (70,740+/-29,381 pg x min/mL) as compared to those of pH 4.0 (59,573+/-13,700 pg x min/mL) and pH 7.0 (55,298+/-17,305 pg x min/mL) formulations. Both the Cmax and AUC values were almost doubled with doubling the dose. On the other hand, the average Tmax, values decreased linearly with a decrease in formulation pH at both doses. For example, at a 0.4 mg dose, the average Tmax values were 26.7+/-5.8, 15.0+/-10.0, and 8.8+/-2.5 minutes at formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects increased substantially with increases in formulation pH and dose.

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, ademetionine, agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, AMG-162, androgel, anidulafungin, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bazedoxifene acetate, bevacizumab, bosentan; Caldaret hydrate, canfosfamide hydrochloride, choriogonadotropin alfa, ciclesonide, combretastatin A-4 phosphate, CY-2301; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, degarelix acetate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, enclomiphene citrate, eplerenone, epratuzumab, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, ezetimibe; Fingolimod hydrochloride, FP-1096; HMR-3339A, HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy, human insulin, HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); Idursulfase, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, InnoVax C insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, irofulven; Labetuzumab, lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, LyphoDerm, Lyprinol; Magnesium sulfate, metelimumab, methylphenidate hydrochloride; Natalizumab, NO-aspirin; OROS(R); PC-515, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, posaconazole, pregabalin, PT-141, pyridoxamine; R-744, ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rebimastat, repinotan hydrochloride, rhC1, rhGAD65, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Sardomozide, solifenacin succinate; Tadalafil, taxus, telavancin, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, testosterone transdermal patch, tetomilast, tirapazamine, torcetrapib; Valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vildagliptin; Yttrium Y90 epratuzumab; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:15672123

  14. Factors affecting the stability and performance of ipratropium bromide; fenoterol hydrobromide pressurized-metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Ninbovorl, Jenjira; Sawatdee, Somchai; Srichana, Teerapol

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the factors affecting the stability and performance of ipratropium bromide and fenoterol hydrobromide in a pressurized-metered dose inhaler (pMDI). A factorial design was applied to investigate the effects of three parameters (propellant, water, and ethanol) on the performance of 27 designed formulations of a solution-based pMDI. The formulations that contained a hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellant lower than 72% v/v and an ethanol concentration higher than 27% v/v remained as clear solutions. Nine formulations that contained the HFA propellant higher than 74% v/v precipitated. The results indicated that it was not only the HFA propellant content of the formulations that was related to the formulation instability but also ethanol content. Only six formulations from the 18 formulations, that did not precipitate, produced drug contents that were within the acceptable range (80-120%). These six formulations generated aerosols with mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) of approximately 2 μm with a fine particle fraction (FPF; particle size, <6.4 μm) between 45% and 52%. The MMAD and FPF did not change significantly after 6 months of storage (P > 0.05). PMID:23975571

  15. Evaluation of Arecoline Hydrobromide Toxicity after a 14-Day Repeated Oral Administration in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jianrong; Zhou, Xuzheng; Li, Jianyong; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    A subchronic toxicity test was conducted in rats on the basis of a previous acute toxicity test to evaluate the safety of arecoline hydrobromide (Ah), to systematically study its pharmacological effects and to provide experimental support for a safe clinical dose. Eighty rats were randomly divided into four groups: a high-dose group (1000 mg/kg), medium-dose group (200 mg/kg), low-dose group (100mg/kg) and blank control group. The doses were administered daily via gastric lavage for 14 consecutive days. There were no significant differences in the low-dose Ah group compared to the control group (P>0.05) with regard to body weight, organ coefficients, hematological parameters and histopathological changes. The high-dose of Ah influenced some of these parameters, which requires further study. The results of this study indicated that a long-term, continuous high dose of Ah was toxic. However, it is safe to use Ah according to the clinically recommended dosing parameters. The level of Ah at which no adverse effects were observed was 100 mg/kg/day under the present study conditions. PMID:25880067

  16. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant Darbepoetin Alfa from Leishmania tarentolae.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Anvarsadat; Mahrooz, Abdolkarim; Oladnabi, Morteza; Safdari, Yaghoub; Ansari, Javad; Veisi, Kamal; Evazalipour, Mehdi; Shahbazmohammadi, Hamid; Omidinia, Eskandar

    2016-09-01

    Darbepoetin alfa is a biopharmaceutical glycoprotein that stimulates erythropoiesis and is used to treat anemia, which associated with renal failure and cancer chemotherapy. We herein describe the structural characterization of recombinant darbepoetin alfa produced by Leishmania tarentolae T7-TR host. The DNA expression cassette was integrated into the L. tarentolae genome through homologous recombination. Transformed clones were selected by antibiotic resistance, diagnostic PCRs, and protein expression analysis. The structure of recombinant darbepoetin alfa was analyzed by isoelectric focusing, ultraviolet-visible spectrum, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Expression analysis showed the presence of a protein band at 40 kDa, and its expression level was 51.2 mg/ml of culture medium. Darbepoetin alfa have 5 isoforms with varying degree of sialylation. The UV absorption and CD spectra were analogous to original drug (Aranesp), which confirmed that the produced protein was darbepoetin alfa. Potency test results revealed that the purified protein was biologically active. In brief, the structural and biological characteristics of expressed darbepoetin alfa were very similar to Aranesp which has been normally expressed in CHO. Our data also suggest that produced protein has potential to be developed for clinical use. PMID:27282622

  17. XM17 Follitropin Alfa (Ovaleap(®)): A Review in Reproductive Endocrine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M

    2016-08-01

    The subcutaneous recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone XM17 follitropin alfa (Ovaleap(®)) is approved in the EU as a biosimilar of follitropin alfa (Gonal-f(®)) for use in all indications for which the reference product is approved, including as a multifollicular stimulant in women undergoing superovulation for assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. In a nonblind, phase I study in healthy female volunteers, the pharmacokinetic profile of XM17 follitropin alfa was bioequivalent to that of reference follitropin alfa following single dosing. Moreover, in a multinational, phase III study, the efficacy of XM17 follitropin alfa as a multifollicular stimulant was equivalent to that of reference follitropin alfa in terms of the number of retrieved oocytes (primary endpoint) in women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for ART treatment. There were no clinically relevant differences in oocyte quality between XM17 follitropin alfa and reference follitropin alfa, with biochemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates and take-home baby rates not significantly differing between the treatment groups. XM17 follitropin alfa was generally well tolerated in this patient population, with its tolerability profile generally similar to that of reference follitropin alfa and with no new unexpected tolerability concerns identified. Thus, XM17 follitropin alfa is an effective treatment option in patients requiring follitropin alfa therapy for various reproductive endocrine disorders, providing a useful alternative to reference follitropin alfa. PMID:27342604

  18. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration's approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age. PMID:27366102

  19. Role of elosulfase alfa in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Debra S; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA or Morquio A) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease which results in a striking skeletal phenotype, but does not negatively impact the intellect of the patient. MPS IVA has a phenotypic continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressing form to a slowly progressive form. The clinical diagnosis is often made in the preschool years based on abnormal bone findings on physical examination and dysplasia on radiographic imaging. Supportive care has been the mainstay in caring for patients. Orthopedic physicians often form the core of the care team due to the early and severe skeletal abnormalities; however, systemic disease is common and requires aggressive monitoring and management. Interdisciplinary care teams often consist of medical geneticists, cardiologists, pulmonary specialists, gastroenterologists, otolaryngologists, audiologists, and ophthalmologists. With the US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of elosulfase alfa, patients >5 years of age now have access to this medication from the time of diagnosis. The clinical trial with once weekly intravenous dosing (2.0 mg/kg per week) showed improvement in the 6-minute walk test. The composite end point analysis to evaluate the combining changes from baseline in 6-minute walk test, 3-minute stair climb test, and respiratory function showed that at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per week, subjects performed better when compared to placebo. This indication was clinically meaningful in the treatment group. The treatment was generally well tolerated, and the uncommon infusion reactions responded well to traditional enzyme replacement therapy infusion reaction management algorithms. Currently, clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy and safety in MPS IVA patients <5 years of age. PMID:27366102

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in the current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-NGFbeta, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; beta-Methyl-6-chloromelatonin, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, CEA-TRICOM, cetuximab, ciclesonide, clofarabine, Cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, Dexamet, drospirenone, drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone; Fenretinide; Gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, iodine (i131) tositumomab, irofulven, ISS-1018; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, liposomal doxorubicin; Nemifitide ditriflutate, nesiritide; Omalizumab; Pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate; Rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride; Satraplatin, St. John's Wort extract, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, tanaproget, Taxus, tiotropium bromide, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; Ximelagatran; Zileuton. PMID:16258596

  1. ALFA: The new ALICE-FAIR software framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Turany, M.; Buncic, P.; Hristov, P.; Kollegger, T.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lindenstruth, V.; Manafov, A.; Richter, M.; Rybalchenko, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Winckler, N.

    2015-12-01

    The commonalities between the ALICE and FAIR experiments and their computing requirements led to the development of large parts of a common software framework in an experiment independent way. The FairRoot project has already shown the feasibility of such an approach for the FAIR experiments and extending it beyond FAIR to experiments at other facilities[1, 2]. The ALFA framework is a joint development between ALICE Online- Offline (O2) and FairRoot teams. ALFA is designed as a flexible, elastic system, which balances reliability and ease of development with performance using multi-processing and multithreading. A message- based approach has been adopted; such an approach will support the use of the software on different hardware platforms, including heterogeneous systems. Each process in ALFA assumes limited communication and reliance on other processes. Such a design will add horizontal scaling (multiple processes) to vertical scaling provided by multiple threads to meet computing and throughput demands. ALFA does not dictate any application protocols. Potentially, any content-based processor or any source can change the application protocol. The framework supports different serialization standards for data exchange between different hardware and software languages.

  2. Corifollitropin alfa: a new option to treat female infertility.

    PubMed

    de Lartigue, Jane

    2011-08-01

    Corifollitropin alfa (Elonva®) is the first hybrid follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) molecule with demonstrated sustained follicle-stimulating activity. The β subunit of this molecule contains the carboxy-terminal peptide of human chorionic gonadotropin, which alters the pharmacokinetic profile of the molecule. It demonstrates a longer circulation half-life and extended time to peak levels when compared with recombinant FSH (rFSH). Like rFSH, it lacks luteinizing hormone activity and binds specifically to the FSH receptor in vitro. Clinical trials show that corifollitropin alfa is able to sustain multiple follicular growth for a week, with a similar ovarian response and safety profile as rFSH. A single injection of corifollitropin alfa can replace 7 daily injections of rFSH during the first week of ovarian stimulation in gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocols. Therefore, corifollitropin alfa addresses the need for a simplified treatment approach to lessen the burden of multiple daily injections for in vitro fertilization. PMID:21850281

  3. Asfotase Alfa Treatment Improves Survival for Perinatal and Infantile Hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Rockman-Greenberg, Cheryl; Ozono, Keiichi; Riese, Richard; Moseley, Scott; Melian, Agustin; Thompson, David D.; Bishop, Nicholas; Hofmann, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism that, in its most severe perinatal and infantile forms, results in 50–100% mortality, typically from respiratory complications. Objectives: Our objective was to better understand the effect of treatment with asfotase alfa, a first-in-class enzyme replacement therapy, on mortality in neonates and infants with severe HPP. Design/Setting: Data from patients with the perinatal and infantile forms of HPP in two ongoing, multicenter, multinational, open-label, phase 2 interventional studies of asfotase alfa treatment were compared with data from similar patients from a retrospective natural history study. Patients: Thirty-seven treated patients (median treatment duration, 2.7 years) and 48 historical controls of similar chronological age and HPP characteristics. Interventions: Treated patients received asfotase alfa as sc injections either 1 mg/kg six times per week or 2 mg/kg thrice weekly. Main Outcome Measures: Survival, skeletal health quantified radiographically on treatment, and ventilatory status were the main outcome measures for this study. Results: Asfotase alfa was associated with improved survival in treated patients vs historical controls: 95% vs 42% at age 1 year and 84% vs 27% at age 5 years, respectively (P < .0001, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test). Whereas 5% (1/20) of the historical controls who required ventilatory assistance survived, 76% (16/21) of the ventilated and treated patients survived, among whom 75% (12/16) were weaned from ventilatory support. This better respiratory outcome accompanied radiographic improvements in skeletal mineralization and health. Conclusions: Asfotase alfa mineralizes the HPP skeleton, including the ribs, and improves respiratory function and survival in life-threatening perinatal and infantile HPP. PMID:26529632

  4. Enhanced antitumor reactivity of tumor-sensitized T cells by interferon alfa

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Woude, D.L.; Wagner, P.D.; Shu, S.; Chang, A.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Tumor-draining lymph node cells from mice bearing the methylcholanthrene-induced MCA 106 tumors can be sensitized in vitro to acquire antitumor reactivity. We examined the effect of interferon alfa on the function of cells that underwent in vitro sensitization in adoptive immunotherapy. Interferon alfa increased the antitumor reactivity of in vitro sensitized cells in the treatment of MCA 106 pulmonary metastases. This effect was evident in irradiated mice, indicating that a host response to the interferon alfa was not required. Interferon alfa treatment increased class I major histocompatibility complex antigen expression on tumor cells and increased their susceptibility to lysis by in vitro sensitized cells. These results suggest that interferon alfa enhancement of adoptive immunotherapy was mediated by its effect on tumor cells. Interferon alfa may be a useful adjunct to the adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  5. Selecting patients with severe sepsis for drotrecogin alfa (activated) therapy.

    PubMed

    Sollet, Jean-Pierre; Garber, Gary E

    2002-12-01

    Selecting patients for drotrecogin alfa (activated) (Xigris; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) therapy outside of a clinical trial setting requires knowledge of the rationale that led the Protein C Worldwide Evaluation in Severe Sepsis (PROWESS) investigators to select the various entry criteria for the trial. Enrollment criteria for the study included a known or suspected infection, presence of at least 3 systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and dysfunction of > or =1 organ or system. The infection criteria used in PROWESS were designed to be straightforward and were based on common clinical and radiological data. Although previous definitions of sepsis required only 2 SIRS criteria, the PROWESS trial investigators required the presence of > or =3 SIRS criteria to improve the sensitivity and specificity of these criteria for the diagnosis of sepsis. Acute organ dysfunction, the diagnostic criterion for severe sepsis, was used to define the study population because it identifies patients at significant risk of death. Characteristics of drotrecogin alfa (activated)-treated patients, including infection, modified SIRS criteria, and organ dysfunction, were similar to those of the placebo group and the general sepsis population. Proper clinical judgment and use of the these inclusion criteria as a guide will help clinicians select and treat sepsis patients with drotrecogin alfa (activated). PMID:12521613

  6. Pharmacologic Evaluation of Antidepressant Activity and Synthesis of 2-Morpholino-5-phenyl-6H-1,3,4-thiadiazine Hydrobromide.

    PubMed

    Sarapultsev, Alexey P; Chupakhin, Oleg N; Sarapultsev, Petr A; Sidorova, Larisa P; Tseitler, Tatiana A

    2016-01-01

    Substituted thiadiazines exert a reliable therapeutic effect in treating stress, and a schematic description of their ability to influence all aspects of a stress response has been depicted. This study was conducted to pharmacologically evaluate compound L-17, a substituted thiadiazine, (2-morpholino-5-phenyl-6H-1,3,4-thiadiazine, hydrobromide) for possible anti-psychotic/antidepressant activity. Compound L-17 was synthesized by cyclocondensation of α-bromoacetophenone with the original morpholine-4-carbothionic acid hydrazide. Pharmacologic evaluations were conducted using methods described by E.F. Lavretskaya (1985), and in accordance with published guidelines for studying drugs for neuroleptic activity. Compound L-17 was evaluated for various possible mechanisms of action, including its effects on cholinergic system agonists/antagonists, dopaminergic neurotransmission, the adrenergic system, and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors. One or more of these mechanisms may be responsible for the beneficial effects shown by thiadiazine compounds in experiments conducted to evaluate their activity in models of acute stress and acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27213404

  7. Pharmacologic Evaluation of Antidepressant Activity and Synthesis of 2-Morpholino-5-phenyl-6H-1,3,4-thiadiazine Hydrobromide

    PubMed Central

    Sarapultsev, Alexey P.; Chupakhin, Oleg N.; Sarapultsev, Petr A.; Sidorova, Larisa P.; Tseitler, Tatiana A.

    2016-01-01

    Substituted thiadiazines exert a reliable therapeutic effect in treating stress, and a schematic description of their ability to influence all aspects of a stress response has been depicted. This study was conducted to pharmacologically evaluate compound L-17, a substituted thiadiazine, (2-morpholino-5-phenyl-6H-1,3,4-thiadiazine, hydrobromide) for possible anti-psychotic/antidepressant activity. Compound L-17 was synthesized by cyclocondensation of α-bromoacetophenone with the original morpholine-4-carbothionic acid hydrazide. Pharmacologic evaluations were conducted using methods described by E.F. Lavretskaya (1985), and in accordance with published guidelines for studying drugs for neuroleptic activity. Compound L-17 was evaluated for various possible mechanisms of action, including its effects on cholinergic system agonists/antagonists, dopaminergic neurotransmission, the adrenergic system, and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors. One or more of these mechanisms may be responsible for the beneficial effects shown by thiadiazine compounds in experiments conducted to evaluate their activity in models of acute stress and acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27213404

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  9. Acquisition of Learning by Facilitating Academics (Project ALFA). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Paula

    This report assesses the Acquisition of Learning by Facilitating Academics (Project ALFA), which is designed to assist the academic progress of Haitian students at Lafayette High School in Brooklyn, New York. Project ALFA served a total of 62 students of limited English proficiency who had attended an English-speaking school system for less than 5…

  10. Development of anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies in clinical trial-treated patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Turkia, Hadhami Ben; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Ida, Hiroyuki; Tantawy, Azza A G; Qin, Yulin; Qiu, Yongchang; Dinh, Quinn; Zimran, Ari

    2016-07-01

    Anti-drug antibodies may develop with biological therapies, possibly leading to a reduction of treatment efficacy and to allergic and other adverse reactions. Patients with Gaucher disease were tested for anti-drug antibodies every 6 or 12weeks in clinical studies of velaglucerase alfa enzyme replacement therapy, as part of a range of safety endpoints. In 10 studies between April 2004 and March 2015, 289 patients aged 2-84years (median 43years) were assessed for the development of anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Sixty-four patients were treatment-naïve at baseline and 225 patients were switched to velaglucerase alfa from imiglucerase treatment. They received velaglucerase alfa treatment for a median of 36.4weeks (interquartile range 26.4-155.4weeks). Four patients (1.4%) became positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa IgG antibodies, two of whom had antibodies that were neutralizing in vitro, but there were no apparent changes in patients' platelet counts, hemoglobin levels or levels of CCL18 and chitotriosidase, suggestive of clinical deterioration after anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies were detected, and no infusion-related adverse events were reported. Less than 2% of patients exposed to velaglucerase alfa tested positive for antibodies and there was no apparent correlation between anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies and adverse events or pharmacodynamic or clinical responses. PMID:27282565

  11. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa

    PubMed Central

    Orimo, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal), perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa) was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change treatments and prognosis of HPP. PMID:27274262

  12. Pathophysiology of hypophosphatasia and the potential role of asfotase alfa.

    PubMed

    Orimo, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited systemic bone disease that is characterized by bone hypomineralization. HPP is classified into six forms according to the age of onset and severity as perinatal (lethal), perinatal benign, infantile, childhood, adult, and odontohypophosphatasia. The causative gene of the disease is the ALPL gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP is expressed ubiquitously, and its physiological role is apparent in bone mineralization. A defect in bone mineralization can manifest in several ways, including rickets or osteomalacia in HPP patients. Patients with severe forms suffer from respiratory failure because of hypoplastic chest, which is the main cause of death. They sometimes present with seizures due to a defect in vitamin B6 metabolism resulting from the lack of alkaline phosphatase activity in neuronal cells, which is also lethal. Patients with a mild form of the disease exhibit rickets or osteomalacia and a functional defect of exercise. Odontohypophosphatasia shows only dental manifestations. To date, 302 mutations in the ALPL gene have been reported, mainly single-nucleotide substitutions, and the relationships between phenotype and genotype have been partially elucidated. An established treatment for HPP was not available until the recent development of enzyme replacement therapy. The first successful enzyme replacement therapy in model mice using a modified human TNAP protein (asfotase alfa) was reported in 2008, and subsequently success in patients with severe form of the disease was reported in 2012. In 2015, asfotase alfa was approved in Japan in July, followed by in the EU and Canada in August, and then by the US Food and Drug Administration in the USA in October. It is expected that therapy with asfotase alfa will drastically change treatments and prognosis of HPP. PMID:27274262

  13. Formulation optimization of galantamine hydrobromide loaded gel drug reservoirs in transdermal patch for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Fong Yen; Basri, Mahiran; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Ahmad, Mansor B; Ismail, Maznah

    2015-01-01

    Galantamine hydrobromide (GH) is an effective drug for Alzheimer’s disease. It is currently delivered via the oral route, and this might cause nausea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal disturbance. In the present work, GH was formulated in a gel-type drug reservoir and then optimized by using response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design. This optimization study involved three independent variables (carbopol amount, triethanolamine amount, and GH amount) and two dependent variables (cumulative drug release amount at 8 hours and the permeation flux of drug). Two models using expert design software were fitted into a quadratic polynomial model. The optimized gel was formulated with 0.89% w/w carbopol, 1.16% w/w triethanolamine, and 4.19% w/w GH. Optimization analysis revealed that the proposed formulation has the predicted cumulative drug release amount at 8 hours of 17.80 mg·cm−2 and the predicted permeation flux of 2.27 mg·cm−2/h. These predicted values have good agreement to actual cumulative drug release amount at 8 hours (16.93±0.08 mg·cm−2) and actual permeation flux (2.32±0.02 mg·cm−2/h). This optimized reservoir formulation was then fabricated in the transdermal patch system. This patch system has moderate pH, high drug content, and controlled drug-release pattern. Thus, this patch system has the potential to be used as the drug carrier for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26089664

  14. Pharmacologic profiling of corifollitropin alfa, the first developed sustained follicle stimulant.

    PubMed

    Verbost, Pieter; Sloot, Willem N; Rose, Ursula M; de Leeuw, Renato; Hanssen, Rob G J M; Verheijden, Gijs F M

    2011-01-25

    Corifollitropin alfa (Elonva®, MSD, previously N.V. Organon or Schering-Plough Oss, The Netherlands) is a newly developed sustained follicle stimulant composed of the α subunit of human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and a hybrid β subunit formed by fusion of the human chorionic gonadotropin β subunit carboxy terminal peptide with the β subunit of human FSH. Binding characteristics of corifollitropin alfa at the rat FSH receptor and transactivation properties at the rat FSH receptor, human luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor, and human thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSH receptor) were assessed in vitro. Bioactivity of corifollitropin alfa in rats was also assessed. Serum corifollitropin alfa levels in rats and dogs were used to derive the main pharmacokinetic parameters of corifollitropin alfa. Binding and transactivation profile of corifollitropin alfa to rat FSH receptor was specific and comparable to that of recombinant human FSH, with no intrinsic TSH receptor or LH receptor activation. From pharmacokinetic studies, circulating half-life of corifollitropin alfa was calculated to be 17.3h in rats and 46.9h in dogs, 1.5- to 2-fold longer than recombinant FSH. Corifollitropin alfa demonstrated a 2- to 4-fold increase in bioactivity (ovarian weight, serum estradiol and progesterone, ovulated ova) over recombinant FSH across all in vivo parameters assessed. These data demonstrate that corifollitropin alfa is a specific ligand with high affinity for FSH receptor, lacking intrinsic activity for LH receptor and TSH receptor. By virtue of its increased in vivo half-life, corifollitropin alfa can be a valuable alternative to FSH by acting as a sustained follicle stimulant. PMID:21115001

  15. Epoetin alfa in platinum-treated ovarian cancer patients: results of a multinational, multicentre, randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P M; Antonopoulos, M; Lahousen, M; Lind, M; Kosmidis, P

    2006-01-01

    This multicentre, open-label, controlled clinical trial assessed the effects of epoetin alfa treatment on haematologic and quality of life (QOL) parameters in 182 anaemic (Hb⩽12 g dl−1) ovarian cancer patients receiving platinum chemotherapy. Patients were randomised 2 : 1 to receive epoetin alfa 10 000–20 000 IU three times weekly plus best standard treatment (BST) or BST only. Main study end points were changes from baseline in haemoglobin (Hb) level, transfusion requirements, and QOL. For the epoetin alfa group, mean Hb increased by 1.8 g dl−1 by weeks 4–6 and was significantly increased from baseline through study end (P<0.001). The mean change in Hb from baseline was significantly (P<0.001) greater for epoetin alfa than BST patients at all postbaseline evaluations. Significantly fewer epoetin alfa than BST patients required transfusion(s) after the first 4 weeks of treatment (7.9 vs 30.5%; P<0.001). Also, significant (P⩽0.04) differences favouring the epoetin alfa group over the BST group were found for all three median CLAS scores (Energy Level, Ability to Do Daily Activities, Overall QOL) and the median average CLAS score during chemotherapy. These findings support use of epoetin alfa to increase Hb levels, reduce transfusion use, and improve QOL in anaemic ovarian cancer patients receiving platinum chemotherapy. PMID:16570051

  16. Evaluating the transport layer of the ALFA framework for the Intel® Xeon Phi™ Coprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santogidis, Aram; Hirstius, Andreas; Lalis, Spyros

    2015-12-01

    The ALFA framework supports the software development of major High Energy Physics experiments. As part of our research effort to optimize the transport layer of ALFA, we focus on profiling its data transfer performance for inter-node communication on the Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessor. In this article we present the collected performance measurements with the related analysis of the results. The optimization opportunities that are discovered, help us to formulate the future plans of enabling high performance data transfer for ALFA on the Intel Xeon Phi architecture.

  17. Fast Radio Burst Discovered in the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Cordes, J. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Wharton, R. S.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Knispel, B.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J. K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W. W.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm-3, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = -0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  18. Fast radio burst discovered in the Arecibo pulsar ALFA survey

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, L. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Wharton, R. S.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; and others

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm{sup –3}, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = –0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  19. Corifollitropin alfa, a long-acting follicle-stimulating hormone agonist for the treatment of infertility.

    PubMed

    Loutradis, Dimitris; Drakakis, Petros; Vlismas, Antonis; Antsaklis, Aristidis

    2009-04-01

    Corifollitropin alfa is being developed by Schering-Plough Corp as an injectable, long-acting follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) agonist for the treatment of infertility. A single dose of corifollitropin alfa could initiate and sustain multifollicular growth in patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation, such as during in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The agent comprises an alpha-subunit, which is identical to that of FSH, and a beta-subunit, which is produced by the fusion of the C-terminal peptide from the beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin to the beta-subunit of FSH. Corifollitropin alfa has a longer half-life compared with FSH and thus requires less frequent dosing. The drug was well tolerated and does not appear to be associated with any serious adverse events or the formation of antibodies. The initial results from a large, phase III, double-blind clinical trial indicated that the ongoing pregnancy rate achieved with corifollitropin alfa treatment was high and similar to the rate established with daily treatment of recombinant FSH. The number of oocytes retrieved following the administration of corifollitropin alfa was slightly higher compared with the number observed with daily recombinant FSH treatment. Thus, corifollitropin alfa has the potential to serve as a viable fertility agent and to gain a place in the infertility market. PMID:19337959

  20. Agalsidase alfa: a review of its use in the management of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-10-01

    The enzyme replacement therapy agalsidase alfa (Replagal®) has an amino acid sequence identical to that of native α-galactosidase A; intravenous agalsidase alfa 0.2 mg/kg every other week is indicated for the long-term treatment of patients with confirmed Fabry disease. This article reviews the efficacy and tolerability of agalsidase alfa in patients with Fabry disease, as well as summarizing its pharmacologic properties. Agalsidase alfa had beneficial effects in adult men with Fabry disease, according to the results of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 6-month trials (n = 15 and 26). For example, left ventricular mass index was reduced to a significantly greater extent with agalsidase alfa than with placebo. Although the change in myocardial globotriaosylceramide content (primary endpoint in one study) did not significantly differ between agalsidase alfa and placebo recipients, the change in the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) 'pain at its worst' score (reflecting neuropathic pain while without pain medications; primary endpoint in the second study) was improved to a significantly greater extent with agalsidase alfa than with placebo. In addition, the change in creatinine clearance, but not inulin clearance, significantly favored agalsidase alfa versus placebo recipients. Abnormalities in functional cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular responses were also reversed with agalsidase alfa therapy. In extensions of these placebo-controlled trials, the reduction in left ventricular mass and improvements in BPI pain scores were maintained after longer-term agalsidase alfa therapy. The significant decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) seen after 48 months' agalsidase alfa treatment was mainly driven by a marked decline in eGFR seen in four patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease at baseline (although the progression of decline appeared slower than that seen in historic controls); renal function appeared stable in patients with

  1. Comparison of isotachophoresis, capillary zone electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of salbutamol, terbutaline sulphate and fenoterol hydrobromide in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Ackermans, M T; Beckers, J L; Everaerts, F M; Seelen, I G

    1992-01-31

    Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), isotachophoresis (ITP) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) were applied to the determination of salbutamol, terbutaline sulphate and fenoterol hydrobromide in commercially available pharmaceutical dosage forms. The comparison showed that especially with the use of ITP, high concentrations of other charged sample components can disturb the separation process. If special attention is paid to ensure a complete separation, all methods give comparable results. For the regression lines of the calibration graphs, regression coefficients of at least ca. 0.999 and nearly zero intercepts are obtained with relative standard deviations of ca. 1-2% for peak area or zone lengths. By applying the different techniques, often different components of the sample matrix can be detected, i.e., a more complete impression of the sample composition can be obtained by using all the three techniques. PMID:1560101

  2. Charging properties of cassiterite (alfa-SnO2) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, L.; Cummings, Peter T; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-01-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite (alfa-SnO2) surfaces at 10 50 C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH-range 4.0 to 4.5 at all conditions and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH2 group is more acidic than the bridging Sn2OH group, with protonation constants (log KH) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural alfa-TiO2 (rutile), apparently due to the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na+ and Rb+, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, while adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable amounts of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na+ between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on surface charge density (pH), while the distribution of adsorbed Rb+ is almost independent of pH. A Surface Complexation Model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD predicted speciation of adsorbed Na+/Rb+ was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH-0.40) and the protonated bridging group (Sn2OH+0.36) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH-range (2.7 10), illustrating the ability of positively and negatively charged surface groups to coexist. Complexation of the medium cations

  3. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia due to epoetin alfa during antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Stravitz, R Todd; Chung, Harold; Sterling, Richard K; Luketic, Velimir A; Sanyal, Arun J; Price, Angie S; Purrington, Amy; Shiffman, Mitchell L

    2005-06-01

    Anemia frequently complicates the treatment of chronic hepatitis C with interferon and ribavirin (RVN), requiring dose reduction and jeopardizing sustained virologic response. Increasingly, epoetin alfa is used to prevent anemia in this setting. Below, we report the first case of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a patient with chronic hepatitis C who received epoetin alfa (Procrit) to manage anti-viral treatment-induced anemia. Red blood cell transfusion-dependence developed 16 wk after the patient was started on peginterferon alfa-2b and RVN for chronic hepatitis C despite the simultaneous administration of epoetin alfa and subsequent discontinuation of the antiviral medications. Bone marrow biopsy was consistent with PRCA. High-titer erythropoietin antibodies, assayed by two methods, appeared shortly after epoetin alfa was administered, and were associated with a decline in serum erythropoietin to undetectable levels. Erythropoietin antibodies directed toward epoetin alfa were shown to cross react with darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp), and a neutralization assay confirmed that they inhibited cell growth in the presence of erythropoietin. Transfusion-dependence resolved approximately 16 wk after discontinuing epoetin alfa, and 6 wk after starting danazol. PRCA caused by the development of erythropoietin antibodies is a potentially life-threatening complication of administering epoetin alfa to prevent the anemia associated with antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:15929778

  4. Corifollitropin alfa versus recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone: an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Griesinger, Georg; Boostanfar, Robert; Gordon, Keith; Gates, Davis; McCrary Sisk, Christine; Stegmann, Barbara J

    2016-07-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted of individual patient data (n = 3292) from three randomized controlled trials of corifollitropin alfa versus rFSH: Engage (150 µg corifollitropin alfa n = 756; 200 IU rFSH n = 750), Ensure (100 µg corifollitropin alfa n = 268; 150 IU rFSH n = 128), and Pursue (150 µg corifollitropin alfa n = 694; 300 IU rFSH n = 696). Women with regular menstrual cycles aged 18-36 and body weight >60 kg (Engage) or ≤60 kg (Ensure), or women aged 35-42 years and body weight ≥50 kg (Pursue), received a single injection (100 µg or 150 µg) of corifollitropin alfa (based on body weight and age) or daily rFSH. The difference (corifollitropin alfa minus rFSH) in the number of oocytes retrieved was +1.0 (95% CI: 0.5-1.5); vital pregnancy rate: -2.2% (95% CI: -5.3%-0.9%); ongoing pregnancy rate: -1.7% (95% CI: -4.7%-1.4%); and live birth rate: -2.0% (95% CI: -5.0%-1.1%). The odds ratio for overall OHSS was 1.15 (95% CI: 0.82-1.61), and for moderate-to-severe OHSS: 1.29 (95% CI: 0.81-2.05). A single dose of corifollitropin alfa for the first 7 days of ovarian stimulation is a generally well-tolerated and similarly effective treatment compared with daily rFSH. PMID:27178762

  5. Collaborative study for the validation of an improved HPLC assay for recombinant IFN-alfa-2.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, K H; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H; Terao, E

    2016-01-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) texts for Interferon (IFN)-alfa-2 include a nonspecific photometric protein assay using albumin as calibrator and a highly variable cell-based assay for the potency determination of the protective effects. A request was expressed by the Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) for improved methods for the batch control of recombinant interferon alfa-2 bulk and market surveillance testing of finished products, including those formulated with Human Serum Albumin (HSA). A HPLC method was developed at the Medical Products Agency (MPA, Sweden) for the testing of IFN-alfa-2 products. An initial collaborative study run under the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP; study code BSP039) revealed the need for minor changes to improve linearity of the calibration curves, assay reproducibility and robustness. The goal of the collaborative study, coded BSP071, was to transfer and further validate this improved HPLC method. Ten laboratories participated in the study. Four marketed IFN-alfa-2 preparations (one containing HSA) together with the Ph. Eur. Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) for IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b, and in-house reference standards from two manufacturers were used for the quantitative assay. The modified method was successfully transferred to all laboratories despite local variation in equipment. The resolution between the main and the oxidised forms of IFN-alfa-2 was improved compared to the results from the BSP039 study. The improved method even allowed partial resolution of an extra peak after the principal peak. Symmetry of the main IFN peak was acceptable for all samples in all laboratories. Calibration curves established with the Ph. Eur. IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b CRSs showed excellent linearity with intercepts close to the origin and coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. Assay repeatability, intermediate precision and reproducibility varied with the tested sample within acceptable

  6. Cloning and expression of codon-optimized recombinant darbepoetin alfa in Leishmania tarentolae T7-TR.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Anvarsadat; Golavar, Raziyeh; Rouintan, Mandana; Mahrooz, Abdolkarim; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Oladnabi, Morteza; Khajeniazi, Safoura; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Omidinia, Eskandar

    2016-02-01

    Darbepoetin alfa is an engineered and hyperglycosylated analog of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) which is used as a drug in treating anemia in patients with chronic kidney failure and cancer. This study desribes the secretory expression of a codon-optimized recombinant form of darbepoetin alfa in Leishmania tarentolae T7-TR. Synthetic codon-optimized gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pLEXSY-I-blecherry3 vector. The resultant expression vector, pLEXSYDarbo, was purified, digested, and electroporated into the L. tarentolae. Expression of recombinant darbepoetin alfa was evaluated by ELISA, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and biological activity. After codon optimization, codon adaptation index (CAI) of the gene raised from 0.50 to 0.99 and its GC% content changed from 56% to 58%. Expression analysis confirmed the presence of a protein band at 40 kDa. Furthermore, reticulocyte experiment results revealed that the activity of expressed darbepoetin alfa was similar to that of its equivalent expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. These data suggested that the codon optimization and expression in L. tarentolae host provided an efficient approach for high level expression of darbepoetin alfa. PMID:26546410

  7. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; Nambo, M J; García, E L

    1998-08-01

    We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy. One hundred and thirty-five patients (stage IIIB-IV B) were initially treated with EBVD (epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine). IF CR was achieved they were randomly assigned to receive either maintenance therapy with IFN 5.0 MU three times a week for one year or no further treatment (control group). Clinical and laboratory characteristics at diagnosis were quite similar in both groups. After a median follow-up of 74.3 months (range 49 to 108), 61 out of 68 patients (91%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 76% to 97%) remain in first complete remission in the IFN-treated group compared to 38 out of 67 (58%; 95% CI: 49% to 71%) in the control group (p<.01). Overall survival was also better in the IFN treated group: 62 patients (92%; 95% CI: 82% to 97%) are alive free of disease at 7-years compared to 40 patients (67%, 95%: 55% to 76%) in the control group (p<.01). Toxicity secondary to IFN administration was mild and no dose modification was necessary during treatment. All patients received the planned dose of IFN. This was not an intent-to treat analysis. IFN administration as maintenance therapy was appears to be the only cause of improvement in outcome in these patients. We feel that IFN should be considered as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease because this treatment improves the final outcome without the excessive toxicities of more aggressive therapeutic approaches such as bone marrow transplantation during first CR. We hope that IFN will be considered in future randomized clinical trials in order to define it's role in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. PMID:9711927

  8. EFFECT OF DORNASE ALFA ON INFLAMMATION AND LUNG FUNCTION: POTENTIAL ROLE IN THE EARLY TREATMENT OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Konstan, Michael W.; Ratjen, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Dornase alfa has been shown to reduce markers of inflammation and neutrophil-associated metalloproteinases in cystic fibrosis (CF), suggesting a potential benefit from use of this therapy early in the disease. However, observational studies indicate that dornase alfa is often reserved for “sicker” patients. A 2-year, early intervention study of dornase alfa in CF patients with early lung disease demonstrated significant improvements in lung function and risk of exacerbation compared to placebo. A more recent analysis, using the database of the large observational Epidemiologic Study of Cystic Fibrosis (ESCF), found that initiation of dornase alfa has the potential to alter the course of CF by decreasing the rate of lung function decline in children and adults. These encouraging results, possibly linked to indirect effects on inflammation, suggest a greater role for dornase alfa therapy in the early treatment of CF, where it may help preserve lung function and potentially extend survival. PMID:22093951

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Arecibo Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) survey. IV. (Lazarus+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, P.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Swiggum, J.; Zhu, W. W.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Ferdman, R.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Arecibo Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) survey observations have been restricted to the two regions of the Galactic plane (|b|<5°) visible from the Arecibo observatory, the inner Galaxy (32°<~l<~77°), and the outer Galaxy (168°<~l<~214°). Integration times are 268s and 180s for inner and outer Galaxy observations, respectively. Observations conducted with the 7-beam Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver of the Arecibo Observatory William E. Gordon 305m Telescope have a bandwidth of 322MHz centered at 1375MHz. PALFA survey data have been recorded with the Mock spectrometers since 2009. (2 data files).

  10. Peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin for treating chronic hepatitis C virus infection: analysis of Mexican patients included in a multicenter international clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Trejo-Estrada, Rafael; Campollo-Rivas, Octaivio; Cortez-Hernández, Carlos; Dehesa-Violante, Margarita; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor; Pérez-Gómez, Rául; Cabrera-Valdespino, Armando

    2003-01-01

    Treatment with polyethylene glycol-modified interferon alfa-2a (peginterferon) alone produces significantly higher sustained antiviral responses than treatment with interferon alfa-2a alone in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We compared the efficacy and safety of peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin, interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin, and peginterferon alfa-2a alone in the initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Thirty-two patients were randomly assigned to treatment, and received at least one dose of medication consisting of 180 microg of peginterferon alfa-2a once weekly plus daily ribavirin (1,000 or 1,200 mg, depending on body weight) (n = 14), weekly peginterferon alfa-2a plus daily placebo (n = 6), or three million units of interferon alfa-2b thrice weekly plus daily ribavirin for 48 weeks (n = 12). More patients who received peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin had a sustained virologic response (defined as the absence of detectable HCV RNA 24 weeks after cessation of therapy) than patients who received interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin (7/14 vs. 4/12) or peginterferon alfa-2a plus placebo (0/6). The overall safety profiles of the three treatment regimens were similar. In conclusion, for patients with chronic hepatitis C, once-weekly peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin was tolerated as well as interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin and produced significant improvements in the rate of sustained viral reduction compared with interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin or peginterferon alfa-2a alone. PMID:15115965

  11. Lattice potential energy and standard molar enthalpy in the formation of 1—dodecylamine hydrobromide (1-C12H25NH3·Br)(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Pu; Di, You-Ying; Dan, Wen-Yan; He, Dong-Hua; Kong, Yu-Xia; Yang, Wei-Wei

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports that 1-dodecylamine hydrobromide (1-C12H25NH3·Br)(s) has been synthesized using the liquid phase reaction method. The lattice potential energy of the compound 1-C12H25NH3·Br and the ionic volume and radius of the 1-C12H25NH3+ cation are obtained from the crystallographic data and other auxiliary thermodynamic data. The constant-volume energy of combustion of 1-C12H25NH3·Br(s) is measured to be ΔcUmo(1-C12H25NH3·Br, s) = -(7369.03±3.28) kJ·mol-1 by means of an RBC-II precision rotating-bomb combustion calorimeter at T = (298.15±0.001) K. The standard molar enthalpy of combustion of the compound is derived to be ΔcHmo(1-C12H25NH3·Br, s) = -(7384.52±3.28) kJ·mol-1 from the constant-volume energy of combustion. The standard molar enthalpy of formation of the compound is calculated to be ΔfHmo(1-C12H25NH3·Br, s)=-(1317.86±3.67) kJ·mol-1 from the standard molar enthalpy of combustion of the title compound and other auxiliary thermodynamic quantities through a thermochemical cycle.

  12. Effects of reserpine and L-cysteine and glutathione depletion on 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide-induced tubular necrosis in Swiss ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D C; Carlson, G P; DeNicola, D B; Carlton, W W

    1991-08-01

    Female Swiss ICR mice were injected ip with 100 or 300 mg 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BEA)/kg body weight. Male Swiss ICR mice were subjected to water deprivation, or treated with 5% dextrose in water, dimethylsulphoxide, piperonyl butoxide, SKF-525A, sodium phenobarbital, beta-naphthoflavone, probenecid, reserpine, diethyl maleate, buthionine sulphoximine or L-cysteine. Urine collected sequentially from male Swiss ICR mice given 300 mg BEA/kg body weight was analysed for glucose, protein, pH and specific gravity. Female mice were less sensitive to BEA than were male mice. Diuresis, antidiuresis, treatment with cytochrome P-450 inducers and inhibitors, and the antioxidant dimethyl-sulphoxide had no effect on the incidence or severity of tubular necrosis (TN) induced by BEA. Probenecid and L-cysteine decreased the severity, but they had no effect on the incidence of TN. Glutathione depletion by diethyl maleate and inhibition of glutathione synthesis by buthionine sulphoximine decreased the dose of BEA necessary to cause TN; buthionine sulphoximine was more effective than diethyl maleate. Reserpine decreased both the incidence and severity of TN. Glycosuria, aciduria and decreased urinary specific gravity occurred before morphological changes were seen under the microscope, indicating that the functional changes precede the morphological changes. These data indicate that glutathione is important in protecting against BEA-induced TN, that BEA or a metabolite is concentrated in the tubule epithelium by way of anion transport, and that vasoconstriction contributes to the development of BEA-induced TN. PMID:1894223

  13. A new hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC) procedure for the simultaneous determination of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSH), diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DPH) and dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DXH) in cough-cold formulations.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammed Shahid; Ghori, Mohsin; Rafiuddin, Syed; Khatri, Aamer Roshanali

    2007-01-01

    A new HILIC method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSH), diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DPH) and dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DXH) in cough-cold syrup. Mobile phase consists of methanol:water (containing 6.0 g of ammonium acetate and 10 mL of triethylamine per liter, pH adjusted to 5.2 with orthophosphoric acid), 95:5 (v/v). Column containing porous silica particles (Supelcosil LC-Si, 25 cm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) is used as stationary phase. Detection is carried out using a variable wavelength UV-vis detector at 254 nm for PSH and DPH, and at 280 nm for DXH. Solutions are injected into the chromatograph under isocratic condition at constant flow rate of 1.2 mL/min. Linearity range and percent recoveries for PSH, DPH and DXH were 150-600, 62.5-250, 75-300 microg/mL and 100.7%, 100.1% and 100.8%, respectively. Method is stability indicating and excipients like saccharin sodium, sodium citrate, flavour and sodium benzoate did not interfere in the analysis. Compounds elute in order of increasing ionization degree caused by cation-exchange mechanism in a run time of less than 15 min. Mobile phase pH is manipulated to regulate ionization and ion-exchange interaction and thereby retention of compounds. PMID:16887317

  14. Asfotase alfa: enzyme replacement for the treatment of bone disease in hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, C; Seefried, L; Jakob, F

    2016-05-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP, TNSALP) gene. HPP causes a multisystemic syndrome with a predominant bone phenotype. The clinical spectrum ranges from high lethality in early onset (<6 months) HPP to mild late-onset syndromes. HPP management so far has been only supportive. Subcutaneous asfotase alfa, a first-in-class bone-targeted human TNAP enzyme replacement therapy, is the first compound to be approved for long-term treatment of bone manifestations in pediatric-onset HPP. In noncomparative clinical trials (treatment up to 7 years), this treatment was associated with skeletal, respiratory and functional improvement in perinatal, infantile and childhood-onset HPP. Compared with age-matched historical controls, patients with life-threatening perinatal and infantile HPP treated with asfotase alfa had substantially improved bone mineralization, survival and ventilation-free survival. In childhood HPP, asfotase alfa improved growth, gross motor function, strength and agility and decreased pain. The compound was well tolerated and most adverse events were of mild to moderate intensity. To date, data and experience concerning its efficacy and safety in long-term treatment are not yet available. Further studies to evaluate risks and benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with asfotase alfa in adults are in progress and are also strongly needed. PMID:27376160

  15. Acquisition of Learning by Facilitating Academics (Project ALFA). Final Evaluation Report, 1993-94. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustin, Marc

    The Acquisition of Learning by Facilitating Academics (Project ALFA) was an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its second year in 1993-94. The project operated at a high school in Brooklyn, and served 75 Haitian-speaking students of limited English proficiency with fewer than 5 years in an English-speaking school.…

  16. The Synchrony and Diachrony of Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Adjectival Long-Form Allomorphy (ALFA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, James Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BCS), the gentive (G) and dative/locative (DL) cases exhibit adjectival long-form allomorphy (ALFA). The genitive -"og" -"oga" and the DL -"om" -"ome" -"omu" stand in free variation, inasmuch as when one form is substituted for another the truth value of an utterance remains unchanged. Some sociolinguists (particularly…

  17. Peginterferon alfa-2a (40 kDa) monotherapy: a novel agent for chronic hepatitis C therapy.

    PubMed

    Zeuzem, S; Heathcote, J E; Martin, N; Nieforth, K; Modi, M

    2001-12-01

    Current therapy for hepatitis C remains far from optimal. The modification of IFN by the attachment of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety has produced long-lasting IFNs. A 40 kDa branched peginterferon alfa-2a (40 kDa) (PEG-IFN alfa-2a) has unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PEG-IFN alfa-2a is absorbed in a sustained manner and its clearance is reduced substantially compared with IFN alfa-2a, resulting in sustained serum drug concentrations. These constant serum drug levels stay above the EC(50) values (effective concentration 50%) needed for antiviral, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory actions. Sustained virological responses were significantly greater in patients who received PEG-IFN alfa-2a versus IFN alfa-2a, with a similar side effect profile. Histological improvements were seen in patients who achieved sustained virological responses and were frequently observed among patients who did not achieve a virological response. The advantages of PEG-IFN alfa-2a were also seen in patients with cirrhosis or hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1. PMID:11772316

  18. Switch from epoetin to darbepoetin alfa in hemodialysis: dose equivalence and hemoglobin stability

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, Javier; Moina, Iñigo; Molina, José; Gallardo, Isabel; Muñiz, María Luisa; Robledo, Carmen; García, Oscar; Vidaur, Fernando; Muñoz, Rosa Inés; Iribar, Izaskun; Aguirre, Román; Maza, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Aim The objective of the study reported here was to describe dose equivalence and hemoglobin (Hb) stability in a cohort of unselected hemodialysis patients who were switched simultaneously from epoetin alfa to darbepoetin alfa. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, retrospective study in patients aged ≥18 years who switched from intravenous (IV) epoetin alfa to IV darbepoetin alfa in October 2007 (Month 0) and continued on hemodialysis for at least 24 months. The dose was adjusted to maintain Hb within 1.0 g/dL of baseline. Results We included 125 patients (59.7% male, mean [standard deviation (SD)] age 70.4 [13.4] years). No significant changes were observed in Hb levels (mean [SD] 11.9 [1.3] g/dL, 12.0 [1.5], 12.0 [1.5], and 12.0 [1.7] at Months −12, 0, 12 and 24, respectively, P=0.409). After conversion, the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) dose decreased significantly (P<0.0001), with an annual mean of 174.7 (88.7) international units (IU)/kg/week for epoetin versus 95.7 (43.4) (first year) and 91.4 (42.7) IU/kg/week (second year) for darbepoetin (65% and 64% reduction, respectively). The ESA resistance index decreased from 15.1 (8.5) IU/kg/week/g/dL with epoetin to 8.1 (3.9) (first year) and 7.9 (4.0) (second year) with darbepoetin (P<0.0001). The conversion rate was 354:1 in patients requiring high (>200 IU/kg/week) doses of epoetin and 291:1 in patients requiring low doses. Conclusion In patients on hemodialysis receiving ESAs, conversion from epoetin alfa to darbepoetin alfa was associated with an approximate and persistent reduction of 65% of the required dose. To maintain Hb stability, a conversion rate of 300:1 seems to be appropriate for most patients receiving low doses of epoetin alfa (≤200 IU/kg/week), while 350:1 would be better for patients receiving higher doses. PMID:25336984

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-510, adalimumab, alefacept, ambrisentan, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, armodafinil, aselizumab, asenapine maleate, azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, bexarotene, bimosiamose, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, BQ-123; C340, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilansetron, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), dimethyl fumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, eglumetad hydrate, emoxipin hydrochloride, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol; Garenoxacin mesilate, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine, human growth hormone-(177-191), human insulin; Indacaterol, INKP-100, INKP-102, insulin glargine, i.v. gamma-globulin; KLH; Lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, levocetirizine, licochalcone A, LMI vaccine, lomefloxacin, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; Miglustat, mycograb; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, nortopixantrone hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, oral insulin, OrM3; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, pemetrexed disodium, pexelizumab, photochlor, pimecrolimus, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, polyphenon E; R-126638, R-411, resveratrol, roflumilast, RS-86, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate, rupatadine fumarate; Sipuleucel-T, somatropin, St. John's Wort extract; Tadalafil, Taxus

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Aclidinium bromide, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Apilimod mesylate, Aripiprazole, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Berberine iodide, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bryostatin 1; Calcipotriol/hydrocortisone, Carglumic acid, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cixutumumab, Coumarin, Custirsen sodium; Darbepoetin alfa, Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Denibulin hydrochloride, Denosumab, Diacetylmorphine, Dulanermin, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Escitalopram oxalate, Esomeprazole sodium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fenofibrate/pravastatin sodium, Ferric carboxymaltose, Flavangenol, Fondaparinux sodium; Glutamine, GSK-1024850A; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Hib-MenC, HIV-LIPO-5; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indacaterol maleate, Indibulin, Indium 111 (¹¹¹In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glulisine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Leucovorin/UFT; Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MMR-V, Morphine hydrochloride, Morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium, Natalizumab; Oncolytic HSV; Paliperidone, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Rilpivirine

  1. Ovulation induction with minimal dose of follitropin alfa: a case series study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gonadotropins are used in ovulation induction (OI) for patients with anovulatory infertility. Pharmacologic OI is associated with risks of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and multiple pregnancy. Treatment protocols that minimize these risks by promoting monofollicular development are required. A starting dose of 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa has been used in OI, particularly among women at high risk of multifollicular development and multiple pregnancy. A retrospective case series study was performed to evaluate rates of monofollicular development and singleton pregnancy following standard treatment with 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa. Methods Spanish centers that had performed at least five OI cycles during 2008 using 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa as a starting dose were invited to participate. Data could be provided from any cycle performed in 2008 (up to a maximum of 12 consecutive cycles per site). Case report forms were collected during April-November 2009 and reviewed centrally. Descriptive statistics were obtained from all cases, and follicular development and clinical pregnancy rates assessed. Potential associations of age and body mass index with follicular development and clinical pregnancy were assessed using univariate correlation analyses. Results Thirty centers provided data on 316 cycles of OI using a starting dose of 37.5 IU/day follitropin alfa. Polycystic ovary syndrome was the cause of anovulatory infertility in 217 (68.7%) cases. Follitropin alfa at 37.5 IU/day was sufficient to achieve ovarian stimulation in 230 (72.8%) cycles. A single follicle ≥16 mm in diameter developed in 193 cycles (61.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 55.7-66.4%). Seventy-eight women (24.7%; 95% CI 19.9-29.5%) became pregnant: 94.9% singleton and 5.1% twin pregnancies. Fourteen started cycles (4.4%) were cancelled, mainly due to poor response. Univariate correlation analyses detected weak associations. Conclusions Monofollicular growth rate was comparable with

  2. Modeling viral and drug kinetics: hepatitis C virus treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2b.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kimberly A; Dixit, Narendra M; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Golia, Preeti; Talal, Andrew H; Perelson, Alan S

    2003-01-01

    Administration of peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin results in an early hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay followed by an increase as the drug concentration declines between doses. Upon administration of the next dose 1 week later, the same pattern is observed. We have incorporated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis into a model of viral dynamics to describe the effect that changes in drug concentration and effectiveness can have on viral levels. To illustrate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and viral dynamics, we fit the model to data from four HCV/human immunodeficiency virus co-infected patients, and obtained good agreement with the measured serum HCV RNA levels. We were able to account for the observed increases in HCV RNA, and estimate virion and drug half-lives that are in agreement with previous reports. Models incorporating pharmacokinetics are needed to correctly interpret viral load changes and estimate drug effectiveness in treatment protocols using peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:12934163

  3. A randomized comparison of every-2-week darbepoetin alfa and weekly epoetin alfa for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia in patients with breast, lung, or gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartzberg, Lee S; Yee, Lorrin K; Senecal, Frank M; Charu, Veena; Tomita, Dianne; Wallace, Joel; Rossi, Greg

    2004-01-01

    An important clinical question is the relative efficacy of the most common dosages of darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp; Amgen Inc.; Thousand Oaks, CA) 200 microg every 2 weeks (Q2W) and epoetin alfa (Procrit; Ortho Biotech Products, LP; Raritan, NJ) 40,000 U weekly (QW) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia. We designed three concurrent randomized, open-label, multicenter, identical trials (with the exception of tumor type criteria of breast, gynecologic, or lung cancer) of darbepoetin alfa and epoetin alfa in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia to validate the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire for Anemia (PSQ-An) treatment tool and to compare the efficacies and safety profiles of these two agents. In each trial, patients were randomized 1:1 to receive either darbepoetin alfa at a dose of 200 microg Q2W or epoetin alfa at a dose of 40,000 U QW for up to 16 weeks. The PSQ-An was assessed for validity, feasibility, and reliability. Secondary clinical endpoints were analyzed using the primary analysis set. Both individual trial analyses and a protocol-specified combined analysis of data from all three trials were conducted. Overall, 312 patients (157 darbepoetin alfa; 155 epoetin alfa) were randomized and received study drug. Baseline characteristics were similar in both treatment groups in each trial and overall. The PSQ-An was valid, feasible, and reliable. In general, no difference between treatment groups was observed for hemoglobin- and transfusion-based endpoints in each individual trial or in the combined analysis. From exploratory analyses, achievement and maintenance of a hemoglobin target range (11-13 g/dl) were similar in both groups. No differences in safety were observed. With the PSQ-An, formal comparisons of the impact of anemia therapies on patients and caregivers can be made in future prospective studies. Further, darbepoetin alfa (200 microg Q2W) and epoetin alfa (40,000 U QW) appear to achieve comparable clinical and hematologic outcomes

  4. Managing infertility with the follitropin alfa prefilled pen injector - patient considerations.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin treatment has been used in fertility treatment since the 1930s. First, preparations coming from animals were injected, then, gonadotropins prepared from the pituitary glands of human cadavers. A great step was achieved with the introduction of human menopausal gonadotropin extracted from the urine of postmenopausal women. When cases of Creutzfeld-Jacob disease were recognized after the use of human pituitary-derived hormone injections, urinary gonadotropins were increasingly purified and then produced by the use of recombinant DNA technology. Recombinant gonadotropins were characterized by the extreme high specificity and the nearly 100% purity. This allows for follitropin alfa, the first recombinant-human follicle stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) approved, to be quantified and filled by mass, with a small variance of only ±2% and no more with a bioassay with a variance of 45%. With recombinant preparations, it is also possible to cover the tremendous growing demand for gonadotropins. Ovarian stimulation has become a self-injecting procedure for the patients. Accurate and easy-to-use injection devices which minimize pain, difficulty, and stress are essential for patient compliance. So, two pen injectors adapted from the well-known insulin pen were introduced in fertility treatment, one as a multiple-use device rechargeable with premixed, prefilled cartridges with r-hFSH (follitropin β) and the other a disposable, prefilled drug delivery system with a liquid formulation of follitropin alfa filled by mass. The efficacy in comparison to the quite more cumbersome handling with ampoules and syringes has been proven very quickly. In several studies, it has been shown that patients had a preference to the prefilled follitropin alfa pen due to the faster preparation and were more confident of accurate dosing. The follitropin alfa (filled by mass [FbM]) prefilled pen is a move toward better quality of treatment and also better quality of life for the women within

  5. The software and hardware for the ground testing of ALFA- ELECTRON space spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batischev, A. G.; Galper, A. M.; Naumov, P. Yu; Naumov, P. P.; Solodovnikov, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The complex for ground testing and space detector system calibration has been designed. The fast multilayer scintillation detector of the new telescope-spectrometer for the ALFA-ELECTRON space experiment is in ground testing mode now. The device will planned to install on the outer surface of the Russian Segment of the International Space Station. The basic scheme for the detector amplitude parameters measurement by use of specially designed hardware and software are described and the first prototype testing results are demonstrated.

  6. Managing infertility with the follitropin alfa prefilled pen injector – patient considerations

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin treatment has been used in fertility treatment since the 1930s. First, preparations coming from animals were injected, then, gonadotropins prepared from the pituitary glands of human cadavers. A great step was achieved with the introduction of human menopausal gonadotropin extracted from the urine of postmenopausal women. When cases of Creutzfeld-Jacob disease were recognized after the use of human pituitary-derived hormone injections, urinary gonadotropins were increasingly purified and then produced by the use of recombinant DNA technology. Recombinant gonadotropins were characterized by the extreme high specificity and the nearly 100% purity. This allows for follitropin alfa, the first recombinant-human follicle stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) approved, to be quantified and filled by mass, with a small variance of only ±2% and no more with a bioassay with a variance of 45%. With recombinant preparations, it is also possible to cover the tremendous growing demand for gonadotropins. Ovarian stimulation has become a self-injecting procedure for the patients. Accurate and easy-to-use injection devices which minimize pain, difficulty, and stress are essential for patient compliance. So, two pen injectors adapted from the well-known insulin pen were introduced in fertility treatment, one as a multiple-use device rechargeable with premixed, prefilled cartridges with r-hFSH (follitropin β) and the other a disposable, prefilled drug delivery system with a liquid formulation of follitropin alfa filled by mass. The efficacy in comparison to the quite more cumbersome handling with ampoules and syringes has been proven very quickly. In several studies, it has been shown that patients had a preference to the prefilled follitropin alfa pen due to the faster preparation and were more confident of accurate dosing. The follitropin alfa (filled by mass [FbM]) prefilled pen is a move toward better quality of treatment and also better quality of life for the women within

  7. Human factors engineering and design validation for the redesigned follitropin alfa pen injection device

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Mary C; Patterson, Patricia; Hayward, Brooke; North, Robert; Green, Dawne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate, using human factors engineering (HFE), that a redesigned, pre-filled, ready-to-use, pre-asembled follitropin alfa pen can be used to administer prescribed follitropin alfa doses safely and accurately. Methods: A failure modes and effects analysis identified hazards and harms potentially caused by use errors; risk-control measures were implemented to ensure acceptable device use risk management. Participants were women with infertility, their significant others, and fertility nurse (FN) professionals. Preliminary testing included ‘Instructions for Use’ (IFU) and pre-validation studies. Validation studies used simulated injections in a representative use environment; participants received prior training on pen use. Results: User performance in preliminary testing led to IFU revisions and a change to outer needle cap design to mitigate needle stick potential. In the first validation study (49 users, 343 simulated injections), in the FN group, one observed critical use error resulted in a device design modification and another in an IFU change. A second validation study tested the mitigation strategies; previously reported use errors were not repeated. Conclusions: Through an iterative process involving a series of studies, modifications were made to the pen design and IFU. Simulated-use testing demonstrated that the redesigned pen can be used to administer follitropin alfa effectively and safely. PMID:25895897

  8. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-07-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3-62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2-4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. PMID:25801797

  9. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3–62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2–4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. Am. J. Hematol. 90:584–591, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25801797

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatment with peginterferon-alfa-2a versus peginterferon-alfa-2b for patients with chronic hepatitis C under the public payer perspective in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C affects approximately 170 million people worldwide, and thus being one of the main causes of chronic liver disease. About 20% of patients with chronic hepatitis C will develop cirrhosis over 20 years, and present an increased risk of developing hepatic complications. Sustained virological response (SVR) is associated with a better prognosis compared to untreated patients and treatment failures. The objective of this analysis was to compare treatment costs and outcomes of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a versus pegylated interferon-alfa-2b, both associated with ribavirin, in the therapeutic scheme of 24 weeks and 48 week for hepatitis C genotypes 2/3 and genotype 1, respectively, under the Brazilian Public Health System (SUS) scenario. Methods To project disease progression, a Markov model was built based on clinical stages of chronic disease. A Delphi panel was conducted to evaluate medical resources related to each stage, followed by costing of related materials, services, procedures and pharmaceutical products. The evaluation was made from a public payer perspective. The source used for costing was government reimbursement procedures list (SAI/SIH–SUS). Drug acquisition costs were obtained from the Brazilian Official Gazette and “Banco de Preços em Saúde” (government official source). It was assumed a mean patient weight of 70 kg. Costs were reported in 2011 Brazilian Reais (US$1 ≈ $Brz1.80). A systematic review followed by a meta-analysis of the 7 identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which compared pegylated interferons, was conducted for obtaining relative efficacy of both drugs: for genotype 2/3, mean rate of SVR was 79.2% for peginterferon-alfa-2a and 73.8% for peginterferon-alfa-2b. For genotype 1, SVR mean rate was 42.09% versus 33.44% (peginterferon-alfa-2a and peginterferon-alfa-2b respectively). Time horizon considered was lifetime. Discount rate for costs and outcomes was 5%, according to Brazilian

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of peginterferon alfa-2a or alfa-2b plus ribavirin in the daily routine treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C in Germany: the PRACTICE study.

    PubMed

    Witthoeft, T; Hueppe, D; John, C; Goelz, J; Heyne, R; Moeller, B; Teuber, G; Wollschlaeger, S; Baumgarten, A; Simon, K-G; Moog, G; Dikopoulos, N; Mauss, S

    2010-07-01

    In randomized clinical trials, treatment with peginterferon plus ribavirin (RBV) results in a sustained virological response (SVR) in around half of hepatitis C virus genotype 1-infected and 80% of genotype 2/3-infected individuals. This study aimed to evaluate efficacy and tolerability of peginterferon alfa-2a plus RBV compared with peginterferon alfa-2b plus RBV for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in routine clinical practice. The intent-to-treat cohort consisted of 3414 patients treated with either peginterferon alfa-2a plus RBV (Group A) or peginterferon alfa-2b plus RBV (Group B) in 23 centres participating in the large, multicentre, observational PRACTICE study. Collected data included baseline characteristics, treatment regimen, RBV dose and outcome. Rates of early virological response, end of treatment response and SVR were 76.6%, 75.7% and 52.9% in Group A, and 70.2%, 65.6% and 50.5% in Group B, respectively. In patients matched by baseline parameters, 59.9% of patients in Group A and 55.9% in Group B achieved an SVR (P < or = 0.051). In genotype 1-infected patients matched by baseline parameters and cumulative RBV dose, SVR rates were 49.6% and 43.7% for Group A and Group B, respectively (P < or = 0.047); when matched by baseline parameters and RBV starting dose, SVR rates were 49.9% and 44.6%, respectively (P = 0.068). Overall, 21.8% of group A and 29.6% of group B patients discontinued treatment (P < or = 0.0001). The efficacy and tolerability of peginterferon plus RBV in this large cohort of patients treated in routine daily practice was similar to that in randomized clinical trials. In matched pairs analyses, more patients achieved an SVR with peginterferon alfa-2a compared with peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:20158603

  12. Unmasking of myasthenia gravis during pegylated Alfa 2 a interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ayesha

    2016-05-01

    Over last few decades, hepatitis C has emerged as a serious infection that has threatened the health and budgets of millions in the world. The objective of health professionals to treat it with recommended therapy of Alfa interferon and Ribavirin combination presents certain risks. One of the alarms is the ability of interferon to stimulate the production of autoantibodies in the body resulting in expression of autoimmune diseases in few who develop these antibodies. The case presented here is about unmasking of myasthenia gravis in a patient who received alfa interferon therapy for her chronic hepatitis C. Alfa interferon probably plays an important role in manifestation of the diseases in susceptible patients and all autoimmune diseases cannot be taken as mere side effects of the therapy. Clinicians need to be alert to pick up these diseases earlier so that the prompt management is possible. PMID:27183950

  13. A Patient Friendly Corifollitropin Alfa Protocol without Routine Pituitary Suppression in Normal Responders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huai-Ling; Lai, Hsing-Hua; Chuang, Tzu-Hsuan; Shih, Yu-Wei; Huang, Shih-Chieh; Lee, Meng-Ju; Chen, Shee-Uan

    2016-01-01

    The release of corifollitropin alfa simplifies daily injections of short-acting recombinant follicular stimulating hormone (rFSH), and its widely-used protocol involves short-acting gonadotropins supplements and a fixed GnRH antagonist regimen, largely based on follicle size. In this study, the feasibility of corifollitropin alfa without routine pituitary suppression was evaluated. A total of 288 patients were stimulated by corifollitropin alfa on cycle day 3 following with routine serum hormone monitoring and follicle scanning every other day after 5 days of initial stimulation, and a GnRH antagonist (0.25 mg) was only used prophylactically when the luteinizing hormone (LH) was ≧ 6 IU/L (over half of the definitive LH surge). The incidence of premature LH surge (≧ 10 IU/L) was 2.4% (7/288) before the timely injection of a single GnRH antagonist, and the elevated LH level was dropped down from 11.9 IU/L to 2.2 IU/L after the suppression. Two hundred fifty-one patients did not need any antagonist (87.2% [251/288]) throughout the whole stimulation. No adverse effects were observed regarding oocyte competency (fertilization rate: 78%; blastocyst formation rate: 64%). The live birth rate per OPU cycle after the first cryotransfer was 56.3% (161/286), and the cumulative live birth rate per OPU cycle after cyrotransfers was 69.6% (199/286). Of patients who did and did not receive GnRH antagonist during stimulation, no significant difference existed in the cumulative live birth rates (78.4% vs. 68.3%, p = 0.25). The results demonstrated that the routine GnRH antagonist administration is not required in the corifollitropin-alfa cycles using a flexible and hormone-depended antagonist regimen, while the clinical outcome is not compromised. This finding reveals that the use of a GnRH antagonist only occasionally may be needed. PMID:27100388

  14. The role of corifollitropin alfa in controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF in combination with GnRH antagonist.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Ayse; Ata, Baris

    2011-01-01

    Corifollitropin alfa is a synthetic recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) molecule containing a hybrid beta subunit, which provides a plasma half-life of ∼65 hours while maintaining its pharmocodynamic activity. A single injection of corifollitropin alfa can replace daily FSH injections for the first week of ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization. Stimulation can be continued with daily FSH injections if the need arises. To date, more than 2500 anticipated normoresponder women have participated in clinical trials with corifollitropin alfa. It is noteworthy that one-third of women did not require additional gonadotropin injections and reached human chorionic gonadotropin criterion on day 8. The optimal corifollitropin dose has been calculated to be 100 μg for women with a body weight ≤60 kg and 150 μg for women with a body weight >60 kg, respectively. Combination of corifollitropin with daily gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist injections starting on stimulation day 5 seems to yield similar or significantly higher numbers of oocytes and good quality embryos, as well as similar ongoing pregnancy rates compared with women stimulated with daily rFSH injections. Stimulation characteristics, embryology, and clinical outcomes seem consistent with repeated corifollitropin-stimulated assisted reproductive technologies cycles. Multiple pregnancy or ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome rates with corifollitropin were not increased over daily FSH regimen. The corifollitropin alfa molecule does not seem to be immunogenic and does not induce neutralizing antibody formation. Drug hypersensitivity and injection-site reactions are not increased. Incidence and nature of adverse events and serious adverse events are similar to daily FSH injections. Current trials do not provide information regarding use of corifollitropin alfa in anticipated hyper- and poor responders to gonadotropin stimulation. Although corifollitropin alfa is unlikely to be teratogenic

  15. Epoetin alfa improves survival after chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer: Final results of a prospective observational study

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Tribius, Silke; Yekebas, Emre F.; Bahrehmand, Roia; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Kilic, Ergin; Muellerleile, Ulrich; Gross, Eberhard; Schild, Steven E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective, nonrandomized study evaluates the effectiveness of epoetin alfa to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to14 g/dL (optimal range for tumor oxygenation) during chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer and its impact on overall survival (OS), metastatic-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients were included. Forty-two patients received epoetin alfa (150 IU/kg, 3 times a week) during radiotherapy, which was started at hemoglobin less than 13 g/dL and stopped at 14 g/dL or higher. Hemoglobin levels were measured weekly during RT. Results: Both groups were balanced for age, sex, performance status, tumor length/location, histology, grading, T-stage/N-stage, chemotherapy, treatment schedule, and hemoglobin before RT. Median change of hemoglobin was +0.3 g/dL/wk with epoetin alfa and -0.5 g/dL/wk without epoetin alfa. At least 60% of hemoglobin levels were 12 to 14 g/dL in 64% and 17% of the patients, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who received epoetin alfa had better OS (32% vs. 8% at 2 years, p = 0.009) and LC (67% vs. 15% at 2 years, p = 0.001). MFS was not significantly different (42% vs. 18% at 2 years, p = 0.09). Conclusions: The findings suggest that epoetin alfa when used to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to 14 g/dL can improve OS and LC of Stage III esophageal cancer patients.

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs:(R)-Flurbiprofen, 90Yttrium-DOTA-huJ591; ABT-510, ACP-103, Ad5-FGF4, adalimumab, ademetionine, AG-7352, alemtuzumab, Amb a 1 ISS-DNA, anakinra, apaziquone, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir sulfate; BAL-8557, bevacizumab, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, CERE-120, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilomilast, cizolirtine citrate, Cypher, cystemustine; Dalbavancin, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, denosumab, desmoteplase, dihydrexidine, dimethyl fumarate, dutasteride, DW-166HC; Eculizumab, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, everolimus; Fallypride, febuxostat, fenretinide, fesoterodine, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gabapentin enacarbil, gefitinib; hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine, HYAL-CT1101; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, inolimomab, ISAtx-247; J591; Lacosamide, landiolol, lasofoxifene tartrate, lestaurtinib, lidocaine/prilocaine, linezolid, lixivaptan, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Natalizumab, nesiritide; OC-108, omalizumab, onercept, OSC; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PD-MAGE-3 vaccine, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pelitinib, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, prasterone sulfate, pregabalin; Ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, RSD-1235, rufinamide, rupatadine fumarate; Sarizotan hydrochloride, SHL-749

  17. Effect of Drotrecogin alfa (activated) on platelet receptor expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schuerholz, Tobias; Friedrich, Lars; Marx, Gernot; Kornau, Ines; Sümpelmann, Robert; Scheinichen, Dirk

    2007-08-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem in critically ill patients, which is associated with increased mortality. Recently, Drotrecogin alfa (activated) (recombinant human activated protein C (APC)) was shown to reduce mortality in patients with severe sepsis. Only minimal effect of APC on coagulation markers was demonstrated. Nevertheless, low platelet count was identified as a risk factor for bleeding with use of this drug. We conducted this study to evaluate possible influence of APC on in vitro expression of platelet receptors at therapeutic and supra-therapeutic concentrations. Blood samples of volunteers and patients with severe sepsis were adjusted with APC to final concentrations of 0.045 microg mL(-1) APC (APC-45, therapeutic dose) and 0.225 microg mL(-1) APC (APC-225, five-fold therapeutic dose), respectively. The activation of platelets was mediated by two different agonists. APC had no significant influence on platelet activation, with or without stimulation at both concentrations. In group APC-225, CD62P showed a non-significant decrease. This in vitro study demonstrates that therapeutic plasma concentrations of Drotrecogin alfa (activated) have neither influence on expression of platelet activation markers nor on platelet-granulocyte complexes in blood of volunteers and patients with severe sepsis. Thus, a direct drug-platelet interaction seems unlikely. PMID:17654307

  18. Immunotherapy with imiquimod and interferon alfa for metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, R.U.; Braunschweig, T.; Ghassemi, A.; Rübben, A.

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (mcc) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin. Remission rates are high with chemotherapy in patients with metastasis, but without any improvement in overall survival. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with facial mcc. After radiation and surgery, the mcc recurred with widespread cutaneous and regional lymph node metastases. The metastases were treated with weekly intralesional injections of 1–2×106 IU interferon alfa-2a, accompanied by topical imiquimod 5% cream 3 times weekly. After partial regression, subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2b was added at a dose of 30 μg weekly, which was then increased to 50 μg weekly. At 4 months after the start of immunotherapy, all cutaneous metastases and the intralesionally treated lymph node metastases receded. Interruption or reduction of systemic interferon application resulted in locoregional relapses that were successfully treated with surgery or intralesional interferon injections. The patient remains alive 30 months after initiation of immunotherapy, suggesting that locally metastasized mcc might be able to be controlled with local and systemic immunotherapy. PMID:27122984

  19. ARECIBO PULSAR SURVEY USING ALFA: PROBING RADIO PULSAR INTERMITTENCY AND TRANSIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Deneva, J. S.; Cordes, J. M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Edel, S.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Nice, D. J.; Crawford, F.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.

    2009-10-01

    We present radio transient search algorithms, results, and statistics from the ongoing Arecibo Pulsar ALFA (PALFA) survey of the Galactic plane. We have discovered seven objects through a search for isolated dispersed pulses. All of these objects are Galactic and have measured periods between 0.4 and 4.7 s. One of the new discoveries has a duty cycle of 0.01%, smaller than that of any other radio pulsar. We discuss the impact of selection effects on the detectability and classification of intermittent sources, and compare the efficiencies of periodicity and single-pulse (SP) searches for various pulsar classes. For some cases we find that the apparent intermittency is likely to be caused by off-axis detection or a short time window that selects only a few bright pulses and favors detection with our SP algorithm. In other cases, the intermittency appears to be intrinsic to the source. No transients were found with DMs large enough to require that they originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Accounting for the on-axis gain of the ALFA system, as well as the low gain but large solid-angle coverage of far-out sidelobes, we use the results of the survey so far to place limits on the amplitudes and event rates of transients of arbitrary origin.

  20. Status report of PYRAMIR: a near-infrared pyramid wavefront sensor for ALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Joana B.; Feldt, Markus; Wagner, Karl; Bizenberger, Peter; Hippler, Stefan; Baumeister, Harald; Stumpf, Micaela; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Esposito, Simone; Henning, Thomas

    2004-10-01

    A new wavefront sensor based on the pyramid principle is being built at MPIA, with the objective of integration in the Calar Alto adaptive optics system ALFA. This sensor will work in the near-infrared wavelength range (J, H and K bands). We present here an update of this project, named PYRAMIR, which will have its first light in some months. Along with the description of the optical design, we discuss issues like the image quality and chromatic effects due to band sensing. We will show the characterization of the tested pyramidal components as well as refer to the difficulties found in the manufacturing process to meet our requirements. Most of the PYRAMIR instrument parts are kept inside a liquid nitrogen cooled vacuum dewar to reduce thermic radiation. The mechanical design of the cold parts is described here. To gain experience, a laboratory pyramid wavefront sensor was set up, with its optical design adapted to PYRAMIR. Different tests were already performed. The electronic and control systems were designed to integrate in the existing ALFA system. We give a description of the new components. An update on the future work is presented.

  1. Macroscale production of crystalline interferon alfa-2b in microgravity on STS-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabhushan, Tattanahalli L.; Reichert, Paul; Long, Marianna M.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    Macroscale crystallization of zinc interferon alfa-2b was achieved on STS-52 in October 1992 in the Protein Crystallization Facility. Conditions for crystallization were established by adapting a microscale vapor diffusion method to a macroscale temperature induction method. A series of earth based pilot experiments established conditions to reproducibly crystallize zinc interferon alfa-2b in high yield and under cleanroom conditions. As a control for the STS-52 mission, a ground experiment was run simultaneously and in the same configuration as the flight experiment. Greater than 95% of the available protein crystallized in both the ground and flight experiments. Using a battery of physical, biochemical and biological characterization assays, demonstrated that sample processing, polysulfone bottle confinement and the conditions used for crystallization did not have a negative effect on protein integrity. Redissolved crystals from the flight and ground experiments showed full biological activity in a cytopathic effect inhibition assay as compared to an interferon control standard. Morphometric analysis comparing the overall length and width of the derived crystals showed a 2.4 fold increase in the length and width of the space grown crystals as compared to earth grown crystals. Space grown crystals have remained a stable free flowing suspension for over 2 years. Based on these results, further experiments are envisioned to investigate macroscale crystallization of biologically active macromolecules in microgravity.

  2. Immunotherapy with imiquimod and interferon alfa for metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R U; Braunschweig, T; Ghassemi, A; Rübben, A

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (mcc) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin. Remission rates are high with chemotherapy in patients with metastasis, but without any improvement in overall survival. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with facial mcc. After radiation and surgery, the mcc recurred with widespread cutaneous and regional lymph node metastases. The metastases were treated with weekly intralesional injections of 1-2×10(6) IU interferon alfa-2a, accompanied by topical imiquimod 5% cream 3 times weekly. After partial regression, subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2b was added at a dose of 30 μg weekly, which was then increased to 50 μg weekly. At 4 months after the start of immunotherapy, all cutaneous metastases and the intralesionally treated lymph node metastases receded. Interruption or reduction of systemic interferon application resulted in locoregional relapses that were successfully treated with surgery or intralesional interferon injections. The patient remains alive 30 months after initiation of immunotherapy, suggesting that locally metastasized mcc might be able to be controlled with local and systemic immunotherapy. PMID:27122984

  3. Drotrecogin alfa (activated)...a sad final fizzle to a roller-coaster party.

    PubMed

    Angus, Derek C

    2012-01-01

    Following the failure of PROWESS-SHOCK to demonstrate efficacy, Eli Lilly and Company withdrew drotrecogin alfa (activated) from the worldwide market. Drotrecogin was initially approved after the original trial, PROWESS, was stopped early for overwhelming efficacy. These events prompt consideration of both the initial approval decision and the later decision to withdraw. It is regrettable that the initial decision was made largely on a single trial that was stopped early. However, the decision to approve was within the bounds of normal regulatory practice and was made by many approval bodies around the world. Furthermore, the overall withdrawal rate of approved drugs remains very low. The decision to withdraw was a voluntary decision by Eli Lilly and Company and likely reflected key business considerations. Drotrecogin does have important biologic effects, and it is probable that we do not know how best to select patients who would benefit. Overall, there may still be a small advantage to drotrecogin alfa, even used non-selectively, but the costs of determining such an effect with adequate certainty are likely prohibitive, and the point is now moot. In the future, we should consider ways to make clinical trials easier and quicker so that more information can be available in a timely manner when considering regulatory approval. At the same time, more sophisticated selection of patients seems key if we are to most wisely test agents designed to manipulate the septic host response. PMID:22309988

  4. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods

    PubMed Central

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Wilkinson, A. G.; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases ‘uniformly’ distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course. PMID:27010238

  5. Characterization of IXINITY® (Trenonacog Alfa), a Recombinant Factor IX with Primary Sequence Corresponding to the Threonine-148 Polymorph

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Dougald M.; Jenny, Richard J.; Van Cott, Kevin E.; Saward, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to extensively characterize the first recombinant FIX therapeutic corresponding to the threonine-148 (Thr-148) polymorph, IXINITY (trenonacog alfa [coagulation factor IX (recombinant)]). Gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and gel filtration were used to determine purity and confirm structure. Chromatographic and mass spectrometry techniques were used to identify and quantify posttranslational modifications. Activity was assessed as the ability to activate factor X (FX) both with and without factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) and in a standard clotting assay. All results were consistent across multiple lots. Trenonacog alfa migrated as a single band on Coomassie-stained gels; activity assays were normal and showed <0.002 IU of activated factor IX (FIXa) per IU of FIX. The molecule has >97%  γ-carboxylation and underwent the appropriate structural change upon binding calcium ions. Trenonacog alfa was activated normally with factor XIa (FXIa); once activated it bound to FVIIIa and FXa. When activated to FIXa, it was inhibited efficiently by antithrombin. Glycosylation patterns were similar to plasma-derived FIX with sialic acid content consistent with the literature reports of good pharmacokinetic performance. These studies have shown that trenonacog alfa is a highly pure product with a primary sequence and posttranslational modifications consistent with the common Thr-148 polymorphism of plasma-derived FIX. PMID:26997955

  6. Molecular design and downstream processing of turoctocog alfa (NovoEight), a B-domain truncated factor VIII molecule.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Haleh; Hansen, Ernst B; Faber, Johan H; Sejergaard, Lars; Karlsson, Johan; Bolt, Gert; Hansen, Jens J; Thim, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Turoctocog alfa (NovoEight) is a third-generation recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) with a truncated B-domain that is manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary cells. No human or animal-derived materials are used in the process. The aim of this study is to describe the molecular design and purification process for turoctocog alfa. A five-step purification process is applied to turoctocog alfa: protein capture on mixed-mode resin; immunoaffinity chromatography using a unique, recombinantly produced anti-FVIII mAb; anion exchange chromatography; nanofiltration and size exclusion chromatography. This process enabled reduction of impurities such as host cell proteins (HCPs) and high molecular weight proteins (HMWPs) to a very low level. The immunoaffinity step is very important for the removal of FVIII-related degradation products. Manufacturing scale data shown in this article confirmed the robustness of the purification process and a reliable and consistent reduction of the impurities. The contribution of each step to the final product purity is described and shown for three manufacturing batches. Turoctocog alfa, a third-generation B-domain truncated rFVIII product is manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary cells without the use of animal or human-derived proteins. The five-step purification process results in a homogenous, highly purified rFVIII product. PMID:26761578

  7. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods.

    PubMed

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A; Wilkinson, A G; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I; Boardman, James P

    2016-01-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases 'uniformly' distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course. PMID:27010238

  8. Accurate Learning with Few Atlases (ALFA): an algorithm for MRI neonatal brain extraction and comparison with 11 publicly available methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serag, Ahmed; Blesa, Manuel; Moore, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Wilkinson, A. G.; MacNaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate whole-brain segmentation, or brain extraction, of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a critical first step in most neuroimage analysis pipelines. The majority of brain extraction algorithms have been developed and evaluated for adult data and their validity for neonatal brain extraction, which presents age-specific challenges for this task, has not been established. We developed a novel method for brain extraction of multi-modal neonatal brain MR images, named ALFA (Accurate Learning with Few Atlases). The method uses a new sparsity-based atlas selection strategy that requires a very limited number of atlases ‘uniformly’ distributed in the low-dimensional data space, combined with a machine learning based label fusion technique. The performance of the method for brain extraction from multi-modal data of 50 newborns is evaluated and compared with results obtained using eleven publicly available brain extraction methods. ALFA outperformed the eleven compared methods providing robust and accurate brain extraction results across different modalities. As ALFA can learn from partially labelled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. ALFA could also be applied to other imaging modalities and other stages across the life course.

  9. Molecular design and downstream processing of turoctocog alfa (NovoEight), a B-domain truncated factor VIII molecule

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian, Haleh; Hansen, Ernst B.; Faber, Johan H.; Sejergaard, Lars; Karlsson, Johan; Bolt, Gert; Hansen, Jens J.; Thim, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Turoctocog alfa (NovoEight) is a third-generation recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) with a truncated B-domain that is manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary cells. No human or animal-derived materials are used in the process. The aim of this study is to describe the molecular design and purification process for turoctocog alfa. A five-step purification process is applied to turoctocog alfa: protein capture on mixed-mode resin; immunoaffinity chromatography using a unique, recombinantly produced anti-FVIII mAb; anion exchange chromatography; nanofiltration and size exclusion chromatography. This process enabled reduction of impurities such as host cell proteins (HCPs) and high molecular weight proteins (HMWPs) to a very low level. The immunoaffinity step is very important for the removal of FVIII-related degradation products. Manufacturing scale data shown in this article confirmed the robustness of the purification process and a reliable and consistent reduction of the impurities. The contribution of each step to the final product purity is described and shown for three manufacturing batches. Turoctocog alfa, a third-generation B-domain truncated rFVIII product is manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary cells without the use of animal or human-derived proteins. The five-step purification process results in a homogenous, highly purified rFVIII product. PMID:26761578

  10. Characterization of IXINITY® (Trenonacog Alfa), a Recombinant Factor IX with Primary Sequence Corresponding to the Threonine-148 Polymorph.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Dougald M; Jenny, Richard J; Van Cott, Kevin E; Buhay, Shelly; Saward, Laura L

    2016-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to extensively characterize the first recombinant FIX therapeutic corresponding to the threonine-148 (Thr-148) polymorph, IXINITY (trenonacog alfa [coagulation factor IX (recombinant)]). Gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and gel filtration were used to determine purity and confirm structure. Chromatographic and mass spectrometry techniques were used to identify and quantify posttranslational modifications. Activity was assessed as the ability to activate factor X (FX) both with and without factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) and in a standard clotting assay. All results were consistent across multiple lots. Trenonacog alfa migrated as a single band on Coomassie-stained gels; activity assays were normal and showed <0.002 IU of activated factor IX (FIXa) per IU of FIX. The molecule has >97%  γ-carboxylation and underwent the appropriate structural change upon binding calcium ions. Trenonacog alfa was activated normally with factor XIa (FXIa); once activated it bound to FVIIIa and FXa. When activated to FIXa, it was inhibited efficiently by antithrombin. Glycosylation patterns were similar to plasma-derived FIX with sialic acid content consistent with the literature reports of good pharmacokinetic performance. These studies have shown that trenonacog alfa is a highly pure product with a primary sequence and posttranslational modifications consistent with the common Thr-148 polymorphism of plasma-derived FIX. PMID:26997955

  11. Recombinant factor VIIa analog in the management of hemophilia with inhibitors: results from a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of vatreptacog alfa

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, S R; Ehrenforth, S; Abdul Karim, F; Matsushita, T; Weldingh, K N; Windyga, J; Mahlangu, J N; For the Adept™2 Investigators

    2014-01-01

    Background Vatreptacog alfa, a recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) analog with three amino acid substitutions and 99% identity to native FVIIa, was developed to improve the treatment of hemophilic patients with inhibitors. Objectives To confirm the safety and assess the efficacy of vatreptacog alfa in treating bleeding episodes in hemophilic patients with inhibitors. Patients and methods In this international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, crossover, confirmatory phase III trial (adept™2) in patients with hemophilia A or B and inhibitors, bleeds were randomized 3 : 2 to treatment with vatreptacog alfa (one to three doses at 80 μg kg−1) or rFVIIa (one to three doses at 90 μg kg−1). Treatment failures after three doses of trial product (TP) were managed according to the local standard of care. Results In the 72 patients enrolled, 567 bleeds were treated with TP. Both vatreptacog alfa and rFVIIa gave 93% effective bleeding control at 12 h. Vatreptacog alfa was superior to rFVIIa in secondary efficacy outcomes, including the number of doses used to treat a bleed and sustained bleeding control 24–48 h after the first dose. Eight patients (11%) developed antibodies against vatreptacog alfa, including four with cross-reactivity against rFVIIa and one with an in vitro neutralizing effect to vatreptacog alfa. Conclusions This large randomized controlled trial confirmed the well-established efficacy and safety profile of rFVIIa, and showed that vatreptacog alfa had similar or better efficacy than rFVIIa. However, because of the development of anti-drug antibodies, a positive benefit–risk profile is unlikely to be achieved with vatreptacog alfa. PMID:24931322

  12. Durability of responses to interferon alfa-2b in advanced hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ratain, M J; Golomb, H M; Bardawil, R G; Vardiman, J W; Westbrook, C A; Kaminer, L S; Lembersky, B C; Bitter, M A; Daly, K

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that significant hematologic improvement occurs in the majority of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) treated with partially purified or recombinant interferon (IFN). Fifty-three patients received IFN alfa-2b for at least 3 months in a dose of 2 X 10(6) U/m2 subcutaneously thrice weekly. Of the 49 patients evaluable for response (at least 6 months of IFN therapy), there were ten complete responses and 29 partial responses for a total response rate of 80%. The peripheral blood counts and bone marrow continued to improve over the course of a full year of therapy. IFN was well tolerated, with no patients discontinuing therapy because of toxicity. Transient myelosuppression occurred in most patients during the first 1 to 2 months of therapy, occasionally precipitating a transfusion requirement. After IFN treatment was discontinued, there was a marked decrease in normal marrow elements and a relative increase in marrow hairy cells. This was associated with a transient increase in normal elements in the peripheral blood. Only one of 24 patients followed after receiving IFN for a median of 8.5 months (range, 3 to 16 months) has required further therapy. We conclude that low-dose IFN alfa-2b is highly effective in advanced HCL; responding patients should be treated for at least 1 year. The decision to initiate a second course of IFN therapy should be based primarily on peripheral blood counts and the clinical status of the patient rather than on the bone marrow. PMID:3814819

  13. Phase III Trial of Bevacizumab Plus Interferon Alfa Versus Interferon Alfa Monotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Final Results of CALGB 90206

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Brian I.; Halabi, Susan; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Vaena, Daniel A.; Archer, Laura; Atkins, James N.; Picus, Joel; Czaykowski, Piotr; Dutcher, Janice; Small, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Bevacizumab is an antibody that binds vascular endothelial growth factor and has activity in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Interferon alfa (IFN-α) is the historic standard initial treatment for RCC. A prospective, randomized, phase III trial of bevacizumab plus IFN-α versus IFN-α monotherapy was conducted. Patients and Methods Patients with previously untreated, metastatic clear cell RCC were randomly assigned to receive either bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks) plus IFN-α (9 million units subcutaneously three times weekly) or the same dose and schedule of IFN-α monotherapy in a multicenter phase III trial. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate, and safety. Results Seven hundred thirty-two patients were enrolled. The median OS time was 18.3 months (95% CI, 16.5 to 22.5 months) for bevacizumab plus IFN-α and 17.4 months (95% CI, 14.4 to 20.0 months) for IFN-α monotherapy (unstratified log-rank P = .097). Adjusting on stratification factors, the hazard ratio was 0.86 (95% CI, 0.73 to 1.01; stratified log-rank P = .069) favoring bevacizumab plus IFN-α. There was significantly more grade 3 to 4 hypertension (HTN), anorexia, fatigue, and proteinuria for bevacizumab plus IFN-α. Patients who developed HTN on bevacizumab plus IFN-α had a significantly improved PFS and OS versus patients without HTN. Conclusion OS favored the bevacizumab plus IFN-α arm but did not meet the predefined criteria for significance. HTN may be a biomarker of outcome with bevacizumab plus IFN-α. PMID:20368558

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-labetuzumab; Abacavir sulfate, abatacept, adalimumab, ademetionine, adjuvanted influenza vaccine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, amlodipine, amphotericin B, anakinra, aripiprazole, aspirin, axitinib; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123; Calcium folinate, canertinib dihydrochloride, carboplatin, carmustine, cetirizine hydrochloride, cetuximab, cholecalciferol, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cinacalcet hydrochloride, cisplatin, clarithromycin, clofazimine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CpG-7909; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DB-289, desloratadine, Dexamet, dicycloverine hydrochloride, dimethyl fumarate, docetaxel, dolastatin 10, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, edotecarin, efaproxiral sodium, enalapril maleate, epoetin beta, epoprostenol sodium, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol, etanercept; Fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil; Gefitinib, gemcitabine, Ghrelin (human), glibenclamide, glimepiride, GTI-2040; Haloperidol, human insulin, hydrocortisone probutate; Imatinib mesylate, indisulam, influenza vaccine, inhaled insulin, insulin aspart, insulin glulisine, insulin lispro, irinotecan, ispronicline; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, lapatinib, letrozole, levocetirizine, lomustine, lonafarnib, lumiracoxib;Magnesium sulfate, MD-1100, melphalan, metformin hydrochloride, methotrexate, metoclopramide hydrochloride, mitiglinide calcium hydrate, monophosphoryl lipid A, montelukast sodium, motexafin gadolinium

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma

  16. Maintenance treatment of renal anaemia in haemodialysis patients with methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta versus darbepoetin alfa administered monthly: a randomized comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Fernando; Lok, Charmaine E.; de Francisco, Angel; Locatelli, Francesco; Mann, Johannes F.E.; Canaud, Bernard; Kerr, Peter G.; Macdougall, Iain C.; Besarab, Anatole; Villa, Giuseppe; Kazes, Isabelle; Van Vlem, Bruno; Jolly, Shivinder; Beyer, Ulrich; Dougherty, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Several studies with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents claim that maintenance therapy of renal anaemia may be possible at extended dosing intervals; however, few studies were randomized, results varied, and comparisons between agents were absent. We report results of a multi-national, randomized, prospective trial comparing haemoglobin maintenance with methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta and darbepoetin alfa administered once monthly. Methods. Haemodialysis patients (n = 490) on stable once-weekly intravenous darbepoetin alfa were randomized to methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta once monthly or darbepoetin alfa every 2 weeks for 26 weeks, with dose adjustment for individual haemoglobin target (11–13 g/dL; maximum decrease from baseline 1 g/dL). Subsequently, patients entered a second 26-week period of once-monthly methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta and darbepoetin alfa. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who maintained average haemoglobin ≥10.5 g/dL, with a decrease from baseline ≤1 g/dL, in Weeks 50–53; the secondary endpoint was dose change over time. The trial is registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00394953. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. One hundred and fifty-seven of 245 patients treated with methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta and 99 of 245 patients with darbepoetin alfa met the response definition (64.1% and 40.4%; P < 0.0001). Doses increased by 6.8% with methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta and 58.8% with darbepoetin alfa during once-monthly treatment. Death rates were equal between treatments (5.7%). Most common adverse events included hypertension, procedural hypotension, nasopharyngitis and muscle spasms, with no differences between groups. Conclusions. Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta maintained target haemoglobin more successfully than darbepoetin alfa at once-monthly dosing intervals despite dose increases with darbepoetin alfa

  17. Long-term efficacy and safety results of taliglucerase alfa up to 36 months in adult treatment-naïve patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Zimran, Ari; Durán, Gloria; Mehta, Atul; Giraldo, Pilar; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Giona, Fiorina; Amato, Dominick J; Petakov, Milan; Muñoz, Eduardo Terreros; Solorio-Meza, Sergio Eduardo; Cooper, Peter A; Varughese, Sheeba; Chertkoff, Raul; Brill-Almon, Einat

    2016-07-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is an intravenous enzyme replacement therapy approved for treatment of type 1 Gaucher disease (GD), and is the first available plant cell-expressed recombinant therapeutic protein. Herein, we report long-term safety and efficacy results of taliglucerase alfa in treatment-naïve adult patients with GD. Patients were randomized to receive taliglucerase alfa 30 or 60 U/kg every other week, and 23 patients completed 36 months of treatment. Taliglucerase alfa (30 U/kg; 60 U/kg, respectively) resulted in mean decreases in spleen volume (50.1%; 64.6%) and liver volume (25.6%; 24.4%) with mean increases in hemoglobin concentration (16.0%; 35.8%) and platelet count (45.7%; 114.0%), and mean decreases in chitotriosidase activity (71.5%; 82.2%). All treatment-related adverse events were mild to moderate in intensity and transient. The most common adverse events were nasopharyngitis, arthralgia, upper respiratory tract infection, headache, pain in extremity, and hypertension. These 36-month results of taliglucerase alfa in treatment-naïve adult patients with GD demonstrate continued improvement in disease parameters with no new safety concerns. These findings extend the taliglucerase alfa clinical safety and efficacy dataset. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00705939. Am. J. Hematol. 91:656-660, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27174694

  18. A Randomized Study of Extended Dosing Regimens for Initiation of Epoetin Alfa Treatment for Anemia of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spinowitz, Bruce; Germain, Michael; Benz, Robert; Wolfson, Marsha; McGowan, Tracy; Tang, K. Linda; Kamin, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Although epoetin alfa is commonly initiated weekly (QW) in anemic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, recent evidence indicates that it can be initiated every 2 wk (Q2W) and used in maintenance therapy every 4 wk (Q4W). This study examined the feasibility of initiating epoetin alfa Q4W in anemic CKD patients not receiving dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: This open-label study randomized subjects (1:2:2:2) to treatment with epoetin alfa 10,000 IU QW, 20,000 IU Q2W, 20,000 IU Q4W, or 40,000 IU Q4W for 16 wk. Subjects were ≥18 yr, had hemoglobin <11 g/dl, a glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 90 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and had not received erythropoietic therapy within 8 wk. The primary analysis was a noninferiority comparison of the 40,000 IU Q4W to the 20,000 IU Q2W group in the per-protocol population with respect to hemoglobin change from baseline to the end of study. Results: Of 262 subjects randomized, 229 comprised the per-protocol population. Mean hemoglobin change from baseline for the 40,000 IU Q4W group (1.24 g/dl) was not inferior to the 20,000 IU Q2W group (1.11 g/dl) with the lower limit of 95% CI, −0.21 g/dl. In the QW, 20,000 IU Q2W, 20,000 IU Q4W, and 40,000 IU Q4W groups, 90%, 87%, 75%, and 86% of subjects, respectively, achieved a hemoglobin increase ≥1 g/dl. Serious adverse events were similar across all groups. Conclusions: Epoetin alfa can be initiated Q4W in anemic CKD subjects. PMID:18400964

  19. Quantification of follicle stimulating hormone (follitropin alfa): is in vivo bioassay still relevant in the recombinant age?

    PubMed

    Driebergen, R; Baer, G

    2003-01-01

    Quantification of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) for clinical use has traditionally involved the use of in vivo bioassays, particularly the Steelman-Pohley bioassay. This assay has limited precision, requires large numbers of laboratory animals and involves cumbersome procedures for data generation and interpretation. Recent advances in manufacturing procedures for recombinant human FSH (r-hFSH) have resulted in a preparation (follitropin alfa; Gonal-F) that is highly consistent in both isoform profile and glycan species distribution. As a result, follitropin alfa can be reliably quantified using an optimised size exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) method, and vials can be filled by mass. Preliminary clinical studies suggest that the fill-by-mass process results in a product that delivers a more consistent clinical response and is more effective than follitropin alfa vials filled by bioassay in women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation. Non-bioassay methods such as SE-HPLC are likely to become increasingly important for quality testing and regulatory purposes, provided that the manufacturing process is well controlled and produces a protein of highly consistent physico-chemical properties. PMID:12661779

  20. Molecular structure of a complex formed between hydrobromide of 7-methyl-1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene and 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenol in crystal and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, Grzegorz; Ratajczak-Sitarz, Małgorzata; Katrusiak, Andrzej; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2002-08-01

    A complex of 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenol with 7-methyl-1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene hydrobromide has been studied using X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. In the crystal structure, a bromide anion is hydrogen-bonded with MTBDH + cation and two hydroxyl groups of two 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenol molecules. In the solid state, the Br - anion is an acceptor in N +-H⋯Br -, and two O-H⋯Br - intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In chloroform and acetonitrile, the structure of the complex assumes a new structure due to almost complete dissociation of protonated MTBD molecule. In chloroform, the MTBDH + cation is hydrogen-bonded with 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenol whereas in acetonitrile it is free and solvated by the solvent. In both cases, the 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenol molecule is hydrogen-bonded to the bromide anion.

  1. Surface displaced alfa-enolase of Lactobacillus plantarum is a fibronectin binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Vastano, Valeria; Siciliano, Rosa Anna; Candela, Marco; Vici, Manuela; Muscariello, Lidia; Marasco, Rosangela; Sacco, Margherita

    2009-01-01

    Background Lactic acid bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are one of the most important health promoting groups of the human intestinal microbiota. Their protective role within the gut consists in out competing invading pathogens for ecological niches and metabolic substrates. Among the features necessary to provide health benefits, commensal microorganisms must have the ability to adhere to human intestinal cells and consequently to colonize the gut. Studies on mechanisms mediating adhesion of lactobacilli to human intestinal cells showed that factors involved in the interaction vary mostly among different species and strains, mainly regarding interaction between bacterial adhesins and extracellular matrix or mucus proteins. We have investigated the adhesive properties of Lactobacillus plantarum, a member of the human microbiota of healthy individuals. Results We show the identification of a Lactobacillus plantarum LM3 cell surface protein (48 kDa), which specifically binds to human fibronectin (Fn), an extracellular matrix protein. By means of mass spectrometric analysis this protein was identified as the product of the L. plantarum enoA1 gene, coding the EnoA1 alfa-enolase. Surface localization of EnoA1 was proved by immune electron microscopy. In the mutant strain LM3-CC1, carrying the enoA1 null mutation, the 48 kDa adhesin was not anymore detectable neither by anti-enolase Western blot nor by Fn-overlay immunoblotting assay. Moreover, by an adhesion assay we show that LM3-CC1 cells bind to fibronectin-coated surfaces less efficiently than wild type cells, thus demonstrating the significance of the surface displaced EnoA1 protein for the L. plantarum LM3 adhesion to fibronectin. Conclusion Adhesion to host tissues represents a crucial early step in the colonization process of either pathogens or commensal bacteria. We demonstrated the involvement of the L. plantarum Eno A1 alfa-enolase in Fn-binding, by studying LM3 and LM3-CC1 surface

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Novel Plant Cell-Expressed Taliglucerase Alfa in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Richat; Park, Glen; Damle, Bharat; Chertkoff, Raul; Alon, Sari

    2015-01-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is a beta-glucocerebrosidase enzyme replacement therapy approved in the United States, Israel, and other countries for treatment of Type 1 Gaucher disease in adults, and is the first approved plant cell—expressed recombinant protein. In this report, taliglucerase alfa pharmacokinetics were assessed in adult and pediatric patients with Gaucher disease from separate multicenter trials of 30 Units/kg and 60 Units/kg doses infused every 2 weeks. Serial blood samples were obtained from adult patients following single-dose administration on day 1 (n = 26) and multiple doses at week 38 (n = 29), and from pediatric patients following administration of multiple doses of taliglucerase alfa for 10–27 months (n = 10). In both adult and pediatric patients, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to last measureable concentration (AUC0-t), and from time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) were higher after 60 Units/kg dose than 30 Units/kg dose. No tendency for accumulation or change in taliglucerase alfa pharmacokinetic parameters over time from day 1 to week 38 was observed with repeated doses of 30 or 60 Units/kg in adults. After multiple doses, mean (range) dose-normalized pharmacokinetic parameters were similar for adult versus pediatric patients receiving 60 Units/kg: Cmax expressed in ng/mL/mg was 42.4 (14.5–95.4) in adults and 46.6 (34.4–68.4) in pediatric patients, AUC0 t expressed in ng•h/mL/mg was 63.4 (26.3–156) in adults and 63.9 (39.8–85.1) in pediatric patients, t1/2 expressed in minutes was 34.8 (11.3–104) in adults and 31.5 (18.0–42.9) in pediatric patients and total body clearance expressed in L/h was 19.9 (6.25–37.9) in adults and 17.0 (11.7–24.9) in pediatric patients. These pharmacokinetic data extend the findings of taliglucerase alfa in adult and pediatric patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT00376168 (in adults); NCT01411228 (in children) PMID

  3. Enzyme replacement therapy with taliglucerase alfa: 36-month safety and efficacy results in adult patients with Gaucher disease previously treated with imiglucerase.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Shankar, Suma P; Petakov, Milan; Giraldo, Pilar; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Amato, Dominick J; Szer, Jeffrey; Chertkoff, Raul; Brill-Almon, Einat; Zimran, Ari

    2016-07-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is the first available plant cell-expressed human recombinant therapeutic protein. It is indicated for treatment of patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD) in adult and pediatric patients in several countries. Study PB-06-002 examined the safety and efficacy of taliglucerase alfa for 9 months in patients who previously received imiglucerase. The results of adult patients from Study PB-06-002 who continued receiving taliglucerase alfa in extension Study PB-06-003 for up to 36 months are reported here. Eighteen patients received at least one dose of taliglucerase alfa in Study PB-06-003; 10 patients completed 36 total months of therapy, and four patients who transitioned to commercial drug completed 30-33 months of treatment. In patients who completed 36 total months of treatment, mean percent (±standard error) changes from baseline/time of switch to taliglucerase alfa to 36 months were as follows: hemoglobin concentration, -1.0% (±1.9%; n = 10); platelet count, +9.3% (±9.8%; n = 10); spleen volume measured in multiples of normal (MN), -19.8% (±9.9%; n = 7); liver volume measured in MN, +0.9% (±5.4%; n = 8); chitotriosidase activity, -51.5% (±8.1%; n = 10); and CCL18 concentration, -36.5 (±8.0%; n = 10). Four patients developed antidrug antibodies, including one with evidence of neutralizing activity in vitro. All treatment-related adverse events were mild or moderate and transient. The 36-month results of switching from imiglucerase to taliglucerase alfa treatment in adults with GD provide further data on the clinical safety and efficacy of taliglucerase alfa beyond the initial 9 months of the original study. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00705939. Am. J. Hematol. 91:661-665, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27102949

  4. Cholangiolocellular carcinoma with rapid progression initially showing abnormally elevated serum alfa-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yoh, Tomoaki; Kato, Tatsushi; Hirohata, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yuya; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiolocellular carcinoma (CoCC) is a rare malignant liver tumor derived from hepatic progenitor cells, which exist in the canals of Hering. We encountered a case of CoCC with an extremely poor clinical course, initially showing abnormally elevated serum alfa-fetoprotein (AFP). A 72-year-old male presented with a liver tumor and abnormally elevated serum AFP levels (16,399 ng/ml). We preoperatively diagnosed hepatocellular carcinoma and performed extended right hepatectomy, after which the serum AFP levels remarkably decreased to 97 ng/ml. Postoperatively, the disease was pathologically diagnosed as CoCC. Furthermore, immunohistochemical pathological findings were alcian blue negative, cytokeratin (CK) 7 partially positive, CK19 positive, hepatocyte paraffin-1 negative, membranous negative for epithelial membrane antigen, and AFP negative. Fifty-five days later, intra- and extrahepatic recurrence developed, and the patient died 65 days after surgery. Although CoCCs show favorable outcomes, these characteristics of our case were not previously reported. It is necessary to accumulate more information on CoCC. PMID:27363839

  5. Reversing anticoagulant effects of novel oral anticoagulants: role of ciraparantag, andexanet alfa, and idarucizumab

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tiffany Y; Vaidya, Vaibhav R; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly used in clinical practice, but lack of commercially available reversal agents is a major barrier for mainstream use of these therapies. Specific antidotes to NOACs are under development. Idarucizumab (aDabi-Fab, BI 655075) is a novel humanized mouse monoclonal antibody that binds dabigatran and reverses its anticoagulant effect. In a recent Phase III study (Reversal Effects of Idarucizumab on Active Dabigatran), a 5 g intravenous infusion of idarucizumab resulted in the normalization of dilute thrombin time in 98% and 93% of the two groups studied, with normalization of ecarin-clotting time in 89% and 88% patients. Two other antidotes, andexanet alfa (PRT064445) and ciraparantag (PER977) are also under development for reversal of NOACs. In this review, we discuss commonly encountered management issues with NOACs such as periprocedural management, laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation, and management of bleeding. We review currently available data regarding specific antidotes to NOACs with respect to pharmacology and clinical trials. PMID:26937198

  6. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; García, E L; Talavera, A; Guzmán, R

    1992-11-01

    Forty-eight consecutive patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. The maintenance therapy was a random either nothing or interferon alfa 2b (IFN) 5.0 MU three times a week for one year. The median duration of CR in the patients treated with IFN has not been reached. After five years 60% of patients remain in CR compared to the control group who had a median CR of 40 months (p < 0.001). Actuarial five-years survival in the IFN treated patients was 88% compared to 42% in the control group (p < 0.001). Maintenance therapy with IFN has been beneficial in patients with DLCL with improvement of duration of CR and survival without the excessive toxicity of most common third generation regimen chemotherapy. We felt that IFN could be explored in most controlled clinical trials in patients with DLCL in CR after conventional chemotherapy. PMID:1487412

  7. Profile of efraloctocog alfa and its potential in the treatment of hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    George, Lindsey A; Camire, Rodney M

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia care has improved dramatically over the past 50 years, evolving from plasma concentrates, to purified plasma proteins, to recombinant clotting factors. These collective developments allowed for home delivery of on-demand and prophylactic treatment, resulting in the reduction of hemophilia morbidity and mortality and improved quality of life. Although efficacious in treating bleeding, conventional factor products’ half-lives require frequent venipuncture, which remains a significant burden to patients. Despite the remarkable advances in hemophilia care, no improvements have, until now, been made to the pharmacokinetic properties of factor products. Multiple strategies have more recently been employed to generate novel bioengineered products that, with great hope, represent the next wave of progress in hemophilia care. The use of these products will undoubtedly raise important discussion about choosing conventional factor over new long-acting factor products. Incorporation of these therapies into clinical care is accompanied by unanswered safety questions that will likely be evaluated only in postmarketing surveillance analysis. Further, these products may change current treatment paradigms with unclear cost repercussions and feasibility. This paper will review efraloctocog alfa (FVIII-Fc) and its role in the treatment of hemophilia A. PMID:25977610

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Moral, M A; Tomillero, A

    2008-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-Chlorotoxin, 423557; Abatacept, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, Adalimumab, AE-941, Ambrisentan, AMR-001, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate; BAY-639044, Bazedoxifene acetate, Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam, Bucindolol hydrochloride; Carfilzomib, Carisbamate, CCX-282, CD20Bi, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, CF-101, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cypher; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Degarelix acetate, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexlansoprazole, Dexverapamil, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Efalizumab, EPs-7630, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib; Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium; Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir, HIV gp120/NefTat/AS02A, HPV-6/11/16/18; INCB-18424, Incyclinide, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir; KNS-760704, KW-0761; Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Levetiracetam, Licofelone, Lidocaine/prilocaine; mAb 216, MEDI-528, Men ACWY, Meningococcal C-CRM197 vaccine, Methylnaltrexone bromide; Nemifitide ditriflutate, Nicotine conjugate vaccine, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Octaparin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pegaptanib octasodium, Pitrakinra, Prasterone, Pregabalin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine, Rimonabant, RTS,S/AS02D; Sarcosine, Sitaxentan sodium, Solifenacin succinate, Sunitinib malate; Taranabant, Taxus, Teduglutide, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Travoprost, TRU-015; USlipristal acetate, Urocortin 2; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; YM-155, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zanolimumab, Zoledronic acid monohydrate, Zotarolimus

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X

    2008-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prouse Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 3F8; Abatacept, ABT-263, Adalimumab, AG-7352, Agatolimod sodium, Alfimeprase, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, AT-9283, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, AVE-1642, AVE-9633, Axitinib, AZD-0530; Becocalcidiol, Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BIBF-1120, BMS-275183, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, Cetuximab, CHR-2797, Ciclesonide, Clevidipine, Cypher, Cytarabine/daunorubicin; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Disufenton sodium, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Eplerenone, Epratuzumab, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Ethynylcytidine, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fulvestrant; Garenoxacin mesilate, Gefitinib, Gestodene; HI-164, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Icatibant acetate, ICX-RHY, Idraparinux sodium, Indacaterol, Ispronicline, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; KB-2115, KW-2449; L-791515, Lapatinib ditosylate, LGD-4665, Licofelone, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lumiracoxib; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Miglustat, Mipomersen sodium, Mitumprotimut-T, MK-0822A, MK-0974; Nelarabine; Obatoclax mesylate, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paliperidone, Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panitumumab, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, Pertuzumab, Pimecrolimus, Pitrakinra, Pixantrone maleate, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Quercetin; RALGA, Raltegravir

  10. A technical feasibility study of dornase alfa delivery with eFlow® vibrating membrane nebulizers: aerosol characteristics and physicochemical stability.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Thomas; Geller, David E; Owyang, Laura; Tservistas, Marcus; Keller, Manfred; Boden, Norbert; Kesser, Kenneth C; Shire, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    Dornase alfa (Pulmozyme®) is an inhaled mucus-active drug that decreases viscoelasticity of sputum in vitro, improves lung function and reduces respiratory exacerbations in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients of 5 years age and older. The regulatory approval of dornase alfa 15 years ago stipulated that only certain jet nebulizer-compressor combinations should be used to deliver the drug. Since that time there have been significant advances in aerosol delivery technology, including development of electronic perforated vibrating membrane devices. Three independent laboratories studied aerosol characteristics, nebulization time, dose delivery, and stability of dornase alfa after nebulization to determine the feasibility of using perforated vibrating membrane devices to deliver the drug. These studies determined that the eFlow® vibrating membrane technology delivers dornase alfa more rapidly and efficiently than jet nebulizers, and does not affect the physicochemical properties of the drug. These in vitro results demonstrate only the technical feasibility of using vibrating membrane devices to deliver dornase alfa. Clinical studies will be required before any conclusions can be made regarding clinical safety and efficacy of these drug-device combinations for cystic fibrosis. PMID:20533437

  11. Maintenance Therapy with Interferon Alfa 2b Improves Outcome in Aggressive Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; García, E L; Nambo, M J

    1998-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with malignant lymphoma on complete response after conventional chemotherapy we start a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and seventy patients were randomized to received either IFN 5.0 MU three time at week by one year or no further treatment, as control group. At a median follow-up of 9.0 years (range 4.3 to 11 years) median freedom from relapse (FFR) has not been reached in patients who received IFN, it is statistically significant to patients in control group with a median FFR of 60 months (p <.001). Actuarial curves show that at 10-years, 58 patients (66%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 53% to 79%) remain in first remission, statistical different to control group 33 patients (40%, 95% Cl: 33% to 57%) (p <.001). Event free survival (EFS) shown that a 10-years 63 patients (71%, 95% CI: 59% to 81%) are alive free of disease in the IFN arm compared to only 38 patients (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 57%) in the control group (p <.001). Toxicity was mild, 81 patients received the planned doses of IFN on time and 6 patients had transitory delay secondary to hematological toxicity (grade 1 or 2) and completed the treatment on 13 months. No late side effects has been observed. After a long term follow-up we confirm that IFN used as maintenance therapy improves outcome in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma who were in complete remission after conventional chemotherapy without excessive toxicity. We feld that IFN will be consider in controlled clinical trials to define the role of this therapeutic option. PMID:27414082

  12. Safety and tolerance of recombinant interferon alfa-2a (Roferon-A) in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, G J; Itri, L M

    1986-04-15

    Recombinant interferon alfa-2a (Roferon-A, Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., Nutley, NJ) has been evaluated in clinical trials of more than 1300 patients with a broad spectrum of oncologic disease. Patients with either solid tumors or hematologic malignancies were treated with daily or three-times-weekly intramuscular injections for induction periods ranging from 8 to 16 weeks. Doses ranged from 1 X 10(6) units to 124 X 10(6) units per injection. When administered in low daily doses (approximately 3 X 10(6) units), Roferon-A was well tolerated, and dose attenuation was rarely required. Change to three-times-weekly treatment regimen at the same dose was usually sufficient to control toxicity when it occurred in this group of low-dose patients. Those patients receiving higher doses frequently required dose attenuation to 50% of the starting dose to improve clinical tolerance. Virtually all patients treated with Roferon-A experienced some degree of acute toxicity manifested as fever, chills, myalgia, and/or headache. These reactions usually occurred with initial dosing and frequently improved spontaneously with continued administration of the drug. Acetaminophen pretreatment was generally useful in ameliorating these symptoms. Common adverse experiences occurring after repeated dosing included fatigue, anorexia, and weight loss. Serious adverse reactions including cardiovascular and neurologic toxicity have occurred infrequently, primarily at higher doses. Hematologic toxicity and elevations in liver function parameters were also observed, but rarely required dose attenuation. Adverse effects were usually reversible after dose reduction or discontinuation of therapy. Approximately 27% of all patients developed antibodies to rHuIFN-alpha 2A during treatment. No adverse clinical sequelae have been associated with antibody development to date. PMID:3948143

  13. Clearance of Hepatic Sphingomyelin by Olipudase Alfa Is Associated With Improvement in Lipid Profiles in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thurberg, Beth L; Wasserstein, Melissa P; Jones, Simon A; Schiano, Thomas D; Cox, Gerald F; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD; Niemann-Pick disease type A and B) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by abnormal intracellular sphingomyelin (SM) accumulation. Prominent liver involvement results in hepatomegaly, fibrosis/cirrhosis, abnormal liver chemistries, and a proatherogenic lipid profile. Olipudase alfa (recombinant human ASM) is in clinical development as an investigational enzyme replacement therapy for the non-neurological manifestations of ASMD. In a phase 1b study conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of within-patient dose escalation with olipudase alfa, measurement of SM levels in liver biopsies was used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of substrate burden. Five adult patients with non neuronopathic ASMD received escalating doses of olipudase alfa every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Liver biopsies obtained at baseline and 26 weeks after treatment were evaluated for SM storage by histomorphometric analysis, biochemistry, and electron microscopy. Biopsies were also assessed for inflammation and fibrosis, and for the association of SM levels with liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles. At baseline, SM storage present in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes ranged from 9.8% to 53.8% of the microscopic field. After 26 weeks of treatment, statistically significant reductions in SM (P<0.0001) measured by morphometry were seen in 4 patients with evaluable liver biopsies. The 26-week biopsy of the fifth patient was insufficient for morphometric quantitation. Posttreatment SM levels ranged from 1.2% to 9.5% of the microscopic field, corresponding to an 84% to 92% relative reduction from baseline. Improvements in liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles were also observed. This study illustrates the utility of SM assessment by liver biopsy as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of disease burden in these patients. PMID:27340749

  14. Safety and clinical activity of elosulfase alfa in pediatric patients with Morquio A syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) less than 5 y

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Simon A.; Bialer, Martin; Parini, Rossella; Martin, Ken; Wang, Hui; Yang, Ke; Shaywitz, Adam J.; Harmatz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that elosulfase alfa has a favorable efficacy/safety profile in Morquio A patients aged ≥5 y. This study evaluated safety and impact on urine keratan sulfate (uKS) levels and growth velocity in younger patients. Methods: Fifteen Morquio A patients aged <5 y received elosulfase alfa 2.0 mg/kg/week for 52 wk during the primary treatment phase of a phase II, open-label, multinational study. Primary endpoint was safety and tolerability; secondary endpoints were change in uKS and growth velocity over 52 wk. Results: All 15 patients completed the primary treatment phase. Six of 743 infusions (0.8%) administered led to adverse events (AEs) requiring infusion interruption and medical intervention. Eleven patients (73.3%) had ≥1 study drug-related AE, mostly infusion-associated reactions. Mean z-score growth rate per year numerically improved from −0.6 at baseline to −0.4 at week 52. Comparison to untreated subjects of similar age in the Morquio A Clinical Assessment Program study showed a smaller decrease in height z-scores for treated than for untreated patients. Mean percent change from baseline in uKS was −30.2% at 2 wk and −43.5% at 52 wk. Conclusion: Early intervention with elosulfase alfa is well-tolerated and produces a decrease in uKS and a trend toward improvement in growth. PMID:26331768

  15. Mapping Hydrogen in the Galaxy, Galactic Halo, and Local Group with ALFA: The GALFA-H I Survey Starting with TOGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. J.; Douglas, K. A.; Heiles, C.; Korpela, E. J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Putman, M. E.; Stanimirović, S.

    2008-08-01

    Radio observations of gas in the Milky Way and Local Group are vital for understanding how galaxies function as systems. The unique sensitivity of Arecibo's 305 m dish, coupled with the 7-beam Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFA), provides an unparalleled tool for investigating the full range of interstellar phenomena traced by the H I 21 cm line. The GALFA (Galactic ALFA) H I Survey is mapping the entire Arecibo sky over a velocity range of -700 to +700 km s-1 with 0.2 km s-1 velocity channels and an angular resolution of 3.4'. We present highlights from the TOGS (Turn On GALFA Survey) portion of GALFA-H I, which is covering thousands of square degrees in commensal drift scan observations with the ALFALFA and AGES extragalactic ALFA surveys. This work is supported in part by the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, operated by Cornell University under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  16. Guillain-Barre syndrome associated with peginterferon alfa-2a for chronic hepatitis C: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Mumtaz A; Azhar, Ashaur; Tufail, Kashif; Feyssa, Eyob L; Penny, Stephen F; McGregory, Marlene; Araya, Victor; Ortiz, Jorge A

    2010-01-01

    The recommended therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection is the combination of a Pegylated interferon and Ribavirin. Almost all such patients on combination therapy experience one or more adverse events during the course of treatment. Significant neurological side effects are rare. A few cases of Bell’s Palsy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and even one case of acute demyelinating polyneuropathy with atypical features for Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) associated with Interferon therapy have been reported but no report of GBS with typical features has been published. We present a case report of typical GBS associated with Peginterferon alfa-2a and Ribavirin used for treatment of CHC infection. PMID:21160989

  17. Efficacy of corifollitropin alfa followed by recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol for Korean women undergoing assisted reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Young; Lee, Min Young; Jeong, Hyo Young; Rho, Yong Sook; Song, Sang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol using corifollitropin alfa in women undergoing assisted reproduction. Methods Six hundred and eighty-six in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles were analyzed. In 113 cycles, folliculogenesis was induced with corifollitropin alfa and recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH), and premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surges were prevented with a GnRH antagonist. In the control group (573 cycles), premature LH surges were prevented with GnRH agonist injection from the midluteal phase of the preceding cycle, and ovarian stimulation was started with rFSH. The treatment duration, quality of oocytes and embryos, number of embryo transfer (ET) cancelled cycles, risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), and the chemical pregnancy rate were evaluated in the two ovarian stimulation protocols. Results There were no significant differences in age and infertility factors between treatment groups. The treatment duration was shorter in the corifollitropin alfa group than in the control group. Although not statistically significant, the mean numbers of matured (86.8% vs. 85.1%) and fertilized oocytes (84.2% vs. 83.1%), good embryos (62.4% vs. 60.3%), and chemical pregnancy rates (47.2% vs. 46.8%) were slightly higher in the corifollitropin alfa group than in the control group. In contrast, rates of ET cancelled cycles and the OHSS risk were slightly lower in the corifollitropin alfa group (6.2% and 2.7%) than in the control group (8.2% and 3.5%), although these differences were also not statistically significant. Conclusion Although no significant differences were observed, the use of corifollitropin alfa seems to offer some advantages to patients because of its short treatment duration, safety, lower ET cancellation rate and reduced risk of OHSS. PMID:26161335

  18. Nonacog alfa: an analysis of safety data from six prospective clinical studies in different patient populations with haemophilia B treated with different therapeutic modalities.

    PubMed

    Rendo, Pablo; Smith, Lynne; Lee, Hsiao-Yu; Shafer, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Nonacog alfa is a recombinant factor IX (FIX) product indicated for treatment and prevention of bleeding episodes in patients with haemophilia B. This posthoc analysis evaluated the safety of nonacog alfa in key clinical studies across 15 years. Data were pooled from six prospective studies that utilized on-demand, prophylactic and preventive nonacog alfa regimens: three open-label, nonrandomized studies that assessed efficacy and safety; a bioequivalence study of original and reformulated nonacog alfa; an open-label, randomized study that compared on-demand and prophylactic treatment; and a noninterventional observational registry study that evaluated safety. Safety assessments included adverse events, serious adverse events (SAEs) and events of special interest. In total, 412 patients received nonacog alfa treatment. Adverse events occurred in 220 patients (53.4%), the most common being pyrexia (n = 63), nasopharyngitis (n = 53) and cough (n = 52). Forty-eight patients (11.7%) experienced treatment-related adverse events; the most common were hypersensitivity (n = 6), urticaria (n = 6), FIX inhibition (n = 5) and pyrexia (n = 4). Seventy-four patients (18.0%) developed SAEs. Thirty-seven events of special interest occurred in 31 (7.5%) patients. Events of special interest included allergic-type manifestations (n = 15), inhibitor development (n = 5), lack of effect (n = 8), red blood cell agglutination in tubing or syringe (n = 7), and thrombogenicity (n = 2). Six patients (1.5%) withdrew due to seven adverse events: hypersensitivity (n = 3), drug eruption, pruritic rash, urticaria and decreased therapeutic response (n = 1 each). Four patients died during the study; no deaths were related to study medication. This pooled safety analysis in haemophilia B patients confirmed the safety of nonacog alfa across various patient populations. PMID:26196195

  19. The influence of a polymorphism in the gene encoding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) on treatment outcomes in late-onset Pompe patients receiving alglucosidase alfa.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rena C; Palmer, Rachel; Pomponio, Robert J; Lu, Yuefeng; Ma, Xiwen; McVie-Wylie, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype (I/I, I/D, D/D), disease severity at baseline and response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) were assessed in the Pompe disease Late-Onset Treatment Study (LOTS). No correlations were observed between ACE genotype and disease severity at baseline. However, D/D patients appeared to have a reduced response to alglucosidase alfa treatment than I/I or I/D patients, suggesting that ACE polymorphisms may influence the response to alglucosidase alfa treatment and warrants further investigation. PMID:27489778

  20. Baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF)

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, John J.V.; Anand, Inder S.; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P.; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Albizem, Moetaz; Cheng, Sunfa; Scarlata, Debra; Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B.; Amuchastegui, M.; Belziti, C.; Bluguermann, J.; Caccavo, M.; Cartasegna, L.; Colque, R.; Cuneo, C.; Fernandez, A.; Gabito, A.; Goicochea, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Gorosito, V.; Grinfeld, L.; Hominal, M.; Kevorkian, R.; Litvak Bruno, M.; Llanos, J.; Mackinnon, I.; Manuale, O.; Marzetti, E.; Nul, D.; Perna, E.; Riccitelli, M.; Sanchez, A.; Santos, D.; Schygiel, P.; Toblli, J.; Vogel, D.; Aggarwal, A.; Amerena, J.; De Looze, F.; Fletcher, P.; Hare, D.; Ireland, M.; Krum, H.; Lattimore, J.; Marwick, T.; Sindone, A.; Thompson, P.; Waites, J.; Altenberger, J.; Ebner, C.; Lenz, K.; Pacher, R.; Poelzl, G.; Charlier, F.; de Ceuninck, M.; De Keulenaer, G.; Dendale, P.; Maréchal, P.; Mullens, W.; Thoeng, J.; Vanderheyden, M.; Vanhaecke, J.; Weytjens, C.; Wollaert, B.; Albuquerque, D.; Almeida, D.; Aspe y Rosas, J.; Bocchi, E.; Bordignon, S.; Clausell, N.; Kaiser, S.; Leaes, P.; Martins Alves, S.; Montera, M.; Moura, L.; Pereira de Castro, R.; Rassi, S.; Reis, A.; Saraiva, J.; Simões, M.; Souza Neto, J.; Teixeira, M.; Benov, H.; Chompalova, B.; Donova, T.; Georgiev, P.; Gotchev, D.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Guenova, D.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Ivanov, D.; Kostova, E.; Manolova, A.; Marchev, S.; Nikolov, F.; Popov, A.; Raev, D.; Tzekova, M.; Czarnecki, W.; Giannetti, N.; Haddad, H.; Heath, J.; Huynh, T.; Lepage, S.; Liu, P.; Lonn, E.; Ma, P.; Manyari, D.; Moe, G.; Parker, J.; Pesant, Y.; Rajda, M.; Ricci, J.; Roth, S.; Sestier, F.; Sluzar, V.; Sussex, B.; Vizel, S.; Antezana, G.; Bugueno, C.; Castro, P.; Conejeros, C.; Manriquez, L.; Martinez, D.; Potthoff, S.; Stockins, B.; Vukasovic, J.; Gregor, P.; Herold, M.; Jerabek, O.; Jirmar, R.; Kuchar, R.; Linhart, A.; Podzemska, B.; Soucek, M.; Spac, J.; Spacek, R.; Vodnansky, P.; Bronnum-Schou, J.; Clemmensen, K.; Egstrup, K.; Jensen, G.; Kjoller-Hansen, L.; Kober, L.; Markenvard, J.; Rokkedal, J.; Skagen, K.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Tuxen, C.; Videbak, L.; Laks, T.; Vahula, V.; Harjola, V.; Kettunen, R.; Kotila, M.; Bauer, F.; Cohen Solal, A.; Coisne, D.; Davy, J.; De Groote, P.; Dos Santos, P.; Funck, F.; Galinier, M.; Gibelin, P.; Isnard, R.; Neuder, Y.; Roul, G.; Sabatier, R.; Trochu, J.; Anker, S.; Denny, S.; Dreykluft, T.; Flesch, M.; Genth-Zotz, S.; Hambrecht, R.; Hein, J.; Jeserich, M.; John, M.; Kreider-Stempfle, H.; Laufs, U.; Muellerleile, K.; Natour, M.; Sandri, M.; Schäufele, T.; von Hodenberg, E.; Weyland, K.; Winkelmann, B.; Tse, H.; Yan, B.; Barsi, B.; Csikasz, J.; Dezsi, C.; Edes, I.; Forster, T.; Karpati, P.; Kerekes, C.; Kis, E.; Kosa, I.; Lupkovics, G.; Nagy, A.; Preda, I.; Ronaszeki, A.; Tomcsanyi, J.; Zamolyi, K.; Agarwal, D.; Bahl, V.; Bordoloi, A.; Chockalingam, K.; Chopda, M.; Chopra, V.; Dugal, J.; Ghaisas, N.; Ghosh, S.; Grant, P.; Hiremath, S.; Iyengar, S.; Jagadeesa Subramania, B.; Jain, P.; Joshi, A.; Khan, A.; Mullasari, A.; Naik, S.; Oomman, A.; Pai, V.; Pareppally Gopal, R.; Parikh, K.; Patel, T.; Prakash, V.; Sastry, B.; Sathe, S.; Sinha, N.; Srikanthan, V.; Subburamakrishnan, P.; Thacker, H.; Wander, G.; Admon, D.; Katz, A.; Klainman, E.; Lewis, B.; Marmor, A.; Moriel, M.; Mosseri, M.; Shotan, A.; Weinstein, J.; Zimlichman, R.; Agostoni, P.; Albanese, M.; Alunni, G.; Bini, R.; Boccanelli, A.; Bolognese, L.; Campana, C.; Carbonieri, E.; Carpino, C.; Checco, L.; Cosmi, F.; D'Angelo, G.; De Cristofaro, M.; Floresta, A.; Fucili, A.; Galvani, M.; Ivleva, A.; Marra, S.; Musca, G.; Peccerillo, N.; Perrone Filardi, P.; Picchio, E.; Russo, T.; Scelsi, L.; Senni, M.; Tavazzi, L.; Erglis, A.; Jasinkevica, I.; Kakurina, N.; Veze, I.; Volans, E.; Bagdonas, A.; Berukstis, E.; Celutkiene, J.; Dambrauskaite, A.; Jarasuniene, D.; Luksiene, D.; Rudys, A.; Sakalyte, G.; Sliaziene, S.; Aguilar-Romero, R.; Cardona-Muñoz, E.; Castro-Jimenez, J.; Chavez-Herrera, J.; Chuquiure Valenzuela, E.; De la Pena, G.; Herrera, E.; Leiva-Pons, J.; Lopez Alvarado, A.; Mendez Machado, G.; Ramos-Lopez, G.; Basart, D.; Buijs, E.; Cornel, J.; de Leeuw, M.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Dunselman, P.; Freericks, M.; Hamraoui, K.; Lenderlink, T.; Linssen, G.; Lodewick, P.; Lodewijks, C.; Lok, D.; Nierop, P.; Ronner, E.; Somsen, A.; van Dantzig, J.; van der Burgh, P.; van Kempen, L.; van Vlies, B.; Voors, A.; Wardeh, A.; Willems, F.; Dickstein, K.; Gundersen, T.; Hole, T.; Thalamus, J.; Westheim, A.; Dabrowski, M.; Gorski, J.; Korewicki, J.; Kuc, K.; Miekus, P.; Musial, W.; Niegowska, J.; Piotrowski, W.; Podolec, P.; Polonski, L.; Ponikowski, P.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Szelemej, R.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Ujda, M.; Wojciechowski, D; Wysokinski, A.; Camacho, A.; Fonseca, C.; Monteiro, P.; Apetrei, E.; Bruckner, I.; Carasca, E.; Coman, I.; Datcu, M.; Dragulescu, S.; Ionescu, P.; Iordachescu-Petica, D.; Manitiu, I.; Popa, V.; Pop-Moldovan, A.; Radoi, M.; Stamate, S.; Tomescu, M.; Vita, I.; Aroutiounov, G.; Ballyuzek, M.; Bart, B.; Churina, S.; Glezer, M.; Goloshchekin, B.; Ivleva, A.; Kobalava, Z.; Kostenko, V.; Lopatin, Y.; Martynov, A.; Orlov, V.; Semernin, E.; Shogenov, Z.; Sidorenko, B.; Skvortsov, A.; Storzhakov, G.; Sulimov, V.; Talibov, O.; Tereshenko, S.; Tsyrline, V.; Zadionchenko, V.; Zateyshchikov, D.; Dzupina, A.; Hranai, M.; Kmec, J.; Micko, K.; Murin, J.; Pella, D.; Sojka, G.; Spisak, V.; Vahala, P.; Vinanska, D.; Badat, A.; Bayat, J.; Dawood, S.; Delport, E.; Ellis, G.; Garda, R.; Klug, E.; Mabin, T.; Naidoo, D.; Pretorius, M.; Ranjith, N.; Van Zyl, L.; Weich, H.; Anguita, M.; Berrazueta, J.; Bruguera i Cortada, J.; de Teresa, E.; Gómez Sánchez, M.; González Juanatey, J.; Gonzalez-Maqueda, I.; Jordana, R.; Lupon, J.; Manzano, L.; Pascual Figal, D.; Pulpón, L.; Recio, J.; Ridocci Soriano, F.; Rodríguez Lambert, J.; Roig Minguell, E.; Roig Minguell, E.; Romero, J.; Valdovinos, P.; Klintberg, L.; Kronvall, T.; Lycksell, M.; Morner, S.; Rydberg, E.; Swedberg, K.; Timberg, I.; Wikstrom, G.; Moccetti, T.4; Ashok, J.; Banerjee, P.; Carr-White, G.; Cleland, J.; Connolly, E.; Francis, M.; Greenbaum, R.; Kadr, H.; Lindsay, S.; McMurray, J.; Megarry, S.; Memon, A.; Murdoch, D.; Senior, R.; Squire, I.; Tan, L.; Witte, K.; Adams, K.; Adamson, P.; Adler, A.; Altschul, L.; Altschuller, A.; Amirani, H.; Anand, I.; Andreou, C.; Ansari, M.; Antonishen, M.; Banchs, H.; Banerjee, S.; Banish, D.; Bank, A.; Barbagelata, A.; Barnard, D.; Bellinger, R.; Benn, A.; Berk, M.; Berry, B.; Bethala, V.; Bilazarian, S.; Bisognano, J.; Bleyer, F.; Blum, M.; Boehmer, J.; Bouchard, A.; Boyle, A.; Bozkurt, B.; Brown, C.; Burlew, B.; Burnham, K.; Butler, J.; Call, J.; Cambier, P.; Cappola, T.; Carlson, R.; Chandler, B.; Chandra, R.; Chandraratna, P.; Chernick, R.; Colan, D.; Colfer, H.; Colucci, W.; Connelly, T.; Costantini, O.; Dadkhah, S.; Dauber, I.; Davis, J.; Davis, S.; Denning, S.; Drazner, M.; Dunlap, S.; Egbujiobi, L.; Elkayam, U.; Elliott, J.; El-Shahawy, M.; Essandoh, L.; Ewald, G.; Fang, J.; Farhoud, H.; Felker, G.; Fernandez, J.; Festin, R.; Fishbein, G.; Florea, V.; Flores, E.; Floro, J.; Gabris, M.; Garg, M.; Gatewood, R.; Geller, M.; Ghali, J.; Ghumman, W.; Gibbs, G.; Gillespie, E.; Gilmore, R.; Gogia, H.; Goldberg, L.; Gradus-Pizlo, I.; Grainger, T.; Gudmundsson, G.; Gunawardena, D.; Gupta, D.; Hack, T.; Hall, S.; Hamroff, G.; Hankins, S.; Hanna, M.; Hargrove, J.; Haught, W.; Hauptman, P.; Hazelrigg, M.; Herzog, C.; Heywood, J.; Hill, T.; Hilton, T.; Hirsch, H.; Hunter, J.; Ibrahim, H.; Imburgia, M.; Iteld, B.; Jackson, B.; Jaffrani, N.; Jain, D.; Jain, A.; James, M.; Jimenez, J.; Johnson, E.; Kale, P.; Kaneshige, A.; Kapadia, S.; Karia, D.; Karlsberg, R.; Katholi, R.; Kerut, E.; Khoury, W.; Kipperman, R.; Klapholz, M.; Kosinski, E.; Kozinn, M.; Kraus, D.; Krueger, S.; Krum, H.; Kumar, S.; Lader, E.; Lee, C.; Levy, W.; Lewis, E.; Light-McGroary, K.; Loh, I.; Lombardi, W.; Machado, C.; Maislos, F.; Mancini, D.; Markus, T.; Mather, P.; McCants, K.; McGrew, F.; McLaurin, B.; McMillan, E.; McNamara, D.; Meyer, T.; Meymandi, S.; Miller, A.; Minami, E.; Modi, M.; Mody, F.; Mohanty, P.; Moscoso, R.; Moskowitz, R.; Moustafa, M.; Mullen, M.; Naz, T.; Noonan, T.; O'Brien, T.; Oellerich, W.; Oren, R.; Pamboukian, S.; Pereira, N.; Pitt, W.; Porter, C.; Prabhu, S.; Promisloff, S.; Ratkovec, R.; Richardson, R.; Ross, A.; Saleh, N.; Saltzberg, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schmedtje, J.; Schneider, R.; Schuyler, G.; Shanes, J.; Sharma, A.; Siegel, C.; Siegel, R.; Silber, D.; Singh, V.; Singh, N.; Singh, J.; Sklar, J.; Small, R.; Smith, A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smull, D.; Sotolongo, R.; Staniloae, C.; Stapleton, D.; Steele, P.; Stehlik, J.; Stein, M.; Tang, W.; Thadani, U.; Torre-Amoine, G.; Trichon, B.; Tsai, C.; Tummala, R.; Van Bakel, A.; Vicari, R.; Vijay, N.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Vittorio, T.; Vossler, M.; Wagoner, L.; Wallis, D.; Ward, N.; Widmer, M.; Wight, J.; Wilkins, C.; Williams, C.; Williams, G.; Winchester, M.; Winkel, E.; Wittmer, B.; Wood, D.; Wormer, D.; Wright, R.; Xu, Z.; Yasin, M.; Zolty, R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims This report describes the baseline characteristics of patients in the Reduction of Events with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure trial (RED-HF) which is testing the hypothesis that anaemia correction with darbepoetin alfa will reduce the composite endpoint of death from any cause or hospital admission for worsening heart failure, and improve other outcomes. Methods and results Key demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings, along with baseline treatment, are reported and compared with those of patients in other recent clinical trials in heart failure. Compared with other recent trials, RED-HF enrolled more elderly [mean age 70 (SD 11.4) years], female (41%), and black (9%) patients. RED-HF patients more often had diabetes (46%) and renal impairment (72% had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2). Patients in RED-HF had heart failure of longer duration [5.3 (5.4) years], worse NYHA class (35% II, 63% III, and 2% IV), and more signs of congestion. Mean EF was 30% (6.8%). RED-HF patients were well treated at randomization, and pharmacological therapy at baseline was broadly similar to that of other recent trials, taking account of study-specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Median (interquartile range) haemoglobin at baseline was 112 (106–117) g/L. Conclusion The anaemic patients enrolled in RED-HF were older, moderately to markedly symptomatic, and had extensive co-morbidity. PMID:23329651

  1. Arecibo Pulsar Survey Using ALFA. III. Precursor Survey and Population Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiggum, J. K.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Bates, S. D.; Champion, D. J.; Ransom, S. M.; Lazarus, P.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Nice, D. J.; Ellis, J.; Senty, T. R.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A. G.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) Survey uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° <~ l <~ 77° and 168° <~ l <~ 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| <~ 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA survey is sensitive to sources fainter and more distant than have previously been seen because of Arecibo's unrivaled sensitivity. In this paper we detail a precursor survey of this region with PALFA, which observed a subset of the full region (slightly more restrictive in l and |b| <~ 1°) and detected 45 pulsars. Detections included 1 known millisecond pulsar and 11 previously unknown, long-period pulsars. In the surveyed part of the sky that overlaps with the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey (36° <~ l <~ 50°), PALFA is probing deeper than the Parkes survey, with four discoveries in this region. For both Galactic millisecond and normal pulsar populations, we compare the survey's detections with simulations to model these populations and, in particular, to estimate the number of observable pulsars in the Galaxy. We place 95% confidence intervals of 82,000 to 143,000 on the number of detectable normal pulsars and 9000 to 100,000 on the number of detectable millisecond pulsars in the Galactic disk. These are consistent with previous estimates. Given the most likely population size in each case (107,000 and 15,000 for normal and millisecond pulsars, respectively), we extend survey detection simulations to predict that, when complete, the full PALFA survey should have detected 1000^{+330}_{-230} normal pulsars and 30^{+200}_{-20} millisecond pulsars. Identical estimation techniques predict that 490^{+160}_{-115} normal pulsars and 12^{+70}_{-5} millisecond pulsars would be detected by the beginning of 2014; at the time, the PALFA survey had detected 283 normal pulsars and 31 millisecond pulsars, respectively. We attribute the deficiency in normal pulsar detections predominantly to the radio frequency interference

  2. Arecibo pulsar survey using ALFA. III. Precursor survey and population synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Swiggum, J. K.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Bates, S. D.; Senty, T. R.; Champion, D. J.; Lazarus, P.; Ransom, S. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Nice, D. J.; Ellis, J.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; and others

    2014-06-01

    The Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) Survey uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° ≲ ℓ ≲ 77° and 168° ≲ ℓ ≲ 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| ≲ 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA survey is sensitive to sources fainter and more distant than have previously been seen because of Arecibo's unrivaled sensitivity. In this paper we detail a precursor survey of this region with PALFA, which observed a subset of the full region (slightly more restrictive in ℓ and |b| ≲ 1°) and detected 45 pulsars. Detections included 1 known millisecond pulsar and 11 previously unknown, long-period pulsars. In the surveyed part of the sky that overlaps with the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey (36° ≲ ℓ ≲ 50°), PALFA is probing deeper than the Parkes survey, with four discoveries in this region. For both Galactic millisecond and normal pulsar populations, we compare the survey's detections with simulations to model these populations and, in particular, to estimate the number of observable pulsars in the Galaxy. We place 95% confidence intervals of 82,000 to 143,000 on the number of detectable normal pulsars and 9000 to 100,000 on the number of detectable millisecond pulsars in the Galactic disk. These are consistent with previous estimates. Given the most likely population size in each case (107,000 and 15,000 for normal and millisecond pulsars, respectively), we extend survey detection simulations to predict that, when complete, the full PALFA survey should have detected 1000{sub −230}{sup +330} normal pulsars and 30{sub −20}{sup +200} millisecond pulsars. Identical estimation techniques predict that 490{sub −115}{sup +160} normal pulsars and 12{sub −5}{sup +70} millisecond pulsars would be detected by the beginning of 2014; at the time, the PALFA survey had detected 283 normal pulsars and 31 millisecond pulsars, respectively. We attribute the deficiency in normal pulsar detections

  3. A multicenter, open-label extension study of velaglucerase alfa in Japanese patients with Gaucher disease: Results after a cumulative treatment period of 24months.

    PubMed

    Ida, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akemi; Matsubayashi, Tomoko; Murayama, Kei; Hongo, Teruaki; Lee, Hak-Myung; Mellgard, Björn

    2016-07-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with exogenous glucocerebrosidase is indicated to treat symptomatic Gaucher disease (GD), a rare, inherited metabolic disorder. ERT with velaglucerase alfa, which is produced in a human cell line using gene activation technology, was studied in a 12-month phase III trial in Japanese patients with type 1 or 3 GD who were switched from imiglucerase ERT (n=6); the current, open-label, 12-month extension study was designed to assess longer-term safety and efficacy. Two adult and three pediatric patients (aged <18years) were enrolled into the extension study. Every-other-week intravenous infusions were administered for 63-78weeks at average doses between 51.5 and 60.7units/kg. Three non-serious adverse events were considered related to velaglucerase alfa treatment, but no patient discontinued from the study. Six serious but non-drug-related adverse events were reported. No patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Hemoglobin concentrations, platelet counts, and liver and spleen volumes (normalized to body weight) in these patients were generally stable over a cumulative 24-month period from the baseline of the parent trial. The data suggest that velaglucerase alfa was well tolerated and maintained clinical stability in Japanese GD patients over 2years after switching from imiglucerase. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01842841. PMID:27241455

  4. Hepatitis C virus treatment with pegylated interferon-alfa therapy leading to generalized interstitial granuloma annulare and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Usman; Li, Xin; Sodeman, Thomas; Daboul, Isam

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the diagnosis and management of a case of generalized granuloma annulare (GA) occurring in a 49-year-old man when being treated with pegylated interferon-alfa for hepatitis C infection. In our case, the GA lesions remained despite an undetectable hepatitis C viral load. The GA resolved only with treatment cessation. PMID:21317616

  5. Sebelipase alfa over 52 weeks reduces serum transaminases, liver volume and improves serum lipids in patients with lysosomal acid lipase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Malinova, Vera; Honzík, Tomas; Balwani, Manisha; Breen, Catherine; Deegan, Patrick B.; Enns, Gregory M.; Jones, Simon A.; Kane, John P.; Stock, Eveline O.; Tripuraneni, Radhika; Eckert, Stephen; Schneider, Eugene; Hamilton, Gavin; Middleton, Michael S.; Sirlin, Claude; Kessler, Bruce; Bourdon, Christopher; Boyadjiev, Simeon A.; Sharma, Reena; Twelves, Chris; Whitley, Chester B.; Quinn, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency is an autosomal recessive enzyme deficiency resulting in lysosomal accumulation of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. LAL-CL04, an ongoing extension study, investigates the long-term effects of sebelipase alfa, a recombinant human lysosomal acid lipase. Methods Sebelipase alfa (1 mg/kg or 3 mg/kg) was infused every-other-week to eligible subjects. Safety and tolerability assessments, including liver function, lipid profiles and liver volume assessment, were carried out at regular intervals. Results 216 infusions were administered to eight adult subjects through Week 52 during LAL-CL04. At Week 52, mean alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were normal with mean change from baseline of −58% and −40%. Mean change for low density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein were −60%, −39%, −36%, and +29%, respectively. Mean liver volume by magnetic resonance imaging and hepatic proton density fat fraction decreased (12% and 55%, respectively). Adverse events were mainly mild and unrelated to sebelipase alfa. Infusion-related reactions were uncommon: three events of moderate severity were reported in two subjects; one patient's event was suggestive of hypersensitivity-like reaction, but additional testing did not confirm this, and the subject has successfully re-started sebelipase alfa. Of samples tested to date, no anti-drug antibodies have been detected. Conclusions Long-term dosing with sebelipase alfa in Lysosomal Acid Lipase-Deficient patients is well tolerated and produces sustained reductions in transaminases, improvements in serum lipid profile and reduction in hepatic fat fraction. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial in children and adults is underway (ARISE: NCT01757184). PMID:24993530

  6. The ALFA (Activity Log Files Aggregation) Toolkit: A Method for Precise Observation of the Consultation

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    a significant difference, with EMIS PCS (Egton Medical Information Systems Limited, Leeds, UK) (P = .007), iSoft Synergy (iSOFT, Banbury, UK) (P = .014), and INPS Vision (INPS, London, UK) (P = .006) facilitating faster coding. In contrast, prescribing was fastest with EMIS LV (mean 23.7 s, 95% CI 20.5-26.8), but nonparametric comparison showed no statistically significant difference. UML sequence diagrams showed that the simplest BP recording interface was not the easiest to use, as users spent longer navigating or looking up previous blood pressures separately. Complex interfaces with free-text boxes left clinicians unsure of what to add. Conclusions The ALFA method allows the precise observation of the clinical consultation. It enables rigorous comparison of core elements of EPR systems. Pilot data suggests its capacity to demonstrate differences between systems. Its outputs could provide the evidence base for making more objective choices between systems. PMID:18812313

  7. Pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2a for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Kazuaki; Konndo, Takeshi; Okada, Shunichi; Enchi, Machiko

    2010-09-27

    We report a case of pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with biological signs of a lupus-like syndrome due to pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy during treatment for chronic hepatitis C. The patient developed moderate weakness in the lower limbs and dyspnea. He was hospitalized for congestive heart failure. An electrocardiogram showed gradual ST-segment elevation in leads V(1) through V(6) without coronary artery disease. A transthoracic cardiac ultrasonographic study revealed moderate pericardial effusion with normal left ventricular function. Anti-DNA antibody and antids DNA IgM were positive. Neurological examination revealed a symmetrical predominantly sensory polyneuropathy with impairment of light touch and pin prick in globe and stoking-like distribution. Treatment with prednisolone improved the pericarditis and motor nerve disturbance and the treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the sensory nerve disturbance. PMID:21161021

  8. Pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2a for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Kazuaki; Konndo, Takeshi; Okada, Shunichi; Enchi, Machiko

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with biological signs of a lupus-like syndrome due to pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy during treatment for chronic hepatitis C. The patient developed moderate weakness in the lower limbs and dyspnea. He was hospitalized for congestive heart failure. An electrocardiogram showed gradual ST-segment elevation in leads V1 through V6 without coronary artery disease. A transthoracic cardiac ultrasonographic study revealed moderate pericardial effusion with normal left ventricular function. Anti-DNA antibody and antids DNA IgM were positive. Neurological examination revealed a symmetrical predominantly sensory polyneuropathy with impairment of light touch and pin prick in globe and stoking-like distribution. Treatment with prednisolone improved the pericarditis and motor nerve disturbance and the treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the sensory nerve disturbance. PMID:21161021

  9. Daclatasvir vs telaprevir plus peginterferon alfa/ribavirin for hepatitis C virus genotype 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Ira; Zeuzem, Stefan; Flisiak, Robert; Knysz, Brygida; Lueth, Stefan; Zarebska-Michaluk, Dorota; Janczewska, Ewa; Ferenci, Peter; Diago, Moises; Zignego, Anna Linda; Safadi, Rifaat; Baruch, Yaacov; Abdurakhmanov, Dzhamal; Shafran, Stephen; Thabut, Dominique; Bruck, Rafael; Gadano, Adrian; Thompson, Alexander James; Kopit, Justin; McPhee, Fiona; Michener, Tracy; Hughes, Eric A; Yin, Philip D; Noviello, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate daclatasvir vs telaprevir, each combined with peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin (pegIFN/RBV), in treatment-naive hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (GT) 1-infected patients. METHODS: In this phase 3, randomized, open-label, noninferiority study, 602 patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to daclatasvir vs telaprevir, stratified by IL28B rs12979860 host genotype (CC vs non-CC), cirrhosis status (compensated cirrhosis vs no cirrhosis), and HCV GT1 subtype (GT1a vs GT1b). Patients were selected by study inclusion criteria from a total of 793 enrolled patients. Patients received daclatasvir 60 mg once daily or telaprevir 750 mg 3 times daily plus pegIFN/RBV. Daclatasvir recipients received 24 wk of daclatasvir plus pegIFN/RBV; those without an extended rapid virologic response (eRVR; undetectable HCV-RNA at weeks 4 and 12) received an additional 24 wk of pegIFN/RBV. Telaprevir-treated patients received 12 wk of telaprevir plus pegIFN/RBV followed by 12 (with eRVR) or 36 (no eRVR) wk of pegIFN/RBV. The primary objective was to compare for noninferiority of sustained virologic response rates at posttreatment week 12 (SVR12) in GT1b-infected patients. Key secondary objectives were to demonstrate that the rates of anemia (hemoglobin < 10 g/dL) and rash-related events, through week 12, were lower with daclatasvir + pegIFN/RBV than with telaprevir + pegIFN/RBV among GT1b-infected patients. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing of the NS5A region for all patients at baseline, and for patients with virologic failure or relapse and HCV-RNA ≥ 1000 IU/mL, to investigate any link between NS5A polymorphisms associated with daclatasvir resistance and virologic outcome. RESULTS: Patient demographics and disease characteristics were generally balanced across treatment arms; however, there was a higher proportion of black/African Americans in the daclatasvir groups (6.0% and 8.2% in the GT1b and GT1a groups, respectively) than in the

  10. 21 CFR 558.265 - Halofuginone hydrobromide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... use. (1) It is used in feed for broiler chickens as follows: (i) Amount. 2.72 grams per ton. (A... sole ration to replacement broiler breeder chickens until 16 weeks of age. Use as the sole source of... used in feed for replacement cage laying chickens and replacement broiler breeder chickens as...

  11. Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis due to Hepatitis C Virus (CH-C) in India: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Daily Interferon-alfa-2b and Ribavirin with Daily Interferon-alfa-2b and Glycyrrhizin—A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Subrat K; Sreenivas, V; Gupta, Siddharth Datta; Kumar, Shakti; Chawla, Yogesh K; Tandon, Anurag; Habeeb, Aejaz; Kar, Premashish; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Sarin, Shiv K; Amarapurkar, DN; Arankalle, Vidya; Gupte, Mohan D; Gupta, Sushma; Mukherjee, Deepali; Seth, Divya; Goyal, Rohit; Tandon, Badri N

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim Pegylated-interferon-alfa (PEG-IFN-α) with ribavirin is an established treatment in chronic hepatitis due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) (CH-C). Such treatment is expensive and in resource-poor countries such as India, alternative less expensive therapy is needed. Methods Multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing two treatment regimens (interferon-alfa-2b [IFN-α-2b] 3 million unit/day [MU/day] and ribavirin 1000 mg/day [I+R] vs IFN-α-2b 3 MU/day and glycyrrhizin 250 mg [I+G]) in CH-C. Viral, host characteristics and therapeutic responses were assessed (ICMR—6 months trial for chronic hepatitis—CTRI/2008/091/000105). Results One hundred and thirty-one patients meeting the inclusion criteria were randomized to I + G (n=64) or I+R (n=67) during the period February 2002 to May 2005. About 85% (I+G=53, I+R=58) completed 6 months of treatment and 89% of them (I+G=46, I+R=53) completed 6 months of follow-up after completion of treatment. Hepatitis C virus genotype 3 was the major type detected (71% patients). The mean log10 viral load (copies/mL), histological activity index, and fibrosis stage for all patients were 5.1 ± 0.98, 5 ± 2, and 2± 1.5, respectively. Sustained viral response (SVR) was significantly higher in I + R group than in I + G group (65.7% vs 46.9%, OR=2.2, P = 0.03). Treatment with I + G was associated with significantly lower frequencies of leukopenia (2% vs 17%, P <0.01) and anemia (8% vs 40%, P <0.001) as compared to treatment with I + R. Conclusion Genotype 3 HCV infection with low viral load is prevalent in India. Daily IFN with ribavirin showed significantly better responses. Leukopenia and anemia were significantly more in ribavirin group. Responses observed with IFN + ribavirin were similar to the reported response rates with PEG-IFN suggesting that this modality may be considered as a cheaper alternative of treatment for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:25755401

  12. PHOENIX: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Peginterferon Alfa-2a Plus Ribavirin as a Prophylactic Treatment After Liver Transplantation for Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bzowej, Natalie; Nelson, David R.; Terrault, Norah A.; Everson, Gregory T.; Teng, Lichen L.; Prabhakar, Avinash; Charlton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy, tolerability, and safety of the prophylactic treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) after liver transplantation (LT) with peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin are not known. LT recipients with HCV were randomized to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin treatment or observation 10 to 26 weeks post-LT. Prophylaxis patients received peginterferon alfa-2a (135 μg/week for 4 weeks and then 180 μg/week for 44 weeks) plus ribavirin (the initial dose of 400 mg/day was escalated to 1200 mg/day). Observation patients received the same regimen only upon significant HCV recurrence (histological activity index ≥ 3 and/or fibrosis score ≥ 2). The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with histological evidence of significant HCV recurrence 120 weeks after randomization. In all, 115 patients were randomized (prophylaxis arm, n = 55; observation arm, n = 60). Sustained virological response was achieved by 12 of 54 prophylaxis patients (22.2%) and by 3 of 14 observation patients who switched to treatment (21.4%). On an intent-to-treat basis, significant HCV recurrence at 120 weeks was similar in the prophylaxis (61.8%) and observation arms (65.0%, P = 0.725). The patient and graft survival rates and the rates of biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection were similar in the 2 study arms. Approximately 70% of the treated patients in both arms had at least one dose reduction for safety reasons. The most common adverse event leading to treatment withdrawal was anemia. Because of the safety profile of peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin and the lack of a clear benefit in terms of HCV recurrence and patient or graft survival, this study does not support the routine use of prophylactic antiviral therapy. PMID:21506241

  13. Phase 2, single-arm trial to evaluate the effectiveness of darbepoetin alfa for correcting anaemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilove, Janice; Paquette, Ronald; Lyons, Roger M; Mushtaq, Chaudhry; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Tomita, Dianne; Dreiling, Lyndah

    2008-01-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) often develop anaemia resulting in frequent transfusions and fatigue. Darbepoetin alfa is an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) approved for treating chemotherapy-induced anaemia. This single-arm, phase 2 study examined the efficacy of darbepoetin alfa 500 μg every 3 weeks (Q3W) for treating anaemia in low-risk MDS patients (after 6 weeks, poor responders received darbepoetin alfa 500 μg every 2 weeks). The primary end-point was the incidence of erythroid responses (International Working Group criteria) after 13 weeks of therapy. Secondary end-points included the incidence of erythroid responses at weeks 28 and 55, [or weeks 27 and 53 for dose escalations to every two weeks (Q2W)], and safety parameters. Analyses were stratified by the patient's previous ESA therapy status [ESA-naïve (n = 144) vs. prior ESA-treated (n = 62)]. After 13 weeks of therapy, 49% of ESA-naïve patients and 26% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved a major erythroid response. After 53/55 weeks, 59% of ESA-naïve patients and 34% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved a major erythroid response; 82% of ESA-naïve patients and 55% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved target haemoglobin of 110 g/l. Thromboembolic or related adverse events occurred in 2% of patients; no pulmonary embolisms were reported. In conclusion, darbepoetin alfa, 500 μg Q3W appeared well tolerated and increased haemoglobin levels in low-risk MDS patients. PMID:18540943

  14. A Saudi Gastroenterology Association Position Statement on the Use of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alfa Antagonists for the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Mahmoud H.; Al-Harbi, Othman; Feagan, Brian G.; Almadi, Majid A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this position statement from the Saudi Gastroenterology Association is to guide gastroenterologists on the use of tumor necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-α) antagonists for the treatment of the idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. In this article, we summarize the relevant literature regarding the safety and efficacy of TNF-α antagonists, highlight relevant safety concerns specific to the environment in Saudi Arabia, and provide specific recommendations for the use of these agents. PMID:26228361

  15. Safety and efficacy of turoctocog alfa (NovoEight®) during surgery in patients with haemophilia A: results from the multinational guardian™ clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Santagostino, E; Lentz, S R; Misgav, M; Brand, B; Chowdary, P; Savic, A; Kilinc, Y; Amit, Y; Amendola, A; Solimeno, L P; Saugstrup, T; Matytsina, I

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) products provide a safe and efficacious replacement therapy for prevention and treatment of bleeding episodes in patients with haemophilia A. The present investigations from the multinational, open-label guardian™ clinical trials assessed the haemostatic response of turoctocog alfa (NovoEight®), a rFVIII product, in patients with severe haemophilia A (FVIII ≤ 1%) undergoing surgery. All patients had a minimum of 50 exposure days to any FVIII product prior to surgery and no history of inhibitors. A total of 41 procedures (13 orthopaedic, 19 dental and 9 general) were performed in 33 patients aged 4–59 years. Of the 41 procedures, 15 were major surgeries in 13 patients and 26 were minor surgeries in 21 patients. The success rate for haemostatic response was 100% (success was defined as ‘excellent’ or ‘good’ haemostatic outcome). Turoctocog alfa consumption on the day of surgery ranged from 27 to 153 IU kg−1. The mean daily dose declined over time, while retaining adequate FVIII coverage as measured by trough levels. Overall, no safety issues were identified. No thrombotic events were observed and none of the patients developed FVIII inhibitors. In conclusion, the present results show that turoctocog alfa was effective in controlling blood loss by obtaining a sufficient haemostatic response in patients with severe haemophilia A undergoing surgery. PMID:25273984

  16. Safety and Efficacy of Combination Immunotherapy With Interferon Alfa-2b and Tremelimumab in Patients With Stage IV Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Cherian, John; Moschos, Stergios J.; Tawbi, Hussein A.; Shuai, Yongli; Gooding, William E.; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that the combination of tremelimumab and interferon alfa-2b acting via different and possibly synergistic mechanisms would overcome tumor immune tolerance and lead to significant and durable clinical responses. Patients and Methods We conducted a phase II study in which patients were administered tremelimumab 15 mg/kg/course (three cycles [one cycle = 4 weeks]) intravenously every 12 weeks. High-dose interferon alfa-2b (HDI) was administered concurrently, including intravenous induction at 20 MU/m2/d for 5 d/wk for 4 weeks followed by maintenance at 10 MU/m2/d subcutaneously three times a week for 8 weeks per course. From course 2 onward, HDI maintenance was administered subcutaneously. Results Thirty-seven patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage IV (9M1a, 6M1b, and 22M1c) were enrolled. Two patients had previously treated brain metastases. Grades 3 and 4 toxicities included neutropenia (six patients; 17%), diarrhea/colitis (four patients; 11%), liver enzyme increase (four patients; 11%), rash (four patients; 11%), fatigue (15 patients; 40%), and anxiety/depression (five patients; 14%). Response data were available for 35 patients. The best objective response rate (RR; Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) by intention to treat was 24% (90% CI, 13% to 36%; four complete responses [CRs] and five partial responses [PRs] that lasted 6, 6, > 12, > 14, > 18, 20, > 28, 30, and > 37 months, respectively). Fourteen patients (38%) had stable disease (SD) that lasted 1.5 to 21 months. The median progression-free survival was 6.4 months (95% CI, 3.3 to 12.1 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 21 months (95% CI, 9.5 to not reached). There was a weak association between therapy-induced autoimmunity and clinical benefits (CR/PR/SD; P = .0059), baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) less than or equal to 2.7× the upper limit of normal and clinical benefits (P = .0494) and improved probability of survival (P = .0032

  17. Age-related differences in response to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, Claudia; Jordan, Sabine; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Hueppe, Dietrich; Mauss, Stefan; Zehnter, Elmar; Stoll, Sabine; Alshuth, Ulrich; Lohse, Ansgar W; Lueth, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin therapy in elderly patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. METHODS: Patients characteristics, treatment results and safety profiles of 4859 patients with hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection receiving treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin were retrieved from a large ongoing German multicentre non-interventional study. Recommended treatment duration was 24 wk for GT 2 and GT 3 infection and 48 wk for GT 1 and GT 4 infection. Patients were stratified according to age (< 60 years vs ≥ 60 years). Because of limited numbers of liver biopsies for further assessment of liver fibrosis APRI (aspartate aminotransferase - platelet ratio index) was performed using pre-treatment laboratory data. RESULTS: Out of 4859 treated HCV patients 301 (6.2%) were ≥ 60 years. There were more women (55.8% vs 34.2%, P < 0.001) and predominantly GT 1 (81.4% vs 57.3%, P < 0.001) infected patients in the group of patients aged ≥ 60 years and they presented more frequently with metabolic (17.6% vs 4.5%, P < 0.001) and cardiovascular comorbidities (32.6% vs 6.7%, P < 0.001) and significant fibrosis and cirrhosis (F3/4 31.1% vs 14.0%, P = 0.0003). Frequency of dose reduction and treatment discontinuation were significantly higher in elderly patients (30.9% vs 13.7%, P < 0.001 and 47.8% vs 30.8%, P < 0.001). Main reason for treatment discontinuation was “virological non-response” (26.6% vs 13.6%). Sustained virological response (SVR) rates showed an age related difference in patients with genotype 1 (23.7% vs 43.7%, P < 0.001) but not in genotype 2/3 infections (57.7% vs 64.6%, P = 0.341). By multivariate analysis, age and stage of liver disease were independent factors of SVR. CONCLUSION: Elderly HCV patients differ in clinical characteristics and treatment outcome from younger patients and demand special attention from their practitioner. PMID:25152602

  18. Lichen planus induced by pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy in a patient monitored for delta hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Safak; Arslan, Eyup; Baysal, Birol; Baykara, Sule Nergiz; Uzun, Ozlem Ceren; Kaya, Sehmuz

    2015-01-01

    Interferons are used for treatment of chronic hepatitis B. They can induce or exacerbate some skin disorders, such as lichen planus. In this study, as we know, we presented the first case developing lichen planus while receiving interferon treatment due to delta hepatitis. A 31-year-old male patient presented to our outpatient clinic with HBsAg positivity. With his analyses, HBV DNA was negative, anti-delta total was positive, ALT was 72 U/L (upper limit 41 U/L), and platelet was 119 000/mm(3). He was therefore started on subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy at 180 mcg/week for delta hepatitis. At month 4 of therapy, the patient developed diffuse eroded lace-like lesions in oral mucosa, white plaques on lips, and itchy papular lesions in the hands and feet. Lichen planus was considered by the dermatology clinic and topical treatment (mometasone furoate) was given. The lesions persisted at month 5 of therapy and biopsy samples were obtained from oral mucosal lesions and interferon dose was reduced to 135 mcg/week. Biopsy demonstrated nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium; epithelial acanthosis, spongiosis, and apoptotic bodies were observed in the epidermis and therefore lichen planus was considered. At month 6 of therapy, lesions did not improve and even progressed and interferon treatment was therefore discontinued. PMID:25821612

  19. Biological modifiers (etretinate (changed from etetrinate) and alfa 2a) in the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Guzmán, R; García, E L; Díaz-Maqueo, J C

    1996-02-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of biological modifiers in combination etetrinate, 0.8 mg/kg/day, po and interferon alfa 2a 9.0 MU, three times at week) in the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTLC) we began a clinical study on 12 heavily treated patients. After 1 year on treatment 10/12 patients (83%) achieved complete response. Two patients were considered failures with disease progression. After a median follow-up of 3 years, seven patients (56%) remained in complete remission. Toxicity was mild. All patients received 93% of the planned dose of etetrinate and interferon. We feel that biological modifiers, as etetrinate and interferons, are agents with limited hematological toxicity even in higher doses. The combination of two agents, with different mechanisms of action, could improve the outcome in patients with refractory CTCL. Controlled trials are necessary to define the roles of this type of therapy as first line of treatment. PMID:10851517

  20. Arecibo Pulsar Survey Using ALFA. IV. Mock Spectrometer Data Analysis, Survey Sensitivity, and the Discovery of 40 Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, P.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Swiggum, J.; Zhu, W. W.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Ferdman, R.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2015-10-01

    The on-going Arecibo Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) survey began in 2004 and is searching for radio pulsars in the Galactic plane at 1.4 GHz. Here we present a comprehensive description of one of its main data reduction pipelines that is based on the PRESTO software and includes new interference-excision algorithms and candidate selection heuristics. This pipeline has been used to discover 40 pulsars, bringing the survey’s discovery total to 144 pulsars. Of the new discoveries, eight are millisecond pulsars (MSPs; P\\lt 10 ms) and one is a Fast Radio Burst (FRB). This pipeline has also re-detected 188 previously known pulsars, 60 of them previously discovered by the other PALFA pipelines. We present a novel method for determining the survey sensitivity that accurately takes into account the effects of interference and red noise: we inject synthetic pulsar signals with various parameters into real survey observations and then attempt to recover them with our pipeline. We find that the PALFA survey achieves the sensitivity to MSPs predicted by theoretical models but suffers a degradation for P≳ 100 ms that gradually becomes up to ˜10 times worse for P\\gt 4 {{s}} at {DM}\\lt 150 pc cm-3. We estimate 33 ± 3% of the slower pulsars are missed, largely due to red noise. A population synthesis analysis using the sensitivity limits we measured suggests the PALFA survey should have found 224 ± 16 un-recycled pulsars in the data set analyzed, in agreement with the 241 actually detected. The reduced sensitivity could have implications on estimates of the number of long-period pulsars in the Galaxy.

  1. HI content and other structural properties of galaxies in the Virgo cluster from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Giovanelli, R.; Haynes, M. P.; Fabello, S.; Fumagalli, M.; Kent, B. R.; Koopmann, R. A.; Brosch, N.; Hoffman, G. L.; Salzer, J. J.; Boselli, A.

    2008-04-01

    We report the results of an HI blind survey of 80 deg2 of the Virgo cluster, based on the 08° ≤ δ ≤ 16° strip of ALFALFA, the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey. 187 HI sources of high significance are found providing a complete census of HI sources in this region of the Virgo cluster (-1000

  2. Interferon Stimulated Gene Expression in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients Treated with Nitazoxanide/Peginterferon-Alfa-2a and Ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Tess; Lee, Yu-Jin; Osinusi, Anu; Amorosa, Valerianna K; Wang, Crystal; Kang, Minhee; Matining, Roy; Zhang, Xiao; Dou, Diana; Umbleja, Triin; Kottilil, Shyam; Peters, Marion G

    2016-07-01

    A combination of nitazoxanide (NTZ), peginterferon (PegIFN), and ribavirin (RBV) may result in higher sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in hepatitis C virus (HCV) monoinfected patients. This study evaluated the effect of NTZ on interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in vitro and in vivo among HIV/HCV genotype-1 (GT-1) treatment-naive patients. The ability of NTZ to enhance host response to interferon (IFN) signaling using the HCV cell culture system was initially evaluated. Second, ISG expression in 53 patients with treatment outcomes [21 SVR and 32 nonresponders (NR)] in the ACTG A5269 trial, a phase-II study (4-week lead in of NTZ 500 mg daily followed by 48 weeks of NTZ, PegIFN, and weight-based RBV), was assessed. The relative expression of 48 ISGs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured at baseline, week 4, and week 8 of treatment in a blinded manner. In vitro NTZ produced a direct and additive antiviral effect with IFN-alfa, with pretreatment of NTZ resulting in maximal HCV suppression. NTZ augmented IFN-mediated ISG induction in PBMCs from relapsers and SVRs (p < 0.05), but not NR. In ACTG A5269, baseline expression of most ISGs was similar between NR and SVR. NTZ minimally induced 17 genes in NR and 13 genes in SVR after 4 weeks of therapy. However, after initiation of PegIFN and RBV, ISG induction was predominantly observed in the SVR group and not NR group. NTZ treatment facilitates IFN-induced suppression of HCV replication. Inability to achieve SVR with IFN-based therapy in this clinical trial is associated with diminished ISG response to therapy that is refractory to NTZ. PMID:26974581

  3. Co-treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and entecavir for hepatitis D: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaigham; Memon, Mohammad Sadik; Umer, Muhammad Amir; Abbas, Minaam; Shazi, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of pegylated interferon alfa (PEG-IFNα) therapy with and without entecavir in patients with chronic hepatitis D. METHODS: Forty hepatitis D virus (HDV) RNA positive patients were randomized to receive either PEG-IFNα-2a 180 μg weekly in combination with entecavir 0.5 mg daily (n = 21) or PEG-IFNα alone (n =19). Patients who failed to show 2 log reduction in HDV RNA level at 24 wk of treatment, or had detectable HDV RNA at 48 wk of therapy were considered as treatment failure. Treatment was continued for 72 wk in the rest of the patients. All the patients were followed for 24 wk post treatment. Intention to treat analysis was performed. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 26.7 ± 6.8 years, 31 were male. Two log reduction in HDV RNA levels at 24 wk of therapy was achieved in 9 (43%) patients receiving combination therapy and 12 (63%) patients receiving PEG-IFNα alone (P = 0.199). Decline in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels was insignificant. At the end of treatment, HDV RNA was negative in 8 patients (38%) receiving combination therapy and 10 patients (53%) receiving PEG-IFNα-2a alone. Virological response persisted in 7 (33%) and 8 (42%) patients, respectively at the end of the 24 wk follow-up period. One responder patient in the combination arm lost HBsAg and became hepatitis B surface antibody positive. Six out of 14 baseline hepatitis B e antigen reactive patients seroconverted and four of these seroconverted patients had persistent HDV RNA clearance. CONCLUSION: Administration of PEG-IFNα-2a with or without entecavir, resulted in persistent HDV RNA clearance in 37% of patients. The addition of entecavir did not improve the overall response. PMID:27190579

  4. Nanomedicines in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection in Asian patients: optimizing use of peginterferon alfa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Hua; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Asia is endemic for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which is the leading cause of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation worldwide. HCV has six major genotypes and each HCV genotype has its specific geographic distribution. HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 6 are common in Asia. The aim of HCV treatment is to eradicate the virus by effective therapeutic agents; viral clearance is durable after long-term post-treatment follow-up. In most Asian countries, peginterferon alfa (PEG-IFN α) in combination with ribavirin remains the standard of care, and the overall sustained viral response (SVR) rate in Asian HCV patients is higher than that in Western patients. The differences are most significant in patients with HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1) infection, which is attributed to the higher frequency of IFN-responsive or favorable interleukin-28B (IL-28B) genotype in Asian populations than in other ethnic populations. In addition, the introduction of response-guided therapy, where the optimized treatment duration is based on the early viral kinetics during the first 12 weeks of treatment, increases the SVR rate. Recently, telaprevir or boceprevir-based triple therapy was found to further improve the SVR rate in treated and untreated HCV-1 patients and has become the new standard of care in Western and some Asian countries. Many novel direct-acting antiviral agents, either in combination with PEG-IFN α plus ribavirin or used as IFN-free regimens are under active investigation. At the time of this writing, simeprevir and sofosbuvir have been approved in the US. Because the SVR rates in Asian HCV patients receiving PEG-IFN α plus ribavirin therapy are high, health care providers should judiciously determine the clinical usefulness of these novel agents on the basis of treatment duration, anticipated viral responses, patient tolerance, financial burdens, and drug accessibility. PMID:24812506

  5. A comparison of menotropin, highly-purified menotropin and follitropin alfa in cycles of intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sandro C; Schertz, Joan C; Verza, Sidney; Schneider, Danielle T; Zabaglia, Silval FC

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last several decades, as a result of an evolution in manufacturing processes, a marked development has been made in the field of gonadotropins for ovarian stimulation. Initially, therapeutic gonadotropins were produced from a simple process of urine extraction and purification; now they are produced via a complex system involving recombinant technology, which yields gonadotropins with high levels of purity, quality, and consistency. Methods A retrospective analysis of 865 consecutive intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) compared the clinical efficacy of three gonadotropins (menotropin [hMG; n = 299], highly-purified hMG [HP-hMG; n = 330] and follitropin alfa [r-hFSH; n = 236]) for ovarian stimulation after pituitary down-regulation. The endpoints were live birth rates and total doses of gonadotropin per cycle and per pregnancy. Results Laboratory and clinical protocols remained unchanged over time, except for the type of gonadotropin used, which was introduced sequentially (hMG, then HP-hMG, and finally r-hFSH). Live birth rates were not significantly different for hMG (24.4%), HP-hMG (32.4%) and r-hFSH (30.1%; p = 0.09) groups. Total dose of gonadotropin per cycle was significantly higher in the hMG (2685 +/- 720 IU) and HP-hMG (2903 +/- 867 IU) groups compared with the r-hFSH-group (2268 +/- 747 IU; p < 0.001). Total dose of gonadotropin required to achieve clinical pregnancy was 15.7% and 11.0% higher for the hMG and HP-hMG groups, respectively, compared with the r-hFSH group, and for live births, the differences observed were 45.3% and 19.8%, respectively. Conclusion Although similar live birth rates were achieved, markedly lower doses of r-hFSH were required compared with hMG or HP-hMG. PMID:19828024

  6. Hepatitis B surface antigen clearance in inactive hepatitis B surface antigen carriers treated with peginterferon alfa-2a

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Hui; Xie, Yao; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Yao; Shen, Ge; Wu, Shu-Ling; Chang, Min; Mu, Cai-Qin; Hu, Lei-Ping; Hua, Wen-Hao; Song, Shu-Jing; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Cheng, Jun; Xu, Dao-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association between interferon (IFN) therapy and loss of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in inactive HBsAg carriers. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study in inactive HBsAg carriers, who were treatment-naive, with a serum HBsAg level < 100 IU/mL and an undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level (< 100 IU/mL). All the 20 treated patients received subcutaneous PEG-IFN alfa-2a 180 μg/wk for 72 wk and were then followed for 24 wk. There were 40 untreated controls matched with 96 wk of observation. Serum HBsAg, HBV DNA, and alanine aminotransferases were monitored every 3 mo in the treatment group and every 3-6 mo in the control group. RESULTS: Thirteen (65.0%) of 20 treated patients achieved HBsAg loss, 12 of whom achieved HBsAg seroconversion. Mean HBsAg level in treated patients decreased to 6.69 ± 13.04 IU/mL after 24 wk of treatment from a baseline level of 26.22 ± 33.00 IU/mL. Serum HBV DNA level remained undetectable (< 100 IU/mL) in all treated patients during the study. HBsAg level of the control group decreased from 25.72 ± 25.58 IU/mL at baseline to 17.11 ± 21.62 IU/mL at week 96 (P = 0.108). In the control group, no patient experienced HBsAg loss/seroconversion, and two (5.0%) developed HBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: IFN treatment results in HBsAg loss and seroconversion in a considerable proportion of inactive HBsAg carriers with low HBsAg concentrations. PMID:27239256

  7. Benefit of Treatment Individualization in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Receiving Peginterferon Alfa-2a and Ribavirin in a Large Noninterventional Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Wolf Peter; Mauss, Stefan; Lutz, Thomas; Schober, Andreas; Böker, Klaus; Moog, Gero; Baumgarten, Axel; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Alshuth, Ulrich; Hüppe, Dietrich; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P.; Schott, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Individualization of treatment with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C showed benefit in controlled trials and was implemented in treatment guidelines to increase response rates and to reduce side effects and costs. However, it is unknown whether individualization was adopted in routine daily practice and whether it translated into improved outcomes. Methods From a large noninterventional cohort study, clinical and virologic response data of 10,262 HCV patients who received peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011 were analyzed. To account for treatment individualization, a matched-pair analysis (2,997 matched pairs) was performed. Variation in treatment duration and dosing of ribavirin were analyzed as indicators for individualization. Results Sustained virological response (SVR) rates were similar between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011 (62.0% vs. 63.7%). Patients with comorbidities were more abundant in the later period, (44.3% vs. 57.1%). The subsequent matched-pair analysis demonstrated higher SVR rates in the 2008-2011 period (64.3%) than in the 2003-2007 period (61.2%, p=0.008). More patients received abbreviated or extended treatment regimens in the later than the earlier period as an indicator of treatment individualization. To the same end, ribavirin doses were higher in the later period (12.6 versus 11.6 mg/kg/day). Factors independently associated with SVR included HCV genotype, low baseline viral load, younger age, route of infection, absence of concomitant diseases, lower APRI score, normal gamma-GT, higher ribavirin doses, no substitution for drug abuse, treatment duration, and treatment in the 2008-2011 period. Conclusions Treatment individualization with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin was implemented in daily routine between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011, SVR rates improved in the same period. These findings may be most relevant in resource-limited settings. PMID:26230998

  8. Safety and physiological effects of two different doses of elosulfase alfa in patients with morquio a syndrome: A randomized, double‐blind, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Barbara K.; Berger, Kenneth I.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Treadwell, Marsha; Mitchell, John J.; Muschol, Nicole; Jones, Simon A.; Sutton, V. Reid; Pastores, Gregory M.; Lau, Heather; Sparkes, Rebecca; Genter, Fred; Shaywitz, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    The primary treatment outcomes of a phase 2, randomized, double‐blind, pilot study evaluating safety, physiological, and pharmacological effects of elosulfase alfa in patients with Morquio A syndrome are herewith presented. Patients aged ≥7 years and able to walk ≥200 m in the 6‐min walk test (6MWT) were randomized to elosulfase alfa 2.0 or 4.0 mg/kg/week for 27 weeks. The primary objective was to evaluate the safety of both doses. Secondary objectives were to evaluate effects on endurance (6MWT and 3‐min stair climb test [3MSCT]), exercise capacity (cardio‐pulmonary exercise test [CPET]), respiratory function, muscle strength, cardiac function, pain, and urine keratan sulfate (uKS) levels, and to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. Twenty‐five patients were enrolled (15 randomized to 2.0 mg/kg/week and 10 to 4.0 mg/kg/week). No new or unexpected safety signals were observed. After 24 weeks, there were no improvements versus baseline in the 6MWT, yet numerical improvements were seen in the 3MSCT with 4.0 mg/kg/week. uKS and pharmacokinetic data suggested no linear relationship over the 2.0–4.0 mg/kg dose range. Overall, an abnormal exercise capacity (evaluated in 10 and 5 patients in the 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg/week groups, respectively), impaired muscle strength, and considerable pain were observed at baseline, and there were trends towards improvements in all domains after treatment. In conclusion, preliminary data of this small study in a Morquio A population with relatively good endurance confirmed the acceptable safety profile of elosulfase alfa and showed a trend of increased exercise capacity and muscle strength and decreased pain. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26069231

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, acyline, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, AEE-788, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, AK-602, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, alprazolam, amdoxovir, AMG-162, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, aminophylline hydrate, anakinra, anecortave acetate, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, APC-8015, aripiprazole, aspirin, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin calcium, atrasentan, AVE-5883, AZD-2171; Betamethasone dipropionate, bevacizumab, bimatoprost, biphasic human insulin (prb), bortezomib, BR-A-657, BRL-55730, budesonide, busulfan; Calcipotriol, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, calcium folinate, capecitabine, capravirine, carmustine, caspofungin acetate, cefdinir, certolizumab pegol, CG-53135, chlorambucil, ciclesonide, ciclosporin, cisplatin, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clozapine, co-trimoxazole, CP-122721, creatine, CY-2301, cyclophosphamide, cypher, cytarabine, cytolin; D0401, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, DASB, desipramine hydrochloride, desloratadine, desvenlafaxine succinate, dexamethasone, didanosine, diquafosol tetrasodium, docetaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecallantide, efalizumab, efavirenz, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, enoxaparin sodium, estramustine phosphate sodium, etanercept, ethinylestradiol, etonogestrel, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoposide, exenatide; Famciclovir, fampridine, febuxostat, filgrastim, fludarabine phosphate, fluocinolone acetonide, fluorouracil, fluticasone propionate

  10. Sustained Virologic Response to a Dual Peginterferon alfa-2a and Ribavirin in Treating Chronic hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Sitt, Than; Aung, Aye TD; Aung, Kyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In Myanmar, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection prevalence is 2%. A combination therapy of pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin (PEG-IFNa/RBV) is a standard treatment, but the effect of this antiviral therapy needs evaluation as to determine the efficacy and safety of dual PEG-IFNa/RBV therapy in treating patients infected with HCV in Myanmar. This was a retrospective analysis of data from a single clinic exclusively for gastrointestinal diseases in Yangon, Myanmar. We assessed treatment responses at the defined time points and stratified by genotypes of HCV. We also determined incidences of adverse events (AEs). We investigated independent predictors of sustained virologic response (SVR) in the participants. A total of 362 HCV-infected cases were included in this study. The majority were females (51.7%) with mean age of 47.12 years (±11.6) and noncirrhosis patients (82%). Rapid virologic response (RVR), early virologic response (EVR), end of treatment response (ETR), and SVR 24 weeks after completion of the dual treatment were 50.3% (178/362), 88% (314/357), 80.1% (286/357), and 85.6% (167/195), respectively. The most frequently reported AEs were nausea/anorexia (72.8%) and flu-like symptoms (62.4%). In multivariate analysis, 4 factors were independently associated with SVR; SVR to genotype 3 (odds ratio [OR] 2.4, 95% CI: 1.24–4.62), EVR (OR 0.54, 95% CI: 0.3–0.95), and duration of treatment (OR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.18–1.98). Study limitations were acknowledged. The efficacy and safety of the dual therapy in treating HCV-infected patient in Myanmar was acceptable. We recommend a prospective randomized control trial looking at duration of therapy and rates of achieving SVR, which could significantly impact the care of HCV-infected patients in Myanmar and perhaps other countries as well. PMID:26222859

  11. Darbepoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... check that the needle is covered with the grey cover and that the yellow plastic sleeve has ... the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do ...

  12. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of surgery to decrease the chance that blood transfusions (transfer of one person's blood to another person's ... injection is used to decrease the risk that blood transfusions will be required due to surgery, it is ...

  13. A first-year dornase alfa treatment impact on clinical parameters of patients with cystic fibrosis: the Brazilian cystic fibrosis multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Tatiana; Silva, Fernando Antônio A. e; Santana, Maria Angélica; Adde, Fabíola Villac; Mendes, Rita Heloisa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical impact of the first year treatment with dornase alfa, according to age groups, in a cohort of Brazilian Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. METHODS: The data on 152 eligible patients, from 16 CF reference centers, that answered the medical questionnaires and performed laboratory tests at baseline (T0), and at six (T2) and 12 (T4) months after dornase alfa initiation, were analyzed. Three age groups were assessed: six to 11, 12 to 13, and >14 years. Pulmonary tests, airway microbiology, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, emergency and routine treatments were evaluated. Student's t-test, chi-square test and analysis of variance were used when appropriated. RESULTS: Routine treatments were based on respiratory physical therapy, regular exercises, pancreatic enzymes, vitamins, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and antibiotics. In the six months prior the study (T0 phase), hospitalizations for pulmonary exacerbations occurred in 38.0, 10.0 and 61.4% in the three age groups, respectively. After one year of intervention, there was a significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits in the six to 11 years group. There were no significant changes in forced expiratory volume in one second (VEF1), in forced vital capacity (FVC), in oxygen saturation (SpO2), and in Tiffenau index for all age groups. A significant improvement in Shwachman-Kulczychi score was observed in the older group. In the last six months of therapy, chronic or intermittent colonization by P. aeruginosa was detected in 75.0, 71.4 and 62.5% of the studied groups, respectively, while S. aureus colonization was identified in 68.6, 66.6 and 41.9% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: The treatment with dornase alfa promoted the maintenance of pulmonary function parameters and was associated with a significant reduction of emergency room visits due to pulmonary exacerbations in the six to 11 years age group, with better clinical scores in the >14 age group, one year after the

  14. A Predictive Model for Selecting Patients with HCV Genotype 3 Chronic Infection with a High Probability of Sustained Virological Response to Peginterferon Alfa-2a/Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Asselah, Tarik; Thompson, Alex J.; Flisiak, Robert; Romero-Gomez, Manuel; Messinger, Diethelm; Bakalos, Georgios; Shiffman, Mitchell L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) is restricted in some settings; thus, the European Association for the Study of the Liver recommends dual peginterferon/ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV) therapy wherever DAAs are unavailable. HCV genotype (GT) 3 infection is now the most difficult genotype to eradicate and PegIFN/RBV remains an effective option. The goal of this study was to devise a simple predictive score to identify GT3 patients with a high probability of achieving a sustained virologic response (SVR) with PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy. Methods Relationships between baseline characteristics and SVR were explored by multiple logistic regression models and used to develop a simple scoring system to predict SVR using data from 1239 treatment-naive GT3 patients who received PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV for 24 weeks in two large observational cohort studies. Results The score was validated using a database of 473 patients. Scores were assigned for six factors as follows: age (years) (≤40: 2 points; >40 but ≤55: 1); bodyweight (kg) (<70: 2; ≥70 but <90: 1); no cirrhosis/transition to cirrhosis (2); ALT ≤2.5 x ULN (1); platelets (109/L) (>200: 2; ≥100 but <200: 1); HCV RNA (<400,000 IU/mL: 1). The points are summed to arrive at a score ranging from 0‒10 where higher scores indicate higher chances of SVR; 141, 123, 203, 249, 232, and 218 patients had total scores of 0‒4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9–10, respectively, among whom SVR rates were 45%, 62%, 72%, 76%, 84%, and 89%. Among 622 patients who had scores of 6‒10 and HCV RNA <50 IU/mL by treatment week 4 the SVR rate was 86% (532/622). Conclusions A simple baseline scoring system involving age, bodyweight, cirrhosis status, ALT level, platelet count and HCV RNA level can be used to identify treatment-naive Caucasian patients with HCV GT3 infection with a high probability of SVR with PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy. PMID:26991780

  15. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of three dosing regimens of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in adults with Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Goláň, Lubor; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Holida, Myrl; Kantola, Ikka; Klopotowski, Mariusz; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linhart, Aleš; Musial, Jacek; Nicholls, Kathleen; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Derlis; Sharma, Reena; Vujkovac, Bojan; Chang, Peter; Wijatyk, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Efficacy and safety of agalsidase alfa at 0.2 mg/kg weekly were compared with 0.2 mg/kg every other week (EOW). Exploratory analyses were performed for 0.4 mg/kg weekly. Patients and methods This was a 53-week, Phase III/IV, multicenter, open-label study (NCT01124643) in treatment-naïve adults (≥18 years) with Fabry disease. Inclusion criteria were left ventricular hypertrophy at baseline, defined as left ventricular mass indexed to height >50 g/m2.7 for males and >47 g/m2.7 for females. Primary endpoint was reduction of left ventricular mass indexed to height as assessed by echocardiography. Secondary endpoints included cardiac (peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, New York Heart Association classification), renal (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and biomarker (plasma globotriaosylceramide) assessments. Safety endpoints were adverse events and anti–agalsidase alfa antibodies. Results Twenty patients were randomized to 0.2 mg/kg EOW (mean age, 50.3 years; 70% male), 19 to 0.2 mg/kg weekly (51.8 years; 53% male), and 5 to 0.4 mg/kg weekly (49.4 years; 40% male). The mean change in left ventricular mass indexed to height by Week 53 in the 0.2-mg/kg EOW and weekly groups was 3.2 g/m2.7 and 0.5 g/m2.7, with no significant difference between groups. No clinically meaningful changes by Week 53 were found within or between the 0.2-mg/kg groups for peak oxygen consumption, 6-minute walk test, or Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. Two patients in each group improved by ≥1 New York Heart Association classification. No significant differences were found between 0.2 mg/kg EOW and weekly for mean change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (−1.21 mL/min/1.73 m2 vs −3.32 mL/min/1.73 m2) or plasma globotriaosylceramide (−1.05 nmol/mL vs −2.13 nmol/mL), respectively. Infusion-related adverse events were experienced by 25% and 21% in the

  16. Vinblastine fails to improve response of renal cancer to interferon alfa-n1: high response rate in patients with pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, J A; Anderson, S A; Harris, J E; Rinehart, J J; Laszlo, J; Dexeus, F H; Einhorn, L H; Trump, D L; Benedetto, P W; Tuttle, R L

    1991-05-01

    One hundred sixty-five patients were randomized to receive either interferon alfa-n1 (Wellferon; Burroughs Wellcome Co, Research Triangle Park, NC) alone or with vinblastine. An initial six-cycle induction treatment consisted of interferon given at daily doses of 3, 5, 20, 20, and 20 x 10(6) U/m2 every 2 weeks. Vinblastine at a dose of 10 mg/m2 (later decreased to 5 mg/m2) was given on day 1 of alternate cycles. Toxicities were generally well tolerated. The overall response rate was 10% with no significant difference between treatment arms. Survival was also not significantly different for the arms. A small subset of patients (16) with metastases only to the lungs had a high complete response (CR) and partial response (PR) rate of 44%. Responses were durable, and overall survival of this group was much better than that of the other patients. PMID:2016626

  17. Rare Form of Erdheim-Chester Disease Presenting with Isolated Central Skeletal Lesions Treated with a Combination of Alfa-Interferon and Zoledronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bulycheva, E. N.; Baykov, V. V.; Zaraĭskiĭ, M. I.; Salogub, G. N.

    2015-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) represents a clonal non-Langerhans histiocytosis, which manifests under an extensive variety of clinical symptoms. This creates a challenge for the physician, who is required to recognize and diagnose the disease in the early stages. Despite this considerable challenge, in the last decade there has been a dramatic increase in ECD diagnoses, in most part due to an increasing awareness of this rare disorder. Involvement of the axial skeleton is exclusively uncommon with no official recommendations for the treatment of the bone lesions. Here, we present a case report of a young male patient with isolated lesions of the spine, ribs, and pelvis, who was successfully treated with a combination therapy of alfa-interferon and zoledronic acid. PMID:25949835

  18. A viral kinetic study using pegylated interferon alfa-2b and/or lamivudine in patients with chronic hepatitis B/HBeAg negative.

    PubMed

    Sypsa, Vassiliki-Anastasia; Mimidis, Konstantinos; Tassopoulos, Nicholas C; Chrysagis, Dimitrios; Vassiliadis, Themistoklis; Moulakakis, Antonios; Raptopoulou, Maria; Haida, Caterina; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2005-07-01

    We studied viral dynamic parameters in 44 chronic hepatitis B/hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)(-) patients treated with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (PEG-IFN) 100 or 200 microg weekly or lamivudine 100 mg daily or the combination of PEG-IFN 100 or 200 microg with lamivudine. Patients receiving PEG-IFN monotherapy exhibited viral load oscillations between weekly injections, which were resolved by the addition of lamivudine. The median pharmacological delay was estimated at 4.1, 5.8, and 1.8 hours in PEG-IFN monotherapy, PEG-IFN 100/200 microg + lamivudine, and lamivudine monotherapy, respectively (P = .44). The median half-life of free virus was 12.7 hours (range, 2.4-69.2 hours). The mean antiviral effectiveness of PEG-IFN 100/200 microg monotherapy was lower than that of lamivudine (82.6% vs. 96.4%; P = .005). The mean effectiveness of PEG-IFN 100 microg + lamivudine and PEG-IFN 200 microg + lamivudine was 92.8% and 94.4%, respectively. The half-life of infected cells ranged from 2.7 to 75 days. The median half-life of infected cells in patients receiving the combination regimens of PEG-IFN and lamivudine was similar to that of lamivudine patients (5.0 days vs. 6.0 days, P = .77). In conclusion, the addition of pegylated interferon alfa-2b in lamivudine treatment was found to neither enhance the potency of blocking HBV production nor the decay rates of infected cells. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0270-9139/suppmat/index.html). PMID:15962284

  19. Multicenter, noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study to evaluate dosing of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone using the redesigned follitropin alfa pen in women undergoing ovulation induction

    PubMed Central

    Nawroth, Frank; Tandler-Schneider, Andreas; Bilger, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study evaluated doses of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) using the redesigned follitropin alfa pen in women who were anovulatory or oligomenorrheic and undergoing ovulation induction (OI) alone or OI with intrauterine insemination. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved monofollicular or bifollicular development (defined as one or two follicles ≥15 mm). Secondary endpoints included characteristics of ovulation stimulation treatment, such as mean total and mean daily r-hFSH doses. Data were analyzed for 3,193 patients from 30 German fertility centers. The proportion of patients with monofollicular or bifollicular development was 71.1% (n=2,270 of a total of 3,193 patients; intent-to-treat population). The mean±standard deviation total and daily doses of r-hFSH were 696.9±542.5 IU and 61.7±29.4 IU, respectively. The three doses prescribed most frequently were: 37.5 IU (n=703 from N=3,189; 22.0%), 50.0 IU (n=1,056 from N=3,189; 33.1%), and 75.0 IU (n=738 from N=3,189; 23.1%) on the first day of stimulation; and 37.5 IU (n=465 from N=3,189; 14.6%), 50.0 IU (n=922 from N=3,189; 28.9%), and 75.0 IU (n=895 from N=3,189; 28.1%) on the last day of stimulation. This noninterventional, post-marketing surveillance study found that monofollicular or bifollicular development was achieved in 71% of patients studied and the small dose increment (12.5 IU) of the redesigned follitropin alfa pen allowed individualized treatment of women undergoing OI. PMID:25926755

  20. Low-dose fludarabine with or without darbepoetin alfa in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and comorbidity: primary results of the CLL9 trial of the German CLL Study Group.

    PubMed

    Goede, Valentin; Busch, Raymonde; Bahlo, Jasmin; Chataline, Viktoria; Kremers, Stephan; Müller, Lothar; Reschke, Daniel; Schlag, Rudolf; Schmidt, Burkhard; Vehling-Kaiser, Ursula; Wedding, Ulrich; Stilgenbauer, Stefan; Hallek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study was planned as a phase 3 trial to investigate low-dose fludarabine with or without darbepoetin alfa in older patients with previously untreated or treated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and comorbidity. Due to slow recruitment, the study was terminated prematurely after accrual of 97 patients who, on average, were 74 years old and had a cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS) total score of 5. We report toxicity and efficacy of the study treatment. Grade 3-5 neutropenia and infection were observed in 25% and 10% of patients, respectively. Response was seen in 73% (5% complete remissions). Median event-free and overall survival was 12.2 and 44.8 months, respectively. No differences in outcome were found for patients treated with versus without darbepoetin alfa. In subjects with progressive/recurrent CLL during or after study treatment, overall survival was similar for patients receiving chemotherapy versus chemoimmunotherapy as salvage treatment. PMID:26293380

  1. GB virus C (GBV-C) infection in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Influence on liver disease and on hepatitis virus behaviour: effect of interferon alfa therapy.

    PubMed

    Pawlotsky, J M; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Muerhoff, A S; Pellerin, M; Germanidis, G; Desai, S M; Bastie, A; Darthuy, F; Rémiré, J; Zafrani, E S; Soussy, C J; Mushahwar, I K; Dhumeaux, D

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in patients with chronic hepatitis C, 1) the prevalence and the epidemiological characteristics of GB virus C (GBV-C) infection, 2) the influence of GBV-C on hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, 3) the pathogenicity of GBV-C in the absence of treatment and under interferon therapy, and 4) the effect of interferon alfa on GBV-C and HCV replications. One hundred fifteen patients with chronic hepatitis C were studied. Before treatment, they were tested for GBV-C RNA by PCR and GBV-C genotype was determined for positive samples. Pretreatment information was collected, including age, gender, source of HCV, estimated duration of HCV infection, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activities, cirrhosis and Knodell's score on liver biopsy, HCV genotype, HCV viral burden and anti-HCV core IgM antibodies. The genetic complexity of the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of HCV was studied by PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism. All patients were treated with 3 to 9 mega units of interferon alfa-2a three times per week for 3 to 6 months. The influence of GBV-C on the evolution of ALT and HCV replication during and after treatment was studied, and GBV-C and HCV RNA were monitored monthly by PCR during this period. Eighteen patients (16%) were GBV-C RNA-positive. Among 11 samples studied, GBV-C genotype 2a was present in 9 cases, 2b in one case and type 3 in one case. GBV-C RNA-positive patients were significantly younger than GBV-C RNA-negative ones (38.4 +/- 11.5 vs. 47.4 +/- 14.0, P = 0.012), a result independent of the route of transmission and the disease duration. No difference between GBV-C RNA-positive and -negative patients was found for other epidemiological parameters (e.g. gender, risk factor for parenteral viral infections, disease duration and HCV genotypes), or for the characteristics of HCV infection and related liver disease (e.g. HCV RNA level, genetic complexity of the HVR1, anti-HCV core Ig

  2. An open-label clinical trial of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in children with Fabry disease who are naïve to enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Longo, Nicola; McDonald, Marie; Shankar, Suma P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Chang, Peter; Shen, Yinghua; Pano, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a drug manufacturing process change, safety/efficacy of agalsidase alfa were evaluated in enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)-naïve children with Fabry disease. Methods In an open-label, multicenter, Phase II study (HGT-REP-084; Shire), 14 children aged ≥7 years received 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase alfa every other week for 55 weeks. Primary endpoints: safety, changes in autonomic function (2-hour Holter monitoring). Secondary endpoints: estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), midwall fractional shortening, pharmacodynamic parameters, and patient-reported quality-of-life. Results Among five boys (median 10.2 [range 6.7, 14.4] years) and nine girls (14.8 [10.1, 15.9] years), eight patients experienced infusion-related adverse events (vomiting, n=4; nausea, n=3; dyspnea, n=3; chest discomfort, n=2; chills, n=2; dizziness, n=2; headache, n=2). One of these had several hypersensitivity episodes. However, no patient discontinued for safety reasons and no serious adverse events occurred. One boy developed immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralizing antidrug antibodies. Overall, no deterioration in cardiac function was observed in seven patients with low/abnormal SDNN (standard deviation of all filtered RR intervals; <100 ms) and no left ventricular hypertrophy: mean (SD) baseline SDNN, 81.6 (20.9) ms; mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) change from baseline to week 55, 17.4 (2.9, 31.9) ms. Changes in SDNN correlated with changes in LVMI (r=−0.975). No change occurred in secondary efficacy endpoints: mean (95% CI) change from baseline at week 55 in LVMI, 0.16 (−3.3, 3.7) g/m2.7; midwall fractional shortening, −0.62% (−2.7%, 1.5%); estimated glomerular filtration rate, 0.15 (−11.4, 11.7) mL/min/1.73 m2; urine protein, −1.8 (−6.0, 2.4) mg/dL; urine microalbumin, 0.6 (−0.5, 1.7) mg/dL; plasma globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), −5.71 (−10.8, −0.6) nmol/mL; urinary Gb3, −1,403.3 (−3,714.0, 907.4) nmol/g creatinine

  3. A randomized controlled trial comparing darbepoetin alfa doses in red blood cell transfusion-dependent patients with low- or intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Ho; Harada, Hironori; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Shimazaki, Ryutaro; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Sawada, Kenichi; Mitani, Kinuko

    2015-10-01

    Darbepoetin alfa (DA) is a standard treatment for anemia in lower-risk MDS. However, to date there has been no comparative study to investigate the initial dosage. We, thus, conducted a randomized controlled trial to elucidate the optimal initial dosage of DA. International Prognostic Scoring System low or intermediate-1 risk MDS patients with hemoglobin levels ≤9.0 g/dL, serum erythropoietin levels ≤500 mIU/mL, and red blood cell transfusion dependency were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive DA either at 60, 120, or 240 μg/week for 16 weeks followed by continuous administration with dose adjustment up to 48 weeks. Of 17, 18, and 15 patients in the 60, 120, and 240 μg DA groups included in the efficacy analysis, 64.7, 44.4, and 66.7 %, respectively, achieved the primary endpoint (major or minor erythroid response), while 17.6, 16.7, and 33.3 % achieved major erythroid responses in the initial 16-week period. No clinically significant safety concerns were identified. DA reduced the transfusion requirements effectively and safely in transfusion-dependent, lower-risk MDS patients. Given the highest achievement rate of the major erythroid response in the 240 μg group and the absence of dose-dependent adverse events, 240 μg weekly is the optimal initial dosage. PMID:26323997

  4. Discovery and basic pharmacology of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), including the hyperglycosylated ESA, darbepoetin alfa: an update of the rationale and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Zoltán; Elliott, Steven; Jedynasty, Kinga; Tesar, Vladimír; Szegedi, János

    2010-04-01

    Cloning of the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene and development of the first recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) drug were truly breakthroughs. This allowed a deeper understanding of the structure and pharmacology of rHuEpo, which in turn inspired the discovery and development of additional erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). In vivo specific activity and serum half-life of rHuEPO are influenced by the amount and structure of the attached carbohydrate. Increased numbers of sialic acids on carbohydrate attached to rHuEPO correlated with a relative increase in in-vivo-specific activity and increased serum half-life. The effect of increasing the number of sialic-acid-containing carbohydrates on in-vivo-specific activity was explored. Initial research focused on solving the problem of how the protein backbone could be engineered so a cell would add more carbohydrate to it. Additional work resulted in darbepoetin alfa, a longer-acting molecule with two additional carbohydrate chains. PMID:20127232

  5. Effects of Exercise in Combination With Epoetin Alfa During High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Elizabeth A.; Coon, Sharon K.; Kennedy, Robert L.; Lockhart, Kimberly D.; Stewart, Carol B.; Anaissie, Elias J.; Barlogie, Bart

    2008-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine the effect of aerobic and strength resistance training and epoetin alfa (EPO) therapy on transfusions, stem cell collections, transplantation recovery, and multiple myeloma treatment response. Design Randomized clinical trial. Setting A myeloma research and therapy center in the south central United States. Sample 135 patients with multiple myeloma, 120 evaluable. Methods Random assignment to exercise or usual care groups. All patients received EPO based on an algorithm. Aerobic capacity, using the six-minute walk test, was assessed prior to induction chemotherapy, prior to stem cell mobilization, and following stem cell collection for all patients and before and after transplantation for patients continuing in the study. Data analysis included analysis of variance to compare other outcome variables by groups. Main Research Variables Number of red blood cell and platelet transfusions during transplantation, number of attempts at and total number of days of stem cell collection, time to recovery after transplantation, and response to intensive therapy for multiple myeloma. Findings Recovery and treatment response were not significantly different between groups after transplantation. The exercise group had significantly fewer red blood cell transfusions and fewer attempts at stem cell collection. Serious adverse events were similar in each group. Conclusions Exercise with prophylactic EPO therapy reduces the number of RBC transfusions and attempts at stem cell collection for patients receiving intensive treatment for multiple myeloma. Implications for Nursing Exercise is safe and has many physiologic benefits for patients receiving multiple myeloma treatment. PMID:18467280

  6. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY. VIII. H I SOURCE CATALOG OF THE ANTI-VIRGO REGION AT {delta} = +25 DEG

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Ann M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Saintonge, Amelie; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Kent, Brian R. E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: sabrina@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: hoffmang@lafayette.edu

    2009-08-01

    We present a fourth catalog of H I sources from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) Survey. We report 541 detections over 136 deg{sup 2}, within the region of the sky having 22{sup h} < {alpha} < 03{sup h} and 24 deg. < {delta} < 26 deg. This complements a previous catalog in the region 26 deg. < {delta} < 28 deg. We present here the detections falling into three classes: (1) extragalactic sources with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)>6.5, where the reliability of the catalog is better than 95%; (2) extragalactic sources 5.0 < S/N < 6.5 and a previously measured optical redshift that corroborates our detection; or (3) High Velocity Clouds (HVCs), or subcomponents of such clouds, in the periphery of the Milky Way. Of the 541 objects presented here, 90 are associated with HVCs, while the remaining 451 are identified as extragalactic objects. Optical counterparts have been matched with all but one of the extragalactic objects.

  7. Determination of conformational and spectroscopic features of ethyl trans-alfa-cyano-3-indole-acrylate compound: An experimental and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinar, Mehmet; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2013-03-01

    The optimized geometrical structure, vibrational and electronic transitions, chemical shifts and non-linear optical properties of ethyl trans-alfa-cyano-3-indole-acrylate (C14H12N2O2) compound were presented in this study. The ground state geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers were carried out by using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) as basis set. The vibrational spectra of title compound were recorded in solid state with FT-IR and FT-Raman in the range of 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-10 cm-1, respectively. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The 1H, 13C and DEPT NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution, and gauge-invariant atomic orbitals (GIAO) method was used to predict the isotropic chemical shifts. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the compound were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm in various solvents of different polarity (acetone, benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroform, DMSO, ethanol, methanol and toluene). Solvent effects were calculated using TD-DFT and CIS method. To investigate the non-linear optical properties, the polarizability, anisotropy of polarizability and molecular first hyperpolarizability were computed. A detailed description of spectroscopic behaviors of compound was given based on the comparison of experimental measurements and theoretical computations.

  8. Determination of conformational and spectroscopic features of ethyl trans-alfa-cyano-3-indole-acrylate compound: an experimental and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Mehmet; Karabacak, Mehmet

    2013-03-01

    The optimized geometrical structure, vibrational and electronic transitions, chemical shifts and non-linear optical properties of ethyl trans-alfa-cyano-3-indole-acrylate (C(14)H(12)N(2)O(2)) compound were presented in this study. The ground state geometrical structure and vibrational wavenumbers were carried out by using density functional (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) as basis set. The vibrational spectra of title compound were recorded in solid state with FT-IR and FT-Raman in the range of 4000-400 cm(-1) and 4000-10 cm(-1), respectively. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The (1)H, (13)C and DEPT NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution, and gauge-invariant atomic orbitals (GIAO) method was used to predict the isotropic chemical shifts. The UV-Vis absorption spectra of the compound were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm in various solvents of different polarity (acetone, benzene, chlorobenzene, chloroform, DMSO, ethanol, methanol and toluene). Solvent effects were calculated using TD-DFT and CIS method. To investigate the non-linear optical properties, the polarizability, anisotropy of polarizability and molecular first hyperpolarizability were computed. A detailed description of spectroscopic behaviors of compound was given based on the comparison of experimental measurements and theoretical computations. PMID:23274474

  9. A new approach for ovarian stimulation in IVF using Corifollitropin Alfa in combination with GnRH analogues to trigger final oocyte maturation. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Decleer, W.; Osmanagaoglu, K.; Meganck, G.; Devroey, P.

    2014-01-01

    A pilot study of 10 patients undergoing IVF stimulation, using the new combination of Corifollitropin Alfa with highly purified hMG and GnRH antagonists has been performed, whereas final oocyte maturation was induced by GnRH analogues. The hormonal profiles were analyzed, as well as the clinical outcome. All patients were recruited between March 1st 2013 and June 30th 2013. They were all younger than 38 years, had a normal BMI (between 18,0 and 32,0) and did not have more than three previous IVF stimulations. The combination of long acting FSH with hphMG, and under protection of GnRH antagonists against spontaneous LH-surge, provided a normal hormonal profile for estradiol, progesterone, LH, and FSH. The average oocyte quality and embryo quality were excellent, which resulted in four pregnancies out of ten. We conclude that the described combination is a safe, efficient, and patient friendly alternative for the classical IVF stimulation. PMID:25374659

  10. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY. IX. THE LEO REGION H I CATALOG, GROUP MEMBERSHIP, AND THE H I MASS FUNCTION FOR THE LEO I GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Stierwalt, Sabrina; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Martin, Ann M.; Kent, Brian R.; Saintonge, Amelie; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Karachentseva, Valentina E. E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: amartin@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: amelie@physik.uzh.ch E-mail: vkarach@observ.univ.kiev.ua

    2009-08-15

    We present the catalog of H I sources extracted from the ongoing Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) extragalactic H I line survey, found within the sky region bounded by 9{sup h}36{sup m} < {alpha} < 11{sup h}36{sup m} and +08{sup 0} < {delta} < +12{sup 0}. The H I catalog presented here for this 118 deg{sup 2} region is combined with the ones derived from surrounding regions also covered by the ALFALFA survey to examine the large-scale structure in the complex Leo region. Because of the combination of wide sky coverage and superior sensitivity, spatial and spectral resolution, the ALFALFA H I catalog of the Leo region improves significantly on the numbers of low H I mass sources as compared with those found in previous H I surveys. The H I mass function of the Leo I group presented here is dominated by low-mass objects: 45 of the 65 Leo I members have M{sub H{sub l}}<10{sup 8} M-odot, yielding tight constraints on the low-mass slope of the Leo I H I mass function. The best-fit slope is {alpha} {approx_equal} -1.41 + 0.2 - 0.1. A direct comparison between the ALFALFA H I line detections and an optical search of the Leo I region proves the advantage of the ALFALFA strategy in finding low-mass, gas-rich dwarfs. These results suggest the existence of a significant population of low surface brightness, gas-rich, yet still very low H I mass galaxies, and may reflect the same type of morphological segregation as is seen in the Local Group. While the low-mass end slope of the Leo I H I mass function is steeper than that determined for luminosity functions of the group, the slope still falls short of the values predicted by simulations of structure formation in the lambda cold dark matter paradigm.

  11. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY. V. THE H I SOURCE CATALOG OF THE ANTI-VIRGO REGION AT {delta} = +27{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Saintonge, Amelie; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Kent, Brian R.; Martin, Ann M.; Stierwalt, Sabrina E-mail: bkentastro@cornell.edu E-mail: sabrina@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu

    2008-02-15

    We present a second catalog of H I sources detected in the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey. We report 488 detections over 135 deg{sup 2}, within the region of the sky having 22 h < {alpha} < 03 h and +26{sup 0} < {delta} < +28{sup 0}. We present here the detections that have either (a) S/N>6.5, where the reliability of the catalog is better than 95% or (b) 5.0 < S/N < 6.5 and a previously measured redshift that corroborates our detection. Of the 488 objects presented here, 49 are high-velocity clouds or clumps thereof with negative heliocentric recession velocities. These clouds are mostly very compact and isolated, while some of them are associated with large features such as Wright's Cloud or the northern extension of the Magellanic Stream. The remaining 439 candidate detections are identified as extragalactic objects and have all been matched with optical counterparts. Five of the six galaxies detected with M{sub Hi}<10{sup 7.5} M{sub sun} are satellites of either the NGC672/IC1727 nearby galaxy pair or their neighboring dwarf irregular galaxy NGC784. The data of this catalog release include a slice through the Pisces-Perseus foreground void, a large nearby underdensity of galaxies. We report no detections within the void, where our catalog is complete for systems with H i masses of 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}. Gas-rich, optically-dark galaxies do not seem to constitute an important void population, and therefore do not suffice for producing a viable solution to the void phenomenon.

  12. Gaucher Disease: Transcriptome Analyses Using Microarray or mRNA Sequencing in a Gba1 Mutant Mouse Model Treated with Velaglucerase alfa or Imiglucerase

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sunghee; Sun, Ying; Jia, Li; Keddache, Mehdi; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease type 1, an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in GBA1 leading to defective glucocerebrosidase (GCase) function and consequent excess accumulation of glucosylceramide/glucosylsphingosine in visceral organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with the biosimilars, imiglucerase (imig) or velaglucerase alfa (vela) improves/reverses the visceral disease. Comparative transcriptomic effects (microarray and mRNA-Seq) of no ERT and ERT (imig or vela) were done with liver, lung, and spleen from mice having Gba1 mutant alleles, termed D409V/null. Disease-related molecular effects, dynamic ranges, and sensitivities were compared between mRNA-Seq and microarrays and their respective analytic tools, i.e. Mixed Model ANOVA (microarray), and DESeq and edgeR (mRNA-Seq). While similar gene expression patterns were observed with both platforms, mRNA-Seq identified more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (∼3-fold) than the microarrays. Among the three analytic tools, DESeq identified the maximum number of DEGs for all tissues and treatments. DESeq and edgeR comparisons revealed differences in DEGs identified. In 9V/null liver, spleen and lung, post-therapy transcriptomes approximated WT, were partially reverted, and had little change, respectively, and were concordant with the corresponding histological and biochemical findings. DEG overlaps were only 8–20% between mRNA-Seq and microarray, but the biological pathways were similar. Cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, heme metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction were most altered with the Gaucher disease process. Imig and vela differentially affected specific disease pathways. Differential molecular responses were observed in direct transcriptome comparisons from imig- and vela-treated tissues. These results provide cross-validation for the mRNA-Seq and microarray platforms, and show differences between the molecular effects of two highly structurally similar ERT biopharmaceuticals

  13. Corifollitropin alfa followed by hpHMG in GnRH agonist protocols. Two prospective feasibility studies in poor ovarian responders.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Corona, Roberta; Van De Vijver, Arne; Blockeel, Christophe; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Vloeberghs, Veerle; De Vos, Michel; Camus, Michel; Humaidan, Peter; Tournaye, Herman

    2015-01-01

    In two prospective uncontrolled feasibility trials, we examined the effect of corifollitropin alfa (CFA) followed by highly purified human menopausal gonadotrophin (hpHMG) in a short flare-up gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and a long GnRH agonist protocol for women with poor ovarian response. Overall, 45 patients were treated with short flare-up and 47 patients with the long agonist protocol. All patients received a single dose of 150 μg CFA, followed by 300 IU hpHMG 7 days later, triggering with 10 000 IU hCG, CSI and day 3 embryo transfer. Ongoing pregnancy rates (OPRs) did not differ between the short 15.6% and the long 17% agonist protocol (p = 0.85). Among patients treated with the short flare-up protocol, OPRs were 20% for younger patients (<40 years old) and 12% in older women (≥40 years old), p = 0.68. Similarly, in patients treated with the long agonist protocol younger women had an OPR of 26.7% versus 12.5% in older women, p = 0.23. Among patients treated with the short flare-up, live births rate were 15% and 4.3% for younger (<40 years old) and older patients (≥40 years old), respectively, p = 0.32. Similarly, in patients treated with the long agonist protocol, live births rate were 25% and 12.9% for younger (<40 years old) and older patients (≥40 years old), respectively, p = 0.41. None of the patients reported any serious adverse event related to treatment. According to our results, CFA followed by hpHMG in a short flare-up or long GnRH agonist protocol appears to be a feasible option for poor ovarian responders. Large phase III trials are mandatory prior to introduction in clinical practice. PMID:26172925

  14. Phase II trial of fluorouracil and recombinant interferon alfa-2a in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Wadler, S; Lembersky, B; Atkins, M; Kirkwood, J; Petrelli, N

    1991-10-01

    In a pilot clinical trial, treatment of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma with the combination of fluorouracil (5FU) and recombinant interferon alfa-2a (IFN) resulted in objective tumor regression in 62% of patients. To confirm these findings in a multiinstitutional setting, a phase II clinical trial was initiated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in 1989. The treatment regimen was identical to that used in the earlier study: 5FU 750 mg/m2/d for 5 days as a continuous infusion followed by weekly outpatient bolus therapy and IFN 9MU subcutaneously beginning day 1 and administered three times per week. Doses were modified for gastrointestinal, hematologic, and neurologic toxicity and for fatigue, similarly to those used in the previous pilot trial. Thirty-eight patients were registered; 36 are evaluable for response (one lost to follow-up and one with nonmeasurable disease). All patients had metastatic or locally recurrent disease beyond the scope of resection; 31 of 38 had liver metastases, and 20 of 38 had two or more sites of involvement. Eight patients had grade 4 toxicities, including sepsis (nonneutropenic) (one), watery diarrhea (two), and granulocytopenia (six). Grade 3 neurologic toxicities were observed in two (5%) patients and included slurred speech and gait disturbance. Objective response was 42% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 27% to 58%), including one clinical complete responder and 14 partial responders. Among the responding patients, the median time to treatment failure was 8 months. Two patients remain on treatment at 10+ and 16+ months: median survival has not been reached. The results of this multiinstitutional trial suggest that the addition of IFN to 5FU enhances the objective response rates achieved in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma and that the toxicities of this regimen are acceptable. PMID:1919631

  15. Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a Yields High Rates of Hematologic and Molecular Response in Patients With Advanced Essential Thrombocythemia and Polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Kantarjian, Hagop; Manshouri, Taghi; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Estrov, Zeev; Pierce, Sherry; Richie, Mary Ann; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase II study of pegylated interferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN-α-2a) in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV). Patients and Methods Seventy-nine patients (40 with PV and 39 with ET) have been treated. Median time from diagnosis to PEG-IFN-α-2a was 54 months in patients with PV and 33 months in patients with ET. Eighty-one percent of patients had received prior therapy. The first three patients received PEG-IFN-α-2a at 450 μg weekly. As a result of poor tolerance, this dose was decreased in a stepwise manner to a current starting dose of 90 μg weekly. Seventy-seven patients are evaluable and have been observed for a median of 21 months. Results The overall hematologic response rate was 80% in PV and 81% in ET (complete in 70% and 76% of patients, respectively). The JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 18 patients with ET and 38 patients with PV; sequential measurements by a pyrosequencing assay were available in 16 patients with ET and 35 patients with PV. The molecular response rate was 38% in ET and 54% in PV, being complete (undetectable JAK2V617F) in 6% and 14%, respectively. The JAK2V617F mutant allele burden continued to decrease with no clear evidence for a plateau. The tolerability of PEG-IFN-α-2a at 90 μg weekly was excellent. Conclusion PEG-IFN-α-2a resulted in remarkable clinical activity, high rates of molecular response, and acceptable toxicity in patients with advanced ET or PV. The ability of PEG-IFN-α-2a to induce complete molecular responses suggests selective targeting of the malignant clone. PMID:19826111

  16. Mericitabine and Either Boceprevir or Telaprevir in Combination with Peginterferon Alfa-2a plus Ribavirin for Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 1 Infection and Prior Null Response: The Randomized DYNAMO 1 and DYNAMO 2 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Heiner; Forns, Xavier; Hézode, Christophe; Lee, Samuel S.; Scalori, Astrid; Voulgari, Athina; Le Pogam, Sophie; Nájera, Isabel; Thommes, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection who have had a previous null response (<2-log10 reduction in HCV RNA by treatment week 12) to peginterferon/ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV) do not achieve a sustained virological response (SVR) when re-treated with a first-generation HCV protease inhibitor (PI) administered in combination with PegIFN/RBV. We studied the incremental benefits associated with adding mericitabine (nucleoside analog inhibitor of HCV polymerase) to PI plus PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV-based therapy in two double-blind randomized multicenter phase 2 trials (with boceprevir in DYNAMO 1, and with telaprevir in DYNAMO 2). The primary endpoint in both trials was SVR, defined as HCV RNA <25 IU/mL 12 weeks after the end of treatment (SVR12). Overall, the addition of mericitabine to PI plus PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy resulted in SVR12 rates of 60–70% in DYNAMO 1 and of 71–96% in DYNAMO 2. SVR12 rates were similar in patients infected with HCV genotype 1a and 1b in both trials. The placebo control arms in both studies were stopped because of high rates of virological failure. Numerically lower relapse rates were associated with longer treatment with mericitabine (24 versus 12 weeks), telaprevir-containing regimens, and regimens that included 48 weeks of PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy. No mericitabine resistance mutations were identified in any patient in either trial. The addition of mericitabine did not add to the safety burden associated with either telaprevir or boceprevir-based regimens. These studies demonstrate increased SVR rates and reduced relapse rates in difficult-to-treat patients when a nucleoside polymerase inhibitor with intermediate antiviral potency is added to regimens containing a first-generation PI. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01482403 and ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01482390 PMID:26752189

  17. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY. X. THE H I MASS FUNCTION AND {Omega}{sub H{sub i}} FROM THE 40% ALFALFA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Ann M.; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Springob, Christopher M.; Stierwalt, Sabrina E-mail: papastergis@astro.cornell.ed E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.ed E-mail: sabrina@ipac.caltech.ed

    2010-11-10

    The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey has completed source extraction for 40% of its total sky area, resulting in the largest sample of H I-selected galaxies to date. We measure the H I mass function from a sample of 10,119 galaxies with 6.2 < log (M{sub H{sub i}}/M{sub sun}) < 11.0 and with well-described mass errors that accurately reflect our knowledge of low-mass systems. We characterize the survey sensitivity and its dependence on profile velocity width, the effect of large-scale structure, and the impact of radio frequency interference in order to calculate the H I mass function with both the 1/V{sub max} and 2DSWML methods. We also assess a flux-limited sample to test the robustness of the methods applied to the full sample. These measurements are in excellent agreement with one another; the derived Schechter function parameters are {phi}{sub *} (h {sup 3}{sub 70} Mpc{sup -3} dex{sup -1}) = 4.8 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup -3}, log (M{sub *}/M{sub sun}) + 2 log h{sub 70} = 9.96 {+-} 0.02, and {alpha} = -1.33 {+-} 0.02. We find {Omega}{sub H{sub i}}= 4.3 {+-} 0.3 x10{sup -4} h {sup -1}{sub 70}, 16% larger than the 2005 HIPASS result, and our Schechter function fit extrapolated to log (M{sub H{sub i}}/M{sub sun}) = 11.0 predicts an order of magnitude more galaxies than HIPASS. The larger values of {Omega}{sub H{sub i}} and of M{sub *} imply an upward adjustment for estimates of the detection rate of future large-scale H I line surveys with, e.g., the Square Kilometer Array. A comparison with simulated galaxies from the Millennium Run and a treatment of photoheating as a method of baryon removal from H I-selected halos indicate that the disagreement between dark matter mass functions and baryonic mass functions may soon be resolved.

  18. The Efficacy of Add-on Telbivudine Versus Switching to Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients With Poor Responses to Adefovir

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xin; Fan, Chao; Zhou, Yun; Kang, Wenzhen; Wang, Jiuping; Sun, Li; Wang, Linxu; Peng, Meijuan; Lian, Jianqi; Jia, Zhansheng; Hao, Chunqiu

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are limited options for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients who have poor responses to adefovir (ADV). Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of adding on telbivudine (LdT) or switching to pegylated interferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN-α2a) as alternative rescue therapies for patients with poor responses to the initial ADV treatments. Patients and Methods: Ninety-seven CHB patients with HBV DNA > 2 log10 copies/mL 48 weeks after ADV monotherapy were included in this study. Fifty-nine of these patients were treated with a combination of LdT plus ADV (LdT + ADV) daily, while thirty-eight patients were switched to PEG-IFN-α2a subcutaneous injections weekly for 48 weeks. Results: Both rescue strategies were proven to be safe and the majority of patients tolerated the therapies well. LdT + ADV led to more rapid reductions in viral loads than PEG-IFN-α2a monotherapy, with 2.14 (LdT + ADV) and 0.98 (PEG-IFN-α2a) log10 copies/mL decreases 48 weeks after rescue treatments, respectively (P < 0.00001). The rates corresponding to virological and biochemical responses were also elevated in patients who received the LdT + ADV combination therapy at the end of the observation period (88.1 vs. 68.4% for virological response, P = 0.017; 83.3 vs. 47.2%, P = 0.00045). However, the decline in the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was more pronounced in PEG-IFN-α2a treated patients. Moreover, the cumulative rates of serological responses were higher in patients who switched to the PEG-IFN-α2a therapy. Conclusions: Both add-on LdT and switching to PEG-IFN-α2a were satisfactory and optimal treatments for CHB patients with poor responses to ADV. Both rescue strategies resulted in significant reductions in serum viral load and ALT levels, and were associated with high rate of serological outcomes in our hospital. PMID:27110255

  19. Endogenous plasma activated protein C levels and the effect of enoxaparin and drotrecogin alfa (activated) on markers of coagulation activation and fibrinolysis in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There are no published data on the status of endogenous activated protein C (APC) in pulmonary embolism (PE), and no data on the effect of drotrecogin alfa (activated) (DAA) given in addition to therapeutic dose enoxaparin. Methods In this double-blind clinical trial, 47 patients with computed tomography (CT)-confirmed acute submassive PE treated with 1 mg/kg body weight of enoxaparin twice daily were randomized to groups receiving a 12-hour intravenous infusion of 6, 12, 18, or 24 μg/kg/hour of DAA or a placebo. Blood samples were drawn before starting DAA infusion, after 4, 8 and 12 hours (at the end of the infusion period), and on treatment days 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Results Initial endogenous plasma activated protein C (APC) levels were 0.36 ± 0.48 ng/ml (<0.10 to 1.72 ng/ml) and remained in the same range in the placebo group. APC levels in patients treated with DAA were 13.67 ± 3.57 ng/ml, 32.71 ± 8.76 ng/ml, 36.13 ± 7.60 ng/ml, and 51.79 ± 15.84 ng/ml in patients treated with 6, 12, 18, and 24 μg/kg/hour DAA, respectively. In patients with a D-dimer level >4 mg/L indicating a high level of acute fibrin formation and dissolution, DAA infusion resulted in a more rapid drop in soluble fibrin, D-dimer, and fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDP) levels, compared to enoxaparin alone. There was a parallel decline of soluble fibrin, D-dimer, FDP, and plasmin-plasmin inhibitor complex (PPIC) in response to treatment with enoxaparin ± DAA, with no evidence of a systemic profibrinolytic effect of the treatment. Conclusions In patients with acute submassive PE endogenous APC levels are low. DAA infusion enhances the inhibition of fibrin formation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00191724 PMID:21241489

  20. The effectiveness of retreatment with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C genotype 2 and 3: a prospective cohort study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 50% of patients infected with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) do not respond to treatment with conventional interferon (IFN) combined with ribavirin (RBV). The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of retreatment with peginterferon alfa-2a or 2b (PEG-IFN 2a or 2b) concomitantly with RBV in patients with HCV genotype 2 and 3, which were non-responders or relapsers to initial treatment with IFN / RBV and to identify possible predictors of sustained virological response (SVR). Methods From September 2003 to March 2009 a cohort of 216 patients who had previously failed therapy with a regimen of standard interferon and ribavirin, were followed in a specialized service implemented in the Brazilian Unified Health System, Rio Grande do Sul. All patients were retreated with PEG-IFN 2a or 2b per week, associated with RBV, through oral route, with doses determined according to weight (1,000 mg if weight ≤ 75 Kg and 1,250 mg if ≥ 75 Kg) per day for 48 weeks. The HCV-RNA was tested by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Virological Response (VR) within 48 weeks and SVR in the 72 weeks was considered for evaluation of treatment efficacy. Analyses were performed in patients who received at least one dose of PEG-IFN. Results The SVR rate for non-responders to previous treatment was 34.4% and for relapsers was 50% (p = 0.031). As predictive factors that contribute to improve SVR, were identified the age (p = 0.005), to be relapsers to previous treatment (p = 0.023) and present liver biopsy examination Metavir F0-F2 (p = 0.004). In assessing the safety profile, 51 patients (23.6%) discontinued treatment prematurely. Conclusions This alternative retreatment for patients who have failed prior therapies for anti-HCV, has demonstrated promising SVR rate, provided that it includes a careful selection of patients with predictors of response and adverse events monitored. PMID:23270376

  1. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), to treat malignant melanoma (a cancer that begins in certain skin cells) ... a week for up to 6 months. malignant melanoma, inject the medication intravenously for 5 consecutive days ...

  2. Peginterferon Alfa-2a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... interferons. Peginterferon is a combination of interferon and polyethylene glycol, which helps the interferon stay active in ... alpha interferons, any other medications, benzyl alcohol, or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Ask your doctor if you are ...

  3. Peginterferon Alfa-2a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medications to treat chronic (long-term) hepatitis C infection (swelling of the liver caused by a ... Peginterferon works by decreasing the amount of hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) in ...

  4. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week. HBV, inject the medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week usually for 16 weeks. hairy cell leukemia, inject ...

  5. Prediction of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome in Patients Treated with Corifollitropin alfa or rFSH in a GnRH Antagonist Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Griesinger, Georg; Verweij, Pierre J. M.; Gates, Davis; Devroey, Paul; Gordon, Keith; Stegmann, Barbara J.; Tarlatzis, Basil C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Question What is the threshold for the prediction of moderate to severe or severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) based on the number of growing follicles ≥ 11 mm and/or estradiol (E2) levels? Summary Answer The optimal threshold of follicles ≥11 mm on the day of hCG to identify those at risk was 19 for both moderate to severe OHSS and for severe OHSS. Estradiol (E2) levels were less prognostic of OHSS than the number of follicles ≥ 11 mm. What Is Known Already In comparison to long gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist protocols, the risk of severe OHSS is reduced by approximately 50% in a GnRH antagonist protocol for ovarian stimulation prior to in vitro fertilisation (IVF), while the two protocols provide equal chances of pregnancy per initiated cycle. Nevertheless, moderate to severe OHSS may still occur in GnRH antagonist protocols if human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is administered to trigger final oocyte maturation, especially in high responder patients. Severe OHSS following hCG trigger may occur with an incidence of 1–2% in a relatively young (aged 18 to 36 years) IVF population treated in a GnRH-antagonist protocol. Study Design, Size, Duration From the Engage, Ensure and Trust trials, in total, 2,433 women who received hCG for oocyte maturation and for whom the number of follicles ≥ 11 mm and the level of E2 on the day of hCG administration were known were included in the analyses. Participants/Materials, Setting, Methods The threshold for OHSS prediction of moderate and severe OHSS was assessed in women treated with corifollitropin alfa or daily recombinant follicle stimulation hormone (rFSH) in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-antagonist protocol. Receiver operating characteristics curve analyses for moderate to severe OHSS and severe OHSS were performed on the combined dataset and the sensitivity and specificity for the optimal threshold of number of follicles ≥ 11 mm, E2 levels on the day of (hCG), and a

  6. HBsAg seroconversion after pegylated interferon alfa 2a rescue in a lamivudine-resistant patient with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B and favourable IL28-B genotype.

    PubMed

    Stanzione, Maria; Stornaiuolo, Gianfranca; Rizzo, Viviana; Pontarelli, Agostina; Gaeta, Giovanni Battista

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) seroconversion to anti-HBs antibody is the best final objective for all available chronic hepatitis B (CHB) treatments. Unfortunately, this goal is rarely achieved with the currently applied therapeutic approaches. Here we describe the case of an anti-HBe-positive CHB patient who was successfully treated with a particular therapeutic schedule. The patient was initially treated with lamivudine (LAM) for nine years. Breakthrough was observed after eight years of LAM therapy. HBV-DNA was 3x10E4 IU/mL and LAM resistance mutations were present. Subcutaneous pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) alfa 2a, 180 mcg/week, was added to LAM and after 4 weeks LAM was discontinued and PEG-IFN alone was continued up to week 52. HBV-DNA became undetectable at week 4 of therapy; serum HBsAg started to decline from week 4 and became undetectable at week 36, with the subsequent appearance of anti-HBs antibodies. IL28-B was genotyped at the polymorphic site rs12979860 and the CC allele was detected. Rescue therapy with Peg-IFN may be an option for selected patients with resistance to nucleos(t)ide analogues. PMID:27367326

  7. Triple combination of thymalfasin, peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C who have failed prior interferon and ribavirin treatment: 24-week interim results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Avila, F; Kershenobich, D; García-Samper, X; Gongora, J; Uribe, M

    2004-12-01

    Despite steady progress in antiviral treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), many patients still have detectable serum HCV RNA levels by the end of interferon-based treatment and are known as virological non-responders. Re-treatment of these patients not responding to previous therapy remains challenging. Studies of the dynamics of the HCV population show a marked decline in new cases since 1996; however, the relative proportion of non-responders is expected to increase over time and, similarly, the number of patients eligible for first-line treatment is expected to decrease. The current standard of care for treatment involves the use of pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. However, many difficult-to-treat groups still have low response rates. Newer combinations are being investigated to optimize chances of attaining a sustained response in these groups: one such triple therapy regimen is peginterferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and thymalfasin, which was given to 23 previously non-responder patients. Viral response was 60.8% at week 12 and 47.8% at week 24. These preliminary results encourage further evaluation of this promising combination. PMID:15546256

  8. Triple combination of thymalfasin, peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C who have failed prior interferon and ribavirin treatment: 24-week interim results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Avila, F; Kershenobich, D; García-Samper, X; Gongora, J; Uribe, M

    2004-12-01

    Despite steady progress in antiviral treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV), many patients still have detectable serum HCV RNA levels by the end of interferon-based treatment and are known as virological non-responders. Re-treatment of these patients not responding to previous therapy remains challenging. Studies of the dynamics of the HCV population show a marked decline in new cases since 1996; however, the relative proportion of non-responders is expected to increase over time and, similarly, the number of patients eligible for first-line treatment is expected to decrease. The current standard of care for treatment involves the use of pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. However, many difficult-to-treat groups still have low response rates. Newer combinations are being investigated to optimize chances of attaining a sustained response in these groups: one such triple therapy regimen is peginterferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and thymalfasin, which was given to 23 previously non-responder patients. Viral response was 60.8% at week 12 and 47.8% at week 24. These preliminary results encourage further evaluation of this promising combination. PMID:15641210

  9. A pharmacoepidemiological study of the multi-level determinants, predictors, and clinical outcomes of biosimilar epoetin alfa for renal anaemia in haemodialysis patients: background and methodology of the MONITOR-CKD5 study.

    PubMed

    Gesualdo, Loreto; London, Gérard; Turner, Matthew; Lee, Christopher; Macdonald, Karen; Goldsmith, David; Covic, Adrian; Zaoui, Philippe; Combe, Christian; Mann, Johannes; Dellanna, Frank; Muenzberg, Michael; Abraham, Ivo

    2013-08-01

    Prior longitudinal observational studies have examined the practice patterns and outcomes of anaemia management, including the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Several dimensions of effectiveness remain unaddressed; especially considering the revised ESA label (target Hb levels between 10 and 12 g/dL), the recently published TREAT study, and the European approval of the first ESA biosimilar (HX575). Anecdotal evidence suggests that patient outcomes are influenced by physician-related variables and whether anaemia management is congruent with practice guidelines, but this has not been studied systematically. MONITOR-CKD5 is an international, prospective, observational, pharmacoepidemiological study evaluating the multi-level factors and outcomes of treatment with HX575 for renal anaemia in haemodialysis patients. Driven by a novel, integrated, multi-focal framework for post-approval observational studies, it examines determinants of response at both the patient and the physician level; integrates an advocated statistical methodology here to fore used mainly in the social and behavioural sciences; assesses factors potentially predictive of a poor treatment response; and evaluates the extent to which treatment is congruent with evidence-based guidelines, good practice evidence, and the revised ESA label. This pan-European study will recruit at least 1,000 patients from a minimum of 75 centres, and follow them for up to 24 months following initiation of anaemia management with biosimilar epoetin alfa. MONITOR-CKD5 will not only study the core issues addressed by prior observational studies but also aims to take knowledge discovery a step further by assessing outcomes across varying cohorts of patients, and examining the impact of evidence-based practice on clinical outcomes, differentiating, in the process, between physician-level and patient-level determinants. PMID:21590439

  10. Randomized study of intensified anthracycline doses for induction and recombinant interleukin-2 for maintenance in patients with acute myeloid leukemia age 50 to 70 years: results of the ALFA-9801 study.

    PubMed

    Pautas, Cecile; Merabet, Fatiha; Thomas, Xavier; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Gardin, Claude; Corm, Selim; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Reman, Oumedaly; Turlure, Pascal; Contentin, Nathalie; de Revel, Thierry; Rousselot, Philippe; Preudhomme, Claude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Fenaux, Pierre; Terré, Christine; Michallet, Mauricette; Dombret, Hervé; Chevret, Sylvie; Castaigne, Sylvie

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE In patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), induction chemotherapy is based on standard doses of anthracyclines and cytarabine. High doses of cytarabine have been reported as being too toxic for patients older than age 50 years, but few studies have evaluated intensified doses of anthracyclines. PATIENTS AND METHODS In this randomized Acute Leukemia French Association 9801 (ALFA-9801) study, high doses of daunorubicin (DNR; 80 mg/m(2)/d x 3 days) or idarubicin (IDA4; 12 mg/m(2)/d x 4 days) were compared with standard doses of idarubicin (IDA3; 12 mg/m(2)/d x 3 days) for remission induction in patients age 50 to 70 years, with an event-free survival (EFS) end point. After two consolidation courses based on intermediate doses of cytarabine, patients in continuous remission were randomly assigned to receive or not receive maintenance therapy with recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2; 5 x 10(6) U/m(2) x 5 days each month) for a total duration of 12 months. A total of 468 patients entered the study (median age, 60 years). Results Overall complete remission rate was 77% with significant differences among the three randomization arms (83%, 78%, and 70% in the IDA3, IDA4, and DNR arms, respectively; P = .04). However, no significant differences were observed in relapse incidence, EFS, or overall survival among the three arms. In the 161 patients randomly assigned for maintenance therapy, no difference in outcome was observed between the rIL-2 and the no further treatment arms. CONCLUSION Neither intensification of anthracycline doses nor maintenance with rIL-2 showed a significant impact on AML course, at least as scheduled in this trial. PMID:20048183

  11. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2b injection is used in people with malignant melanoma (a life-threatening cancer that begins in certain ... is used to reduce the chance that malignant melanoma will come back and must be started within ...

  12. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol pad. Remove the protective needle cap and fill the syringe with air by pulling the plunger back to the 0.7 mL mark on the ... protective cap from the needle of the syringe. Fill the syringe with air by pulling the plunger back to the mL mark that matches your prescribed ...

  13. A Protective Role of Arecoline Hydrobromide in Experimentally Induced Male Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Indraneel; Das, Joydeep; Maiti, Biswaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Arecoline, the most potent and abundant alkaloid of betel nut, causes elevation of serum testosterone and androgen receptor expression in rat prostate, in addition to increase in serum insulin levels in rats, leading to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes-like conditions. This study investigated the role of arecoline on the reproductive status of experimentally induced type 1 diabetic rats. Methods. Changes in the cellular architecture were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Blood glucose, serum insulin, testosterone, FSH, and LH were assayed. Fructose content of the coagulating gland and sialic acid content of the seminal vesicles were also analyzed. Results. Arecoline treatment for 10 days at a dose of 10 mg/kg of body weight markedly facilitated β-cell regeneration and reversed testicular and sex accessory dysfunctions by increasing the levels of serum insulin and gonadotropins in type 1 diabetic rats. Critical genes related to β-cell regeneration, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (pdx-1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT-2), were found to be activated by arecoline at the protein level. Conclusion. It can thus be suggested that arecoline is effective in ameliorating the detrimental effects caused by insulin deficiency on gonadal and male sex accessories in rats with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25695047

  14. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of bupropion hydrobromide and metabolites in healthy adolescent and adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Oh, D Alexander; Crean, Christopher S

    2015-09-01

    Data from 2 pediatric single-dose studies, conducted at the same center, were combined to evaluate exposure levels of bupropion and metabolites in adolescents 12-17 years old, compared with adults > 18 years. Pharmacokinetic analyses of bupropion and its metabolites were performed using normalization and pharmacological/convulsive weighting methods on exposure. When compared with adults (>18 years), subjects 12-14 years had an increase in weight-normalized exposure to bupropion (ie, Cmax , 78%; AUC0-t , 83%; and AUCinf , 85%). Variability in this younger age group was also higher, with observations of a 3- to 4-fold increase in exposure. When the changes in metabolites were accounted within pharmacological and convulsive-weighted exposures, the relative ratio of 12-14 years to adults in body weight-normalized Cmax was 127% and 110%, respectively. Subjects 15-17 years did not exhibit a difference in exposure compared with adults. The influence of age on bupropion pharmacokinetics demonstrates that, in general, healthy adolescent subjects cannot be considered smaller healthy adult subjects; the increase in exposure is inversely related to age and appears to be solely associated with bupropion, not with its metabolites. Because there are no clinical safety and efficacy data of bupropion in adolescents, this data may shift its risk-benefit profile. PMID:27137143

  15. Gateways to clinical trials. December 2008.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a; Abatacept, ABT-263, Adalimumab, Aflibercept, Afobazole, Aliskiren fumarate, Anakinra, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Aviscumine, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Bevacizumab, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Briobacept; Carmoterol hydrochloride, CCX-282, Ceftobiprole medocaril, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Dasatinib, Denosumab, Doripenem, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7080, Epratuzumab, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Gefitinib, Golimumab; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; Imatinib mesylate, Insulin detemir, Insulin glulisine, IVX-0142; Laquinimod sodium, Linezolid, Lopinavir/ritonavir; Ocrelizumab, Omalizumab; Parecoxib sodium, Pemetrexed disodium, Pregabalin; Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine; Sorafenib, Sugammadex sodium; Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Tocilizumab; Ularitide, Ustekinumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Varenicline tartrate, Vatalanib succinate, Vildagliptin, Vorinostat. PMID:19271026

  16. Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin (MAP) Plus Maintenance Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b Versus MAP Alone in Patients With Resectable High-Grade Osteosarcoma and Good Histologic Response to Preoperative MAP: First Results of the EURAMOS-1 Good Response Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bielack, Stefan S.; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Whelan, Jeremy S.; Marina, Neyssa; Jovic, Gordana; Hook, Jane M.; Krailo, Mark D.; Gebhardt, Mark; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Meyer, James; Nadel, Helen; Randall, R. Lor; Deffenbaugh, Claudia; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Brennan, Bernadette; Letson, G. Douglas; Teot, Lisa A.; Goorin, Allen; Baumhoer, Daniel; Kager, Leo; Werner, Mathias; Lau, Ching C.; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Gelderblom, Hans; Meyers, Paul; Gorlick, Richard; Windhager, Reinhard; Helmke, Knut; Eriksson, Mikael; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Schomberg, Paula; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Kühne, Thomas; Jürgens, Heribert; van den Berg, Henk; Böhling, Tom; Picton, Susan; Renard, Marleen; Reichardt, Peter; Gerss, Joachim; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Morris, Carol; Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W.; Seddon, Beatrice; Calaminus, Gabriele; Michelagnoli, Maria; Dhooge, Catharina; Sydes, Matthew R.; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EURAMOS-1, an international randomized controlled trial, investigated maintenance therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) in patients whose osteosarcoma showed good histologic response (good response) to induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods At diagnosis, patients age ≤ 40 years with resectable high-grade osteosarcoma were registered. Eligibility after surgery for good response random assignment included ≥ two cycles of preoperative MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, and cisplatin), macroscopically complete surgery of primary tumor, < 10% viable tumor, and no disease progression. These patients were randomly assigned to four additional cycles MAP with or without IFN-α-2b (0.5 to 1.0 μg/kg per week subcutaneously, after chemotherapy until 2 years postregistration). Outcome measures were event-free survival (EFS; primary) and overall survival and toxicity (secondary). Results Good response was reported in 1,041 of 2,260 registered patients; 716 consented to random assignment (MAP, n = 359; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 357), with baseline characteristics balanced by arm. A total of 271 of 357 started IFN-α-2b; 105 stopped early, and 38 continued to receive treatment at data freeze. Refusal and toxicity were the main reasons for never starting IFN-α-2b and for stopping prematurely, respectively. Median IFN-α-2b duration, if started, was 67 weeks. A total of 133 of 268 patients who started IFN-α-2b and provided toxicity information reported grade ≥ 3 toxicity during IFN-α-2b treatment. With median follow-up of 44 months, 3-year EFS for all 716 randomly assigned patients was 76% (95% CI, 72% to 79%); 174 EFS events were reported (MAP, n = 93; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 81). Hazard ratio was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.61 to 1.12; P = .214) from an adjusted Cox model. Conclusion At the preplanned analysis time, MAP plus IFN-α-2b was not statistically different from MAP alone. A considerable proportion of patients never started IFN-α-2b or stopped

  17. Selective blockade of a slowly inactivating potassium current in striatal neurons by (+/-) 6-chloro-APB hydrobromide (SKF82958).

    PubMed

    Nisenbaum, E S; Mermelstein, P G; Wilson, C J; Surmeier, D J

    1998-07-01

    The ion channels of rat striatal neurons are known to be modulated by stimulation of D1 dopamine receptors. The susceptibility of depolarization-activated K+ currents to be modulated by the D1 agonist, 6-chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetra-hydro-1H-3-benzaze pine (APB) was investigated using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording techniques from acutely isolated neurons. APB (0.01-100 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction in the total K+ current. At intermediate concentrations (ca. 10 microM), APB selectively depressed the slowly inactivating A-current (I(As)). A similar effect was produced by application of the D1 agonist, 7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1-H-2-benzazepine (SKF38393, 10 microM). APB reduced I(As) rapidly, having onset and recovery time constants of 1.2 sec and 1.6 sec, respectively. Unexpectedly, the effect of APB could not be mimicked by application of Sp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate triethylamine (Sp-cAMPS, 100-200 microM), a membrane-permeable analog of cyclic AMP (cAMP), or by pretreatment with forskolin (25 microM), an activator of adenylyl cyclase. The reduction in I(As) also was not blocked by pretreatment with the D1 receptor antagonist, R(+)-SCH23390 hydrochloride (SCH23390, 10-20 microM). In addition, intracellular dialysis with guanosine-5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate (GDP-beta-S, 200 microM) did not preclude the APB-induced inhibition of I(As), nor did dialysis with guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate (GTP-gamma-S, 400 microM) prevent reversal of the effect. The effect of APB was produced by a reduction in the maximal conductance of I(As) without changing the voltage-dependence of the current. Collectively, these results argue that APB does not inhibit I(As) through D1 receptors coupled to stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, but rather by allosterically regulating or blocking the channels giving rise to this current. PMID:9635891

  18. DIC Complicating APL Successfully Treated With Recombinant Thrombomodulin Alfa.

    PubMed

    Saito, Aki; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Seki, Yuko; Matsunaga, Manaka; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Kodama, Yuichi; Nishikawa, Takuro; Tanabe, Takayuki; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-08-01

    An 8-year-old boy developed anorexia, fatigue, and fever. Laboratory examination revealed a high white blood cell (WBC) count of 145×10/μL with 97.5% abnormal promyelocytic cells that contained Auer bodies. Faggot cells were seen. He was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Later, a chromosome analysis showed 46,XY,t(15;17)(q22;q12). Promyelocytic Leukemia-retinoic acid receptor α-fused gene and chimeric mRNA were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. He was complicated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and his fibrin and fibrinogen degradation product at the onset was 37.6 μg/mL. Human recombinant thrombomodulin (rTM) was started for DIC. After dexamethasone was administered at a dose of 8 mg/m to prevent all-trans retinoic acid syndrome on day 1, all-trans retinoic acid was started at a dose of 45 mg/m on day 4. Cytarabine (100 mg/m/d) and daunorubicin (45 mg/m/d) were started on day 9. The WBC count gradually increased to 270×10/μL on day 8, and then decreased beginning on day 9. DIC improved after the initiation of chemotherapy and only minor petechia was noted. DIC did not become worse even after rTM was stopped on day 8. The risk of DIC and bleeding is high in the early stage of treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia, especially in patients with a high WBC count. In our patient, rTM may have prevented fatal DIC and made it possible to safely administer induction chemotherapy. PMID:27123666

  19. HI Absorbers from Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Z.; Haynes, M. P.; Giovanelli, R.; Zhu, M.; Chen, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    We present some preliminary results of an on-going study of the HI 21-cm absorption line based on the 40% data release of the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) survey. Ten HI absorption candidates have been detected. Five of them are previously published in the literature, and the rest of them are new detections that need further confirmation. For those sources with no detected absorptions, we calculated the upper limits of their foreground HI column density N_{HI}. The statistical result of the N_{HI} distribution indicates that the ratio of average spin temperature to covering factor T_{s}/f for DLAs (the damped Lyα systems) might be larger than 500 K. Radio frequency interference (RFI) and standing waves are the main issues affecting the detection of HI absorption profiles. Our study can serve as the pathfinder for a large scale search of HI 21-cm absorption lines using the Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) which is an Arecibo-type radio telescope currently under construction in China. We discuss two types of observational studies of HI absorptions toward extragalactic sources using the FAST telescope.

  20. Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b in Treating Patients With Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  1. Repeated dose toxicity of alfa-cypermethrin in rats.

    PubMed

    Manna, S; Bhattacharyya, D; Mandal, T K; Das, S

    2004-09-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the subacute effect of alpha-cypermethrin (alpha-CP) in rats. Alfacypermethrin a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and oral LD50 was investigated after administering orally different doses in rats and was determined as 145 mg/kg. Other groups of rats were given repeated daily oral dose (1/10 LD50) of alpha-CP for 30 days. The animals were sacrificed on 31st day. Activities of various enzymes, cytochrome P450 and b5 contents in liver, hepatic antioxidant status, tissue residue concentration, haemogram and pathological changes were studied. It increased the serum aminotransaminases (AST, ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and blood glucose level significantly. alpha-CP decreased RBC count, PCV and Hb level significantly. It significantly decreased cytochrome P450 in liver. Residues were present in different tissues. It increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, while decreased the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glycogen level in liver significantly. Mild to moderate histological alterations were observed in lungs, liver, stomach, kidneys, testes and cerebellum. So repeated daily oral doses of alpha-CP at 1/10LD50 altered the biochemical parameters, decreased cytochrome P450 content, antioxidant status, which correlated with histopathological changes of tissues. PMID:15365239

  2. PMF: The front end electronic of the ALFA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrillon, P.; Blin, S.; Cheikali, C.; Cuisy, D.; Gaspard, M.; Fournier, D.; Heller, M.; Iwanski, W.; Lavigne, B.; De la Taille, C.; Puzo, P.; Socha, J.-L.

    2010-11-01

    The front end electronic (PMF) of the future ATLAS luminometer is described here. It is composed of a MAPMT and a compact stack of three PCBs, which deliver high voltage, route and read out of the output signals. The third board contains an FPGA and MAROC, a 64-channel ASIC, which can correct the non-uniformity of the MAPMT channels gain, thanks to a variable gain preamplifier. Its main role is to shape and discriminate the input signals at 1/3 photo-electron and produce 64 trigger outputs. Laboratory tests performed on prototype and pre-series PMFs have showed performances in good agreement with the requirements and have fulfilled the approval criteria for the final production of all elements.

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Know- ledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, adefovir dipivoxil, AdPEDF.11, AES-14, albumex, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvimopan hydrate, aAminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anti-IL-12 MAb, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atrasentan, avanafil; Banoxantrone, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, CBT-1, ciclesonide, clofarabine, conivaptan hydrochloride, CpG-7909, C-Vax, Cypher; DA-8159, DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eculizumab, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, ETC-642, etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Gefitinib, IV gamma-globulin; Human insulin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; IDN-6556, iguratimod, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, ixabepilone; Laquinimod, LB-80380, lidocaine/prilocaineliraglutide, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lucinactant; MAb-14.18, melatonin, MLN-591-DM1; NC-531, neridronic acid, nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, olcegepant, oral Insulin, ORV-105; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAmAb, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, pegvisomant, perifosine, pexelizumab, phenoxodiol, phenserine tartrate, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-542, prostate cancer vaccine, PT-141; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, reslizumab, rh-Lactoferrin, ribamidine hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium; S-8184l, SC-1, sorafenib, St. John's Wort extract, SU-11248; Taxus, telbivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, adalimumab, AERx morphine sulphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, amprenavir, aripiprazole, atenolol, atorvastatin calcium; BSYX-A110; Cantuzumab mertansine, capravirine, CDP-571, CDP-870, celecoxib; Delavirdine mesilate, docetaxel, dofetilide, donepezil hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride, dydrogesterone; Efavirenz, emtricitabine, enjuvia, enteryx, epristeride, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etanercept, etonogestrel, etoricoxib; Fesoterodine, finasteride, flt3ligand; Galantamine hydrobromide, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, genistein, gepirone hydrochloride; Indinavir sulfate, infliximab; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, leteprinim potassium, levetiracetam, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, losartan potassium; MCC-465, MRA; Nebivolol, nesiritide, nevirapine; Olanzapine, OROS(R)-Methylphenidate hydrochloride; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, Pimecrolimus, polyethylene glycol 3350, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Risedronate sodium, risperidone, ritonavir, rituximab, rivastigmine tartrate, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium; Saquinavir mesilate, Stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride, telmisartan, tomoxetine hydrochloride, treprostinil sodium, trimegestone, trimetrexate; Valdecoxib, venlafaxine hydrochloride; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:12616965

  5. How Clearly Written are Children's Textbooks? or, of Bladderworts and Alfa. Reading Education Report No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Thomas H.; And Others

    Two representative samples of expository prose from sixth grade textbooks (one in science and one in social studies) were analyzed for clarity of explanation. Four text criteria were applied to the analyses: structure, unity, coherence, and audience appropriateness. The results of the analysis suggested that many children's textbooks are not…

  6. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey: The Galaxy Population Detected by ALFALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle

    2012-09-01

    Making use of H I 21 cm line measurements from the ALFALFA survey (α.40) and photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we investigate the global scaling relations and fundamental planes linking stars and gas for a sample of 9417 common galaxies: the α.40-SDSS-GALEX sample. In addition to their H I properties derived from the ALFALFA data set, stellar masses (M *) and star formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fitting the UV-optical spectral energy distributions. 96% of the α.40-SDSS-GALEX galaxies belong to the blue cloud, with the average gas fraction f H I ≡ M H I /M * ~ 1.5. A transition in star formation (SF) properties is found whereby below M * ~ 109.5 M ⊙, the slope of the star-forming sequence changes, the dispersion in the specific star formation rate (SSFR) distribution increases, and the star formation efficiency (SFE) mildly increases with M *. The evolutionary track in the SSFR-M * diagram, as well as that in the color-magnitude diagram, is linked to the H I content; below this transition mass, the SF is regulated strongly by the H I. Comparison of H I and optically selected samples over the same restricted volume shows that the H I-selected population is less evolved and has overall higher SFR and SSFR at a given stellar mass, but lower SFE and extinction, suggesting either that a bottleneck exists in the H I-to-H2 conversion or that the process of SF in the very H I-dominated galaxies obeys an unusual, low-efficiency SF law. A trend is found that, for a given stellar mass, high gas fraction galaxies reside preferentially in dark matter halos with high spin parameters. Because it represents a full census of H I-bearing galaxies at z ~ 0, the scaling relations and fundamental planes derived for the ALFALFA population can be used to assess the H I detection rate by future blind H I surveys and intensity mapping experiments at higher redshift. Based on observations made with the Arecibo Observatory. The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968) and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana and the Universities Space Research Association.

  7. Interleukin-12 Followed by Interferon Alfa in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Storage and treatment of SNF of Alfa class nuclear submarines: current status and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatiev, Sviatoslav; Zabudko, Alexey; Pankratov, Dmitry; Somov, Ivan; Suvorov, Gennady

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The current status and main problems associated with storage, defueling and following treatment of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of Nuclear Submarines (NS) with heavy liquid metal cooled reactors are considered. In the final analysis these solutions could be realized in the form of separate projects to be funded through national and bi- and multilateral funding in the framework of the international collaboration of the Russian Federation on complex utilization of NS and rehabilitation of contaminated objects allocated in the North-West region of Russia. (authors)

  9. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY: THE GALAXY POPULATION DETECTED BY ALFALFA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jarle@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2012-09-10

    Making use of H I 21 cm line measurements from the ALFALFA survey ({alpha}.40) and photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we investigate the global scaling relations and fundamental planes linking stars and gas for a sample of 9417 common galaxies: the {alpha}.40-SDSS-GALEX sample. In addition to their H I properties derived from the ALFALFA data set, stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fitting the UV-optical spectral energy distributions. 96% of the {alpha}.40-SDSS-GALEX galaxies belong to the blue cloud, with the average gas fraction f{sub HI} {identical_to} M{sub HI}/M{sub *} {approx} 1.5. A transition in star formation (SF) properties is found whereby below M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }, the slope of the star-forming sequence changes, the dispersion in the specific star formation rate (SSFR) distribution increases, and the star formation efficiency (SFE) mildly increases with M{sub *}. The evolutionary track in the SSFR-M{sub *} diagram, as well as that in the color-magnitude diagram, is linked to the H I content; below this transition mass, the SF is regulated strongly by the H I. Comparison of H I and optically selected samples over the same restricted volume shows that the H I-selected population is less evolved and has overall higher SFR and SSFR at a given stellar mass, but lower SFE and extinction, suggesting either that a bottleneck exists in the H I-to-H{sub 2} conversion or that the process of SF in the very H I-dominated galaxies obeys an unusual, low-efficiency SF law. A trend is found that, for a given stellar mass, high gas fraction galaxies reside preferentially in dark matter halos with high spin parameters. Because it represents a full census of H I-bearing galaxies at z {approx} 0, the scaling relations and fundamental planes derived for the ALFALFA population can be used to assess the H I detection rate by future blind H I surveys and intensity mapping experiments at higher redshift.

  10. Interleukin-2 Plus Interferon Alfa in Treating Adults With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-10

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Tailoring of a metastable material: alfa-FeSi2 thin film

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, Guixin; Singh, David J; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Samolyuk, German D; Qiao, Liang; Parish, Chad M; Ke, Jin; Zhang, Yanwen; Guo, Hangwen; Wang, Wenbin; et al

    2015-01-01

    The epitaxially stabilized metallic -FeSi2 thin films on Si(001) were grown using pulsed laser deposition. While the bulk material of -FeSi2 is a high temperature metastable phase and nonmagnetic, the thin film is stabilized at room temperature and shows unusual electronic transport and magnetic properties due to strain modification. The transport renders two different conducting states with a strong crossover at 50 K accompanied by an onset of ferromagnetism as well as a substantial magnetocaloric effect and magnetoresistance. These experimental results are discussed in terms of the unusual electronic structure of -FeSi2 obtained within density functional calculations and Boltzmann transportmore » calculations with and without strain. Our findings provide an example of a tailored material with interesting physics properties for practical applications.« less

  12. HI Absorption Lines Detected from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong-zu, Wu; Martha P, Haynes; Riccardo, Giovanelli; Ming, Zhu; Ru-rong, Chen

    2015-10-01

    We present some preliminary results of an on-going study of HI 21-cm absorption lines based on the 40% survey data released by the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA). (1) Ten HI candidate absorbers have been detected. Five of them are previously published in the literature, and the rest of them are new detections that need further confirmation. (2) For those sources with no detected absorptions, we have calculated the upper limit of their foreground HI column density NHI. The statistical result of the NHI distribution indicates that the ratio Ts/f between the averaged spin temperature and coverage factor for DLAs (the damped Lyα systems) might be larger than 500 K. The radio frequency interference (RFI) and standing wave are the main factors affecting the detection of HI absorption lines, which have been analyzed and discussed as well in order to find a method of solution. Our study can serve as a pathfinder for the future large-scale search of HI 21-cm absorption lines using the Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), which is an Arecibo-type radio telescope currently under construction in China with greatly increased sensitivity, bandwidth, and observational sky area. As prospects, we have discussed two types of observational studies of HI absorption lines toward extragalactic sources using the FAST telescope.

  13. Messenger RNAs bearing tRNA-like features exemplified by interferon alfa 5 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Toledano, Rosa; Gómez, Jordi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to ascertain whether liver mRNA species share common structural features with hepatitis C virus (HCV) mRNA that allow them to support the RNase-P (pre-tRNA/processing enzyme) cleavage reaction in vitro. The presence of RNase-P competitive elements in the liver mRNA population was determined by means of biochemical techniques, and a set of sensitive mRNA species were identified through microarray screening. Cleavage specificity and substrate length requirement of around 200 nts, were determined for three mRNA species. One of these cleavage sites was found in interferon-alpha 5 (IFNA5) mRNA between specific base positions and with the characteristic RNase-P chemistry of cleavage. It was mapped within a cloverleaf-like structure revealed by a comparative structural analysis based on several direct enzymes and chemical probing methods of three RNA fragments of increasing size, and subsequently contrasted against site-directed mutants. The core region was coincident with the reported signal for the cytoplasmic accumulation region (CAR) in IFNAs. Striking similarities with the tRNA-like element of the antagonist HCV mRNA were found. In general, this study provides a new way of looking at a variety of viral tRNA-like motifs as this type of structural mimicry might be related to specific host mRNA species rather than, or in addition to, tRNA itself. PMID:25900662

  14. Dinamica numerica di microsonde verso Alfa Centauri con impulsi LASER su vele spaziali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-05-01

    Starshot project aims to reach alpha Centauri at 4.4 light years in 24 years, by accelerating to velocity 0.2 c with collimated LASER light pressure for 1000s several grams-scale microprobes with space sails. The energetics and dynamical equations are solved numerically on a worksheet and discussed.

  15. Gateways to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, and provides information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiciximab, acetylcholine chloride, acetylcysteine, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen, alteplase, aminopterin, amoxicillin sodium, amphotericin B, anastrozole, argatroban monohydrate, arsenic trioxide, aspirin, atazanavir, atorvastatin, augmerosen, azathioprine; Benzylpenicillin, BMS-284756, botulinum toxin type A, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, budesonide, BXT-51072; Calcium folinate, carbamazepine, carboplatin, carmustine, ceftriaxone sodium, cefuroxime axetil, chorionic gonadotropin (human), cimetidine, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, cisplatin, citalopram hydrobromide, cladribine, clarithromycin, clavulanic acid, clofarabine, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clotrimazole, CNI-1493, colesevelam hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, cytarabine; Dalteparin sodium, daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, debrisoquine sulfate, dexrazoxane, diaziquone, didanosine, docetaxel, donezepil, doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome injection, DX-9065a; Eberconazole, ecogramostim, eletriptan, enoxaparin sodium, epoetin, epoprostenol sodium, erlizumab, ertapenem sodium, ezetimibe; Fampridine, fenofibrate, filgrastim, fluconazole, fludarabine phosphate, fluorouracil, 5-fluorouracil/epinephrine, fondaparinux sodium, formoterol fumarate; Gabapentin, gemcitabine, gemfibrozil, glatiramer; Heparin sodium, homoharringtonine; Ibuprofen, iloprost, imatinib mesilate, imiquimod, interferon alpha-2b, interferon alpha-2c, interferon-beta; KW-6002; Lamotrigine, lanoteplase, metoprolol tartrate, mitoxantrone hydrochloride; Naproxen sodium, naratriptan, Natalizumab, nelfinavir mesilate

  16. [POLYMORPHISM OF ALFA-AMYLASE AND CONJUGATION IN COMMON WHEAT ENZYME TYPES WITH QUANTITATIVE TRAITS OF PLANTS].

    PubMed

    Netsvetaev, V P; Bondarenko, L S; Motorina, I P

    2015-01-01

    Using polymorphism of alpha-amylase in the winter common wheat studied inheritance isoenzymes and its conjugation enzyme types with germinating grain on the "vine", grain productivity, plant height and time of ear formation. It is shown that the polymorphism isoenzyme of alpha-amylase wheat is limited by the presence of different loci whose products are similar in electrophoretic parameters. In this regard, one component of the enzyme can be controlling at one or two or three genes. Identification of a locus controlling alpha-amylase isoenzyme in the fast moving part of the electrophoretogram, designated as α-Amy-B7. Determine the distance of the locus to factor α-Amy-B6. PMID:26841490

  17. Understanding early serum hepatitis D virus and HBsAg kinetics during pegylated interferon-alfa therapy via mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Jeremie; Rotman, Yaron; Cotler, Scott J.; Koh, Christopher; Schmid, Peter; Albrecht, Jeff; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Liang, Jake T.; Hoofnagle, Jay H.; Heller, Theo; Dahari, Harel

    2014-01-01

    There is little information on the early kinetics of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) during interferon-α therapy. Here a mathematical model was developed and fitted to frequent HDV and HBsAg kinetic data from 10 patients during the first 28 weeks of pegylated-interferon-α2a (peg-IFN) therapy. Three patients achieved a complete virological response (CVR), defined as undetectable HDV 6 months after treatment stopped with loss of HBsAg and anti-HBsAg seroconversion. After initiation of therapy a median delay of 9 days (interquartile range IQR:[5;15]) was observed with no significant changes in HDV level. Thereafter, HDV declined in a biphasic manner, where a rapid first-phase lasting for 25 days (IQR:[23;58]) was followed by a slower or plateau second-phase. The model predicts that the main effect of peg-IFN is to reduce HDV production/release with a median effectiveness of 96% (IQR:[93;99.8]). Median serum HDV half-life (t1/2) was estimated to 2.9 days (IQR:[1.5;5.3]) with pretreatment production and clearance of about 1010 (IQR:[109.8-1010.8]) virions/day. None of the patients with flat 2nd phase in HDV achieved CVR. HBsAg kinetics of decline paralleled the second-phase of HDV decline consistent with HBsAg-productive-infected cells being the main source of production of HDV, with a median t1/2 of 135 days (IQR:[20-460]. The interferon lambda-3 polymorphism (rs12979860) was not associated with kinetic parameters. Conclusions Modeling results provide insights into HDV-host dynamics, the relationship between serum HBsAg levels and HBsAg-infected cells, IFN's mode of action and its effectiveness. The observation that a flat second phase in HDV and HBsAg kinetics was associated with failure to achieve CVR provides the basis to develop early stopping rules during peg-IFN treatment in HDV-infected patients. PMID:25098971

  18. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. [Study of the behavior of the vegetative meristem of alfa (Stipa tenacissima L.). Cytological and histological approaches].

    PubMed

    Mehdadi, Z; Benaouda, Z; Bouchaour, I; Moulessehoul, S; Joseph, M; Delcourt, A

    2000-01-01

    The biological and cytological studies of the vegetative meristem of Stipa tenacissima L. gave clear indication about its structure. It was similar to what was previously described in several species. This meristem showed an axial apical zone constituted by sommital cells of both tunica and corpus, a sub-apical lateral zone, very chromophilous, representing the initial ring and a medullar meristem. The cytofluorimetric determination of DNA in interphasic nuclei of these three zones revealed that the nuclei of the apical and lateral zones were in S phase, announcing the beginning of mitosis and meaning that these zones were the centers of the foliar initiation. The medullar meristem was in dormancy: all the nuclei were in G1 phase. PMID:11324322

  20. Sialadenitis following low dose I-131 diagnostic thyroid scan with Thyrogen® (recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone - thyrotropin alfa)

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Marta E; Muttikkal, Thomas Jose Eluvathingal; Rehm, Patrice K

    2015-01-01

    Salivary dysfunction and sialadenitis are well known complications of radioiodine treatment for thyroid cancer. The parotid gland is more frequently affected and the salivary gland injury is dose related. The symptoms may develop shortly after therapeutic Iodine 131(I-131) administration or months later and progress with time. The development of unilateral parotiditis following a low dose, diagnostic I-131 scan performed following Thyrogen stimulation in a patient without prior history of sialadenitis is rare in our experience, and has not been reported in the medical literature. PMID:26622936

  1. Sciami meteorici minori d'Agosto: le Piscis Austrinidi, le alfa Capricornidi e le delta Acquaridi meridionali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-09-01

    The Piscis Austrinids, PAU, Alpha Capricornids CAP, and Southern Delta Acquarids SDA meteors are minor shower during the month of August, occurring during the most famous Perseids shower. These rare meteors are 'fossil' of their parent body (comet or asteroid) already destroyed since several thousands of years. Useful observations can give information on their dynamics and density.

  2. CONSORT: Effects of adding adefovirdipivoxil to peginterferon alfa-2a at different time points on HBeAg-positivepatients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ka; Cao, Hong; Liang, Jiayi; Shu, Xin; Sun, Haixia; Li, Gang; Xu, Qihuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy and safety of the addition of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) (started at different time points) to pegylated interferon alpha-2a (PEG-INF-α2a) and PEG-INF-α2a monotherapy. This prospective, randomized study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of PEG-INF-α2a and ADV at different time points.120 patients were randomized into groups that received PEG-INF-α2a as monotherapy (group A) or in combination with ADV started at week 0 (group B), 12 (group C), or 24 (group D). All patients were followed for 48 weeks. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed. Methods: Patients in group a received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a by subcutaneous injection once weekly for 48 weeks. Patients in the ADV add-on group received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a subcutaneously once weekly and received 10 mg of ADV administered once daily for 48 weeks. HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBeAg, and hepatitis B e antibody levels were determined. Responses were determined at week 12 (ADV add-on), the end of treatment for PEG-INF-α2a (48weeks) and ADV (EOT) and at the end of 96 weeks of follow-up (EOF). Results: The rate of HBV DNA loss were higher in the combination groups than group A at the week 12, week 48, the EOT and EOF (P < 0.05). The rates of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss were similar among the treatment groups (P>0.05). The alanineaminotransferase (ALT) normalization rate was higher in the combination group than group A only at the EOT (P = 0.007). By the EOF, the patients with ADV added at week 12 achieved higher rates of HBV DNA loss (71.9%), HBeAg seroconversion (50.0%), HBsAg loss (15.6%), and ALT normalization (78.1%). Conclusions: PEG-INF-α2a plus ADV combination therapy is safe and superior to PEG-INF-α2amonotherapyfor decreasing serum HBV DNA and normalizing the ALT level but has no significant impact on the rate of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss. Adding ADV at week 12 may be an optimal combination strategy. PMID:27495085

  3. Risk of Orthopedic Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated with Antitumor Necrosis Factor Alfa Therapy

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Bernardo Matos; Maria Henrique da Mota, Licia; dos Santos-Neto, Leopoldo Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. International guidelines recommend interruption of anti-TNF medications in the perioperative period, but there are no randomized trials to support such recommendation. Objectives. To study literature evidence assessing the risk of surgical site infections in orthopedic surgery patients with RA using anti-TNF drugs, compared to untreated patients or those using conventional DMARD. Methods. Systematic review of cohort studies is concerning surgical site infections in orthopedic procedures in patients with RA. Results. Three studies were selected. Only one was considered of high-quality, albeit with low statistical power. The review resulted in inconclusive data, since the best quality study showed no significant differences between groups, while others showed increased risk of infections in patients using anti-TNF medications. Conclusion. It is unclear whether patients with RA using anti-TNF medications are at increased risk of surgical site infections. Randomized controlled trials or new high quality observational studies are needed to clarify the issue. PMID:22500176

  4. Gateways to Clinical Trials. June 2002.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, abciximab, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, alteplase, amlodipine, amoxicillin trihydrate, amprenavir, argatroban monohydrate, aspirin, atorvastatin calcium, azathioprine; Baclofen, benidipine hydrochloride, benserazide, BMS-214662, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Candesartan cilexetil, carbamazepine, carbidopa, carboplatin, ceftriaxone sodium, celecoxib, cetirizine hydrochloride, clarithromycin, clavulanate potassium, clopidogrel hydrogensulfate, clozapine, CPI-1189, cyclophosphamide, cytarabine; Darbepoetin alfa, denileukin diftitox, dexamethasone, dipyridamole, droperidol, DW-166HC; Ebastine, efalizumab, efavirenz, eletriptan, enalapril maleate, enfuvirtide, enoxaparin sodium, enrasentan, entacapone, epoetin, eprosartan mesilate, etanercept, etoricoxib; Fenofibratefexofenadine hydrochloride, filgrastim, fludarabine phosphate, fluoxetine hydrochloride fluvoxamine maleate, frovatriptan, furosemide; Gabapentin, galantamine hydrobromide, gatifloxacin, gefitinib, ghrelin (human), glatiramer acetate; Haloperidol; Ibuprofen, ibuprofen, guaiacol ester, idarubicin hydrochloride, imipramine hydrochloride, imiquimod, interferon beta, interferon beta-1a, interferon beta-1b, interferon omega, irbesartan, itraconazole; Ketorolac, ketorolac tromethamine; Lamifiban, lamotrigine, lanoteplase, lansoprazole, leflunomide, leuprorelin acetate, levetiracetam, levocetirizine, levodopa, lisinopril, loratadine; Manidipine, methylprednisolone, metronidazole, mirtazapine, mizolastine, modafinil, morphine sulfate; Naproxen sodium, naratriptan hydrochloride, nifedipine, NSC-683864; Ofloxacin, olanzapine

  5. High-Dose Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2B, Ipilimumab, or Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV High Risk Melanoma That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Metastatic Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Stage III Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVB Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVC Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck

  6. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey: The α.40 H I Source Catalog, Its Characteristics and Their Impact on the Derivation of the H I Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Martin, Ann M.; Hess, Kelley M.; Saintonge, Amélie; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Huang, Shan; Kent, Brian R.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Papastergis, Emmanouil; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Balonek, Thomas J.; Craig, David W.; Higdon, Sarah J. U.; Kornreich, David A.; Miller, Jeffrey R.; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Olowin, Ronald P.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Spekkens, Kristine; Troischt, Parker; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2011-11-01

    We present a current catalog of 21 cm H I line sources extracted from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) survey over ~2800 deg2 of sky: the α.40 catalog. Covering 40% of the final survey area, the α.40 catalog contains 15,855 sources in the regions 07h30m < R.A. < 16h30m, +04° < decl. <+16°, and +24° < decl. <+28° and 22h < R.A. < 03h, +14° < decl. <+16°, and +24° < decl. < + 32°. Of those, 15,041 are certainly extragalactic, yielding a source density of 5.3 galaxies per deg2, a factor of 29 improvement over the catalog extracted from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey. In addition to the source centroid positions, H I line flux densities, recessional velocities, and line widths, the catalog includes the coordinates of the most probable optical counterpart of each H I line detection, and a separate compilation provides a cross-match to identifications given in the photometric and spectroscopic catalogs associated with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. Fewer than 2% of the extragalactic H I line sources cannot be identified with a feasible optical counterpart; some of those may be rare OH megamasers at 0.16 < z < 0.25. A detailed analysis is presented of the completeness, width-dependent sensitivity function and bias inherent of the α.40 catalog. The impact of survey selection, distance errors, current volume coverage, and local large-scale structure on the derivation of the H I mass function is assessed. While α.40 does not yet provide a completely representative sampling of cosmological volume, derivations of the H I mass function using future data releases from ALFALFA will further improve both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  7. Consensus protocol for the use of recombinant activated factor VII [eptacog alfa (activated); NovoSeven] in elective orthopaedic surgery in haemophilic patients with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, P L F; Wilde, J T; Madan, B; Ludlam, C A; Tuddenham, E G D; Goddard, N J; Dolan, G; Ingerslev, J

    2009-03-01

    Patients with haemophilia complicated by inhibitors have a significant burden of joint disease, which is associated with a negative impact on their quality of life. Successful elective orthopaedic surgery can result in decreased bleed frequency into a new joint, less time spent in hospital, increased mobility and improved well being. This paper describes a new protocol for use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in elective orthopaedic surgery, based on a review of published data as well as the personal experience of a group of expert physicians. The protocol offers guidance on the planning of the surgery and preoperative testing as well as the bolus schedule for rFVIIa and advice on the concomitant use of antifibrinolytic agents and fibrin sealants. A total of 10 operations involving 13 procedures in eight patients in five comprehensive care centres have been undertaken until now using the protocol, which employs an initial bolus dose of rFVIIa in the range of 120-180 microg kg(-1) to cover surgery. The clinical experience reported here encompasses all cases of elective orthopaedic surgery using rFVIIa as initial treatment carried out in the UK and Republic of Ireland over the last 2 years. In all cases, there was good control of haemostasis during surgery and the final outcome was rated as 'excellent' or 'extremely satisfactory' by the reporting clinicians. Although the initial cost of product to cover surgery such as arthroplasty is high, it needs to be borne in mind that this may be offset in subsequent years by savings resulting from avoidance of bleeding episodes in the affected joint. PMID:19187194

  8. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY: THE {alpha}.40 H I SOURCE CATALOG, ITS CHARACTERISTICS AND THEIR IMPACT ON THE DERIVATION OF THE H I MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Martin, Ann M.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Hallenbeck, Gregory; Huang Shan; Papastergis, Emmanouil E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: shan@astro.cornell.edu; and others

    2011-11-15

    We present a current catalog of 21 cm H I line sources extracted from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA) survey over {approx}2800 deg{sup 2} of sky: the {alpha}.40 catalog. Covering 40% of the final survey area, the {alpha}.40 catalog contains 15,855 sources in the regions 07{sup h}30{sup m} < R.A. < 16{sup h}30{sup m}, +04 Degree-Sign < decl. <+16 Degree-Sign , and +24 Degree-Sign < decl. <+28 Degree-Sign and 22{sup h} < R.A. < 03{sup h}, +14 Degree-Sign < decl. <+16 Degree-Sign , and +24 Degree-Sign < decl. < + 32 Degree-Sign . Of those, 15,041 are certainly extragalactic, yielding a source density of 5.3 galaxies per deg{sup 2}, a factor of 29 improvement over the catalog extracted from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey. In addition to the source centroid positions, H I line flux densities, recessional velocities, and line widths, the catalog includes the coordinates of the most probable optical counterpart of each H I line detection, and a separate compilation provides a cross-match to identifications given in the photometric and spectroscopic catalogs associated with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. Fewer than 2% of the extragalactic H I line sources cannot be identified with a feasible optical counterpart; some of those may be rare OH megamasers at 0.16 < z < 0.25. A detailed analysis is presented of the completeness, width-dependent sensitivity function and bias inherent of the {alpha}.40 catalog. The impact of survey selection, distance errors, current volume coverage, and local large-scale structure on the derivation of the H I mass function is assessed. While {alpha}.40 does not yet provide a completely representative sampling of cosmological volume, derivations of the H I mass function using future data releases from ALFALFA will further improve both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  9. ALTERED SENSITIVITY OF THE MOUSE FETUS TO IMPAIRED PROSTATIC BUD FORMATION BY DIOXIN: INFLUENCE OF GENETIC BACKGROUND AND NULL EXPRESSION OF TGF-ALFA AND EGF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered sensitivity of the mouse fetus to impaired prostatic bud formation by dioxin: Influence of genetic background and null expression of TGF and EGF.
    Rasmussen, N.T., Lin T-M., Fenton, S.E., Abbott, B.D. and R.E. Peterson.
    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)...

  10. Protein isolated from biopharmaceutical formulations cannot be used for comparative studies: Follow-up to "a case study using Epoetin Alfa from Epogen and EPREX".

    PubMed

    Heavner, G A; Arakawa, T; Philo, J S; Calmann, M A; Labrenz, S

    2007-12-01

    In the biotechnology area, the issue of comparability with an innovator product is complex. Ideally, a side-by-side comparison of physical properties would be part of the demonstration of comparability. However, biogeneric companies do not have access to the bulk drug substance from the innovator company for biophysical comparison, and isolation of protein from marketed product cannot be guaranteed to produce material that is identical to the bulk drug substance from which it was prepared. In a recently published study, protein was isolated from marketed product and comparative studies performed. In a follow-up investigation of the published work, we demonstrate here that even a simple isolation procedure can significantly compromise the protein, which raises serious questions about the interpretation of that study, and in a broader context the value of any studies done with such "out-of-process" protein. PMID:17721976

  11. 2007 Standards, Options, and Recommendations: use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA: epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, and darbepoetin) for the management of anemia in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Marec-Berard, Perrine; Chastagner, Pascal; Kassab-Chahmi, Diana; Casadevall, Nicole; Marchal, Christian; Misset, Jean-Louis; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2009-07-01

    The Standards, Options, and Recommendations (SOR) project undertaken by the French National Federation of Cancer Centers (FNCLCC) to develop and disseminate clinical practice guidelines in oncology has now been taken over by the French National Cancer Institute. In 2007, the SOR updated the information related to the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) in anemic children with cancer. Updates were based on a review of the most reliable scientific data available, followed by critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts and validation by independent experts. The literature review identified four randomized trials likely to provide reliable new information on the use of ESA in children. This review confirmed four points: treatment increases hemoglobin levels and decreases the need for blood transfusions; no quality-of-life and no survival benefit has been demonstrated; treatment does not seem associated with significantly more side effects; impact on thromboembolic events and patient quality of life remains unclear. The main result of the study was the elaboration of a new standard of care unavailable at the time of the 2003 version. Systematic administration of ESA is not recommended for the prevention or treatment of anemia in pediatric cancer patients. However, treatment decision must be made on a case-by-case basis and, when treatment is considered, the intravenous route must be preferred. The full French document is available at www.sor-cancer.fr. PMID:19229970

  12. Concentration-guided ribavirin dosing with darbepoetin support and peg-IFN alfa-2a for treatment of hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ackefors, M; Gjertsen, H; Wernerson, A; Weiland, O

    2012-09-01

    Relapse of hepatitis C virus infection after liver transplantation is universal. Standard-of-care (SOC) treatment for relapse offers less satisfactory treatment response than in nontransplanted patients. Tolerance for treatment is suboptimal and withdrawals owing to adverse events induced by treatment frequent. To improve tolerance for SOC, and ribavirin (RBV) in particular, concentration-guided RBV dosing calculated by a formula taking renal function and weight into consideration was utilized. A serum RBV concentration of 10 μm was set as the goal. All patients were given maintenance darbepoetin therapy from 2 weeks prior to initiation of treatment. In total, 21 patients with a mean age of 52 (range 25-64) years were included. The mean RBV concentration at week 4 was 10.2 and 7.36 μm in genotype 1/4 and non-1/4 patients, respectively, and 11.7 and 9.42 at week 12. The mean haemoglobin drop was 25 g/L vs 21 g/L in the genotype 1/4 and non-1/4 group, respectively, a nonsignificant difference. With this treatment approach, 80-90% of patients could be kept adherent to treatment. Sustained viral response was achieved 8/16 (50%) with low-grade fibrosis (fibrosis stage ≤ 2) vs in none of five patients with advanced fibrosis (Fibrosis stage 3 and 4), P < 0.05. We conclude that a treatment algorithm utilizing concentration-guided RBV dosing during darbepoetin maintenance therapy substantially improves tolerance and allows high adherence to a SOC treatment schedule, and that therapy needs to be initiated before advanced fibrosis is developed. PMID:22863267

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis following PEG-interferon-alfa-2a plus ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of Pegylated Interferon-alpha (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin is the current standard of care for the treatment of HCV infection. Unfortunately, IFN-α may lead to the induction or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, such as psoriasis, thyroiditis, systemic lupus erythematosus and, rarely, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Case presentation We report the case of a man affected with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) due to HCV genotype 3a infection, who developed RA after a complete course of PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin. Nine weeks after cessation of antiviral treatment, the patient developed symmetrical polyarthritis, with pain and edema in the wrists, knees, shoulders and metacarpophalangeal joints; magnetic resonance imaging detected initial bone erosions with juxta-articular osteopenia in wrist, knee and hand joints. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies were positive. Conclusions Autoimmune diseases, including RA, may occur when treating chronic hepatitis C with PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin; therefore, a close surveillance for the occurrence of autoimmune phenomena should be suggested in the setting of HCV management. PMID:24171974

  14. [Treatment of multiple myeloma with high-dose chemotherapy and transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells and subsequent maintenance therapy with interferon alfa-2b or interferon alfa 2b and dexamethasone. Report of the ongoing study of the "4W" Czech Myeloma Group].

    PubMed

    Adam, Z; Krejcí, M; Bacovský, J; Hejlová, N; Kuca, B; Svojgrová, M; Franková, H; Gumulec, J; Janca, J; Veprek, K; Januska, B; Lehanka, F; Rezek, Z; Praskac, P; Cahová, S; Vránová, M; Papajík, T; Králová, E; Novotná, J; Scudla, V; Koza, V; Drbal, J; Faber, E; Mareschová, I; Hájek, R

    1998-07-01

    We report our results with high-dose chemotherapy in previously untreated multiple myeloma patients (4 courses of VAD chemotherapy, collection of PBSC after priming with cyclophosphamide, 5 g/m2, high-dose chemotherapy with melphalan, 200 mg/m2). Second transplantation was indicated only for patients who did not achieve remission after the first high-dose therapy (paraprotein lower than 25% of the pretreatment value). For the second transplantation melphalan (200 mg/m2) with methylprednisolone (1.5 g for 5 days) were used as conditioning regimen. After high-dose therapy all patients were randomized into two arms of maintenance therapy: interferon alpha-2b or sequential maintenance therapy (interferon alpha-2b for 3 months followed after 4 week pause by 40 mg of dexamethasone days 1-4, 10-13 and 20-23. The administration of interferon alpha was resumed four weeks after the last dexamethasone for next three months. The maintenance therapy continued for 48 months or until the progression. Fifty-five patients were enrolled in the study from January 1996 to August 1997. Thirty-five patients have undergone the first transplantation and 57% of them reached complete remission. There were 10% of non-responders after the first high-dose regimen. The mean time to reach white blood cell count above 1 x 10(9)/L after the application of high dose melphalan and platelets more than 50 x 10(9)/L were 12.2 (range 6-16 days) and 12.4 (range 0-25 days), respectively. Grade 4 mucositis according to SWOG classification requiring total parenteral nutrition was presented in 40% of the patients. The mean number of 1 unit of platelets and 2 units of packed red blood cells transfusions were given within the posttransplant period. Early transplant related mortality was 3%. This paper describes the response and tolerance of each particular step of therapy. The follow-up has been too short to evaluate event-free and overall survivals. PMID:9748876

  15. Formulation and Evaluation of Galantamine Gel as Drug Reservoir in Transdermal Patch Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Fong Yen, Woo; Basri, Mahiran; Ahmad, Mansor; Ismail, Maznah

    2015-01-01

    Galantamine hydrobromide is formulated in tablets and capsules prescribed through oral delivery for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. However, oral delivery of drugs can cause severe side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Transdermal delivery of galantamine hydrobromide could avoid these unwanted side effects. In this work, galantamine hydrobromide was formulated in gel drug reservoir which was then fabricated in the transdermal patch. The in vitro drug release studies revealed that the drug release from the donor chamber to receptor chamber of Franz diffusion cell was affected by the amount of polymer, amount of neutralizer, amount of drug, types of permeation enhancer, and amount of permeation enhancer. Visual observations of the gels showed that all formulated gels are translucent, homogeneous, smooth, and stable. These gels have pH in the suitable range for skin. The gel also showed high drug content uniformity. Hence, this formulation can be further used in the preparation of transdermal patch drug delivery system. PMID:25853145

  16. Pharmacokinetics of peginterferons.

    PubMed

    Zeuzem, Stefan; Welsch, Christoph; Herrmann, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Two polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified interferons are approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. The pharmocokinetic properties of the branched 40 kDa pegylated interferon alfa-2a differ from the linear 12 kDa pegylated interferon alfa-2b. The absorption half-life of standard interferon alfa is 2.3 hours, while absorption half-lives for peginterferon alfa-2a and alfa-2b are 50 hours and 4.6 hours, respectively. The volume of distribution for peginterferon alfa-2a is considerably restricted, while the volume of distribution for peginterferon alfa-2b is only approximately 30% lower than that for conventional interferon. Because of its large size, the 40 kD peginterferon alfa-2a has a more than 100-fold reduction in renal clearance compared with conventional interferon alfa. Clearance of peginterferon alfa-2b is about one-tenth that of unmodified interferon alfa. Although data are limited, both drugs appear to show differences in the initial viral decay pattern in patients with chronic hepatitis C. However, it remains unknown whether these differences in the initial viral decline predict differences in the primary clinical endpoint, sustained virological response. PMID:12934165

  17. Dasatinib combined with interferon-alfa induces a complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia harboring the T315I BCR-ABL1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, A Megan; Welch, Mary-Alma; Koller, Charles; Jabbour, Elias

    2011-06-01

    Mutations of BCR-ABL1 are observed in 50% of patients with imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The T315I mutation is resistant to imatinib and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We report the case of a 57-year-old man diagnosed with CML in 2003 in whom imatinib therapy failed after which he acquired the T315I mutation. He was treated sequentially with an anti-T315I-specific agent, KW-2449, that led to eradication of the mutation without any further improvement. Subsequent introduction of combination therapy that included dasatinib and pegylated interferon led to the achievement of a sustained complete cytogenetic and major molecular response (MMR). This case illustrates the benefit of combination therapy that includes a TKI and a second agent with a different mechanism of action, either sequentially (TKI followed by KW-2449) or concomitantly (TKI + interferon), in eradicating resistant disease with the T315I clone. PMID:22035739

  18. Coulometric determination of some antiasthmatics.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, K; Arsenijevec, L; Bogavac, M

    1993-03-01

    A simple and rapid method for the assay of microquantities of fenoterol hydrobromide, orciprenaline sulphate and terbutaline sulphate in pure state and various pharmaceutical formulations, is presented. The method is based on the coulometric titration of the investigated compounds with electrogenerated chlorine in the presence of methyl orange as indicator. The method requires a simple apparatus and gives accurate and reproducible results. PMID:8518319

  19. Nebulized scopolamine in the management of oral dribbling: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G

    1999-04-01

    Difficulty swallowing saliva or its excessive production may be problematic for some patients. The resulting oral dribbling is often embarrassing. Three patients were admitted for hospice care complaining of oral dribbling. Each patient was given nebulized scopolamine hydrobromide which helped lessen the dribbling. PMID:10203882

  20. Analysis of Dextromethorphan in Cough Drops and Syrups: A Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Todd M.; Wiseman, Frank L., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the quantity of dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DM) in over-the-counter (OTC) cough drops and syrups. This experiment is appropriate for an undergraduate medicinal chemistry laboratory course when studying OTC medicines and active ingredients. Students prepare the cough drops and syrups for analysis,…

  1. 21 CFR 558.265 - Halofuginone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... grams of halofuginone hydrobromide per kilogram. (b) Approvals. See No. 016592 in § 510.600(c) of this... feed for broiler chickens as follows: (i) Amount. 2.72 grams per ton. (A) Indications for use. For the.... (ii) Amount per ton. Halofuginone 2.72 grams (0.0003 percent) plus bambermycins 1 to 2 grams....

  2. Free-surface phenomena under low- and zero-gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, D.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus to measure contact angle was constructed to exploit the proposed internal-corner criterion. If 2 alfa is the internal angle between two intersecting vertical planes and gamma is the contact angle, a meniscus at the corner rises to a finite height if alfa + gamma pi/2 and to an infinite height if alfa + gamma pi/2. The apparatus operates by decreasing the angle alfa from pi/2 until the meniscus height changes abruptly. A number of liquids are tested on glass and plexiglas.

  3. Peginterferon Lambda-1a Is Associated with a Low Incidence of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, Paul; Hillson, Jan; Gray, Todd; Shemanski, Lynn; Dimitrova, Dessislava; Srinivasan, Subasree

    2015-11-01

    Peginterferon alfa (alfa) increases the risk of autoimmune disease. Peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda) acts through a receptor with a more liver-specific distribution compared to the alfa receptor. In a phase-2b study, 525 treatment-naive patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection received ribavirin and Lambda interferon (120, 180, or 240 μg) or alfa interferon (180 μg) for 24 (genotypes 2 and 3) or 48 (genotypes 1 and 4) weeks. Retrospective analysis found that adverse events of MedDRA-coded thyroid dysfunction and abnormal levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were significantly more frequent with alfa versus Lambda (12% versus 2.6% and 15.2% versus 3.4%, respectively, both P<0.0001). Most Lambda recipients with abnormal TSH had levels below the lower limit of normal; the frequency of low and high TSH was similar in alfa recipients with abnormal TSH. Blinded review by an endocrinologist found that new-onset primary hypothyroidism or painless thyroiditis was less frequent with Lambda versus alfa (0.5% and 1.8% versus 5.3% and 7.5%, respectively, P<0.0001). Most TSH elevations reflected new-onset hypothyroidism requiring treatment, while most markedly suppressed TSH values reflected probable painless thyroiditis and resolved without sequelae. In conclusion, HCV-infected patients treated with Lambda/ribavirin experienced fewer adverse events of thyroid dysfunction compared with patients treated with alfa/ribavirin. PMID:26376344

  4. Beyond Higher Education. A Survey and Analysis of the Experience of Access Students Proceeding through the Polytechnic of North London and into Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Verna

    Access to Learning for Adults (ALFA) links education providers and organizations in collaborative work to extend and improve access to education opportunities for adults underrepresented in the system. A survey followed the progress, performance, and experiences of 86 former ALFA students, aged 25 to 49, in London, England, in their seeking of…

  5. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  6. Quantization of Dextromethorphan and Levocetirizine in Combined Dosage form Using a Novel Validated RP-HPLC Method

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shalini; Bhatia, C.; Bal, C. S.; Rawat, M. S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reveals a simple isocratic RP-HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of dextromethorphan hydrobromide and levocetirizine dihydrochloride in a cough syrup. The separation of these compounds was achieved within 10 min on a Phenomenex (USA) C18 analytical column, 250×4.0 mm i.d., using an isocratic mobile phase consisting of potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) - acetonitrile- tetrahydrofuran (70:25:5, v/v/v). The analysis was performed at a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min and at a detection wavelength of 232 nm. Percentage recovery and RSD were 100.36% and 0.05% for levocetirizine dihydrochloride, 100.35% and 0.27% for dextromethorphan hydrobromide respectively. Quantification of the components in syrup formulation was calculated against the peak areas of freshly prepared standard solutions. The method was validated as per ICH guidelines. PMID:23204629

  7. Quantization of Dextromethorphan and Levocetirizine in Combined Dosage form Using a Novel Validated RP-HPLC Method.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shalini; Bhatia, C; Bal, C S; Rawat, M S M

    2012-01-01

    The present study reveals a simple isocratic RP-HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of dextromethorphan hydrobromide and levocetirizine dihydrochloride in a cough syrup. The separation of these compounds was achieved within 10 min on a Phenomenex (USA) C(18) analytical column, 250×4.0 mm i.d., using an isocratic mobile phase consisting of potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) - acetonitrile- tetrahydrofuran (70:25:5, v/v/v). The analysis was performed at a flow rate of 1.2 ml/min and at a detection wavelength of 232 nm. Percentage recovery and RSD were 100.36% and 0.05% for levocetirizine dihydrochloride, 100.35% and 0.27% for dextromethorphan hydrobromide respectively. Quantification of the components in syrup formulation was calculated against the peak areas of freshly prepared standard solutions. The method was validated as per ICH guidelines. PMID:23204629

  8. Experimental Papillary Necrosis of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, R. G.; Hill, G. S.; Murray, G.; Ramsden, P. W.; Heptinstall, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Reserpine is able to exert a pronounced inhibitory effect on the development of papillary necrosis following the administration of bromoethylamine hydrobromide to the rat. This inhibitory effect has been observed using light microscopy, histochemistry, indigo carmine excretion and urine output. These observations suggest that vasoconstriction may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of papillary necrosis, but the evidence for this is incomplete. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6 PMID:4114974

  9. Airborne testing of three antimotion sickness preparations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. H.; Money, K. E.; Graybiel, A.

    1976-01-01

    Thirteen human volunteers were exposed to weekly flights in which standardized, steep turns were used to produce motion sickness. A combination of promethazine hydrochloride (25 mg) plus ephedrine sulphate (25 mg) was found to be equally as effective as the combination of 1-scopolamine hydrobromide (0.35 mg) plus d-amphetamine sulphate (5 mg). Droperidol (2.5 mg) was indistinguishable from the placebo. It was concluded that the treatment of choice for motion sickness is promethazine plus ephedrine.

  10. Activated cholinergic signaling provides a target in squamous cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Pingfang; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Fu, Xiao Wen; Maier, Michelle; Jia, Yibing; Duan, Jie; Proskosil, Becky J; Gravett, Courtney; Lindstrom, Jon; Mark, Gregory P; Saha, Saurabh; Spindel, Eliot R

    2008-06-15

    The binding of exogenous nicotine to nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChR) and the binding of endogenous ACh to both nAChR and muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChR) stimulate growth of both small cell and non-small cell lung carcinomas. Understanding how cholinergic signaling is up-regulated in lung cancer may suggest new therapeutic approaches. Analysis of 28 squamous cell lung carcinomas (SCC) showed increased levels of alpha5 and beta3 nAChR mRNA and increased levels of ACh associated with increased levels of choline acetyltransferase mRNA and decreased cholinesterase mRNAs. Lynx1, an allosteric inhibitor of nAChR activity, was also decreased in SCC. Thus, cholinergic signaling is broadly increased in SCC caused by increased levels of receptors, increased levels of ligands, and decreased levels of receptor inhibitors. Partially explaining the cholinergic up-regulation seen in SCC, incubation of the H520 SCC cell line with nicotine increased levels of ACh secretion, increased expression of nAChR, and, as measured by electrophysiologic recording, increased activity of the expressed nAChR. Consistent with these effects, nicotine stimulated proliferation of H520 cells. One approach to blocking proliferative effects of nicotine and ACh on growth of lung cancers may be through M3 mAChR antagonists, which can limit the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase that is caused by both nicotinic and muscarinic signaling. This was tested with the M3-selective muscarinic antagonist darifenacin. Darifenacin blocked nicotine-stimulated H520 growth in vitro and also blocked H520 growth in nude mice in vivo. Thus, cholinergic signaling is broadly up-regulated in SCC and blocking cholinergic signaling can limit basal and nicotine-stimulated growth of SCC. PMID:18559515

  11. 76 FR 29028 - Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... modification of special permits (e.g. to provide for additional hazardous materials, packaging design changes... Auburn, ME. additional non-bulk packaging. 14457-M Amtrol Alfa 49 CFR To modify the...

  12. Simeprevir

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rebetol) and peginterferon alfa (Pegasys) to treat chronic hepatitis C (an ongoing viral infection that damages the liver). ... inhibitors. It works by decreasing the amount of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the body. Simeprevir may not ...

  13. Boceprevir

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rebetol] and peginterferon alfa [Pegasys]) to treat chronic hepatitis C (an ongoing viral infection that damages the liver) ... inhibitors. It works by decreasing the amount of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the body. Boceprevir may not ...

  14. AIDSinfo Drug Database

    MedlinePlus

    ... B Virus Infection Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B (Recombinant) Vaccine Hepatitis B Vaccine Peginterferon Alfa-2a (HBV, HCV) ... 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58) Vaccine, Recombinant Human Papillomavirus Bivalent (types 16 and 18) Vaccine, ...

  15. Sofosbuvir

    MedlinePlus

    Sofosbuvir is used along with ribavirin (Copegus, Rebetol) and sometimes another medication (peginterferon alfa [Pegasys] to treat ... an ongoing viral infection that damages the liver). Sofosbuvir is also used along with ribavirin (Copegus, Rebetol) ...

  16. Training Strategy: Computer Education for Teachers in Uruguay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunberg, Jorge

    1987-01-01

    Described is the Alfa Project in Uruguay, designed to integrate computer education into secondary schools through teacher-training. Both teacher-users and teacher-authors were considered. Course objectives, curriculum content, and teaching guidelines are presented. (MNS)

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-chTNT; Abatacept, adalimumab, alemtuzumab, APC-8015, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bortezomib, bosentan, buserelin; Caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, ChAGCD3, ciclesonide, clopidogrel, curcumin, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, dapoxetine hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, denosumab, DMXB-Anabaseine, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edodekin alfa, efaproxiral sodium, elaidic acid-cytarabine, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etonogestrel/testosterone decanoate, exenatide; Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, glycine, GVS-111; Homoharringtonine; ICC-1132, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, i.v. gamma-globulin; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, lintuzumab, liposomal nystatin, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Manitimus, mapatumumab, melatonin, micafungin sodium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Oblimersen sodium, OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), pasireotide, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranolazine, rosuvastatin calcium, rubitecan, rupatadine fumarate; Sardomozide, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, talactoferrin alfa, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, testosterone transdermal patch, TH-9507, tigecycline, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tocilizumab, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vandetanib

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-11-01

    Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil, AN-2728, Apixaban, Aripiprazole, Armodafinil, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Atrasentan, Azacitidine, Bevacizumab, Blinatumomab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Carfilzomib, Caspofungin acetate, Cediranib, Cetuximab, Choriogonadotropin alfa, Clevudine, Clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, Clofarabine, Daidzeol, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Dexlansoprazole, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Elacytarabine, Enfuvirtide, Enoxaparin, Entecavir, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Ezetimibe/simvastatin, Forodesine hydrochloride, Fosamprenavir calcium, Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Golimumab, Imatinib mesylate, Imetelstat, Insulin gl'argine, Insulin glulisine, Interferon alfa-2b XL, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Lintuzumab, Liposomal adriamycin, Liposomal belotecan, Liposome-encapsulated fentanyl, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lutropin alfa, LY-207320, Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MKC-253, MP-470, NGR-TNF, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate, PAN-811, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, PF-734200, Phentermine/topiramate, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Pregabalin, Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Ranibizumab, Recombinant Bet V1, Recombinant human insulin, Regadenoson, rhITF, Romidepsin, Rosuvastatin calcium, Ruboxistaurin hydrochloride, Rufinamide, Sapropterin dihydrochloride Saracatinib, SB-73, SC-599, Seliciclib, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate, Tadalafil, Tanespimycin, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tegaserod maleate, Telbivudine, Tenofovir

  19. Characterization of gene-activated human acid-β-glucosidase: Crystal structure, glycan composition, and internalization into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Brumshtein, Boris; Salinas, Paul; Peterson, Brian; Chan, Victor; Silman, Israel; Sussman, Joel L; Savickas, Philip J; Robinson, Gregory S; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-01-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disease, can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), in which defective acid-β-glucosidase (GlcCerase) is supplemented by a recombinant, active enzyme. The X-ray structures of recombinant GlcCerase produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells (imiglucerase, Cerezyme®) and in transgenic carrot cells (prGCD) have been previously solved. We now describe the structure and characteristics of a novel form of GlcCerase under investigation for the treatment of Gaucher disease, Gene-ActivatedTM human GlcCerase (velaglucerase alfa). In contrast to imiglucerase and prGCD, velaglucerase alfa contains the native human enzyme sequence. All three GlcCerases consist of three domains, with the active site located in domain III. The distances between the carboxylic oxygens of the catalytic residues, E340 and E235, are consistent with distances proposed for acid–base hydrolysis. Kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase, as well as their specific activities, are similar. However, analysis of glycosylation patterns shows that velaglucerase alfa displays distinctly different structures from imiglucerase and prGCD. The predominant glycan on velaglucerase alfa is a high-mannose type, with nine mannose units, while imiglucerase contains a chitobiose tri-mannosyl core glycan with fucosylation. These differences in glycosylation affect cellular internalization; the rate of velaglucerase alfa internalization into human macrophages is at least 2-fold greater than that of imiglucerase. PMID:19741058

  20. [Treatment of acute exacerbation of the obstructive pulmonary disease with hospitalization at an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Stanková, Y; Skricková, J; Potrepciaková, S

    2011-10-01

    Bronchodilatation is preferably achieved with beta-2-agonists (SABA), salbutamol. Therapy is intensified with anticholinergics (ipratropium bromide monohydrate). A combined preparation may also be used (ipratropium bromide monohydrate and fenoterole hydrobromide). Methylxantines (theophylline) are the second line option. Corticosteroids are administered orally (prednisolone) or intravenously (methylprednisolone or hydrocortisone). Patients who have problems expectorating are administered mucolytics (ambroxol hydrochloride or bromhexine hydrochloride). Some patients are treated with antibiotics. Oxygenotherapy is indicated in patients with hypoxemia. Insufficient treatment effect and progression of respiratory insufficiency warrants application of mechanical or non-invasive ventilation. PMID:22097692

  1. LC for analysis of two sustained-release mixtures containing cough cold suppressant drugs.

    PubMed

    El-Gindy, Alaa; Sallam, Shehab; Abdel-Salam, Randa A

    2010-07-01

    A liquid chromatographic method was applied for the analysis of two sustained-release mixtures containing dextromethorphane hydrobromide, carbinoxamine maleate with either phenylephrine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical capsules (Mix 1) or phenyl-propanolamine, methylparaben, and propylparaben, which bonds as a drug base to ion exchange resin in pharmaceutical syrup (Mix 2). The method was used for their simultaneous determination using a CN column with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-12 mM ammonium acetate in the ratio of 60:40 (v/v, pH 6.0) for Mix 1 and 45:55 (v/v, pH 6.0) for Mix 2. PMID:20822669

  2. Spectral studies on Ag 8+ ions irradiated LAHCl·H 2O and LAHBr·H 2O single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, K.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Ramamurthi, K.; Prakash, Jai; Khan, S. A.

    2011-09-01

    L-Arginine hydrochloride monohydrate and L-arginine hydrobromide monohydrate single crystals are irradiated by 100 MeV Ag 8+ swift heavy ions. The residual gases liberated from the irradiated samples are monitored as a function of ion fluence using quadrupole mass analyzer. The C 2H 3+, C 2H 2, N 2, CO, HCl and CO 2 are the dominant gases liberated. Fourier transform infrared spectra of irradiated crystals explain the breaking of bonds in a localized region of the crystals. The crystallinity of irradiated crystals is analyzed by powder X-ray diffractions.

  3. Pharmacokinetic properties of IB1001, an investigational recombinant factor IX, in patients with haemophilia B: repeat pharmacokinetic evaluation and sialylation analysis.

    PubMed

    Martinowitz, U; Shapiro, A; Quon, D V; Escobar, M; Kempton, C; Collins, P W; Chowdary, P; Makris, M; Mannucci, P M; Morfini, M; Valentino, L A; Gomperts, E; Lee, M

    2012-11-01

    IB1001 trenacog alfa is an investigational recombinant factor IX (FIX) for the treatment and prevention of bleeding in individuals with haemophilia B. To compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of IB1001 with nonacog alfa in individuals with haemophilia B and to assess the relationship between sialylation and PK of IB1001 (NCT00768287). A randomized, double-blind, non-inferiority, cross-over study conducted in participants aged ≥ 12 years weighing ≥ 40 kg, with severe or moderately severe haemophilia B (FIX activity ≤ 2 IU dL (-1) ). PK parameters were derived using observed FIX concentration levels and actual PK sampling times, and repeated in a subset of participants who had received IB1001 prophylaxis for 4-18 months. A retrospective analysis was conducted in subgroups according to the sialylation levels of IB1001 (50.8, 57.8-59.0%, or 71.7%). In the 32 adolescent and adult males evaluated, there were no clinically meaningful differences in PK parameters between those receiving IB1001 75 IU kg(-1) or nonacog alfa. The lower limit of the one-sided 95% confidence interval for the ratio of AUC(0-t) and AUC(0-∞) (IB1001/nonacog alfa) was 0.90, establishing non-inferiority. Terminal phase half-lives were similar (29.7 ± 18.2 h for IB1001 and 33.4 ± 21.2 h for nonacog alfa). The PK results were stable for up to 18 months of IB1001 exposure; the impact of sialylation levels was not clinically meaningful. There were no clinically meaningful PK differences between IB1001 and nonacog alfa. IB1001 was well tolerated and without safety concerns. The non-inferiority of IB1001 to nonacog alfa supports IB1001 becoming a useful alternative recombinant agent for the management of haemophilia B. PMID:22764744

  4. Alternative to Ph. Eur. pour-plate method for detection of microbial contamination in non-sterile pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Palicz, A; Paul, A; Hofmann, A; Denzel, K

    2016-01-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) texts for Interferon (IFN)-alfa-2 include a nonspecific photometric protein assay using albumin as calibrator and a highly variable cell-based assay for the potency determination of the protective effects. A request was expressed by the Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) for improved methods for the batch control of recombinant interferon alfa-2 bulk and market surveillance testing of finished products, including those formulated with Human Serum Albumin (HSA). A HPLC method was developed at the Medical Products Agency (MPA, Sweden) for the testing of IFN-alfa-2 products. An initial collaborative study run under the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP; study code BSP039) revealed the need for minor changes to improve linearity of the calibration curves, assay reproducibility and robustness. The goal of the collaborative study, coded BSP071, was to transfer and further validate this improved HPLC method. Ten laboratories participated in the study. Four marketed IFN-alfa-2 preparations (one containing HSA) together with the Ph. Eur. Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) for IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b, and in-house reference standards from two manufacturers were used for the quantitative assay. The modified method was successfully transferred to all laboratories despite local variation in equipment. The resolution between the main and the oxidised forms of IFN-alfa-2 was improved compared to the results from the BSP039 study. The improved method even allowed partial resolution of an extra peak after the principal peak. Symmetry of the main IFN peak was acceptable for all samples in all laboratories. Calibration curves established with the Ph. Eur. IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b CRSs showed excellent linearity with intercepts close to the origin and coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. Assay repeatability, intermediate precision and reproducibility varied with the tested sample within acceptable

  5. Matching-adjusted indirect comparisons of efficacy of BAY 81-8973 vs two recombinant factor VIII for the prophylactic treatment of severe hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Pocoski, Jennifer; Li, Nanxin; Ayyagari, Rajeev; Church, Nikki; Maas Enriquez, Monika; Xiang, Quer; Kelkar, Sneha; Du, Ella X; Wu, Eric Q; Xie, Jipan

    2016-01-01

    Background No head-to-head trials comparing recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) products currently exist. This was a matching-adjusted indirect comparison (MAIC) study of efficacy of BAY 81-8973 with antihemophilic factor (recombinant) plasma/albumin-free method (rAHF-PFM) and turoctocog alfa for the prophylaxis of severe hemophilia A. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify trials of rAHF-PFM and turoctocog alfa. Comparisons were conducted using BAY 81-8973 individual patient data (IPD) from LEOPOLD trials and published data from rAHF-PFM and turoctocog alfa trials. Differences in outcome reporting were reconciled using transformation of BAY 81-8973 IPD. Patients in pooled LEOPOLD trials were weighted to match baseline characteristics for rAHF-PFM or turoctocog alfa trials using MAICs. After matching, annualized bleed rates (ABRs) were compared using weighted t-tests. Results Two rAHF-PFM trials and one turoctocog alfa trial were identified. In these trials, rFVIIIs were dosed thrice weekly or every other day; in LEOPOLD trials, BAY 81-8973 was dosed twice- or thrice weekly. Three MAICs were conducted because the two rAHF-PFM trials calculated ABRs differently, matching for age, race, and weight (turoctocog alfa only). BAY 81-8973 had similar ABR of all bleeds vs rAHF-PFM (two trials: 4.8 vs 6.3, 1.9 vs 1.8 [square root transform]) and lower ABR of spontaneous bleeds and trauma bleeds (2.6 vs 4.1, 2.1 vs 4.7; both P<0.05). BAY 81-8973 showed lower ABR of all bleeds and spontaneous bleeds vs turoctocog alfa (4.3 vs 6.5, 2.8 vs 4.3; both P<0.05) and similar ABR of trauma bleeds (1.5 vs 1.6). In subgroup analysis, twice-weekly BAY 81-8973 had similar ABRs of all bleeds, spontaneous bleeds, and trauma bleeds compared to rAHF-PFM and turoctocog alfa. Conclusion This indirect comparison found that prophylaxis with BAY 81-8973, even including the lower frequency of two times a week and lower factor VIII consumption, has efficacy comparable to r

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-05-01

    O(6)-Benzylguanine; (-)-Gossypol; Abatacept, AC-2592, Adalimumab, AIDSVAX gp120 B/E, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, ALVAC E120TMG, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Armodafinil, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Avotermin; Bevacizumab, BIBW-2992, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B; Canakinumab, CAT-354, Ciclesonide, CMV gB vaccine, Corifollitropin alfa, Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Denosumab; EndoTAG-1, Eplerenone, Esomeprazole sodium, Eszopiclone, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; F-50040, Fesoterodine fumavate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, Golimumab; Imatinib mesylate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glargine, Ivabradine hydrochloride; Lercanidipine hydrochloride/enalapril maleate, Levosimendan, Liposomal vincristine sulfate, Liraglutide; MDV-3100, Mometasone furoate/formoterol fumavate, Multiepitope CTL peptide vaccine, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt, Nabiximols, Natalizumab, Nesiritide; Obeticholic acid, Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab, Omecamtiv mecarbil; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Paliperidone, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Polymyxin B nonapeptide, PORxin-302, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Pridopidine; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, rDEN4delta30-4995, Recombinant human relaxin H2, rhFSH, Rilonacept, Rolofylline, Rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine; Salcaprozic acid sodium salt, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate, Sitaxentan sodium, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Temsirolimus, Tenofovir, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Tolvaptan, Tozasertib, Treprostinil sodium; Ustekinumab; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Varenicline tartrate, Vatalanib succinate, Voriconazole, Vorinostat; Zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:20508873

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3,4-DAP; Adefovir dipivoxil, ADL-10-0101, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alosetron hydrochloride, ALT-711, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab, atvogen; Bortezomib; CETP vaccine, clevudine, crofelemer; DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DX-9065a; E-7010, edodekin alfa, emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlosamide, erlotinib hydrochloride, everolimus, exenatide; Fondaparinux sodium, frovatriptan, fulvestrant; Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gestodene; Homoharringtonine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, indium 111 (111In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, inhaled insulin, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, ivabradine hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, lapatinib, LAS-34475, levetiracetam, liraglutide, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melagatran, micafungin sodium; Natalizumab, NSC-640488; Oblimersen sodium; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, pleconaril, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, prucalopride; rAHF-PFM, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rDNA insulin, recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, rhGM-CSF, roxifiban acetate, RSD-1235, rubitecan, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; SC-51, squalamine; Tegaserod maleate, telbivudine, tesaglitazar, testosterone gel, tezosentan disodium, tipranavir; Vatalanib succinate; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:14671684

  8. Using an open source observational tool to measure the influence of the doctor's consulting style and the computer system on the outcomes of the clinical consultation.

    PubMed

    De Lusignan, Simon; Kumarapeli, Pushpa; Debar, Safia; Kushniruk, Andre W; Pearce, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Computerization of general practice is an international phenomenon. Many of the Electronic Patient Record (EPR) systems have developed organically with considerable variation in their interface and functionality. Consequently they have differing impact on the clinical consultation. There is a dearth of tools available to study their impact on the consultation. The objective is to use ALFA to film and analyze a simulated clinical consultation. We used the ALFA (Activity Log File Aggregation) open source toolkit, to make video based observation and analysis of the computer mediated consultation. ALFA enables precise comparison of core elements of EPR systems. It allows multiple video channels including screen capture, data about computer use, and verbal interactions to be synchronized, timed and navigated through for analysis. The toolkit is free and can be downloaded under an open source license from www.biomedicalinformatics.info/alfa/. Its outputs, which include Unified Modelling Language (UML), provide the evidence-base for assessing the impact of the computer on the consultation the designing of EPR systems. ALFA has been used to compare different brands of primary care computer systems; nurse case-load selection and consultation in psychiatry. PMID:19745467

  9. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the simultaneous determination of ipratropium bromide, fenoterol, salbutamol and terbutaline in nebulizer solution.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, G A; Peterson, G M

    1994-06-01

    A reversed-phase ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography assay was developed for the simultaneous determination of ipratropium bromide, fenoterol hydrobromide, salbutamol sulphate and terbutaline sulphate in nebulizer solution. Chromatographic separation was achieved with a Nova-Pak C18 4 microns 10 cm x 8 mm i.d. Radial-pak cartridge inside a Waters RCM 8 x 10 compression module using ternary gradient analysis. Detection was performed using UV detection at 220 nm. The standard curves were linear over the following ranges: ipratropium bromide 20.8-250.0 micrograms ml-1, fenoterol hydrobromide 27.8-500.0 micrograms ml-1, salbutamol sulphate 34.7-2500.0 micrograms ml-1 and terbutaline sulphate 69.5-2500 micrograms ml-1. Inter-day and intra-day relative standard deviations for each compound ranged from 4.5-5.2% and 3.5-3.9%, respectively. The assay procedure was developed to allow the accurate determination of constituents in various combinations of nebulizer solution, as well as for stability indicating purposes. This provides a convenient means of testing long-term compatibility and stability following the post-manufacture mixing of commonly used nebulized preparations. PMID:7918785

  10. Application of high performance capillary electrophoresis on toxic alkaloids analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Yurong; Yu, Yunqiu

    2007-06-01

    We employed CE to identify mixtures of the toxic alkaloids lappaconitine, bullatine A, atropine sulfate, atropine methobromide, scopolamine hydrobromide, anisodamine hydrobromide, brucine, strychnine, quinine sulfate, and chloroquine in human blood and urine, using procaine hydrochloride as an internal standard. The separation employed a fused-silica capillary of 75 microm id x 60 cm length (effective length: 50.2 cm) and a buffer containing 100 mM phosphate and 5% ACN (pH 4.0). The sample was injected in a pressure mode and the separation was performed at a voltage of 16 kV and a temperature of 25 degrees C. The compounds were detected by UV absorbance at wavelengths of 195 and 235 nm. All the ten alkaloids were separated within 16 min. The method was validated with regard to precision (RSD), accuracy, sensitivity, linear range, LOD, and LOQ. In blood and urine samples, the detection limits were 5-40 ng/mL and linear calibration curves were obtained over the range of 0.02-10 microg/mL. The precision of intra- and interday measurements was less than 15%. Electrophoretic peaks could be identified either by the relative migration time or by their UV spectrum. PMID:17623479

  11. Development of specific dopamine D-1 agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Sakolchai, S.

    1987-01-01

    To develop potentially selective dopamine D-1 agonists and to investigate on the structural requirement for D-1 activity, the derivatives of dibenzocycloheptadiene are synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated. The target compounds are 5-aminomethyl-10,11-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxy-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cycloheptene hydrobromide 10 and 9,10-dihydroxy-1,2,3,7,8,12b-hexahydrobenzo(1,2)cyclohepta(3,4,5d,e)isoquinoline hydrobromide 11. In a dopamine-sensitive rat retinal adenylate cyclase assay, a model for D-1 activity, compound 10 is essentially inert for both agonist and antagonist activity. In contrast, compound 11 is approximately equipotent to dopamine in activation of the D-1 receptor. Based on radioligand and binding data, IC{sub 50} of compound 11 for displacement of {sup 3}H-SCH 23390, a D-1 ligand, is about 7 fold less than that for displacement of {sup 3}H-spiperone, a D-2 ligand. These data indicate that compound 11 is a potent selective dopamine D-1 agonist. This study provides a new structural class of dopamine D-1 acting agent: dihydroxy-benzocycloheptadiene analog which can serve as a lead compound for further drug development and as a probe for investigation on the nature of dopamine D-1 receptor.

  12. Adhesion analysis of non-woven natural fibres in unsaturated polyester resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omri, Med Amin; Triki, A.; Guicha, M.; Ben Hassen, Med; Arous, M.; Ahmed El Hamzaoui, H.; Bulou, A.

    2015-03-01

    The presence of wool fibres in non-woven Alfa fibres sheet was investigated as a mean of improving adhesion of Alfa fibre-reinforced unsaturated polyester composite. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy results revealed that such improvement could occur by a decrease in the hydrophilic character of the Alfa fibres owing to the presence of wool fibres. Hence, physical and chemical interactions could happen between the reinforcement and the matrix as demonstrated by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy results. Tensile testing performed on this composite confirmed that such adhesion could occur according to its excellent specific parameters despite of its low tensile strength attributed to a higher fibre to fibre contact of wool fibres.

  13. [Busulfan versus busulfan-interferon as maintenance therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    López Hernández, M A; Flores-Chapa, J D; Trueba Christy, E; Borbolla Escoboza, J R; Carrillo Rosales, T

    1996-01-01

    We studied 30 patients in order to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of alfa interferon associated with busulfan as maintenance treatment in de novo chronic granulocytic leukemia. Patients received 0.2 mg/kg of busulfan and reached complete hematological remission (CHR). Patients were then randomized in two groups: one to receive busulfan to be administered when the leukocyte count was above 15 x 10(9)/L, and another to receive subcutaneously 5 million IU of alpha-interferon three times per week (plus busulfan if the leukocyte count went above 15 x 10(9)/L). The duration of CHR was longer in the alfa-interferon group: 31 vs 16 months (p = 0.03) but no cytogenetic remissions were observed. Alfa interferon was well tolerated: no patient was excluded from the study due to toxicity. PMID:8966391

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGES HI sources in NGC 7448 field (Taylor+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Minchin, R. F.; Herbst, H.; Davies, J. I.; Rodriguez, R.; Vazquez, C.

    2015-04-01

    Observations of this field began in June 2008 and were completed in November 2011, using the 7-beam ALFA (Arecibo L-band Feed Array) instrument on the Arecibo telescope in spectral line mode. The field observed to full depth spans 5 degrees of R.A. by 4 degrees of declination centred on NGC 7448. Due to ALFA.s hexagonal beam arrangement, a small area outside this range is also included at a lower sensitivity. The full spatial range of the data considered here is from 22:49:00 to 23:10:50 in R.A, and from +13:51:00 to +18:06:00 in declination. (2 data files).

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 81C6; Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase alfa, AGM-1470, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alosetron hydrochloride, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir; BAY-43-9006, BBR-3438, beta-L-Fd4C, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentanBR96-doxorubicin; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide, cilengitide, cilomilast, COL-1621, COL-3, CpG-7909, cyclosporine; DCVax-Brain, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), donepezil hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTI-015, [99Tc]-DTPA-mannosyldextran, duloxetine hydrochloride; Emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, epothilone B, estradiol-MNP, etonogestrel/etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoricoxib; Febuxostat, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GVS-111; Heparinase I, HspE7, human alpha-glucosidase, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, INGN-241, interferon alfa B/D hybrid, interferon alfa Biphasix, ISIS-14803; Lanicemine hydrochloride, 1311-lipiodol, liposome-encapsulated mitoxantrone, lixivaptan, lumiracoxib, lupus-AHP, LY-466700; Marimastat, MEN-10755, micafungin sodium; Nitronaproxen, NSC-683864 Omalizumab, oral insulin; Palonosetron hydrochloride, peginterferon alfa-2a, pimecrolimus, pralnacasan, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, pyrazoloacridine; R-165335, ranolazine, risperidone, RPR-109881;, RSD-1235, Satraplatin, seocalcitol, sertindole, SMART anti-interferon gamma antibody, sulfasalazine; T-138067, TAK-013, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, TP-38; Valdecoxib, vatalanib succinate, voriconazole; ZD-9331. PMID:12690708

  16. MACC1 mediates acetylcholine-induced invasion and migration by human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianling; Zhou, Rui; Wu, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Yang; Shi, Min

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) promotes the growth and metastasis of several cancers via its M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R). Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) is an oncogene that is overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC) and plays an important role in GC progression, though it is unclear how MACC1 activity is regulated in GC. In this study, we demonstrated that ACh acts via M3Rs to promote GC cell invasion and migration as well as expression of several markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The M3R antagonist darifenacin inhibited GC cell activity in both the presence and absence of exogenous ACh, suggesting GC cells secrete endogenous ACh, which then acts in an autocrine fashion to promote GC cell migration/invasion. ACh up-regulated MACC1 in GC cells, and MACC1 knockdown using siRNA attenuated the effects of ACh on GC cells. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) served as an intermediate signal between ACh and MACC1. These findings suggest that ACh acts via a M3R/AMPK/MACC1 signaling pathway to promote GC cell invasion/migration, which provides insight into the mechanisms underlying GC growth and metastasis and may shed light on new targets for GC treatment. PMID:26919111

  17. Comparative drought response in eleven diverse alfalfa accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) production is often negatively affected by drought stress. This is particularly true for alfalfa that is cultivated on rangeland. Thus, the development of drought-tolerant alfalfa cultivars is of great significance. A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate 11 alfa...

  18. Trace gas fluxes from a northern mixed-grass prairie interseeded with alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of legumes in improving soil fertility, forage quantity and quality is well established, however what is less clear is the extent that the nitrogen fixed by legumes may drive increased trace gas emissions. A chronosequence study in native prairie that had been interseed with the legume alfa...

  19. [Possibility of the combined use of tumor markers in endometrial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, S R; Cecchi, A; Thodos, A; Brandi, S; Carta, G

    1991-10-01

    The Authors have studied the haematic levels of CA 125, CA 19-9, CA 50, CEA, TPA, alfa-feto-proteina e CA 15-3 in 24 women with endometrial carcinoma and in 28 healthy women. The results show that these markers are not useful for the screening of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:1722568

  20. The Training of Music Teachers in Colombia: A Descriptive Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayibe Cárdenas Soler, Ruth; Lorenzo Quiles, Oswaldo; Hargreaves, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study is an evaluative analysis of 13 Music Education programs in Colombia that provide training for secondary school music teachers for 6th to 11th grade in the Colombian education system. The study utilized an analysis matrix from the International Research Project ALFA II-0448-A, which developed a similar study with Latin American and…

  1. 77 FR 43429 - Unblocking of 1 Individual and 2 Entities Designated Pursuant to Executive Order 13315

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... TRADING AND MARKETING, P.O. Box 212953, Amman 11121, Jordan; c/o ALFA COMPANY LIMITED FOR INTERNATIONAL TRADING AND MARKETING, P.O. Box 910606, Amman 11191, Jordan; c/o TRADING AND TRANSPORT SERVICES, Al- Razi Medical Complex, Jabal Al-Hussein, Amman, Jordan; c/o TRADING AND TRANSPORT SERVICES, P.O. Box...

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, 667-coumate, 9-aminocamptothecin; Ad5CMV-p53, AES-14, alefacept, anecortave acetate, APC-8024, APD-356, asoprisnil; Bevacizumab, bimakalim, bimatoprost, BLP-25, BR-1; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DNA.HIVA; Efaproxiral sodium, ertapenem sodium; Frovatriptan; HuMax-EGFr, HYB-2055, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, Id-KLH vaccine, imatinib mesylate; Lapatinib, lonafarnib, Motexafin lutetium, MVA.HIVA, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nesiritide, NS-2330; Olmesartan medoxomil; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, pregabalin; QbG-10; Ralfinamide, rasburicase, rFGF-2, Ro-31-7453; Sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib; Tadalafil, TC-1734, telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, thymus nuclear protein, tipifarnib; Vandetanib, vibriolysin, vildagliptin, voriconazole. PMID:15834466

  3. 78 FR 57166 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... meeting. Agenda: The committee will discuss new drug application (NDA) 205123, simeprevir (a hepatitis C... the treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection, in combination with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin (two medicines approved to treat chronic hepatitis C) in adult patients with compensated...

  4. 76 FR 14026 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... application (NDA) 202-258, boceprevir (a hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor), manufactured by Merck & Co., Inc., with a proposed indication for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection, in combination with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin (two medicines approved to treat chronic hepatitis...

  5. African Americans Respond Poorly to Hepatitis C Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    African Americans have a significantly lower response rate to treatment for chronic hepatitis C than non-Hispanic Whites, according to a new study led by Duke University Medical Center researchers. Some African Americans--19 percent--did respond to the drug combination of peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. But in non-Hispanic Whites with the…

  6. Testing Adjuvant Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with stage III or stage IV melanoma that has been completely resected will be randomly assigned to receive post-surgical treatment with either ipilimumab or high-dose interferon alfa-2b, the current standard of care.

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-chlorotoxin; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, albumin interferon alfa, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, AR-C126532, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cangrelor tetrasodium, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, collagen-PVP, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, dasatinib, denosumab, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (lung cancer), dexrazoxane, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, eel calcitonin, efalizumab, entecavir, etoricoxib; Falciparum merozoite protein-1/AS02A, fenretinide, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, ghrelin (human); hLM609; Icatibant acetate, imatinib mesylate, ipsapirone, irofulven; LBH-589, LE-AON, levocetirizine, LY-450139; Malaria vaccine, mapatumumab, motexafin gadolinium, muraglitazar, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; nab-paclitaxel, nelarabine; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, orbofiban acetate; Panitumumab, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, pleconaril, prasterone, pregabalin; Ranolazine, rebimastat, recombinant malaria vaccine, rosuvastatin calcium; SQN-400; Taxus, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, troxacitabine; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Val-Tyr sardine peptidase, VNP-40101M, vorinostat. PMID:16845450

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-11-01

    1-Octanol, 9vPnC-MnCc; Abiraterone acetate, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, ARRY-520, AS-1404, Asimadoline, Atazanavir sulfate, AVE-0277, Azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Boceprevir, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B; Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Clevudine, Contusugene ladenovec, CP-751871, Crofelemer, Cypher, CYT006-AngQb; Darbepoetin alfa, Desmopressin, Dexlansoprazole, DG-041; E-5555, Ecogramostim, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Falecalcitriol, Fampridine, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fingolimod hydrochloride; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GS-7904L, GV-1001; HT-1001; Insulin detemir, ISIS-112989, Istradefylline; Laquinimod sodium, Latanoprost/timolol maleate, Lenalidomide, Levobetaxolol hydrochloride, Liposomal doxorubicin, Liposomal morphine sulfate, Lubiprostone, Lumiracoxib, LY-518674; MEM-1003, Mesna disulfide, Mipomersen sodium, MM-093, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naptumomab estafenatox, Natalizumab; Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Pasireotide, Pazufloxacin mesilate, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimagedine, Pimecrolimus, Pramlintide acetate, Prasterone, Pregabalin, Prulifloxacin; QAE-397; Rec-15/2615, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhGAD65, Roflumilast, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine, Rupatadine fumarate; Safinamide mesilate, SIR-Spheres, Sitagliptin phosphate, Sodium phenylacetate, Sodium phenylacetate/Sodium benzoate, Sorafenib, SSR-244738; Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Teduglutide, Tegaserod maleate, Telaprevir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tigecycline, Tiotropium bromide, Trabectedin, Travoprost

  9. Neuraxial anesthesia for labor and cesarean delivery in a parturient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency on recombinant human antithrombin infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Pamnani, Anup; Rosenstein, Megan; Darwich, Alaeldin; Wolfson, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    A recombinant human antithrombin (rhAT; generic name: antithrombin Alfa) has recently been developed. A 37 year-old parturient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency, receiving rhAT infusion therapy, who successfully received an epidural catheter for analgesia and anesthesia during labor and cesarean delivery, is presented. PMID:20868967

  10. Characterization of Lithium Stearate: Processing Aid for Filled Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    E. Eastwood; C. Densmore

    2007-02-05

    This topical report presents work completed to characterize lithium stearate so a replacement supplier could be identified. Lithium stearate from Alfa Aesar and Chemtura was obtained and characterized along with the current material from Witco. Multiple methods were used to characterize the materials including Karl Fischer, FT-IR, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis.

  11. Electronic Publishing in Librarianship and Information Science in Latin America--A Step towards Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ian M.; Cano, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This paper draws on the results of studies undertaken between 2004 and 2007 as part of Project REVISTAS, supported by the European Commission's ALFA Programme. Method: A variety of methods was employed over the life of the project, including analysis of directories, a survey of universities in the region believed to be offering…

  12. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 220 - Recommended Phonetic Alphabet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... appendix A of part 220 does not exist in 49 CFR parts 200 to 399, revised as of Oct. 1, 1997. ...—Recommended Phonetic Alphabet A—ALFA B—BRAVO C—CHARLIE D—DELTA E—ECHO F—FOXTROT G—GOLF H—HOTEL I—INDIA...

  13. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 220 - Recommended Phonetic Alphabet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... appendix A of part 220 does not exist in 49 CFR parts 200 to 399, revised as of Oct. 1, 1997. ...—Recommended Phonetic Alphabet A—ALFA B—BRAVO C—CHARLIE D—DELTA E—ECHO F—FOXTROT G—GOLF H—HOTEL I—INDIA...

  14. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 220 - Recommended Phonetic Alphabet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... appendix A of part 220 does not exist in 49 CFR parts 200 to 399, revised as of Oct. 1, 1997. ...—Recommended Phonetic Alphabet A—ALFA B—BRAVO C—CHARLIE D—DELTA E—ECHO F—FOXTROT G—GOLF H—HOTEL I—INDIA...

  15. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 220 - Recommended Phonetic Alphabet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appendix A of part 220 does not exist in 49 CFR parts 200 to 399, revised as of Oct. 1, 1997. ...—Recommended Phonetic Alphabet A—ALFA B—BRAVO C—CHARLIE D—DELTA E—ECHO F—FOXTROT G—GOLF H—HOTEL I—INDIA...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 220 - Recommended Phonetic Alphabet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... appendix A of part 220 does not exist in 49 CFR parts 200 to 399, revised as of Oct. 1, 1997. ...—Recommended Phonetic Alphabet A—ALFA B—BRAVO C—CHARLIE D—DELTA E—ECHO F—FOXTROT G—GOLF H—HOTEL I—INDIA...

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-11-01

    5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, (R)-flurbiprofen; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, Alequel, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, anakinra, aprepitant, aripiprazole, armodafinil; Bevacizumab, bortezomib, bosentan; Canfosfamide hydrochloride, ciclesonide, clofarabine, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, diclofenac potassium, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; Eel calcitonin, eletriptan, eplerenone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Frovatriptan; Gefitinib, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; HKI-272, HYB-165; Ibutamoren mesylate, imatinib mesylate, interleukin-21, ixabepilone; KRN-951; L-Arginine hydrochloride, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone; Micafungin sodium, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nesiritide; Peginterferon alfa-2a, pitavastatin calcium, pralatrexate, pregabalin, pVAX/L523S-Ad.L523S; Rasagiline mesylate, recombinant human nerve growth factor, regadenoson, rF-PSA, rimonabant, rizatriptan, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium, rV-B7.1, rV-PSA; Sipuleucel-T, sirolimus-eluting stent, solifenacin succinate, sorafenib, sunitinib malate; Talactoferrin alfa, Taxus, tegaserod maleate, teriparatide, tipifarnib; Valdecoxib, vandetanib, vatalanib succinate; WT1-peptide vaccine; Xaliproden hydrochloride. (c) 2006 Prous Science. All rights reserved. PMID:17200730

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-04-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 5A8; Agomelatine, alefacept, almotriptan, anakinra, APC-8015, atazanavir, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bicifadine; Cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CAT-213, CGP-51901, ciclesonide, cipamfylline; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dibotermin alfa, DX-9065a; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, eniluracil, EPI-KAL2, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, etilevodopa, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Fosamprenavir calcium, fosamprenavir sodium, fumagillin; Gadofosveset sodium, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin; HSPPC-96, human papillomavirus vaccine; Icatibant Id-KLH, imatinib mesylate, INS-37217, iodine (I131) tositumomab; LAS-34475, levobupivacaine hydrochloride, levocetirizine, linezolid, 131I-lipiodol, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-450108; Magnetites, MBI-594AN, melagatran, melatonin, mepolizumab, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NC-100100; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, omapatrilat, onercept; PEG-filgrastim, (PE)HRG21, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pleconaril, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, prasterone; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasagiline mesilate, reslizumab, rFGF-2, rhOP-1, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate; Sitaxsentan sodium, sodium lauryl sulfate; Tadalafil, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tipranavir, TMC-114, tucaresol; Valdecoxib, voriconazole; Ximelagatran; Zofenopril calcium, zosuquidar trihydrochloride. PMID:12743628

  19. Differential Modulation of Angiogenesis by Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents in a Mouse Model of Ischaemic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    McVicar, Carmel M.; Colhoun, Liza M.; Abrahams, Jodie L.; Kitson, Claire L.; Hamilton, Ross; Medina, Reinhold J.; Durga, Dash; Gardiner, Tom A.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Stitt, Alan W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) are widely used to treat anaemia but concerns exist about their potential to promote pathological angiogenesis in some clinical scenarios. In the current study we have assessed the angiogenic potential of three ESAs; epoetin delta, darbepoetin alfa and epoetin beta using in vitro and in vivo models. Methodology/Principal Findings The epoetins induced angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells at high doses, although darbepoetin alfa was pro-angiogenic at low-doses (1–20 IU/ml). ESA-induced angiogenesis was VEGF-mediated. In a mouse model of ischaemia-induced retinopathy, all ESAs induced generation of reticulocytes but only epoetin beta exacerbated pathological (pre-retinal) neovascularisation in comparison to controls (p<0.05). Only epoetin delta induced a significant revascularisation response which enhanced normality of the vasculature (p<0.05). This was associated with mobilisation of haematopoietic stem cells and their localisation to the retinal vasculature. Darbepoetin alfa also increased the number of active microglia in the ischaemic retina relative to other ESAs (p<0.05). Darbepoetin alfa induced retinal TNFα and VEGF mRNA expression which were up to 4 fold higher than with epoetin delta (p<0.001). Conclusions This study has implications for treatment of patients as there are clear differences in the angiogenic potential of the different ESAs. PMID:20686695

  20. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Graham R.; Coppola, Carmine; Derbala, Moutaz; Ferenci, Peter; Orlandini, Alessandra; Reddy, K. Rajender; Tallarico, Ludovico; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Ahlers, Silke; Bakalos, Georgios; Hassanein, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD) and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR) in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice. Methods A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12). Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL) were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G)1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0–9 points) on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively. Results SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634), 77.1% (279/362), 68.0% (514/756), and 51.3% (203/396), respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046) and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016); sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5. Conclusions In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with

  1. Estimating the likelihood of sustained virological response in chronic hepatitis C therapy.

    PubMed

    Mauss, S; Hueppe, D; John, C; Goelz, J; Heyne, R; Moeller, B; Link, R; Teuber, G; Herrmann, A; Spelter, M; Wollschlaeger, S; Baumgarten, A; Simon, K-G; Dikopoulos, N; Witthoeft, T

    2011-04-01

    The likelihood of a sustained virological response (SVR) is the most important factor for physicians and patients in the decision to initiate and continue therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. This study identified predictive factors for SVR with peginterferon plus ribavirin (RBV) in patients with CHC treated under 'real-life' conditions. The study cohort consisted of patients from a large, retrospective German multicentre, observational study who had been treated with peginterferon alfa-2a plus RBV or peginterferon alfa-2b plus RBV between the years 2000 and 2007. To ensure comparability regarding peginterferon therapies, patients were analysed in pairs matched by several baseline variables. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the effect of nonmatched baseline variables and treatment modality on SVR. Among 2378 patients (1189 matched pairs), SVR rates were 57.9% overall, 46.5% in HCV genotype 1/4-infected patients and 77.3% in genotype 2/3-infected patients. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, positive predictors of SVR were HCV genotype 2 infection, HCV genotype 3 infection, low baseline viral load and treatment with peginterferon alfa-2a. Negative predictors of SVR were higher age (≥40 years), elevated baseline gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and low baseline platelet count (<150,000/μL). Among patients treated with peginterferon plus RBV in routine clinical practice, genotype, baseline viral load, age, GGT level and platelet levels all predict the likelihood of treatment success. In patients matched by baseline characteristics, treatment with peginterferon alfa-2a may be a positive predictor of SVR when compared to peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:20849436

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M; Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, adenosine triphosphate, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, autologous renal tumor vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; C340, cantuzumab mertansine, caspofungin acetate, CGP-36742, CHAMPION everolimus-eluting coronary stent, cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, everolimus, ezetimibe; Flesinoxan hydrochloride, fosamprenavir calcium, FR-901228, frovatriptan; Gadofosveset sodium, gadomer-17, galiximab, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); IDN-6556, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, iseganan hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; LB-80380, levocetirizine, liposomal doxorubicin, LMB-9, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Mecasermin, midostaurin, morphine hydrochloride; Natalizumab, nelfinavir, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; Olcegepant, omalizumab, oregovomab; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, perospirone hydrochloride, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, prinomastat; Resiquimod, rhIGFBP-3, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3, ritanserin, ro-31-7453, rosuvastatin calcium; SCIO-469, SDZ-SID-791, SU-11248, suberanilohydroxamic acid; Tadalafil, taxus, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, TER-286, tezosentan disodium, TH-9507, tipifarnib, tipranavir, tolvaptan, tramadol hydrochloride/acetaminophen, travoprost, treprostinil sodium, tucaresol

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-04-01

    (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, [(123)I]-BZA, 9-Aminocamptothecin; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, Ambrisentan, Amsilarotene, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Apricitabine, Aripiprazole, Arsenic trioxide, Atazanavir sulfate, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Atrasentan, Azacitidine; Banoxantrone, Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bromfenac; Cachectin, Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Canakinumab, Carfilzomib, CAT-354, CCX-282, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, Clevudine, Clofarabine, CNTO-328, Corifollitropin alfa, Crofelemer; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Emtricitabine, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Epoetin zeta, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farglitazar, Febuxostat, Fosamprenavir calcium, FX-06; Gabapentin enacarbil, Gefitinib; HIVIS DNA; Imatinib mesylate, INCB- 18424, Indacaterol, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Insulin detemir; JNJ-26854165; Lacosamide, Landiolol, Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, L-NAME, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lumiracoxib; Maraviroc, Mepolizumab, Methoxy polyethylene glycol- epoetin-beta, Miglustat, MK-0493, MVA-CMDR, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, Nepafenac, Neratinib, Neridronic acid, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel poliglumex, Palifermin, Patupilone, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, PHA-848125, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Povidone-iodine liposome complex, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Prucalopride; Raltegravir potassium, Retigabine, Revaprazan hydrochloride, rhFSH, Rilpivirine, Rivaroxaban, Romidepsin

  4. New Surfactant with SP-B and C Analogs Gives Survival Benefit after Inactivation in Preterm Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Kuypers, Elke; Jellema, Reint K.; Ophelders, Daan R. M. G.; Ospina, Olga L.; Perez-Gil, J.; Bianco, Federico; Garzia, Raffaella; Razzetti, Roberta; Kramer, Boris W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory distress syndrome in preterm babies is caused by a pulmonary surfactant deficiency, but also by its inactivation due to various conditions, including plasma protein leakage. Surfactant replacement therapy is well established, but clinical observations and in vitro experiments suggested that its efficacy may be impaired by inactivation. A new synthetic surfactant (CHF 5633), containing synthetic surfactant protein B and C analogs, has shown comparable effects on oxygenation in ventilated preterm rabbits versus Poractant alfa, but superior resistance against inactivation in vitro. We hypothesized that CHF 5633 is also resistant to inactivation by serum albumin in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Nineteen preterm lambs of 127 days gestational age (term = 150 days) received CHF 5633 or Poractant alfa and were ventilated for 48 hours. Ninety minutes after birth, the animals received albumin with CHF 5633 or Poractant alfa. Animals received additional surfactant if PaO2 dropped below 100 mmHg. A pressure volume curve was done post mortem and markers of pulmonary inflammation, surfactant content and biophysiology, and lung histology were assessed. CHF 5633 treatment resulted in improved arterial pH, oxygenation and ventilation efficiency index. The survival rate was significantly higher after CHF 5633 treatment (5/7) than after Poractant alfa (1/8) after 48 hours of ventilation. Biophysical examination of the surfactant recovered from bronchoalveolar lavages revealed that films formed by CHF 5633-treated animals reached low surface tensions in a wider range of compression rates than films from Poractant alfa-treated animals. Conclusions For the first time a synthetic surfactant containing both surfactant protein B and C analogs showed significant benefit over animal derived surfactant in an in vivo model of surfactant inactivation in premature lambs. PMID:23091635

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  6. Inhibition of artificially induced cough in man by bronchodilators.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, R; Higenbottam, T; Johnson, T; Godden, D

    1987-01-01

    1. The antitussive properties of bronchodilators were evaluated in a total of 47 normal volunteers. 2. Cough was induced by inhalation of ultrasonically nebulized solutions of distilled water and hypotonic saline. 3. Inhaled fenoterol hydrobromide (360 micrograms; 20 volunteers) and inhaled ipratropium bromide (72 micrograms; 14 volunteers) both significantly reduced couch compared with placebo (P less than 0.01). Oral salbutamol sulphate (4 mg; 11 volunteers) and oral pirenzepine hydrochloride (50 mg; 14 volunteers) had lesser effects. 4. Cough inhibition correlated with a small but statistically significant degree of bronchodilatation as measured by specific airway conductance (sGaw) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) in six normal subjects studied with each treatment in a placebo controlled, double blind study (r = 0.67, P less than 0.001). 5. Small reductions in airway tone are associated with a reduced cough response elicited by inhaled ultrasonically nebulized distilled water. PMID:3689630

  7. Effect of age on upregulation of the cardiac adrenergic beta receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, N.; Houck, W.T.; Roberts, J.

    1990-03-01

    Radioligand binding studies were performed to determine whether upregulation of postjunctional beta receptors occurs in sympathectomized hearts of aged animals. Fischer 344 rats 6, 12, and 24 months of age (n = 10) were used in these experiments. To produce sympathectomy, rats were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA; 2 x 50 mg/kg iv) on days 1 and 8; the animals were decapitated on day 15. The depletion of norepinephrine in the heart was about 86% in each age group. 125I-Iodopindolol (IPIN), a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist, was employed to determine the affinity and total number of beta adrenergic receptors in the ventricles of the rat heart. The maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) was significantly elevated by 37%, 48%, and 50% in hearts from sympathectomized 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. These results indicate that beta receptor mechanisms in older hearts can respond to procedures that cause upregulation of the beta adrenergic receptors.

  8. The Reactivity of Thymine and Thymidine 5,6-Epoxides with Organometallic Reagents - A Route to Thymidine (6-4) Photoproduct Analogues.

    PubMed

    Wrigstedt, Pauli; Kavakka, Jari; Heikkinen, Sami; Nieger, Martin; Räisänen, Minna; Repo, Timo

    2016-05-01

    This report describes an efficient procedure for the generation and isolation of various thymine and thymidine 5,6-epoxides from the corresponding trans-5,6-bromohydrins by reaction with triethylamine. The quantitative isolation of the epoxides, accomplished by solvent precipitation of triethylamine hydrobromide, enabled their regiospecific ring-opening at C6 position by organometallic nucleophiles. The reaction was amenable to a broad range of alkyl, aryl, alkenyl, and alkynyl organomagnesium, -zinc, -aluminum, or -boron reagents, although the reactivity was strongly affected by the electronic effects of N3 protecting group. Additionally, the reaction featured excellent cis-diastereoselectivity providing access to C6-carbon-functionalized dihydrothymidine cis-alcohols, which are synthetic derivatives of UV-induced DNA lesions, namely, thymidine (6-4) photoproducts. PMID:27080560

  9. Metronidazole-Induced Bullous Pemphigoid: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Saibal; Banerjee, Indranil; Sikder, Ayan; Das, Prasanta

    2015-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune cutaneous blistering disorder, the exact pathogenesis of which is still not fully elucidated. Drug-induced bullous pemphigoid eruptions are rare but have been reported earlier with the use of frusemide, psoralens, ibuprofen, galantamine hydrobromide, ACE inhibitors like captopril, spironolactone, penicillin, ampicillin, levofloxacin, penicillamine. We hereby report a case of metronidazole induced bullous pemphigoid (BP) in a 52-year-old male patient suffering from liver abscess following 4 days of drug administration. The skin biopsy findings obtained from the patient were consistent with the diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid (BP). Metronidazole was discontinued and symptomatic treatment was offered to the patient. Following withdrawal of metronidazole, the bullae subsided in the next 7-10 days without any significant residual scarring. The causality assessment performed as per the Naranjo algorithm revealed the case to be probable (Naranjo score 7). PMID:26816913

  10. Chemical Sympathectomy Increases Susceptibility to Ocular Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Amanda; Nguyen, Gabrielle; Ash, John D.; Straub, Rainer H.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2008-01-01

    The cornea is one of the most highly innervated tissues in the mammalian host. We hypothesized changes to cornea innervation through chemical sympathectomy would significantly alter the host response to the neurotropic viral pathogen, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) following ocular infection. Mice treated with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide displayed reduced tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers residing in the cornea. Sympathectomized mice were also found to show a transient rise in virus recovered in infected tissues and succumbed to infection in greater numbers. Whereas there were no differences in infiltrating leukocyte populations including HSV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the infected tissue, an increase in substance P and a decrease in IFN-γ levels in the trigeminal ganglion but not brain stem of sympathectomized mice were noted. Sympathectomized mice treated with the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist L703,606 had delayed mortality implicating the involvement of substance P in HSV-1-mediated death. PMID:18495255

  11. Synthesis of imperatorin analogs and their evaluation as acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K; Jarończyk, Małgorzata; Maurin, Jan K; Mazurek, Aleksander P; Czarnocki, Zbigniew

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we synthesized several imperatorin analogs using imperatorin and xanthotoxin as substrates. The anti-cholinesterase activities of all compounds were evaluated in in vitro experiments according to the modified Ellman's method. For each synthesized compound, IC50 values for both enzymes were established. Galantamine hydrobromide was used as a positive control in the enzymatic experiments. All active compounds showed selectivity toward butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) rather than acetylcholinesterase. The most active ones were 8-(3-methylbutoxy)-psoralen and 8-hexoxypsoralen with IC50 values for BuChE of around 16.5 and 16.4 µM, respectively. The results of our study may be considered as the beginning of a search for potential anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs based on the structure of natural furocoumarins. PMID:24123207

  12. Oxoaporphine alkaloids: conversion of lysicamine into liriodendronine and its 2-O-methyl ether, and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Pabuccuoglu, V; Rozwadowska, M D; Brossi, A; Clark, A; Hufford, C D; George, C; Flippen-Anderson, J L

    1991-01-01

    Pschorr reaction of diazonium salt 7 in aqueous methanolic sulfuric acid afforded, besides lysicamine 2, the orange colored sulfate of oxodibenzopyrrocoline (8). The structure is fully supported by an X-ray analysis of its picrate salt. Selective ether cleavage of lysicamine (2) with 48% HBr afforded a hydrobromide of 9, and free betaine 9 on treatment with pyridine-water. Both compounds methylated on treatment with etherial diazomethane on nitrogen to give the known 2-O,N-dimethylliriodendronine (11). Liriodendronine (10) was obtained from lysicamine (2) on heating with pyridine HBr at 189 degrees C, and treatment with pyridine-water, as a dark violet betaine. Betaine 12 was obtained by heating 11.HCl to 200 degrees C. The quaternary salts of lysicamine, lysicamine methiodide (3) and lysicamine methosulfate (4) were comparable in anticandidal activity to liriodenine (1), but were not as active as liriodenine methiodide (13). PMID:2043039

  13. Therapeutic effectiveness of medications taken during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    1992-01-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness of medications during spaceflight is considered in light of extensive anecdotal and experimental evidence. Attention is given to a range of medications for space motion sickness, sleeplessness, and physical discomfort. About 70 individual cases are reviewed in which crewmembers used such medications as: (1) scopolamine hydrobromide, dextroamphetamine sulfate, and promethazine hydrochloride for motion sickness; (2) metoclopramide hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride for bowel motility; and (3) aspirin and acetaminophen for headache and back pain. The effectiveness of orally ingested medications for space motion sickness is shown to be very low, while promethazine hydrochloride is effective when administered intramuscularly. The medications for pain are shown to be generally effective, and the use of sleep-inducing medications is limited by potentially detrimental performance effects.

  14. Evaluation of some Mannich bases derived from substituted acetophenones against P-388 lymphocytic leukemia and on respiration in isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dimmock, J R; Shyam, K; Hamon, N W; Logan, B M; Raghavan, S K; Harwood, D J; Smith, P J

    1983-08-01

    Series of 3-dimethylamino-1-aryl-1-propanone hydrobromides (IV) and 3-dimethylamino-2-dimethylaminomethyl-1-aryl-1-propanone dihydrobromides (V) were synthesized. Evaluation of these derivatives against P-388 lymphocytic leukemia growth revealed that two compounds show promise as antineoplastic agents. Compounds of the V series were unstable in phosphate buffer (in contrast to series IV), and when the same nuclear substituent was present in both series of compounds, V was approximately 100 times more active than IV in both the stimulation and inhibition of respiration of mitochondria isolated from rat liver cells. Representatives from both series showed that respiration in mitochondria was affected by changing the pH of the aqueous buffer from 7.4 to 6.9 or 6.4 and by reducing the temperature from 37 degrees to 20 degrees. The compounds showed reactivity toward a biomimetic thiol. PMID:6620142

  15. α1-Adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors in voiding function – binding characteristics of therapeutic agents in relation to the pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shizuo; Ito, Yoshihiko; Tsukada, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    In vivo and ex vivo binding of α1-adrenoceptor and muscarinic receptors involved in voiding function is reviewed with therapeutic agents (α1-adrenoceptor antagonists: prazosin, tamsulosin and silodosin; and muscarinic receptor antagonists: oxybutynin, tolterodine, solifenacin, propiverine, imiafenacin and darifenacin) in lower urinary tract symptoms. This approach allows estimation of the inhibition of a well-characterized selective (standard) radioligand by unlabelled potential drugs or direct measurement of the distribution and receptor binding of a standard radioligand or radiolabelled form of a novel drug. In fact, these studies could be conducted in various tissues from animals pretreated with radioligands and/or unlabelled novel drugs, by conventional radioligand binding assay, radioactivity measurement, autoradiography and positron emission tomography. In vivo and ex vivo receptor binding with α1-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic receptor antagonists have been proved to be useful in predicting the potency, organ selectivity and duration of action of drugs in relation to their pharmacokinetics. Such evaluations of drug–receptor binding reveal that adverse effects could be avoided by the use of new α1-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic receptor antagonists for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms. Thus, the comparative analysis of α1-adrenoceptor and muscarinic receptor binding characteristics in the lower urinary tract and other tissues after systemic administration of therapeutic agents allows the rationale for their pharmacological characteristics from the integrated viewpoint of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The current review emphasizes the usefulness of in vivo and ex vivo receptor binding in the discovery and development of novel drugs for the treatment of not only urinary dysfunction but also other disorders. PMID:21265873

  16. Electrophysiological evidence showing muscarinic agonist-antagonist activities of N-desmethylclozapine using hippocampal excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yuto; Kikuchi, Yui; Yoneda, Mitsugu; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako

    2016-07-01

    The atypical antipsychotic clozapine is widely used for treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients. Clozapine and its major active metabolite, N-desmethylclozapine (NDMC), have complex pharmacological properties, and interact with various neurotransmitter receptors. There are several biochemical studies reporting that NDMC exhibits a partial agonist profile at the human recombinant M1 muscarinic receptors. However, direct electrophysiological evidence showing the ability of NDMC to activate native M1 receptors in intact neurons is poor. Using rat hippocampal neurons, we previously demonstrated that activation of muscarinic receptors by a muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine M (oxo-M), induces a decrease in outward K(+)current at -40mV. In the present study, using this muscarinic current response we assessed agonist and antagonist activities of clozapine and NDMC at native muscarinic receptors in intact hippocampal excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Suppression of the oxo-M-induced current response by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine was evident only in excitatory neurons, while the M3 antagonist darifenacin was effective in both types of neurons. Muscarinic agonist activity of NDMC was higher than that of clozapine, higher in excitatory neurons than in inhibitory neurons, sensitive to pirenzepine, and partially masked when co-applied with clozapine. Muscarinic antagonist activity of clozapine as well as NDMC was not different between excitatory and inhibitory neurons, but clozapine was more effective than NDMC. These results demonstrate that NDMC has the ability to activate native M1 receptors expressed in hippocampal excitatory neurons, but its agonist activity might be limited in clozapine-treated patients because of the presence of excessive clozapine with muscarinic antagonist activity. PMID:27048752

  17. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    PubMed

    Hua, Nan; Wei, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaoyun; He, Xinhua; Zhuo, Rengong; Zhao, Zhe; Wang, Liyun; Yan, Haitao; Zhong, Bohua; Zheng, Jianquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs). In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC. PMID:23285263

  18. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects. PMID:24072071

  19. Appropriateness of oral drugs for long-term treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms in older persons: results of a systematic literature review and international consensus validation process (LUTS-FORTA 2014)

    PubMed Central

    Oelke, Matthias; Becher, Klaus; Castro-Diaz, David; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Kirby, Mike; Wagg, Adrian; Wehling, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: we aimed to systematically review drugs to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) regularly used in older persons to classify appropriate and inappropriate drugs based on efficacy, safety and tolerability by using the Fit fOR The Aged (FORTA) classification. Methods: to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of drugs used for treatment of LUTS in older persons, a systematic review was performed. Papers on clinical trials and summaries of individual product characteristics were analysed regarding efficacy and safety in older persons (≥65 years). The most frequently used drugs were selected based on current prescription data. An interdisciplinary international expert panel assessed the drugs in a Delphi process. Results: for the 16 drugs included here, a total of 896 citations were identified; of those, only 25 reported clinical trials with explicit data on, or solely performed in older people, underlining the lack of evidence in older people for drug treatment of LUTS. No drug was rated at the FORTA-A-level (indispensable). Only three were assigned to FORTA B (beneficial): dutasteride, fesoterodine and finasteride. The majority was rated FORTA C (questionable): darifenacin, mirabegron, extended release oxybutynin, silodosin, solifenacin, tadalafil, tamsulosin, tolterodine and trospium. FORTA D (avoid) was assigned to alfuzosin, doxazosin, immediate release oxybutynin, propiverine and terazosin. Conclusions: dutasteride, fesoterodine and finasteride were classified as beneficial in older persons or frail elderly people (FORTA B). For most drugs, in particular those from the group of α-blockers and antimuscarinics, use in this group seems questionable (FORTA C) or should be avoided (FORTA D). PMID:26104505

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-06-01

    [¹¹C]RAC; (18)F-Fluoromisonidazole; 89-12; 9-[¹⁸F]Fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine; Adalimumab, Adecatumumab, ADMVA, ADXS-11-001, Aflibercept, Agatolimod sodium, AGS-004, Alglucosidase alfa, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvocidib hydrochloride, AMG-108, AMG-853, Apixaban, Aripiprazole, Armodafinil, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BioMatrix Flex drug eluting stent, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Caspofungin acetate, Cediranib, Cetuximab, ChimeriVax-Dengue, Choriogonadotropin alfa, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cizolirtine citrate, Clofarabine, Cocaine conjugate vaccine, CX-717; Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexamethasone sodium phosphate, Dienogest, Diphencyprone, Doripenem, DTaP-HepB-IPV, Dutasteride; E-7010, Ecallantide, Ecstasy, Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Emtricitabine, Enfuvirtide, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Eszopiclone, Etonogestrel/ethinyl estradiol, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent EVT-201, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Ferumoxytol, Fesoterodine fumavate, Figitumumab, Filgrastim, Fingolimod hydrochloride, Fluticasone furoate, Fluval P, Fluzone, Fondaparinux sodium, Fulvestrant, Fungichromin; Gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, Gefitinib, GHB-01L1, GLY-230, GSK-1349572; Hib-MenCY-TT, Hib-TT, HPV-6/11/16/18, Hydrocodone bitartrate; IC-51, Icatibant acetate, Imatinib mesylate, Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indetanib, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glargine, Insulin glulisine, Interferon-beta, Ispinesib mesylate, Ixabepilone; Laromustine, Latanoprost/timolol maleate, L-Citrulline, Lenalidomide, Lexatumumab, Linezolid, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lutropin alfa; Mapatumumab, MDX-066, MDX-1388, Mepolizumab, Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Metreleptin, Micafungin sodium, Mometasone furoate/oxymetazoline hydrochloride, Mx-dnG1, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nabiximols, Natalizumab

  1. Half-life extended factor VIII for the treatment of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Tiede, A

    2015-06-01

    Prophylactic infusion of factor VIII (FVIII) prevents joint bleeding and other hemorrhages in patients with hemophilia A. Conventional FVIII concentrates have a short half-life, with an average of about 12 h in adults, ranging in individual patients between 6 and 24 h, and even shorter in younger children. Therefore, effective prophylaxis requires frequent intravenous injection, usually three times per week or every other day. Several technologies are currently under investigation to extend the half-life of FVIII, including Fc fusion (Eloctate, Elocta, efmoroctocog alfa), addition of polyethylene glycol (turoctocog alfa pegol [N8-GP], BAY 94-9027, BAX 855), and a single-chain construct (CSL627). This review summarizes characteristics of products in clinical development and discusses their potential benefits. PMID:26149020

  2. Reduction and Analysis of GALFACTS Data in Search of Compact Variable Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Trey; Barenfeld, S.; Ghosh, T.; Salter, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Galactic ALFA Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS) is an all-Arecibo sky, full-Stokes survey from 1225 to 1525 MHz using the multibeam Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA). Using data from survey field N1, the first field covered by GALFACTS, we are searching for compact sources that vary in intensity and/or polarization. The multistep procedure for reducing the data includes radio frequency interference (RFI) removal, source detection, Gaussian fitting in multiple dimensions, polarization leakage calibration, and gain calibration. We have developed code to analyze and calculate the calibration parameters from the N1 calibration sources, and apply these to the data of the main run. For detected compact sources, our goal is to compare results from multiple passes over a source to search for rapid variability, as well as to compare our flux densities with those from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) to search for longer time-scale variations.

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-04-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, AMA1-C1/alhydrogel, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Aripiprazole, Artesunate/amodiaquine, Asenapine maleate; Bosentan, Brivaracetam; Carisbamate, Clevudine, Clofarabine, Corticorelin acetate; Dasatinib; Elinogrel potassium, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Etazolate; Fampridine, Fluarix, Fondaparinux sodium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GDC-0941, GI-5005, Golimumab; Imatinib mesylate, Lacosamide, Lapatinib ditosylate, Levetiracetam, Liraglutide, LOLA; Mecasermin, Morphine hydrochloride; Natalizumab, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Poly I:CLC, Pralatrexate, Pregabalin; Ranolazine, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine hydrochloride, Rhenium Re-186 etidronate, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine, RTL-1000, Rufinamide; Sirolimus-eluting coronary stent, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Stiripentol; Tiotropium bromide; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Varenicline tartrate; XL-184; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:20448862

  4. Results from the Arecibo Galactic HI Survey (GALFA-HI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Ayesha; Ballering, N.; Stanimirovic, S.; Douglas, K.; Gibson, S. J.; Grcevich, J.; Heiles, C.; Korpela, E.; Lee, M.; Peek, J. E. G.; Putman, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    The consortium for Galactic studies with the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) is conducting a neutral hydrogen survey of the whole Arecibo sky (declination range from -1 to 38 deg), over a velocity range of -700 to +700 km/s, with high angular (3.5 arcmin) and velocity resolution (0.2 km/s). We present highlights from TOGS (Turn On GALFA Survey), the largest portion of GALFA-HI, which is covering thousands of square degrees in commensal drift scan observations with the ALFALFA and AGES extragalactic ALFA surveys. The unprecedented resolution and sensitivity of our survey resulted in the detection of numerous isolated, ultra-compact HI clouds at low Galactic velocities, which are distinctly separated from the HI disk emission. We will discuss properties of this population, and their role in the interplay between the Galactic disk and halo.

  5. Future treatment options for HCV: double, triple, what is the optimal combination?

    PubMed

    Kronenberger, Bernd; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Specifically Targeted Antiviral Therapy against hepatitis C virus (STAT-C) stands for a new era in the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Results from recent trials with protease and polymerase inhibitors indicate that therapy with a single HCV specific compound will not be sufficient to eradicate hepatitis C virus infection and that combination therapy will be necessary to improve sustained virologic response rates. The search for the optimal combination of STAT-C compounds with peginterferon alfa with or without ribavirin is currently under investigation in several clinical trials. Overall the current studies indicate that peginterferon alfa and ribavirin remain the backbone of antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C even in the era of STAT-C. Nevertheless, it can be anticipated that combination of STAT-C compounds with non-overlapping resistance profiles could improve response to antiviral therapy. Promising combinations are protease inhibitors plus nucleoside analogue and non-nucleoside analogue polymerase inhibitors. PMID:19187871

  6. Contemporary management of infected necrosis complicating severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jamdar, Saurabh; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic necrosis complicating severe acute pancreatitis is a challenging scenario in contemporary critical care practice; it requires multidisciplinary care in a setting where there is a relatively limited evidence base to support decision making. This commentary provides a concise overview of current management of patients with infected necrosis, focusing on detection, the role of pharmacologic intervention, and the timing and nature of surgical interventions. Fine-needle aspiration of necrosis remains the mainstay for establishment of infection. Pharmacological intervention includes antibiotic therapy as an adjunct to surgical debridement/drainage and, more recently, drotrecogin alfa. Specific concerns remain regarding the suitability of drotrecogin alfa in this setting. Early surgical intervention is unhelpful; surgery is indicated when there is strong evidence for infection of necrotic tissue, with the current trend being toward 'less drastic' surgical interventions. PMID:16356213

  7. Minority Student Scientists Searching for Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Zermeno, Adrienne; Miller, A.; Stovall, K.; Jenet, F.

    2007-12-01

    Modern astronomy offers the means to excite students about science. At the Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) part of University of Texas at Brownsville's Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy (CGWA), high school and undergraduate students experience what it is like to be a scientist by assisting in the international effort to identify pulsars as part of the P-ALFA survey. By participating in the ARCC, students start their contribution to the P-ALFA project by remotely controlling the Arecibo telescope for data collection. Then, using a web-based software instrument developed by researchers at the CGWA, students analyze the data to identify potential pulsar candidates. These early career students have become a vital part of this data analysis pipeline. Here we discuss this implementation as a case study of authentic research experiences for minority students.

  8. [Morquio disease (Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV-A): clinical aspects, diagnosis and new treatment with enzyme replacement therapy].

    PubMed

    Politei, Juan; Schenone, Andrea B; Guelbert, Norberto; Fainboim, Alejandro; Szlago, Marina

    2015-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV-A (Morquio A disease) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase, that results in impaired catabolism of two glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin-6-sulfate and keratan sulfate. Clinical presentations reflect a spectrum of progression from a severe phenotype to an attenuated expression. Accumulation of substrate manifests predominantly as short stature and skeletal dysplasia, including atlantoaxial instability and cervical cord compression. Other abnormalities in the visual, auditory, cardiovascular and respiratory systems can also affect individuals with Morquio disease. Elosulfase alfa showed in clinical trials in children and adults a significant and sustained improvement in endurance and urinary levels of keratan sulfate. Data from the ongoing observational, multinational Morquio A Registry Study will provide valuable information on the long-term efficacy and safety of elosulfase alfa in patients, as well as on the natural history of this very rare disease. PMID:26172013

  9. Retinopathy in chronic hepatitis C patients during interferon treatment with ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, K; Lam, W; Waheeb, S; Thai, Q; Heathcote, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the ocular effect of interferon alfa 2b prescribed with ribavirin in patients undergoing therapy for chronic hepatitis C.
METHODS—19 patients with chronic hepatitis C who satisfied the follow up criteria were assessed for ocular complications using slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy before, during, and after the treatment at regular intervals.
RESULTS—8/19 patients, while on treatment, developed an asymptomatic retinopathy. Among these 3/8 were relapsers and 5/9 were non-responders to interferon monotherapy. All retinal changes faded, often while the patients continued the therapy. There was no significant association in occurrence of retinopathy with haematological and/or biochemical changes.
CONCLUSION—Retinopathy was more common in interferon monotherapy non-responders than relapsers when treated with interferon alfa 2b with the addition of ribavirin. The changes were transient, disappearing while the patients were still being treated.

 PMID:11567959

  10. Mechanism of action of guanfacine: a postsynaptic differential approach to the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (adhd).

    PubMed

    Alamo, Cecilio; López-Muñoz, Francisco; Sánchez-García, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The treatment of ADHD has focused on the use of psychostimulants drugs such as methylphenidate or amphetamine and derivatives, or not stimulants agents, such as atomoxetine. These agents act mainly on catecholaminergic presynaptic mechanisms. Recently the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has approved another not psychostimulant drug, guanfacine extended release (ER), as a new option to the treatment of ADHD, which acts at postsynaptic level. Guanfacine stimulates postsynaptic alfa-2A adrenergic receptors so it inhibits the production of cAMP and closes HCN channels enhancing the effectiveness of the signal of the pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), thus improving working memory and attention. In addition, stimulation of the alpha-2A receptors promotes growth and maturation of the dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons of the medial PFc, that are associated with brain function such as learning and memory. In contrast with psychostimulants or atomoxetine, guanfacine mimics noradrenaline stimulation of postsynaptic receptors alfa-2A on the PFC. PMID:27254403

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin

  13. Hospital inpatient prospective payment system: incorporating new technology.

    PubMed

    Durthaler, Jeffrey M; Miller, Alicia

    2003-11-01

    New technologies in the impatient prospective payment system are discussed. On December 21, 2000, Congress passed Public Law 106-554 that includes a requirement to establish a mechanism to more expeditiously incorporate the costs and establish qualifying criteria for payment of new services and technologies into the hospital inpatient prospective payment system. The final ruling of this law states that a new service or technology must demonstrate substantial improvement, be inadequately paid under the DRG system, and be "new." The intent of these criteria is to identify new technologies that offer substantial improvement over existing technologies and to provide supplemental payment that encourages physicians and hospitals to utilize the new technology. In November 2001, drotrecogin alfa (activated) received fast-track FDA approval because of the robust findings from the PROWESS trial. Drotrecogin alfa (activated) is the first agent proven to reduce mortality in patients suffering from severe sepsis associated with acute organ dysfunction who are at a high risk of death (i.e., APACHE II score > 24). In August 2002, drotrecogin alfa (activated) was one of four such new technologies and the first agent approved for new technology payment under the prospective payment system (PPS). This decision offers confidence that the PPS is effectively striving to incorporate new medical services and technologies at a pace similar to that of innovation. Providers may receive up to $3400 in additional reimbursement when drotrecogin alfa (activated) is administered in the Medicare population. Pharmacy and patient accounting personnel should develop a collaborative process to identify, document, and capture this new source of payment. PMID:14619129

  14. The Use of Interferons in the Treatment of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Spaccarelli, Natalie; Rook, Alain H

    2015-10-01

    Interferons are polypeptides that naturally occur in the human body as a part of the innate immune response. By harnessing these immunomodulatory functions, synthetic interferons have shown efficacy in combating various diseases including cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This article closely examines the qualities of interferon alfa and interferon gamma and the evidence behind their use in the 2 most common types of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, namely, mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome. PMID:26433845

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-10-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, (S)-Tenatoprazole sodium salt monohydrate 19-28z, Acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate, ADV-TK, AE-37, Aflibercept, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Asenapine maleate, Axitinib; Bavituximab, Becatecarin, beta-1,3/1,6-Glucan, Bevacizumab, Bremelanotide; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Casopitant mesylate, Catumaxomab, CDX-110, Cediranib, CMD-193, Cositecan; Darinaparsin, Denosumab, DP-b99, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E75, Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, EMD-273063, EndoTAG-1, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Eribulin mesilate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, Febuxostat, Fenretinide; Ghrelin (human); I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, I-131-3F8, Iclaprim, Iguratimod, Iloperidone, Imatinib mesylate, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Ipilimumab, Iratumumab, Ispinesib mesylate, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Laquinimod sodium, Larotaxel dehydrate, Linezolid, LOR-2040; Mapatumumab, MKC-1, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NK-012; Olanzapine pamoate, Oncolytic HSV, Ortataxel; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Paliperidone palmitate, Panitumumab, Patupilone, PCV-9, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pimecrolimus, Plerixafor hydrochloride, PM-02734, Poly I:CLC, PR1, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Progesterone caproate, Prucalopride, Pumosetrag hydrochloride; RAV-12, RB-006, RB-007, Recombinant human erythropoietin alfa, Rimonabant, Romidepsin; SAR-109659, Satraplatin, Sodium butyrate; Tadalafil, Talampanel, Tanespimycin, Tarenflurbil, Tariquidar

  16. Improvement with ongoing Enzyme Replacement Therapy in advanced late-onset Pompe disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura E; Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; DeArmey, Stephanie M; Mackey, Joanne; Kishnani, Priya S

    2008-12-01

    Benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa), anecdotally reported in late-onset Pompe disease, range from motor and pulmonary improvement in less severely affected patients, to stabilization with minimal improvement in those with advanced disease. We report a case of a 63-year-old patient with significant morbidity who made notable motor and pulmonary function gains after two years on therapy. Thus, improvements in those with advanced disease may be possible after long-term treatment. PMID:18930676

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: A-007, A6, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, AllerVax Ragweed, amphora, anakinra, angiotensin-(1-7), anidulafungin, apomine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, avanafil; BAL-8557, becatecarin, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, CG-0070, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, cryptophycin 52, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darapladib, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, deferasirox, desloratadine, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DMF, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol valerate/dienogest, eszopiclone, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gefitinib, gestodene, GYKI-16084; Hyaluronic acid, hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine; Juzen-taiho-to; Lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, L-BLP-25, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lexatumumab, lidocaine/prilocaine, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; MAb-14.18, mitoquidone; Natalizumab, neridronic acid, neuradiab; Olpadronic acid sodium salt, omalizumab; p53-DC vaccine, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, prasterone, prasugrel, PRO-2000

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 166Ho-DOTMP, 3-AP; Abatacept, abetimus sodium, ACR-16, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, AMD-070, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, anatumomab mafenatox, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, AP-12009, AP-23573, APC-8024, aripiprazole, ATL-962, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clofazimine, colchicine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CRM197; Desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diethylhomospermine; Edodekin alfa, efalizumab, elcometrine, eletriptan, enfuvirtide, entecavir, EP-2101, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, etoricoxib, everolimus, exherin, ezetimibe; Febuxostat, fluorescein lisicol, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; Hemoglobin raffimer, HSPPC-96, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, IRX-2, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ixabepilone; Kahalalide F; L-759274, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, licofelone, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lurtotecan, LY-156735; MAb G250, mecasermin, melatonin, midostaurin, muraglitazar; Nesiritide, nitronaproxen; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, PG-CPT, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, posaconazole; Rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, RG228, rimonabant hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; S-3304, safinamide mesilate, salcaprozic acid sodium salt, SDZ-SID-791, SGN-30, soblidotin

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a, Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Aripiprazole, AT-7519, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Besifloxacin hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Budesonide/formoterol fumarate; CAIV-T, Carisbamate, Casopitant mesylate, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone, CTCE-9908; Dalcetrapib, Darunavir, Deferasirox, Desloratadine, Disitertide, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTA-H19, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Eribulin mesilate, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, EUR-1008, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide; Fampridine, Fluticasone furoate, Formoterol fumarate/fluticasone propionate, Fosamprenavir calcium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GS-7904L; HPV-6/11/16/18, Human Secretin, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Indacaterol maleate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ixabepilone; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Loratadine/montelukast sodium, Lutropin alfa; MeNZB, Mepolizumab, Micafungin sodium, Morphine hydrochloride; Nabiximols, Nikkomycin Z; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Perifosine, PF-489791, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; QAX-576; Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Rasagiline

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-09-01

    12B75, 274150; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Abatacept, Ad2/HIF-1alpha, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, AGN-201904-Z, AIDSVAX, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amlodipine besylate/Olmesartan medoxomil, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Amodiaquine, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Arsenic trioxide, Artesunate/Amodiaquine, Ascorbic acid, Atazanavir sulfate, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Atrigel-Leuprolide, Axitinib; Bevacizumab, Binodenoson, Bortezomib, Bovine lactoferrin; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Carisbamate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, Conivaptan hydrochloride, CP-690550, CP-751871, Cypher; Dapivirine, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, del-1 Genemedicine, Denosumab, Desloratadine, Dexlansoprazole, DiabeCell, Drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, DTaP-HepB-IPV, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Eldecalcitol, Eletriptan, Emtricitabine, Entecavir, Eritoran tetrasodium, Ertapenem sodium, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Estradiol acetate, Eszopiclone, ETEC vaccine, Etoricoxib, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fluticasone furoate, Fosmidomycin, Fosmidomycin/clindamycin; Glutamine; Heat Shock Protein 10, Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HIV vaccine, Hochuekki-to, Human Albumin, Human papillomavirus vaccine; Immune globulin subcutaneous [human], IMP-321, Interferon omega, ISIS-301012, Istaroxime; Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine; Latanoprost/timolol maleate, Lenalidomide, Linaclotide acetate, Lumiracoxib, LY-517717; Malaria vaccine, MAS-063D, Meningitis B vaccine, Mepolizumab, Methylnaltrexone bromide, Micafungin sodium, MK-0822A, Morphine glucuronide, Morphine hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, Nesiritide, Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol, NT-201; Oblimersen sodium, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, Omalizumab, Otamixaban; Paclitaxel nanoparticles

  2. Rapid progression of antiviral treatments of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pol, S; Corouge, M; Mallet, V; Sogni, P

    2013-06-01

    The treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin leads to a sustained virologic response in around 50% of patients with HCV genotype 1, 65% with HCV genotype 4, 75% with HCV genotype 3 and around 80% with HCV genotype 2. A better understanding of the HCV life-cycle recently resulted in the development of several potential direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs) targeting viral proteins (NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B nucleos(t)idic and non nucleos(t)idic polymerase inhibitors, NS5A replication complex inhibitors). A lot of data have been reported with the combinations of pegylated interferon-alfa/ribavirin and the first generation oral DAAs, Telaprevir and Boceprevir. These regimens have demonstrated a high level of antiviral efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in treatment-naïve patients and in prior non-responders to pegylated interferon-alfa/ribavirin. After this first major step, the combination of the second generation DAAs with pegylated interferon-alfa/ribavirin will impact antiviral potency and tolerance and will reduce the duration of therapies and the pill burden. The next step will be the oral combination of new DAAs which is likely to become the standard of care for chronic HCV after 2015. Most studies are conducted in small numbers of "easy-to-treat" patients with short post-treatment period for concluding to a sustained virologic response: extension of both the numbers of treated patients and post-treatment follow-up, inclusion of more difficult-to-treat patients (experienced genotype 3-infected or genotype 1-infected patients who failed to first generation protease inhibitors, cirrhotic, HIV co-infected patients, allograft recipients or candidates to transplantation) will probably reduce the overall rate of cure. PMID:23831907

  3. Patients with Fabry Disease after Enzyme Replacement Therapy Dose Reduction Versus Treatment Switch

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Johannes; Duning, Thomas; Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Krebs, Alice; González, Hans Guerrero; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Niemann, Markus; Störk, Stefan; Schelleckes, Michael; Reiermann, Stefanie; Stypmann, Jörg; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Wanner, Christoph; Brand, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Because of the shortage of agalsidase-beta in 2009, many patients with Fabry disease were treated with lower doses or were switched to agalsidase-alfa. This observational study assessed end-organ damage and clinical symptoms during dose reduction or switch to agalsidase-alfa. A total of 105 adult patients with Fabry disease who had received agalsidase-beta (1.0 mg/kg body weight) for ≥1 year were nonrandomly assigned to continue this treatment regimen (regular-dose group, n=38), receive a reduced dose of 0.3–0.5 mg/kg (dose-reduction group, n=29), or switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-alfa (switch group) and were followed prospectively for 1 year. We assessed clinical events (death, myocardial infarction, severe arrhythmia, stroke, progression to ESRD); changes in cardiac, renal, and neurologic function; and Fabry-related symptoms (neuropathic pain, hypohidrosis, diarrhea, and disease severity scores). Organ function and Fabry-related symptoms remained stable in the regular-dose group. In contrast, estimated GFR decreased by about 3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (P=0.01) in the dose-reduction group, and the median albumin-to-creatinine ratio increased from 114 (0–606) mg/g to 216 (0–2062) mg/g (P=0.03) in the switch group. Furthermore, mean Mainz Severity Score Index scores and frequencies of pain attacks, chronic pain, gastrointestinal pain, and diarrhea increased significantly in the dose-reduction and switch groups. In conclusion, patients receiving regular agalsidase-beta dose had a stable disease course, but dose reduction led to worsening of renal function and symptoms. Switching to agalsidase-alfa is safe, but microalbuminuria may progress and Fabry-related symptoms may deteriorate. PMID:24556354

  4. High magnetic field facilities in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, R.; Grössinger, R.; Bertorello, H.; Broto, J. M.; Davies, H. A.; Estevez-Rams, E.; Gonzalez, J.; Matutes, J.; Sinnecker, J. P.; Sagredo, V.

    2006-11-01

    The EC supported a network (under the Framework 5 ALFA Programme) designated HIFIELD (Project number II0147FI) and entitled: "Measurement methods involving high magnetic fields for advanced and novel materials". As a result, high field facilities were initiated, constructed or extended at the following laboratories in Latin America: University Cordoba (Argentina), CES, Merida (Venezuela), CIMAV, Chihuahua (Mexico), University Federal de Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, Ad5-FGF4, adeno-Interferon gamma, AE-941, AERx, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, alpharadin, anakinra, anatumomab mafenatox, ANG-453, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AP-12009, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, astemizole, atlizumab, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BMS-188667, botulinum toxin type B, BufferGel; Caffeine, CDP-870, cetuximab, cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator, CP-461; Darbepoetin alfa, deferasirox, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diflomotecan, dolasetron, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EKB-569, eletriptan, EMD-72000, enfuvirtide, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib; Fampridine, ferumoxytol, fondaparinux sodium; Gadofosveset sodium, gastrazole, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride glutamine; hLM609, HSPPC-96, human insulin; IDD-1, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lapatinib, laquinimod, LDP-02, LE-SN38, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal NDDP, lopinavir, lumiracoxib, LY-156735; Morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, motexafin gadolinium, MS-27-275, MVA-5T4, MVA-Muc1-IL-2; Nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid nitronaproxen, NSC-683864, NSC-703940, NVP-LAF-237; Oblimersen sodium, ocinaplon, oncomyc-NG, OPC-28326, ortataxel, ospemifene; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pemetrexed disodium, pregabalin, prilocaine, pyridoxamine; RDP

  6. Automated laser fabrication of cemented carbide components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, C. P.; Khajepour, A.

    2008-07-01

    Automated Laser Fabrication (ALFa) is one of the most rapidly growing rapid-manufacturing technologies. It is similar to laser cladding at process level with different end applications. In general, laser cladding technique is used to deposit materials on the substrate either to improve the surface properties or to refurbish the worn-out parts, while ALFa is capable of near net shaping the components by layer-by-layer deposition of the material directly from CAD model. This manufacturing method is very attractive for low volume manufacturing of hard materials, as near net shaping minimizes machining of hard material and subsequently brings significant savings in time and costly material. To date, many researchers have used this technology to fabricate components using various alloy steels, nickel-based alloys and cobalt-based alloys. In the present study, the work is extended to tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) composites. A set of comprehensive experiments was carried out to study the effect of processing parameters during multi-layer fabrication. The process parameters were optimized for the component-level fabrication. Fabricated components were subjected to dye-penetrant testing, three-point flexural testing, hardness measurement, optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The test results revealed that the laser-fabricated material was defect free and more ductile in nature. Thus, ALFa technology, not only produced the quality components, but also minimized machining of hard material and brought significant saving of time and costly WC-Co material.

  7. Mannose receptor-mediated delivery of moss-made α-galactosidase A efficiently corrects enzyme deficiency in Fabry mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jin-Song; Busch, Andreas; Day, Taniqua S; Meng, Xing-Li; Yu, Chun I; Dabrowska-Schlepp, Paulina; Fode, Benjamin; Niederkrüger, Holger; Forni, Sabrina; Chen, Shuyuan; Schiffmann, Raphael; Frischmuth, Thomas; Schaaf, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is an effective treatment for several lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Intravenously infused enzymes are taken up by tissues through either the mannose 6-phosphate receptor (M6PR) or the mannose receptor (MR). It is generally believed that M6PR-mediated endocytosis is a key mechanism for ERT in treating LSDs that affect the non-macrophage cells of visceral organs. However, the therapeutic efficacy of MR-mediated delivery of mannose-terminated enzymes in these diseases has not been fully evaluated. We tested the effectiveness of a non-phosphorylated α-galactosidase A produced from moss (referred to as moss-aGal) in vitro and in a mouse model of Fabry disease. Endocytosis of moss-aGal was MR-dependent. Compared to agalsidase alfa, a phosphorylated form of α-galactosidase A, moss-aGal was more preferentially targeted to the kidney. Cellular localization of moss-aGal and agalsidase alfa in the heart and kidney was essentially identical. A single injection of moss-aGal led to clearance of accumulated substrate in the heart and kidney to an extent comparable to that achieved by agalsidase alfa. This study suggested that mannose-terminated enzymes may be sufficiently effective for some LSDs in which non-macrophage cells are affected, and that M6P residues may not always be a prerequisite for ERT as previously considered. PMID:26310963

  8. The modelling of symmetric airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Wendt, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to determine the dependence of vortex generator geometry and impinging flow conditions on shed vortex circulation and crossplane peak vorticity for one type of vortex generator. The vortex generator is a symmetric airfoil having a NACA 0012 cross-sectional profile. The geometry and flow parameters varied include angle-of-attack alfa, chordlength c, span h, and Mach number M. The vortex generators are mounted either in isolation or in a symmetric counter-rotating array configuration on the inside surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio is delta/R = 0. 17. Circulation and peak vorticity data are derived from crossplane velocity measurements conducted at or about 1 chord downstream of the vortex generator trailing edge. Shed vortex circulation is observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. With these parameters held constant, circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio AR. Shed vortex peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. Unlike circulation, however, peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at AR approx. 2.0 before falling off.

  9. GALFA HI: Candidate Sites for H2 Formation in Cold HI Emission and Other Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Jonathan; Gibson, S. J.; Douglas, K. A.; Koo, B.; Kang, J.; Park, G.; Peek, J. E. G.; Korpela, E. J.; Heiles, C.; Dame, T. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interstellar gas has a variety of temperature phases, but only the coldest clouds are dense enough to collapse gravitationally and form stars. How do such clouds form? A key step in this process is the transition from neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) to molecular hydrogen (H2). To identify candidate sites where this HI-to-H2 transition may be underway, we have developed a method of fitting isolated HI 21cm emission features to constrain their spin temperature and other properties vs. position 21cm-line data cubes. Our method uses the Nelder-Meade `amoeba' method to solve the relevant radiative transfer equation by identifying the absolute chi-squared minimum in the parameter space. As other investigators have noted, this approach requires a very high signal-to-noise ratio, so we are using sensitive Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) observations, starting with narrow-line HI emission clouds in the inner-Galaxy ALFA (I-GALFA) survey, and we have also tested the reliability of our method with a large suite of model spectra. Cold HI clouds confirmed by the fit will be compared to tracers of molecular gas, including CO lines and FIR dust emission. The I-GALFA survey is part of the Galactic ALFA HI data set obtained with the Arecibo 305m telescope. Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, operated sequentially by Cornell University and Stanford Research Institute under Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  10. GALFA-HI: A Targeted Search For Star Formation on the Far Side of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantzos, Nicholas; Gostisha, M.; Benjamin, R.; Gibson, S.; Koo, B.; Douglas, K. A.; Kang, J.; Park, G.; Peek, J. E. G.; Korpela, E. J.; Heiles, C.; Newton, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    The I-GALFA Survey provides a unique window on the spiral structure of the Milky Way as it contains three coherent 21 cm features that have been identified as spiral arms: the Perseus Arm, the Outer Arm, and the recently discovered Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm. Moreover, all three of these arms lie beyond the solar circle (although the Perseus arm is thought to cross interior to the solar circle for l< 50 degrees), so this gas does not suffer the kinematic distance ambiguity encountered in the inner Galaxy. We use this data and the CO surveys compiled by Dame et al (2001) to target a search for distant star formation regions seen in the Spitzer Space Telescope/GLIMPSE and WISE mid-infrared all-sky surveys. We characterize the HI arms, and present the star formation regions that may be potentially associated with these three arms. Many of these objects will need spectroscopic follow-up, but some have been previously identified in the Green Bank Telescope HII Region Discovery Survey of Anderson et al (2011). The Inner Galaxy ALFA (I-GALFA) survey is part of the Galactic ALFA HI data set obtained with the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) on the Arecibo 305m telescope. Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, operated sequentially by Cornell University and Stanford Research Institute under Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamasri, Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka, Kusnanto

    2011-01-01

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 μm was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA. The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300° C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-Kα radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600° C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm2 and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  12. Enzyme replacement therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome): effect and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B.; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert W.; Khan, Shaukat; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Barrera, Luis A.; Mackenzie, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Following a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled, multinational study in subjects with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of elosulfase alfa has been approved in several countries. The study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of elosulfase alfa in patients with MPS IVA aged 5 years and older. Areas covered Outcomes of clinical trials for MPS IVA have been described. Subjects received either 2.0 mg/kg/week, 2.0 mg/kg/every other week, or PBO, for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance compared to PBO. The 6MWT results improved in patients receiving 2 mg/kg weekly compared to PBO. The every other week regimen resulted in walk distances comparable to PBO. There was no change from baseline in the 3 Min Stair Climb Test in both treatment groups. Following completion of the initial study, patients, who continued to receive elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg weekly (QW) for another 48 weeks (for a total of up to 72-week exposure), did not show additional improvement on 6MWT. Expert opinion We suggest that ERT is a therapeutic option for MPS IVA, providing a modest effect and the majority of the effects are seen in the soft tissues. PMID:26973801

  13. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Jamasri; Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka; Kusnanto

    2011-01-17

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 {mu}m was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA.The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300 deg. C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-K{sub {alpha}} radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600 deg. C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm{sup 2} and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-06-01

    (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Agalsidase beta, Alemtuzumab, Alglucosidase alfa, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Aripiprazole, Atrasentan, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bilastine, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Caspofungin acetate, CG-100649, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Clindamycin phosphate/ benzoyl peroxide; Dasatinib, Denosumab, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride, Dutasteride/tamsulosin; Ecogramostim, Eculizumab, Eltrombopag olamine, EndoTAG-1, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; FAHF-2, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Golimumab; HEV-239, HSV-TK; Imatinib mesylate, Indium 111 ((111)In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza vaccine(surface antigen, inactivated, prepared in cell culture), Insulin glargine; Kisspeptin-54; Lidocaine/prilocaine, Lomitapide; Maraviroc, Mirodenafil hydrochloride, MK-8141, MVA-Ag85A; Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pitavastatin calcium, Prasugrel; Recombinant human relaxin H2, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium, RRz2; Sagopilone, Salinosporamide A, SB-509, Serlopitant, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, TG-4010, Tositumomab/iodine (I131) tositumomab; Velusetrag Hydrochloride; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan. PMID:19649342

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-09-01

    Aclidinium bromide, AE-37, Alemtuzumab, AMA1-C1/ISA 720, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Arachidonic acid, Arbaclofen placarbil, Aripiprazole, ARQ-621, Azelnidipine, Azilsartan medoxomil potassium; Bevacizumab, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib; Choriogonadotropin alfa, CTS-1027; Dapagliflozin, Dasatinib, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denufosol tetrasodium, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dronedarone hydrochloride, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Etaracizumab, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Ferric carboxymaltose, Fludarabine, Foretinib; Gefitinib, GFT-505, GSK-256066; HPV-6/11/16/18, HuM195/rGel, HyperAcute-Lung cancer vaccine; I5NP, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ivabradine hydrochloride; L2G7, Lacosamide, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Lidocaine/prilocaine, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide, Lixivaptan; Meningococcal (groups A, C, Y and W-135) oligosaccharide diphtheria CRM197 conjugate vaccine, Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-β, Mirabegron, Morphine/oxycodone, MR Vaccine, MSC-1936369B, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Narlaprevir, N-Desmethylclozapine; Ocriplasmin, Olaparib, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/azelnidipine, ONO-5334, ONO-8539; Palifermin, Panitumumab, Pardoprunox hydrochloride, PCV7, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pexelizumab, PF-337210, Pitavastatin calcium; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant interleukin-7, Regadenoson, Reniale, Roflumilast, Rosuvastatin calcium; Safinamide mesilate, SB-1518, SCH-527123, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talaporfin sodium, Tanespimycin, Technosphere/Insulin, Telaprevir, Telatinib, Telcagepant, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Teriparatide, Testosterone transdermal gel, TH-302, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Trabedersen, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Visilizumab, Voreloxin, Vorinostat. PMID

  16. Low rate of sustained virological response in an outbreak of acute hepatitis C in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Laguno, Montserrat; Martínez-Rebollar, Maria; Perez, Iñaki; Costa, Josep; Larrousse, Maria; Calvo, Marta; Loncá, Montse; Muñoz, Ana; González-Cordón, Ana; Blanco, José Luís; Martínez, Esteban; Gatell, Josep Maria; Mallolas, Josep

    2012-10-01

    Recent reports have suggested an increased risk of acute hepatitis C (AHC) infection in homosexual HIV-infected men and that early treatment with interferon-alfa, alone or associated with ribavirin, significantly reduces the risk of chronic evolution. A retrospective analysis of 38 HIV-infected patients who were consecutively diagnosed as developing AHC, defined by both seroconversion of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies and detection of serum HCV-RNA in those with previous negative results. Thirty-six patients were men with history of unprotected sexual intercourse with men and two were women with sexual and nosocomial risk factors. AHC infection was asymptomatic in 26 patients; asthenia and jaundice were the most frequent symptoms. HCV genotype 1 was present in 19 patients and genotype 4 in 14 patients. Thirty-five patients received early antiviral treatment with pegylated interferon-alfa associated with ribavirin; 15 of the 32 patients who completed the follow-up (47%) achieved a sustained virological response, as defined by undetectable HCV-RNA 6 months after the end of therapy. There is a risk of sexual transmission of HCV in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. In our experience, early treatment of AHC with pegylated interferon-alfa plus ribavirin in HIV patients achieves poor results. PMID:22428909

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, AMGN-0007, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, L-arginine hydrochloride, arzoxifene hydrochloride, astemizole, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab; Belimumab, BG-9928, binodenoson, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, BufferGel; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide,cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, CVT-3146; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, diflomotecan, doripenem, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DT388-GM-CSF, duloxetine hydrochloride, E-5564, efalizumab, enfuvirtide, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, ETC-642, exenatide, exisulind, ezetimib; Febuxostat; Gallium maltolate, ganirelix acetate, garenoxacin mesilate, gefitinib; H11, HuMax; IL-15, IDD-1, IGIV-C, imatinib mesylate, ISIS-14803, ITF-1697, ivabradine hydrochloride; KRN-5500; L-365260, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, linezolid, LJP-1082, lopinavir lumiracoxib; MCC-478, melatonin, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, moxidectin; N-Acetylcarnosine, natalizumab, NM-702, NNC-05-1869, NSC-703940; Ocinaplon OM-89, omalizumab, omeprazole/ sodium bicarbonate, OPC-28326, ospemifene; PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2a, pegsunercept, pirfenidone, pralmorelin, pregabalin; Recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repifermin, RSD-1235; S-8184, selodenoson, sodium dichloroacetate, suberanilohydroxamic acid; TAS-102, terfenadine, teriparatide, tipranavir troxacitabine; Ximelagatran; YM-337. PMID:14735233

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com.This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-263, AC-2307, Aclidinium bromide, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Anakinra, Apaziquone, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, ASM-8, Atiprimod hydrochloride, AVE-0277, AVE-1642, AVE-8062, Axitinib, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BI-2536, Biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-387032, BMS-663513, Bortezomib, BQ-123, Brivanib alaninate, BSI-201; Caspofungin acetate, CDX-110, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, CR-011, Cypher; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Dexlansoprazole, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DNA-Hsp65 vaccine, Dovitinib, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hibvaccine, DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, Emtricitabine, Endothelin, Entecavir, Eplivanserin fumarate, Escitalopram oxalate, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farletuzumab, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fibrin sealant (human), Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Glufosfamide, GSK-1562902A; Hib-TT; Imatinib mesylate, IMC-11F8, Imidazoacridinone, IMP-321, INCB-18424, Indiplon, Indisulam, INNO-406, Irinotecan hydrochloride/Floxuridine, ITF-2357, Ixabepilone; KRN-951; Lasofoxifene tartrate; Lenalidomide, LGD-4665, Lonafarnib, Lubiprostone, Lumiliximab; MDX-1100, Melan-A/MART-1/gp100/IFN-alfa, Methyl-CDDO, Metreleptin, MLN-2704, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Na-ASP-2, Naproxcinod, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NPI-2358; Oblimersen sodium, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, PAN-811, Panobinostat, PBI-1402, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate; ACP-103, Ad.Egr.TNF.11 D, adalimumab, AF-IL 12, AIDSVAX gp120 B/B, alefacept, alemtuzumab, a-Galactosylceramide, ALVAC vCP 1452, alvimopan hydrate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, antarelix, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic sulfide, asoprisnil, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BrachySil, brivudine; Caffeine, calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, capsaicin for injection, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, cetuximab, CGP-36742, clofazimine, CpG-7909, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, dimethylfumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fampridine, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GPI-0100; hA 20, HTU-PA, human insulin, HuOKT 3 gamma 1(Ala 234-Ala 235), hyaluronic acid; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, INKP-100, INKP-102, iodine (I131) tositumomab, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lasofoxifene tartrate, LB-80380, lenalidomide, lidocaine/tetracaine, linezolid, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Maribavir, morphine glucuronide, MVA-5 T

  20. Cholinergic receptors as target for cancer therapy in a systems medicine perspective.

    PubMed

    Russo, P; Del Bufalo, A; Milic, M; Salinaro, G; Fini, M; Cesario, A

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells not innervated by cholinergic neurons express nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChR, mAChR). nAChR and mAChR are components of the auto-/paracrine-regulatory loop of non-neuronal ACh release. The cholinergic control of non-neuronal cells may be mediated by different effects (synergistic, additive, or reciprocal) triggered by these receptors. The ionic events (Ca(+2) influx) are generated by the ACh-opening of nAChR channels, while the metabolic events by ACh-binding to G-proteincoupled mAChR. Effective inter- and intracellular signaling is crucial for valuable cancer cells proliferation and survival. Depending on cancer cell type, different AChR have been identified. The proliferation of airways epithelial cancer cells and pancreatic cancer cells may be under the control of α7-nAChR and M3-mAChR, while breast cancer cells and colon cancer cells are regulated by α9-nAChR, and M3-mAChR, respectively. In turn, these receptors may activate different pathways (Ras-Raf-1-Erk-AKT) as well as other receptors (β- adrenergicR). nAChR or mAChR antagonists may inhibit cancer growth. Inhibition of M3 by antisense or antagonists (Darifenacin, Tiotropium) reduces lung or colon cancer proliferation, as well as inhibition of α9- nAChR [polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate] diminishes breast cancer cells growth. α7-nAChR silencing inhibits lung cancer proliferation. Moreover, inhibition of the nAChR-β-adrenergicR pathway (β-blockers) could be also useful. This review will describe the future translational perspectives of cholinergic receptors druginhibition in a complex disease such as cancer that poses compelling treatment challenges. Cancer happens as consequence of disease-perturbed molecular networks in relevant organ cells that change during progression. The framework for approaching these challenges is a systems approach. PMID:25324001

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of pipazethate HCl, dextromethorphan HBr and drotaverine HCl in their pharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Alaa S.; El-Sheikh, Ragaa; Zahran, Faten; Gouda, Ayman Abou El-fetouh

    2007-07-01

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method is proposed for the rapid determination of pipazethate hydrochloride, dextromethorphan hydrobromide and drotaverine hydrochloride using chromotrope 2B (C2B) and chromotrope 2R (C2R). The method consists of extracting the formed ion-associates into chloroform in the case of pipazethate HCl and dextromethorphan HBr or into methylene chloride in the case of drotaverine HCl. The ion-associates exhibit absorption maxima at 528, 540 and 532 nm with C2B and at 526, 517 and 522 nm with C2R for pipazethate HCl, dextromethorphan HBr and drotaverine HCl, respectively. The calibration curves resulting from the measurements of absorbance-concentration relations (at the optimum reaction conditions) of the extracted ion-pairs are linear over the concentration range 4.36-52.32 μg mL -1 for pipazethate, 3.7-48.15 μg mL -1 for dextromethorphan and 4.34-60.76 μg mL -1 for drotaverine, respectively. The effect of acidity, reagent concentration, time, solvent and stoichiometric ratio of the ion-associates were estimated. The molar absorptivity and Sandell sensitivity of the reaction products were calculated. Statistical treatment of the results reflects that the procedure is precise, accurate and easily applied for the determination of the drugs under investigation in pure form and in their pharmaceutical preparations.

  2. Spectrophotometric determination of pipazethate HCl, dextromethorphan HBr and drotaverine HCl in their pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alaa S; El-Sheikh, Ragaa; Zahran, Faten; Gouda, Ayman Abou El-fetouh

    2007-07-01

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method is proposed for the rapid determination of pipazethate hydrochloride, dextromethorphan hydrobromide and drotaverine hydrochloride using chromotrope 2B (C2B) and chromotrope 2R (C2R). The method consists of extracting the formed ion-associates into chloroform in the case of pipazethate HCl and dextromethorphan HBr or into methylene chloride in the case of drotaverine HCl. The ion-associates exhibit absorption maxima at 528, 540 and 532 nm with C2B and at 526, 517 and 522 nm with C2R for pipazethate HCl, dextromethorphan HBr and drotaverine HCl, respectively. The calibration curves resulting from the measurements of absorbance-concentration relations (at the optimum reaction conditions) of the extracted ion-pairs are linear over the concentration range 4.36-52.32 microg mL(-1) for pipazethate, 3.7-48.15 microg mL(-1) for dextromethorphan and 4.34-60.76 microg mL(-1) for drotaverine, respectively. The effect of acidity, reagent concentration, time, solvent and stoichiometric ratio of the ion-associates were estimated. The molar absorptivity and Sandell sensitivity of the reaction products were calculated. Statistical treatment of the results reflects that the procedure is precise, accurate and easily applied for the determination of the drugs under investigation in pure form and in their pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:17092767

  3. Nicotinic modulation of Ca2+ oscillations in rat cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, JianGang; Wang, YaLi; Guo, FangLi; Feng, ZhiBo; Wang, XiangFang; Lu, ChengBiao

    2016-05-01

    The roles of nicotine on Ca(2+) oscillations [intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) oscillation] in rat primary cultured cortical neurons were studied. The spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations (SCO) were recorded in a portion of the neurons (65%) cultured for 7-10 days in vitro. Application of nicotine enhanced [Ca(2+)]i oscillation frequency and amplitude, which were reduced by the selective α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) hydrobromide, and the selective α7-nAChRs antagonist methyllycaconitine citrate (MLA, 20 nM). DHβE reduced SCO frequency and prevented the nicotinic increase in the frequency. DHβE somewhat enhanced SCO amplitude and prevented nicotinic increase in the amplitude. MLA (20 nM) itself reduced SCO frequency without affecting the amplitude but blocked nicotinic increase in [Ca(2+)]i oscillation frequency and amplitude. Furthermore, coadministration of both α4β2- and α7-nAChRs antagonists completely prevented nicotinic increment in [Ca(2+)]i oscillation frequency and amplitude. Thus, our results indicate that both α4β2- and α7-nAChRs mediated nicotine-induced [Ca(2+)]i oscillations, and two nAChR subtypes differentially regulated SCO. PMID:26843531

  4. [Rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine with MRM by LC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Xi-Ru; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Song, Geng-Shen

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the establishment of a method for rapid identification 15 effective components of anti common cold medicine (paracetamol, aminophenazone, pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, methylephedrine hydrochloride, caffeine, amantadine hydrochloride, phenazone, guaifenesin, chlorphenamine maleate, dextromethorphen hydrobromide, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, promethazine hydrochloride, propyphenazone, benorilate and diclofenac sodium) with MRM by LC-MS/MS. The samples were extracted by methanol and were separated from a Altantis T3 column within 15 min with a gradient of acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (containing 0.25% glacial acetic acid), a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source (ESI) was used in positive ion mode, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was performed for qualitative analysis of these compounds. The minimum detectable quantity were 0.33-2.5 microg x kg(-1) of the 15 compounds. The method is simple, accurate and with good reproducibility for rapid identification many components in the same chromatographic condition, and provides a reference for qualitative analysis illegally added chemicals in anti common cold medicine. PMID:23600148

  5. Development and validation of a generic high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous separation and determination of six cough ingredients: Robustness study on core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Ali Mohamed; Essam, Hebatallah Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    A generally applicable high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of pharmaceutical preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride, paracetamol, ephedrine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, doxylamine succinate, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide is developed. Optimization of chromatographic conditions was performed for the gradient elution using different buffer pH values, flow rates and two C18 stationary phases. The method was developed using a Kinetex® C18 column as a core-shell stationary phase with a gradient profile using buffer pH 5.0 and acetonitrile at 2.0 mL/min flow rate. Detection was carried out at 220 nm and linear calibrations were obtained for all components within the studied ranges. The method was fully validated in agreement with ICH guidelines. The proposed method is specific, accurate and precise (RSD% < 3%). Limits of detection are lower than 2.0 μg/mL. Qualitative and quantitative responses were evaluated using experimental design to assist the method robustness. The method was proved to be highly robust against 10% change in buffer pH and flow rate (RSD% < 10%), however, the flow rate may significantly influence the quantitative responses of phenylephrine, paracetamol, and doxylamine (RSD% > 10%). Satisfactory results were obtained for commercial combinations analyses. Statistical comparison between the proposed chromatographic and official methods revealed no significant difference. PMID:27404374

  6. Liquid chromatography and chemometric-assisted spectrophotometric methods for the analysis of two multicomponent mixtures containing cough suppressant drugs.

    PubMed

    El-Gindy, Alaa; Emara, Samy; Mesbah, Mostafa K; Hadad, Ghada M

    2005-01-01

    Three methods were applied for the analysis of 2 multicomponent mixtures containing dextromethorphan hydrobromide, phenylephrine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate, methylparaben, and propylparaben, together with either sodium benzoate (Mix 1) or ephedrine hydrochloride and benzoic acid (Mix 2). In the first method, liquid chromatography was used for their simultaneous determination using an ODS column with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-phosphate buffer, pH 2.7 (40 + 60, v/v), containing 5mM heptanesulfonic acid sodium salt and ultraviolet (UV) detection at 214 nm. Also, 2 chemometric methods, principal component regression, and partial least squares were used. For both chemometric calibrations, a concentration set of the mixture consisting of each compound in each mixture was prepared in distilled water. The absorbance data in the UV spectra were measured for the 76 or 71 wavelength points in the spectral region 210-240 or 210-224 nm considering the intervals of deltagamma = 0.4 or 0.2 nm for Mix 1 and Mix 2, respectively. The 2 chemometric methods did not require any separation step. These methods were successfully applied for the analysis of the 2 multicomponent combinations in synthetic mixtures and in commercial syrups, and the results were compared with each other. PMID:16152922

  7. Multi-residue method for detecting coccidiostats at carry-over level in feed by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Delahaut, Ph; Pierret, G; Ralet, N; Dubois, M; Gillard, N

    2010-06-01

    A multi-residue HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method has been developed for the simultaneous extraction, detection and confirmation of the 11 coccidiostats referenced by Regulation 2009/8/EC (lasalocid sodium, narasin, salinomycin sodium, monensin sodium, semduramicin sodium, maduramicin ammonium alpha, robenidine hydrochloride, decoquinate, halofuginone hydrobromide, nicarbazin, and diclazuril) in feedstuffs at carry-over level. The sensitivity of the method allows quantification and confirmation for all coccidiostats below target concentration. The method was in-house validated and meets all criteria of European legislation (2002/657/EC). The precision of the method was determined under repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility conditions; RSD(r) and RSD(R) were below the maximum permitted values for every tested concentration. The specificity was checked by analysing representative blank samples and blank samples fortified with potentially interfering substances (benzimidazoles, corticosteroides, triphenylmethane dyes, quinolones, nitrofurans, nitroimidazoles, phenicols); no interference were found. Concerning quantification, a quadratic regression model was fitted to every calibration curve with a regression coefficient r2 above 0.99 on each data set. Finally, the expanded uncertainty U was calculated with data obtained within the laboratory while applying the method during validation and in routine tests. PMID:20198524

  8. Anticoccidial evaluation of a traditional Chinese medicine--Brucea javanica--in broilers.

    PubMed

    Lan, L; Zuo, B; Ding, H; Huang, Y; Chen, X; Du, A

    2016-04-01

    The traditional Chinese medicinal plant Brucea javanica has received much attention for its significant antiprotozoal effects in recent years; however, little is known about its potential anticoccidial functions. In the present study, a series of experiments was conducted to investigate the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of ethanol extract from B. javanica on coccidiosis induced by Eimeria tenella in broiler chickens. Chickens infected with E. tenella were treated with B. javanica extract and compared either with broilers treated with the anticoccidial halofuginone hydrobromide (Stenorol) or with control groups that consisted of infected-unmedicated and uninfected-unmedicated broilers. The experiments revealed that the B. javanica extract could significantly (P<0.05) reduce bloody diarrhea and lesion scores. Additional, OPG output in these plant extract treated groups was reduced in comparison with non-treated groups (P<0.05). However, there was no evidence to show that the extract could promote BWG. Histological data showed that the number of second-generation schizonts in the medicated groups was substantially less than that in the infected-unmedicated control. In summary, our work showed that B. javanica extract exerted considerable anticoccidial effects, supporting its use as a promising therapeutic in controlling avian coccidiosis. PMID:26787922

  9. Ionic liquid self-combustion synthesis of BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 heterojunctions with exceptional visible-light photocatalytic performances.

    PubMed

    Li, Fa-tang; Wang, Qing; Ran, Jingrun; Hao, Ying-juan; Wang, Xiao-jing; Zhao, Dishun; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2015-01-21

    Heterostructured BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 nanocomposites with surface oxygen vacancies are constructed by a facile in situ route of one-step self-combustion of ionic liquids. The compositions can be easily controlled by simply adjusting the fuel ratio of urea and 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BTH). BTH serves not only as a fuel, but also as a complexing agent for ionic liquids and a reactant to supply the Br element. The heterojunctions show remarkable adsorptive ability for both the cationic dye of rhodamine B (RhB) and the anionic dye of methylene orange (MO) at high concentrations, which is attributed to the abundant surface oxygen vacancies. The sample containing 75.2% BiOBr and 24.8% Bi24O31Br10 exhibits the highest photocatalytic activity. Its reaction rate constant is 4.0 and 9.0 times that of pure BiOBr in degrading 50 mg L(-1) of RhB and 30 mg L(-1) of MO under visible-light (λ > 400 nm) irradiation, respectively, which is attributed to the narrow band gap and highly efficient transfer efficiency of charge carriers. Different photocatalytic reaction processes and mechanisms over pure BiOBr and heterojunctions are proposed. PMID:25482071

  10. Spectrophotometric determination of some anti-tussive and anti-spasmodic drugs through ion-pair complex formation with thiocyanate and cobalt(II) or molybdenum(V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shiekh, Ragaa; Zahran, Faten; El-Fetouh Gouda, Ayman Abou

    2007-04-01

    Two rapid, simple and sensitive extractive specrophotometric methods has been developed for the determination of anti-tussive drugs, e.g., dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DEX) and pipazethate hydrochloride (PiCl) and anti-spasmodic drugs, e.g., drotaverine hydrochloride (DvCl) and trimebutine maleate (TM) in bulk and in their pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of cobalt(II)-thiocyanate (method A) and molybdenum(V)-thiocyanate ions (method B) with the cited drugs to form stable ion-pair complexes which extractable with an n-butnol-dichloromethane solvent mixture (3.5:6.5) and methylene chloride for methods A and B, respectively. The blue and orange red color complexes are determined either colorimetrically at λmax 625 nm (using method A) and 467 or 470 nm for (DEX and PiCl) or (DvCl and TM), respectively (using method B). The concentration range is 20-400 and 2.5-50 μg mL -1 for methods A and B, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in pure and in pharmaceutical formulations applying the standard additions technique and the results obtained in good agreement well with those obtained by the official method.

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of some anti-tussive and anti-spasmodic drugs through ion-pair complex formation with thiocyanate and cobalt(II) or molybdenum(V).

    PubMed

    El-Shiekh, Ragaa; Zahran, Faten; El-Fetouh Gouda, Ayman Abou

    2007-04-01

    Two rapid, simple and sensitive extractive specrophotometric methods has been developed for the determination of anti-tussive drugs, e.g., dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DEX) and pipazethate hydrochloride (PiCl) and anti-spasmodic drugs, e.g., drotaverine hydrochloride (DvCl) and trimebutine maleate (TM) in bulk and in their pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of cobalt(II)-thiocyanate (method A) and molybdenum(V)-thiocyanate ions (method B) with the cited drugs to form stable ion-pair complexes which extractable with an n-butnol-dichloromethane solvent mixture (3.5:6.5) and methylene chloride for methods A and B, respectively. The blue and orange red color complexes are determined either colorimetrically at lambdamax 625 nm (using method A) and 467 or 470 nm for (DEX and PiCl) or (DvCl and TM), respectively (using method B). The concentration range is 20-400 and 2.5-50 microg mL-1 for methods A and B, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in pure and in pharmaceutical formulations applying the standard additions technique and the results obtained in good agreement well with those obtained by the official method. PMID:17142094

  12. [Studies and safety evaluation of aflatoxins in herbal plants].

    PubMed

    Ledzion, Ewa; Rybińska, Krystyna; Postupolski, Jacek; Kurpińska-Jaworska, Jolanta; Szczesna, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    Herbs and herbal products are commonly used in food and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of this study was to test herbal plants for contamination with aflatoxins (AF), genotoxic, cancerogenic and hepatotoxic compounds which can cause immunotoxic and allergic effects as well as growth disorders. Aflatoxins were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with post column derivatization involving bromination with pyridinium hydrobromide perbromide (PBPB). Extracts was cleaned-up by immunoaffinity columns (IAC). The contents of aflatoxins B, B, G, and G, in more than 500 herbal plants samples mainly from Eastern Poland were investigated. Samples were supplied by manufacturers (herbal facilities) in 2006-2010 years. In all the evaluated samples the levels of aflatoxins above the detection limits of methods applied were not observed: for AF B1--0.2 microg/kg; AF B2--0.03 microg/kg; AF G1--0.3 microg/kg; AF G2--0.03 microg/kg (PN-EN 14123) and for AF B1--0.15 microg/kg (Ph. Eur.6, 2008:2.8.18). All the herbal plants tested for contamination with aflatoxins should be considered safe, which indicates that manufacturers used good manufacturing practices during drying and storage of raw materials. PMID:22435291

  13. The GABAA antagonist DPP-4-PIOL selectively antagonises tonic over phasic GABAergic currents in dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Boddum, Kim; Frølund, Bente; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2014-11-01

    GABAA receptors mediate two different types of inhibitory currents: phasic inhibitory currents when rapid and brief presynaptic GABA release activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors and tonic inhibitory currents generated by low extrasynaptic GABA levels, persistently activating extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. The two inhibitory current types are mediated by different subpopulations of GABAA receptors with diverse pharmacological profiles. Selective antagonism of tonic currents is of special interest as excessive tonic inhibition post-stroke has severe pathological consequences. Here we demonstrate that phasic and tonic GABAA receptor currents can be selectively inhibited by the antagonists SR 95531 and the 4-PIOL derivative, 4-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol hydrobromide (DPP-4-PIOL), respectively. In dentate gyrus granule cells, SR 95531 was found approximately 4 times as potent inhibiting phasic currents compared to tonic currents (IC50 values: 101 vs. 427 nM). Conversely, DPP-4-PIOL was estimated to be more than 20 times as potent inhibiting tonic current compared to phasic current (IC50 values: 0.87 vs. 21.3 nM). Consequently, we were able to impose a pronounced reduction in tonic GABA mediated current (>70 %) by concentrations of DPP-4-PIOL, at which no significant effect on the phasic current was seen. Our findings demonstrate that selective inhibition of GABA mediated tonic current is possible, when targeting a subpopulation of GABAA receptors located extrasynaptically using the antagonist, DPP-4-PIOL. PMID:25103229

  14. Design and synthesis of some substituted thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidine derivatives of potential biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Moty, Samia G.; Hussein, Mostafa A.; Abdel Aziz, Salah A.; Abou-Salim, Mahrous A.

    2013-01-01

    In continuation to our previous work, thiazolopyrimidines 2a–x were synthesized through intramolecular cyclization of 2-phenacylthio-dihydropyrimidine hydrobromides 1a–x using polyphosphoric acid. On the other hand, thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidine-3-one 3 was coupled with aryldiazonium salts or condensed with isatin to afford compounds 4a–c or 5, respectively. Chemical structure of the target compounds was substantiated by IR, FT-IR, 1H-, 13C and DEPT-13C NMR, MS as well as microanalyses. Moreover, the lipophilicity of the target compounds is expressed as Clog P. The antimicrobial screening of the test compounds 2a–x, 4a–c and 5 revealed moderate activity in comparison to reference drugs. Compounds 2a–c, 2e, 2o and 2v showed a gradual increase in their anti-inflammatory activity reaching its maximum at 5 h compared to indomethacin. Furthermore, the analgesic activity of compounds 2a–c, 2e, 2o and 2v revealed a maximum activity after 5 h of injection compared to aspirin and the LD50 of compounds 2e and 2v was determined. PMID:27013904

  15. Activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the preBötzinger region has little impact on the respiratory pattern.

    PubMed

    Radocaj, Tomislav; Mustapic, Sanda; Prkic, Ivana; Stucke, Astrid G; Hopp, Francis A; Stuth, Eckehard A E; Zuperku, Edward J

    2015-07-01

    The preBötzinger (preBötC) complex has been suggested as the primary site where systemically administered selective serotonin agonists have been shown to reduce or prevent opioid-induced depression of breathing. However, this hypothesis has not been tested pharmacologically in vivo. This study sought to determine whether 5-HT1A receptors within the preBötC and ventral respiratory column (VRC) mediate the tachypneic response induced by intravenous (IV) (±)-8-Hydroxy-2-diproplyaminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) in a decerebrated dog model. IV 8-OH-DPAT (19 ± 2 μg/kg) reduced both inspiratory (I) and expiratory (E) durations by ∼ 40%, but had no effect on peak phrenic activity (PPA). Picoejection of 1, 10, and 100 μM 8-OH-DPAT on I and E preBötC neurons produced dose-dependent decreases up to ∼ 40% in peak discharge. Surprisingly, microinjections of 8-OH-DPAT and 5-HT within the VRC from the obex to 9 mm rostral had no effect on timing and PPA. These results suggest that the tachypneic effects of IV 8-OH-DPAT are due to receptors located outside of the areas we studied. PMID:25850079

  16. Sympathetic Nervous System Control of Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Oxidative Stress in Liver through α-Adrenergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun; Peng, Yi-Jen; Wang, Shih-Yu; Young, Ton-Ho; Salter, Donald M.; Lee, Herng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being the primary organ involved in redox cycling, the liver is one of the most highly innervated tissues in mammals. The interaction between hepatocytes and sympathetic, parasympathetic, and peptidergic nerve fibers through a variety of neurotransmitters and signaling pathways is recognized as being important in the regulation of hepatocyte function, liver regeneration, and hepatic fibrosis. However, less is known regarding the role of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in modulating the hepatic response to oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate the role of the SNS in healthy and oxidatively stressed liver parenchyma. Mice treated with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide were used to realize chemical sympathectomy. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injection was used to induce oxidative liver injury. Sympathectomized animals were protected from CCl4 induced hepatic lipid peroxidation-mediated cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as assessed by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels, morphological features of cell damage, and DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, sympathectomy modulated hepatic inflammatory response induced by CCl4-mediated lipid peroxidation. CCl4 induced lipid peroxidation and hepatotoxicity were suppressed by administration of an α-adrenergic antagonist. We conclude that the SNS provides a permissive microenvironment for hepatic oxidative stress indicating the possibility that targeting the hepatic α-adrenergic signaling could be a viable strategy for improving outcomes in patients with acute hepatic injury. PMID:26798417

  17. In vitro Labeling of Neural Stem Cells with Poly-L-Lysine Coated Super Paramagnetic Nanoparticles for Green Fluorescent Protein Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Albukhaty, Salim; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Tiraihi, Taki

    2013-01-01

    Background: The magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection method is a relatively new technique for delivery of functional genes to target tissues. We aimed to evaluate the transfection efficiency of rat neural stem cell (NSC) using poly-L-lysine hydrobromide (PLL)-coated super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). Methods: The SPION was prepared and coated with PLL as transfection agent and the transfection efficiency was evaluated in rat NSC using enhanced green fluorescent protein-N1 plasmid containing GFP as a reporter gene. NSC was incubated for 24 h in cell culture media containing 25 µg/ml SPION and in different concentrations of PLL (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1 and 2 µg/ml). Cell viability was determined before and after transfection for every concentration using Trypan blue assay. Characterization of prepared uncoated (SPION) and coated (SPION-PLL) complexes were evaluated by a transmission electron microscope and the zeta potential. Results: PLL at 0.75 μg/ml showed optimal results with 25 μg/ml SPION concentration compared with other PLL concentrations (0.25, 0.50, 1 and 2 μg/ml). The 18% efficiency of the transfected cells showed green fluorescence. Conclusion: Transfection with SPION is an efficient, non-viral gene transfere method. PMID:23567848

  18. Using an innovative combination of quality-by-design and green analytical chemistry approaches for the development of a stability indicating UHPLC method in pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Boussès, Christine; Ferey, Ludivine; Vedrines, Elodie; Gaudin, Karen

    2015-11-10

    An innovative combination of green chemistry and quality by design (QbD) approach is presented through the development of an UHPLC method for the analysis of the main degradation products of dextromethorphan hydrobromide. QbD strategy was integrated to the field of green analytical chemistry to improve method understanding while assuring quality and minimizing environmental impacts, and analyst exposure. This analytical method was thoroughly evaluated by applying risk assessment and multivariate analysis tools. After a scouting phase aimed at selecting a suitable stationary phase and an organic solvent in accordance with green chemistry principles, quality risk assessment tools were applied to determine the critical process parameters (CPPs). The effects of the CPPs on critical quality attributes (CQAs), i.e., resolutions, efficiencies, and solvent consumption were further evaluated by means of a screening design. A response surface methodology was then carried out to model CQAs as function of the selected CPPs and the optimal separation conditions were determined through a desirability analysis. Resulting contour plots enabled to establish the design space (DS) (method operable design region) where all CQAs fulfilled the requirements. An experimental validation of the DS proved that quality within the DS was guaranteed; therefore no more robustness study was required before the validation. Finally, this UHPLC method was validated using the concept of total error and was used to analyze a pharmaceutical drug product. PMID:26183807

  19. Attachment of motile bacterial cells to prealigned holed microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Sergey; Fan, Zhifang; Nyamjav, Dorjderem; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A; Holz, Richard C

    2006-12-19

    Construction of biomotors is an exciting area of scientific research that holds great promise for the development of new technologies with broad potential applications in areas such as the energy industry and medicine. Herein, we demonstrate the fabrication of prealigned microarrays of motile Escherichia coli bacterial cells on SiOx substrates. To prepare these arrays, holed surfaces with a gold layer on the bottom of the holes were utilized. The attachment of bacteria to the holes was achieved via nonspecific interactions using poly-l-lysine hydrobromide (PLL). Our data suggest that a single motile bacterial cell can be selectively attached to an individual hole on a surface and bacterial cell binding can be controlled by altering the pH, with the greatest occupancy occurring at pH 7.8. Cells attached to hole arrays remained motile for at least 4 h. These data indicate that holed surface structures provide a promising footprint for the attachment of motile bacterial cells to form high-density site-specific functional bacterial microarrays. PMID:17154612

  20. Rheological characterization and drug release studies of gum exudates of Terminalia catappa Linn.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sadhis V; Sasmal, Dinakar; Pal, Subodh C

    2008-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the gum exudates of Terminalia catappa Linn. (TC gum) as a release retarding excipient in oral controlled drug delivery system. The rheological properties of TC gum were studied and different formulation techniques were used to evaluate the comparative drug release characteristics. The viscosity was found to be dependent on concentration and pH. Temperature up to 60 degrees C did not show significant effect on viscosity. The rheological kinetics evaluated by power law, revealed the shear thinning behavior of the TC gum dispersion in water. Matrix tablets of TC gum were prepared with the model drug dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DH) by direct compression, wet granulation and solid dispersion techniques. The dissolution profiles of the matrix tablets were compared with the pure drug containing capsules using the USP Basket apparatus with 500 ml phosphate buffer of pH 6.8 as a dissolution medium. The drug release from the compressed tablets containing TC gum was comparatively sustained than pure drug containing capsules. Even though all the formulation techniques showed reduction of dissolution rate, aqueous wet granulation showed the maximum sustained release of more than 8 h. The release kinetics estimated by the power law revealed that the drug release mechanism involved in the dextromethorphan matrix is anomalous transport as indicated by the release exponent n values. Thus the study confirmed that the TC gum might be used in the controlled drug delivery system as a release-retarding polymer. PMID:18661243

  1. Preparation of a β-Cyclodextrin-Based Open-Tubular Capillary Electrochromatography Column and Application for Enantioseparations of Ten Basic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Linlin; Yu, Jia; Jiang, Zhen; Guo, Xingjie

    2016-01-01

    An open-tubular capillary electrochromatography column was prepared by chemically immobilized β-cyclodextrin modified gold nanoparticles onto new surface with the prederivatization of (3-mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane. The synthesized nanoparticles and the prepared column were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. When the column was employed as the chiral stationary phase, no enantioselectivity was observed for ten model basic drugs. So β-cyclodextrin was added to the background electrolyte as chiral additive to expect a possible synergistic effect occurring and resulting in a better separation. Fortunately, significant improvement in enantioselectivity was obtained for ten pairs of drug enantiomers. Then, the effects of β-cyclodextrin concentration and background electrolyte pH on the chiral separation were investigated. With the developed separation mode, all the enantiomers (except for venlafaxine) were baseline separated in resolutions of 4.49, 1.68, 1.88, 1.57, 2.52, 2.33, 3.24, 1.63 and 3.90 for zopiclone, chlorphenamine maleate, brompheniramine maleate, dioxopromethazine hydrochloride, carvedilol, homatropine hydrobromide, homatropine methylbromide, venlafaxine, sibutramine hydrochloride and terbutaline sulfate, respectively. Further, the possible separation mechanism involved was discussed. PMID:26771454

  2. The synthesis of desired functional groups on PEI microgel particles for biomedical and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Nurettin; Demirci, Sahin; Sahiner, Mehtap; Al-Lohedan, Hamad

    2015-11-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) microgels were synthesized by micro emulsion polymerization technique and converted to positively charged forms by chemical treatments with various modifying agents with different functional groups, such as 2-bromoethanol (-OH), 4-bromobutyronitrile (-CN), 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (-NH2), and glycidol (-OH). The functionalization of PEI microgels was confirmed by FT-IR, TGA and zeta potential measurements. Furthermore, a second modification of the modified PEI microgels was induced on 4-bromo butyronitrile-modified PEI microgels (PEI-CN) by amidoximation, to generate new functional groups on the modified PEI microgels. The PEI and modified PEI microgels were also tested for their antimicrobial effects against various bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25323. Moreover, the PEI-based particles were used for removal of organic dyes such as methyl orange (MO) and congo red (CR). The absorption capacity of PEI-based microgels increased with modification from 101.8 mg/g to 218.8 mg/g with 2-bromoethylamine, 216.2 m/g with 1-bromoethanol, and 224.5 mg/g with 4-bromobutyronitrile for MO. The increase in absorption for CR dyes was from 347.3 mg/g to 390.4 mg/g with 1-bromoethanol, 399.6 mg/g with glycidol, and 349.9 mg/g with 4-bromobutyronitrile.

  3. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties. PMID:26159785

  4. Simultaneous determination of some active ingredients in cough and cold preparations by gas chromatography, and method validation.

    PubMed

    Harsono, Thresiana; Yuwono, Mochammad; Indrayanto, Gunawan

    2005-01-01

    A simple and rapid gas chromatographic (GC) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of combinations of acetaminophen, phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, caffeine, chlorpheniramine maleate, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide in cough and cold tablets and syrups. After extraction of the analyte with alkaline ethyl acetate, 2 microL extract was injected (splitting ratio of 50:1) into a gas chromatograph equipped with a CBP1-M25-025 fused silica capillary column (25 m x 0.22 mm; film thickness, 0.25 microm). The column temperature was held at 150 degrees C for 5 min, increased to 175 degrees C at 3 degrees C/min, and increased to 270 degreesC at 10 degrees C/min. The temperatures of the flame ionization detector and injector were maintained at 300 degrees C. The GC method is inexpensive, rapid, accurate, and precise, and thus it can be used for routine analysis of tablet and syrup preparations in quality control laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. PMID:16152925

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses, which has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the world's first drug discovery and development portal, providing information on study design, treatments, conclusions and references. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate; abciximab; abetimus sodium; adalimumab; aldesleukin; almotriptan; alteplase; amisulpride; amitriptyline hydrochloride; amoxicillin trihydrate; atenolol; atorvastatin calcium; atrasentan; Beclometasone dipropionate; bosentan; Captopril; ceftriaxone sodium; cerivastatin sodium; cetirizine hydrochloride; cisplatin; citalopram hydrobromide; Dalteparin sodium; darusentan; desirudin; digoxin; Efalizumab; enoxaparin sodium; ertapenem sodium; esomeprazole magnesium; estradiol; ezetimibe; Famotidine; farglitazar; fluorouracil; fluticasone propionate; fosamprenavir sodium; Glibenclamide; glucosamine sulfate; Heparin sodium; HSPPC-96; hydrochlorothiazide; Imatinib mesilate; implitapide; Lamivudine; lansoprazole; lisinopril; losartan potassium; l-Propionylcarnitine; Melagatran; metformin hydrochloride; methotrexate; methylsulfinylwarfarin; Nateglinide; norethisterone; Olmesartan medoxomil; omalizumab; omapatrilat; omeprazole; oseltamivir phosphate; oxatomide; Pantoprazole; piperacillin sodium; pravastatin sodium; Quetiapine hydrochloride; Rabeprazole sodium; raloxifene hydrochloride; ramosetron hydrochloride; ranolazine; rasburicase; reboxetine mesilate; recombinant somatropin; repaglinide; reteplase; rosiglitazone; rosiglitazone maleate; rosuvastatin calcium; Sertraline; simvastatin; sumatriptan succinate; Tazobactam sodium; tenecteplase; tibolone; tinidazole; tolterodine tartrate; troglitazone; Uniprost; Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran. PMID:11980386

  6. Pharmacology of dextromethorphan: Relevance to dextromethorphan/quinidine (Nuedexta®) clinical use.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Charles P; Traynelis, Stephen F; Siffert, Joao; Pope, Laura E; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2016-08-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) has been used for more than 50years as an over-the-counter antitussive. Studies have revealed a complex pharmacology of DM with mechanisms beyond blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and inhibition of glutamate excitotoxicity, likely contributing to its pharmacological activity and clinical potential. DM is rapidly metabolized to dextrorphan, which has hampered the exploration of DM therapy separate from its metabolites. Coadministration of DM with a low dose of quinidine inhibits DM metabolism, yields greater bioavailability and enables more specific testing of the therapeutic properties of DM apart from its metabolites. The development of the drug combination DM hydrobromide and quinidine sulfate (DM/Q), with subsequent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for pseudobulbar affect, led to renewed interest in understanding DM pharmacology. This review summarizes the interactions of DM with brain receptors and transporters and also considers its metabolic and pharmacokinetic properties. To assess the potential clinical relevance of these interactions, we provide an analysis comparing DM activity from in vitro functional assays with the estimated free drug DM concentrations in the brain following oral DM/Q administration. The findings suggest that DM/Q likely inhibits serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake and also blocks NMDA receptors with rapid kinetics. Use of DM/Q may also antagonize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, particularly those composed of α3β4 subunits, and cause agonist activity at sigma-1 receptors. PMID:27139517

  7. Solid-Phase Synthesis with Attachment of Peptide to Resin through an Amino Acid Side Chain: [8-Lysine]-Vasopressin

    PubMed Central

    Meienhofer, Johannes; Trzeciak, Arnold

    1971-01-01

    It is proposed that the scope of solid-phase peptide synthesis could be considerably broadened by attaching peptides to the solid-phase through functional side-chain groups rather than through the commonly used α-carboxyl groups. Side-chain attachment offers the use of a large variety of chemical linkages to solid supports. Attachment through the ε-amino group of the lysine residue to a polystyrene resin has been applied to a solid-phase synthesis of lysine-vasopressin. Nα-tert-butyl-oxycarbonyl-L-lysyl-glycinamide was condensed with chloroformoxymethyl polystyrene-2% divinylbenzene resin. After removal of the Nα-protecting tert-butyloxycarbonyl group, the peptide chain was elongated by standard Merrifield procedures to give Tos-Cys(Bzl)-Tyr-Phe-Glu-(NH2) - Asp(NH2) - Cys(Bzl) - Pro - Lys(Z - resin) - Gly-NH2. Cleavage from the resin with HBr in dioxane or trifluoroacetic acid gave a partially protected nonapeptide hydrobromide. For purification, it was converted into a fully protected peptide by treatment with benzyl p-nitro-phenyl carbonate and crystallized. Deprotection by sodium in liquid ammonia, oxidative cyclization, IRC-50 desalting, and ion-exchange chromatography gave lysinevasopressin with high potency in a rat-pressor assay. PMID:5280519

  8. Development of a High-Throughput Screening Paradigm for the Discovery of Small-Molecule Modulators of Adenylyl Cyclase: Identification of an Adenylyl Cyclase 2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Jason M.; Brand, Cameron S.; Bogard, Amy S.; Pratt, Evan P. S.; Xu, Ruqiang; Hockerman, Gregory H.; Ostrom, Rennolds S.; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2013-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms are implicated in several physiologic processes and disease states, but advancements in the therapeutic targeting of AC isoforms have been limited by the lack of potent and isoform-selective small-molecule modulators. The discovery of AC isoform-selective small molecules is expected to facilitate the validation of AC isoforms as therapeutic targets and augment the study of AC isoform function in vivo. Identification of chemical probes for AC2 is particularly important because there are no published genetic deletion studies and few small-molecule modulators. The present report describes the development and implementation of an intact-cell, small-molecule screening approach and subsequent validation paradigm for the discovery of AC2 inhibitors. The NIH clinical collections I and II were screened for inhibitors of AC2 activity using PMA-stimulated cAMP accumulation as a functional readout. Active compounds were subsequently confirmed and validated as direct AC2 inhibitors using orthogonal and counterscreening assays. The screening effort identified SKF-83566 [8-bromo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepin-7-ol hydrobromide] as a selective AC2 inhibitor with superior pharmacological properties for selective modulation of AC2 compared with currently available AC inhibitors. The utility of SKF-83566 as a small-molecule probe to study the function of endogenous ACs was demonstrated in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells and human bronchial smooth muscle cells. PMID:24008337

  9. Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens reveals local modulation of presynaptic release

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, James R.; Ferris, Mark J.; Stuber, Garret D.; Riddle, David R.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse local microenvironments. Dopamine (DA) neuron terminals similarly express a heterogeneous collection of terminal receptors that modulate DA signaling. Cyclic voltammetry is often used to probe DA terminal dynamics in brain slice preparations; however, this method traditionally requires electrical stimulation to induce DA release. Electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially introducing simultaneous, multi-synaptic modulation of DA terminal release. We used optogenetics to selectively stimulate DA terminals and used voltammetry to compare DA responses from electrical and optical stimulation of the same area of tissue around a recording electrode. We found that with multiple pulse stimulation trains, optically stimulated DA release increasingly exceeded that of electrical stimulation. Furthermore, electrical stimulation produced inhibition of DA release across longer duration stimulations. The GABAB antagonist, CGP 55845, increased electrically stimulated DA release significantly more than light stimulated release. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide, inhibited single pulse electrically stimulated DA release while having no effect on optically stimulated DA release. Our results demonstrate that electrical stimulation introduces local multi-synaptic modulation of DA release that is absent with optogenetically targeted stimulation. PMID:26011081

  10. Vortioxetine for the treatment of major depression.

    PubMed

    Dhir, A

    2013-12-01

    Vortioxetine (Lu-AA-21004; 1-[2-(2,4-dimethylphenylsulfanyl)phenyl]piperazine hydrobromide) is a novel orally active molecule that is being investigated by Lundbeck and Takeda for the treatment of major depression and generalized anxiety disorders. Vortioxetine has a unique "multi-modal" mechanism of action. It inhibits the activity of serotonin transporters and is an agonist of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor, partial agonist of 5-HT1B and antagonist of 5-HT3A, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptors. Vortioxetine has been effective in various animal models of depression and anxiety and clinical studies have shown the antidepressant and antianxiety properties of vortioxetine in a dose range of 5-20 mg/day. Vortioxetine reverses cognitive decline in patients with depression making it a unique molecule. The molecule lacks any serious side effects and drug-drug interactions. However, dose adjustments are required if vortioxetine is co-administered with rifampicin or bupropion. The molecule is under review by various regulatory agencies around the world for the treatment of major depression. PMID:24524096

  11. Yokukansan Increases 5-HT1A Receptors in the Prefrontal Cortex and Enhances 5-HT1A Receptor Agonist-Induced Behavioral Responses in Socially Isolated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Yamaguchi, Takuji; Nishi, Akinori; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan has an anxiolytic effect, which occurs after repeated administration. In this study, to investigate the underlying mechanisms, we examined the effects of repeated yokukansan administration on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor density and affinity and its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of socially isolated mice. Moreover, we examined the effects of yokukansan on a 5-HT1A receptor-mediated behavioral response. Male mice were subjected to social isolation stress for 6 weeks and simultaneously treated with yokukansan. Thereafter, the density and affinity of 5-HT1A receptors were analyzed by a receptor-binding assay. Levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein and mRNA were also measured. Furthermore, (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; a 5-HT1A receptor agonist) was injected intraperitoneally, and rearing behavior was examined. Social isolation stress alone did not affect 5-HT1A receptor density or affinity. However, yokukansan significantly increased receptor density and decreased affinity concomitant with unchanged protein and mRNA levels. Yokukansan also enhanced the 8-OH-DPAT-induced decrease in rearing behavior. These results suggest that yokukansan increases 5-HT1A receptors in the PFC of socially isolated mice and enhances their function, which might underlie its anxiolytic effects. PMID:26681968

  12. Radiosynthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of a new (18)F-labeled triethylene glycol derivative of triphenylphosphonium.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Takahiro; Ito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Iwata, Ren; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Furumoto, Shozo

    2016-03-01

    Delocalized lipophilic cations such as [(18)F]fluorobenzyltriphenylphosphonium ([(18)F]FBnTP) can accumulate in mitochondria and have been used in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). In this study, we established a simplified method for [(18)F]FBnTP synthesis using triphenylphosphine hydrobromide (PPh3 •HBr) without preparing an intermediate that contains benzyl bromide structure. Applying this new method, we synthesized and evaluated a novel (18)F-labeled PEGylated BnTP derivative ([(18)F]FPEGBnTP). In vitro cellular uptake study demonstrated that [(18)F]FPEGBnTP accumulated in cells in proportion to the relative intensity of mitochondrial membrane potential. Biodistribution study revealed that the heart : liver uptake ratio of [(18)F]FPEGBnTP (4.00 at 60 min) was superior to that of [(18)F]FBnTP (1.50 at 60 min). However, [(18)F]FPEGBnTP showed slow blood clearance and high radioactivity uptake in bone at 120-min post-injection. These results imply the possibility of [(18)F]FPEGBnTP being used as a MPI agent. However, there is a need of further structural optimization and flow-dependent uptake study. PMID:26861736

  13. Isolation and characterization of degradation products of citalopram and process-related impurities using RP-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ramisetti Nageswara; Raju, Ale Narasa; Narsimha, Ramaram

    2008-06-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous separation and determination of citalopram hydrobromide and its process impurities in bulk drugs and pharmaceutical formulations was developed. The separation was accomplished on an Inertsil ODS 3V (250x4.6 mm; particle size 5 mum) column using 0.3% diethylamine (pH = 4.70) and methanol/acetonitrile (55:45 v/v) as mobile phase in a gradient elution mode. The eluents were monitored by a photodiode array detector set at 225 nm. The chromatographic behavior of all the related substances was examined under variable conditions of different solvents, buffer concentrations, and pH. The method was validated in terms of accuracy, precision, and linearity. The method could be of use not only for rapid and routine evaluation of the quality of citalopram in bulk drug manufacturing units but also for the detection of its impurities in pharmaceutical formulations. Three unknown impurities were consistently observed during the analysis of different batches of citalopram. Forced degradation of citalopram was carried out under thermal, photo, acidic, alkaline, and peroxide conditions. The degradation products and unknown impurities were isolated and characterized by ESI-MS/MS, (1)H NMR, and FT-IR spectroscopy. PMID:18481321

  14. Synthesis and biological activities of tricyclic conformationally restricted tetrahydropyrido annulated furo[2,3-d]pyrimidines as inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductases.

    PubMed

    Gangjee, A; Elzein, E; Queener, S F; McGuire, J J

    1998-04-23

    The synthesis of seven 2,4-diamino-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-7-substituted pyrido[4',3':4,5]furo[2,3-d]pyrimidines 1-6 are reported as nonclassical antifolate inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and compound 7 as a classical antifolate inhibitor of tumor cells in culture. The compounds were designed as conformationally restricted analogues of trimetrexate. The synthesis was accomplished from the cyclocondensation of 3-bromo-4-piperidone with 2, 4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine to afford regiospecifically 2, 4-diamino-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrido[4',3':4,5]furo[2, 3-d]pyrimidine-7-hydrobromide (16). This in turn was alkylated with the appropriate benzyl halide to afford the target compounds 1-6. The classical antifolate 7 utilized 4-(chloromethyl)benzoyl-l-glutamic acid diethyl ester (17) instead of the benzyl halide for alkylation, followed by saponification to afford 7. Compounds 1-6 showed moderate inhibitory potency against DHFR from Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, Mycobacterium avium, and rat liver. The classical analogue 7 was 88-fold more potent against M. avium DHFR than against rat liver DHFR. The classical analogue was also inhibitory against the growth of tumor cells, CCRF-CEM, and FaDu, in culture. PMID:9554874

  15. [Induction of rat hepatic CYP2E1 expression by arecoline in vivo].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-tao; Xiao, Run-mei; Wang, Ming-feng; Wang, Jun-jun; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The regulation mechanism of arecoline on rat hepatic CYP2E1 was studied in vivo. After oral administration of arecoline hydrobromide (AH; 4, 20 and 100 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) to rats for one week, the hepatic CYP2E1 mRNA level remained unchanged, but the hepatic CYP2E1 protein content was dose-dependently increased. Additionally, although the hepatic CYP2E1 activity was induced by AH treatment, the induction was attenuated with the increase in dosage. The results indicate that the effect of arecoline on rat hepaticdoes not involve transcriptional activation of the gene, but largely involves the stabilization of CYP2E1 protein against degradation or increased efficiency of CYP2E1 mRNA translation, and additionally involve the post- ranslational modification of CYP2E1 protein. Furthermore, the CYP2E1 response is fairly equal among the different species, the induction of rat hepatic CYP2E1 by arecoline suggests that there is a risk of metabolic interaction among the substrate drugs of CYP2E1 in betel-quid use human. PMID:27405178

  16. Binding of a protein or a small polyelectrolyte onto synthetic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sciscione, Fabiola; Pucci, Carlotta; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-03-18

    Catanionic vesicles were prepared by mixing nonstoichiometric amounts of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate and dioctyldimethylammonium bromide in water. Depending on the concentration and mole ratios between the surfactants, catanionic vesicular aggregates are formed. They have either negative or positive charges in excess and are endowed with significant thermodynamic and kinetic stability. Vesicle characterization was performed by dynamic light scattering and electrophoretic mobility. It was inferred that vesicle size scales in inverse proportion with its surface charge density and diverges as the latter quantity approaches zero and/or the mole ratio equals unity. Therefore, both variables are controlled by the anionic/cationic mole ratio. Small-angle X-ray scattering, in addition, indicates that vesicles are unilamellar. Selected anionic vesicular systems were reacted with poly-L-lysine hydrobromide or lysozyme. Polymer binding continues until complete neutralization of the negatively charged sites on the vesicles surface is attained, as inferred by electrophoretic mobility. Lipoplexes are formed as a result of significant electrostatic interactions between cationic polyelectrolytes and negatively charged vesicles. PMID:24564353

  17. Ritanserin-sensitive receptors modulate the prosocial and the anxiolytic effect of MDMA derivatives, DOB and PMA, in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Luisa; Sala, Mariaelvina; Braida, Daniela

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about the pharmacological effects of amphetamine derivatives. In the present study, the effect on social preference and anxiety-like behavior of 2,5-dimetoxy-4-bromo-amphetamine hydrobromide (DOB) and para-methoxyamphetamine (PMA), in comparison with 3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) was investigated in zebrafish, an emerging model to study emotional behavior in an inexpensive and quick manner. DOB (0.05-2mg/kg), PMA (0.0005-2mg/kg) or MDMA (0.25-20mg/kg), given i.m. to adult zebrafish, progressively increased the time spent in the proximity of nacre fish picture in a social preference test. However, high doses were ineffective. Similarly, in the novel tank diving and light-dark tests the compounds elicited a progressive anxiolytic effect in terms of time spent in the upper half of the tank and in the light compartment, respectively. All the above effects were interpolated by symmetrical parabolas. The 5-HT2A/C antagonist ritanserin (0.025-2.5mg/kg) in association with the maximal effective dose of MDMA, DOB and PMA blocked both the social and anxiolytic effect. Taken together these findings demonstrate for the first time the prosocial and anxiolytic properties of DOB and PMA and focus on the mechanisms of their action through the serotonergic-like system suggesting a potential clinical application. PMID:27506653

  18. Design and synthesis of some substituted thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidine derivatives of potential biological activities.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moty, Samia G; Hussein, Mostafa A; Abdel Aziz, Salah A; Abou-Salim, Mahrous A

    2016-03-01

    In continuation to our previous work, thiazolopyrimidines 2a-x were synthesized through intramolecular cyclization of 2-phenacylthio-dihydropyrimidine hydrobromides 1a-x using polyphosphoric acid. On the other hand, thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidine-3-one 3 was coupled with aryldiazonium salts or condensed with isatin to afford compounds 4a-c or 5, respectively. Chemical structure of the target compounds was substantiated by IR, FT-IR, (1)H-, (13)C and DEPT-(13)C NMR, MS as well as microanalyses. Moreover, the lipophilicity of the target compounds is expressed as Clog P. The antimicrobial screening of the test compounds 2a-x, 4a-c and 5 revealed moderate activity in comparison to reference drugs. Compounds 2a-c, 2e, 2o and 2v showed a gradual increase in their anti-inflammatory activity reaching its maximum at 5 h compared to indomethacin. Furthermore, the analgesic activity of compounds 2a-c, 2e, 2o and 2v revealed a maximum activity after 5 h of injection compared to aspirin and the LD50 of compounds 2e and 2v was determined. PMID:27013904

  19. Oxidation of pharmaceutically active compounds by a ligninolytic fungal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Eibes, Gemma; Debernardi, Gianfranco; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, M Teresa; Lema, Juan M

    2011-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals are an important group of emerging pollutants with increasing interest due to their rising consumption and the evidence for ecotoxicological effects associated to trace amounts in aquatic environments. In this paper, we assessed the potential degradation of a series of pharmaceuticals: antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole), antidepressives (citalopram hydrobromide and fluoxetine hydrochloride), antiepileptics (carbamazepine), anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and naproxen) and estrogen hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol) by means of a versatile peroxidase (VP) from the ligninolytic fungus Bjerkandera adusta. The effects of the reaction conditions: VP activity, organic acid concentration and H(2)O(2) addition rate, on the kinetics of the VP based oxidation system were evaluated. Diclofenac and estrogens were completely degraded after only 5-25 min even with a very low VP activity (10 U l(-1)). High degradation percentages (80%) were achieved for sulfamethoxazole and naproxen. Low or undetectable removal yields were observed for citalopram (up to 18%), fluoxetine (lower than 10%) and carbamazepine (not degraded). PMID:20972884

  20. In vitro interaction of polyelectrolyte nanocapsules with model cells.

    PubMed

    Łukasiewicz, Sylwia; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof

    2014-02-01

    The nanocapsules based on a liquid core with polyelectrolyte shells prepared by the technique of sequential adsorption of polyelectrolytes (LbL) were investigated to verify capsules bioacceptance. Using AOT (docusate sodium salt) as emulsifier, we obtained liquid cores, stabilized by the interfacial complex AOT/PLL (poly-l-lysine hydrobromide). These liquid cores were encapsulated by sequential adsorption of polyelectrolytes using biocompatible polyanion PGA (poly-l-glutamic acid sodium salt) and biocompatible polycation PLL. The average size of the formed capsules was 60-80 nm. The influence of a number of polyelectrolytes layer in the shell (thickness of polyelectrolytes shell), surface charge, and capsule doses on cell viability was studied in a cellular coculture assay. In order to improve nanocapsules biocompatibility, the PEG-ylated external layers were prepared using PGA-g-PEG (PGA grafted by PEG poly(ethylene glycol)). For the most toxic nanocapsules (with only one polycation layer) about 90% of cells could survive when the concentration of nanocapsules was below 0.2 × 10(6) per one cell. That suggests that they use as a delivery vehicles is quite safe for living cells. Analysis of internalization of AOT(PLL/PGA)4-g-PEG in HEK 293 cells indicates that tested nanocapsules can easily penetrate cells membrane. PMID:24410319

  1. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen

    PubMed Central

    Buffa, Francesca M.; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V.; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K.; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S.

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization. PMID:25788274

  2. Effects of selected anticholinergics on acoustic startle response in rats.

    PubMed

    Sipos, M L; Burchnell, V; Galbicka, G

    2001-12-01

    The present study compared the effects of the anticholinergics aprophen hydrochloride, atropine sulfate, azaprophen hydrochloride, benactyzine hydrochloride, biperiden hydrochloride, diazepam, procyclidine hydrochloride, scopolamine hydrobromide and trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride on acoustic startle response in rats. Peak startle amplitude, latency to peak startle amplitude and prepulse inhibition following 100- and 120-dB tones were recorded 15 min following drug administration in food-restricted rats. Aprophen, atropine, azaprophen, benactyzine, biperiden and scopolamine significantly increased peak startle amplitude and decreased latency to peak startle amplitude following 100-dB pulses. In contrast, only biperiden increased peak startle amplitude following 120-dB pulses, whereas atropine and trihexyphenidyl decreased latency to peak startle amplitude following 120-dB pulses. Benactyzine decreased prepulse inhibition following both 100- and 120-dB pulses, whereas both biperiden and scopolamine decreased prepulse inhibition following 120-dB pulses. Acoustic startle response measures were effective in differentiating the effects of anticholinergic compounds. The comparison of drug effects on the acoustic startle response may be useful in selecting efficacious anticholinergic drug therapies with a minimal range of side-effects. In addition, these data may be useful in down-selecting the number of anticholinergic drugs that need to be tested in comparison studies involving more complex behavioral tests. PMID:11920928

  3. pH-Sensitive ionomeric particles obtained via chemical conjugation of silk with poly(amino acid)s.

    PubMed

    Serban, Monica A; Kaplan, David L

    2010-12-13

    Silk-fibroin-based biomaterials have been widely utilized for a range of biomaterial-related systems. For all these previously reported systems, the β-sheet forming feature of the silk was the key stabilizing element of the final material structure. Herein, we describe a different strategy, based on the engineering of silk-based ionomers that can yield stable colloidal composites or particle suspensions through electrostatic interactions. These silk-based ionomers were obtained by carbodiimide-mediated coupling of silk fibroin with polylysine hydrobromide and polyglutamic acid sodium salts, respectively. Colloidal composites could be obtained by mixing the ionomeric pair at high concentration (i.e., 25% w/v), while combining them at lower concentrations (i.e., 5% w/v) yielded particle suspensions. The assembly of the ionomers was driven by electrostatic interactions, pH-dependent, and reversible. The network assembly appeared to be polarized, with the interacting poly(amino acid) chains clustered to the core of the particles and the silk backbone oriented outward. In agreement with this assembly mode, doxorubicin, a hydrophilic antitumor drug, could be released at a slow rate, in a pH-dependent manner, indicating that the inside of the ionomeric particles was mainly hydrophilic in nature. PMID:21028849

  4. Hypophosphatasia - pathophysiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Millán, José Luis; Plotkin, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    English Summary Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is the inborn-error-of-metabolism caused by loss-of-function mutation(s) in the gene that encodes the tissue-nonspecific isozyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). The disease has been classified according to patient age when the first signs and symptoms manifest; i.e., perinatal, infantile, childhood, adult HPP. Other types include odonto HPP and perinatal benign. Babies with the perinatal/infantile forms of HPP often die with severe rickets and respiratory insufficiency and sometimes hypercalcemia and vitamin B6-responsive seizures. The primary biochemical defect in HPP is a deficiency of TNAP activity that leads to elevated circulating levels of substrates, in particular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), a potent calcification inhibitor. To-date, the management of HPP has been essentially symptomatic or orthopedic. However, enzyme replacement therapy with mineral-targeting TNAP (sALP-FcD10, also known as ENB-0040 or asfotase alfa) has shown promising results in a mouse model of HPP (Alpl−/− mice). Administration of mineral-targeting TNAP from birth increased survival and prevented the seizures, rickets, as well as all the tooth abnormalities, including dentin, acellular cementum, and enamel defects in this model of severe HPP. Clinical trials using mineral-targeting TNAP in children 3 years of age or younger with life-threatening HPP was associated with healing of the skeletal manifestations of HPP as well as improved respiratory and motor function. Improvement is still being observed in the patients receiving continued asfotase alfa therapy, with more than 3 years of treatment in some children. Enzyme replacement therapy with asfotase alfa has to-date been successful in patients with life-threatening HPP. PMID:25254037

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abatacept, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Aleglitazar, Aliskiren fumarate, AM-103, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Amlodipine, Anakinra, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Axitinib; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Bortezomib, Bupropion/naltrexone; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, CYT-997; Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride cogramostim; Eltrombopag olamine, Emtricitabine, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fenretinide, Filibuvir, Fludarabine; Golimumab; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HEV-239, HP-802-247, HPV-16/18 AS04, HPV-6/11/16/18, Human albumin, Human gammaglobulin; Imatinib mesylate, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Invaplex 50 vaccine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lopinavir, Lumiliximab, LY-686017; Maraviroc, Mecasermin rinfabate; Narlaprevir; Ocrelizumab, Oral insulin, Oritavancin, Oxycodone hydrochloride/naloxone; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pazopanib hydrochloride, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, Prucalopride succinate; Raltegravir potassium, Ranibizumab, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salclobuzic acid sodium salt, SCY-635, Selenate sodium, Semapimod hydrochloride, Silodosin, Siltuximab, Silybin, Sirolimus-eluting stent, SIR-Spheres, Sunitinib malate; Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil

  6. Side effects of cytokines approved for therapy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines, currently known to be more than 130 in number, are small MW (<30 kDa) key signaling proteins that modulate cellular activities in immunity, infection, inflammation and malignancy. Key to understanding their function is recognition of their pleiotropism and often overlapping and functional redundancies. Classified here into 9 main families, most of the 20 approved cytokine preparations (18 different cytokines; 3 pegylated), all in recombinant human (rh) form, are grouped in the hematopoietic growth factor, interferon, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) families. In the hematopoietin family, approved cytokines are aldesleukin (rhIL-2), oprelvekin (rhIL-11), filgrastim and tbo-filgrastim (rhG-CSF), sargramostim (rhGM-CSF), metreleptin (rh-leptin) and the rh-erythropoietins, epoetin and darbepoietin alfa. Anakinra, a recombinant receptor antagonist for IL-1, is in the IL-1 family; recombinant interferons alfa-1, alfa-2, beta-1 and gamma-1 make up the interferon family; palifermin (rhKGF) and becaplermin (rhPDGF) are in the PDGF family; and rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 represent the TGFβ family. The main physicochemical features, FDA-approved indications, modes of action and side effects of these approved cytokines are presented. Underlying each adverse events profile is their pleiotropism, potency and capacity to release other cytokines producing cytokine 'cocktails'. Side effects, some serious, occur despite cytokines being endogenous proteins, and this therefore demands caution in attempts to introduce individual members into the clinic. This caution is reflected in the relatively small number of cytokines currently approved by regulatory agencies and by the fact that 14 of the FDA-approved preparations carry warnings, with 10 being black box warnings. PMID:25270293

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-05-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com/. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alemtuzumab, alendronate sodium/cholecalciferol, aliskiren fumarate, AMGN-0007, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anidulafungin, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan; Calcipotriol/beta methasone dipropionate, caldaret hydrate, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, cocaine-BSA conjugate, conivaptan hydrochloride, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, delmitide, desloratadine, desmoteplase, desoxyepothilone B, disufenton sodium, DU-176b, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; EBV-specific CTLs, ecogramostim, edodekin alfa, efalizumab, eletriptan, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fanapanel, fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, GTI-2040, GW-501516; Her2 E75-peptide vaccine, human insulin; Ibogaine, icatibant acetate, Id-KLH vaccine, imatinib mesylate, immune globulin subcutaneous [human], indacaterol, inolimomab, ipilimumab, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa methyl ester hydrochloride/carbidopa, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine; Maraviroc, mecasermin, melevodopa hydrochloride, mepolizumab, mitumomab; Nesiritide; Omalizumab, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), patupilone, pegaptanib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, pemetrexed disodium, photochlor, pimecrolimus, posaconazole, prasterone, prasugrel, pregabalin, prilocaine, PRX-00023; QS-21; Ranibizumab, ranirestat, rhodamine 123, rotigaptide; Sarcosine, sirolimus

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Activated protein C concentrate, Ad-CD154, Adeno-Interferon gamma, alemtuzumab, APC-8024, 9-aminocamptothecin, aprepitant, l-arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, asimadoline; O6-Benzylguanine, bevacizumab, Bi-20, binodenoson, biphasic insulin aspart, bivatuzumab, 186Re-bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, bryostatin 1; Carboxy- amidotriazole, caspofungin acetate, CB-1954, CC-4047, CDP-860, cerivastatin sodium, clevidipine, CTL-102; 3,4-DAP, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, desloratadine, DHA-paclitaxel, duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, eniluracil, ENMD-0997, eplerenone, eplivanserin, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, FR-901228, FTY-720; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, iodine (I131) tositumomab, ISV-205, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, linezolid, liposomal NDDP, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-156735; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, magnesium sulfate, maxacalcitol, meclinertant, melagatran, melatonin, MENT, mepolizumab, micafungin sodium, midostaurin, motexafin gadolinium; Nesiritide, NS-1209, NSC-601316, NSC-683864; Osanetant; Palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegylated OB protein, pemetrexed disodium, perillyl alcohol, picoplatin, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plevitrexed

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-03-01

    ABT-869, Acadesine, Acetylsalicylic acid/omeprazole, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, AEG-35156, Agatolimod sodium, Albiglutide, Alemtuzumab, Alipogene tiparvovec, Alogliptin benzoate, AMG-386, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Apremilast, Aripiprazole, Asoprisnil, Atorvastatin/fenofibrate, AVN-944, Axitinib; Belinostat, Bevacizumab, BHT-3021, BI-2536, Biapenem, Bilastine, Biphasic insulin aspart, Blinatumomab, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, CD-NP, Cediranib, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, Ciclesonide, CK-1827452,Clevudine, Clofarabine, CSL-360, CYT-997; Dapagliflozin, Darinaparsin, Denosumab, Densiron 68, Desloratadine, Dulanermin; Edoxaban tosilate, Emtricitabine, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fidaxomicintiacumiv, Fulvestrant; G-207, GCR-8015, Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), Glufosfamide; HPV16L1E7CVLP; Ibutamoren mesilate, Imatinib mesylate, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Iodine (I131) tositumomab, Istaroxime, ITMN-191, Ixabepilone; JZP-4, Lenalidomide; Levetiracetam, Linaclotide acetate, Liposomal cytarabine/daunorubicin, Liposomal doxorubicin, Liraglutide, LY-518674; Milatuzumab, MMR-V, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Niacin/simvastatin; Obatoclax mesylate, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pazufloxacin, PBT-2, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Perampanel, PfCP2.9, Pitavastatin calcium, Poly I:CLC, Pomalidomide, Pralatrexate, Pramlintide acetate, Prucalopride; rhGAD65, Roflumilast; RTS,S/AS02D; SCH-530348, Semagacestat, Sirolimus-eluting coronary stent, Sirolimus-Eluting Stent, SIR-Spheres, Sivelestat sodium hydrate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tafluprost, Tanespimycin, Teduglutide, Telaprevir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tiotropium bromide, TMC-435350, Tositumomab/iodine (I131) tositumomab, Travoprost/timolol, Triciribine

  10. Screen and confirmation of PEG-epoetin β in equine plasma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y; Maylin, G M; Matsumoto, G; Neades, S M; Catlin, D H

    2011-01-01

    Methods have been developed to screen for and confirm darbepoetin alfa, recombinant human EPO, and methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin β (PEG-epoetin β) in horse plasma. All three methods screen samples with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirm by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This report focuses on PEG-epoetin β. The ELISA assay was able to detect PEG-epoetin β at 0.02 ng/mL in 50 µL of horse plasma. Many samples had high background levels of immunoreactivity; however, introducing polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) into the samples before the ELISA assay removed the high background and increased the apparent concentrations of PEG-epoetin β. In samples collected following the administration of 100 µg of PEG-epoetin β by the intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) routes, PEG-epoetin β was detectable up to 72, 144, and 120 h, respectively. The samples were prepared for LC-MS/MS analysis by extraction with anti-rHuEPO-antibodies-coated Dynabeads followed by digestion with trypsin. The LC-MS/MS confirmation method used the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) scan mode to monitor four precursor-product ion transitions of the EPO-derived peptide T₆. All four transitions of T₆ were detectable with S/N > 3. The limit of confirmation for PEG-epoetin β was 1.0 ng/mL in 2 mL of horse plasma. The method successfully confirmed the presence of PEG-epoetin β in a sample collected from a Mircera®-treated horse. Compared to PEG-epoetin β, better sensitivity was achieved for darbepoetin alfa and recombinant human EPO. Darbepoetin alfa was detected in horse plasma four days after IM administration of 100 µg. PMID:21254454

  11. Comparative Effectiveness of Three Surfactant Preparations in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Trembath, Andrea; Hornik, Christoph P.; Clark, Reese; Smith, P. Brian; Daniels, Julie; Laughon, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare effectiveness of three surfactant preparations (beractant, calfactant, and poractant alpha) in premature infants for preventing three outcomes: (1) air leak syndromes; (2) death; and (3) bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death (composite outcomes). Study design We conducted a comparative effectiveness study of premature infants admitted to 322 neonatal intensive care units in the U.S. from 2005–2010 who were treated with beractant, calfactant, or poractant alfa. We compared the incidence of air leak syndromes, death, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death, adjusting for gestational age, antenatal steroids, discharge year, and small-for-gestational-age status. Results 51,282 infants received surfactant; 40% received beractant, 30% calfactant, and 30% poractant alfa. Median birth weight was 1435 g (interquartile range 966–2065); median gestational age was 30 weeks (27–33). On adjusted analysis, we observed a similar risk of air leak syndromes (calfactant vs. beractant odds ratio [OR]=1.17 [95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.43]; calfactant vs. poractant OR=1.23 [0.98, 1.56]; beractant vs. poractant OR=1.06 [0.87, 1.29]), death (calfactant vs. beractant OR=1.14 [0.93, 1.39]; calfactant vs. poractant OR=0.98 [0.78, 1.23]; beractant vs. poractant OR=0.86 [0.72, 1.04]), and BPD or death (calfactant vs. beractant OR=1.08 [0.93, 1.26]; calfactant vs. poractant OR=1.19 [1.00, 1.41]; beractant vs. poractant OR=1.10 [0.96, 1.27]). Conclusions Beractant, calfactant, and poractant alfa demonstrated similar effectiveness in prevention of air leak syndromes, death, and BPD or death in premature infants when adjusted for site. Previously described differences in mortality between surfactants likely do not represent true differences in effectiveness but may relate to site variation in outcomes. PMID:23769501

  12. Identification of recombinant human EPO variants in greyhound plasma and urine by ELISA, LC-MS/MS and western blotting: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Timms, Mark; Steel, Rohan; Vine, John

    2016-02-01

    The recombinant human erythropoietins epoetin alfa (Eprex®), darbepoetin (Aranesp®) and methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta (Mircera®) were administered to greyhounds for 7, 10 and 14 days respectively. Blood and urine samples were collected and analysed for erythropoietin by ELISA, LC-MS/MS and western blotting. Limits of confirmation in plasma for western blotting and LC-MS/MS methods ranged from a low of 2.5mIU/mL, and closely matched the sensitivity of ELISA screening. PMID:26290355

  13. Biological agents: investigation into leprosy and other infectious diseases before indication.

    PubMed

    Antônio, João Roberto; Soubhia, Rosa Maria Cordeiro; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco; Amarante, Carolina Forte; Travolo, Ana Regina Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Biological agents are widely used for various immune-mediated diseases, with remarkable effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease. However, attention needs to be drawn to the adverse effects of these therapies and the risk of reactivating underlying granulomatous infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy, syphilis, leishmaniasis, among others. The objective of this paper is to describe a case of leprosy in a patient with RA using anti-TNF alfa, demonstrating the need for systematic investigation of skin lesions suggestive of leprosy in patients who require rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic treatment, especially in endemic regions like Brazil. PMID:24346871

  14. Noninvasive sensors in critical care medicine: near-infrared spectroscopy for the detection of altered microvascular blood flow in severe sepsis and septic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walz, J. Matthias; Soller, Babs; Soyemi, Olusola; Yang, Ye; Landry, Michelle; Heard, Stephen O.

    2006-10-01

    It is estimated that 750,000 cases of severe sepsis occur in the United States annually, at least 225,000 of which are fatal, resulting in significant utilization of healthcare resources and expenses. Significant progress in the understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of this condition has been made lately. Among the newer treatment strategies for critically ill patients are the administration of early goal directed therapy, and Recombinant Human Activated Protein C (Drotrecogrin alfa (activated) [DTAA]) for severe sepsis. However, mortality remains unacceptably high.

  15. Diffraction and Forward Physics in ATLAS: results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschi, M.

    2015-03-01

    The present and future potential of ATLAS for diffraction and forward physics is presented. As recent results the rapidity gap cross section and elastic and total pp cross sections are reported. The upgrade project AFP is presented and it is shown how it will complement the ALFA acceptance for diffractive physics in measurements taken with β*=90 m LHC beam optics. Moreover, the AFP detector will guarantee good acceptance on diffractive events also during normal running conditions allowing to improve the ATLAS detector performances. If in addition, a high luminosity program will be feasible, AFP might be fundamental for potential discoveries with extra dimensions being one example.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dimethyl sulfide laboratory um, mm & FIR spectra (Jabri+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabri, A.; Nguyen, H. V. L.; Mouhib, H.; Tchana, F. K.; Manceron, L.; Stahl, W.; Kleiner, I.

    2016-02-01

    DMS was purchased from Alfa Aesar GmbH & Co KG, Karlsruhe, Germany and used without further purification. The microwave spectrum was measured in the frequency range 2-40GHz using two Molecular Beam Fourier Transform MicroWave (MB-FTMW) spectrometers in Aachen, Germany. The millimeter spectrum was recorded in the 50-110GHz range. The FIR spectrum was measured for the first time at high resolution using the FT spectrometer and the newly built cryogenic cell at the French synchrotron SOLEIL. (3 data files).

  17. Sonoreactor-based technology for fast high-throughput proteolytic digestion of proteins.

    PubMed

    Rial-Otero, R; Carreira, R J; Cordeiro, F M; Moro, A J; Fernandes, L; Moura, I; Capelo, J L

    2007-02-01

    Fast (120 s) and high-throughput (more than six samples at once) in-gel trypsin digestion of proteins using sonoreactor technology has been achieved. Successful protein identification was done by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, MALDI-TOF-MS. Specific identification of the adenylylsulphate reductase alfa subunit from a complex protein mixture from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was done as a proof of the methodology. The new sample treatment is of easy implementation, saves time and money, and can be adapted to online procedures and robotic platforms. PMID:17269750

  18. Recent advances in the treatment of orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Davis, T L

    1995-04-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a fall in blood pressure on standing that causes symptoms of dizziness, visual changes, and discomfort in the head and neck. The goal of treatment is the improvement of the patient's functional capacity, rather than a target blood pressure. For treatment to be successful, it must be individualized. Non-pharmalogic interventions include carefully managed exercise, scheduled activities, and monitoring of the environmental temperature. Agents such as fludrocortisone, midodrine, and epoetin alfa offer successful pharmacologic interventions. Although these measures ease the symptoms of orthostatic hypotension, current approaches neither reverse nor stabilize the disease process in autonomic disorders. PMID:7746370

  19. Discussion remarks on the role of wood and chitin constituents during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilnicka, Anna; Lukaszewicz, Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    Nature is a source of some biomaterials like wood and chitin which can be successfully transformed into chars of advanced structural/surface parameters. The manuscript is discursive and suggests that particular components of the materials (cellulose, lignin, hemicellulose, alfa-chitin fibrils, mineral-protein matrix) play a specific role in the manufacturing of porous chars. It is proposed that some of the components (hemicellulose and mineral-protein matrixes) behave like a natural soft template during carbonization of wood and chitin. It is suggested why particular components and derivatives of wood and chitin (cellulose and chitosan) can not form porous carbonaceous matrixes when are carbonized separately.

  20. Hepatitis C virus. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, E.

    1991-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus has been shown to be responsible for most cases of posttransfusion hepatitis, as well as for sporadic non-A, non-B viral hepatitis. Hepatitis C virus has also been implicated in the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma, autoimmune hepatitis, and fulminant viral hepatitis. Although the role of the parenteral transmission of hepatitis C virus is well established, its route of transmission in cases of sporadic infection remains unclear. Sexual transmission is suspected but not confirmed. Recent work regarding treatment has shown interferon alfa to be effective, but the discontinuation of therapy is associated with a 50% relapse rate. PMID:1656611

  1. Experiments with a small behaviour controlled planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.; Desai, Rajiv S.; Gat, Erann; Ivlev, Robert; Loch, John

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments that were performed on the Rocky 3 robot is described. Rocky 3 is a small autonomous rover capable of navigating through rough outdoor terrain to a predesignated area, searching that area for soft soil, acquiring a soil sample, and depositing the sample in a container at its home base. The robot is programmed according to a reactive behavior control paradigm using the ALFA programming language. This style of programming produces robust autonomous performance while requiring significantly less computational resources than more traditional mobile robot control systems. The code for Rocky 3 runs on an eight bit processor and uses about ten k of memory.

  2. [Pharmacovigilance].

    PubMed

    Livio, F; Renard, D; Buclin, T

    2012-01-18

    Main pharmacovigilance updates in 2011 are reviewed. Dronedarone: Serious cardio-vascular and hepatic adverse reactions for a questionable efficacy. Long-term proton pump inhibitors: A cause of hypomagnesemia. Bisphosphonates: A risk of atypical femoral fractures. Dasatinib: Cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension reported. Lenalidomide: A risk of second primary malignancies. Daptomycine: Cases of eosinophilic pneumonia reported. Tigecycline: Inferior to comparators. Drotrecogin alfa: Market withdrawal due to lack of efficacy. Nimesulide: More hepatotoxic than other NSAIDs. Topiramate: Evidence of teratogenicity (oral clefts). Valproate: Impaired cognitive development in addition to well-known teratogenicity. Antipsychotics in late pregnancy: A risk of neonatal complications. PMID:23185821

  3. PYRAMIR: construction and implementation of the world's first infrared pyramid sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D.; Baumeister, H.; Bizenberger, P.; Feldt, M.; Henning, Th.; Hippler, S.; Ligori, S.; Mall, U.; Neumann, U.; Salm, N.; Storz, C.; Wagner, K.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the construction and implementation of the unmodulated infrared pyramid wavefront sensor PYRAMIR at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. PYRAMIR is an extension of the existing visible Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system ALFA, which allows wavefront sensing in the near-infrared wavefront regime. We describe the optical setup and the calibration procedure of the pyramid wavefront sensor. We discuss possible drawbacks of the calibration and show the results gained on Calar Alto.

  4. Treating hepatitis C - what's new?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alex J; Holmes, Jacinta A

    2015-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection causes cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, and is the most common indication for liver transplantation. Hepatitis C is curable and complications can be prevented. Until recently, treatment regimens involved peginterferon alfa. Although effective, their widespread use is limited by treatment-related toxicity. A number of direct-acting drugs for hepatitis C, such as sofosbuvir, have recently been developed and target multiple steps in the viral life cycle. These drugs are used in combination in interferon-free regimens. Short courses are highly effective with minimal toxicity. PMID:26843711

  5. Advancing chronic kidney disease care: new imperatives for recognition and intervention.

    PubMed

    Szromba, Charlotte; Thies, Mary Ann; Ossman, Sherry Smith

    2002-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects over 6.2 million people in the U.S. and most commonly results from diabetes and/or hypertension. Patients with CKD have an increased risk of anemia and hypertension. Anemia occurs early in CKD and can be effectively treated with epoetin alfa. Hypertension can be managed with lifestyle modifications and medications. Nurses play a vital role in managing these patients by providing early CKD/anemia screening and intervention, education, patient monitoring, and support for patients and caregivers. PMID:12596604

  6. Influence of thin porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer on aluminum cathode to the H{sub a}lpha line shape in glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Steflekova, V.; Sisovic, N. M.; Konjevic, N.

    2009-06-01

    The results of the Balmer alfa line shape study in a plane cathode-hollow anode Grimm discharge with aluminum (Al) cathode covered with thin layer of porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are presented. The comparison with same line profile recorded with pure Al cathode shows lack of excessive Doppler broadened line wings, which are always detected in glow discharge with metal cathode. The effect is explained by the lack of strong electric field in the cathode sheath region, which is missing in the presence of thin oxide layer in, so called, spray discharge.

  7. Current Results at PALFA Pulsar Survey at Arecibo Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beroiz, Martin; Stovall, K.; Jenet, F.; Cordes, J.; Lorimer, D.; Backer, D.; PALFA Consortium

    2010-01-01

    We present the current progress on the PALFALFA (Pulsar-ALFALFA) survey recently started at the Arecibo Radio Observatory. PALFALFA enhances the ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) extragalactic HI survey by adding a commensal real-time pulsar/radio transient search pipe-line. The current analysis pipe-line runs on an 8 core (2.3 GHz) G5 Macpro at the observatory. It incorporates the PRESTO periodicity search tools together with software developed at University of Texas at Brownsville for radio transient detection. In this poster we present results, statistics, and algorithms used in the survey.

  8. Infasurf and Curosurf: Theoretical and Practical Considerations with New Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy N.; Cunsolo, Stephanie M.; Gal, Peter; Ransom, J. Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Type II pneumocytes, normally responsible for surfactant production and release, are insufficiently formed and differentiated in the premature infant born before 34 weeks' gestation. Without an adequate amount of pulmonary surfactant, alveolar surface tension increases, leading to collapse and decreased lung compliance. Pulmonary surfactants are naturally occurring substances made of lipids and proteins. They lower surface tension at the interface between the air in the lungs, specifically at the alveoli, and the blood in the capillaries. This review examines the relative benefits of the two most recently marketed surfactants, calfactan (Infasurf) and poractant alfa (Curosurf). PMID:23300398

  9. Biological agents: investigation into leprosy and other infectious diseases before indication*

    PubMed Central

    Antônio, João Roberto; Soubhia, Rosa Maria Cordeiro; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco; Amarante, Carolina Forte; Travolo, Ana Regina Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Biological agents are widely used for various immune-mediated diseases, with remarkable effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease. However, attention needs to be drawn to the adverse effects of these therapies and the risk of reactivating underlying granulomatous infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy, syphilis, leishmaniasis, among others. The objective of this paper is to describe a case of leprosy in a patient with RA using anti-TNF alfa, demonstrating the need for systematic investigation of skin lesions suggestive of leprosy in patients who require rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic treatment, especially in endemic regions like Brazil. PMID:24346871

  10. [New therapeutical options for heavy gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Braun, Georg; Messmann, Helmut

    2015-06-01

    The number of patients taking new oral anticoagulants is rising, so is the number of serious bleeding events. In severe bleeding, the decision to start a procoagulant therapy is difficult to take. With Idarucizumab and Andexanet Alfa, specific antidotes have been developed against both, direct thrombin inhibitors as well as direct Factor Xa inhibitors. In the endoscopic treatment of severe gastrointestinal bleeding, alternative treatment options are available with Hemospray™, Endoclot™ and new hemostasis clips. Especially in the recurrent ulcer bleeding, the newly developed clips can achieve hemostasis and prevent an operational procedure. PMID:26069913

  11. Classification of stevia sweeteners in soft drinks using liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kakigi, Y; Suzuki, T; Icho, T; Uyama, A; Mochizuki, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the characterisation of stevia sweeteners in soft drinks. By using LC and time-of-flight MS, we detected 30 steviol glycosides from nine stevia sweeteners. The mass spectral data of these compounds were applied to the analysis to determine steviol glycosides in nine soft drinks. On the basis of chromatographic data and principal-component analysis, these soft drinks were classified into three groups, and the soft drinks of each group, respectively, contained high-rebaudioside A extract, normal stevia extract or alfa-glucosyltransferase-treated stevia extract. PMID:24168664

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGES sources in Virgo cluster (Taylor+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Davies, J. I.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R. F.

    2013-04-01

    Two areas of the Virgo cluster have been selected for study with AGES, VC1 and VC2. This paper examines the VC1 area while Paper II (2013MNRAS.428..459T) will consider VC2 and compare the results of the two areas. Observations were taken in 2008 January-June, 2009 February-June, 2010 January-June and 2011 January, using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) instrument on the Arecibo telescope in spectral line mode. (4 data files).

  13. Lube oil centrifuge saves Odeco $360,000/year

    SciTech Connect

    Closs, D.E.

    1983-05-01

    Purifying centrifuges were installed in the offshore drilling operation diesel engines of the Odeco Co. of New Orleans. The centrifuges extend filter life fourfold, eliminate the need to change oil at all, and defer the need for costly overhauls indefinitely. The Alfa-Laval built centrifuges were placed on 23 mobile rigs that Odeco has working in the Gulf of Mexico, and they paid for their cost twice over during the first year of operation. Originally, a lubricant centrifuge was tested aboard the Ocean Tempest. The results were so remarkable that similar installations were placed on all other vessels in the domestic drilling division.

  14. High rates of sustained virological response in hepatitis C virus-infected injection drug users receiving directly observed therapy with peginterferon alpha-2a (40KD) (PEGASYS) and once-daily ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Waizmann, Michael; Ackermann, Grit

    2010-06-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of directly observed therapy with peginterferon alfa-2a and once-daily ribavirin (RBV) for chronic hepatitis C in 49 opioid-addicted injection drug users (IDUs) participating in a drug treatment program at a specialized outpatient center. Patients also received prophylactic citalopram to minimize the risk of interferon-induced depression. Patients had daily access to and support from specialist physicians, nurses and counseling services at the center, and a 24-hour helpline. Sustained virological response was achieved by 48 of 49 patients (98%) overall, including 20 of 21 (95%) hepatitis C virus (HCV) Genotype 1/4-infected patients and 28 of 28 (100%) Genotype 2/3-infected patients. Treatment was well tolerated, and no unexpected side effects of peginterferon treatment were seen. The safety profile of once-daily RBV was not different from twice-daily dosing. Decline in hemoglobin levels was similar to those reported in clinical trials including once-daily RBV and did not lead to dose reduction or treatment withdrawal. Our data demonstrate that HCV-infected IDUs on stable L-polamidone (methadone) or buprenorphine maintenance can be successfully and safely treated with peginterferon alfa-2a and RBV in an optimal substitution setting. PMID:20362408

  15. Comparative study on mannose 6-phosphate residue contents of recombinant lysosomal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Tadayasu; Takada, Masaru; Aizawa, Yoshiaki; Tsukimura, Takahiro; Chiba, Yasunori; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    As most recombinant lysosomal enzymes are incorporated into cells via mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptors, the M6P content is important for effective enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for lysosomal diseases. However, there have been no comprehensive reports of the M6P contents of lysosomal enzymes. We developed an M6P assay method comprising three steps, i.e., acid hydrolysis of glycoproteins, derivatization of M6P, and high-performance liquid chromatography, and determined the M6P contents of six recombinant lysosomal enzymes now available for ERT and one in the process of development. The assay is easy, specific, and reproducible. The results of the comparative study revealed that the M6P contents of agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, modified α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, alglucosidase alfa, laronidase, idursulfase, and imiglucerase are 2.1, 2.9, 5.9, 0.7, 2.5, 3.2, and <0.3 mol/mol enzyme, respectively. The results were correlated with those of the biochemical analyses previously performed and that of the binding assay of exposed M6P of the enzymes with the domain 9 of the cation-independent M6P receptor. This assay method is useful for comparison of the M6P contents of recombinant lysosomal enzymes for ERT. PMID:24439675

  16. Discovery and Follow-up of a Nearby Galaxy from the Arecibo Zone of Avoidance Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, T. P.; Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Henning, P. A.; Kaur, A.; Parton, B.

    2011-09-01

    The Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Survey has discovered a nearby galaxy, ALFA ZOA J1952+1428, at a heliocentric velocity of +279 km s-1. The galaxy was discovered at low Galactic latitude by 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen (H I). We have obtained follow-up observations with the Expanded Very Large Array and the 0.9 m Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy optical telescope. The H I distribution overlaps an uncataloged, potential optical counterpart. The H I linear size is 1.4 kpc at our adopted distance of D = 7 Mpc, but the distance estimate is uncertain as Hubble's law is unreliable at low recessional velocities. The optical counterpart has mB = 16.9 mag and B - R = 0.1 mag. These characteristics, including M_H I = 107.0 M sun and LB = 107.5 L sun, if at 7 Mpc, indicate that this galaxy is a blue compact dwarf, but this remains uncertain until further follow-up observations are complete. Optical follow-up observations are ongoing and near-infrared follow-up observations have been scheduled.

  17. Evaluation of High-Power Solar Electric Propulsion using Advanced Ion, Hall, MPD, and PIT Thrusters for Lunar and Mars Cargo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of mission analyses that expose the advantages and disadvantages of high-power (MWe-class) Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) for Lunar and Mars Cargo missions that would support human exploration of the Moon and Mars. In these analyses, we consider SEP systems using advanced Ion thrusters (the Xenon [Xe] propellant Herakles), Hall thrusters (the Bismuth [Bi] propellant Very High Isp Thruster with Anode Layer [VHITAL], magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters (the Lithium [Li] propellant Advanced Lithium-Fed, Applied-field Lorentz Force Accelerator (ALFA2), and pulsed inductive thruster (PIT) (the Ammonia [NH3] propellant Nuclear-PIT [NuPIT]). The analyses include comparison of the advanced-technology propulsion systems (VHITAL, ALFA2, and NuPIT) relative to state-of-theart Ion (Herakles) propulsion systems and quantify the unique benefits of the various technology options such as high power-per-thruster (and/or high power-per-thruster packaging volume), high specific impulse (Isp), high-efficiency, and tankage mass (e.g., low tankage mass due to the high density of bismuth propellant). This work is based on similar analyses for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) systems.

  18. The non-haematopoietic biological effects of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Arcasoy, Murat O

    2008-04-01

    In the haematopoietic system, the principal function of erythropoietin (Epo) is the regulation of red blood cell production, mediated by its specific cell surface receptor (EpoR). Following the cloning of the Epo gene (EPO) and characterization of the selective haematopoietic action of Epo in erythroid lineage cells, recombinant Epo forms (epoetin-alfa, epoetin-beta and the long-acting analogue darbepoetin-alfa) have been widely used for treatment of anaemia in chronic kidney disease and chemotherapy-induced anaemia in cancer patients. Ubiquitous EpoR expression in non-erythroid cells has been associated with the discovery of diverse biological functions for Epo in non-haematopoietic tissues. During development, Epo-EpoR signalling is required not only for fetal liver erythropoiesis, but also for embryonic angiogenesis and brain development. A series of recent studies suggest that endogenous Epo-EpoR signalling contributes to wound healing responses, physiological and pathological angiogenesis, and the body's innate response to injury in the brain and heart. Epo and its novel derivatives have emerged as major tissue-protective cytokines that are being investigated in the first human studies involving neurological and cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on the scientific evidence documenting the biological effects of Epo in non-haematopoietic tissues and discusses potential future applications of Epo and its derivatives in the clinic. PMID:18324962

  19. A Search for Fast Radio Bursts in GALFACTS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Tyler; Salter, Christopher J.; Ghosh, Tapasi

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are transient radio sources whose high dispersion measures suggest they are of extra-galactic origin. They are particularly difficult to detect because, unlike other fast radio transients, they are non-recurring events. At present, 11 such bursts have been detected, 10 by the Parkes Radio Telescope and one by Arecibo Observatory. The G-ALFA Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS) is the highest resolution, full-Stokes, radio-continuum survey of the foreground sky. The Arecibo radio telescope is the largest single-aperture telescope in the world, offering the superior point-source sensitivity necessary to detect additional FRBs. GALFACTS utilizes Arecibo's ALFA receiver, an L-band 7-beam feed array, to produce a high-time (1 ms), low-spectral (MHz) resolution (HTLS) data stream between 1225 and 1525 MHz. We used ``Red_Transient", a robust search pipeline developed by A.A. Deshpande, to de-disperse the HTLS data with the intention of detecting FRBs in the ~30% of the total sky surveyed by GALFACTS. Concurrently, the student produced a similar search pipeline to calibrate HTLS data and validate detections by ``Red_Transient". Here, we present the results of initial processing runs on the first several days of GALFACTS observations. Currently, no FRB detections have been found. However, the detection of pulses from the known pulsar J1916+1312 indicates that ``Red_Transient" is capable of detecting fast transient signals present in the data stream.

  20. Clinical effectiveness of contemporary dentin bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Krithikadatta, Jogikalmat

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the clinical effectiveness of contemporary resin-based dentin bonding agents primarily focussing on the longevity of restoration. Materials and Methods: The literature published from June 2004 up to September 2010 was reviewed for clinical trials that tested the effectiveness of dentin bonding agents in the longevity of noncarious class V restoration. Results of each study reported using the USPHS criteria for clinical assessment of restoration were included and tabulated. The American Dental Association guidelines for dentin and enamel adhesives were used as a reference to compare the performance of individual bonding agents. Kruskal–Wallis followed by Mann–Whitney U was done to compare the mean Alfa score percentage for the three categories of bonding systems [etch-and-rinse (ER), self-etch primer (SEP), and self-etch-adhesive (SEA)]. Results: A comparison of the mean Alfa score percentages revealed no difference between the ER, SEP, and SEA categories of bonding systems except for marginal adaptation where ER was found to be superior to SEA. Conclusion: The clinical effectiveness of resin-based bonding agents is comparable among the three categories. PMID:21217944

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AdGVVEGF121.10, anastrozole, anecortave acetate, aripiprazole, asulacrine isethionate, atazanavir, ATL-962, 16-Aza-epothilone B; Bevacizumab, bicalutamide, blonanserin, BMS-188667, bosentan; Celecoxib, celmoleukin, cetuximab, cilomilast, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CNTF(Ax15), colesevelam hydrochloride; Daclizumab, delavirdine mesilate, desogestrel, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, emtricitabine, epalrestat, escitalopram oxalate, examorelin, exendin-4, ezetimibe; Fidarestat, frovatriptan; HIV-1 Immunogen; Iloperidone, insulin detemir, insulin lispro, irinotecan hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levetiracetam, levormeloxifene, levosimendan, lumiracoxib, LY-307161 SR; Memantine hydrochloride, MEN-10755, metformin hydrochloride, metreleptin, motexafin gadolinium; Naratriptan hydrochloride, natalizumab, nesiritide, nicotine, NN-2211, NN-414; Olanzapine, omalizumab; Pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pimecrolimus, pirfenidone, pramlintide acetate prasterone, pregabalin; Quetiapine fumarate; Rabeprazole sodium, raloxifene hydrochloride, raltitrexed, rDNA insulin, rFGF-2, risedronate sodium, rofecoxib, roflumilast, rosiglitazone maleate; SN-22995; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tegaserod maleate, tiotropium bromide, tomoxetine hydrochloride, trastuzumab, trimegestone; Voglibose, Voriconazole; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:12616707

  2. Perspectives on dual hepatitis B and C infection in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jen; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2016-05-01

    Dual hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is not rare in HBV or HCV endemic areas, and can be found in populations at risk of parenteral viral transmission. Clinical observatory studies suggest a higher risk of liver disease progression in patients with dual HCV/HBV infection than in HBV or HCV monoinfected patients. Recent trials confirmed that combination therapy of peginterferon alfa-2a or alfa-2b and ribavirin was effective and safe in dually infected patients with positive HCV RNA. Moreover, about 30% of the dually infected patients cleared hepatitis B surface antigen within 5 years after the start of peginterferon-based therapy. The optimal treatment strategies for dually infected patients with active hepatitis B, with decompensated cirrhosis, or in other clinical situations should be explored in further studies. Finally, the advent of new direct-acting antiviral-based anti-HCV therapy may lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of dually infected patients with active hepatitis C, particularly for those not tolerating or not eligible for peginterferon-based therapy. Notably, direct-acting antivirals would not have any activity against HBV infection; simultaneous or on-demand nucleos(t)ide analogs would be needed if clinically indicated. PMID:26188762

  3. Immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, R M

    1999-06-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma continue to present a therapeutic challenge. Current therapeutic approaches involve surgery and various types of immunotherapy. The rationale for this latter form of therapy include the observations of spontaneous tumor regression, the presence of a T-cell-mediated immune response, and the tumor responses observed in patients receiving cytokine therapy. Analysis of prognostic factors in these patients demonstrates that clinical responses occur most frequently in individuals with good performance status. The cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2, aldesleukin [Proleukin], interferon-alfa (Intron A, Roferon-A), or the combination produce responses in 15% to 20% of patients. Randomized trials suggest that administration of interferon-alfa may result in a modest improvement in median survival. Investigation of the molecular genetics of renal cell carcinoma and the presence of T-lymphocyte immune dysregulation have suggested new therapeutic strategies. Further preclinical and clinical studies investigating inhibitors of angiogenesis or pharmacologic methods to reverse immune dysregulation are ongoing. Therapeutic results in patients with renal cell carcinoma remain limited, and investigational approaches are warranted. PMID:10378218

  4. Profiling the resting venom gland of the scorpion Tityus stigmurus through a transcriptomic survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The scorpion Tityus stigmurus is widely distributed in Northeastern Brazil and known to cause severe human envenoming, inducing pain, hyposthesia, edema, erythema, paresthesia, headaches and vomiting. The present study uses a transcriptomic approach to characterize the gene expression profile from the non-stimulated venom gland of Tityus stigmurus scorpion. Results A cDNA library was constructed and 540 clones were sequenced and grouped into 153 clusters, with one or more ESTs (expressed sequence tags). Forty-one percent of ESTs belong to recognized toxin-coding sequences, with transcripts encoding antimicrobial toxins (AMP-like) being the most abundant, followed by alfa KTx- like, beta KTx-like, beta NaTx-like and alfa NaTx-like. Our analysis indicated that 34% of the transcripts encode “other possible venom molecules”, which correspond to anionic peptides, hypothetical secreted peptides, metalloproteinases, cystein-rich peptides and lectins. Fifteen percent of ESTs are similar to cellular transcripts. Sequences without good matches corresponded to 11%. Conclusions This investigation provides the first global view of gene expression of the venom gland from Tityus stigmurus under resting conditions. This approach enables characterization of a large number of venom gland component molecules, which belong either to known or non yet described types of venom peptides and proteins from the Buthidae family. PMID:22853446

  5. The analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of shark cartilage are due to a peptide molecule and are nitric oxide (NO) system dependent.

    PubMed

    Fontenele, J B; Araújo, G B; de Alencar, J W; Viana, G S

    1997-11-01

    The present work shows an antinociceptive and dose-dependent effect of shark cartilage hydrosoluble fraction (HF) on writhing and formalin tests in mice. The effect was not altered by thalidomide, a known inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-alfa) synthesis. Similarly, the antinociceptive effect did not change in the presence of naloxone, indicating that the opioid system is not involved. However, the effect observed was blocked by L-arginine, a NO synthesis substrate, and it was potentiated by L-NAME, suggesting a role of the NO system in the shark cartilage antinociceptive effect. Effects similar to those seen with the HF were detected with peak II from gel filtration chromatography. The increase in vascular permeability induced by serotonin in rats was significantly abolished by the HF at the dose of 2 mg/kg, p.o., and again it was not potentiated by thalidomide. The observed blockade in the vascular permeability increase induced by histamine was detected only with a higher dose (10 mg/kg, p.o.). PMID:9401722

  6. Development of receptor bronchial system in isolated preparation of piglet trachea in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bexheti, Sadi; Haliti, Naim; Islami, Hilmi; Sukalo, Aziz; Nuraj, Bajram; Krasniqi, Valon; Kutllovci, Skender; Beqiraj, Rruke; Disha, Mentor

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the flow research of the development of receptor bronchial system in the first month of extra-uterine life up to the sixth month of development, performed by tracking the reactions of isolated tracheal rings in acetylcholine (Ach), propranolol (P), histamine (Hist), and prostaglandin (PGF2-alfa) in concentrations of: 10-4, 10-3, 10-2 and 10-1 mol/dm3; in piglets of ages: 1 month, 2 months, 4 months and 6 months. Results shows that Ach causes reaction of smooth muscles from the first month of extra-uterine life (p < 0.01) and that Propranolol (P) significantly emphasizes the effect of Ach (p > 0.1), while histamine and PGF2-alpha do not cause constriction (histamine up to 4 months of age, PGF2-alfa up to 6 months of extra-uterine life). This shows that cholinergic and adrenergic system in piglet airways is developed during intrauterine life and reaction can be registered in the first month of extra-uterine life, while other receptor systems are developed in later periods of extra-uterine life. This suggests that lack of reaction of tracheal smooth musculature (TSM) comes as a result of sufficient non-maturity of mast cells from which chemical mediators, with local functioning, are released. PMID:20514768

  7. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OF A NEARBY GALAXY FROM THE ARECIBO ZONE OF AVOIDANCE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, T. P.; Henning, P. A.; Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Kaur, A.; Parton, B.

    2011-09-20

    The Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Survey has discovered a nearby galaxy, ALFA ZOA J1952+1428, at a heliocentric velocity of +279 km s{sup -1}. The galaxy was discovered at low Galactic latitude by 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen (H I). We have obtained follow-up observations with the Expanded Very Large Array and the 0.9 m Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy optical telescope. The H I distribution overlaps an uncataloged, potential optical counterpart. The H I linear size is 1.4 kpc at our adopted distance of D = 7 Mpc, but the distance estimate is uncertain as Hubble's law is unreliable at low recessional velocities. The optical counterpart has m{sub B} = 16.9 mag and B - R = 0.1 mag. These characteristics, including M{sub H} {sub i} = 10{sup 7.0} M{sub sun} and L{sub B} = 10{sup 7.5} L{sub sun}, if at 7 Mpc, indicate that this galaxy is a blue compact dwarf, but this remains uncertain until further follow-up observations are complete. Optical follow-up observations are ongoing and near-infrared follow-up observations have been scheduled.

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-05-01

    (-)-Gossypol; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, ACAM-1000, ACE-011, Agomelatine, AGS-004, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, AMG-317, Amlodipine, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Azacitidine; Becatecarin, Belinostat, Bevacizumab, BMS-387032, BMS-690514, Bortezomib; Casopitant mesylate, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, CK-1827452, Clofarabine, Conivaptan hydrochloride; Dabigatran etexilate, DADMe-Immucillin-H, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, DC-WT1, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Denosumab, Dienogest, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Eculizumab, Edoxaban tosilate, Elacytarabine, Elesclomol, Eltrombopag olamine, Enfuvirtide, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine; Flibanserin, Fludarabine, Fondaparinux sodium, Fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, Genistein; I-131-L19-SIP, Idrabiotaparinux sodium, Imatinib mesylate, IMGN-901, Ipilimumab; Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal cisplatin, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir; Maraviroc, MDV-3100, Mecasermin rinfabate, MP-470, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxcinod, NB-002, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NK-012; Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pitavastatin calcium, PL-3994, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Plitidepsin, PM-10450; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, ReoT3D, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rivaroxaban, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rozrolimupab; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, Salinosporamide A, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Smallpox (Vaccinia) Vaccine, Live, Sorafenib; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Teriparatide, Tipifarnib, Tipranavir, Trabectedin, Trifluridine/TPI; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Vinflunine, Volociximab, Vorinostat; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, Zoledronic acid monohydrate

  9. Gonadotropin therapy in assisted reproduction: an evolutionary perspective from biologics to biotech

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rogério de Barros F.; Esteves, Sandro C.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin therapy plays an integral role in ovarian stimulation for infertility treatments. Efforts have been made over the last century to improve gonadotropin preparations. Undoubtedly, current gonadotropins have better quality and safety profiles as well as clinical efficacy than earlier ones. A major achievement has been introducing recombinant technology in the manufacturing processes for follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and human chorionic gonadotropin. Recombinant gonadotropins are purer than urine-derived gonadotropins, and incorporating vial filling by mass virtually eliminated batch-to-batch variations and enabled accurate dosing. Recombinant and fill-by-mass technologies have been the driving forces for launching of prefilled pen devices for more patient-friendly ovarian stimulation. The most recent developments include the fixed combination of follitropin alfa + lutropin alfa, long-acting FSH gonadotropin, and a new family of prefilled pen injector devices for administration of recombinant gonadotropins. The next step would be the production of orally bioactive molecules with selective follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone activity. PMID:24714837

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-12-01

    [Methoxy-(11)C]PD-153035, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Adalimumab, Adecatumumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, ADX-10059, Aflibercept, AIR-human growth hormone, Aliskiren fumarate, AMG-221, Amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil, Aprepitant; Bavituximab, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BIBW-2992, BMS-690514, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Briakinumab; Capecitabine, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cholecalciferol, Choline fenofibrate, Chorionic gonadotropin (human), Cixutumumab, Clopidogrel, CP-690550 citrate; Dabigatran, Dacetuzumab, Daclizumab, Dapagliflozin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Denosumab; Efavirenz, Elisidepsin, Enoxaparin, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide; Fenobam, Figitumumab, Filibuvir, Fondaparinux sodium, Fresolimumab; Gefitinib, Golimumab, Golnerminogene pradenovec; Ifosfamide, Imatinib mesylate, Ipilimumab, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide; M-118, Masitinib mesylate, Metformin hydrochloride, Micafungin sodium, Moxifloxacin hydrochloride; Neratinib; Oblimersen sodium, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Palifosfamide lysine, Panobacumab, Panobinostat, Patupilone, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pegylated arginine deiminase 20000, Piclozotan hydrochloride hydrate, Pixantrone maleate, Prasterone, Prasugrel, Prednisone, Progesterone, Prucalopride, pVGI.1 (VEGF-2); Retigabine, rhFSH, Rituximab, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salinosporamide A, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Somatropin, Sorafenib, SSR-244738, Sunitinib malate; Tamoxifen citrate, Teduglutide, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telmisartan, Telmisartan/amlodipine, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Temsirolimus, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tipifarnib, Tolvaptan, Trastuzumab, Trastuzumab-MCC-DM1, Travoprost, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Valsartan/amlodipine besylate/hydrochlorothiazide, Valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Vandetanib

  11. Innovative approach for improved rFVIII concentrate.

    PubMed

    Morfini, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    The development of a new recombinant factor VIII was designed and implemented to answer a number of unmet needs of patients affected by hemophilia A. Turoctocog alfa is bioengineered in a specific Chinese hamster ovary clone to present translational and posttranslational characteristics (sulphation, glycosylation) biosimilar to natural circulating forms of FVIII, with the aim to devoid any minimal change which may impact immunogenicity and antigenicity of recombinant protein. Both producer cell line and media are maintained free of any animal or human plasma derivative. Downstream processes of purification are performed by five steps (immunoaffinity chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, virus inactivation by means of solvent-detergent treatment and nanofiltration, and to end with gel filtration), to provide the best possible margin of safety from known and unknown infectious agents. Large clinical trials seem to confirm the expectations placed in Turoctocog alfa in terms of high quality and safety of recombinant FVIII toward the goal of overcoming actual and future challenges of hemophilia therapy. PMID:24766411

  12. The emerging role of biosimilar epoetins in nephrology in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, Steven; Shah, Hitesh H

    2015-04-01

    Biologic drugs, including epoetin, continue to play an important role in the management of medical conditions. However, biologics are costly and soon many of the patents on these drugs will expire, making way for non-brand name products (ie, biosimilars). It is only by introducing competition to the marketplace that costs will de-escalate. In Europe, a specific regulatory pathway for approving biosimilars has been in place since 2005. A similar review pathway in the United States has been developed by the US Food and Drug Administration. These guidelines for approving biosimilars are stringent, requiring preclinical pharmacodynamic and toxicologic studies, clinical studies to demonstrate bioequivalence and efficacy, and long-term postmarketing studies to monitor drug safety. Biosimilar epoetin has been used in Europe since 2007, and a wealth of data has been collected. These studies and reports indicate that the efficacy and safety profiles of biosimilar epoetin are similar to those of originator epoetin alfa. Biosimilars of epoetin alfa are expected to be among the first biosimilar agents to be approved for use in the United States. The availability of lower cost epoetins may have significant impact on the treatment of anemia of chronic kidney disease. PMID:25582283

  13. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey IX: the isolated galaxy sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, R. F.; Auld, R.; Davies, J. I.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Keenan, O. C.; Momjian, E.; Rodriguez, R.; Taber, T.; Taylor, R.

    2016-02-01

    We have used the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) to map three regions, each of 5 deg2, around the isolated galaxies NGC 1156, UGC 2082, and NGC 5523. In the vicinity of these galaxies we have detected two dwarf companions: one near UGC 2082, previously discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey, and one near NGC 1156, discovered by this project and reported in an earlier paper. This is significantly fewer than the 15.4^{+1.7}_{-1.5} that would be expected from the field H I mass function from ALFALFA or the 8.9 ± 1.2 expected if the H I mass function from the Local Group applied in these regions. The number of dwarf companions detected is, however, consistent with a flat or declining H I mass function as seen by a previous, shallower, H I search for companions to isolated galaxies. We attribute this difference in H I mass functions to the different environments in which they are measured. This agrees with the general observation that lower ratios of dwarf to giant galaxies are found in lower density environments.

  14. Membrane treatment of alkaline bleaching effluents from elementary chlorine free kraft softwood cellulose production.

    PubMed

    Oñate, Elizabeth; Rodríguez, Edgard; Bórquez, Rodrigo; Zaror, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports experimental results on the sequential use of ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to fractionate alkaline extraction bleaching effluents from kraft cellulose production. The aim was to unveil the way key pollutants are distributed when subjected to sequential UF/NF/RO membrane separation processes. Alkaline bleaching effluents were obtained from a local pinewood-based mill, featuring elementary chlorine free bleaching to produce high-brightness cellulose. The experimental system was based on a laboratory-scale membrane system, DSS LabStak® M20 Alfa Laval, using Alfa Laval UF and NF/RO membranes, operated at a constant transmembrane pressure (6 bar for UF membranes and 32 bar for NF/RO membranes), at 25°C. Results show that 78% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total phenols, 82% adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) and 98% colour were retained by UF membranes which have molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) above 10 kDa. In all, 16% of original COD, total phenols and AOX, and the remaining 2% colour were retained by UF membranes within the 1 to 10 kDa MWCO range. Chloride ions were significantly present in all UF permeates, and RO was required to obtain a high-quality permeate with a view to water reuse. It is concluded that UF/NF/RO membranes offer a feasible option for water and chemicals recovery from alkaline bleaching effluents in kraft pulp production. PMID:25253193

  15. Gateways to clinical trials. March 2003.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-03-01

    Gateways to clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and devlopment protal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-CF, adalimumab, ademetionine, afeletecan hydrochloride, agomelatine, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, amdoxovir, aplidine, aranose, arsenic sulfide, atazanavir, atlizumab; Bimatoprost, BMS-181176, BMS-188667, bortezomib, bryostatin 1; Combretastatin A-4 phosphate; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, deferasirox, desloratadine, DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib-vaccine, DTI-0009; Eculizumab, edodekin alfa, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, epoetin, esomeprazole magnesium etoricoxib; Fampridine, fenretinide, FR-146687; Galiximab, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, ganirelix acetate, gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gimatecan; HEA125xOKT3, hIL-13-PE38QQR, HSV-2 theracine, Hu14.18-IL-2, human gammaglobulin; Idraparinux sodium, imatinib mesylate, IMiD3, insulin detemir, interleukin-4, irofulven, ISAtx-247; JT-1001; Levetiracetam, levosimendan, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal vincristine sulfate, lixivaptan, lopinavir, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melatonin, midostaurin, MLN-518; Neridronic acid, nesiritide, nitronaproxen; Oblimersen sodium, oregovomab; PEG-filgrastim polyglutamate paclitaxel, prasterone, pregabalin; Rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; SGN-30; T-1249, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipranavir, TMC-114, trabectedin, transdermal selegiline; UK-427857; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, vardenafil, vatalanib succinate, vincristine sulfate TCS; Zofenopril calcium. PMID:12731460

  16. Ionic liquid self-combustion synthesis of BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 heterojunctions with exceptional visible-light photocatalytic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fa-Tang; Wang, Qing; Ran, Jingrun; Hao, Ying-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Dishun; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Heterostructured BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 nanocomposites with surface oxygen vacancies are constructed by a facile in situ route of one-step self-combustion of ionic liquids. The compositions can be easily controlled by simply adjusting the fuel ratio of urea and 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BTH). BTH serves not only as a fuel, but also as a complexing agent for ionic liquids and a reactant to supply the Br element. The heterojunctions show remarkable adsorptive ability for both the cationic dye of rhodamine B (RhB) and the anionic dye of methylene orange (MO) at high concentrations, which is attributed to the abundant surface oxygen vacancies. The sample containing 75.2% BiOBr and 24.8% Bi24O31Br10 exhibits the highest photocatalytic activity. Its reaction rate constant is 4.0 and 9.0 times that of pure BiOBr in degrading 50 mg L-1 of RhB and 30 mg L-1 of MO under visible-light (λ > 400 nm) irradiation, respectively, which is attributed to the narrow band gap and highly efficient transfer efficiency of charge carriers. Different photocatalytic reaction processes and mechanisms over pure BiOBr and heterojunctions are proposed.Heterostructured BiOBr/Bi24O31Br10 nanocomposites with surface oxygen vacancies are constructed by a facile in situ route of one-step self-combustion of ionic liquids. The compositions can be easily controlled by simply adjusting the fuel ratio of urea and 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BTH). BTH serves not only as a fuel, but also as a complexing agent for ionic liquids and a reactant to supply the Br element. The heterojunctions show remarkable adsorptive ability for both the cationic dye of rhodamine B (RhB) and the anionic dye of methylene orange (MO) at high concentrations, which is attributed to the abundant surface oxygen vacancies. The sample containing 75.2% BiOBr and 24.8% Bi24O31Br10 exhibits the highest photocatalytic activity. Its reaction rate constant is 4.0 and 9.0 times that of pure BiOBr in degrading 50 mg L-1 of RhB and 30 mg

  17. Hypoxia-dependent retinal toxicity of bioreductive anticancer prodrugs in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, A E; Wilson, W R

    2000-02-15

    The bioreductive anticancer prodrug CI-1010 ((2R)-1-[(2-bromoethyl)amino]-3-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-2-propanol hydrobromide) is an alkylating nitroimidazole which shows selective toxicity against hypoxic cells in murine tumors, but causes extensive apoptosis in the outer retina in rodents and monkeys. This irreversible retinal toxicity has terminated preclinical development of CI-1010. We have investigated whether such toxicity is due to physiological hypoxia in the retina, and whether it is a general feature of hypoxia-selective bioreductive drugs. Retinal damage was quantified by morphometric analysis of histological sections following treatment of female C57Bl6 mice. Both CI-1010 and tirapazamine (TPZ, 1,2,4-benzotriazin-3-amine 1,4-dioxide), a bioreductive drug in Phase III clinical trial, caused a time and dose-dependent loss of photoreceptor cells of the outer retina following administration of single intraperitoneal doses. The lesion caused by TPZ was qualitatively similar to that with CI-1010, but was less severe at equivalent fractions of the maximum tolerated dose (as defined by lethality). With both bioreductive drugs, lesion severity was increased if animals breathed 10% O(2) for 3 h after drug administration, while breathing 95% O(2)/5% CO(2) was protective. Other hypoxia-selective bioreductive drugs tested (the quinone porfiromycin, the anthraquinone N-oxide AQ4N and the nitrogen mustard prodrugs SN 23816 and SN 25341) did not cause retinal damage at their maximum tolerated doses. This study suggests that the retinal toxicity of bioreductive drugs might be avoided by manipulation of tissue hypoxia using 95% O(2)/5% CO(2), although this intervention could suppress antitumor activity. The finding that not all bioreductive drugs cause retinal toxicity suggests this toxicity can be avoided through appropriate drug design. PMID:10662604

  18. Serotonin in the dorsal periaqueductal gray inhibits panic-like defensive behaviors in rats exposed to acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Spiacci, A; Sergio, T de Oliveira; da Silva, G S F; Glass, M L; Schenberg, L C; Garcia-Cairasco, N; Zangrossi, H

    2015-10-29

    It has been proposed that spontaneous panic attacks are the outcome of the misfiring of an evolved suffocation alarm system. Evidence gathered in the last years is suggestive that the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) in the midbrain harbors a hypoxia-sensitive suffocation alarm system. We here investigated whether facilitation of 5-HT-mediated neurotransmission within the dPAG changes panic-like defensive reactions expressed by male Wistar rats submitted to a hypoxia challenge (7% O2), as observed in other animal models of panic. Intra-dPAG injection of 5-HT (20 nmol), (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) (8 nmol), a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, or (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodo amphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) (16 nmol), a preferential 5-HT2A agonist, reduced the number of upward jumps directed to the border of the experimental chamber during hypoxia, interpreted as escape attempts, without affecting the rats' locomotion. These effects were similar to those caused by chronic, but not acute, intraperitoneal administration of the antidepressant fluoxetine (5-15 mg/kg), or acute systemic administration of the benzodiazepine receptor agonist alprazolam (1-4 mg/kg), both drugs clinically used in the treatment of panic disorder. Our findings strengthen the view that the dPAG is a key encephalic area involved in the defensive behaviors triggered by activation of the suffocation alarm system. They also support the use of hypoxia-evoked escape as a model of respiratory-type panic attacks. PMID:26319117

  19. High-Throughput Screening of Myometrial Calcium-Mobilization to Identify Modulators of Uterine Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Herington, Jennifer L.; Swale, Daniel R.; Brown, Naoko; Shelton, Elaine L.; Choi, Hyehun; Williams, Charles H.; Hong, Charles C.; Paria, Bibhash C.; Denton, Jerod S.; Reese, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The uterine myometrium (UT-myo) is a therapeutic target for preterm labor, labor induction, and postpartum hemorrhage. Stimulation of intracellular Ca2+-release in UT-myo cells by oxytocin is a final pathway controlling myometrial contractions. The goal of this study was to develop a dual-addition assay for high-throughput screening of small molecular compounds, which could regulate Ca2+-mobilization in UT-myo cells, and hence, myometrial contractions. Primary murine UT-myo cells in 384-well plates were loaded with a Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent probe, and then screened for inducers of Ca2+-mobilization and inhibitors of oxytocin-induced Ca2+-mobilization. The assay exhibited robust screening statistics (Z´ = 0.73), DMSO-tolerance, and was validated for high-throughput screening against 2,727 small molecules from the Spectrum, NIH Clinical I and II collections of well-annotated compounds. The screen revealed a hit-rate of 1.80% for agonist and 1.39% for antagonist compounds. Concentration-dependent responses of hit-compounds demonstrated an EC50 less than 10μM for 21 hit-antagonist compounds, compared to only 7 hit-agonist compounds. Subsequent studies focused on hit-antagonist compounds. Based on the percent inhibition and functional annotation analyses, we selected 4 confirmed hit-antagonist compounds (benzbromarone, dipyridamole, fenoterol hydrobromide and nisoldipine) for further analysis. Using an ex vivo isometric contractility assay, each compound significantly inhibited uterine contractility, at different potencies (IC50). Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that high-throughput small-molecules screening of myometrial Ca2+-mobilization is an ideal primary approach for discovering modulators of uterine contractility. PMID:26600013

  20. [To the mechanisms of antiarrhythmic action of Allapinine].

    PubMed

    Vakhitova, Iu V; Farafontova, E I; Khisamutdinova, R Iu; Iunusov, V M; Cypasheva, I P; Iunusov, M S

    2013-01-01

    Allapinine (lappaconitine hydrobromide) is a drug for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, it shows IC class antiarrhythmics properties. Its action mechanism is associated with blockade of Na(+)-channels with subsequent inhibition of the depolarization rate and, consequently, of the slowing and reducing the excitability of the cardiac conduction system. At the moment, it is not established, what factors are associated with side effects of Allapinine, and therefore it seems important to study the molecular mechanisms of its action. The target genes were identified in a rat model of aconitine-induced arrhythmia using a commercial kit "Rat Neuroscience Ion Channels & Transporters RT2 Profiler PCR Array" (SABioscienses). Comparison of the expression of 84 genes in the experimental (aconitine arrhythmias/Allapinine) and control (aconitine arrhythmias/saline) animals revealed changes in the mRNA level of 18 genes. It has been shown an increase in mRNA levels of genes encoding various types of K(+)-channels (kcna6, kcnj1, kcnj4, kcnq2, kcnq4), Ca(2+)-channel (cacna 1g), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (slc 18a3). Decrease in the mRNA level was observed for genes encoding the Na(+)-channel (scn8a), K(+)-channels (kcne 1, kcns 1), membrane transporters (atp4a, slc6a9). Taken together, it appears that the effect of Allapinine on aconitine--induced arrhythmias is due to modulation of genes encoding Na(+)-, K(+)-, Ca(2+)-channels, conducting ionic currents (I(Na), I(to), I(Ks), I(K1), I(CaT)), which are involved in the formation of different phases of the action potential. The effect of the drug on the mRNA levels of genes encoding the acetylcholine and glycine transporters, suggesting the participation of these neurotransmitters in the mechanisms of anti-arrhythmic properties of the Allapinine. PMID:23844512

  1. Long-Term Citalopram Treatment Alters the Stress Responses of the Cortical Dopamine and Noradrenaline Systems: the Role of Cortical 5-HT1A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Fumi; Kishikawa, Yuki; Hanada, Yuuki; Yamada, Makiko; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cortical dopamine and noradrenaline are involved in the stress response. Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has direct and indirect effects on the serotonergic system. Furthermore, long-term treatment with citalopram affects the dopamine and noradrenaline systems, which could contribute to the therapeutic action of antidepressants. Methods: The effects of long-term treatment with citalopram on the responses of the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the rat prefrontal cortex to acute handling stress were evaluated using in vivo microdialysis. Results: Acute handling stress increased dopamine and noradrenaline levels in the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine and noradrenaline responses were suppressed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 7-(Dipropylamino)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ol;hydrobromide, into the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine response was abolished by long-term treatment with citalopram, and the abolished dopamine response was reversed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, (Z)-but-2-enedioic acid;N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-N-pyridin-2-ylcyclohexanecarboxamide into the prefrontal cortex. On the other hand, long-term treatment with citalopram reduced the basal noradrenaline levels (approximately 40% of the controls), but not the basal dopamine levels. The noradrenaline response was maintained despite the low basal noradrenaline levels. Signaling from the 5-HT1A receptors and α2-adrenoceptors was not involved in the decrease in the basal noradrenaline levels but partially affected the noradrenaline response. Conclusions: Chronic citalopram treatment differentially suppresses the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the prefrontal cortex, and the dopamine stress response was preferentially controlled by upregulating 5-HT1A receptor signaling. Our findings provide insight into how antidepressants modulate the dopamine and noradrenaline systems to overcome acute stress. PMID

  2. Morphological Alterations of the Palpebral Conjunctival Epithelium in a Dry Eye Model

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Johanna Tukler; De Paiva, Cintia S.; Farley, William; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Burns, Alan R.; Bergmanson, Jan P.G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the normal palpebral conjunctival histology in C57BL/6 mice, and the structural changes that occur in a dry eye model. Methods 24 male and female C57BL/6 mice, 8 untreated (UT) and 16 exposed to experimental ocular surface desiccating stress (DS). Ocular dryness was induced by administration of scopolamine hydrobromide (0.5 mg/0.2 ml) QID for 5 (DS5) or 10 (DS10) days. Counts and measurements were obtained using anatomical reference points and goblet cell density was investigated with a variety of stains. Results Near the junction between the lid margin and the normal palpebral conjunctiva, the epithelium had an average thickness of 45.6±10.5μm, 8.8±2.0 cell layers, versus 37.7±5.6μm, 7.4±1.3 layers in DS10 (P<0.05). In the goblet cell populated palpebral region the normal epithelium was thicker (P<0.05) than in DS5 and DS10. In the control, 43% of the goblet cells were covered by squamous epithelium, compared to 58% (DS5) and 63% (DS10) (P<0.05). A decreased number of Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) and Alcian blue stained goblet cells was observed in the dry eye. Not all goblet cells stained with PAS and Alcian blue. Conclusions The mouse palpebral conjunctival epithelium was structurally similar to the human. After DS the palpebral conjunctival epithelium decreased in thickness and goblet cell access to the surface appeared to be inhibited by surrounding epithelial cells, potentially slowing down their migration to the surface. Differential staining with PAS and Alcian blue suggests there may be different subtypes of conjunctival goblet cells. PMID:23146932

  3. Effects and mechanism of cerebroprotein hydrolysate on learning and memory ability in mice.

    PubMed

    An, L; Han, X; Li, H; Ma, Y; Shi, L; Xu, G; Yuan, G; Sun, J; Zhao, N; Sheng, Y; Wang, M; Du, P

    2016-01-01

    Cerebroprotein hydrolysate is an extract from porcine brain tissue that acts on the central nervous system in various ways to protect neurons and improve memory, attention, and vigilance. This study examined the effect and mechanism of cerebroprotein hydrolysate on learning and memory in mice with scopolamine-induced impairment. Mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of scopolamine hydrobromide to establish a murine model of learning and memory impairment. After 35 successive days of cerebroprotein hydrolysate treatment, their behaviors were observed in the Morris water maze and step-down test. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamic acid (Glu) levels in the brain tissue of the mice were determined, and pathological changes in the hippocampus were examined. The results of the water-maze test showed that cerebroprotein hydrolysate shortened the escape latency and increased the number of platform crossings. In the step-down test, cerebroprotein hydrolysate treatment prolonged the step-down latency and reduced the number of errors; cerebroprotein hydrolysate increased the activity of SOD, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, and AChE, reduced the levels of MDA, decreased the Glu/GABA ratio in brain tissue, and reduced pathological changes in the hippocampus. The results indicate that cerebroprotein hydrolysate can improve learning and memory in mice with scopolamine-induced impairment. This effect may be associated with its ability to reduce injury caused by free radicals, improve acetylcholine function, and modulate the Glu/GABA learning and memory regulation system, reducing excitotoxicity caused by Glu. PMID:27525868

  4. Automated capillary GC/NPD assay for the determination in plasma of McN-5707, a potential antidepressant drug

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M.L.; Uetz, J.A.; Ng, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    McN-5707 x HBr (trans-6-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,2,3,5,6,10b-hexa-hydropyrrolo(2,1-a)isoquinoline hydrobromide (1:1)) is a novel, potential antidepressant which is currently under pre-clinical evaluation. The present study reports the development of a sensitive and reproducible capillary gas chromatographic (GC) assay with nitrogen-phosphorus ionization detection (NPD) for McN-5707 in plasma. The assay includes a three step extraction as follows: McN-5707 and the internal standard (IS) are extracted from alkalinized plasma (1 mL) into hexane and back-extracted into 0.1 N HCl. Following alkalinization of the aqueous layer, McN-5707 and IS are re-extracted into hexane. The solvent is evaporated and the residue is reconstituted with 50 ..mu..L of a solution of 10% methanol in toluene. A 2.5 ..mu..L aliquot is injected into an HP 5880A capillary GC using the HP 7672A auto-sampler. Separation is accomplished using a 15 m x 0.32 mm i.d. DB-5 fused silica capillary column and temperature programming from 160 to 200/sup 0/C at 10/sup 0//min. Calibration curves are linear from 1 to 100 ng/mL. Accuracy and precision, expressed as relative deviation from the true value and coefficient of variation are < 10% at all concentrations in the linear range. The assay has been successfully used for pharmacokinetic studies in rats and dogs and has been cross-validated with a /sup 3/H-norepinephrine uptake inhibition assay.

  5. In vivo PET imaging of the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor as a marker for brain inflammation after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Martín, Abraham; Szczupak, Boguslaw; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Domercq, Maria; Cano, Ainhoa; Padro, Daniel; Muñoz, Clara; Higuchi, Makoto; Matute, Carlos; Llop, Jordi

    2015-04-15

    PET imaging of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) could become an effective tool for the diagnosis and therapy evaluation of neurologic diseases. Despite this, the role of nAChRs α4β2 receptors after brain diseases such as cerebral ischemia and its involvement in inflammatory reaction is still largely unknown. To investigate this, we performed in parallel in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) with 2[(18)F]-fluoro-A85380 and [(11)C]PK11195 at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 d after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats. In the ischemic territory, PET with 2[(18)F]-fluoro-A85380 and [(11)C]PK11195 showed a progressive binding increase from days 3-7, followed by a progressive decrease from days 14-28 after cerebral ischemia onset. Ex vivo immunohistochemistry for the nicotinic α4β2 receptor and the mitochondrial translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) confirmed the PET findings and demonstrated the overexpression of α4β2 receptors in both microglia/macrophages and astrocytes from days 7-28 after experimental ischemic stroke. Likewise, the role played by α4β2 receptors on neuroinflammation was supported by the increase of [(11)C]PK11195 binding in ischemic rats treated with the α4β2 antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide (DHBE) at day 7 after MCAO. Finally, both functional and behavioral testing showed major impaired outcome at day 1 after ischemia onset, followed by a recovery of the sensorimotor function and dexterity from days 21-28 after experimental stroke. Together, these results suggest that the nicotinic α4β2 receptor could have a key role in the inflammatory reaction underlying cerebral ischemia in rats. PMID:25878273

  6. Cooperative regulation of anxiety and panic-related defensive behaviors in the rat periaqueductal grey matter by 5-HT1A and μ-receptors.

    PubMed

    Roncon, Camila M; Biesdorf, Carla; Coimbra, Norberto C; Audi, Elisabeth A; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico G

    2013-12-01

    Previous results with the elevated T-maze (ETM) test indicate that the antipanic action of serotonin (5-HT) in the dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG) depends on the activation endogenous opioid peptides. The aim of the present work was to investigate the interaction between opioid- and serotonin-mediated neurotransmission in the modulation of defensive responses in rats submitted to the ETM. The obtained results showed that intra-dPAG administration of morphine significantly increased escape latency, a panicolytic-like effect that was blocked by pre-treatment with intra-dPAG injection of either naloxone or the 5-HT1A antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1 piperazinyl] ethyl] -N- 2- pyridinyl-ciclohexanecarboxamide maleate (WAY-100635). In addition, previous administration of naloxone antagonized both the anti-escape and the anti-avoidance (anxiolytic-like) effect of the 5-HT1A agonist (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), but did not affect the anti-escape effect of the 5-HT2A agonist (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI). Moreover, the combination of sub-effective doses of locally administered 5-HT and morphine significantly impaired ETM escape performance. Finally, the µ-antagonist D-PHE-CYS-TYR-D-TRP-ORN-THR-PEN (CTOP) blocked the anti-avoidance as well as the anti-escape effect of 8-OHDPAT, and the association of sub-effective doses of the µ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt (DAMGO) and of 8-OHDPAT had anti-escape and anti-avoidance effects in the ETM. These results suggest a synergic interaction between the 5-HT1A and the µ-opioid receptor at post-synaptic level on neurons of the dPAG that regulate proximal defense, theoretically related to panic attacks. PMID:23598399

  7. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome (DRESS) syndrome associated with azithromycin presenting like septic shock: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome is a potentially life-threatening cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterized by extensive mucocutaneous eruption, fever, hematologic abnormalities including eosinophilia and/or atypical lymphocytosis, and extensive organ involvement. The drugs most often responsible for causing drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome are anticonvulsants, antimicrobial agents and antipyretic or anti-inflammatory analgesics. Although azithromycin is widely prescribed in clinical practice, serious cutaneous reactions from this agent have been rarely described. We report the first adult case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome associated with azithromycin. Case presentation A 44-year-old previously healthy Caucasian man with history of tobacco use presented to his primary care physician with fever and productive cough. He was prescribed azithromycin, promethazine hydrochloride and dextromethorphan hydrobromide syrup. One week later, he developed a blistering erythematous rash over both hands, which over the next two weeks spread to involve nearly his entire body surface, sparing only his face. He was admitted to an outside hospital with signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and severe sepsis, presumably from a skin infection. Despite aggressive therapy he deteriorated, with worsening diffuse erythema, and was transferred to our institution. He developed multiple organ failure requiring ventilatory and hemodynamic support. Pertinent laboratory studies included a leukocytosis with a white blood cell count of 17.6×109/L and 47% eosinophils. A skin biopsy showed evidence of spongiotic lichenoid dermatitis with eosinophils and neutrophils, compatible with a systemic drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction. Our patient was started on high-dose steroids and showed dramatic improvement within 48 hours. Conclusions We report the first adult case of

  8. A comparison of the effects of anticholinergic and beta 2-agonist and combination therapy on respiratory impedance in COPD.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, G; Mostert, R; Wouters, E F

    1992-01-01

    The effects of three different regimens of inhaled bronchodilators on spirometry and respiratory impedance as measured with the technique of forced oscillations were compared in a double-blind crossover study in 22 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (FEV1 less than 70 percent predicted). On three trial days, patients inhaled, in random order, 40 micrograms ipratropium bromide, 200 micrograms fenoterol hydrobromide, or a combination of 40 micrograms ipratropium and 100 micrograms fenoterol from a powder inhaler, followed by a second dose of the same drug after 60 min. The effects were measured at baseline and 20, 40, 60, and 120 min after the first inhalation. No significant decrease in total respiratory resistance at 8 Hz (Rrs [8]) was observed after ipratropium, whereas Rrs (8) decreased significantly 20 min after fenoterol and 40 min after the combination regimen (p less than 0.05). All three studied drugs resulted in a significant increase in the reactance (p less than 0.01) and decrease in resonant frequency. Both fenoterol (delta FEV1 34 percent, p less than 0.0001) and the combination regimen (delta FEV1 38 percent, p less than 0.0001) resulted in a significantly larger increase in FEV1 than ipratropium alone (delta FEV1 17 percent, p less than 0.0001). A second dose of fenoterol and of the combination regimen resulted in a further significant increase in FEV1 after 120 min (p less than 0.05). A second dose of ipratropium did not result in a further significant increase in FEV1. The changes in respiratory impedance were qualitatively similar for all three drug regimens, but larger in absolute terms after fenoterol and the combination regimen than after ipratropium. The similar effect of these drugs on the reactance can be explained by an increase in the capacitance of the respiratory system, and in combination with a decrease in frequency dependence of resistance, by assuming a decrease in peripheral airway resistance. PMID:1530836

  9. Migraine therapeutics in adolescents: a systematic analysis and historic perspectives of triptan trials in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haihao; Bastings, Eric; Temeck, Jean; Smith, P Brian; Men, Angela; Tandon, Veneeta; Murphy, Dianne; Rodriguez, William

    2013-03-01

    OBJECTIVES To conduct a systematic review and analysis of trial data submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to identify possible causes for the failure of pediatric trials of triptans for treatment of migraines. DATA SOURCE The FDA website for drug information and published literature. STUDY SELECTION All pediatric efficacy and pharmacokinetics trial data of drugs used for abortive treatment of migraine submitted to the FDA from January 1, 1999, through December 31, 2011. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient demographic baseline characteristics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, trial designs, efficacy end points, and pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed and compared across drug products. RESULTS We analyzed data for sumatriptan succinate nasal spray and zolmitriptan, eletriptan hydrobromide, almotriptan malate, and rizatriptan benzoate tablets. Seven efficacy trials had a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial design. In 4 trials, patients were required to have a history of migraine attacks lasting at least 4 hours. High response rates for placebo were observed in all trials, with pain relief at 2 hours ranging from 53% to 57.5%. Nonrandomization of patients with an early placebo response design was used in the rizatriptan trial in 2011. Compared with the rizatriptan trial conducted in 1999, the 2011 rizatriptan trial reduced the placebo response rate by 6% for headache freedom at the 2-hour posttreatment end point owing to study design. The pharmacokinetic profiles between adolescents and adults were statistically similar. CONCLUSIONS High placebo response rates are consistent across all trials and may represent the principal challenge in pediatric trials of drugs for abortive treatment of migraine. Enrichment with selection of subjects with long-lasting migraine attacks is not sufficient to overcome high placebo response rates. Another enrichment strategy, the nonrandomization of patients with an early placebo response

  10. A possible trend suggesting increased abuse from Coricidin exposures reported to the Texas Poison Network: comparing 1998 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Baker, S David; Borys, Douglas J

    2002-06-01

    Coricidin products seemed to be one of the over-the-counter medications being reportedly abused by adolescents, as observed from the Texas Poison Center Network data. This retrospective chart review investigated the occurrence of abuse, developed a patient profile, and defined the clinical effects resulting from the abuse of Coricidin products. Data collected from the Texas Poison Center Network Toxic Exposure Surveillance System database included human exposures between 1998 and 1999, patients > or = 10y old, intentional use or abuse, and single substance ingestion of I of the tablet formulations of Coricidin. Thirty-three cases from 1998 and 59 cases from 1999 were reviewed. Of these cases, 85% met the inclusion criteria. Of the 7 medications searched, only 4 substances were coded for: Coricidin D, Coricidin D (long acting), Coricidin D (cold, flu & sinus) and Coriciding HBP. These contain a combination of dextromethorphan hydrobromide, chlorpheniramine maleate, phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, and acetaminophen. Of the 78 cases, 63% were male and 38% were female. The mean age was 14.67 years, 77% being between 13 to 17 years old. Eighteen different symptoms were reported: tachycardia 50%, somnolence 24.4%, mydriasis and hypertension 16.7%, agitation 12.8%, disorientation 10.3%, slurred speech 9%, ataxia 6.4%, vomiting 5.1%, dry mouth and hallucinations 3.9%, tremor 2.6%, and headache, dizziness, syncope, seizure, chest pain, and nystagmus each 1.3%; 12.8% of the calls originated from the school nurse. The incidence of abuse reported increased 60% from 1998 to 1999. This worrisome trend suggests increased abuse of these products. PMID:12046973

  11. Serotonergic modulation of the trigeminocardiac reflex neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

    PubMed

    Gorini, C; Jameson, H S; Mendelowitz, D

    2009-09-01

    Stimulation of the trigeminal nerve evokes a dramatic decrease in heart rate and blood pressure, and this reflex has generally been termed the trigeminocardiac reflex. A subset of the trigeminocardiac reflex is the diving reflex in which the nasal mucosa is stimulated with water or air-borne chemical irritants. Activation of the diving reflex evokes a pronounced bradycardia, mediated by increased parasympathetic cardiac activity, and is the most powerful autonomic reflex. However, exaggeration of this protective response could be detrimental and has been implicated in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Despite the importance and strength of the trigeminocardiac reflex, there is little information about the cellular mechanisms and brain stem pathways that constitute this reflex. To address these issues, stimulation of trigeminal afferent fibers and the evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents were recorded in cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in an in vitro brain stem slice preparation. This synaptic pathway is robust and activation of the trigeminal pathway often evoked action potentials in CVNs. Application of the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor citalopram significantly enhanced these responses. Consistent with the hypothesis this pathway is endogenously modulated by 5-HT receptors the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY 100635 inhibited, whereas the 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist, ketanserin facilitated the excitatory neurotransmission to CVNs. The 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide increased, whereas the 5-HT2 receptor agonist, alpha-methylserotonin maleate salt inhibited this reflex pathway. These results indicate stimulation of trigeminal fibers evokes a powerful excitatory and polysynaptic pathway to CVNs, and this pathway is endogenously modulated and differentially enhanced and depressed, by 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors, respectively. PMID:19553488

  12. Mutations at the signature sequence of CFTR create a Cd(2+)-gated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Bompadre, Silvia G; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2009-01-01

    The canonical sequence LSGGQ, also known as the signature sequence, defines the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Crystallographic studies reveal that the signature sequence, together with the Walker A and Walker B motifs, forms the ATP-binding pocket upon dimerization of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in a head-to-tail configuration. The importance of the signature sequence is attested by the fact that a glycine to aspartate mutation (i.e., G551D) in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) results in a severe phenotype of cystic fibrosis. We previously showed that the G551D mutation completely eliminates ATP-dependent gating of the CFTR chloride channel. Here, we report that micromolar [Cd(2+)] can dramatically increase the activity of G551D-CFTR in the absence of ATP. This effect of Cd(2+) is not seen in wild-type channels or in G551A. Pretreatment of G551D-CFTR with the cysteine modification reagent 2-aminoethyl methane thiosulfonate hydrobromide protects the channel from Cd(2+) activation, suggesting an involvement of endogenous cysteine residue(s) in mediating this effect of Cd(2+). The mutants G551C, L548C, and S549C, all in the signature sequence of CFTR's NBD1, show robust response to Cd(2+). On the other hand, negligible effects of Cd(2+) were seen with T547C, Q552C, and R553C, indicating that a specific region of the signature sequence is involved in transmitting the signal of Cd(2+) binding to the gate. Collectively, these results suggest that the effect of Cd(2+) is mediated by a metal bridge formation between yet to be identified cysteine residue(s) and the engineered aspartate or cysteine in the signature sequence. We propose that the signature sequence serves as a switch that transduces the signal of ligand binding to the channel gate. PMID:19114635

  13. Mutations at the Signature Sequence of CFTR Create a Cd2+-gated Chloride Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Bompadre, Silvia G.; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2009-01-01

    The canonical sequence LSGGQ, also known as the signature sequence, defines the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Crystallographic studies reveal that the signature sequence, together with the Walker A and Walker B motifs, forms the ATP-binding pocket upon dimerization of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in a head-to-tail configuration. The importance of the signature sequence is attested by the fact that a glycine to aspartate mutation (i.e., G551D) in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) results in a severe phenotype of cystic fibrosis. We previously showed that the G551D mutation completely eliminates ATP-dependent gating of the CFTR chloride channel. Here, we report that micromolar [Cd2+] can dramatically increase the activity of G551D-CFTR in the absence of ATP. This effect of Cd2+ is not seen in wild-type channels or in G551A. Pretreatment of G551D-CFTR with the cysteine modification reagent 2-aminoethyl methane thiosulfonate hydrobromide protects the channel from Cd2+ activation, suggesting an involvement of endogenous cysteine residue(s) in mediating this effect of Cd2+. The mutants G551C, L548C, and S549C, all in the signature sequence of CFTR's NBD1, show robust response to Cd2+. On the other hand, negligible effects of Cd2+ were seen with T547C, Q552C, and R553C, indicating that a specific region of the signature sequence is involved in transmitting the signal of Cd2+ binding to the gate. Collectively, these results suggest that the effect of Cd2+ is mediated by a metal bridge formation between yet to be identified cysteine residue(s) and the engineered aspartate or cysteine in the signature sequence. We propose that the signature sequence serves as a switch that transduces the signal of ligand binding to the channel gate. PMID:19114635

  14. Immunoaffinity column cleanup with liquid chromatography for determination of aflatoxin B1 in corn samples: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Brera, Carlo; Debegnach, Francesca; Minardi, Valentina; Pannunzi, Elena; De Santis, Barbara; Miraglia, Marina

    2007-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of an immunoaffinity column cleanup liquid chromatography (LC) method for the determination of aflatoxin B1 levels in corn samples, enforced by European Union legislation. A test portion was extracted with methanol-water (80 + 20); the extract was filtered, diluted with phosphate-buffered saline solution, filtered on a microfiber glass filter, and applied to an immunoaffinity column. The column was washed with deionized water to remove interfering compounds, and the purified aflatoxin B1 was eluted with methanol. Aflatoxin B1 was separated and determined by reversed-phase LC with fluorescence detection after either pre- or postcolumn derivatization. Precolumn derivatization was achieved by generating the trifluoroacetic acid derivative, used by 8 laboratories. The postcolumn derivatization was achieved either with pyridinium hydrobromide perbromide, used by 16 laboratories, or with an electrochemical cell by the addition of bromide to the mobile phase, used by 5 laboratories. The derivatization techniques used were not significantly different when compared by the Student's t-test; the method was statistically evaluated for all the laboratories. Five corn sample materials, both spiked and naturally contaminated, were sent to 29 laboratories (22 Italian and 7 European). Test portions were spiked with aflatoxin B1 at levels of 2.00 and 5.00 ng/g. The mean values for recovery were 82% for the low level and 84% for the high contamination level. Based on results for spiked samples (blind pairs at 2 levels) as well as naturally contaminated samples (blind pairs at 3 levels), the values for relative standard deviation for repeatability (RSDr) ranged from 9.9 to 28.7%. The values for relative standard deviation for reproducibility (RSDR) ranged from 18.6 to 36.8%. The method demonstrated acceptable within- and between-laboratory precision for this matrix, as evidenced by the HorRat values. PMID:17580628

  15. Structural investigations of a series of 1,6-aryl-7-hydroxy-2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidin-5(1H)-ones with potential antinociceptive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Waldemar; Karczmarzyk, Zbigniew; Rządkowska, Marzena; Szacoń, Elżbieta; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Kalicki, Przemysław

    2015-08-01

    The structural investigations of a series of new bioactive imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidines 1-6 were undertaken using IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic analysis, X-ray crystal structure determinations and theoretical calculations. The compounds 1-6 were obtained by condensation of the respective 1-aryl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-amine hydrobromide and diethyl phenylmalonate in presence of sodium methoxide in methanol and for these compounds the equilibrium between possible O10-enol/O11-keto (a), O11-enol/O10-keto (b) and O10,O11-diketo (c) tautomeric forms were investigated in the gaseous phase, solution and crystalline state. Spectroscopic studies 1H, 13C NMR and IR allowed for the identification of the compounds 1-6 but they did not indicate explicitly their tautomeric forms present in solution and in the solid state. The X-ray analysis showed that the molecules of all investigated compounds exist as the O10-enol/O11-keto (a) tautomeric form in the crystalline state. The hydroxyl and carbonyl groups characteristic for existing tautomeric form are involved in a strong intra- and/or intermolecular Osbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds. The theoretical calculations at DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level showed that two tautomeric forms (a) and (c) can coexist both in gas phase and the solution with the population of them being in the relation (a) > (or ≫) (c). The comparison of the experimentally recorded IR, 1H and 13C spectra with the corresponding spectra theoretically calculated for all possible tautomeric forms of 1-6 shows that the correlation of experimental and theoretical spectra can be used to a limited extent for the identification of tautomeric forms.

  16. Animal model of neuropathic tachycardia syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, R. P.; Appalsamy, M.; Diedrich, A.; Davis, T. L.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    Clinically relevant autonomic dysfunction can result from either complete or partial loss of sympathetic outflow to effector organs. Reported animal models of autonomic neuropathy have aimed to achieve complete lesions of sympathetic nerves, but incomplete lesions might be more relevant to certain clinical entities. We hypothesized that loss of sympathetic innervation would result in a predicted decrease in arterial pressure and a compensatory increase in heart rate. Increased heart rate due to loss of sympathetic innervation is seemingly paradoxical, but it provides a mechanistic explanation for clinical autonomic syndromes such as neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome. Partially dysautonomic animals were generated by selectively lesioning postganglionic sympathetic neurons with 150 mg/kg 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored using radiotelemetry. Systolic blood pressure decreased within hours postlesion (Delta>20 mm Hg). Within 4 days postlesion, heart rate rose and remained elevated above control levels. The severity of the lesion was determined functionally and pharmacologically by spectral analysis and responsiveness to tyramine. Low-frequency spectral power of systolic blood pressure was reduced postlesion and correlated with the diminished tyramine responsiveness (r=0.9572, P=0.0053). The tachycardia was abolished by treatment with the beta-antagonist propranolol, demonstrating that it was mediated by catecholamines acting on cardiac beta-receptors. Partial lesions of the autonomic nervous system have been hypothesized to underlie many disorders, including neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome. This animal model may help us better understand the pathophysiology of autonomic dysfunction and lead to development of therapeutic interventions.

  17. Biosynthesis and identification of an N-oxide/N-glucuronide metabolite and first synthesis of an N-O-glucuronide metabolite of Lu AA21004.

    PubMed

    Uldam, Henriette Kold; Juhl, Martin; Pedersen, Henrik; Dalgaard, Lars

    2011-12-01

    This article describes the biosynthesis and identification of a new class of metabolites, a piperazine N-oxide/N-glucuronide metabolite 4-[2-(2,4-dimethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-phenyl]-1-β-D-glucuronic acid-piperazine 1-oxide (4). The metabolite was found in urine and plasma from humans and animals dosed with 1-[2-(2,4-dimethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-phenyl]-piperazine hydrobromide (Lu AA21004, 1), as a novel multimodal antidepressant under development for treatment of depression. Human liver microsomes in combination with uridine 5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid were used as an in vitro system to generate enough material of 4 to perform one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR experiments for structure elucidation. Based on rotating frame Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy NMR experiments, the distance correlation between a piperazine proton and the anomeric proton of the glucuronic acid moiety is of a magnitude similar to that of the H-3' and H-5' protons and can only be explained by proximity in space and the postulated structure (4). The structural analog, the N-O-glucuronic acid conjugate 6-{4-[2-(2,4-dimethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-phenyl]-piperazin-1-yloxy}-1-β-D-glucuronic acid (3) was also observed in biological samples from humans and animals and the first organic synthesis and structural identification of this metabolite is also reported. Treatment of the glucuronide metabolites 3 and 4 with β-glucuronidase gave mainly the expected hydrolysis product, the hydroxyl amine 4-[2-(2,4-dimethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-phenyl]-piperazin-1-ol (2). PMID:21896789

  18. Effect of GDNF on depressive-like behavior, spatial learning and key genes of the brain dopamine system in genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Ilchibaeva, Tatyana V; Khotskin, Nikita V; Semenova, Alina A; Popova, Nina K

    2014-11-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and brain dopamine system in predisposed to depressive-like behavior ASC (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics) mice in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA mice was studied. In 7days after administration (800ng, i.c.v.) GDNF decreased escape latency time and the path traveled to reach hidden platform in Morris water maze in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavioral traits in both "nondepressive" CBA and "depressive" ASC mice. In CBA mice, GDNF decreased functional response to agonists of D1 (chloro-APB hydrobromide) and D2 (sumanirole maleate) receptors in tail suspension test, reduced D2 receptor gene expression in the substantia nigra and increased monoamine oxydase A (MAO A) gene expression in the striatum. GDNF increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in the nucleus accumbens of ASC mice but failed to alter expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, MAO B and tyrosine hydroxylase genes in both investigated mouse strains. Thus, GDNF produced long-term genotype-dependent effect on behavior and the brain dopamine system. GDNF pretreatment (1) reduced D1 and D2 receptors functional responses and D2 receptor gene expression in s. nigra of CBA mice; (2) increased D1 and D2 receptor genes expression in n. accumbens of ASC mice and (3) improved spatial learning in ASC mice. GDNF enhanced depressive-like behavior both in CBA and ASC mice. The data suggest that genetically defined variance in the cross-talk between GDNF and brain dopamine system contributes to the variability of GDNF-induced responses and might be responsible for controversial GDNF effects. PMID:25101543

  19. Development and validation of a sensitive UHPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous analysis of tramadol, dextromethorphan chlorpheniramine and their major metabolites in human plasma in forensic context: application to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Heneedak, Hala M; Salama, Ismail; Mostafa, Samia; El-Kady, Ehab; El-Sadek, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    The prerequisites for forensic confirmatory analysis by LC/MS/MS with respect to European Union guidelines are chromatographic separation, a minimum number of two MS/MS transitions to obtain the required identification points and predefined thresholds for the variability of the relative intensities of the MS/MS transitions (MRM transitions) in samples and reference standards. In the present study, a fast, sensitive and robust method to quantify tramadol, chlorpheniramine, dextromethorphan and their major metabolites, O-desmethyltramadol, dsmethyl-chlorpheniramine and dextrophan, respectively, in human plasma using ibuprofen as internal standard (IS) is described. The analytes and the IS were extracted from plasma by a liquid-liquid extraction method using ethyl acetate-diethyl-ether (1:1). Extracted samples were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Chromatographic separation was performed by pumping the mobile phase containing acetonitrile, water and formic acid (89.2:11.7:0.1) for 2.0 min at a flow rate of 0.25 μL/min into a Hypersil-Gold C18 column, 20 × 2.0 mm (1.9 µm) from Thermoscientific, New York, USA. The calibration curve was linear for the six analytes. The intraday precision (RSD) and accuracy (RE) of the method were 3-9.8 and -1.7-4.5%, respectively. The analytical procedure herein described was used to assess the pharmacokinetics of the analytes in 24 healthy volunteers after a single oral dose containing 50 mg of tramadol hydrochloride, 3 mg chlorpheniramine maleate and 15 mg of dextromethorphan hydrobromide. PMID:25417559

  20. Functional and molecular effects of mercury compounds on the human OCTN1 cation transporter: C50 and C136 are the targets for potent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Galluccio, Michele; Pochini, Lorena; Peta, Valentina; Iannì, Maria; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-03-01

    The effect of mercury compounds has been tested on the organic cation transporter, hOCTN1. MeHg(+), Hg(2+), or Cd(2+) caused strong inhibition of transport. 1,4-Dithioerythritol (DTE), cysteine (Cys), and N-acetyl-l-cysteine reversed (NAC) the inhibition at different extents. 2-Aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate hydrobromide (MTSEA), a prototype SH reagent, exerted inhibition of transport similar to that observed for the mercurial agents. To investigate the mechanism of action of mercurials, mutants of hOCTN1 in which each of the Cys residues was substituted by Ala have been constructed, over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) uptake mediated by each mutant in proteoliposomes was comparable to that of wild type (WT). IC50 values of the WT and mutants for the mercury compounds were derived from dose-response analyses. The mutants C50A and C136A showed significant increase of IC50 indicating that the 2 Cys residues were involved in the interaction with the mercury compounds and inhibition of the transporter. The double mutant C50A/C136A was constructed; the lack of inhibition confirmed that the 2 Cys residues are the targets of mercury compounds. MTSEA showed similar behavior with respect to the mercurial reagents with the difference that increased IC50 was observed also in the C81A mutant. Similar results were obtained when transport was measured as acetylcholine uptake. Ethyl mercury (Thimerosal) inhibited hOCTN1 as well. C50A, C50A/C136A and, at very lower extent, C136A showed increased IC50 indicating that C50 was the major target of this mercury compound. The homology model of hOCTN1 was built using as template PiPT and validated by the experimental data on mutant proteins. PMID:25490951