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Sample records for alfa-2a peginterferon alfa-2b

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatment with peginterferon-alfa-2a versus peginterferon-alfa-2b for patients with chronic hepatitis C under the public payer perspective in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C affects approximately 170 million people worldwide, and thus being one of the main causes of chronic liver disease. About 20% of patients with chronic hepatitis C will develop cirrhosis over 20 years, and present an increased risk of developing hepatic complications. Sustained virological response (SVR) is associated with a better prognosis compared to untreated patients and treatment failures. The objective of this analysis was to compare treatment costs and outcomes of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a versus pegylated interferon-alfa-2b, both associated with ribavirin, in the therapeutic scheme of 24 weeks and 48 week for hepatitis C genotypes 2/3 and genotype 1, respectively, under the Brazilian Public Health System (SUS) scenario. Methods To project disease progression, a Markov model was built based on clinical stages of chronic disease. A Delphi panel was conducted to evaluate medical resources related to each stage, followed by costing of related materials, services, procedures and pharmaceutical products. The evaluation was made from a public payer perspective. The source used for costing was government reimbursement procedures list (SAI/SIH–SUS). Drug acquisition costs were obtained from the Brazilian Official Gazette and “Banco de Preços em Saúde” (government official source). It was assumed a mean patient weight of 70 kg. Costs were reported in 2011 Brazilian Reais (US$1 ≈ $Brz1.80). A systematic review followed by a meta-analysis of the 7 identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which compared pegylated interferons, was conducted for obtaining relative efficacy of both drugs: for genotype 2/3, mean rate of SVR was 79.2% for peginterferon-alfa-2a and 73.8% for peginterferon-alfa-2b. For genotype 1, SVR mean rate was 42.09% versus 33.44% (peginterferon-alfa-2a and peginterferon-alfa-2b respectively). Time horizon considered was lifetime. Discount rate for costs and outcomes was 5%, according to Brazilian

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of peginterferon alfa-2a or alfa-2b plus ribavirin in the daily routine treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C in Germany: the PRACTICE study.

    PubMed

    Witthoeft, T; Hueppe, D; John, C; Goelz, J; Heyne, R; Moeller, B; Teuber, G; Wollschlaeger, S; Baumgarten, A; Simon, K-G; Moog, G; Dikopoulos, N; Mauss, S

    2010-07-01

    In randomized clinical trials, treatment with peginterferon plus ribavirin (RBV) results in a sustained virological response (SVR) in around half of hepatitis C virus genotype 1-infected and 80% of genotype 2/3-infected individuals. This study aimed to evaluate efficacy and tolerability of peginterferon alfa-2a plus RBV compared with peginterferon alfa-2b plus RBV for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C in routine clinical practice. The intent-to-treat cohort consisted of 3414 patients treated with either peginterferon alfa-2a plus RBV (Group A) or peginterferon alfa-2b plus RBV (Group B) in 23 centres participating in the large, multicentre, observational PRACTICE study. Collected data included baseline characteristics, treatment regimen, RBV dose and outcome. Rates of early virological response, end of treatment response and SVR were 76.6%, 75.7% and 52.9% in Group A, and 70.2%, 65.6% and 50.5% in Group B, respectively. In patients matched by baseline parameters, 59.9% of patients in Group A and 55.9% in Group B achieved an SVR (P < or = 0.051). In genotype 1-infected patients matched by baseline parameters and cumulative RBV dose, SVR rates were 49.6% and 43.7% for Group A and Group B, respectively (P < or = 0.047); when matched by baseline parameters and RBV starting dose, SVR rates were 49.9% and 44.6%, respectively (P = 0.068). Overall, 21.8% of group A and 29.6% of group B patients discontinued treatment (P < or = 0.0001). The efficacy and tolerability of peginterferon plus RBV in this large cohort of patients treated in routine daily practice was similar to that in randomized clinical trials. In matched pairs analyses, more patients achieved an SVR with peginterferon alfa-2a compared with peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:20158603

  3. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called interferons. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ... allergic to peginterferon alfa-2b injection (PegIntron, Sylatron), interferon alfa-2b (Intron), any other medications, or any ...

  4. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... inject into your stomach if you are very thin. Use a different spot for each injection. Do not inject peginterferon alfa-2b into an area where the skin is sore, red, bruised, scarred, irritated, or infected; has stretch marks ...

  5. Peginterferon Alfa-2a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... interferons. Peginterferon is a combination of interferon and polyethylene glycol, which helps the interferon stay active in ... alpha interferons, any other medications, benzyl alcohol, or polyethylene glycol (PEG). Ask your doctor if you are ...

  6. Peginterferon Alfa-2a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medications to treat chronic (long-term) hepatitis C infection (swelling of the liver caused by a ... Peginterferon works by decreasing the amount of hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) in ...

  7. Peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin for treating chronic hepatitis C virus infection: analysis of Mexican patients included in a multicenter international clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Trejo-Estrada, Rafael; Campollo-Rivas, Octaivio; Cortez-Hernández, Carlos; Dehesa-Violante, Margarita; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor; Pérez-Gómez, Rául; Cabrera-Valdespino, Armando

    2003-01-01

    Treatment with polyethylene glycol-modified interferon alfa-2a (peginterferon) alone produces significantly higher sustained antiviral responses than treatment with interferon alfa-2a alone in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We compared the efficacy and safety of peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin, interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin, and peginterferon alfa-2a alone in the initial treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Thirty-two patients were randomly assigned to treatment, and received at least one dose of medication consisting of 180 microg of peginterferon alfa-2a once weekly plus daily ribavirin (1,000 or 1,200 mg, depending on body weight) (n = 14), weekly peginterferon alfa-2a plus daily placebo (n = 6), or three million units of interferon alfa-2b thrice weekly plus daily ribavirin for 48 weeks (n = 12). More patients who received peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin had a sustained virologic response (defined as the absence of detectable HCV RNA 24 weeks after cessation of therapy) than patients who received interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin (7/14 vs. 4/12) or peginterferon alfa-2a plus placebo (0/6). The overall safety profiles of the three treatment regimens were similar. In conclusion, for patients with chronic hepatitis C, once-weekly peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin was tolerated as well as interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin and produced significant improvements in the rate of sustained viral reduction compared with interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin or peginterferon alfa-2a alone. PMID:15115965

  8. Pharmacokinetics of peginterferons.

    PubMed

    Zeuzem, Stefan; Welsch, Christoph; Herrmann, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Two polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified interferons are approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. The pharmocokinetic properties of the branched 40 kDa pegylated interferon alfa-2a differ from the linear 12 kDa pegylated interferon alfa-2b. The absorption half-life of standard interferon alfa is 2.3 hours, while absorption half-lives for peginterferon alfa-2a and alfa-2b are 50 hours and 4.6 hours, respectively. The volume of distribution for peginterferon alfa-2a is considerably restricted, while the volume of distribution for peginterferon alfa-2b is only approximately 30% lower than that for conventional interferon. Because of its large size, the 40 kD peginterferon alfa-2a has a more than 100-fold reduction in renal clearance compared with conventional interferon alfa. Clearance of peginterferon alfa-2b is about one-tenth that of unmodified interferon alfa. Although data are limited, both drugs appear to show differences in the initial viral decay pattern in patients with chronic hepatitis C. However, it remains unknown whether these differences in the initial viral decline predict differences in the primary clinical endpoint, sustained virological response. PMID:12934165

  9. Peginterferon alfa-2a (40 kDa) monotherapy: a novel agent for chronic hepatitis C therapy.

    PubMed

    Zeuzem, S; Heathcote, J E; Martin, N; Nieforth, K; Modi, M

    2001-12-01

    Current therapy for hepatitis C remains far from optimal. The modification of IFN by the attachment of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety has produced long-lasting IFNs. A 40 kDa branched peginterferon alfa-2a (40 kDa) (PEG-IFN alfa-2a) has unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PEG-IFN alfa-2a is absorbed in a sustained manner and its clearance is reduced substantially compared with IFN alfa-2a, resulting in sustained serum drug concentrations. These constant serum drug levels stay above the EC(50) values (effective concentration 50%) needed for antiviral, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory actions. Sustained virological responses were significantly greater in patients who received PEG-IFN alfa-2a versus IFN alfa-2a, with a similar side effect profile. Histological improvements were seen in patients who achieved sustained virological responses and were frequently observed among patients who did not achieve a virological response. The advantages of PEG-IFN alfa-2a were also seen in patients with cirrhosis or hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1. PMID:11772316

  10. Guillain-Barre syndrome associated with peginterferon alfa-2a for chronic hepatitis C: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Mumtaz A; Azhar, Ashaur; Tufail, Kashif; Feyssa, Eyob L; Penny, Stephen F; McGregory, Marlene; Araya, Victor; Ortiz, Jorge A

    2010-01-01

    The recommended therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection is the combination of a Pegylated interferon and Ribavirin. Almost all such patients on combination therapy experience one or more adverse events during the course of treatment. Significant neurological side effects are rare. A few cases of Bell’s Palsy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and even one case of acute demyelinating polyneuropathy with atypical features for Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) associated with Interferon therapy have been reported but no report of GBS with typical features has been published. We present a case report of typical GBS associated with Peginterferon alfa-2a and Ribavirin used for treatment of CHC infection. PMID:21160989

  11. PHOENIX: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Peginterferon Alfa-2a Plus Ribavirin as a Prophylactic Treatment After Liver Transplantation for Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bzowej, Natalie; Nelson, David R.; Terrault, Norah A.; Everson, Gregory T.; Teng, Lichen L.; Prabhakar, Avinash; Charlton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy, tolerability, and safety of the prophylactic treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) after liver transplantation (LT) with peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin are not known. LT recipients with HCV were randomized to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin treatment or observation 10 to 26 weeks post-LT. Prophylaxis patients received peginterferon alfa-2a (135 μg/week for 4 weeks and then 180 μg/week for 44 weeks) plus ribavirin (the initial dose of 400 mg/day was escalated to 1200 mg/day). Observation patients received the same regimen only upon significant HCV recurrence (histological activity index ≥ 3 and/or fibrosis score ≥ 2). The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with histological evidence of significant HCV recurrence 120 weeks after randomization. In all, 115 patients were randomized (prophylaxis arm, n = 55; observation arm, n = 60). Sustained virological response was achieved by 12 of 54 prophylaxis patients (22.2%) and by 3 of 14 observation patients who switched to treatment (21.4%). On an intent-to-treat basis, significant HCV recurrence at 120 weeks was similar in the prophylaxis (61.8%) and observation arms (65.0%, P = 0.725). The patient and graft survival rates and the rates of biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection were similar in the 2 study arms. Approximately 70% of the treated patients in both arms had at least one dose reduction for safety reasons. The most common adverse event leading to treatment withdrawal was anemia. Because of the safety profile of peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin and the lack of a clear benefit in terms of HCV recurrence and patient or graft survival, this study does not support the routine use of prophylactic antiviral therapy. PMID:21506241

  12. Peginterferon Alfa-2b Injection (Sylatron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2b injection is used in people with malignant melanoma (a life-threatening cancer that begins in certain ... is used to reduce the chance that malignant melanoma will come back and must be started within ...

  13. Peginterferon Alfa-2b (PEG-Intron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol pad. Remove the protective needle cap and fill the syringe with air by pulling the plunger back to the 0.7 mL mark on the ... protective cap from the needle of the syringe. Fill the syringe with air by pulling the plunger back to the mL mark that matches your prescribed ...

  14. Benefit of Treatment Individualization in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Receiving Peginterferon Alfa-2a and Ribavirin in a Large Noninterventional Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Wolf Peter; Mauss, Stefan; Lutz, Thomas; Schober, Andreas; Böker, Klaus; Moog, Gero; Baumgarten, Axel; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Alshuth, Ulrich; Hüppe, Dietrich; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P.; Schott, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Individualization of treatment with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C showed benefit in controlled trials and was implemented in treatment guidelines to increase response rates and to reduce side effects and costs. However, it is unknown whether individualization was adopted in routine daily practice and whether it translated into improved outcomes. Methods From a large noninterventional cohort study, clinical and virologic response data of 10,262 HCV patients who received peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011 were analyzed. To account for treatment individualization, a matched-pair analysis (2,997 matched pairs) was performed. Variation in treatment duration and dosing of ribavirin were analyzed as indicators for individualization. Results Sustained virological response (SVR) rates were similar between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011 (62.0% vs. 63.7%). Patients with comorbidities were more abundant in the later period, (44.3% vs. 57.1%). The subsequent matched-pair analysis demonstrated higher SVR rates in the 2008-2011 period (64.3%) than in the 2003-2007 period (61.2%, p=0.008). More patients received abbreviated or extended treatment regimens in the later than the earlier period as an indicator of treatment individualization. To the same end, ribavirin doses were higher in the later period (12.6 versus 11.6 mg/kg/day). Factors independently associated with SVR included HCV genotype, low baseline viral load, younger age, route of infection, absence of concomitant diseases, lower APRI score, normal gamma-GT, higher ribavirin doses, no substitution for drug abuse, treatment duration, and treatment in the 2008-2011 period. Conclusions Treatment individualization with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin was implemented in daily routine between 2003-2007 and 2008-2011, SVR rates improved in the same period. These findings may be most relevant in resource-limited settings. PMID:26230998

  15. Age-related differences in response to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, Claudia; Jordan, Sabine; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, Heike; Hueppe, Dietrich; Mauss, Stefan; Zehnter, Elmar; Stoll, Sabine; Alshuth, Ulrich; Lohse, Ansgar W; Lueth, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin therapy in elderly patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. METHODS: Patients characteristics, treatment results and safety profiles of 4859 patients with hepatitis c virus (HCV) infection receiving treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin were retrieved from a large ongoing German multicentre non-interventional study. Recommended treatment duration was 24 wk for GT 2 and GT 3 infection and 48 wk for GT 1 and GT 4 infection. Patients were stratified according to age (< 60 years vs ≥ 60 years). Because of limited numbers of liver biopsies for further assessment of liver fibrosis APRI (aspartate aminotransferase - platelet ratio index) was performed using pre-treatment laboratory data. RESULTS: Out of 4859 treated HCV patients 301 (6.2%) were ≥ 60 years. There were more women (55.8% vs 34.2%, P < 0.001) and predominantly GT 1 (81.4% vs 57.3%, P < 0.001) infected patients in the group of patients aged ≥ 60 years and they presented more frequently with metabolic (17.6% vs 4.5%, P < 0.001) and cardiovascular comorbidities (32.6% vs 6.7%, P < 0.001) and significant fibrosis and cirrhosis (F3/4 31.1% vs 14.0%, P = 0.0003). Frequency of dose reduction and treatment discontinuation were significantly higher in elderly patients (30.9% vs 13.7%, P < 0.001 and 47.8% vs 30.8%, P < 0.001). Main reason for treatment discontinuation was “virological non-response” (26.6% vs 13.6%). Sustained virological response (SVR) rates showed an age related difference in patients with genotype 1 (23.7% vs 43.7%, P < 0.001) but not in genotype 2/3 infections (57.7% vs 64.6%, P = 0.341). By multivariate analysis, age and stage of liver disease were independent factors of SVR. CONCLUSION: Elderly HCV patients differ in clinical characteristics and treatment outcome from younger patients and demand special attention from their practitioner. PMID:25152602

  16. A Predictive Model for Selecting Patients with HCV Genotype 3 Chronic Infection with a High Probability of Sustained Virological Response to Peginterferon Alfa-2a/Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Asselah, Tarik; Thompson, Alex J.; Flisiak, Robert; Romero-Gomez, Manuel; Messinger, Diethelm; Bakalos, Georgios; Shiffman, Mitchell L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) is restricted in some settings; thus, the European Association for the Study of the Liver recommends dual peginterferon/ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV) therapy wherever DAAs are unavailable. HCV genotype (GT) 3 infection is now the most difficult genotype to eradicate and PegIFN/RBV remains an effective option. The goal of this study was to devise a simple predictive score to identify GT3 patients with a high probability of achieving a sustained virologic response (SVR) with PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy. Methods Relationships between baseline characteristics and SVR were explored by multiple logistic regression models and used to develop a simple scoring system to predict SVR using data from 1239 treatment-naive GT3 patients who received PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV for 24 weeks in two large observational cohort studies. Results The score was validated using a database of 473 patients. Scores were assigned for six factors as follows: age (years) (≤40: 2 points; >40 but ≤55: 1); bodyweight (kg) (<70: 2; ≥70 but <90: 1); no cirrhosis/transition to cirrhosis (2); ALT ≤2.5 x ULN (1); platelets (109/L) (>200: 2; ≥100 but <200: 1); HCV RNA (<400,000 IU/mL: 1). The points are summed to arrive at a score ranging from 0‒10 where higher scores indicate higher chances of SVR; 141, 123, 203, 249, 232, and 218 patients had total scores of 0‒4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9–10, respectively, among whom SVR rates were 45%, 62%, 72%, 76%, 84%, and 89%. Among 622 patients who had scores of 6‒10 and HCV RNA <50 IU/mL by treatment week 4 the SVR rate was 86% (532/622). Conclusions A simple baseline scoring system involving age, bodyweight, cirrhosis status, ALT level, platelet count and HCV RNA level can be used to identify treatment-naive Caucasian patients with HCV GT3 infection with a high probability of SVR with PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy. PMID:26991780

  17. Hepatitis B surface antigen clearance in inactive hepatitis B surface antigen carriers treated with peginterferon alfa-2a

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Hui; Xie, Yao; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Yao; Shen, Ge; Wu, Shu-Ling; Chang, Min; Mu, Cai-Qin; Hu, Lei-Ping; Hua, Wen-Hao; Song, Shu-Jing; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Cheng, Jun; Xu, Dao-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association between interferon (IFN) therapy and loss of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in inactive HBsAg carriers. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study in inactive HBsAg carriers, who were treatment-naive, with a serum HBsAg level < 100 IU/mL and an undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level (< 100 IU/mL). All the 20 treated patients received subcutaneous PEG-IFN alfa-2a 180 μg/wk for 72 wk and were then followed for 24 wk. There were 40 untreated controls matched with 96 wk of observation. Serum HBsAg, HBV DNA, and alanine aminotransferases were monitored every 3 mo in the treatment group and every 3-6 mo in the control group. RESULTS: Thirteen (65.0%) of 20 treated patients achieved HBsAg loss, 12 of whom achieved HBsAg seroconversion. Mean HBsAg level in treated patients decreased to 6.69 ± 13.04 IU/mL after 24 wk of treatment from a baseline level of 26.22 ± 33.00 IU/mL. Serum HBV DNA level remained undetectable (< 100 IU/mL) in all treated patients during the study. HBsAg level of the control group decreased from 25.72 ± 25.58 IU/mL at baseline to 17.11 ± 21.62 IU/mL at week 96 (P = 0.108). In the control group, no patient experienced HBsAg loss/seroconversion, and two (5.0%) developed HBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: IFN treatment results in HBsAg loss and seroconversion in a considerable proportion of inactive HBsAg carriers with low HBsAg concentrations. PMID:27239256

  18. Sustained Virologic Response to a Dual Peginterferon alfa-2a and Ribavirin in Treating Chronic hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Sitt, Than; Aung, Aye TD; Aung, Kyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In Myanmar, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection prevalence is 2%. A combination therapy of pegylated interferon alfa-2a and ribavirin (PEG-IFNa/RBV) is a standard treatment, but the effect of this antiviral therapy needs evaluation as to determine the efficacy and safety of dual PEG-IFNa/RBV therapy in treating patients infected with HCV in Myanmar. This was a retrospective analysis of data from a single clinic exclusively for gastrointestinal diseases in Yangon, Myanmar. We assessed treatment responses at the defined time points and stratified by genotypes of HCV. We also determined incidences of adverse events (AEs). We investigated independent predictors of sustained virologic response (SVR) in the participants. A total of 362 HCV-infected cases were included in this study. The majority were females (51.7%) with mean age of 47.12 years (±11.6) and noncirrhosis patients (82%). Rapid virologic response (RVR), early virologic response (EVR), end of treatment response (ETR), and SVR 24 weeks after completion of the dual treatment were 50.3% (178/362), 88% (314/357), 80.1% (286/357), and 85.6% (167/195), respectively. The most frequently reported AEs were nausea/anorexia (72.8%) and flu-like symptoms (62.4%). In multivariate analysis, 4 factors were independently associated with SVR; SVR to genotype 3 (odds ratio [OR] 2.4, 95% CI: 1.24–4.62), EVR (OR 0.54, 95% CI: 0.3–0.95), and duration of treatment (OR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.18–1.98). Study limitations were acknowledged. The efficacy and safety of the dual therapy in treating HCV-infected patient in Myanmar was acceptable. We recommend a prospective randomized control trial looking at duration of therapy and rates of achieving SVR, which could significantly impact the care of HCV-infected patients in Myanmar and perhaps other countries as well. PMID:26222859

  19. Interferon Stimulated Gene Expression in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients Treated with Nitazoxanide/Peginterferon-Alfa-2a and Ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Tess; Lee, Yu-Jin; Osinusi, Anu; Amorosa, Valerianna K; Wang, Crystal; Kang, Minhee; Matining, Roy; Zhang, Xiao; Dou, Diana; Umbleja, Triin; Kottilil, Shyam; Peters, Marion G

    2016-07-01

    A combination of nitazoxanide (NTZ), peginterferon (PegIFN), and ribavirin (RBV) may result in higher sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in hepatitis C virus (HCV) monoinfected patients. This study evaluated the effect of NTZ on interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in vitro and in vivo among HIV/HCV genotype-1 (GT-1) treatment-naive patients. The ability of NTZ to enhance host response to interferon (IFN) signaling using the HCV cell culture system was initially evaluated. Second, ISG expression in 53 patients with treatment outcomes [21 SVR and 32 nonresponders (NR)] in the ACTG A5269 trial, a phase-II study (4-week lead in of NTZ 500 mg daily followed by 48 weeks of NTZ, PegIFN, and weight-based RBV), was assessed. The relative expression of 48 ISGs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was measured at baseline, week 4, and week 8 of treatment in a blinded manner. In vitro NTZ produced a direct and additive antiviral effect with IFN-alfa, with pretreatment of NTZ resulting in maximal HCV suppression. NTZ augmented IFN-mediated ISG induction in PBMCs from relapsers and SVRs (p < 0.05), but not NR. In ACTG A5269, baseline expression of most ISGs was similar between NR and SVR. NTZ minimally induced 17 genes in NR and 13 genes in SVR after 4 weeks of therapy. However, after initiation of PegIFN and RBV, ISG induction was predominantly observed in the SVR group and not NR group. NTZ treatment facilitates IFN-induced suppression of HCV replication. Inability to achieve SVR with IFN-based therapy in this clinical trial is associated with diminished ISG response to therapy that is refractory to NTZ. PMID:26974581

  20. Mericitabine and Either Boceprevir or Telaprevir in Combination with Peginterferon Alfa-2a plus Ribavirin for Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 1 Infection and Prior Null Response: The Randomized DYNAMO 1 and DYNAMO 2 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Heiner; Forns, Xavier; Hézode, Christophe; Lee, Samuel S.; Scalori, Astrid; Voulgari, Athina; Le Pogam, Sophie; Nájera, Isabel; Thommes, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection who have had a previous null response (<2-log10 reduction in HCV RNA by treatment week 12) to peginterferon/ribavirin (PegIFN/RBV) do not achieve a sustained virological response (SVR) when re-treated with a first-generation HCV protease inhibitor (PI) administered in combination with PegIFN/RBV. We studied the incremental benefits associated with adding mericitabine (nucleoside analog inhibitor of HCV polymerase) to PI plus PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV-based therapy in two double-blind randomized multicenter phase 2 trials (with boceprevir in DYNAMO 1, and with telaprevir in DYNAMO 2). The primary endpoint in both trials was SVR, defined as HCV RNA <25 IU/mL 12 weeks after the end of treatment (SVR12). Overall, the addition of mericitabine to PI plus PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy resulted in SVR12 rates of 60–70% in DYNAMO 1 and of 71–96% in DYNAMO 2. SVR12 rates were similar in patients infected with HCV genotype 1a and 1b in both trials. The placebo control arms in both studies were stopped because of high rates of virological failure. Numerically lower relapse rates were associated with longer treatment with mericitabine (24 versus 12 weeks), telaprevir-containing regimens, and regimens that included 48 weeks of PegIFN alfa-2a/RBV therapy. No mericitabine resistance mutations were identified in any patient in either trial. The addition of mericitabine did not add to the safety burden associated with either telaprevir or boceprevir-based regimens. These studies demonstrate increased SVR rates and reduced relapse rates in difficult-to-treat patients when a nucleoside polymerase inhibitor with intermediate antiviral potency is added to regimens containing a first-generation PI. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01482403 and ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01482390 PMID:26752189

  1. Modeling viral and drug kinetics: hepatitis C virus treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2b.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kimberly A; Dixit, Narendra M; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Golia, Preeti; Talal, Andrew H; Perelson, Alan S

    2003-01-01

    Administration of peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin results in an early hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay followed by an increase as the drug concentration declines between doses. Upon administration of the next dose 1 week later, the same pattern is observed. We have incorporated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis into a model of viral dynamics to describe the effect that changes in drug concentration and effectiveness can have on viral levels. To illustrate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and viral dynamics, we fit the model to data from four HCV/human immunodeficiency virus co-infected patients, and obtained good agreement with the measured serum HCV RNA levels. We were able to account for the observed increases in HCV RNA, and estimate virion and drug half-lives that are in agreement with previous reports. Models incorporating pharmacokinetics are needed to correctly interpret viral load changes and estimate drug effectiveness in treatment protocols using peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:12934163

  2. Triple combination of thymalfasin, peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C who have failed prior interferon and ribavirin treatment: 24-week interim results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Avila, F; Kershenobich, D; García-Samper, X; Gongora, J; Uribe, M

    2004-12-01

    Despite steady progress in antiviral treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), many patients still have detectable serum HCV RNA levels by the end of interferon-based treatment and are known as virological non-responders. Re-treatment of these patients not responding to previous therapy remains challenging. Studies of the dynamics of the HCV population show a marked decline in new cases since 1996; however, the relative proportion of non-responders is expected to increase over time and, similarly, the number of patients eligible for first-line treatment is expected to decrease. The current standard of care for treatment involves the use of pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. However, many difficult-to-treat groups still have low response rates. Newer combinations are being investigated to optimize chances of attaining a sustained response in these groups: one such triple therapy regimen is peginterferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and thymalfasin, which was given to 23 previously non-responder patients. Viral response was 60.8% at week 12 and 47.8% at week 24. These preliminary results encourage further evaluation of this promising combination. PMID:15546256

  3. Triple combination of thymalfasin, peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C who have failed prior interferon and ribavirin treatment: 24-week interim results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Avila, F; Kershenobich, D; García-Samper, X; Gongora, J; Uribe, M

    2004-12-01

    Despite steady progress in antiviral treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV), many patients still have detectable serum HCV RNA levels by the end of interferon-based treatment and are known as virological non-responders. Re-treatment of these patients not responding to previous therapy remains challenging. Studies of the dynamics of the HCV population show a marked decline in new cases since 1996; however, the relative proportion of non-responders is expected to increase over time and, similarly, the number of patients eligible for first-line treatment is expected to decrease. The current standard of care for treatment involves the use of pegylated interferons in combination with ribavirin. However, many difficult-to-treat groups still have low response rates. Newer combinations are being investigated to optimize chances of attaining a sustained response in these groups: one such triple therapy regimen is peginterferon alfa-2a, ribavirin and thymalfasin, which was given to 23 previously non-responder patients. Viral response was 60.8% at week 12 and 47.8% at week 24. These preliminary results encourage further evaluation of this promising combination. PMID:15641210

  4. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; Nambo, M J; García, E L

    1998-08-01

    We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy. One hundred and thirty-five patients (stage IIIB-IV B) were initially treated with EBVD (epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine). IF CR was achieved they were randomly assigned to receive either maintenance therapy with IFN 5.0 MU three times a week for one year or no further treatment (control group). Clinical and laboratory characteristics at diagnosis were quite similar in both groups. After a median follow-up of 74.3 months (range 49 to 108), 61 out of 68 patients (91%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 76% to 97%) remain in first complete remission in the IFN-treated group compared to 38 out of 67 (58%; 95% CI: 49% to 71%) in the control group (p<.01). Overall survival was also better in the IFN treated group: 62 patients (92%; 95% CI: 82% to 97%) are alive free of disease at 7-years compared to 40 patients (67%, 95%: 55% to 76%) in the control group (p<.01). Toxicity secondary to IFN administration was mild and no dose modification was necessary during treatment. All patients received the planned dose of IFN. This was not an intent-to treat analysis. IFN administration as maintenance therapy was appears to be the only cause of improvement in outcome in these patients. We feel that IFN should be considered as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease because this treatment improves the final outcome without the excessive toxicities of more aggressive therapeutic approaches such as bone marrow transplantation during first CR. We hope that IFN will be considered in future randomized clinical trials in order to define it's role in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. PMID:9711927

  5. Macroscale production of crystalline interferon alfa-2b in microgravity on STS-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabhushan, Tattanahalli L.; Reichert, Paul; Long, Marianna M.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    Macroscale crystallization of zinc interferon alfa-2b was achieved on STS-52 in October 1992 in the Protein Crystallization Facility. Conditions for crystallization were established by adapting a microscale vapor diffusion method to a macroscale temperature induction method. A series of earth based pilot experiments established conditions to reproducibly crystallize zinc interferon alfa-2b in high yield and under cleanroom conditions. As a control for the STS-52 mission, a ground experiment was run simultaneously and in the same configuration as the flight experiment. Greater than 95% of the available protein crystallized in both the ground and flight experiments. Using a battery of physical, biochemical and biological characterization assays, demonstrated that sample processing, polysulfone bottle confinement and the conditions used for crystallization did not have a negative effect on protein integrity. Redissolved crystals from the flight and ground experiments showed full biological activity in a cytopathic effect inhibition assay as compared to an interferon control standard. Morphometric analysis comparing the overall length and width of the derived crystals showed a 2.4 fold increase in the length and width of the space grown crystals as compared to earth grown crystals. Space grown crystals have remained a stable free flowing suspension for over 2 years. Based on these results, further experiments are envisioned to investigate macroscale crystallization of biologically active macromolecules in microgravity.

  6. Durability of responses to interferon alfa-2b in advanced hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ratain, M J; Golomb, H M; Bardawil, R G; Vardiman, J W; Westbrook, C A; Kaminer, L S; Lembersky, B C; Bitter, M A; Daly, K

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that significant hematologic improvement occurs in the majority of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) treated with partially purified or recombinant interferon (IFN). Fifty-three patients received IFN alfa-2b for at least 3 months in a dose of 2 X 10(6) U/m2 subcutaneously thrice weekly. Of the 49 patients evaluable for response (at least 6 months of IFN therapy), there were ten complete responses and 29 partial responses for a total response rate of 80%. The peripheral blood counts and bone marrow continued to improve over the course of a full year of therapy. IFN was well tolerated, with no patients discontinuing therapy because of toxicity. Transient myelosuppression occurred in most patients during the first 1 to 2 months of therapy, occasionally precipitating a transfusion requirement. After IFN treatment was discontinued, there was a marked decrease in normal marrow elements and a relative increase in marrow hairy cells. This was associated with a transient increase in normal elements in the peripheral blood. Only one of 24 patients followed after receiving IFN for a median of 8.5 months (range, 3 to 16 months) has required further therapy. We conclude that low-dose IFN alfa-2b is highly effective in advanced HCL; responding patients should be treated for at least 1 year. The decision to initiate a second course of IFN therapy should be based primarily on peripheral blood counts and the clinical status of the patient rather than on the bone marrow. PMID:3814819

  7. Maintenance therapy with interferon alfa 2b in patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; García, E L; Talavera, A; Guzmán, R

    1992-11-01

    Forty-eight consecutive patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) in complete remission (CR) after conventional chemotherapy were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. The maintenance therapy was a random either nothing or interferon alfa 2b (IFN) 5.0 MU three times a week for one year. The median duration of CR in the patients treated with IFN has not been reached. After five years 60% of patients remain in CR compared to the control group who had a median CR of 40 months (p < 0.001). Actuarial five-years survival in the IFN treated patients was 88% compared to 42% in the control group (p < 0.001). Maintenance therapy with IFN has been beneficial in patients with DLCL with improvement of duration of CR and survival without the excessive toxicity of most common third generation regimen chemotherapy. We felt that IFN could be explored in most controlled clinical trials in patients with DLCL in CR after conventional chemotherapy. PMID:1487412

  8. Maintenance Therapy with Interferon Alfa 2b Improves Outcome in Aggressive Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; García, E L; Nambo, M J

    1998-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with malignant lymphoma on complete response after conventional chemotherapy we start a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and seventy patients were randomized to received either IFN 5.0 MU three time at week by one year or no further treatment, as control group. At a median follow-up of 9.0 years (range 4.3 to 11 years) median freedom from relapse (FFR) has not been reached in patients who received IFN, it is statistically significant to patients in control group with a median FFR of 60 months (p <.001). Actuarial curves show that at 10-years, 58 patients (66%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 53% to 79%) remain in first remission, statistical different to control group 33 patients (40%, 95% Cl: 33% to 57%) (p <.001). Event free survival (EFS) shown that a 10-years 63 patients (71%, 95% CI: 59% to 81%) are alive free of disease in the IFN arm compared to only 38 patients (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 57%) in the control group (p <.001). Toxicity was mild, 81 patients received the planned doses of IFN on time and 6 patients had transitory delay secondary to hematological toxicity (grade 1 or 2) and completed the treatment on 13 months. No late side effects has been observed. After a long term follow-up we confirm that IFN used as maintenance therapy improves outcome in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma who were in complete remission after conventional chemotherapy without excessive toxicity. We feld that IFN will be consider in controlled clinical trials to define the role of this therapeutic option. PMID:27414082

  9. Safety and Efficacy of Combination Immunotherapy With Interferon Alfa-2b and Tremelimumab in Patients With Stage IV Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Cherian, John; Moschos, Stergios J.; Tawbi, Hussein A.; Shuai, Yongli; Gooding, William E.; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that the combination of tremelimumab and interferon alfa-2b acting via different and possibly synergistic mechanisms would overcome tumor immune tolerance and lead to significant and durable clinical responses. Patients and Methods We conducted a phase II study in which patients were administered tremelimumab 15 mg/kg/course (three cycles [one cycle = 4 weeks]) intravenously every 12 weeks. High-dose interferon alfa-2b (HDI) was administered concurrently, including intravenous induction at 20 MU/m2/d for 5 d/wk for 4 weeks followed by maintenance at 10 MU/m2/d subcutaneously three times a week for 8 weeks per course. From course 2 onward, HDI maintenance was administered subcutaneously. Results Thirty-seven patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage IV (9M1a, 6M1b, and 22M1c) were enrolled. Two patients had previously treated brain metastases. Grades 3 and 4 toxicities included neutropenia (six patients; 17%), diarrhea/colitis (four patients; 11%), liver enzyme increase (four patients; 11%), rash (four patients; 11%), fatigue (15 patients; 40%), and anxiety/depression (five patients; 14%). Response data were available for 35 patients. The best objective response rate (RR; Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) by intention to treat was 24% (90% CI, 13% to 36%; four complete responses [CRs] and five partial responses [PRs] that lasted 6, 6, > 12, > 14, > 18, 20, > 28, 30, and > 37 months, respectively). Fourteen patients (38%) had stable disease (SD) that lasted 1.5 to 21 months. The median progression-free survival was 6.4 months (95% CI, 3.3 to 12.1 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 21 months (95% CI, 9.5 to not reached). There was a weak association between therapy-induced autoimmunity and clinical benefits (CR/PR/SD; P = .0059), baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) less than or equal to 2.7× the upper limit of normal and clinical benefits (P = .0494) and improved probability of survival (P = .0032

  10. Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis due to Hepatitis C Virus (CH-C) in India: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Daily Interferon-alfa-2b and Ribavirin with Daily Interferon-alfa-2b and Glycyrrhizin—A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Subrat K; Sreenivas, V; Gupta, Siddharth Datta; Kumar, Shakti; Chawla, Yogesh K; Tandon, Anurag; Habeeb, Aejaz; Kar, Premashish; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Sarin, Shiv K; Amarapurkar, DN; Arankalle, Vidya; Gupte, Mohan D; Gupta, Sushma; Mukherjee, Deepali; Seth, Divya; Goyal, Rohit; Tandon, Badri N

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim Pegylated-interferon-alfa (PEG-IFN-α) with ribavirin is an established treatment in chronic hepatitis due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) (CH-C). Such treatment is expensive and in resource-poor countries such as India, alternative less expensive therapy is needed. Methods Multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing two treatment regimens (interferon-alfa-2b [IFN-α-2b] 3 million unit/day [MU/day] and ribavirin 1000 mg/day [I+R] vs IFN-α-2b 3 MU/day and glycyrrhizin 250 mg [I+G]) in CH-C. Viral, host characteristics and therapeutic responses were assessed (ICMR—6 months trial for chronic hepatitis—CTRI/2008/091/000105). Results One hundred and thirty-one patients meeting the inclusion criteria were randomized to I + G (n=64) or I+R (n=67) during the period February 2002 to May 2005. About 85% (I+G=53, I+R=58) completed 6 months of treatment and 89% of them (I+G=46, I+R=53) completed 6 months of follow-up after completion of treatment. Hepatitis C virus genotype 3 was the major type detected (71% patients). The mean log10 viral load (copies/mL), histological activity index, and fibrosis stage for all patients were 5.1 ± 0.98, 5 ± 2, and 2± 1.5, respectively. Sustained viral response (SVR) was significantly higher in I + R group than in I + G group (65.7% vs 46.9%, OR=2.2, P = 0.03). Treatment with I + G was associated with significantly lower frequencies of leukopenia (2% vs 17%, P <0.01) and anemia (8% vs 40%, P <0.001) as compared to treatment with I + R. Conclusion Genotype 3 HCV infection with low viral load is prevalent in India. Daily IFN with ribavirin showed significantly better responses. Leukopenia and anemia were significantly more in ribavirin group. Responses observed with IFN + ribavirin were similar to the reported response rates with PEG-IFN suggesting that this modality may be considered as a cheaper alternative of treatment for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:25755401

  11. CONSORT: Effects of adding adefovirdipivoxil to peginterferon alfa-2a at different time points on HBeAg-positivepatients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ka; Cao, Hong; Liang, Jiayi; Shu, Xin; Sun, Haixia; Li, Gang; Xu, Qihuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy and safety of the addition of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) (started at different time points) to pegylated interferon alpha-2a (PEG-INF-α2a) and PEG-INF-α2a monotherapy. This prospective, randomized study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of PEG-INF-α2a and ADV at different time points.120 patients were randomized into groups that received PEG-INF-α2a as monotherapy (group A) or in combination with ADV started at week 0 (group B), 12 (group C), or 24 (group D). All patients were followed for 48 weeks. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed. Methods: Patients in group a received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a by subcutaneous injection once weekly for 48 weeks. Patients in the ADV add-on group received 135 μg of PEG-INF-α2a subcutaneously once weekly and received 10 mg of ADV administered once daily for 48 weeks. HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBeAg, and hepatitis B e antibody levels were determined. Responses were determined at week 12 (ADV add-on), the end of treatment for PEG-INF-α2a (48weeks) and ADV (EOT) and at the end of 96 weeks of follow-up (EOF). Results: The rate of HBV DNA loss were higher in the combination groups than group A at the week 12, week 48, the EOT and EOF (P < 0.05). The rates of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss were similar among the treatment groups (P>0.05). The alanineaminotransferase (ALT) normalization rate was higher in the combination group than group A only at the EOT (P = 0.007). By the EOF, the patients with ADV added at week 12 achieved higher rates of HBV DNA loss (71.9%), HBeAg seroconversion (50.0%), HBsAg loss (15.6%), and ALT normalization (78.1%). Conclusions: PEG-INF-α2a plus ADV combination therapy is safe and superior to PEG-INF-α2amonotherapyfor decreasing serum HBV DNA and normalizing the ALT level but has no significant impact on the rate of HBeAg seroconversion and HBsAg loss. Adding ADV at week 12 may be an optimal combination strategy. PMID:27495085

  12. A viral kinetic study using pegylated interferon alfa-2b and/or lamivudine in patients with chronic hepatitis B/HBeAg negative.

    PubMed

    Sypsa, Vassiliki-Anastasia; Mimidis, Konstantinos; Tassopoulos, Nicholas C; Chrysagis, Dimitrios; Vassiliadis, Themistoklis; Moulakakis, Antonios; Raptopoulou, Maria; Haida, Caterina; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2005-07-01

    We studied viral dynamic parameters in 44 chronic hepatitis B/hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)(-) patients treated with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (PEG-IFN) 100 or 200 microg weekly or lamivudine 100 mg daily or the combination of PEG-IFN 100 or 200 microg with lamivudine. Patients receiving PEG-IFN monotherapy exhibited viral load oscillations between weekly injections, which were resolved by the addition of lamivudine. The median pharmacological delay was estimated at 4.1, 5.8, and 1.8 hours in PEG-IFN monotherapy, PEG-IFN 100/200 microg + lamivudine, and lamivudine monotherapy, respectively (P = .44). The median half-life of free virus was 12.7 hours (range, 2.4-69.2 hours). The mean antiviral effectiveness of PEG-IFN 100/200 microg monotherapy was lower than that of lamivudine (82.6% vs. 96.4%; P = .005). The mean effectiveness of PEG-IFN 100 microg + lamivudine and PEG-IFN 200 microg + lamivudine was 92.8% and 94.4%, respectively. The half-life of infected cells ranged from 2.7 to 75 days. The median half-life of infected cells in patients receiving the combination regimens of PEG-IFN and lamivudine was similar to that of lamivudine patients (5.0 days vs. 6.0 days, P = .77). In conclusion, the addition of pegylated interferon alfa-2b in lamivudine treatment was found to neither enhance the potency of blocking HBV production nor the decay rates of infected cells. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the HEPATOLOGY website (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0270-9139/suppmat/index.html). PMID:15962284

  13. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), to treat malignant melanoma (a cancer that begins in certain skin cells) ... a week for up to 6 months. malignant melanoma, inject the medication intravenously for 5 consecutive days ...

  14. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week. HBV, inject the medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week usually for 16 weeks. hairy cell leukemia, inject ...

  15. Ribavirin improves early responses to peginterferon through enhanced interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Jordan J.; Lutchman, Glen A.; Heller, Theo; Hara, Koji; Pfeiffer, Julie K.; Leff, Richard D; Meek, Claudia; Rivera, Maria; Ko, Myung; Koh, Christopher; Rotman, Yaron; Ghany, Marc G.; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Neumann, Avidan U.; Liang, T. Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims: The therapeutic mechanisms of ribavirin for hepatitis C are unclear. Microarray analyses have shown that ribavirin increases induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). We evaluated viral kinetics, serum cytokine expression, and viral mutagenesis during early stages of peginterferon therapy with and without ribavirin. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection genotype 1 were randomly assigned to groups that were given peginterferon alfa-2a, with or without ribavirin, for 4 weeks; all patients then received an additional 44 weeks of combination therapy. First- and second-phase viral kinetics were evaluated. Serum levels of IP10, MIG, and MCP1 were quantified as measures of the ISG response. NS5A and NS5B were partially sequenced and mutation rates were calculated. Results: The first-phase decrease in HCV RNA was similar between groups. Patients that received ribavirin had a more rapid second-phase decrease, compared with patients that did not receive ribavirin—particularly those with an adequate first-phase decrease (0.61 vs. 0.35 log10 IU/mL/week, p=0.018). At 12 hrs, fold induction of serum IP10 was higher in patients given the combination therapy than those given only peginterferon (7.6- vs. 3.8-fold, p=0.01); however, the difference was greatest in patients with an adequate first-phase decrease in HCV RNA. IP10-induction correlated with first- and second-phase kinetics and with ribavirin serum concentrations on day 3. HCV mutation rates were similar between groups. Conclusion: Ribavirin improves the kinetics of the early response to therapy in patients with an adequate initial response to peginterferon. Induction of interferon-stimulated cytokines correlates with viral kinetics following ribavirin therapy, suggesting that ribavirin promotes interferon signaling. PMID:20303352

  16. Safety and tolerance of recombinant interferon alfa-2a (Roferon-A) in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, G J; Itri, L M

    1986-04-15

    Recombinant interferon alfa-2a (Roferon-A, Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., Nutley, NJ) has been evaluated in clinical trials of more than 1300 patients with a broad spectrum of oncologic disease. Patients with either solid tumors or hematologic malignancies were treated with daily or three-times-weekly intramuscular injections for induction periods ranging from 8 to 16 weeks. Doses ranged from 1 X 10(6) units to 124 X 10(6) units per injection. When administered in low daily doses (approximately 3 X 10(6) units), Roferon-A was well tolerated, and dose attenuation was rarely required. Change to three-times-weekly treatment regimen at the same dose was usually sufficient to control toxicity when it occurred in this group of low-dose patients. Those patients receiving higher doses frequently required dose attenuation to 50% of the starting dose to improve clinical tolerance. Virtually all patients treated with Roferon-A experienced some degree of acute toxicity manifested as fever, chills, myalgia, and/or headache. These reactions usually occurred with initial dosing and frequently improved spontaneously with continued administration of the drug. Acetaminophen pretreatment was generally useful in ameliorating these symptoms. Common adverse experiences occurring after repeated dosing included fatigue, anorexia, and weight loss. Serious adverse reactions including cardiovascular and neurologic toxicity have occurred infrequently, primarily at higher doses. Hematologic toxicity and elevations in liver function parameters were also observed, but rarely required dose attenuation. Adverse effects were usually reversible after dose reduction or discontinuation of therapy. Approximately 27% of all patients developed antibodies to rHuIFN-alpha 2A during treatment. No adverse clinical sequelae have been associated with antibody development to date. PMID:3948143

  17. Patient education improves adherence to peg-interferon and ribavirin in chronic genotype 2 or 3 hepatitis C virus infection: A prospective, real-life, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Cacoub, Patrice; Ouzan, Denis; Melin, Pascal; Lang, Jean-Philippe; Rotily, Michel; Fontanges, Thierry; Varastet, Marina; Chousterman, Michel; Marcellin, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of therapeutic education on adherence to antiviral treatment and sustained virological response (SVR) in a real-life setting in genotype 2/3 hepatitis C, as there are few adherence data in genotype 2/3 infection, even from randomized trials. METHODS: This prospective survey included genotype 2/3 patients who received peg-interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. There was no intervention. Adherence was self-reported over the past 4 wk (peg-interferon) or 7 d (ribavirin). Adherence to bitherapy was defined as adherence to the two drugs for ≥ 20 wk. SVR was defined as undetectable RNA ≥ 12wk after the end of treatment. RESULTS: 370/674 patients received education during the first 3 mo of treatment. After 6 mo, adherence to bitherapy was higher in educated patients (61% vs 47%, P = 0.01). Adherence to peg-interferon was 78% vs 69% (P = 0.06). Adherence to ribavirin was 70% vs 56% (P = 0.006). The SVR (77% vs 70%, P = 0.05) and relapse (10% vs 16%, P = 0.09) rates tended to be improved. After adjustment for baseline differences, education improved adherence [Odds ratio (OR) 1.58, P = 0.04] but not the SVR (OR 1.54, P = 0.06). CONCLUSION: In genotype 2/3 patients, therapeutic education helped maintain real-life adherence to bitherapy. PMID:18985810

  18. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... peginterferon beta-1a injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  19. Estimating the likelihood of sustained virological response in chronic hepatitis C therapy.

    PubMed

    Mauss, S; Hueppe, D; John, C; Goelz, J; Heyne, R; Moeller, B; Link, R; Teuber, G; Herrmann, A; Spelter, M; Wollschlaeger, S; Baumgarten, A; Simon, K-G; Dikopoulos, N; Witthoeft, T

    2011-04-01

    The likelihood of a sustained virological response (SVR) is the most important factor for physicians and patients in the decision to initiate and continue therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. This study identified predictive factors for SVR with peginterferon plus ribavirin (RBV) in patients with CHC treated under 'real-life' conditions. The study cohort consisted of patients from a large, retrospective German multicentre, observational study who had been treated with peginterferon alfa-2a plus RBV or peginterferon alfa-2b plus RBV between the years 2000 and 2007. To ensure comparability regarding peginterferon therapies, patients were analysed in pairs matched by several baseline variables. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the effect of nonmatched baseline variables and treatment modality on SVR. Among 2378 patients (1189 matched pairs), SVR rates were 57.9% overall, 46.5% in HCV genotype 1/4-infected patients and 77.3% in genotype 2/3-infected patients. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, positive predictors of SVR were HCV genotype 2 infection, HCV genotype 3 infection, low baseline viral load and treatment with peginterferon alfa-2a. Negative predictors of SVR were higher age (≥40 years), elevated baseline gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and low baseline platelet count (<150,000/μL). Among patients treated with peginterferon plus RBV in routine clinical practice, genotype, baseline viral load, age, GGT level and platelet levels all predict the likelihood of treatment success. In patients matched by baseline characteristics, treatment with peginterferon alfa-2a may be a positive predictor of SVR when compared to peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:20849436

  20. Pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2a for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Kazuaki; Konndo, Takeshi; Okada, Shunichi; Enchi, Machiko

    2010-09-27

    We report a case of pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with biological signs of a lupus-like syndrome due to pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy during treatment for chronic hepatitis C. The patient developed moderate weakness in the lower limbs and dyspnea. He was hospitalized for congestive heart failure. An electrocardiogram showed gradual ST-segment elevation in leads V(1) through V(6) without coronary artery disease. A transthoracic cardiac ultrasonographic study revealed moderate pericardial effusion with normal left ventricular function. Anti-DNA antibody and antids DNA IgM were positive. Neurological examination revealed a symmetrical predominantly sensory polyneuropathy with impairment of light touch and pin prick in globe and stoking-like distribution. Treatment with prednisolone improved the pericarditis and motor nerve disturbance and the treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the sensory nerve disturbance. PMID:21161021

  1. Pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2a for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Kazuaki; Konndo, Takeshi; Okada, Shunichi; Enchi, Machiko

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of pericarditis and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with biological signs of a lupus-like syndrome due to pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy during treatment for chronic hepatitis C. The patient developed moderate weakness in the lower limbs and dyspnea. He was hospitalized for congestive heart failure. An electrocardiogram showed gradual ST-segment elevation in leads V1 through V6 without coronary artery disease. A transthoracic cardiac ultrasonographic study revealed moderate pericardial effusion with normal left ventricular function. Anti-DNA antibody and antids DNA IgM were positive. Neurological examination revealed a symmetrical predominantly sensory polyneuropathy with impairment of light touch and pin prick in globe and stoking-like distribution. Treatment with prednisolone improved the pericarditis and motor nerve disturbance and the treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin improved the sensory nerve disturbance. PMID:21161021

  2. High rates of sustained virological response in hepatitis C virus-infected injection drug users receiving directly observed therapy with peginterferon alpha-2a (40KD) (PEGASYS) and once-daily ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Waizmann, Michael; Ackermann, Grit

    2010-06-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of directly observed therapy with peginterferon alfa-2a and once-daily ribavirin (RBV) for chronic hepatitis C in 49 opioid-addicted injection drug users (IDUs) participating in a drug treatment program at a specialized outpatient center. Patients also received prophylactic citalopram to minimize the risk of interferon-induced depression. Patients had daily access to and support from specialist physicians, nurses and counseling services at the center, and a 24-hour helpline. Sustained virological response was achieved by 48 of 49 patients (98%) overall, including 20 of 21 (95%) hepatitis C virus (HCV) Genotype 1/4-infected patients and 28 of 28 (100%) Genotype 2/3-infected patients. Treatment was well tolerated, and no unexpected side effects of peginterferon treatment were seen. The safety profile of once-daily RBV was not different from twice-daily dosing. Decline in hemoglobin levels was similar to those reported in clinical trials including once-daily RBV and did not lead to dose reduction or treatment withdrawal. Our data demonstrate that HCV-infected IDUs on stable L-polamidone (methadone) or buprenorphine maintenance can be successfully and safely treated with peginterferon alfa-2a and RBV in an optimal substitution setting. PMID:20362408

  3. Lichen planus induced by pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy in a patient monitored for delta hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Safak; Arslan, Eyup; Baysal, Birol; Baykara, Sule Nergiz; Uzun, Ozlem Ceren; Kaya, Sehmuz

    2015-01-01

    Interferons are used for treatment of chronic hepatitis B. They can induce or exacerbate some skin disorders, such as lichen planus. In this study, as we know, we presented the first case developing lichen planus while receiving interferon treatment due to delta hepatitis. A 31-year-old male patient presented to our outpatient clinic with HBsAg positivity. With his analyses, HBV DNA was negative, anti-delta total was positive, ALT was 72 U/L (upper limit 41 U/L), and platelet was 119 000/mm(3). He was therefore started on subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a therapy at 180 mcg/week for delta hepatitis. At month 4 of therapy, the patient developed diffuse eroded lace-like lesions in oral mucosa, white plaques on lips, and itchy papular lesions in the hands and feet. Lichen planus was considered by the dermatology clinic and topical treatment (mometasone furoate) was given. The lesions persisted at month 5 of therapy and biopsy samples were obtained from oral mucosal lesions and interferon dose was reduced to 135 mcg/week. Biopsy demonstrated nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium; epithelial acanthosis, spongiosis, and apoptotic bodies were observed in the epidermis and therefore lichen planus was considered. At month 6 of therapy, lesions did not improve and even progressed and interferon treatment was therefore discontinued. PMID:25821612

  4. Biological modifiers (etretinate (changed from etetrinate) and alfa 2a) in the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Guzmán, R; García, E L; Díaz-Maqueo, J C

    1996-02-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of biological modifiers in combination etetrinate, 0.8 mg/kg/day, po and interferon alfa 2a 9.0 MU, three times at week) in the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTLC) we began a clinical study on 12 heavily treated patients. After 1 year on treatment 10/12 patients (83%) achieved complete response. Two patients were considered failures with disease progression. After a median follow-up of 3 years, seven patients (56%) remained in complete remission. Toxicity was mild. All patients received 93% of the planned dose of etetrinate and interferon. We feel that biological modifiers, as etetrinate and interferons, are agents with limited hematological toxicity even in higher doses. The combination of two agents, with different mechanisms of action, could improve the outcome in patients with refractory CTCL. Controlled trials are necessary to define the roles of this type of therapy as first line of treatment. PMID:10851517

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-11-01

    Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil, AN-2728, Apixaban, Aripiprazole, Armodafinil, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Atrasentan, Azacitidine, Bevacizumab, Blinatumomab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Carfilzomib, Caspofungin acetate, Cediranib, Cetuximab, Choriogonadotropin alfa, Clevudine, Clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, Clofarabine, Daidzeol, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Dexlansoprazole, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Elacytarabine, Enfuvirtide, Enoxaparin, Entecavir, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Ezetimibe/simvastatin, Forodesine hydrochloride, Fosamprenavir calcium, Gefitinib, Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Golimumab, Imatinib mesylate, Imetelstat, Insulin gl'argine, Insulin glulisine, Interferon alfa-2b XL, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Lacosamide, Lenalidomide, Lintuzumab, Liposomal adriamycin, Liposomal belotecan, Liposome-encapsulated fentanyl, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lutropin alfa, LY-207320, Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MKC-253, MP-470, NGR-TNF, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate, PAN-811, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, PF-734200, Phentermine/topiramate, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Pregabalin, Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Ranibizumab, Recombinant Bet V1, Recombinant human insulin, Regadenoson, rhITF, Romidepsin, Rosuvastatin calcium, Ruboxistaurin hydrochloride, Rufinamide, Sapropterin dihydrochloride Saracatinib, SB-73, SC-599, Seliciclib, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate, Tadalafil, Tanespimycin, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tegaserod maleate, Telbivudine, Tenofovir

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-04-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, AMA1-C1/alhydrogel, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Aripiprazole, Artesunate/amodiaquine, Asenapine maleate; Bosentan, Brivaracetam; Carisbamate, Clevudine, Clofarabine, Corticorelin acetate; Dasatinib; Elinogrel potassium, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Etazolate; Fampridine, Fluarix, Fondaparinux sodium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GDC-0941, GI-5005, Golimumab; Imatinib mesylate, Lacosamide, Lapatinib ditosylate, Levetiracetam, Liraglutide, LOLA; Mecasermin, Morphine hydrochloride; Natalizumab, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Poly I:CLC, Pralatrexate, Pregabalin; Ranolazine, Rasagiline mesilate, Retigabine hydrochloride, Rhenium Re-186 etidronate, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine, RTL-1000, Rufinamide; Sirolimus-eluting coronary stent, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Stiripentol; Tiotropium bromide; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Varenicline tartrate; XL-184; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:20448862

  7. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3-AP, 667-coumate, 9-aminocamptothecin; Ad5CMV-p53, AES-14, alefacept, anecortave acetate, APC-8024, APD-356, asoprisnil; Bevacizumab, bimakalim, bimatoprost, BLP-25, BR-1; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DNA.HIVA; Efaproxiral sodium, ertapenem sodium; Frovatriptan; HuMax-EGFr, HYB-2055, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, Id-KLH vaccine, imatinib mesylate; Lapatinib, lonafarnib, Motexafin lutetium, MVA.HIVA, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nesiritide, NS-2330; Olmesartan medoxomil; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, pregabalin; QbG-10; Ralfinamide, rasburicase, rFGF-2, Ro-31-7453; Sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib; Tadalafil, TC-1734, telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, thymus nuclear protein, tipifarnib; Vandetanib, vibriolysin, vildagliptin, voriconazole. PMID:15834466

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, ademetionine, agalsidase alfa, agalsidase beta, alemtuzumab, alfimeprase, AMG-162, androgel, anidulafungin, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bazedoxifene acetate, bevacizumab, bosentan; Caldaret hydrate, canfosfamide hydrochloride, choriogonadotropin alfa, ciclesonide, combretastatin A-4 phosphate, CY-2301; Darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, degarelix acetate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, enclomiphene citrate, eplerenone, epratuzumab, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, ezetimibe; Fingolimod hydrochloride, FP-1096; HMR-3339A, HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy, human insulin, HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); Idursulfase, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, InnoVax C insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, irofulven; Labetuzumab, lacosamide, lanthanum carbonate, LyphoDerm, Lyprinol; Magnesium sulfate, metelimumab, methylphenidate hydrochloride; Natalizumab, NO-aspirin; OROS(R); PC-515, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, posaconazole, pregabalin, PT-141, pyridoxamine; R-744, ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rebimastat, repinotan hydrochloride, rhC1, rhGAD65, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Sardomozide, solifenacin succinate; Tadalafil, taxus, telavancin, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, testosterone transdermal patch, tetomilast, tirapazamine, torcetrapib; Valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vildagliptin; Yttrium Y90 epratuzumab; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:15672123

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-05-01

    O(6)-Benzylguanine; (-)-Gossypol; Abatacept, AC-2592, Adalimumab, AIDSVAX gp120 B/E, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, ALVAC E120TMG, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, Armodafinil, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Avotermin; Bevacizumab, BIBW-2992, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B; Canakinumab, CAT-354, Ciclesonide, CMV gB vaccine, Corifollitropin alfa, Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Denosumab; EndoTAG-1, Eplerenone, Esomeprazole sodium, Eszopiclone, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; F-50040, Fesoterodine fumavate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, Golimumab; Imatinib mesylate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glargine, Ivabradine hydrochloride; Lercanidipine hydrochloride/enalapril maleate, Levosimendan, Liposomal vincristine sulfate, Liraglutide; MDV-3100, Mometasone furoate/formoterol fumavate, Multiepitope CTL peptide vaccine, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt, Nabiximols, Natalizumab, Nesiritide; Obeticholic acid, Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab, Omecamtiv mecarbil; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Paliperidone, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Polymyxin B nonapeptide, PORxin-302, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Pridopidine; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasagiline mesilate, rDEN4delta30-4995, Recombinant human relaxin H2, rhFSH, Rilonacept, Rolofylline, Rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine; Salcaprozic acid sodium salt, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate, Sitaxentan sodium, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Temsirolimus, Tenofovir, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Tolvaptan, Tozasertib, Treprostinil sodium; Ustekinumab; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Varenicline tartrate, Vatalanib succinate, Voriconazole, Vorinostat; Zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:20508873

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-11-01

    1-Octanol, 9vPnC-MnCc; Abiraterone acetate, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, ARRY-520, AS-1404, Asimadoline, Atazanavir sulfate, AVE-0277, Azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Boceprevir, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B; Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Clevudine, Contusugene ladenovec, CP-751871, Crofelemer, Cypher, CYT006-AngQb; Darbepoetin alfa, Desmopressin, Dexlansoprazole, DG-041; E-5555, Ecogramostim, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Falecalcitriol, Fampridine, Fesoterodine fumarate, Fingolimod hydrochloride; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GS-7904L, GV-1001; HT-1001; Insulin detemir, ISIS-112989, Istradefylline; Laquinimod sodium, Latanoprost/timolol maleate, Lenalidomide, Levobetaxolol hydrochloride, Liposomal doxorubicin, Liposomal morphine sulfate, Lubiprostone, Lumiracoxib, LY-518674; MEM-1003, Mesna disulfide, Mipomersen sodium, MM-093, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naptumomab estafenatox, Natalizumab; Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Pasireotide, Pazufloxacin mesilate, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimagedine, Pimecrolimus, Pramlintide acetate, Prasterone, Pregabalin, Prulifloxacin; QAE-397; Rec-15/2615, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhGAD65, Roflumilast, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotigotine, Rupatadine fumarate; Safinamide mesilate, SIR-Spheres, Sitagliptin phosphate, Sodium phenylacetate, Sodium phenylacetate/Sodium benzoate, Sorafenib, SSR-244738; Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Teduglutide, Tegaserod maleate, Telaprevir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tigecycline, Tiotropium bromide, Trabectedin, Travoprost

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131I-chTNT; Abatacept, adalimumab, alemtuzumab, APC-8015, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bortezomib, bosentan, buserelin; Caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, ChAGCD3, ciclesonide, clopidogrel, curcumin, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, dapoxetine hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, denosumab, DMXB-Anabaseine, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edodekin alfa, efaproxiral sodium, elaidic acid-cytarabine, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etonogestrel/testosterone decanoate, exenatide; Fulvestrant; Gefitinib, glycine, GVS-111; Homoharringtonine; ICC-1132, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, i.v. gamma-globulin; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, lintuzumab, liposomal nystatin, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Manitimus, mapatumumab, melatonin, micafungin sodium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Oblimersen sodium, OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), pasireotide, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PT-141; Quercetin; Ranolazine, rosuvastatin calcium, rubitecan, rupatadine fumarate; Sardomozide, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, talactoferrin alfa, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, testosterone transdermal patch, TH-9507, tigecycline, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, tocilizumab, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vandetanib

  12. Phase II trial of fluorouracil and recombinant interferon alfa-2a in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Wadler, S; Lembersky, B; Atkins, M; Kirkwood, J; Petrelli, N

    1991-10-01

    In a pilot clinical trial, treatment of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma with the combination of fluorouracil (5FU) and recombinant interferon alfa-2a (IFN) resulted in objective tumor regression in 62% of patients. To confirm these findings in a multiinstitutional setting, a phase II clinical trial was initiated by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) in 1989. The treatment regimen was identical to that used in the earlier study: 5FU 750 mg/m2/d for 5 days as a continuous infusion followed by weekly outpatient bolus therapy and IFN 9MU subcutaneously beginning day 1 and administered three times per week. Doses were modified for gastrointestinal, hematologic, and neurologic toxicity and for fatigue, similarly to those used in the previous pilot trial. Thirty-eight patients were registered; 36 are evaluable for response (one lost to follow-up and one with nonmeasurable disease). All patients had metastatic or locally recurrent disease beyond the scope of resection; 31 of 38 had liver metastases, and 20 of 38 had two or more sites of involvement. Eight patients had grade 4 toxicities, including sepsis (nonneutropenic) (one), watery diarrhea (two), and granulocytopenia (six). Grade 3 neurologic toxicities were observed in two (5%) patients and included slurred speech and gait disturbance. Objective response was 42% (95% confidence interval [Cl], 27% to 58%), including one clinical complete responder and 14 partial responders. Among the responding patients, the median time to treatment failure was 8 months. Two patients remain on treatment at 10+ and 16+ months: median survival has not been reached. The results of this multiinstitutional trial suggest that the addition of IFN to 5FU enhances the objective response rates achieved in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma and that the toxicities of this regimen are acceptable. PMID:1919631

  13. Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a Yields High Rates of Hematologic and Molecular Response in Patients With Advanced Essential Thrombocythemia and Polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Kantarjian, Hagop; Manshouri, Taghi; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Estrov, Zeev; Pierce, Sherry; Richie, Mary Ann; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase II study of pegylated interferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN-α-2a) in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV). Patients and Methods Seventy-nine patients (40 with PV and 39 with ET) have been treated. Median time from diagnosis to PEG-IFN-α-2a was 54 months in patients with PV and 33 months in patients with ET. Eighty-one percent of patients had received prior therapy. The first three patients received PEG-IFN-α-2a at 450 μg weekly. As a result of poor tolerance, this dose was decreased in a stepwise manner to a current starting dose of 90 μg weekly. Seventy-seven patients are evaluable and have been observed for a median of 21 months. Results The overall hematologic response rate was 80% in PV and 81% in ET (complete in 70% and 76% of patients, respectively). The JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 18 patients with ET and 38 patients with PV; sequential measurements by a pyrosequencing assay were available in 16 patients with ET and 35 patients with PV. The molecular response rate was 38% in ET and 54% in PV, being complete (undetectable JAK2V617F) in 6% and 14%, respectively. The JAK2V617F mutant allele burden continued to decrease with no clear evidence for a plateau. The tolerability of PEG-IFN-α-2a at 90 μg weekly was excellent. Conclusion PEG-IFN-α-2a resulted in remarkable clinical activity, high rates of molecular response, and acceptable toxicity in patients with advanced ET or PV. The ability of PEG-IFN-α-2a to induce complete molecular responses suggests selective targeting of the malignant clone. PMID:19826111

  14. Efficacy and Tolerability of Peginterferon α-2a and Peginterferon α-2b, Both plus Ribavirin, for Chronic Hepatitis C: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Liping; Yang, Lei; Chen, Xiaorong

    2013-01-01

    Background. The efficacy and tolerability of peginterferon α-2a and peginterferon α-2b in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients remain controversial. Methods. PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane libraries were electronically searched until August 30, 2012. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated by two reviewers independently. Results. The overall sustained virologic response (SVR) rate of the peginterferon α-2a group was significantly higher than that of the peginterferon α-2b group (46.7% versus 42.4%, P value = 0.01). The same tendency was observed for naïve, genotype 1/4, and genotype 2/3 patients. The early virologic response (EVR) and end-of-treatment response (ETR) rates were significantly higher in the peginterferon α-2a group than in the peginterferon α-2b group (56.1% versus 49.8%, P < 0.0001; 67.9% versus 56.6%, P < 0.00001, resp.). Peginterferon α-2a had a significantly lower discontinuation rate than peginterferon α-2b (27.9% versus 33.9%, P < 0.0001) in naïve patients. In both naïve CHC and hepatitis C virus genotype 1 patients, peginterferon α-2a had a higher relapse rate than peginterferon α-2b. Conclusions. Peginterferon α-2a has superior efficacy with higher EVR, ETR, and SVR than peginterferon α-2b for CHC patients, both plus ribavirin. Peginterferon α-2a might obtain a similar or even lower discontinuation rate than peginterferon α-2b. However, peginterferon α-2a had a higher relapse rate than peginterferon α-2b. PMID:23662098

  15. Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2b in Treating Patients With Melanoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Stage IA Skin Melanoma; Stage IB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  16. The Efficacy of Add-on Telbivudine Versus Switching to Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients With Poor Responses to Adefovir

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xin; Fan, Chao; Zhou, Yun; Kang, Wenzhen; Wang, Jiuping; Sun, Li; Wang, Linxu; Peng, Meijuan; Lian, Jianqi; Jia, Zhansheng; Hao, Chunqiu

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are limited options for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients who have poor responses to adefovir (ADV). Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of adding on telbivudine (LdT) or switching to pegylated interferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN-α2a) as alternative rescue therapies for patients with poor responses to the initial ADV treatments. Patients and Methods: Ninety-seven CHB patients with HBV DNA > 2 log10 copies/mL 48 weeks after ADV monotherapy were included in this study. Fifty-nine of these patients were treated with a combination of LdT plus ADV (LdT + ADV) daily, while thirty-eight patients were switched to PEG-IFN-α2a subcutaneous injections weekly for 48 weeks. Results: Both rescue strategies were proven to be safe and the majority of patients tolerated the therapies well. LdT + ADV led to more rapid reductions in viral loads than PEG-IFN-α2a monotherapy, with 2.14 (LdT + ADV) and 0.98 (PEG-IFN-α2a) log10 copies/mL decreases 48 weeks after rescue treatments, respectively (P < 0.00001). The rates corresponding to virological and biochemical responses were also elevated in patients who received the LdT + ADV combination therapy at the end of the observation period (88.1 vs. 68.4% for virological response, P = 0.017; 83.3 vs. 47.2%, P = 0.00045). However, the decline in the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was more pronounced in PEG-IFN-α2a treated patients. Moreover, the cumulative rates of serological responses were higher in patients who switched to the PEG-IFN-α2a therapy. Conclusions: Both add-on LdT and switching to PEG-IFN-α2a were satisfactory and optimal treatments for CHB patients with poor responses to ADV. Both rescue strategies resulted in significant reductions in serum viral load and ALT levels, and were associated with high rate of serological outcomes in our hospital. PMID:27110255

  17. Efficacy and safety of peginterferon alpha-2a/ribavirin in treatment-naive Cameroonian patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Njouom, Richard; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Timba, Isabelle; Nerrienet, Eric; Tchendjou, Patrice; Pasquier, Christophe; Rousset, Dominique

    2008-12-01

    Data were examined from a day-to-day clinical practice in Yaounde, Cameroon to evaluate the efficacy and safety of peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in treatment-naive Cameroonian patients with chronic hepatitis C. Ninety adults with chronic hepatitis C (mean age, 53 +/- 8 years; 79% males; 37.8% genotype 1; 23.3% genotype 2; and 38.9% genotype 4) were given at least 12 weeks of combination therapy between February 2003 and August 2007. Of these, 54 completed the treatment and the 24-week follow up. Subsequently, 18 continued treatment and 18 (20%) discontinued the treatment, 6 (6.7%) due to adverse effects. An intention-to-treat analysis showed that 38 (52.8%) had an end-of-treatment virologic response and 34 (47.2%) had a sustained virologic response. Sustained virologic response were significantly higher among patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2 (83.4%) than in those with genotype 1 (31%) or genotype 4 (42.3%) (P < 0.05). Non HCV-2 genotype, pretreatment fibrosis score >2, HCV RNA level >8.0 x 10(5) IU/ml and a non-virologic response at 12 weeks of treatment were associated with poor sustained virologic response (P < 0.05). Thus, HCV can be treated in a Sub-Saharan African country. It indicates that Cameroonian HCV-1 and -4 patients have a poorer sustained virologic response than the published results for Western and Middle-East countries. Virus subtype may influence the treatment outcome, since there is a great genetic diversity within Cameroonian HCV-1 and -4 genotypes. PMID:19040282

  18. Methotrexate, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin (MAP) Plus Maintenance Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2b Versus MAP Alone in Patients With Resectable High-Grade Osteosarcoma and Good Histologic Response to Preoperative MAP: First Results of the EURAMOS-1 Good Response Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bielack, Stefan S.; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Whelan, Jeremy S.; Marina, Neyssa; Jovic, Gordana; Hook, Jane M.; Krailo, Mark D.; Gebhardt, Mark; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Meyer, James; Nadel, Helen; Randall, R. Lor; Deffenbaugh, Claudia; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Brennan, Bernadette; Letson, G. Douglas; Teot, Lisa A.; Goorin, Allen; Baumhoer, Daniel; Kager, Leo; Werner, Mathias; Lau, Ching C.; Sundby Hall, Kirsten; Gelderblom, Hans; Meyers, Paul; Gorlick, Richard; Windhager, Reinhard; Helmke, Knut; Eriksson, Mikael; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Schomberg, Paula; Tunn, Per-Ulf; Kühne, Thomas; Jürgens, Heribert; van den Berg, Henk; Böhling, Tom; Picton, Susan; Renard, Marleen; Reichardt, Peter; Gerss, Joachim; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Morris, Carol; Hogendoorn, Pancras C.W.; Seddon, Beatrice; Calaminus, Gabriele; Michelagnoli, Maria; Dhooge, Catharina; Sydes, Matthew R.; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EURAMOS-1, an international randomized controlled trial, investigated maintenance therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) in patients whose osteosarcoma showed good histologic response (good response) to induction chemotherapy. Patients and Methods At diagnosis, patients age ≤ 40 years with resectable high-grade osteosarcoma were registered. Eligibility after surgery for good response random assignment included ≥ two cycles of preoperative MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, and cisplatin), macroscopically complete surgery of primary tumor, < 10% viable tumor, and no disease progression. These patients were randomly assigned to four additional cycles MAP with or without IFN-α-2b (0.5 to 1.0 μg/kg per week subcutaneously, after chemotherapy until 2 years postregistration). Outcome measures were event-free survival (EFS; primary) and overall survival and toxicity (secondary). Results Good response was reported in 1,041 of 2,260 registered patients; 716 consented to random assignment (MAP, n = 359; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 357), with baseline characteristics balanced by arm. A total of 271 of 357 started IFN-α-2b; 105 stopped early, and 38 continued to receive treatment at data freeze. Refusal and toxicity were the main reasons for never starting IFN-α-2b and for stopping prematurely, respectively. Median IFN-α-2b duration, if started, was 67 weeks. A total of 133 of 268 patients who started IFN-α-2b and provided toxicity information reported grade ≥ 3 toxicity during IFN-α-2b treatment. With median follow-up of 44 months, 3-year EFS for all 716 randomly assigned patients was 76% (95% CI, 72% to 79%); 174 EFS events were reported (MAP, n = 93; MAP plus IFN-α-2b, n = 81). Hazard ratio was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.61 to 1.12; P = .214) from an adjusted Cox model. Conclusion At the preplanned analysis time, MAP plus IFN-α-2b was not statistically different from MAP alone. A considerable proportion of patients never started IFN-α-2b or stopped

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M; Adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, adenosine triphosphate, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, autologous renal tumor vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; C340, cantuzumab mertansine, caspofungin acetate, CGP-36742, CHAMPION everolimus-eluting coronary stent, cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, emtricitabine, enfuvirtide, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, everolimus, ezetimibe; Flesinoxan hydrochloride, fosamprenavir calcium, FR-901228, frovatriptan; Gadofosveset sodium, gadomer-17, galiximab, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; HuOKT3gamma1(Ala234-Ala235); IDN-6556, imatinib mesylate, iodine (I131) tositumomab, iseganan hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; LB-80380, levocetirizine, liposomal doxorubicin, LMB-9, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib, lurtotecan; Mecasermin, midostaurin, morphine hydrochloride; Natalizumab, nelfinavir, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; Olcegepant, omalizumab, oregovomab; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, perospirone hydrochloride, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, prinomastat; Resiquimod, rhIGFBP-3, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3, ritanserin, ro-31-7453, rosuvastatin calcium; SCIO-469, SDZ-SID-791, SU-11248, suberanilohydroxamic acid; Tadalafil, taxus, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, TER-286, tezosentan disodium, TH-9507, tipifarnib, tipranavir, tolvaptan, tramadol hydrochloride/acetaminophen, travoprost, treprostinil sodium, tucaresol

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-03-01

    ABT-869, Acadesine, Acetylsalicylic acid/omeprazole, Adefovir, Adefovir dipivoxil, AEG-35156, Agatolimod sodium, Albiglutide, Alemtuzumab, Alipogene tiparvovec, Alogliptin benzoate, AMG-386, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Apremilast, Aripiprazole, Asoprisnil, Atorvastatin/fenofibrate, AVN-944, Axitinib; Belinostat, Bevacizumab, BHT-3021, BI-2536, Biapenem, Bilastine, Biphasic insulin aspart, Blinatumomab, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, CD-NP, Cediranib, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, Ciclesonide, CK-1827452,Clevudine, Clofarabine, CSL-360, CYT-997; Dapagliflozin, Darinaparsin, Denosumab, Densiron 68, Desloratadine, Dulanermin; Edoxaban tosilate, Emtricitabine, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fidaxomicintiacumiv, Fulvestrant; G-207, GCR-8015, Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), Glufosfamide; HPV16L1E7CVLP; Ibutamoren mesilate, Imatinib mesylate, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Iodine (I131) tositumomab, Istaroxime, ITMN-191, Ixabepilone; JZP-4, Lenalidomide; Levetiracetam, Linaclotide acetate, Liposomal cytarabine/daunorubicin, Liposomal doxorubicin, Liraglutide, LY-518674; Milatuzumab, MMR-V, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Niacin/simvastatin; Obatoclax mesylate, Odanacatib; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pazufloxacin, PBT-2, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, Perampanel, PfCP2.9, Pitavastatin calcium, Poly I:CLC, Pomalidomide, Pralatrexate, Pramlintide acetate, Prucalopride; rhGAD65, Roflumilast; RTS,S/AS02D; SCH-530348, Semagacestat, Sirolimus-eluting coronary stent, Sirolimus-Eluting Stent, SIR-Spheres, Sivelestat sodium hydrate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tafluprost, Tanespimycin, Teduglutide, Telaprevir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tiotropium bromide, TMC-435350, Tositumomab/iodine (I131) tositumomab, Travoprost/timolol, Triciribine

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 166Ho-DOTMP, 3-AP; Abatacept, abetimus sodium, ACR-16, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, AMD-070, aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, anatumomab mafenatox, anti-CTLA-4 MAb, antigastrin therapeutic vaccine, AP-12009, AP-23573, APC-8024, aripiprazole, ATL-962, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan, BR-1; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clofazimine, colchicine, cold-adapted influenza vaccine trivalent, CRM197; Desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diethylhomospermine; Edodekin alfa, efalizumab, elcometrine, eletriptan, enfuvirtide, entecavir, EP-2101, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, etoricoxib, everolimus, exherin, ezetimibe; Febuxostat, fluorescein lisicol, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; Hemoglobin raffimer, HSPPC-96, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, IRX-2, istradefylline, IV gamma-globulin, ixabepilone; Kahalalide F; L-759274, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, licofelone, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lurtotecan, LY-156735; MAb G250, mecasermin, melatonin, midostaurin, muraglitazar; Nesiritide, nitronaproxen; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, omapatrilat, oral insulin; Parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, PG-CPT, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, posaconazole; Rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, RG228, rimonabant hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride; S-3304, safinamide mesilate, salcaprozic acid sodium salt, SDZ-SID-791, SGN-30, soblidotin

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-04-01

    (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, [(123)I]-BZA, 9-Aminocamptothecin; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, Ambrisentan, Amsilarotene, Anacetrapib, Anakinra, Apricitabine, Aripiprazole, Arsenic trioxide, Atazanavir sulfate, Atazanavir/ritonavir, Atrasentan, Azacitidine; Banoxantrone, Bazedoxifene acetate, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bromfenac; Cachectin, Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Canakinumab, Carfilzomib, CAT-354, CCX-282, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, Clevudine, Clofarabine, CNTO-328, Corifollitropin alfa, Crofelemer; Daptomycin, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Denosumab, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Emtricitabine, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Epoetin zeta, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Farglitazar, Febuxostat, Fosamprenavir calcium, FX-06; Gabapentin enacarbil, Gefitinib; HIVIS DNA; Imatinib mesylate, INCB- 18424, Indacaterol, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Insulin detemir; JNJ-26854165; Lacosamide, Landiolol, Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, L-NAME, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lumiracoxib; Maraviroc, Mepolizumab, Methoxy polyethylene glycol- epoetin-beta, Miglustat, MK-0493, MVA-CMDR, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, Nepafenac, Neratinib, Neridronic acid, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel poliglumex, Palifermin, Patupilone, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, Pemetrexed disodium, PHA-848125, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Povidone-iodine liposome complex, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Prucalopride; Raltegravir potassium, Retigabine, Revaprazan hydrochloride, rhFSH, Rilpivirine, Rivaroxaban, Romidepsin

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abiraterone acetate, Ad5CMV-p53, adefovir dipivoxil, AE-941, ambrisentan, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atrasentan; BCH-10618, bimatoprost, BMS-184476, BMS-275183, BMS-387032, botulinum toxin type B, BR-1, BR96-Doxorubicin; Capravirine, caspofungin acetate, cinacalcet hydrochloride; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dextrin sulfate, DJ-927, duloxetine hydrochloride; Elacridar, emtricitabine, eplerenone, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, ESP-24217, etoricoxib, exenatide, ezetimibe; Ferumoxtran-10, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; GS-7904L, GW-5634; HMN-214, human insulin; IC-14, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine, insulinotropin, iseganan hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, L-Arginine hydrochloride, LEA29Y, lenalidomide, LE-SN38, lestaurtinib, L-MDAM, lometrexol, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir; Magnesium sulfate, maraviroc, mepolizumab, metreleptin, milataxel, MNA-715, morphine hydrochloride; Nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, NK-911; Olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ortataxel, oxycodone hydrochloride/ibuprofen; Panitumumab, patupilone, PC-515, PD-MAGE-3 Vaccine, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, prasugrel, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Rosuvastatin calcium, RPR-113090; sabarubicin hydrochloride, safinamide mesilate, SB-715992, sitaxsentan sodium, soblidotin, synthadotin; Tadalafil, taltobulin, temsirolimus, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, testosterone gel, tigecycline, tipranavir, tirapazamine, trabectedin

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen; Ad.muIFN-beta AD-237, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, agalsidase alfa, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, ALVAC vCP1452, alvimopan hydrate, ambrisentan, anakinra, anti-IFN-gamma MAb; Bimatoprost, BMS-188797, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan, bovine lactoferrin; Caffeine, canertinib dihydrochloride, canfosfamide hydrochloride, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, cH36, ChimeriVax-JE, ciclesonide, cilansetron, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clopidogrel, CpG-7909, Cypher; Daptomycin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, decitabine, denufosol tetrasodium, Dexamet, diindolemethane, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, DX-9065a; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, elacridar, eletriptan, emtricitabine, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Fludarabine, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gavestinel sodium, gefitinib, granisetron-Biochronomer; Human Albumin, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, interleukin-2 XL, isatoribine, ISS-1018, i.v. gamma-globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Lanthanum carbonate, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal doxorubicin, LY-450139; Magnesium sulfate, melatonin, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, nesiritide, niacin/lovastatin; OGX-011, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, ospemifene; PACAP38, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, patupilone, pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  6. Perspectives on dual hepatitis B and C infection in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jen; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2016-05-01

    Dual hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is not rare in HBV or HCV endemic areas, and can be found in populations at risk of parenteral viral transmission. Clinical observatory studies suggest a higher risk of liver disease progression in patients with dual HCV/HBV infection than in HBV or HCV monoinfected patients. Recent trials confirmed that combination therapy of peginterferon alfa-2a or alfa-2b and ribavirin was effective and safe in dually infected patients with positive HCV RNA. Moreover, about 30% of the dually infected patients cleared hepatitis B surface antigen within 5 years after the start of peginterferon-based therapy. The optimal treatment strategies for dually infected patients with active hepatitis B, with decompensated cirrhosis, or in other clinical situations should be explored in further studies. Finally, the advent of new direct-acting antiviral-based anti-HCV therapy may lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of dually infected patients with active hepatitis C, particularly for those not tolerating or not eligible for peginterferon-based therapy. Notably, direct-acting antivirals would not have any activity against HBV infection; simultaneous or on-demand nucleos(t)ide analogs would be needed if clinically indicated. PMID:26188762

  7. HBsAg seroconversion after pegylated interferon alfa 2a rescue in a lamivudine-resistant patient with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B and favourable IL28-B genotype.

    PubMed

    Stanzione, Maria; Stornaiuolo, Gianfranca; Rizzo, Viviana; Pontarelli, Agostina; Gaeta, Giovanni Battista

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) seroconversion to anti-HBs antibody is the best final objective for all available chronic hepatitis B (CHB) treatments. Unfortunately, this goal is rarely achieved with the currently applied therapeutic approaches. Here we describe the case of an anti-HBe-positive CHB patient who was successfully treated with a particular therapeutic schedule. The patient was initially treated with lamivudine (LAM) for nine years. Breakthrough was observed after eight years of LAM therapy. HBV-DNA was 3x10E4 IU/mL and LAM resistance mutations were present. Subcutaneous pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) alfa 2a, 180 mcg/week, was added to LAM and after 4 weeks LAM was discontinued and PEG-IFN alone was continued up to week 52. HBV-DNA became undetectable at week 4 of therapy; serum HBsAg started to decline from week 4 and became undetectable at week 36, with the subsequent appearance of anti-HBs antibodies. IL28-B was genotyped at the polymorphic site rs12979860 and the CC allele was detected. Rescue therapy with Peg-IFN may be an option for selected patients with resistance to nucleos(t)ide analogues. PMID:27367326

  8. Protracted anaphylaxis developed after peginterferon α-2a administration for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Sakatani, Akihiko; Doi, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Takaaki; Sasai, Yasutaka; Nishida, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Megumi; Uenoyama, Naoto; Matsumoto, Yoshiya; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    Peginterferon is a key drug used to treat chronic viral hepatitis that is known for causing various side effects. Side effects occurring immediately after administration include headache, nausea, and influenza-like symptoms, such as fever and joint pain. However, reports of anaphylactic shock are extremely rare. Here we report a patient with protracted anaphylaxis who suffered shock symptoms after peginterferon α-2a administration for chronic hepatitis C. Although the patient improved temporarily with shock treatment, symptoms of anaphylaxis recurred. As peginterferon is often administered on an outpatient basis, it is important to recognize life-threatening side effects that may develop in a protracted manner. PMID:25759556

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-10-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride, (S)-Tenatoprazole sodium salt monohydrate 19-28z, Acotiamide hydrochloride hydrate, ADV-TK, AE-37, Aflibercept, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Asenapine maleate, Axitinib; Bavituximab, Becatecarin, beta-1,3/1,6-Glucan, Bevacizumab, Bremelanotide; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Casopitant mesylate, Catumaxomab, CDX-110, Cediranib, CMD-193, Cositecan; Darinaparsin, Denosumab, DP-b99, Duloxetine hydrochloride; E75, Ecogramostim, Elacytarabine, EMD-273063, EndoTAG-1, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Eribulin mesilate, Esomeprazole magnesium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Faropenem daloxate, Febuxostat, Fenretinide; Ghrelin (human); I-131 ch-TNT-1/B, I-131-3F8, Iclaprim, Iguratimod, Iloperidone, Imatinib mesylate, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Ipilimumab, Iratumumab, Ispinesib mesylate, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Laquinimod sodium, Larotaxel dehydrate, Linezolid, LOR-2040; Mapatumumab, MKC-1, Motesanib diphosphate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NK-012; Olanzapine pamoate, Oncolytic HSV, Ortataxel; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Paclitaxel poliglumex, Paliperidone palmitate, Panitumumab, Patupilone, PCV-9, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pimecrolimus, Plerixafor hydrochloride, PM-02734, Poly I:CLC, PR1, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Progesterone caproate, Prucalopride, Pumosetrag hydrochloride; RAV-12, RB-006, RB-007, Recombinant human erythropoietin alfa, Rimonabant, Romidepsin; SAR-109659, Satraplatin, Sodium butyrate; Tadalafil, Talampanel, Tanespimycin, Tarenflurbil, Tariquidar

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-09-01

    , Panitumumab, Panobinostat, Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Parecoxib sodium, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pegvisomant, PI-88, Pimecrolimus, Pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, Pneumococcal 9-valent conjugate vaccine, Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, Poloxamer-188, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Prulifloxacin; R-109339, Ramipril/amlodipine, Ranolazine, Rasburicase, rHA influenza vaccine, Ro-50-3821, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rotavirus vaccine, Rotigotine, Ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; Satavaptan, SC-75416, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sugammadex sodium, Sunitinib malate, Synthetic conjugated estrogens B; Tadalafil, Talnetant, Taxus, Tegaserod maleate, Telbivudine, Temsirolimus, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tetomilast, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tofimilast, Tremelimumab, Trimethoprim; Udenafil, Urocortin 2; Valdecoxib, Vernakalant hydrochloride; XP-828L. PMID:17982511

  12. The effectiveness of retreatment with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C genotype 2 and 3: a prospective cohort study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 50% of patients infected with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) do not respond to treatment with conventional interferon (IFN) combined with ribavirin (RBV). The aim of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of retreatment with peginterferon alfa-2a or 2b (PEG-IFN 2a or 2b) concomitantly with RBV in patients with HCV genotype 2 and 3, which were non-responders or relapsers to initial treatment with IFN / RBV and to identify possible predictors of sustained virological response (SVR). Methods From September 2003 to March 2009 a cohort of 216 patients who had previously failed therapy with a regimen of standard interferon and ribavirin, were followed in a specialized service implemented in the Brazilian Unified Health System, Rio Grande do Sul. All patients were retreated with PEG-IFN 2a or 2b per week, associated with RBV, through oral route, with doses determined according to weight (1,000 mg if weight ≤ 75 Kg and 1,250 mg if ≥ 75 Kg) per day for 48 weeks. The HCV-RNA was tested by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Virological Response (VR) within 48 weeks and SVR in the 72 weeks was considered for evaluation of treatment efficacy. Analyses were performed in patients who received at least one dose of PEG-IFN. Results The SVR rate for non-responders to previous treatment was 34.4% and for relapsers was 50% (p = 0.031). As predictive factors that contribute to improve SVR, were identified the age (p = 0.005), to be relapsers to previous treatment (p = 0.023) and present liver biopsy examination Metavir F0-F2 (p = 0.004). In assessing the safety profile, 51 patients (23.6%) discontinued treatment prematurely. Conclusions This alternative retreatment for patients who have failed prior therapies for anti-HCV, has demonstrated promising SVR rate, provided that it includes a careful selection of patients with predictors of response and adverse events monitored. PMID:23270376

  13. Daclatasvir vs telaprevir plus peginterferon alfa/ribavirin for hepatitis C virus genotype 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Ira; Zeuzem, Stefan; Flisiak, Robert; Knysz, Brygida; Lueth, Stefan; Zarebska-Michaluk, Dorota; Janczewska, Ewa; Ferenci, Peter; Diago, Moises; Zignego, Anna Linda; Safadi, Rifaat; Baruch, Yaacov; Abdurakhmanov, Dzhamal; Shafran, Stephen; Thabut, Dominique; Bruck, Rafael; Gadano, Adrian; Thompson, Alexander James; Kopit, Justin; McPhee, Fiona; Michener, Tracy; Hughes, Eric A; Yin, Philip D; Noviello, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate daclatasvir vs telaprevir, each combined with peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin (pegIFN/RBV), in treatment-naive hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (GT) 1-infected patients. METHODS: In this phase 3, randomized, open-label, noninferiority study, 602 patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to daclatasvir vs telaprevir, stratified by IL28B rs12979860 host genotype (CC vs non-CC), cirrhosis status (compensated cirrhosis vs no cirrhosis), and HCV GT1 subtype (GT1a vs GT1b). Patients were selected by study inclusion criteria from a total of 793 enrolled patients. Patients received daclatasvir 60 mg once daily or telaprevir 750 mg 3 times daily plus pegIFN/RBV. Daclatasvir recipients received 24 wk of daclatasvir plus pegIFN/RBV; those without an extended rapid virologic response (eRVR; undetectable HCV-RNA at weeks 4 and 12) received an additional 24 wk of pegIFN/RBV. Telaprevir-treated patients received 12 wk of telaprevir plus pegIFN/RBV followed by 12 (with eRVR) or 36 (no eRVR) wk of pegIFN/RBV. The primary objective was to compare for noninferiority of sustained virologic response rates at posttreatment week 12 (SVR12) in GT1b-infected patients. Key secondary objectives were to demonstrate that the rates of anemia (hemoglobin < 10 g/dL) and rash-related events, through week 12, were lower with daclatasvir + pegIFN/RBV than with telaprevir + pegIFN/RBV among GT1b-infected patients. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing of the NS5A region for all patients at baseline, and for patients with virologic failure or relapse and HCV-RNA ≥ 1000 IU/mL, to investigate any link between NS5A polymorphisms associated with daclatasvir resistance and virologic outcome. RESULTS: Patient demographics and disease characteristics were generally balanced across treatment arms; however, there was a higher proportion of black/African Americans in the daclatasvir groups (6.0% and 8.2% in the GT1b and GT1a groups, respectively) than in the

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, abarelix, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, AdGVVEGF121.10, anastrozole, anecortave acetate, aripiprazole, asulacrine isethionate, atazanavir, ATL-962, 16-Aza-epothilone B; Bevacizumab, bicalutamide, blonanserin, BMS-188667, bosentan; Celecoxib, celmoleukin, cetuximab, cilomilast, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CNTF(Ax15), colesevelam hydrochloride; Daclizumab, delavirdine mesilate, desogestrel, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, emtricitabine, epalrestat, escitalopram oxalate, examorelin, exendin-4, ezetimibe; Fidarestat, frovatriptan; HIV-1 Immunogen; Iloperidone, insulin detemir, insulin lispro, irinotecan hydrochloride; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levetiracetam, levormeloxifene, levosimendan, lumiracoxib, LY-307161 SR; Memantine hydrochloride, MEN-10755, metformin hydrochloride, metreleptin, motexafin gadolinium; Naratriptan hydrochloride, natalizumab, nesiritide, nicotine, NN-2211, NN-414; Olanzapine, omalizumab; Pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pimecrolimus, pirfenidone, pramlintide acetate prasterone, pregabalin; Quetiapine fumarate; Rabeprazole sodium, raloxifene hydrochloride, raltitrexed, rDNA insulin, rFGF-2, risedronate sodium, rofecoxib, roflumilast, rosiglitazone maleate; SN-22995; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tegaserod maleate, tiotropium bromide, tomoxetine hydrochloride, trastuzumab, trimegestone; Voglibose, Voriconazole; Ziprasidone hydrochloride. PMID:12616707

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in the current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV-NGFbeta, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; beta-Methyl-6-chloromelatonin, BMS-214662, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, CEA-TRICOM, cetuximab, ciclesonide, clofarabine, Cypher; Dalbavancin, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, Dexamet, drospirenone, drospirenone/ethinylestradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone; Fenretinide; Gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, iodine (i131) tositumomab, irofulven, ISS-1018; Lasofoxifene tartrate, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, liposomal doxorubicin; Nemifitide ditriflutate, nesiritide; Omalizumab; Pegfilgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, phVEGF-A165, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate; Rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride; Satraplatin, St. John's Wort extract, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, tanaproget, Taxus, tiotropium bromide, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate; Ximelagatran; Zileuton. PMID:16258596

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-06-01

    (+)-Dapoxetine hydrochloride; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Agalsidase beta, Alemtuzumab, Alglucosidase alfa, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Amlodipine, Aripiprazole, Atrasentan, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bilastine, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Caspofungin acetate, CG-100649, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Clindamycin phosphate/ benzoyl peroxide; Dasatinib, Denosumab, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride, Dutasteride/tamsulosin; Ecogramostim, Eculizumab, Eltrombopag olamine, EndoTAG-1, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; FAHF-2, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Golimumab; HEV-239, HSV-TK; Imatinib mesylate, Indium 111 ((111)In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza vaccine(surface antigen, inactivated, prepared in cell culture), Insulin glargine; Kisspeptin-54; Lidocaine/prilocaine, Lomitapide; Maraviroc, Mirodenafil hydrochloride, MK-8141, MVA-Ag85A; Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate; Olmesartan medoxomil; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pitavastatin calcium, Prasugrel; Recombinant human relaxin H2, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium, RRz2; Sagopilone, Salinosporamide A, SB-509, Serlopitant, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, TG-4010, Tositumomab/iodine (I131) tositumomab; Velusetrag Hydrochloride; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan. PMID:19649342

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-06-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 131-I-chlorotoxin; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, albumin interferon alfa, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, AR-C126532, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cangrelor tetrasodium, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, collagen-PVP, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, darusentan, dasatinib, denosumab, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (lung cancer), dexrazoxane, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, eel calcitonin, efalizumab, entecavir, etoricoxib; Falciparum merozoite protein-1/AS02A, fenretinide, fondaparinux sodium; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, ghrelin (human); hLM609; Icatibant acetate, imatinib mesylate, ipsapirone, irofulven; LBH-589, LE-AON, levocetirizine, LY-450139; Malaria vaccine, mapatumumab, motexafin gadolinium, muraglitazar, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; nab-paclitaxel, nelarabine; O6-Benzylguanine, olmesartan medoxomil, orbofiban acetate; Panitumumab, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, peptide YY3-36, pleconaril, prasterone, pregabalin; Ranolazine, rebimastat, recombinant malaria vaccine, rosuvastatin calcium; SQN-400; Taxus, tegaserod maleate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, troxacitabine; Valganciclovir hydrochloride, Val-Tyr sardine peptidase, VNP-40101M, vorinostat. PMID:16845450

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-09-01

    Aclidinium bromide, AE-37, Alemtuzumab, AMA1-C1/ISA 720, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Arachidonic acid, Arbaclofen placarbil, Aripiprazole, ARQ-621, Azelnidipine, Azilsartan medoxomil potassium; Bevacizumab, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib; Choriogonadotropin alfa, CTS-1027; Dapagliflozin, Dasatinib, Deforolimus, Degarelix acetate, Denufosol tetrasodium, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dronedarone hydrochloride, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Etaracizumab, Everolimus, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Ferric carboxymaltose, Fludarabine, Foretinib; Gefitinib, GFT-505, GSK-256066; HPV-6/11/16/18, HuM195/rGel, HyperAcute-Lung cancer vaccine; I5NP, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ivabradine hydrochloride; L2G7, Lacosamide, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Lidocaine/prilocaine, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide, Lixivaptan; Meningococcal (groups A, C, Y and W-135) oligosaccharide diphtheria CRM197 conjugate vaccine, Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-β, Mirabegron, Morphine/oxycodone, MR Vaccine, MSC-1936369B, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Narlaprevir, N-Desmethylclozapine; Ocriplasmin, Olaparib, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/azelnidipine, ONO-5334, ONO-8539; Palifermin, Panitumumab, Pardoprunox hydrochloride, PCV7, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pexelizumab, PF-337210, Pitavastatin calcium; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant interleukin-7, Regadenoson, Reniale, Roflumilast, Rosuvastatin calcium; Safinamide mesilate, SB-1518, SCH-527123, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talaporfin sodium, Tanespimycin, Technosphere/Insulin, Telaprevir, Telatinib, Telcagepant, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Teriparatide, Testosterone transdermal gel, TH-302, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Trabedersen, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Visilizumab, Voreloxin, Vorinostat. PMID

  19. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abacavir sulfate, adalimumab, AERx morphine sulphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alendronic acid sodium salt, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, amprenavir, aripiprazole, atenolol, atorvastatin calcium; BSYX-A110; Cantuzumab mertansine, capravirine, CDP-571, CDP-870, celecoxib; Delavirdine mesilate, docetaxel, dofetilide, donepezil hydrochloride, duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride, dydrogesterone; Efavirenz, emtricitabine, enjuvia, enteryx, epristeride, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etanercept, etonogestrel, etoricoxib; Fesoterodine, finasteride, flt3ligand; Galantamine hydrobromide, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, genistein, gepirone hydrochloride; Indinavir sulfate, infliximab; Lamivudine, lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, leteprinim potassium, levetiracetam, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, losartan potassium; MCC-465, MRA; Nebivolol, nesiritide, nevirapine; Olanzapine, OROS(R)-Methylphenidate hydrochloride; Peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, Pimecrolimus, polyethylene glycol 3350, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-2000; Risedronate sodium, risperidone, ritonavir, rituximab, rivastigmine tartrate, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium; Saquinavir mesilate, Stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tamsulosin hydrochloride, telmisartan, tomoxetine hydrochloride, treprostinil sodium, trimegestone, trimetrexate; Valdecoxib, venlafaxine hydrochloride; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:12616965

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-04-01

    Gateways to clinical trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 5A8; Agomelatine, alefacept, almotriptan, anakinra, APC-8015, atazanavir, atomoxetine hydrochloride, azimilide hydrochloride; Bicifadine; Cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CAT-213, CGP-51901, ciclesonide, cipamfylline; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, dibotermin alfa, DX-9065a; Ecogramostim, efalizumab, eletriptan, eniluracil, EPI-KAL2, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, etilevodopa, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Fosamprenavir calcium, fosamprenavir sodium, fumagillin; Gadofosveset sodium, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin; HSPPC-96, human papillomavirus vaccine; Icatibant Id-KLH, imatinib mesylate, INS-37217, iodine (I131) tositumomab; LAS-34475, levobupivacaine hydrochloride, levocetirizine, linezolid, 131I-lipiodol, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-450108; Magnetites, MBI-594AN, melagatran, melatonin, mepolizumab, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; NC-100100; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, omapatrilat, onercept; PEG-filgrastim, (PE)HRG21, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pleconaril, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, prasterone; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasagiline mesilate, reslizumab, rFGF-2, rhOP-1, rosuvastatin calcium, roxifiban acetate; Sitaxsentan sodium, sodium lauryl sulfate; Tadalafil, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tipranavir, TMC-114, tucaresol; Valdecoxib, voriconazole; Ximelagatran; Zofenopril calcium, zosuquidar trihydrochloride. PMID:12743628

  1. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 3,4-DAP; Adefovir dipivoxil, ADL-10-0101, alefacept, alemtuzumab, alosetron hydrochloride, ALT-711, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab, atvogen; Bortezomib; CETP vaccine, clevudine, crofelemer; DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DX-9065a; E-7010, edodekin alfa, emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, erlosamide, erlotinib hydrochloride, everolimus, exenatide; Fondaparinux sodium, frovatriptan, fulvestrant; Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gestodene; Homoharringtonine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, indium 111 (111In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, inhaled insulin, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, ivabradine hydrochloride; Lanthanum carbonate, lapatinib, LAS-34475, levetiracetam, liraglutide, lumiracoxib; Maxacalcitol, melagatran, micafungin sodium; Natalizumab, NSC-640488; Oblimersen sodium; Parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, pleconaril, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, prucalopride; rAHF-PFM, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rDNA insulin, recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, rhGM-CSF, roxifiban acetate, RSD-1235, rubitecan, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate; SC-51, squalamine; Tegaserod maleate, telbivudine, tesaglitazar, testosterone gel, tezosentan disodium, tipranavir; Vatalanib succinate; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:14671684

  2. Peginterferon beta-1a in multiple sclerosis: 2-year results from ADVANCE

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Douglas L; Balcer, Laura J; Boyko, Alexey A; Pelletier, Jean; Liu, Shifang; Zhu, Ying; Seddighzadeh, Ali; Hung, Serena; Deykin, Aaron; Sheikh, Sarah I; Calabresi, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous peginterferon beta-1a over 2 years in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis in the ADVANCE study. Methods: Patients were randomized to placebo or 125 µg peginterferon beta-1a every 2 or 4 weeks. For Year 2 (Y2), patients originally randomized to placebo were re-randomized to peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks. Patients randomized to peginterferon beta-1a in Year 1 (Y1) remained on the same dosing regimen in Y2. Results: Compared with Y1, annualized relapse rate (ARR) was further reduced in Y2 with every 2 week dosing (Y1: 0.230 [95% CI 0.183–0.291], Y2: 0.178 [0.136–0.233]) and maintained with every 4 week dosing (Y1: 0.286 [0.231–0.355], Y2: 0.291 [0.231–0.368]). Patients starting peginterferon beta-1a from Y1 displayed improved efficacy versus patients initially assigned placebo, with reductions in ARR (every 2 weeks: 37%, p<0.0001; every 4 weeks: 17%, p=0.0906), risk of relapse (every 2 weeks: 39%, p<0.0001; every 4 weeks: 19%, p=0.0465), 12-week disability progression (every 2 weeks: 33%, p=0.0257; every 4 weeks: 25%, p=0.0960), and 24-week disability progression (every 2 weeks: 41%, p=0.0137; every 4 weeks: 9%, p=0.6243). Over 2 years, greater reductions were observed with every 2 week versus every 4 week dosing for all endpoints and peginterferon beta-1a was well tolerated. Conclusions: Peginterferon beta-1a efficacy is maintained beyond 1 year, with greater effects observed with every 2 week versus every 4 week dosing, and a similar safety profile to Y1. Clinicaltrials.gov Registration Number: NCT00906399. PMID:25432952

  3. [A case of chronic hepatitis C with pancreas divisum and acute pancreatitis during combination treatment with telaprevir/peginterferon/ribavirin].

    PubMed

    Morio, Reona; Imamura, Michio; Fukuhara, Takayuki; Kan, Hiromi; Fujino, Hatsue; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Hiramatsu, Akira; Aikata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Tamito; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-10-01

    A 47-year-old man developed acute pancreatitis during combination treatment with telaprevir/peginterferon/ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Cessation of telaprevir, fasting, and gabexate mesilate improved the pancreatitis. Although peginterferon and ribavirin treatment was continued, there was no recurrence of the pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography incidentally showed a pancreas divisum. We definitively diagnosed drug-induced acute pancreatitis due to telaprevir. PMID:25283229

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-03-01

    , mycophenolate mofetil, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nitisinone; Omalizumab, omapatrilat, ONYX-015, oxaliplatin; Paclitaxel, paclitaxel nanoparticles, panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pertuzumab, phosphatidylcholine-rich phospholipid mixture, pimecrolimus, pioglitazone hydrochloride, pramlintide acetate, prasterone; QR-333; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, ranolazine, rasagiline mesilate, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, ribavirin, rifabutin, risperidone, rituximab, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride, rotavirus vaccine; S-236, salmeterol xinafoate, sarizotan hydrochloride, sildenafil, sildenafil citrate, sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, tegaserod maleate, temozolomide, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, trabectedin, treprostinil sodium; Vandetanib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vatalanib succinate, vinflunine, virosome influenza vaccine, voriconazole; Zidovudine. PMID:16636723

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-01-01

    4; NBI-56418, NCX-4016, nesiritide, nicotine conjugate vaccine, NSC-330507; Oglufanide, omalizumab, oxipurinol; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, PEGylated interferon alfacon-1, perospirone hydrochloride, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plerixafor hydrochloride, PowderJect lidocaine, pradefovir mesylate, prasterone, pregabalin, Prostvac VF, PT-141, PTC-124, pyridoxamine; QS-21, quercetin; R-126638, R-411, ralfinamide, rasagiline mesilate, rF-PSA, RG-2077, rhThrombin, rimonabant hydrochloride, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine hydrochloride, rV-PSA; S-18886, S-303, seocalcitol, SGN-40, sitaxsentan sodium, SPP-301, St. John's Wort extract; Tadalafil, taxus, telithromycin, tenatoprazole, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, testosterone MDTS, testosterone transdermal patch, tgAAC-09, TH-9507, thioacetazone, tipifarnib, TQ-1011, trabectedin, travoprost, trimethoprim; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, valopicitabine, voriconazole; Xcellerated T cells. PMID:16179960

  6. EXCESS MORTALITY IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CHRONIC HEPATITIS C TREATED WITH LONG-TERM PEGINTERFERON

    PubMed Central

    Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Stoddard, Anne M.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Seeff, Leonard B.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Morishima, Chihiro; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Snow, Kristin K.; Lee, William M.; Fontana, Robert J.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Ghany, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic hepatitis C virus infection can cause chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and liver cancer. The HALT-C Trial was a prospective, randomized controlled study of long-term, low-dose peginterferon therapy in patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C who had failed to respond to a previous course of optimal antiviral therapy. The aim of this follow-up analysis was to describe the frequency and causes of death among this cohort of patients. Methods Deaths occurring during and after the HALT-C Trial were reviewed by a committee of investigators to determine the cause of death and to categorize each death as liver- or non-liver-related and as related or not to complications of peginterferon. Rates of liver transplantation were also assessed. Results Over a median of 5.7 years, 122 deaths occurred among 1,050 randomized patients (12%) of which 76 were considered liver-related (62%) and 46 non-liver-related (38%); 74 patients (7%) underwent liver transplantation. At 7 years, the cumulative mortality rate was higher in the treatment compared to the control group (20% versus 15%, p=0.049); the primary difference in mortality was in patients in the fibrosis compared to the cirrhosis stratum (14% versus 7%, p=0.01); comparable differences were observed when liver transplantation was included. Excess mortality, emerging after 3 years of treatment, was related largely to non-liver-related death; liver-related mortality was similar in the treatment and control groups. No specific cause of death accounted for the excess mortality, and only one death was suspected to be a direct complication of peginterferon. Conclusions Long-term maintenance peginterferon in patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C is associated with an excess overall mortality, which was primarily due to non-liver-related causes among patients with bridging fibrosis. PMID:21480316

  7. Pre-treatment prediction of response to peginterferon plus ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C genotype 3

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, Sebastián; Borzi, Silvia M; Dirchwolf, Melisa; Ridruejo, Ezequiel; Mendizabal, Manuel; Bessone, Fernando; Sirotinsky, María E; Giunta, Diego H; Trinks, Julieta; Olivera, Pablo A; Galdame, Omar A; Silva, Marcelo O; Fainboim, Hugo A; Gadano, Adrián C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pre-treatment factors associated with sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 treated with peginterferon and ribavirin (RBV). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed treatment naive, mono-infected HCV genotype 3 patients treated with peginterferon and RBV. Exclusion criteria included presence of other liver disease, alcohol consumption and African American or Asian ethnicity. The variables collected and compared between patients who achieved an SVR and patients who did not were as follows: gender, age, fibrosis stage, diabetes, body mass index, steatosis, INFL3 polymorphism, pre-treatment HCV-RNA, type of peginterferon, RBV dose and adherence. RESULTS: A total of 107 patients treated between June, 2004 and March, 2013 were included. Mean treatment duration was 25.1 (± 1.8) wk. Overall, 58% (62/107) of the patients achieved an SVR and 42% (45/107) did not. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, pre-treatment HCV-RNA ≥ 600000 UI/mL (OR = 0.375, 95%CI: 0.153-0.919, P = 0.032) and advanced fibrosis (OR = 0.278, 95%CI: 0.113-0.684, P = 0.005) were significantly associated with low SVR rates. In patients with pre-treatment HCV-RNA ≥ 600000 UI/mL and advanced fibrosis, the probability of achieving an SVR was 29% (95%CI: 13.1-45.2). In patients with pre-treatment HCV-RNA < 600000 UI/mL and mild to moderate fibrosis, the probability of achieving an SVR was 81% (95%CI: 68.8-93.4). CONCLUSION: In patients with HCV genotype 3 infections the presence of advance fibrosis and high pre-treatment viral load might be associated with poor response to peginterferon plus RBV. These patients could benefit the most from new direct antiviral agents-based regimes. PMID:25866607

  8. A randomized controlled trial adding fluvastatin to peginterferon and ribavirin for naïve genotype 1 hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Bader, T; Hughes, L D; Fazili, J; Frost, B; Dunnam, M; Gonterman, A; Madhoun, M; Aston, C E

    2013-09-01

    Fluvastatin or simvastatin has demonstrable antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) as monotherapy. The safety and efficacy of adding fluvastatin or simvastatin to peginterferon/ribavirin for 48 weeks was tested in HCV genotype 1 naïve-to-treatment veterans. Thirty-seven naïve-to-treatment genotype 1 HCV patients were randomized to either a control group (n = 20) to receive peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin or an experimental group (n = 18) to similarly receive peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin as well as fluvastatin 20 mg/day. In addition, seven patients who presented for HCV treatment already were on simvastatin and could not be withdrawn. These simvastatin users were not randomized but were entered into a concurrent prospective pilot arm. There were no unique safety issues with fluvastatin or simvastatin when these drugs were given with peginterferon/ribavirin for 48 weeks. Thirteen of 25 statin patients achieved sustained viral response (SVR), while 5 of 20 control patients achieved SVR. Analysis of SVR by intention-to-treat showed P = 0.078. In this phase 2 study, there were no safety issues with the addition of fluvastatin or simvastatin to peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks. There was a trend towards improvement in SVR when fluvastatin or simvastatin was administered with peginterferon/ribavirin. The size of the groups did not reach the prestudy size thought needed to show significant difference (type II error). These results support the significant results of two other larger randomized controlled trials reported using the same dose of fluvastatin in naïve-to-treatment genotype 1 HCV patients. PMID:23910646

  9. Reversible bilateral ototoxicity in a patient with chronic hepatitis B during peginterferon alpha-2a treatment.

    PubMed

    Gozdas, Hasan Tahsin; Karabay, Oguz

    2015-01-01

    Peginterferon alpha-2a (PEG IFN α-2a) is frequently used in chronic hepatitis B (CHB)treatment. Numerous adverse events can be noted during this therapy such as flu-like disease, rash, weight loss and depression. However, PEG IFN α-2a related ototoxicity seems to be an uncommon entity. Ototoxicity can be detected objectively by audiometry. In this paper, we present a case of CHB who developed reversible bilateral ototoxicity during PEG IFN α-2a treatment. Due to ototoxicity detected objectively by audiogram, treatment was ceased at sixth month and ototoxicity completely recovered one month after stopping the drug. PMID:25821325

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-11-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abatacept, Adalimumab, AdCD40L, Adefovir, Aleglitazar, Aliskiren fumarate, AM-103, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Amlodipine, Anakinra, Aprepitant, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Axitinib; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bimatoprost, Bortezomib, Bupropion/naltrexone; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, Certolizumab pegol, Ciclesonide, CYT-997; Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride cogramostim; Eltrombopag olamine, Emtricitabine, Escitalopram oxalate, Eslicarbazepine acetate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide, Ezetimibe; Fenretinide, Filibuvir, Fludarabine; Golimumab; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, HEV-239, HP-802-247, HPV-16/18 AS04, HPV-6/11/16/18, Human albumin, Human gammaglobulin; Imatinib mesylate, Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Invaplex 50 vaccine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lopinavir, Lumiliximab, LY-686017; Maraviroc, Mecasermin rinfabate; Narlaprevir; Ocrelizumab, Oral insulin, Oritavancin, Oxycodone hydrochloride/naloxone; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pazopanib hydrochloride, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Pitavastatin calcium, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, Prucalopride succinate; Raltegravir potassium, Ranibizumab, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salclobuzic acid sodium salt, SCY-635, Selenate sodium, Semapimod hydrochloride, Silodosin, Siltuximab, Silybin, Sirolimus-eluting stent, SIR-Spheres, Sunitinib malate; Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, alefacept, alemtuzumab, 3-AP, AP-12009, APC-8015, L-Arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arundic acid, avasimibe; Bevacizumab, bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, BMS-184476, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, BRL-55730, bryostatin 1; CEP-1347, cetuximab, cinacalcet hydrochloride, CP-461, CpG-7909; D-003, dabuzalgron hydrochloride, darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, DHA-paclitaxel, diflomotecan, DN-101, DP-b99, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, duramycin; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, EKB-569, elcometrine, enfuvirtide, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, ezetimibe; Fenretinide, fosamprenavir calcium, frovatriptan; GD2L-KLH conjugate vaccine, gefitinib, glufosfamide, GTI-2040; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin, hydroquinone, gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium; IL-4(38-37)-PE38KDEL, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; KRN-5500; LY-544344; MDX-210, melatonin, mepolizumab, motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, NSC-330507, NSC-683864; 1-Octanol, omalizumab, ortataxel; Pagoclone, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, phenoxodiol, pimecrolimus, plevitrexed, polyphenon E, pramlintide acetate, prasterone, pregabalin, PX-12; QS-21; Ragaglitazar, ranelic acid distrontium salt, RDP-58, recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repinotan hydrochloride, rhEndostatin, rh-Lactoferrin, (R)-roscovitine; S-8184, semaxanib, sitafloxacin hydrate, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, synthadotin

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-03-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity(R), the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Activated protein C concentrate, Ad-CD154, Adeno-Interferon gamma, alemtuzumab, APC-8024, 9-aminocamptothecin, aprepitant, l-arginine hydrochloride, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, asimadoline; O6-Benzylguanine, bevacizumab, Bi-20, binodenoson, biphasic insulin aspart, bivatuzumab, 186Re-bivatuzumab, BMS-181176, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, BQ-123, bryostatin 1; Carboxy- amidotriazole, caspofungin acetate, CB-1954, CC-4047, CDP-860, cerivastatin sodium, clevidipine, CTL-102; 3,4-DAP, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, desloratadine, DHA-paclitaxel, duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, eniluracil, ENMD-0997, eplerenone, eplivanserin, erlosamide, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, eszopiclone, everolimus, exatecan mesilate, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, FR-901228, FTY-720; Gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride; Hexyl insulin M2, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, iodine (I131) tositumomab, ISV-205, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; Levetiracetam, levocetirizine, linezolid, liposomal NDDP, lonafarnib, lopinavir, LY-156735; Mafosfamide cyclohexylamine salt, magnesium sulfate, maxacalcitol, meclinertant, melagatran, melatonin, MENT, mepolizumab, micafungin sodium, midostaurin, motexafin gadolinium; Nesiritide, NS-1209, NSC-601316, NSC-683864; Osanetant; Palonosetron hydrochloride, parecoxib sodium, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegylated OB protein, pemetrexed disodium, perillyl alcohol, picoplatin, pimecrolimus, pixantrone maleate, plevitrexed

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs:(R)-Flurbiprofen, 90Yttrium-DOTA-huJ591; ABT-510, ACP-103, Ad5-FGF4, adalimumab, ademetionine, AG-7352, alemtuzumab, Amb a 1 ISS-DNA, anakinra, apaziquone, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir sulfate; BAL-8557, bevacizumab, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, CERE-120, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilomilast, cizolirtine citrate, Cypher, cystemustine; Dalbavancin, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, denosumab, desmoteplase, dihydrexidine, dimethyl fumarate, dutasteride, DW-166HC; Eculizumab, enfuvirtide, entecavir, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, eszopiclone, etoricoxib, everolimus; Fallypride, febuxostat, fenretinide, fesoterodine, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gabapentin enacarbil, gefitinib; hMaxi-K, human papillomavirus vaccine, HYAL-CT1101; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, inolimomab, ISAtx-247; J591; Lacosamide, landiolol, lasofoxifene tartrate, lestaurtinib, lidocaine/prilocaine, linezolid, lixivaptan, lonafarnib, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lumiracoxib; Natalizumab, nesiritide; OC-108, omalizumab, onercept, OSC; Palifermin, palonosetron hydrochloride, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PD-MAGE-3 vaccine, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pelitinib, pitavastatin calcium, plerixafor hydrochloride, posaconazole, prasterone sulfate, pregabalin; Ramelteon, ranelic acid distrontium salt, rasburicase, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, RSD-1235, rufinamide, rupatadine fumarate; Sarizotan hydrochloride, SHL-749

  14. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: A-007, A6, adalimumab, adenosine triphosphate, alefacept, alemtuzumab, AllerVax Ragweed, amphora, anakinra, angiotensin-(1-7), anidulafungin, apomine, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride, avanafil; BAL-8557, becatecarin, bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-188797, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, brivudine; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, catumaxomab, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, CG-0070, ciclesonide, cinacalcet hydrochloride, clindamycin phosphate/benzoyl peroxide, cryptophycin 52, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darapladib, darbepoetin alfa, decitabine, deferasirox, desloratadine, dexanabinol, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, DMF, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; E-7010, edaravone, efalizumab, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, estradiol valerate/dienogest, eszopiclone, exenatide, ezetimibe; Fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gefitinib, gestodene, GYKI-16084; Hyaluronic acid, hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, indiplon, insulin glargine; Juzen-taiho-to; Lamivudine/zidovudine/abacavir sulfate, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, L-BLP-25, lenalidomide, levocetirizine, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lexatumumab, lidocaine/prilocaine, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; MAb-14.18, mitoquidone; Natalizumab, neridronic acid, neuradiab; Olpadronic acid sodium salt, omalizumab; p53-DC vaccine, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pemetrexed disodium, perifosine, pimecrolimus, prasterone, prasugrel, PRO-2000

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM), the drug discovery and development portal, http://www.thomsonreutersintegrity.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone caproate; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Aclidinium bromide, Adalimumab, Adefovir, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Apilimod mesylate, Aripiprazole, Axitinib, Azacitidine; Belotecan hydrochloride, Berberine iodide, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bryostatin 1; Calcipotriol/hydrocortisone, Carglumic acid, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Cixutumumab, Coumarin, Custirsen sodium; Darbepoetin alfa, Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Dasatinib, Denibulin hydrochloride, Denosumab, Diacetylmorphine, Dulanermin, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Enfuvirtide, Entecavir, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eplerenone, Escitalopram oxalate, Esomeprazole sodium, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fenofibrate/pravastatin sodium, Ferric carboxymaltose, Flavangenol, Fondaparinux sodium; Glutamine, GSK-1024850A; Hepatitis B hyperimmunoglobulin, Hib-MenC, HIV-LIPO-5; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Indacaterol maleate, Indibulin, Indium 111 (¹¹¹In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent vaccine, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin glulisine; Lapatinib ditosylate, Leucovorin/UFT; Maraviroc, Mecasermin, MMR-V, Morphine hydrochloride, Morphine sulfate/naltrexone hydrochloride, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium, Natalizumab; Oncolytic HSV; Paliperidone, PAN-811, Paroxetine, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Raltegravir potassium, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Rilpivirine

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-09-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: AAV1/SERCA2a, Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Adalimumab, Aliskiren fumarate, Ambrisentan, Aripiprazole, AT-7519, Atazanavir sulfate, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Azacitidine, Azelnidipine; Besifloxacin hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, Bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Budesonide/formoterol fumarate; CAIV-T, Carisbamate, Casopitant mesylate, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, Ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone, CTCE-9908; Dalcetrapib, Darunavir, Deferasirox, Desloratadine, Disitertide, Drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTA-H19, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Ecogramostim, Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Eribulin mesilate, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, EUR-1008, Everolimus-eluting coronary stent, Exenatide; Fampridine, Fluticasone furoate, Formoterol fumarate/fluticasone propionate, Fosamprenavir calcium, Fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, GS-7904L; HPV-6/11/16/18, Human Secretin, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Inalimarev/Falimarev, Indacaterol, Indacaterol maleate, Inhalable human insulin, Insulin detemir, Insulin glargine, Ixabepilone; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Loratadine/montelukast sodium, Lutropin alfa; MeNZB, Mepolizumab, Micafungin sodium, Morphine hydrochloride; Nabiximols, Nikkomycin Z; Olmesartan medoxomil, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Perifosine, PF-489791, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; QAX-576; Raltegravir potassium, Ramelteon, Rasagiline

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-10-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, [188Re]-P2045, 12B75, 89-12; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, Abatacept, Abiraterone acetate, ABT-869, Adalimumab, Ad-rh Endostatin, AI-700, Alemtuzumab, Alvimopan hydrate, Amrubicin hydrochloride, AP-12009, Apomab 7.3, Arformoterol tartrate, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Azacitidine, AZD-0530; Bevacizumab, BHT-3009, Biapenem, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Bremelanotide; CA9-SCAN, Calcitonin gene-related peptide, Canertinib dihydrochloride, Cannabidiol, Carboxyamidotriazole, Caspofungin acetate, Celgosivir, Certolizumab pegol, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Clevudine, CP-751871, Curcumin, Cx-401, Cypher; Darunavir, Decitabine, Deforolimus, Dexamet, Dipyridamole/prednisolone, Drospirenone, Drospirenone/estradiol, DTPw-HepB-Hib, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Efalizumab, Emtricitabine, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone; Ferumoxtran-10, Ferumoxytol, Fondaparinux sodium, Fosaprepitant dimeglumine; gamma-Hydroxybutyrate sodium, Gefitinib, Genistein, Ghrelin (human), Gimatecan, GM-CSF PMED, Golimumab, gp100 PMED; Imatinib mesylate, Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), IV Gamma-globulin; LA-419, Laropiprant, L-BLP-25, Levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, Lidocaine/prilocaine, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lumiracoxib, LY-2076962; Mepolizumab, Methylnaltrexone bromide, Mitiglinide calcium hydrate, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt, Myristyl nicotinate; Natalizumab, Nesiritide, Niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, Ozarelix; Palonosetron hydrochloride, Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), Pazopanib hydrochloride, Pegaptanib octasodium, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa- 2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pexelizumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, PRO-1762, Progesterone caproate, Prulifloxacin; Ramelteon, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Reparixin, Rosuvastatin calcium; Rotigotine; Satraplatin, Sertraline, Sipuleucel-T, SLIT-cisplatin, SNDX-275

  18. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, Ad5-FGF4, adeno-Interferon gamma, AE-941, AERx, alemtuzumab, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, alpharadin, anakinra, anatumomab mafenatox, ANG-453, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, AP-12009, aprepitant, aripiprazole, arsenic trioxide, astemizole, atlizumab, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BMS-188667, botulinum toxin type B, BufferGel; Caffeine, CDP-870, cetuximab, cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator, CP-461; Darbepoetin alfa, deferasirox, desloratadine, desoxyepothilone B, diflomotecan, dolasetron, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; ED-71, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EKB-569, eletriptan, EMD-72000, enfuvirtide, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib; Fampridine, ferumoxytol, fondaparinux sodium; Gadofosveset sodium, gastrazole, gefitinib, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, gepirone hydrochloride glutamine; hLM609, HSPPC-96, human insulin; IDD-1, imatinib mesylate, indisulam, inhaled insulin, ixabepilone; Keratinocyte growth factor; Lapatinib, laquinimod, LDP-02, LE-SN38, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, liposomal doxorubicin, liposomal NDDP, lopinavir, lumiracoxib, LY-156735; Morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, motexafin gadolinium, MS-27-275, MVA-5T4, MVA-Muc1-IL-2; Nemifitide ditriflutate, neridronic acid nitronaproxen, NSC-683864, NSC-703940, NVP-LAF-237; Oblimersen sodium, ocinaplon, oncomyc-NG, OPC-28326, ortataxel, ospemifene; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2(a), peginterferon alfa-2b, pegsunercept, pemetrexed disodium, pregabalin, prilocaine, pyridoxamine; RDP

  19. AIDSinfo Drug Database

    MedlinePlus

    ... B Virus Infection Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B (Recombinant) Vaccine Hepatitis B Vaccine Peginterferon Alfa-2a (HBV, HCV) ... 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58) Vaccine, Recombinant Human Papillomavirus Bivalent (types 16 and 18) Vaccine, ...

  20. Treatment Response and Long-Term Outcome of Peginterferon α and Ribavirin Therapy in Korean Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chang Ho; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yim, Sun Young; Suh, Sang Jun; Yim, Hyung Joon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Peginterferon plus ribavirin remains a standard therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in Korea. We investigated the efficacy and long-term outcome of peginterferon and ribavirin therapy in Korean patients with CHC, particularly in relation to the stage of liver fibrosis. Methods The incidence of sustained virological response (SVR), hepatic decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver-related death was analyzed in 304 patients with CHC; the patients were followed up for a median of 54 months. Results Among patients with HCV genotype 1, the SVR rate was 36.7% (18/49) and 67% (69/103) for patients with and without cirrhosis, respectively (p<0.001). For patients with non-1 HCV genotypes, the SVR rates were 86.0% (37/43) in cirrhotic patients and 86.2% (94/109) in noncirrhotic patients. SVR significantly reduced the risk of liver-related death, hepatic decompensation, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which had hazard ratios of 0.27, 0.16, and 0.22, respectively (all p<0.05). However, despite the SVR rate, patients with advanced fibrosis were still at risk of developing liver-related complications. Conclusions A relatively high SVR rate was achieved by peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy in Korean patients with CHC, which improved their long-term outcomes. However, all CHC patients with advanced hepatic fibrosis should receive close follow-up observations, even after successful antiviral treatment. PMID:27114417

  1. African Americans Respond Poorly to Hepatitis C Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    African Americans have a significantly lower response rate to treatment for chronic hepatitis C than non-Hispanic Whites, according to a new study led by Duke University Medical Center researchers. Some African Americans--19 percent--did respond to the drug combination of peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. But in non-Hispanic Whites with the…

  2. [Predicting side effects of the treatment of chronic hepatitis with peginterferon alpha-2A with ribaverin].

    PubMed

    Sarkisiants, N K; Grigorian, É G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to monitor the commonest side effects of the treatment of chronic hepatitis with peginterferon alpha-2A (PEG-IFN) and ribaverin (RBV) and the influence of various factors on their development. The work was done in the Department of Infectious Disease, Erevan State Medical University. Monitoring 16 adverse reactions was carried out with the use of special tables within 1, 2, 4 and 6 months after the onset of therapy in patients with genotypes 2 and 3 and in addition after 8, 10 and 12 months in patients with genotype 1. The influence of independent prognostic factors was estimated by logistic regression analysis. The commonest side effects of PEG-IFN plus RBV therapy were leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, weight loss, depression, fatigue, and insomnia that occurred at one time or another in more than half of the patients. Weight loss during therapy amounted to 8.36 kg (95% CI 6.7-10) (maximum 21 kg). Myalgia, anorexia, arthralgia, headache, alopecia, and vomiting were documented in 20-50% of the cases. Anemia, pruritis, eruption, erythema, and hair shedding at injection sites occurred in 1/4 of the patients. It is concluded that logistic regression analysis with matching selected prognostic factors permits to estimate the probability of such side effects as weight loss, flu-like syndrome, and myalgia. PMID:24159787

  3. Regional differences in hepatitis C treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin in Japan: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Kazuki; Kawasaki, Yohei; Yamada, Hiroshi; Masaki, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate regional differences in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin in Japan and to develop and validate statistical models for analysis of regional differences, using generalized linear mixed models. Methods Individuals with chronic HCV infection were identified from the Japanese Interferon Database (registered from December 2009 to April 2013). The total sustained virologic response rate and the rate in each prefecture were calculated. In the analysis using generalized linear mixed models, the following four models were constructed: 1) prefecture as a fixed effect, 2) prefecture and other confounding variables as fixed effects, 3) prefecture as a random effect, and 4) prefecture as a random effect and other confounding variables as fixed effects. The quality of the model fit was assessed using the Akaike information criterion and the Bayesian information criterion. All statistical analyses were performed using SAS Version 9.4 for Windows. Results From 36 prefectures, 16,349 cases were recorded in the study period. Of these, 4,677 were excluded according to certain criteria. The total sustained virologic response rate was 59.9% (range, 43.9%–71.6%). The statistical model including prefecture as a random effect and other confounding variables as fixed effects showed the best fit based on the Akaike information criterion (13,830.92) and Bayesian information criterion (13,845.17). Conclusion Regional differences may exist in HCV infection treatment in Japan. The model including prefecture as a random effect and other confounding variables as fixed effects was appropriate for analysis of such regional differences. Additional studies considering the medical situations of each patient would provide useful information that could contribute to improve and standardize HCV infection treatment. PMID:27042013

  4. Incidence, characterization, and clinical impact analysis of peginterferon beta1a immunogenicity in patients with multiple sclerosis in the ADVANCE trial

    PubMed Central

    White, Joleen T.; Newsome, Scott D.; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Bermel, Robert A.; Cui, Yue; Seddighzadeh, Ali; Hung, Serena; Crossman, Mary; Subramanyam, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficacy of interferon beta in multiple sclerosis (MS) can be dampened in patients who develop neutralizing antidrug antibodies (NAbs). Peginterferon beta1a is an interferon conjugated with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety. Pegylation increases a drug’s half life and exposure, and may also reduce immunogenicity. Objective: The objective of this study was to characterize the incidence and impact of immunogenicity to peginterferon beta1a over 2 years in patients with MS. Methods: Patients with relapsing–remitting MS (N = 1512) were randomized to subcutaneous peginterferon beta1a 125 μg every 2 or 4 weeks, or placebo, for 1 year; patients in the placebo group were rerandomized to active treatment in year 2. The incidence and titers of binding antibodies (BAbs) and NAbs to interferon and antibodies to PEG (anti-PEG) were assessed in analytically validated assays. The clinical impact of immunogenicity on relapse and magnetic resonance imaging endpoints was evaluated. Results: Over 2 years, 6%, less than 1%, and 7% of patients developed anti-interferon BAbs, NAbs, and anti-PEG antibodies, respectively. There was no discernible clinically meaningful effect of antibody status on the pharmacodynamic, efficacy, or safety parameters evaluated, although these analyses were limited by the low incidence of treatment-emergent antibodies. Conclusion: The treatment effect of peginterferon beta1a in patients with relapsing–remitting MS is not expected to be attenuated by immunogenicity. PMID:27366230

  5. Peginterferon Lambda-1a Is Associated with a Low Incidence of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, Paul; Hillson, Jan; Gray, Todd; Shemanski, Lynn; Dimitrova, Dessislava; Srinivasan, Subasree

    2015-11-01

    Peginterferon alfa (alfa) increases the risk of autoimmune disease. Peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda) acts through a receptor with a more liver-specific distribution compared to the alfa receptor. In a phase-2b study, 525 treatment-naive patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection received ribavirin and Lambda interferon (120, 180, or 240 μg) or alfa interferon (180 μg) for 24 (genotypes 2 and 3) or 48 (genotypes 1 and 4) weeks. Retrospective analysis found that adverse events of MedDRA-coded thyroid dysfunction and abnormal levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were significantly more frequent with alfa versus Lambda (12% versus 2.6% and 15.2% versus 3.4%, respectively, both P<0.0001). Most Lambda recipients with abnormal TSH had levels below the lower limit of normal; the frequency of low and high TSH was similar in alfa recipients with abnormal TSH. Blinded review by an endocrinologist found that new-onset primary hypothyroidism or painless thyroiditis was less frequent with Lambda versus alfa (0.5% and 1.8% versus 5.3% and 7.5%, respectively, P<0.0001). Most TSH elevations reflected new-onset hypothyroidism requiring treatment, while most markedly suppressed TSH values reflected probable painless thyroiditis and resolved without sequelae. In conclusion, HCV-infected patients treated with Lambda/ribavirin experienced fewer adverse events of thyroid dysfunction compared with patients treated with alfa/ribavirin. PMID:26376344

  6. Highly effective peginterferon α-2a plus ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C in hemophilia in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Suh Yoon; Lee, Hyun Woong; Lee, Youn Jae; Park, Sung Jae; Yoo, Ki Young

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a major comorbidity in patients with hemophilia. However, there are no published data on the efficacy of antiviral therapy in Korea. We assessed the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with peginterferon α-2a plus ribavirin for CHC in hemophilia. Methods Patients (n=115) were enrolled between March 2007 and December 2008. Seventy-seven patients were genotype 1 or 6, and 38 patients were genotype 2 or 3. We evaluated rapid virologic responses (RVRs), early virologic response (EVRs), end-of-treatment response (ETRs), sustained virologic response (SVRs), and relapses. Safety evaluations included adverse events and laboratory tests. Results Eleven patients were excluded from the study because they had been treated previously. Among the remaining 104 treatment-naïve patients, RVR was achieved in 64 (60.6%), ETR was achieved in 95 (91.3%), and SVR was achieved in 89 (85.6%). Relapse occurred in eight patients (8.9%). Common adverse events were hair loss (56.7%) and headache (51.0%). Common hematologic adverse events were neutropenia (22.1%), anemia (27.9%), and thrombocytopenia (3.8%). However, there were no serious adverse events such as bleeding. RVR was the only predictor of SVR in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Peginterferon α-2a plus ribavirin combination treatment produced a favorable response rate in CHC patients with hemophilia without serious adverse events. PMID:26157749

  7. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses of annualized relapse rate over 2 years in the ADVANCE trial of peginterferon beta-1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Scott D; Kieseier, Bernd C; Arnold, Douglas L; Shang, Shulian; Liu, Shifang; Hung, Serena; Sabatella, Guido

    2016-09-01

    ADVANCE was a 2-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 study in 1512 patients aged 18-65 years with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, which demonstrated that peginterferon beta-1a 125 mcg administered subcutaneously every 2 or 4 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rate (ARR) compared with placebo. This analysis examined ARR over 2 years in ADVANCE across subgroups. Patients were treated with peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks, or placebo during Year 1. Thereafter, patients on placebo were re-randomized to peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks (delayed treatment). Subgroup analyses were conducted by demographics and baseline disease characteristics. The following results compared ARR in these subgroups for patients in continuous 2-week treatment versus continuous 4-week treatment. ARR was similar in most demographic and baseline disease characteristic subgroups evaluated within the peginterferon beta-1a every-2-week arm or every-4-week arm over 2 years. Although for both doses some differences in the point estimates for ARR were noted among the subgroups, considerable overlap in the confidence intervals suggested that the efficacy of peginterferon beta-1a is similar in all patients irrespective of gender, age, body weight, geographical region, and disease activity at initiation of treatment. Within each peginterferon beta-1a dosing group, ARR was generally similar across most subgroups. PMID:27314959

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-09-01

    -2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Perillyl alcohol, Perphenazine 4-aminobutyrate, PeviPRO/breast cancer, PF-03814735, PHA-739358, Pimecrolimus, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Prasterone, Prasugrel, Pregabalin, Prucalopride, PRX-08066; rAAV2-TNFR:Fc, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranibizumab, rCD154-CLL, Retapamulin, RTS,S/SBAS2, rV-PSA-TRICOM/rF-PSA-TRICOM; SG-2000, Sinecatechins, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sorafenib, SP-1640, Strontium malonate, Succinobucol, Sunitinib malate; Taxus, Teduglutide, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telbivudine, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Tocilizumab; Ustekinumab; V-5 Immunitor, Voriconazole, Vorinostat; Xience V, XL-184, XL-647, XL-765; Y-39983, Zibotentan. PMID:18985183

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    -globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; LA-419, lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lidocaine/prilocaine, liposomal cisplatin, lutropin alfa; Matuzumab, MBP(82-98), mecasermin, MGCD-0103, MMR-V, morphine hydrochloride, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, neridronic acid, nesiritide, nilotinib, NSC-330507; O6-benzylguanine, olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, omalizumab; Panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pemetrexed disodium, perospirone hydrochloride, pexelizumab, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, posaconazole, pramiconazole, prasugrel, pregabalin, prilocaine; rAAV-GAD65, raclopride, rasagiline mesilate, retapamulin, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, rufinamide; SarCNU, SB-743921, SHL-749, sirolimus-eluting stent, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib; TachoSil, tadalafil, talampanel, Taxus, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, temsirolimus, tenatoprazole, teriflunomide, tetrathiomolybdate, ticilimumab, timcodar dimesilate, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TPI, tramiprosate, trifluridine/TPI, trimethoprim; Ularitide, Urocortin 2; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, valproate magnesium, valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vitespen, vofopitant hydrochloride, volociximab, vorinostat; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, zotarolimus, zotarolimus-eluting stent. PMID:17136234

  10. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-06-01

    , Nemonoxacin, Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol; Oblimersen sodium, Ocriplasmin, Olmesartan medoxomil, Omacetaxine mepesuccinate; Paclitaxel-eluting stent, Pagoclone, Paliperidone, Panitumumab, Pazopanib hydrochloride, PCV7, Pegaptanib octasodium, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b/ ribavirin, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Perifosine, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Plitidepsin, Posaconazole, Pregabalin, Progesterone capriate; Raltegravir potassium, Ramucirumab, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Rasburicase, Recombinant Bet V1, Recombinant human insulin, rhFSH, Rolofylline, Romidepsin, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium; Sapacitabine, Sevelamer carbonate, Sinecatechins, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sitagliptin phosphate monohydrate, SN-29244, Sorafenib, Sugammadex sodium, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tafenoquine, Talnetant, Tanezumab, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tasocitinib citrate, Technosphere/Insulin, Telcagepant, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Teriparatide, Ticagrelor, Tigecycline, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tocilizumab, TS-041; Ulipristal acetate, Urtoxazumab, Ustekinumab; Vandetanib, Varenicline tartrate, Vicriviroc, Voriconazole, Vorinostat, VRC-HIVADV014-00-VP, VRC-HIVDNA016-00-VP; Zoledronic acid monohydrate. PMID:20664824

  11. Factors associated with early virological response to peginterferon-α-2a/ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    García-Samaniego, Javier; Romero, Miriam; Granados, Rafael; Alemán, Remedios; Jorge Juan, Miguel; Suárez, Dolores; Pérez, Ramón; Castellano, Gregorio; González-Portela, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of sociodemographic/clinical factors on early virological response (EVR) to peginterferon/ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in clinical practice. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study in Hepatology Units of 91 Spanish hospitals. CHC patients treated with peginterferon α-2a plus ribavirin were included. EVR was defined as undetectable hepatitis C virus (HCV)-ribonucleic acid (RNA) or ≥ 2 log HCV-RNA decrease after 12 wk of treatment. A bivariate analysis of sociodemographic and clinical variables associated with EVR was carried out. Independent factors associated with an EVR were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis that included the following baseline demographic and clinical variables: age (≤ 40 years vs > 40 years), gender, race, educational level, marital status and family status, weight, alcohol and tobacco consumption, source of HCV infection, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) (≤ 85 IU/mL vs > 85 IU/mL), serum ferritin, serum HCV-RNA concentration (< 400 000 vs ≥ 400 000), genotype (1/4 vs 3/4), cirrhotic status and ribavirin dose (800/1000/1200 mg/d). RESULTS: A total of 1014 patients were included in the study. Mean age of the patients was 44.3 ± 9.8 years, 70% were male, and 97% were Caucasian. The main sources of HCV infection were intravenous drug abuse (25%) and blood transfusion (23%). Seventy-eight percent were infected with HCV genotype 1/4 (68% had genotype 1) and 22% with genotypes 2/3. The HCV-RNA level was > 400 000 IU/mL in 74% of patients. The mean ALT and AST levels were 88.4 ± 69.7 IU/mL and 73.9 ± 64.4 IU/mL, respectively, and mean GGT level was 82 ± 91.6 IU/mL. The mean ferritin level was 266 ± 284.8 μg/L. Only 6.2% of patients presented with cirrhosis. All patients received 180 mg of peginterferon α-2a. The most frequently used ribavirin doses were 1000 mg/d (41

  12. Effect of Peginterferon or Ribavirin Dosing on Efficacy of Therapy With Telaprevir in Treatment-Experienced Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C and Advanced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Janczewska, Ewa; Flisiak, Robert; Zarebska-Michaluk, Dorota; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Berak, Hanna; Dobracka, Beata; Librant-Suska, Marta; Lojewski, Wladyslaw; Jurczyk, Krzysztof; Musialik, Joanna; Postawa-Klosińska, Barbara; Wroblewski, Jacek; Augustyniak, Krystyna; Dudziak, Marek; Olszok, Iwona; Ruszala, Agata; Pisula, Arkadiusz; Lapinski, Tadeusz; Kryczka, Wieslaw; Horban, Andrzej; Dobracki, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the safety, efficacy, and impact of ribavirin and peginterferon dose reduction on complete early virologic response and sustained virologic response (SVR) to triple therapy with telaprevir in treatment-experienced patients with advanced liver fibrosis. Treatment was initiated for 211 patients who failed treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin, with bridging fibrosis (F3, n = 68) or cirrhosis (F4, n = 143), including 103 (49%) null-responders (NR), 30 (14%) partial responders (PR), and 78 (37%) relapsers (REL). Impaired liver function (ILF) platelets <100,000/mm3 or albumin <35 g/L were present in 40 patients. The distribution of hepatitis C virus subtypes was: 1a, 1b, or 1, with undetermined subtype for 10 (5%), 187 (89%), and 14 (6%) patients, respectively. Treatment was started with peginterferon alpha-2a or alpha-2b, ribavirin, and telaprevir at standard doses. The overall SVR24 rate was 56% and was lower in cirrhotic patients (NR: 35%, PR: 40%, and REL: 63%, respectively) than in patients with bridging fibrosis (NR: 50%, PR: 75%, and REL: 75%, respectively). The lowest probability of SVR24 was in NRs with ILF (26%). The SVR24 rate significantly decreased in NRs receiving <60% vs >60% of the total ribavirin dose (23% vs 44%, respectively) or <80% vs >80% of the total ribavirin dose (33% vs 48%, respectively). A significant SVR24 decrease was noted subsequent to a total peginterferon dose reduction, both when comparing patients who received <60% vs >60% of the total dose (NR: 0% vs 44%; REL: 33% vs 68%) and patients who received <80% vs >80% of the total dose (NR: 17% vs 50%; REL: 46% vs 71%). Serious adverse events were observed in 31 patients (15%). Deaths occurred in 4 patients. All of the deceased subjects were cirrhotic members of the ILF (baseline serum albumin level <35 g/L and/or platelet count <100,000/mm3) group. Ribavirin dose reduction did not affect efficacy in REL but did in NR. Peginterferon dose reduction

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Adding Ribavirin to Interferon or Peginterferon in Treatment of Hepatitis C Infection in Patients With Thalassemia: A Systematic Review on Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Aminizadeh, Ehsan; Alavian, Seyed Moayyed; Akbari Sari, Ali; Ebrahimi Daryani, Nasser; Behnava, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Context Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver-morbidity and mortality among patients with thalassemia. Peginterferon plus ribavirin is currently the recommended therapy for hepatitis C infection in patients do not have thalassemia, but using ribavirin in patients with thalassemia is restricted due to its hemolytic effect. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding ribavirin to peginterferon or interferon, authors performed a systematic review on the available literatures. Evidence Acquisition Trials were identified through electronic database, manual searches of journals and bibliographies and approaching authors of trials. Randomized trials that enrolled patients with a diagnosis of thalassemia and chronic hepatitis C infection treated with interferon or peginterferon with or without ribavirin were included. Two investigators independently evaluated the trials for inclusion criteria, risk of bias and data extraction. The primary outcomes were sustained virological response (SVR), liver-related morbidity, mortality and adverse events. The odds ratios from each trial were calculated individually and in the subgroup analysis of trials. Data were analyzed with fixed-effect model. Results Three randomized clinical trials with 92 patients were included. All three trials had unclear risk of bias. Compared with peginterferon monotherapy, adding ribavirin to peginterferon had significant beneficial effect on sustained virological response (OR = 3.44, 95% CI: 1.18 - 10.06). There was no significant difference between combination therapy and monotherapy in the end of treatment achievement response. Other than about 30% increase in blood transfusion due to anemia that returned to normal level 2 - 3 months after treatment, there was no significant increase in side effects followed by adding ribavirin to pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN). Data were insufficient to determine the impact of genotype, viral load and age on the response to treatment

  14. Aplastic anemia and severe pancytopenia during treatment with peg-interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Sabela; Calleja, Jose L; Campillo, Ana; Carrión, Jose A; Broquetas, Teresa; Perello, Christie; de la Revilla, Juan; Mariño, Zoe; Londoño, María-Carlota; Sánchez-Tapias, Jose M; Urbano-Ispizua, Álvaro; Forns, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Telaprevir and Boceprevir are the first direct acting antivirals approved for chronic hepatitis C in combination with peg-interferon alfa and ribavirin. Pancytopenia due to myelotoxicity caused by these drugs may occur, but severe hematological abnormalities or aplastic anemia (AA) have not been described. We collected all cases of severe pancytopenia observed during triple therapy with telaprevir in four Spanish centers since approval of the drug in 2011. Among 142 cirrhotic patients receiving treatment, 7 cases of severe pancytopenia (5%) were identified and three were consistent with the diagnosis of AA. Mean age was 59 years, five patients had compensated cirrhosis and two patients had severe hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation. Severe pancytopenia was diagnosed a median of 10 wk after the initiation of therapy. Three patients had pre-treatment hematological abnormalities related to splenomegaly. In six patients, antiviral treatment was interrupted at the onset of hematological abnormalities. Two patients died due to septic complications and one patient due to acute alveolar hemorrhage. The remaining patients recovered. Severe pancytopenia and especially AA, are not rare during triple therapy with telaprevir in patients with advanced liver disease. Close monitoring is imperative in this setting to promptly detect serious hematological disorders and to prevent further complications. PMID:25954117

  15. Aplastic anemia and severe pancytopenia during treatment with peg-interferon, ribavirin and telaprevir for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Lens, Sabela; Calleja, Jose L; Campillo, Ana; Carrión, Jose A; Broquetas, Teresa; Perello, Christie; de la Revilla, Juan; Mariño, Zoe; Londoño, María-Carlota; Sánchez-Tapias, Jose M; Urbano-Ispizua, Álvaro; Forns, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    Telaprevir and Boceprevir are the first direct acting antivirals approved for chronic hepatitis C in combination with peg-interferon alfa and ribavirin. Pancytopenia due to myelotoxicity caused by these drugs may occur, but severe hematological abnormalities or aplastic anemia (AA) have not been described. We collected all cases of severe pancytopenia observed during triple therapy with telaprevir in four Spanish centers since approval of the drug in 2011. Among 142 cirrhotic patients receiving treatment, 7 cases of severe pancytopenia (5%) were identified and three were consistent with the diagnosis of AA. Mean age was 59 years, five patients had compensated cirrhosis and two patients had severe hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation. Severe pancytopenia was diagnosed a median of 10 wk after the initiation of therapy. Three patients had pre-treatment hematological abnormalities related to splenomegaly. In six patients, antiviral treatment was interrupted at the onset of hematological abnormalities. Two patients died due to septic complications and one patient due to acute alveolar hemorrhage. The remaining patients recovered. Severe pancytopenia and especially AA, are not rare during triple therapy with telaprevir in patients with advanced liver disease. Close monitoring is imperative in this setting to promptly detect serious hematological disorders and to prevent further complications. PMID:25954117

  16. High-Dose Recombinant Interferon Alfa-2B, Ipilimumab, or Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV High Risk Melanoma That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Metastatic Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Cutaneous Melanoma; Stage III Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVB Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck; Stage IVC Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck

  17. Elevated on-treatment levels of serum IFN-gamma is associated with treatment failure of peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Ying; Huang, Ching-I; Dai, Chia-Yen; Wang, Shu-Chi; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Liang, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Hung; Hou, Nai-Jen; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection had been associated with cytokine imbalance. Cytokine dynamics in response to peginterferon/ribavirin therapy have an impact on the treatment efficacy for HCV patients. Ninety-two treatment-naive chronic hepatitis C patients were treated with 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy according to their viral genotypes. Sustained virologic response (SVR) is defined as undetectable HCV RNA throughout a 24-week post-treatment follow-up period. Dynamic serum levels of the following cytokines: (1) Th1-mediated cytokines: IFN-γ, interleukin-2, and TNF-alpha; (2)Th2-mediated cytokines: interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-6, and interleukin-10 and (3)immuno-modulatory cytokines: interleukin-1β, interleukin-8, and interleukin-12 were determined by Fluorescent Bead immunoassay. Serial dynamic cytokine expression demonstrated that not only elevated IFN-γ concentrations at specific time points but also the total IFN-γ amount was strongly linked to non-response in peginterferon/ribavirin therapy. IFN-γ levels could serve as an independent predictor for SVR analyzed by multivariate logistic regression test. The accuracy of discriminating responders from non-responders was acceptable when IFN-γ cut-off levels were set at 180, 120, and 40 pg/ml at the 4th week, 12th week, and end-of-treatment of therapy, respectively. Elevated on-treatment IFN-γ concentration was significantly associated with treatment failure among interleukin-28B rs8099917TT carriers and those patients failed to achieve rapid virologic response. PMID:26965318

  18. Simeprevir added to peginterferon and ribavirin lessens time with fatigue, depressive symptoms and functional limitations in patients with chronic hepatitis C compared with peginterferon and ribavirin: results from 1161 patients in the QUEST-1, QUEST-2 and PROMISE studies.

    PubMed

    Scott, J; Gilles, L; Fu, M; Brohan, E; Panter, C; Arbuckle, R; Jessner, W; Beumont, M

    2015-08-01

    The value of adding simeprevir (SMV) vs placebo (PBO) to peginterferon and ribavirin (PR) for treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection was examined using patient-reported outcomes (PROs); further, concordance of PROs with virology endpoints and adverse events (AEs) was explored. Patients (n = 768 SMV/PR, n = 393 PBO/PR) rated fatigue (FSS), depressive symptoms (CES-D) and functional impairment (WPAI: Hepatitis C Productivity, Daily Activity and Absenteeism) at baseline and throughout treatment in three randomised, double-blind trials comparing the addition of SMV or PBO during initial 12 weeks of PR. PR was administered for 48 weeks (PBO group) and 24/48 weeks (SMV group) using a response-guided therapy (RGT) approach. Mean PRO scores (except Absenteeism) worsened from baseline to Week 4 to the same extent in both groups but reverted after Week 24 for SMV/PR and only after Week 48 for PBO/PR. Accordingly, there was a significantly lower area under the curve (baseline-Week 60, AUC60 ) and fewer weeks with clinically important worsening of scores in the SMV/PR group at any time point. Incidences of patients with fatigue and anaemia AEs were similar in both groups, but FSS scores showed that clinically important increases in fatigue lasted a mean of 6.9 weeks longer with PBO/PR (P < 0.001). PRO score subgroup analysis indicated better outcomes for patients who met the criteria for RGT or achieved sustained virological response 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12); differences in mean PRO scores associated with fibrosis level were only observed with PBO/PR. Greater efficacy of SMV/PR enabled reduced treatment duration and reduced time with PR-related AEs without adding to AE severity. PMID:25487355

  19. Management Strategies for Flu-Like Symptoms and Injection-Site Reactions Associated with Peginterferon Beta-1a

    PubMed Central

    Centonze, Diego; Newsome, Scott D.; Huang, DeRen; Robertson, Christopher; You, Xiaojun; Sabatella, Guido; Evilevitch, Vladimir; Leahy, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Flu-like symptoms (FLSs) and injection-site reactions (ISRs) have been reported with interferon beta treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS). We sought to obtain consensus on the characteristics/management of FLSs/ISRs in patients with relapsing-remitting MS based on experiences from the randomized, placebo-controlled ADVANCE study of peginterferon beta-1a. Methods: ADVANCE investigators with a predefined number of enrolled patients were eligible to participate in a consensus-generating exercise using a modified Delphi method. An independent steering committee oversaw the development of two sequential Delphi questionnaires. An average rating (AR) of 2.7 or more was defined as consensus a priori. Results: Thirty and 29 investigators (ie, responders) completed questionnaires 1 and 2, respectively, representing 374 patients from ADVANCE. Responders reported that the incidence/duration of FLSs/ISRs in their typical patient generally declined after 3 months of treatment. Responders reached consensus that FLSs typically last up to 24 hours (AR = 3.17) and have mild/moderate effects on activities of daily living (AR = 3.34). Patients should initiate acetaminophen/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment on a scheduled basis (AR = 3.31) and change the timing of injection (AR = 3.28) to manage FLSs. Injection-site rotation/cooling and drug administration at room temperature (all AR ≥ 3.10) were recommended for managing ISRs. Patient education on FLSs/ISRs was advocated before treatment initiation. Conclusions: Delphi responders agreed on the management strategies for FLSs/ISRs and agreed that patient education is critical to set treatment expectations and promote adherence. PMID:27551246

  20. Nanomedicines in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection in Asian patients: optimizing use of peginterferon alfa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Hua; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Asia is endemic for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which is the leading cause of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation worldwide. HCV has six major genotypes and each HCV genotype has its specific geographic distribution. HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 6 are common in Asia. The aim of HCV treatment is to eradicate the virus by effective therapeutic agents; viral clearance is durable after long-term post-treatment follow-up. In most Asian countries, peginterferon alfa (PEG-IFN α) in combination with ribavirin remains the standard of care, and the overall sustained viral response (SVR) rate in Asian HCV patients is higher than that in Western patients. The differences are most significant in patients with HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1) infection, which is attributed to the higher frequency of IFN-responsive or favorable interleukin-28B (IL-28B) genotype in Asian populations than in other ethnic populations. In addition, the introduction of response-guided therapy, where the optimized treatment duration is based on the early viral kinetics during the first 12 weeks of treatment, increases the SVR rate. Recently, telaprevir or boceprevir-based triple therapy was found to further improve the SVR rate in treated and untreated HCV-1 patients and has become the new standard of care in Western and some Asian countries. Many novel direct-acting antiviral agents, either in combination with PEG-IFN α plus ribavirin or used as IFN-free regimens are under active investigation. At the time of this writing, simeprevir and sofosbuvir have been approved in the US. Because the SVR rates in Asian HCV patients receiving PEG-IFN α plus ribavirin therapy are high, health care providers should judiciously determine the clinical usefulness of these novel agents on the basis of treatment duration, anticipated viral responses, patient tolerance, financial burdens, and drug accessibility. PMID:24812506

  1. Predictors of psychopathological outcome during peg-interferon and ribavirin therapy in patients with chronic HCV-correlated hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Prati, Gianmaria; Palazzo, M Carlotta; Rumi, Maria Grazia; Cavallaro, Flaminia; Aghemo, Alessio; Colombo, Massimo; Altamura, A Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Peg-interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy is reported to induce psychiatric symptoms and syndromes in 20% of patients treated for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection. Present study was aimed to quantify the phenomenon and assess the influence of psychiatric counseling over antiviral completion rate and the use of psychometric tools, in terms of prediction of psychopathological outcome. Ninety-six HCV patients were assessed, before antiviral treatment, by means of the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), Symptom Checklist-90, and Internal State Scale (ISS). Sociodemographic and clinical variables and completion rate were collected. Binary logistic regression was performed to evaluate whether scores were predictive of psychiatric visit, development of psychiatric disorders, and need for treatment. Ninety-five patients (99%) completed antiviral treatment; 27 subjects (29%) needed psychiatric visit: among them, mood disorder was diagnosed in 15 (16%) and were pharmacologically treated. Baseline SDS and MDQ higher scores were found to be predictive of psychiatric visit [odds ratio (OR)=1.258, P<0.001 and OR=1.425, P=0.05, respectively]. Furthermore, higher MDQ score (P=0.017) and ISS hostility scores (OR=1.048, P=0.014) at baseline predicted the subsequent development of mood episodes, while ISS activation correlated negatively (OR=0.948, P=0.009). Finally, the need for treatment was predicted by higher scores at the MDQ and ISS activation items (OR=2.467, P=0.030; OR=0.970, P=0.038). Present findings suggest that psychiatric counseling may be needed in almost 30% of HCV patients on antiviral treatment, with positive influence over the completion rate. Baseline higher scores at psychometric questionnaires-MDQ-in particular, predictors of psychopathological outcome during Peg-IFN and RBV therapy in patients with chronic HCV-correlated hepatitis reflecting individual functioning before starting antiviral therapy and positive history

  2. High post-treatment absolute monocyte count predicted hepatocellular carcinoma risk in HCV patients who failed peginterferon/ribavirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Ming; Lin, Chun-Che; Huang, Pi-Teh; Wen, Chen-Fan

    2016-06-01

    Salient studies have investigated the association between host inflammatory response and cancer. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that peripheral absolute monocyte counts (AMC) could impart an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients after a failed peginterferon/ribavirin (PR) combination therapy. A total of 723 chronic HCV-infected patients were treated with PR, of which 183 (25.3 %) patients did not achieve a sustained virological response (non-SVR). Post-treatment AMC values were measured at 6 months after end of PR treatment. Fifteen (2.8 %) of 540 patients with an SVR developed HCC during a median follow-up period of 41.4 months, and 14 (7.7 %) of 183 non-SVR patients developed HCC during a median follow-up of 36.8 months (log rank test for SVR vs. non-SVR, P = 0.002). Cox regression analysis revealed that post-treatment AFP level (HR 1.070; 95 % CI = 1.024-1.119, P = 0.003) and post-treatment aspartate aminotransferase (AST)-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) ≥0.5 (HR 4.401; 95 % CI = 1.463-13.233, P = 0.008) were independent variables associated with HCC development for SVR patients. For non-SVR patients, diabetes (HR 5.750; 95 % CI = 1.387-23.841, P = 0.016), post treatment AMC ≥370 mm(-3) (HR 5.805; 95 % CI = 1.268-26.573, P = 0.023), and post-treatment APRI ≥1.5 (HR 10.905; 95 % CI = 2.493-47.697, P = 0.002) were independent risks associated with HCC. In conclusion, post-treatment AMC has a role in prognostication of HCC development in HCV-infected patients who failed to achieve an SVR after PR combination therapy. PMID:26662957

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of peginterferon beta-1a compared with interferon beta-1a and glatiramer acetate in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Luis; Guo, Shien; Kinter, Elizabeth; Fay, Monica

    2016-07-01

    Objective Peginterferon beta-1a 125 mcg, administered subcutaneously (SC) every 2 weeks, a new disease-modifying therapy (DMT) for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014. This study assesses the cost-effectiveness of peginterferon beta-1a vs interferon beta-1a (44 mcg SC 3 times per week) and glatiramer acetate (20 mg SC once-daily) in the treatment of RRMS from the perspective of a US payer over 10 years. Methods A Markov cohort economic model was developed for this analysis. The model predicts disability progression, occurrence of relapses and other adverse events and translates them into quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs. Natural history data were obtained from the placebo arm of the ADVANCE trial of peginterferon beta-1a, the London Ontario (Canada) database and a large population-based MS survey. Comparative efficacy of each DMT vs placebo was obtained from a network meta-analysis. Costs (in 2014 US dollars) were sourced from public databases and literature. Clinical and economic outcomes were discounted at 3% per year. Results Over 10 years, peginterferon beta-1a was dominant (i.e., more effective and less costly), with cost-savings of $22,070 and additional 0.06 QALYs when compared with interferon beta-1a 44 mcg and with cost-savings of $19,163 and 0.07 QALYs gained when compared with glatiramer acetate 20 mg. Results were most sensitive to variations in the treatment effect of each DMT, treatment acquisition costs of each DMT and the time horizon. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that peginterferon beta-1a remains dominant in >90% of 5,000 replications compared with either DMTs. Conclusion This analysis suggests that long-term treatment with peginterferon beta-1a improves clinical outcomes at reduced costs compared with interferon beta-1a 44 mcg and glatiramer acetate 20 mg and should be a valuable addition to managed care formularies for treating

  4. [Treatment of multiple myeloma with high-dose chemotherapy and transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells and subsequent maintenance therapy with interferon alfa-2b or interferon alfa 2b and dexamethasone. Report of the ongoing study of the "4W" Czech Myeloma Group].

    PubMed

    Adam, Z; Krejcí, M; Bacovský, J; Hejlová, N; Kuca, B; Svojgrová, M; Franková, H; Gumulec, J; Janca, J; Veprek, K; Januska, B; Lehanka, F; Rezek, Z; Praskac, P; Cahová, S; Vránová, M; Papajík, T; Králová, E; Novotná, J; Scudla, V; Koza, V; Drbal, J; Faber, E; Mareschová, I; Hájek, R

    1998-07-01

    We report our results with high-dose chemotherapy in previously untreated multiple myeloma patients (4 courses of VAD chemotherapy, collection of PBSC after priming with cyclophosphamide, 5 g/m2, high-dose chemotherapy with melphalan, 200 mg/m2). Second transplantation was indicated only for patients who did not achieve remission after the first high-dose therapy (paraprotein lower than 25% of the pretreatment value). For the second transplantation melphalan (200 mg/m2) with methylprednisolone (1.5 g for 5 days) were used as conditioning regimen. After high-dose therapy all patients were randomized into two arms of maintenance therapy: interferon alpha-2b or sequential maintenance therapy (interferon alpha-2b for 3 months followed after 4 week pause by 40 mg of dexamethasone days 1-4, 10-13 and 20-23. The administration of interferon alpha was resumed four weeks after the last dexamethasone for next three months. The maintenance therapy continued for 48 months or until the progression. Fifty-five patients were enrolled in the study from January 1996 to August 1997. Thirty-five patients have undergone the first transplantation and 57% of them reached complete remission. There were 10% of non-responders after the first high-dose regimen. The mean time to reach white blood cell count above 1 x 10(9)/L after the application of high dose melphalan and platelets more than 50 x 10(9)/L were 12.2 (range 6-16 days) and 12.4 (range 0-25 days), respectively. Grade 4 mucositis according to SWOG classification requiring total parenteral nutrition was presented in 40% of the patients. The mean number of 1 unit of platelets and 2 units of packed red blood cells transfusions were given within the posttransplant period. Early transplant related mortality was 3%. This paper describes the response and tolerance of each particular step of therapy. The follow-up has been too short to evaluate event-free and overall survivals. PMID:9748876

  5. Analysis of peginterferon β-1a exposure and Gd-enhanced lesion or T2 lesion response in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Hang, Yaming; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shifang; Deykin, Aaron; Nestorov, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    The effect of subcutaneous (SC) peginterferon β-1a exposure on reduction of gadolinium-enhanced (Gd+) lesion count over time was evaluated in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) in a Phase 3 study (ADVANCE). Patients were randomized to receive SC injections of placebo (n = 500), 125 mcg every-2-weeks (n = 512), or 125 mcg every-4-weeks (n = 500) for 1 year, and then active treatment in the second year. Steady state 4-week AUC (AUCss) was derived for each individual based on sparse pharmacokinetic (PK) sample and a population PK model. Several longitudinal count models, including marginal, mixed effect, and mixture models, were compared to explore the relationship between AUCss and Gd+ lesion count (or T2 lesion count). A mixture model which divided subjects into two subpopulations by low and high baseline lesion activity was found to yield best goodness-of-fit for the data. In this model, the point estimate and 95 % CI for drug effect slope on log(λ) are -0.0256 (-0.0304, -0.0216) for Gd+ lesion and -0.0147 (-0.0170, -0.0124) for T2 lesion. This suggested that reduction of Gd+ lesion (or T2 lesion) count over time is significantly related to SC peginterferon β-1a exposure, and that the increased reduction lesion count with the every-2-week regimen versus the every-4-week regimen was driven by the higher exposure achieved in that treatment arm (mean Gd+ lesion count 0.2 and 0.7 at Year 2, respectively). The every-2-week regimen produced an exposure range that was close to the plateau range of the exposure-response curve, supporting its selection as the regulatory approved dosage. PMID:27299457

  6. Effect of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b Core and NS5A Mutations on Response to Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Shingo; Imazeki, Fumio; Arai, Makoto; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core- and NS5A-region mutations are associated with response to peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin combination therapy. A total of 103 patients with high HCV genotype 1b viral loads (≥ 100 KIU/mL) were treated with the combination therapy. Pretreatment mutations in the core region and interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR) in the NS5A region were analyzed. In univariate analysis, arginine and leucine at positions 70 and 91 in the core region, defined as double wild (DW)-type, were associated with early virologic response (p = 0.002), sustained virologic response (SVR) (p = 0.004), and non-response (p = 0.005). Non-threonine at position 110 was associated with SVR (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed the following pretreatment predictors of SVR: hemoglobin level ≥ 14 g/dL (odds ratio (OR) 6.2, p = 0.04); platelet count ≥ 14 × 10⁴/mm³ (OR 5.2, p = 0.04); aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio < 0.9 (OR 6.17, p = 0.009); DW-type (OR 6.8, p = 0.02); non-threonine at position 110 (OR 14.5, p = 0.03); and ≥ 2 mutations in the ISDR (OR 12.3, p = 0.02). Patients with non-DW-type, non-threonine at position 110, and < 2 ISDR mutations showed significantly lower SVR rates than others (11/45 (24.4%) vs. 27/37 (73.0%), respectively; p < 0.001). SVR can be predicted through core and NS5A region mutations and host factors like hemoglobin, platelet count, and AST/ALT ratio in HCV genotype 1b-infected patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy. PMID:26370958

  7. Role of hepatitis C virus substitutions and interleukin-28B polymorphism on response to peginterferon plus ribavirin in a prospective study of response-guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Liang, C-M; Hu, T-H; Lu, S-N; Hung, C-H; Huang, C-M; Wang, J-H; Yen, Y-H; Chen, C-H; Chang, K-C; Tsai, M-C; Kuo, Y-H; Lee, C-M

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have indicated that amino acid (aa) substitutions in the core region and NS5A interferon sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) as well as genetic polymorphisms in the interleukin-28B (IL-28B) locus affect the outcome of interferon (IFN)-based therapies. We aimed to investigate the role of these factors on response to peginterferon plus ribavirin in a prospective study of response-guided therapy. The aa sequences in core region and ISDR and rs12979860 genotypes were analysed in 115 HCV-1 patients. The treatment was 24 weeks for patients achieving a rapid virological response (RVR), 48 weeks for those with an early virological response (EVR) and early terminated in those without an EVR. A sustained virological response (SVR) was achieved in 82% of 34 RVR patients, 45% of 74 EVR patients and 0% of seven non-EVR patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that ISDR mutation (≥2) [odds ratio(OR): 6.024], double core 70/91 mutations (OR: 0.136), and platelet counts≥15×10(4) /μL (OR: 3.119) were independent pretreatment factors associated with SVR. Apart from rs12979860 CC genotype, low viral load and ISDR mutation (≥2) were significant factors predictive of RVR. Combination of rs12979860 genotype and baseline viral characteristics (viral load and core/ISDR mutations) could predict RVR and SVR with positive predictive value of 100% and 91%, and negative predictive value of 80% and 54%, respectively. In conclusion, pretreatment screening rs12979860 genotype and aa substitutions in the core region and ISDR could help identifying patients who are good candidates for peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy. PMID:24168255

  8. Effect of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b Core and NS5A Mutations on Response to Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Shingo; Imazeki, Fumio; Arai, Makoto; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core- and NS5A-region mutations are associated with response to peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin combination therapy. A total of 103 patients with high HCV genotype 1b viral loads (≥100 KIU/mL) were treated with the combination therapy. Pretreatment mutations in the core region and interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR) in the NS5A region were analyzed. In univariate analysis, arginine and leucine at positions 70 and 91 in the core region, defined as double wild (DW)-type, were associated with early virologic response (p = 0.002), sustained virologic response (SVR) (p = 0.004), and non-response (p = 0.005). Non-threonine at position 110 was associated with SVR (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed the following pretreatment predictors of SVR: hemoglobin level ≥ 14 g/dL (odds ratio (OR) 6.2, p = 0.04); platelet count ≥ 14 × 104/mm3 (OR 5.2, p = 0.04); aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio < 0.9 (OR 6.17, p = 0.009); DW-type (OR 6.8, p = 0.02); non-threonine at position 110 (OR 14.5, p = 0.03); and ≥2 mutations in the ISDR (OR 12.3, p = 0.02). Patients with non-DW-type, non-threonine at position 110, and <2 ISDR mutations showed significantly lower SVR rates than others (11/45 (24.4%) vs. 27/37 (73.0%), respectively; p < 0.001). SVR can be predicted through core and NS5A region mutations and host factors like hemoglobin, platelet count, and AST/ALT ratio in HCV genotype 1b-infected patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy. PMID:26370958

  9. Sustained Virologic Response at 24 Weeks after the End of Treatment Is a Better Predictor for Treatment Outcome in Real-World HCV-Infected Patients Treated by HCV NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors with Peginterferon plus Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Haga, Yuki; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Tawada, Akinobu; Arai, Makoto; Mikami, Shigeru; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct-acting antiviral agents against HCV with or without peginterferon plus ribavirin result in higher eradication rates of HCV and shorter treatment duration. We examined which is better for predicting persistent virologic response, the assessment of serum HCV RNA at 12 or 24 weeks after the end of treatment for predicting sustained virologic response (SVR12 or SVR24, respectively) in patients treated by HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors with peginterferon plus ribavirin. Methods. In all, 149 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1b treated by peginterferon plus ribavirin with telaprevir or simeprevir were retrospectively analyzed: 59 and 90 patients were treated with telaprevir- and simeprevir-including regimens, respectively. HCV RNA was measured by TaqMan HCV Test, version 2.0, real-time PCR assay. SVR12 or SVR24, respectively, was defined as HCV RNA negativity at 12 or 24 weeks after ending treatment. Results. Total SVR rates were 78.0% and 66.7% in the telaprevir and simeprevir groups, respectively. In the telaprevir group, all 46 patients with SVR12 finally achieved SVR24. In the simeprevir group, 60 (93.8%) of the total 64 patients with SVR12 achieved SVR24, with the other 4 patients all being previous-treatment relapsers. Conclusions. SVR12 was suitable for predicting persistent virologic response in almost all cases. In simeprevir-including regimens, SVR12 could not always predict persistent virologic response. Clinicians should use SVR24 for predicting treatment outcome in the use of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors with peginterferon plus ribavirin for any group of real-world patients chronically infected with HCV. PMID:27076789

  10. Rapid Prediction of Treatment Futility of Boceprevir with Peginterferon-Ribavirin for Taiwanese Treatment Experienced Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Chieh; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Su, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chung-Feng; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Lo, Ching-Chu; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Hsu, Shih-Jer; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Su, Chien-Wei; Liu, Chun-Jen; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of the boceprevir (BOC)-containing triple therapy in Taiwanese treatment-experienced patients remains elusive. After 4 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin lead-in therapy, patients with cirrhosis or previous null-response received triple therapy for 44 weeks; whereas others received 32 weeks of triple therapy followed by 12 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy. Patients with HCV RNA > 100 IU/mL at week 12 or with detectable HCV RNA at week 24 of treatment were viewed as futile. A total of 123 patients received treatment. The rates of sustained virological response (SVR) and relapse were 66.7% and 8.9%, respectively by using intention-to-treat analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that factors associated with SVR included HCV-1b (odds ratio [OR]/ 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 19.23/1.76-525.15, P = 0.01), BOC adherence (7.69/1.55-48.78, P = 0.01), serum albumin (OR/CI:6.25/1.14-40.07, P = 0.03) levels and HCV RNA levels (OR/CI:0.34/0.12-0.79, P = 0.01). Twenty-six (21.1%) patients experienced severe adverse events (SAEs). Multivariate analysis revealed that APRI > 1.5 was the single factor associated with occurring SAEs (OR/CI: 3.77/ 0.97-14.98, P = 0.05). Merging the cut-off values of HCV RNA > 7 log IU/mL at baseline and HCV RNA > 6 log IU/mL at week 4 provided the earliest and best combing viral kinetics in predicting week 12/24 futility with the PPV of 100% and accuracy of 93.5%. HCV-1 treatment experienced Taiwanese patients treated with boceprevir-containing triple therapy in real world had comparable efficacy and safety profiles with those reported in clinical trials. Early viral kinetics before week 4 of treatment highly predicted futility at week 12 or 24 of treatment. PMID:26368130

  11. Rapid Prediction of Treatment Futility of Boceprevir with Peginterferon-Ribavirin for Taiwanese Treatment Experienced Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chi-Chieh; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Su, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chung-Feng; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Lo, Ching-Chu; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Hsu, Shih-Jer; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Su, Chien-Wei; Liu, Chun-Jen; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of the boceprevir (BOC)-containing triple therapy in Taiwanese treatment-experienced patients remains elusive. After 4 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin lead-in therapy, patients with cirrhosis or previous null-response received triple therapy for 44 weeks; whereas others received 32 weeks of triple therapy followed by 12 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy. Patients with HCV RNA > 100 IU/mL at week 12 or with detectable HCV RNA at week 24 of treatment were viewed as futile. A total of 123 patients received treatment. The rates of sustained virological response (SVR) and relapse were 66.7% and 8.9%, respectively by using intention-to-treat analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that factors associated with SVR included HCV-1b (odds ratio [OR]/ 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 19.23/1.76–525.15, P = 0.01), BOC adherence (7.69/1.55–48.78, P = 0.01), serum albumin (OR/CI:6.25/1.14–40.07, P = 0.03) levels and HCV RNA levels (OR/CI:0.34/0.12–0.79, P = 0.01). Twenty-six (21.1%) patients experienced severe adverse events (SAEs). Multivariate analysis revealed that APRI > 1.5 was the single factor associated with occurring SAEs (OR/CI: 3.77/ 0.97–14.98, P = 0.05). Merging the cut-off values of HCV RNA > 7 log IU/mL at baseline and HCV RNA > 6 log IU/mL at week 4 provided the earliest and best combing viral kinetics in predicting week 12/24 futility with the PPV of 100% and accuracy of 93.5%. HCV-1 treatment experienced Taiwanese patients treated with boceprevir-containing triple therapy in real world had comparable efficacy and safety profiles with those reported in clinical trials. Early viral kinetics before week 4 of treatment highly predicted futility at week 12 or 24 of treatment. PMID:26368130

  12. Pre-existence and Persistence of Resistant Minority Hepatitis C Virus Variants in Genotype 1-Infected Patients Treated With Simeprevir/Peginterferon/Ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, Bart; Thys, Kim; Van Eygen, Veerle; Verbinnen, Thierry; Van Rossem, Elizabeth; Buelens, Annemie; Aerssens, Jeroen; Witek, James; Picchio, Gaston; De Meyer, Sandra; Lenz, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background. The pre-existence of minority hepatitis C virus (HCV) variants and their impact on treatment outcome, as well as the persistence of emerging resistant variants posttreatment in patients failing treatment with simeprevir/peginterferon/ribavirin (SMV/PR), were assessed by deep sequencing (DS). Methods. Population sequencing (PS) and Illumina DS were performed on HCV genotype 1 isolates from patients treated with SMV/PR in Phase 2b (PILLAR [NCT00882908] and ASPIRE [NCT00980330]) and Phase 3 (QUEST-1 [NCT01289782], QUEST-2 [NCT01290679], and PROMISE [NCT01281839]) trials. Results. Minority polymorphisms (ie, detected pretreatment by DS only) reducing SMV activity in vitro were uncommon (3.6%, 19 of 534 patients). These SMV-resistant minority polymorphisms were detected in similar proportions of patients achieving (3.7%) and not achieving (3.3%) sustained virologic response with SMV/PR and generally did not emerge as major variants at time of failure. SMV-resistant variants emerging at time of failure were no longer detected at end of study in 69.3% and 52.0% of the patients by PS and DS, respectively. Conclusions. Minority polymorphisms did not impact outcome of SMV/PR treatment. The majority of emerging variants that became undetectable at end of study by PS were also undetectable by DS. These results suggest no added value of DS for clinical usage of SMV. PMID:27186579

  13. Predictors of viral kinetics to peginterferon plus ribavirin combination therapy in Japanese patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b.

    PubMed

    Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Kawamura, Yusuke; Yatsuji, Hiromi; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Mariko; Arase, Yasuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2007-11-01

    For chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, evaluation of response to peginterferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) therapy based on viral kinetics is useful as an early predictor of treatment efficacy, but the underlying mechanisms of the different viral kinetics to treatment are still unclear. The response to 48-week PEG-IFN-RBV combination therapy was evaluated in 160 Japanese adult patients infected with HCV genotype 1b and determined the rapid virological response (at 4 weeks), early virological response (at 12 weeks), end-of treatment response, and sustained virological response (6 months after end of treatment). The proportion of patients who showed rapid, early and sustained virological, and end-of treatment responses were 50%, 73%, 47%, and 71%, respectively. Furthermore, 66% of patients who achieved early virological response also showed sustained virological response. Multivariate analysis identified substitutions of amino acid (aa) 70 and 91 in the HCV core region (double-wild-type) as a predictor of early HCV-RNA negativity, rapid, early, and sustained virological responses and end-of treatment response, and lipid metabolic factors (high levels of LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol) as predictors of early and rapid virological responses and end-of treatment response. Male sex and low levels of alpha-fetoprotein were other predictors of sustained virological response. Furthermore, female sex and severity of liver fibrosis were determinants of lack of sustained virological response in spite of early virological response. This study identified predictors of efficacy of PEG-IFN-RBV therapy based on viral kinetics in Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1b. PMID:17854035

  14. Regional Differences in Hepatitis C Treatment with Peginterferon and Ribavirin in Japan in Both Genotype 1 and Genotype 2: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ide, Kazuki; Kawasaki, Yohei; Akutagawa, Maiko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Masaki, Naohiko

    2016-09-01

    There has been no report on the genotype-dependent regional, especially prefectural, differences in hepatitis C treatment in Japan. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the nationwide database. The registration period of the database was from December 2009 to April 2013. Individuals with chronic hepatitis C were identified from the database. The sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in each prefecture were calculated stratified by genotype. Confounding variables were identified using stepwise logistic regression analysis. The range of the point estimate of the adjusted odds ratio explained prefectural differences in treatment outcomes. During the registration period, 36 prefectures registered cases to the database. A total of 16349 cases were registered and 11653 cases were included in the analysis. The mean age was 57.9±10.5 years; 7950 (68.2%) had hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and 3703 (31.8%) had HCV genotype 2. The range in SVR rates was 30.0 to 63.0% for genotype 1 and 55.0 to 100.0% for genotype 2. In the multivariate analysis, the ranges of the adjusted odds ratio of each prefecture were 0.658 to 2.125 for genotype 1 and 0.364 to 2.630 for genotype 2. Our results suggest that regional, particularly prefectural, differences in chronic hepatitis C treatment with peg-interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) exist in Japan and that these regional differences may similarly exist both in HCV genotypes 1 and 2. Additional studies using these methods, considering medical situations in each prefecture and new treatments regimens, could greatly contribute to improving and standardizing chronic hepatitis C treatment. PMID:27384444

  15. Sofosbuvir with peginterferon-ribavirin for 12 weeks in previously treated patients with hepatitis C genotype 2 or 3 and cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lawitz, Eric; Poordad, Fred; Brainard, Diana M; Hyland, Robert H; An, Di; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Symonds, William T; McHutchison, John G; Membreno, Fernando E

    2015-01-01

    Sofosbuvir (SOF) in combination with ribavirin (RBV) for 12 or 24 weeks is the current standard of care for patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 2 and 3, respectively. However, in clinical trials treatment-experienced patients, particularly those with cirrhosis, had suboptimal sustained virological response (SVR) rates. We assessed the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir plus peginterferon and ribavirin (SOF+Peg-IFN+RBV) administered for 12 weeks to treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotypes 2 and 3, with and without cirrhosis. We enrolled 47 patients in this open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled phase 2 study. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with SVR at 12 weeks after cessation of study treatment (SVR12). The overall rate of SVR12 was 89% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 77-97). Rates of SVR12 were higher in patients with genotype 2 than in those with genotype 3, 96% (95% CI: 78-100) and 83% (95% CI: 62-95), respectively. Rates of SVR12 were similar in patients with and without cirrhosis: for genotype 2, 93% of patients with cirrhosis and 100% of patients without cirrhosis achieved SVR12, and for genotype 3, the SVR12 rate was 83% in patients both with and without cirrhosis. One patient discontinued study treatment because of an adverse event and four patients experienced serious adverse events. The most common adverse events were influenza-like illness, fatigue, anemia, and neutropenia. Conclusion: In treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotypes 2 and 3, 12-week administration of SOF+Peg-IFN+RBV provided high SVR rates, irrespective of cirrhosis status. No safety concerns were identified. (Hepatology 2015;61:769–775) PMID:25322962

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-06-01

    , fluvastatin sodium, fondaparinux sodium; Gaboxadol, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib, gelclair, gemcitabine, gemfibrozil, glibenclamide, glyminox; Haloperidol, heparin sodium, HPV 16/HPV 18 vaccine, human insulin, human insulin; Icatibant, imatinib mesylate, indium 111 (111In) ibritumomab tiuxetan, infliximab, INKP-100, iodine (I131) tositumomab, IoGen, ipratropium bromide, ixabepilone; L-870810, lamivudine, lapatinib, laquinimod, latanoprost, levonorgestrel, licochalcone a, liposomal doxorubicin, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lorazepam, lovastatin; Maraviroc, maribavir, matuzumab, MDL-100907, melphalan, methotrexate, methylprednisolone, mitomycin, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, MK-0431, MN-001, MRKAd5 HIV-1 gag/pol/nef, MRKAd5gag, MVA.HIVA, MVA-BN Nef, MVA-Muc1-IL-2, mycophenolate mofetil; Nelfinavir mesilate, nesiritide, NSC-330507; Olanzapine, olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, oral insulin, osanetant; PA-457, paclitaxel, paroxetine, paroxetine hydrochloride, PCK-3145, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, perillyl alcohol, pexelizumab, pimecrolimus, pitavastatin calcium, porfiromycin, prasterone, prasugrel, pravastatin sodium, prednisone, pregabalin, prinomastat, PRO-2000, propofol, prostate cancer vaccine; Rasagiline mesilate, rhBMP-2/ACS, rhBMP-2/BCP, rhC1, ribavirin, rilpivirine, ritonavir, rituximab, Ro-26-9228, rosuvastatin calcium, rosuvastatin sodium, rubitecan; Selodenoson, simvastatin, sirolimus, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib, SS(dsFv)-PE38, St. John's Wort extract, stavudine; Tacrolimus, tadalafil, tafenoquine succinate, talaglumetad, tanomastat, taxus, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, tempol, tenofovir, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, testosterone enanthate, TH-9507, thalidomide, tigecycline, timolol maleate, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, torcetrapib, trabectedin, travoprost, travoprost/timolol, treprostinil sodium; Valdecoxib, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, varenicline, VEGF-2 gene therapy, venlafaxine hydrochloride

  17. Unmasking of myasthenia gravis during pegylated Alfa 2 a interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ayesha

    2016-05-01

    Over last few decades, hepatitis C has emerged as a serious infection that has threatened the health and budgets of millions in the world. The objective of health professionals to treat it with recommended therapy of Alfa interferon and Ribavirin combination presents certain risks. One of the alarms is the ability of interferon to stimulate the production of autoantibodies in the body resulting in expression of autoimmune diseases in few who develop these antibodies. The case presented here is about unmasking of myasthenia gravis in a patient who received alfa interferon therapy for her chronic hepatitis C. Alfa interferon probably plays an important role in manifestation of the diseases in susceptible patients and all autoimmune diseases cannot be taken as mere side effects of the therapy. Clinicians need to be alert to pick up these diseases earlier so that the prompt management is possible. PMID:27183950

  18. Co-treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and entecavir for hepatitis D: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaigham; Memon, Mohammad Sadik; Umer, Muhammad Amir; Abbas, Minaam; Shazi, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of pegylated interferon alfa (PEG-IFNα) therapy with and without entecavir in patients with chronic hepatitis D. METHODS: Forty hepatitis D virus (HDV) RNA positive patients were randomized to receive either PEG-IFNα-2a 180 μg weekly in combination with entecavir 0.5 mg daily (n = 21) or PEG-IFNα alone (n =19). Patients who failed to show 2 log reduction in HDV RNA level at 24 wk of treatment, or had detectable HDV RNA at 48 wk of therapy were considered as treatment failure. Treatment was continued for 72 wk in the rest of the patients. All the patients were followed for 24 wk post treatment. Intention to treat analysis was performed. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 26.7 ± 6.8 years, 31 were male. Two log reduction in HDV RNA levels at 24 wk of therapy was achieved in 9 (43%) patients receiving combination therapy and 12 (63%) patients receiving PEG-IFNα alone (P = 0.199). Decline in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels was insignificant. At the end of treatment, HDV RNA was negative in 8 patients (38%) receiving combination therapy and 10 patients (53%) receiving PEG-IFNα-2a alone. Virological response persisted in 7 (33%) and 8 (42%) patients, respectively at the end of the 24 wk follow-up period. One responder patient in the combination arm lost HBsAg and became hepatitis B surface antibody positive. Six out of 14 baseline hepatitis B e antigen reactive patients seroconverted and four of these seroconverted patients had persistent HDV RNA clearance. CONCLUSION: Administration of PEG-IFNα-2a with or without entecavir, resulted in persistent HDV RNA clearance in 37% of patients. The addition of entecavir did not improve the overall response. PMID:27190579

  19. Peginterferon add-on results in more HBsAg decline compared to monotherapy in HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, W P; Sonneveld, M J; Xie, Q; Guo, S; Zhang, N; Zeuzem, S; Tabak, F; Zhang, Q; Simon, K; Akarca, U S; Streinu-Cercel, A; Hansen, B E; Janssen, H L A

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether peginterferon (PEG-IFN) add-on to entecavir (ETV) leads to more HBsAg decline compared to PEG-IFN monotherapy or combination therapy, and whether ETV therapy may prevent HBsAg increase after PEG-IFN cessation. We performed a post hoc analysis of 396 HBeAg-positive patients treated for 72 weeks with ETV + 24 weeks PEG-IFN add-on from week 24 to 48 (add-on, n = 85), 72 weeks with ETV monotherapy (n = 90), 52 weeks with PEG-IFN monotherapy (n = 111) and 52 weeks PEG-IFN + lamivudine (combination, n = 110) within 2 randomized trials. HBsAg decline was assessed at the end of PEG-IFN (EOP) and 6 months after PEG-IFN (EOF) discontinuation. Differences in baseline characteristics were accounted for using inversed probability of treatment weights. At EOP, a HBsAg reduction of ≥1log10 IU/mL was more frequently achieved for patients in the add-on or combination therapy arms (both 36%), compared to PEG-IFN mono (20%) or ETV (8%) (add-on vs PEG-IFN mono P = 0.050). At EOF, the HBsAg reduction ≥1log10 IU/mL was only sustained in patients treated with ETV consolidation (add-on vs combination and PEG-IFN mono: 40% vs 23% and 18%, P = 0.029 and P = 0.003, respectively). For add-on, combination, PEG-IFN mono and ETV, the mean HBsAg-level change at EOF was -0.84, -0.81, -0.68 and -0.33 log10 IU/mL, respectively (P > 0.05 for PEG-IFN arms). HBeAg loss at EOF was 36%, 31%, 33% and 20%, respectively (P > 0.05). PEG-IFN add-on for 24 weeks results in more on-treatment HBsAg decline than does 52 weeks of PEG-IFN monotherapy. ETV therapy may maintain the HBsAg reduction achieved with PEG-IFN. PMID:26403919

  20. 24 versus 48 Weeks of Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 6 Chronically Infected Patients with a Rapid Virological Response: A Non-Inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min; Huang, Mingshou; Ren, Zefang; Lu, Ling; Mei, Yongyu; Xu, Min; Zhu, Jianyun; Shi, Haiyan; Lin, Guoli; Liu, Ying; Hu, Fengyu; Luo, Qiumin; Lan, Yun; Guo, Fengxia; Zhao, Zhixin; Gao, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 6 is unclear owing to its limited geographic distribution. Because of a high predictive value of rapid virological response (RVR) for sustained virological response (SVR), we conducted an open-label randomized controlled trial to compare 24- and 48-week peginterferon/ribavirin combination therapy for patients with HCV genotype 6 in Southern China who achieved an RVR. Methods and Findings Treatment-naive, non-cirrhotic patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 6 were treated with pegylated interferon α-2a (180 μg/week) and ribavirin (800–1,200 mg, according to weight) for 4 weeks. Patients who achieved an RVR, which was defined as HCV RNA negativity at week 4 (<50 IU), were randomized to receive either an additional 20 or 44 weeks of treatment (24- and 48-week treatment groups, respectively). The primary outcome measure was SVR. From January 2011 to June 2014, 152(152/210, 72.4%) patients with HCV genotype 6a and RVR were randomized 1:1 to the 24- or 48-week treatment group. The SVR rates in the 24- and 48-week groups in the intention-to-treat analysis were 90.8% (69/76) and 88.2% (67/76), respectively; those in the per-protocol analysis were 95.7% (67/70) and 97.0% (64/66), respectively. More patients in the 48-week group had anemia (46.1% vs. 28.9%, P = 0.03), but other adverse events were comparable between the groups. The limitation of the present study was that only patients from Southern China were enrolled which may inhibit the extensive application of the findings. Conclusion Twenty-four weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin combination therapy was non-inferior to 48 weeks in patients with HCV genotype 6a in Southern China who achieved an RVR. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01263860 PMID:26509605

  1. Sustained virological response after a 17-day treatment with daclatasvir plus asunaprevir in a cirrhotic patient with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and null response for peginterferon ribavirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Ishii, Toshiya; Adachi, Kayo; Kumon, Daisuke; Tamura, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Youhei; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Okuse, Chiaki

    2016-04-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) plus asunaprevir (ASV) treatment, an oral therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b infection, can achieve a high sustained viral response (SVR) rate within a 24-week treatment period. A 55-year-old Japanese female with cirrhosis and null response for peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy received DCV plus ASV therapy, but she reported a slight fever beginning on treatment day 4. The fever increased to >38.0 °C beginning on treatment day 15 and could not be controlled with antipyretics; thus, the treatment was discontinued on day 17. Although the patient was still positive for HCV RNA 6 days after treatment discontinuation, she achieved an SVR at week 24 after treatment cessation. In some patients with HCV genotype 1b infection, an SVR can be achieved with short-term DCV plus ASV treatment, and HCV RNA positivity at the end of treatment does not always indicate virological failure. PMID:26896968

  2. Sustained Virological Response after 8-Week Treatment of Simeprevir with Peginterferon α-2a plus Ribavirin in a Japanese Female with Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b and IL28B Minor Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Yasui, Shin; Nakamoto, Shingo; Haga, Yuki; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Tawada, Akinobu; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Direct-acting antivirals with or without peginterferon α (PEG-IFN α) plus ribavirin are now available for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Direct-acting antivirals are potent inhibitors of HCV replication, but some of them occasionally possess serious adverse events. We experienced a 64-year-old female with chronic HCV genotype 1b infection who showed elevated alanine aminotransferase of 528 IU/l at week 9 after the commencement of treatment of simeprevir with PEG-IFN α-2a plus ribavirin. However, she achieved sustained virological response at week 24 after the end of treatment. In Japan, we also have to treat elderly patients infected with HCV and/or advanced hepatic fibrosis. Until an effective interferon-free regimen is established, direct-acting antivirals with PEG-IFN plus ribavirin may still play a role in the treatment for certain patients. To avoid serious results from adverse events, careful attention and follow-up will be needed in the treatment course of simeprevir with PEG-IFN plus ribavirin for chronic HCV infection. PMID:26269697

  3. Alisporivir with peginterferon/ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection who failed to respond to or relapsed after prior interferon-based therapy: FUNDAMENTAL, a Phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Buti, M; Flisiak, R; Kao, J-H; Chuang, W-L; Streinu-Cercel, A; Tabak, F; Calistru, P; Goeser, T; Rasenack, J; Horban, A; Davis, G L; Alberti, A; Mazzella, G; Pol, S; Orsenigo, R; Brass, C

    2015-07-01

    Alisporivir (ALV) is an oral, investigational host-targeting agent, with pangenotypic activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase II study explored the efficacy and safety of ALV with peginterferon-α2a/ribavirin (PR) in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection in whom prior PR had failed (43% relapsers, 34% null responders and 23% partial responders). Four-hundred-and-fifty-nine patients were randomized (1:1:1:1) to ALV 600 mg once daily (QD), ALV 800 mg QD, ALV 400 twice daily (BID) or placebo plus PR for 48 weeks. When the global ALV trial programme was put on clinical hold, all patients in this study had received ≥31 weeks of randomized treatment; patients completed 48 weeks on PR alone. All ALV groups demonstrated superior rates of complete early virologic response (cEVR; primary endpoint) vs PR alone (P ≤ 0.0131), with highest cEVR rate seen with ALV 400 mg BID (74% vs 36% with PR alone; P < 0.0001). Respective SVR12 rates (key secondary endpoint) were 65% vs 26% in prior relapsers, 63% vs 5% in partial responders and 68% vs 3% in null responders. In patients who received >40 weeks of randomized treatment, the SVR12 rate was 89% for ALV 400 mg BID vs 30% for PR alone (P = 0.0053). Rates of viral breakthrough and relapse were lowest with ALV 400 mg BID. One case of pancreatitis (fully recovered) occurred with ALV/PR. Common AEs were headache, fatigue, anaemia, neutropenia and nausea. Hypertension was infrequent, but more common with ALV. ALV merits further investigation in interferon-free regimens in combination with direct-acting antiviral agents. PMID:25412795

  4. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Graham R.; Coppola, Carmine; Derbala, Moutaz; Ferenci, Peter; Orlandini, Alessandra; Reddy, K. Rajender; Tallarico, Ludovico; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Ahlers, Silke; Bakalos, Georgios; Hassanein, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD) and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR) in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice. Methods A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12). Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL) were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G)1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0–9 points) on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively. Results SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634), 77.1% (279/362), 68.0% (514/756), and 51.3% (203/396), respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046) and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016); sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5. Conclusions In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with

  5. Cost Effectiveness of Daclatasvir/Asunaprevir Versus Peginterferon/Ribavirin and Protease Inhibitors for the Treatment of Hepatitis c Genotype 1b Naïve Patients in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Giglio, Andrés; Soza, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Daclatasvir and Asunaprevir (DCV/ASV) have recently been approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. In association, they are more effective and safer than previous available treatments, but more expensive. It is unclear if paying for the additional costs is an efficient strategy considering limited resources. Methods A Markov model was built to estimate the expected costs in Chilean pesos (CL$) and converted to US dollars (US$) and benefits in quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in a hypothetic cohort of naive patients receiving DCV/ASV compared to protease inhibitors (PIs) and Peginterferon plus Ribavirin (PR). Efficacy was obtained from a mixed-treatment comparison study and costs were estimated from local sources. Utilities were obtained applying the EQ-5D survey to local patients and then valued with the Chilean tariff. A time horizon of 46 years and a discount rate of 3% for costs and outcomes was considered. The ICERs were estimated for a range of DCV/ASV prices. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results PIs were extendedly dominated by DCV/ASV. The ICER of DCV/ASV compared to PR was US$ 16,635/QALY at a total treatment price of US$ 77,419; US$11,581 /QALY at a price of US$ 58,065; US$ 6,375/QALY at a price of US$ 38,710; and US$ 1,364 /QALY at a price of US$ 19,355. The probability of cost-effectiveness at a price of US$ 38,710 was 91.6% while there is a 21.43% probability that DCV/ASV dominates PR if the total treatment price was US$ 19,355. Although the results are sensitive to certain parameters, the ICER did not increase above the suggested threshold of 1 GDP per capita. Conclusions DCV/ASV can be considered cost-effective at any price of the range studied. These results provide decision makers useful information about the value of incorporating these drugs into the public Chilean healthcare system. PMID:26544203

  6. An Open-Label Trial of 12-Week Simeprevir plus Peginterferon/Ribavirin (PR) in Treatment-Naïve Patients with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Genotype 1 (GT1)

    PubMed Central

    Asselah, Tarik; Moreno, Christophe; Sarrazin, Christoph; Gschwantler, Michael; Foster, Graham R.; Craxí, Antonio; Buggisch, Peter; Ryan, Robert; Lenz, Oliver; Scott, Jane; Van Dooren, Gino; Lonjon-Domanec, Isabelle; Schlag, Michael; Buti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Shortening duration of peginterferon-based HCV treatment reduces associated burden for patients. Primary objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy against the minimally acceptable response rate 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) and safety of simeprevir plus PR in treatment-naïve HCV GT1 patients treated for 12 weeks. Additional objectives included the investigation of potential associations of rapid viral response and baseline factors with SVR12. Methods In this Phase III, open-label study in treatment-naïve HCV GT1 patients with F0–F2 fibrosis, patients with HCV-RNA <25 IU/mL (detectable/undetectable) at Week 2, and undetectable HCV-RNA at Weeks 4 and 8, stopped all treatment at Week 12. All other patients continued PR for a further 12 weeks. Baseline factors significantly associated with SVR12 were identified through logistic regression. Results Of 163 patients who participated in the study, 123 (75%) qualified for 12-week treatment; of these, 81 (66%) achieved SVR12. Baseline factors positively associated with SVR12 rates in patients receiving the 12-week regimen were: IL28B CC genotype: (94% SVR12); HCV RNA ≤800,000 IU/mL (82%); F0–F1 fibrosis (74%). Among all 163 patients, 94% experienced ≥1 adverse event (AE), 4% a serious AE, and 2.5% discontinued due to an AE. Reduced impairment in patient-reported outcomes was observed in the 12-week vs >12-week regimen. Conclusions Overall SVR12 rate (66%) was below the target of 80%, indicating that shortening of treatment with simeprevir plus PR to 12 weeks based on very early response is not effective. However, baseline factors associated with higher SVR12 rates were identified. Therefore, while Week 2 response alone is insufficient to predict efficacy, GT1 patients with favourable baseline factors may benefit from a shortened simeprevir plus PR regimen. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01846832 PMID:27428331

  7. A randomized clinical trial of peginterferon alpha-2b with or without entecavir in patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis B: Role of host and viral factors associated with treatment response.

    PubMed

    Tangkijvanich, P; Chittmittraprap, S; Poovorawan, K; Limothai, U; Khlaiphuengsin, A; Chuaypen, N; Wisedopas, N; Poovorawan, Y

    2016-06-01

    Combining peginterferon (PEG-IFN) and a potent nucleoside/nucleotide analogue might improve treatment response in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy of PEG-IFN alpha-2b with or without entecavir in HBeAg-negative CHB and to investigate predictors of response. A total of 126 treatment-naïve patients were randomly assigned to receive monotherapy (n = 63) or combination therapy (n = 63) for 48 weeks. Virological response (VR) was defined as HBV DNA level <2000 IU/mL at week 96. Baseline factors including polymorphisms in the IFNL3 (rs12979860) and HLA-DPA1 (rs3077) genes and on-treatment viral kinetics were determined. At week 48, rates of undetectable HBV DNA were lower in the monotherapy than combination groups, but rates of HBsAg clearance and decline were comparable. At week 96, there was no difference between the corresponding groups regarding virological response (41.3% vs 38.1%, P = 0.856), HBsAg clearance (9.5% vs 4.8%, P = 0.491) and HBsAg decline. Baseline HBsAg level [odds ratio (OR): 3.14 (1.34-7.69), P = 0.012] and rs3077 polymorphism [OR: 2.78 (1.27-6.11), P = 0.011] were independent predictors of response. Patients carried GG genotype of rs3077 with low baseline HBV (<1000 IU/mL) had high probability of achieving VR (76.5%) and HBsAg clearance (29.4%). None of the patients without decrease in HBsAg combined with <2 log10 HBV DNA decline at week 12 achieved a virological response. In conclusion, the combination therapy lead to greater on-treatment HBV DNA suppression but did not improve virological response and HBsAg clearance/decline over monotherapy. Host and viral factors could help optimize decision-making at baseline and during PEG-IFN-based therapy. PMID:26387494

  8. Concentration-guided ribavirin dosing with darbepoetin support and peg-IFN alfa-2a for treatment of hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ackefors, M; Gjertsen, H; Wernerson, A; Weiland, O

    2012-09-01

    Relapse of hepatitis C virus infection after liver transplantation is universal. Standard-of-care (SOC) treatment for relapse offers less satisfactory treatment response than in nontransplanted patients. Tolerance for treatment is suboptimal and withdrawals owing to adverse events induced by treatment frequent. To improve tolerance for SOC, and ribavirin (RBV) in particular, concentration-guided RBV dosing calculated by a formula taking renal function and weight into consideration was utilized. A serum RBV concentration of 10 μm was set as the goal. All patients were given maintenance darbepoetin therapy from 2 weeks prior to initiation of treatment. In total, 21 patients with a mean age of 52 (range 25-64) years were included. The mean RBV concentration at week 4 was 10.2 and 7.36 μm in genotype 1/4 and non-1/4 patients, respectively, and 11.7 and 9.42 at week 12. The mean haemoglobin drop was 25 g/L vs 21 g/L in the genotype 1/4 and non-1/4 group, respectively, a nonsignificant difference. With this treatment approach, 80-90% of patients could be kept adherent to treatment. Sustained viral response was achieved 8/16 (50%) with low-grade fibrosis (fibrosis stage ≤ 2) vs in none of five patients with advanced fibrosis (Fibrosis stage 3 and 4), P < 0.05. We conclude that a treatment algorithm utilizing concentration-guided RBV dosing during darbepoetin maintenance therapy substantially improves tolerance and allows high adherence to a SOC treatment schedule, and that therapy needs to be initiated before advanced fibrosis is developed. PMID:22863267

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis following PEG-interferon-alfa-2a plus ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of Pegylated Interferon-alpha (PEG-IFN-α) and ribavirin is the current standard of care for the treatment of HCV infection. Unfortunately, IFN-α may lead to the induction or exacerbation of autoimmune diseases, such as psoriasis, thyroiditis, systemic lupus erythematosus and, rarely, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Case presentation We report the case of a man affected with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) due to HCV genotype 3a infection, who developed RA after a complete course of PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin. Nine weeks after cessation of antiviral treatment, the patient developed symmetrical polyarthritis, with pain and edema in the wrists, knees, shoulders and metacarpophalangeal joints; magnetic resonance imaging detected initial bone erosions with juxta-articular osteopenia in wrist, knee and hand joints. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies were positive. Conclusions Autoimmune diseases, including RA, may occur when treating chronic hepatitis C with PEG-IFN-α and ribavirin; therefore, a close surveillance for the occurrence of autoimmune phenomena should be suggested in the setting of HCV management. PMID:24171974

  10. Collaborative study for the validation of an improved HPLC assay for recombinant IFN-alfa-2.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, K H; Daas, A; Buchheit, K H; Terao, E

    2016-01-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) texts for Interferon (IFN)-alfa-2 include a nonspecific photometric protein assay using albumin as calibrator and a highly variable cell-based assay for the potency determination of the protective effects. A request was expressed by the Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) for improved methods for the batch control of recombinant interferon alfa-2 bulk and market surveillance testing of finished products, including those formulated with Human Serum Albumin (HSA). A HPLC method was developed at the Medical Products Agency (MPA, Sweden) for the testing of IFN-alfa-2 products. An initial collaborative study run under the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP; study code BSP039) revealed the need for minor changes to improve linearity of the calibration curves, assay reproducibility and robustness. The goal of the collaborative study, coded BSP071, was to transfer and further validate this improved HPLC method. Ten laboratories participated in the study. Four marketed IFN-alfa-2 preparations (one containing HSA) together with the Ph. Eur. Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) for IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b, and in-house reference standards from two manufacturers were used for the quantitative assay. The modified method was successfully transferred to all laboratories despite local variation in equipment. The resolution between the main and the oxidised forms of IFN-alfa-2 was improved compared to the results from the BSP039 study. The improved method even allowed partial resolution of an extra peak after the principal peak. Symmetry of the main IFN peak was acceptable for all samples in all laboratories. Calibration curves established with the Ph. Eur. IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b CRSs showed excellent linearity with intercepts close to the origin and coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. Assay repeatability, intermediate precision and reproducibility varied with the tested sample within acceptable

  11. Alternative to Ph. Eur. pour-plate method for detection of microbial contamination in non-sterile pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Palicz, A; Paul, A; Hofmann, A; Denzel, K

    2016-01-01

    The current European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) texts for Interferon (IFN)-alfa-2 include a nonspecific photometric protein assay using albumin as calibrator and a highly variable cell-based assay for the potency determination of the protective effects. A request was expressed by the Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) for improved methods for the batch control of recombinant interferon alfa-2 bulk and market surveillance testing of finished products, including those formulated with Human Serum Albumin (HSA). A HPLC method was developed at the Medical Products Agency (MPA, Sweden) for the testing of IFN-alfa-2 products. An initial collaborative study run under the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP; study code BSP039) revealed the need for minor changes to improve linearity of the calibration curves, assay reproducibility and robustness. The goal of the collaborative study, coded BSP071, was to transfer and further validate this improved HPLC method. Ten laboratories participated in the study. Four marketed IFN-alfa-2 preparations (one containing HSA) together with the Ph. Eur. Chemical Reference Substance (CRS) for IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b, and in-house reference standards from two manufacturers were used for the quantitative assay. The modified method was successfully transferred to all laboratories despite local variation in equipment. The resolution between the main and the oxidised forms of IFN-alfa-2 was improved compared to the results from the BSP039 study. The improved method even allowed partial resolution of an extra peak after the principal peak. Symmetry of the main IFN peak was acceptable for all samples in all laboratories. Calibration curves established with the Ph. Eur. IFN-alfa-2a and IFN-alfa-2b CRSs showed excellent linearity with intercepts close to the origin and coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. Assay repeatability, intermediate precision and reproducibility varied with the tested sample within acceptable

  12. S-adenosyl methionine improves early viral responses and interferon-stimulated gene induction in hepatitis C nonresponders

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Jordan J.; Modi, Apurva A.; El-Diwany, Ramy; Rotman, Yaron; Thomas, Emmanuel; Koh, Christopher; Cherepanov, Vera; Heller, Theo; Ghany, Marc G.; Park, Yoon; Hoofnagle, Jay H.; Liang, T. Jake

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Fewer than half of patients infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) achieve sustained viral clearance after peginterferon and ribavirin therapy. S-adenosyl methionine (SAMe) increases interferon signaling in cell culture. We assessed the effect of SAMe on the kinetics of the early anti-viral response and interferon signaling in patients that did not respond to previous therapy (nonresponders) and investigated its mechanisms. Methods Nonresponders with HCV genotype-1 were given 2 weeks of peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin (Course A, baseline/control). After a 1-month period, patients received SAMe (1600 mg daily) for 2 weeks and then peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks (Course B; completed by 21 of 24 patients). Viral kinetics and interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were compared between courses. Results The decrease in HCV RNA from 0 to 48 hours (phase 1) was similar before and after administration of SAMe. However, the slope increased for the second-phase decrease in HCV between courses A and B (Course A=0.11±0.04 log10IU/mL/week, Course B=0.27±0.06; P=0.009); 11 patients (53%) achieved an early virological response and 10 (48%) had undetectable HCV RNA by week 24. Induction of ISGs in PBMCs was significantly greater after Course B. In cultured cells, SAMe increased induction of ISGs, compared with only peginterferon and ribavirin, and the antiviral effects of interferon by increasing STAT1 methylation, which might promote binding of STAT1 to DNA. Conclusions The addition of SAMe to peginterferon and ribavirin improves the kinetics of the early anti-viral response and induces ISGs in patients with HCV genotype 1 that do not respond to interferon therapy. SAMe might be used with peginterferon-based therapies in patients with chronic HCV infections. PMID:20854821

  13. Immunotherapy with imiquimod and interferon alfa for metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, R.U.; Braunschweig, T.; Ghassemi, A.; Rübben, A.

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (mcc) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin. Remission rates are high with chemotherapy in patients with metastasis, but without any improvement in overall survival. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with facial mcc. After radiation and surgery, the mcc recurred with widespread cutaneous and regional lymph node metastases. The metastases were treated with weekly intralesional injections of 1–2×106 IU interferon alfa-2a, accompanied by topical imiquimod 5% cream 3 times weekly. After partial regression, subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2b was added at a dose of 30 μg weekly, which was then increased to 50 μg weekly. At 4 months after the start of immunotherapy, all cutaneous metastases and the intralesionally treated lymph node metastases receded. Interruption or reduction of systemic interferon application resulted in locoregional relapses that were successfully treated with surgery or intralesional interferon injections. The patient remains alive 30 months after initiation of immunotherapy, suggesting that locally metastasized mcc might be able to be controlled with local and systemic immunotherapy. PMID:27122984

  14. Immunotherapy with imiquimod and interferon alfa for metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R U; Braunschweig, T; Ghassemi, A; Rübben, A

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (mcc) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumour of the skin. Remission rates are high with chemotherapy in patients with metastasis, but without any improvement in overall survival. We present the case of a 90-year-old woman with facial mcc. After radiation and surgery, the mcc recurred with widespread cutaneous and regional lymph node metastases. The metastases were treated with weekly intralesional injections of 1-2×10(6) IU interferon alfa-2a, accompanied by topical imiquimod 5% cream 3 times weekly. After partial regression, subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2b was added at a dose of 30 μg weekly, which was then increased to 50 μg weekly. At 4 months after the start of immunotherapy, all cutaneous metastases and the intralesionally treated lymph node metastases receded. Interruption or reduction of systemic interferon application resulted in locoregional relapses that were successfully treated with surgery or intralesional interferon injections. The patient remains alive 30 months after initiation of immunotherapy, suggesting that locally metastasized mcc might be able to be controlled with local and systemic immunotherapy. PMID:27122984

  15. Baseline factors associated with treatment response in patients infected with hepatitis C virus 1b by stratification of IL28B polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Ling, Qihua; Chen, Jianjie; Zhou, Hua; Zhong, Jun; Chen, Yiyun; Ye, Qingyan; Zhuo, Yunhui; Min, Niehong; Shang, Binyi

    2015-04-01

    Although the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs12979860 in the IL28B gene is a better predictor of sustained virological response to treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) than other baseline factors, some CHC patients with the favorable C allele cannot achieve a sustained virological response when treated with peginterferon plus ribavirin. The aim of this study was to examine baseline factors as predictors of rapid virological response (RVR) and complete early virological response (cEVR) to peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin treatment in Chinese CHC patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b, with emphasis on the difference between the rs129860 CC and CT/TT genotypes. A total of 337 treatment-naïve patients participated in this study. All patients were treated with peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin at standard dosage. Serum samples from all patients were collected at baseline, week 4, and week 12 for testing of laboratory parameters, and IL28B genotypes were determined. Multivariate analysis showed that among rs12979860 CC genotype patients, glucose level and aspartate amino transferase (AST) activity were inversely associated with RVR, while abnormal platelet count and allergy inversely associated with cEVR. Among rs12979860 CT genotype patients, age below 40 years and short infection duration were associated with RVR, while age below 40 years, short infection duration, high body mass index (BMI), and no history of allergies were associated with cEVR. The baseline factors associated with the response to CHC treatment may depend on the IL28B genotype. Refinement of the baseline predictors based on IL28B genotypes may be useful for management of HCV infection. PMID:25687192

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-10-01

    [Methoxy-11c]PD-153035; Afamelanotide, Agalsidase beta, Alemtuzumab, Alkaline phosphatase, Amlodipine, Anecortave acetate, Apixaban, Aripiprazole, Atomoxetine hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brimonidine tartrate/timolol maleate, Brivudine; Canakinumab, Cetuximab, Chlorotoxin, Cinaciguat; Dapagliflozin, Decitabine, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Elagolix sodium, Eplerenone, Eritoran tetrasodium, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Ezetimibe; Fospropofol disodium; G-207, Gabapentin enacarbil, Gefitinib, Golimumab; Human plasmin; Inotuzumab ozogamicin, Insulin glargine, Insulin glulisine, Istaroxime, Ixabepilone; KLH; Levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone; Miglustat, Mitumprotimut-T, MP-470; Oblimersen sodium, Olmesartan medoxomil; P53-SLP, PAN-811, Patupilone, Pazopanib hydrochloride, PC-515, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pegylated arginine deiminase 20000, Pemetrexed disodium, Plitidepsin, Pregabalin; Rasagiline mesilate, Rotigotine; SCH-697243, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Sumatriptan succinate/naproxen sodium, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Tapentadol hydrochloride, TMC-207; V-211, Valganciclovir hydrochloride; Zolpidem tartrate. PMID:19967103

  17. Cutaneous melanoma: new advances in treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Foletto, Michele Ceolin; Haas, Sandra Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a challenge to treat. Over the last 30 years, no drug or combination of drugs demonstrated significant impact to improve patient survival. From 1995 to 2000, the use of cytokines such as interferon and interleukin become treatment options. In 2011, new drugs were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, including peginterferon alfa-2b for patients with stage III disease, vemurafenib for patients with metastatic melanoma with the BRAF V600E mutation, and ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody directed to the CTLA-4 T lymphocyte receptor, to combat metastatic melanoma in patients who do not have the BRAF V600E mutation. Both ipilimumab and vemurafenib showed results in terms of overall survival. Other trials with inhibitors of other genes, such as the KIT gene and MEK, are underway in the search for new discoveries. The discovery of new treatments for advanced or metastatic disease aims to relieve symptoms and improve patient quality of life. PMID:24770508

  18. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia due to epoetin alfa during antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Stravitz, R Todd; Chung, Harold; Sterling, Richard K; Luketic, Velimir A; Sanyal, Arun J; Price, Angie S; Purrington, Amy; Shiffman, Mitchell L

    2005-06-01

    Anemia frequently complicates the treatment of chronic hepatitis C with interferon and ribavirin (RVN), requiring dose reduction and jeopardizing sustained virologic response. Increasingly, epoetin alfa is used to prevent anemia in this setting. Below, we report the first case of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a patient with chronic hepatitis C who received epoetin alfa (Procrit) to manage anti-viral treatment-induced anemia. Red blood cell transfusion-dependence developed 16 wk after the patient was started on peginterferon alfa-2b and RVN for chronic hepatitis C despite the simultaneous administration of epoetin alfa and subsequent discontinuation of the antiviral medications. Bone marrow biopsy was consistent with PRCA. High-titer erythropoietin antibodies, assayed by two methods, appeared shortly after epoetin alfa was administered, and were associated with a decline in serum erythropoietin to undetectable levels. Erythropoietin antibodies directed toward epoetin alfa were shown to cross react with darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp), and a neutralization assay confirmed that they inhibited cell growth in the presence of erythropoietin. Transfusion-dependence resolved approximately 16 wk after discontinuing epoetin alfa, and 6 wk after starting danazol. PRCA caused by the development of erythropoietin antibodies is a potentially life-threatening complication of administering epoetin alfa to prevent the anemia associated with antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:15929778

  19. Novel Approaches to Treatment of Advanced Melanoma: A Review on Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Niezgoda, Anna; Niezgoda, Piotr; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing. The majority of patients are diagnosed in early stages when the disease is highly curable. However, the more advanced or metastatic cases have always been a challenge for clinicians. The poor prognosis for patients with melanoma is now changing as numerous of promising approaches have appeared recently. The discovery of aberrations of pathways responsible for intracellular signal transduction allowed us to introduce agents specifically targeting the mutated cascades. Numerous clinical studies have been conducted to improve effectiveness of melanoma treatment. From 2011 until now, the U.S. FDA has approved seven novel agents, such as BRAF-inhibitors (vemurafenib 2011, dabrafenib 2013), MEK-inhibitors (trametinib 2013), anti-PD1 antibodies (nivolumab 2014, pembrolizumab 2014), anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab 2011), or peginterferon-alfa-2b (2011) intended to be used in most advanced cases of melanoma. Nevertheless, clinicians continue working on new possible methods of treatment as resistance to the novel drugs is a commonly observed problem. This paper is based on latest data published until the end of January 2015. PMID:26171394

  20. Novel Approaches to Treatment of Advanced Melanoma: A Review on Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Niezgoda, Anna; Niezgoda, Piotr; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing. The majority of patients are diagnosed in early stages when the disease is highly curable. However, the more advanced or metastatic cases have always been a challenge for clinicians. The poor prognosis for patients with melanoma is now changing as numerous of promising approaches have appeared recently. The discovery of aberrations of pathways responsible for intracellular signal transduction allowed us to introduce agents specifically targeting the mutated cascades. Numerous clinical studies have been conducted to improve effectiveness of melanoma treatment. From 2011 until now, the U.S. FDA has approved seven novel agents, such as BRAF-inhibitors (vemurafenib 2011, dabrafenib 2013), MEK-inhibitors (trametinib 2013), anti-PD1 antibodies (nivolumab 2014, pembrolizumab 2014), anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab 2011), or peginterferon-alfa-2b (2011) intended to be used in most advanced cases of melanoma. Nevertheless, clinicians continue working on new possible methods of treatment as resistance to the novel drugs is a commonly observed problem. This paper is based on latest data published until the end of January 2015. PMID:26171394

  1. Gateways to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2002-04-01

    , nevirapine, nifedipine, NSC-683864; Oral heparin; Paclitaxel, peginterferon alfa-2b, phenytoin, pimecrolimus, piperacillin, pleconaril, pramipexole hydrochloride, prednisone, pregabalin, progesterone; Rasburicase, ravuconazole, reteplase, ribavirin, rituximab, rizatriptan, rosiglitazone maleate, rotigotine; Semaxanib, sildenafil citrate, simvastatin, stavudine, sumatriptan; Tacrolimus, tamoxifen citrate, tanomastat, tazobactam, telithromycin, tenecteplase, tolafentrine, tolterodine tartrate, triamcinolone acetonide, trimetazidine, troxacitabine; Valproic acid, vancomycin hydrochloride, vincristine, voriconazole, Warfarin sodium; Ximelagatran, Zidovudine, zolmitriptan. PMID:12087878

  2. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-05-01

    (-)-Gossypol; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, ACAM-1000, ACE-011, Agomelatine, AGS-004, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, AMG-317, Amlodipine, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Azacitidine; Becatecarin, Belinostat, Bevacizumab, BMS-387032, BMS-690514, Bortezomib; Casopitant mesylate, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, CK-1827452, Clofarabine, Conivaptan hydrochloride; Dabigatran etexilate, DADMe-Immucillin-H, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, DC-WT1, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Denosumab, Dienogest, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Eculizumab, Edoxaban tosilate, Elacytarabine, Elesclomol, Eltrombopag olamine, Enfuvirtide, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine; Flibanserin, Fludarabine, Fondaparinux sodium, Fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, Genistein; I-131-L19-SIP, Idrabiotaparinux sodium, Imatinib mesylate, IMGN-901, Ipilimumab; Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal cisplatin, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir; Maraviroc, MDV-3100, Mecasermin rinfabate, MP-470, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxcinod, NB-002, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NK-012; Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pitavastatin calcium, PL-3994, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Plitidepsin, PM-10450; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, ReoT3D, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rivaroxaban, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rozrolimupab; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, Salinosporamide A, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Smallpox (Vaccinia) Vaccine, Live, Sorafenib; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Teriparatide, Tipifarnib, Tipranavir, Trabectedin, Trifluridine/TPI; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Vinflunine, Volociximab, Vorinostat; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, Zoledronic acid monohydrate

  3. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-01-01

    [90Y-DOTA-Tyr3]octreotate, Abatacept, ABT-888, ACE-011, Adefovir dipivoxil, Alosetron hydrochloride, Aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, Amlodipine, Apaziquone, Aripiprazole, AS-101, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, Atrasentan, Azacitidine; Bevacizumab, Biphasic insulin aspart, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Brivanib alaninate; CERE-120, Cetuximab, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Combretastatin A-1 phosphate, Conatumumab, CT-322; Dabigatran etexilate, Darunavir, Deforolimus, Desloratadine, Doripenem, Doxorubicin eluting beads, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine, Exenatide, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium; Gabapentin enacarbil, Ghrelin (human), Golimumab; IC-51, IDM-2, JX-594; Lidocaine/prilocaine, Liraglutide, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir, Lumiracoxib; Men ACWY, MxdnG1; Naproxcinod; OBP-301, Omalizumab; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Pasireotide, Pazopanib hydrochloride, Pegaptanib octasodium, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pegvisomant, Pemetrexed disodium, Pimecrolimus, Prasterone, Pregabalin; Raclopride, Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranibizumab, RB-006, Recombinant human relaxin H2, REG1, Regadenoson, Reximmune-C, Rilonacept; Saxagliptin, SCH-697243, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib; Tadalafil, Tapentadol hydrochloride, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Tipifarnib, Tolvaptan; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Vicriviroc, Volociximab, Vorinostat; WB-1001; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan. PMID:19798455

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-12-01

    [Methoxy-(11)C]PD-153035, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Adalimumab, Adecatumumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, ADX-10059, Aflibercept, AIR-human growth hormone, Aliskiren fumarate, AMG-221, Amlodipine besylate/olmesartan medoxomil, Aprepitant; Bavituximab, Bevacizumab, Bexarotene, BIBW-2992, BMS-690514, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Briakinumab; Capecitabine, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cholecalciferol, Choline fenofibrate, Chorionic gonadotropin (human), Cixutumumab, Clopidogrel, CP-690550 citrate; Dabigatran, Dacetuzumab, Daclizumab, Dapagliflozin, Darbepoetin alfa, Dasatinib, Denosumab; Efavirenz, Elisidepsin, Enoxaparin, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Everolimus, Exenatide; Fenobam, Figitumumab, Filibuvir, Fondaparinux sodium, Fresolimumab; Gefitinib, Golimumab, Golnerminogene pradenovec; Ifosfamide, Imatinib mesylate, Ipilimumab, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; Lapatinib ditosylate, Lenalidomide, Levocetirizine dihydrochloride, Liposomal vincristine, Liraglutide; M-118, Masitinib mesylate, Metformin hydrochloride, Micafungin sodium, Moxifloxacin hydrochloride; Neratinib; Oblimersen sodium, Ofatumumab, Olmesartan medoxomil; Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Palifosfamide lysine, Panobacumab, Panobinostat, Patupilone, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pegylated arginine deiminase 20000, Piclozotan hydrochloride hydrate, Pixantrone maleate, Prasterone, Prasugrel, Prednisone, Progesterone, Prucalopride, pVGI.1 (VEGF-2); Retigabine, rhFSH, Rituximab, Rivaroxaban, Rosuvastatin calcium; Salinosporamide A, Selumetinib, Sipuleucel-T, Somatropin, Sorafenib, SSR-244738, Sunitinib malate; Tamoxifen citrate, Teduglutide, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telmisartan, Telmisartan/amlodipine, Telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Temsirolimus, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tipifarnib, Tolvaptan, Trastuzumab, Trastuzumab-MCC-DM1, Travoprost, Tremelimumab; Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Valsartan/amlodipine besylate/hydrochlorothiazide, Valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide, Vandetanib

  5. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: Abetimus sodium, adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, almotriptan, AMGN-0007, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, L-arginine hydrochloride, arzoxifene hydrochloride, astemizole, atazanavir sulfate, atlizumab; Belimumab, BG-9928, binodenoson, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, BufferGel; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide,cilomilast, ciluprevir, clofarabine, CVT-3146; Darbepoetin alfa, desloratadine, diflomotecan, doripenem, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DT388-GM-CSF, duloxetine hydrochloride, E-5564, efalizumab, enfuvirtide, esomeprazole magnesium, estradiol acetate, ETC-642, exenatide, exisulind, ezetimib; Febuxostat; Gallium maltolate, ganirelix acetate, garenoxacin mesilate, gefitinib; H11, HuMax; IL-15, IDD-1, IGIV-C, imatinib mesylate, ISIS-14803, ITF-1697, ivabradine hydrochloride; KRN-5500; L-365260, levetiracetam, levosimendan, licofelone, linezolid, LJP-1082, lopinavir lumiracoxib; MCC-478, melatonin, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide, moxidectin; N-Acetylcarnosine, natalizumab, NM-702, NNC-05-1869, NSC-703940; Ocinaplon OM-89, omalizumab, omeprazole/ sodium bicarbonate, OPC-28326, ospemifene; PEG-filgrastim peginterferon alfa-2a, pegsunercept, pirfenidone, pralmorelin, pregabalin; Recombinant glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) amide, repifermin, RSD-1235; S-8184, selodenoson, sodium dichloroacetate, suberanilohydroxamic acid; TAS-102, terfenadine, teriparatide, tipranavir troxacitabine; Ximelagatran; YM-337. PMID:14735233

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-11-01

    5-Methyltetrahydrofolate, (R)-flurbiprofen; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, alefacept, alemtuzumab, Alequel, alicaforsen sodium, almotriptan, anakinra, aprepitant, aripiprazole, armodafinil; Bevacizumab, bortezomib, bosentan; Canfosfamide hydrochloride, ciclesonide, clofarabine, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, diclofenac potassium, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride; Eel calcitonin, eletriptan, eplerenone, everolimus, ezetimibe; Frovatriptan; Gefitinib, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; HKI-272, HYB-165; Ibutamoren mesylate, imatinib mesylate, interleukin-21, ixabepilone; KRN-951; L-Arginine hydrochloride, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone; Micafungin sodium, motexafin gadolinium, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Nesiritide; Peginterferon alfa-2a, pitavastatin calcium, pralatrexate, pregabalin, pVAX/L523S-Ad.L523S; Rasagiline mesylate, recombinant human nerve growth factor, regadenoson, rF-PSA, rimonabant, rizatriptan, rofecoxib, rosuvastatin calcium, rV-B7.1, rV-PSA; Sipuleucel-T, sirolimus-eluting stent, solifenacin succinate, sorafenib, sunitinib malate; Talactoferrin alfa, Taxus, tegaserod maleate, teriparatide, tipifarnib; Valdecoxib, vandetanib, vatalanib succinate; WT1-peptide vaccine; Xaliproden hydrochloride. (c) 2006 Prous Science. All rights reserved. PMID:17200730

  7. Interstitial pneumonia associated to peginterferon alpha-2a: A focus on lung function.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Telles, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity related to the use of pegylated interferon alpha-2a during treatment of hepatitis C infections is rare; nonetheless, some cases with fatal outcomes have been reported. Evaluating patients' pulmonary function is a key to diagnosis, follow-up and prognosis of several respiratory diseases, but case reports of respiratory manifestations related to the use of pegylated interferon alpha-2a have limited their findings to only baseline measurements. This paper examines the case of a 65-year-old woman with chronic hepatitis C virus infection who developed interstitial pneumonitis associated with pegylated interferon alpha-2a. Initial lung function evaluation revealed a marked reduction compared to an earlier assessment; the results were consistent with a moderate restricted pattern. Fortunately, over the ensuing 8 weeks of follow-up after discontinuing the drug, the patient recovered her lung function and experienced an overall improvement in her respiratory symptoms. PMID:27051119

  8. Interstitial pneumonia associated to peginterferon alpha-2a: A focus on lung function

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Telles, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicity related to the use of pegylated interferon alpha-2a during treatment of hepatitis C infections is rare; nonetheless, some cases with fatal outcomes have been reported. Evaluating patients’ pulmonary function is a key to diagnosis, follow-up and prognosis of several respiratory diseases, but case reports of respiratory manifestations related to the use of pegylated interferon alpha-2a have limited their findings to only baseline measurements. This paper examines the case of a 65-year-old woman with chronic hepatitis C virus infection who developed interstitial pneumonitis associated with pegylated interferon alpha-2a. Initial lung function evaluation revealed a marked reduction compared to an earlier assessment; the results were consistent with a moderate restricted pattern. Fortunately, over the ensuing 8 weeks of follow-up after discontinuing the drug, the patient recovered her lung function and experienced an overall improvement in her respiratory symptoms. PMID:27051119

  9. Comparison of peg-interferon, ribavirin plus telaprevir vs simeprevir by propensity score matching

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hideki; Nishimura, Takeshi; Umemura, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Yamaguchi, Kanji; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Sumida, Yoshio; Mitsuyoshi, Hironori; Yokomizo, Chihiro; Tanaka, Saiyu; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Nishioji, Kenichi; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Takami, Shiro; Nagao, Yasuyuki; Takeuchi, Takayuki; Shima, Toshihide; Sawa, Yoshihiko; Minami, Masahito; Yasui, Kohichiroh; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare efficacy of telaprevir (TVR) and simeprevir (SMV) combined with pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) while treating chronic hepatitis C (CHC). METHODS: In all, 306 CHC patients were included in this study. There were 159 patients in the TVR combination therapy group and 147 patients in the SMV combination therapy group. To evaluate pretreatment factors contributing to sustained virological response at 12 wk (SVR12), univariate and multivariate analyses were performed in TVR and SMV groups. To adjust for patient background between TVR and SMV groups, propensity score matching was performed. Virological response during treatment and SVR12 were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall rates of SVR12 [undetectable serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels] were 79.2% and 69.4% in TVR and SMV groups, respectively. Patients in the SMV group were older, had higher serum HCV RNA levels, lower hemoglobin, higher prevalence of unfavorable interleukin-28B (IL28B) genotype (rs8099917), and poorer response to previous PEG-IFN and RBV treatment. Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for backgrounds (n = 104) and demonstrated SVR12 rates of 74.0% and 73.1% in the TVR and SMV groups, respectively. In the TVR group, discontinuation rates were higher because of adverse events; however, breakthrough and nonresponse was more frequent in the in SMV group. Multivariate analysis revealed IL28B genotype (rs8099917) as the only independent predictive factor of SVR12 in both groups. CONCLUSION: SVR12 rates were almost identical following propensity score matching. PMID:26668696

  10. Addicts with chronic hepatitis C: Difficult to reach, manage or treat?

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Barbara; Benini, Federica; Pigozzi, Marie Graciella; Furba, Patrizia; Giacò, Ernesto; Cinquegrana, Antonia; Fasoli, Mariagrazia; Lanzini, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the acceptance, safety and efficacy of care and treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in drug addicts. METHODS: We designed a multidisciplinary, phase IV prospective cohort study. All illicit drug users (IDUs) visited a Territorial Addiction Service (SerT) in the District of Brescia, and hepatitis C antibody (HCVAb) testing positive were offered as part of a standardised hepatologic visit in our Gastroenterology Unit. Patients with confirmed CHC and without medical contraindications were administered peginterferon alfa-2b 1.5 μg/kg per week plus ribavirin (800-1400 mg/d) for 16-48 wk. All IDUs were unselected because of ongoing addiction and read and signed an informed consent form. Virologic responses at weeks 4 and 12 of therapy, at the end of treatment and 24 wk after the end of treatment were the main measures of efficacy. Adherence was estimated according to the 80/80/80 criteria. RESULTS: From November 2007 to December 2009, 162 HCVAb+ IDUs were identified. Sixty-seven patients (41% of the initial cohort) completed the diagnostic procedure, and CHC was diagnosed in 54 (33% of the total). Forty-nine patients were offered therapy, and 39 agreed (80% of acceptance rate). The prevalent HCV genotype was type 1, and the HCV RNA baseline level was over 5.6 log/mL in 61% of cases. Five patients dropped out, two because of severe adverse events (SAEs) and three without medical need. Twenty-three and 14 patients achieved end of treatment responses (ETRs; 59%) and sustained virologic responses (SVRs; 36%), respectively. Thirty-one patients were fully compliant with the study protocol (80% adherence). The prevalence of host and viral characteristics negatively affecting the treatment response was high: age over 40 years (54%), male gender (85%), overweight body type (36%), previous unsuccessful antiviral therapy (21%), HCV genotype and viral load (60% and 62%, respectively), earlier contact with HBV (40%) and steatosis and fibrosis (44% and 17

  11. Predictors of Virological Response in 3,235 Chronic HCV Egyptian Patients Treated with Peginterferon Alpha-2a Compared with Peginterferon Alpha-2b Using Statistical Methods and Data Mining Techniques.

    PubMed

    El Raziky, Maissa; Fathalah, Waleed Fouad; Zakaria, Zeinab; Eldeen, Hadeel Gamal; Abul-Fotouh, Amr; Salama, Ahmed; Awad, Abubakr; Esmat, Gamal; Mabrouk, Mahasen

    2016-05-01

    Despite the appearance of new oral antiviral drugs, pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN)/RBV may remain the standard of care therapy for some time, and several viral and host factors are reported to be correlated with therapeutic effects. This study aimed to reveal the independent variables associated with failure of sustained virological response (SVR) to PEG-IFN alpha-2a versus PEG-IFN alpha-2b in treatment of naive chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) Egyptian patients using both statistical methods and data mining techniques. This retrospective cohort study included 3,235 chronic hepatitis C patients enrolled in a large Egyptian medical center: 1,728 patients had been treated with PEG-IFN alpha-2a plus ribavirin (RBV) and 1,507 patients with PEG-IFN alpha-2b plus RBV between 2007 and 2011. Both multivariate analysis and Reduced Error Pruning Tree (REPTree)-based model were used to reveal the independent variables associated with treatment response. In both treatment types, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) >10 ng/mL and HCV viremia >600 × 10(3) IU/mL were the independent baseline variables associated with failure of SVR, while male gender, decreased hemoglobin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone were the independent variables associated with good response (P < 0.05). Using REPTree-based model showed that low AFP was the factor of initial split (best predictor) of response for either PEG-IFN alpha-2a or PEG-IFN alpha-2b (cutoff value 8.53, 4.89 ng/mL, AUROC = 0.68 and 0.61, P = 0.05). Serum AFP >10 ng/mL and viral load >600 × 10(3) IU/mL are variables associated with failure of response in both treatment types. REPTree-based model could be used to assess predictors of response. PMID:26859168

  12. Associations between serum lipids and hepatitis C antiviral treatment efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Ramcharran, Darmendra; Wahed, Abdus S.; Conjeevaram, Hari S.; Evans, Rhobert W.; Wang, Tianyi; Belle, Steven H.; Yee, Leland J.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one half of patients who undergo antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection will not respond to treatment. African Americans (AAs) are less responsive to treatment than Caucasian Americans (CAs) and the reasons for this disparity are largely unknown. Recent studies suggest that serum lipids may be associated with treatment response. The aims of this study were to evaluate baseline and changes in serum lipids during therapy, determine if serum lipids are associated with virological response, and assess if these measures explain the racial difference in efficacy. Participants were from Virahep-C, a prospective study of treatment naïve participants with type 1 HCV infection who received peginterferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin therapy for up to 48 weeks. Fasting serum lipids were analyzed at baseline, during, and after therapy in 160 AAs and 170 CAs. A relative risk (RR) model was employed to evaluate characteristics associated with sustained virological response (SVR). Antiviral therapy was associated with changes in serum lipids during and after antiviral therapy, with the changes differing by race and the amount of PEG-IFN taken. Baseline lipid measures independently associated with a higher rate of SVR were lower TG and higher LDLc, with an interaction between high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) and gender. Lipid measures did not contribute significantly to explaining the racial difference in SVR. Conclusion Lipid levels are associated with SVR, although lipid parameters did not explain the racial difference in treatment response. Results are compatible with proposed biological mechanisms of HCV entry, replication, and secretion, and may underscore new potential therapeutic targets for HCV eradication. PMID:20690192

  13. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2003-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Studies knowledge area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 81C6; Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase alfa, AGM-1470, albumin interferon alfa, alefacept, alosetron hydrochloride, anakinra, anti-CTLA-4 Mab, aprepitant, aripiprazole, atazanavir; BAY-43-9006, BBR-3438, beta-L-Fd4C, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentanBR96-doxorubicin; Caspofungin acetate, ciclesonide, cilengitide, cilomilast, COL-1621, COL-3, CpG-7909, cyclosporine; DCVax-Brain, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), donepezil hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), DTI-015, [99Tc]-DTPA-mannosyldextran, duloxetine hydrochloride; Emivirine, emtricitabine, entecavir, epothilone B, estradiol-MNP, etonogestrel/etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol, etoricoxib; Febuxostat, fondaparinux sodium, fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, GVS-111; Heparinase I, HspE7, human alpha-glucosidase, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, INGN-241, interferon alfa B/D hybrid, interferon alfa Biphasix, ISIS-14803; Lanicemine hydrochloride, 1311-lipiodol, liposome-encapsulated mitoxantrone, lixivaptan, lumiracoxib, lupus-AHP, LY-466700; Marimastat, MEN-10755, micafungin sodium; Nitronaproxen, NSC-683864 Omalizumab, oral insulin; Palonosetron hydrochloride, peginterferon alfa-2a, pimecrolimus, pralnacasan, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, pyrazoloacridine; R-165335, ranolazine, risperidone, RPR-109881;, RSD-1235, Satraplatin, seocalcitol, sertindole, SMART anti-interferon gamma antibody, sulfasalazine; T-138067, TAK-013, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide, tiotropium bromide, tipifarnib, TP-38; Valdecoxib, vatalanib succinate, voriconazole; ZD-9331. PMID:12690708

  14. Gateways to clinical trials. July-August 2008.

    PubMed

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2008-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, 501516, 89-12; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, AG-701, Agatolimod sodium, Alefacept, Aliskiren fumarate, Apixaban, Atazanavir sulfate, Atrasentan, Axitinib; BI-1744-CL, BIBF-1120, BIBW-2992, Bortezomib; Carboxyamidotriazole, Caspofungin acetate, CBP-501, Cediranib, Ceftobiprole, Certolizumab pegol, Cetuximab, Cholesteryl hydrophobized polysaccharide-Her2 protein complex, CHP-NY-ESO-1, Cypher; Dalbavancin, Dalcetrapib, Daptomycin, Darapladib, Deferasirox, Deforolimus, Denosumab, DNA-HIV-C, Dovitinib, DR-5001, Dronedarone hydrochloride, DT388IL3; E75, EC-17/EC-90, Ecogramostim, Efungumab, Entecavir, EP HIV-1090, EP-2101, Everolimus, Ezetimibe, Ezetimibe/simvastatin; Faropenem daloxate, Fluticasone furoate, Fondaparinux sodium, Fospropofol disodium, Fulvestrant; Golimumab, GSK-089, GW-590735; HO/03/03, hTERT572, hTERT572Y; Iloperidone; Immunoglobulin intravenous (human), Ispinesib mesylate, Istradefylline, Ixabepilone; JR-031, JX-594; KLH; Laropiprant, Lecozotan hydrochloride, Lenalidomide, Lestaurtinib, Linezolid; MGCD-0103, MK-0646, MVA-BN Measles; NI-0401, Niacin/laropiprant, NSC-719239, NYVAC-C; Ospemifene; Paliperidone palmitate, PAN-811, PCV7, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, PEGirinotecan, Perifosine, Pertuzumab, PF-00299804, Picoplatin, Pimavanserin tartrate, Pitavastatin calcium, Pomalidomide, Prasterone, Pratosartan, Prucalopride, PSMA27/pDOM, Pyridoxal phosphate; QS-21, Quercetin; Rebimastat, Rimonabant, Rolofylline, Romidepsin, Rosuvastatin calcium, RTS,S/SBAS2; SCH-530348, SN-29244, Soblidotin, Sodium dichloroacetate, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Spheramine, SU-6668, Succinobucol; Taranabant, Taxus, Telaprevir, Telavancin hydrochloride, Telbivudine, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tigecycline, Tiotropium bromide, Tocilizumab, Triphendiol; UC-781, Udenafil, UNIL-025; V-5 Immunitor, Valsartan/amlodipine besylate, Varenicline tartrate, Velafermin, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Vinflunine, Vitespen, Vorinostat

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABT-510, adalimumab, alefacept, ambrisentan, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, armodafinil, aselizumab, asenapine maleate, azelnidipine; Bevacizumab, bexarotene, bimosiamose, biphasic insulin aspart, bortezomib, bosentan, BQ-123; C340, cannabidiol, caspofungin acetate, CC-4047, certolizumab pegol, cetuximab, ciclesonide, cilansetron, Cypher; Dabigatran etexilate, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin hydrobromide, desloratadine, dexosome vaccine (melanoma), dimethyl fumarate, dronabinol/cannabidiol, drospirenone, drospirenone/estradiol, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Efalizumab, eglumetad hydrate, emoxipin hydrochloride, eplerenone, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etonogestrel/ethinylestradiol; Garenoxacin mesilate, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium, gefitinib; H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine, human growth hormone-(177-191), human insulin; Indacaterol, INKP-100, INKP-102, insulin glargine, i.v. gamma-globulin; KLH; Lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, lasofoxifene tartrate, levocetirizine, licochalcone A, LMI vaccine, lomefloxacin, lubiprostone, lumiracoxib; Miglustat, mycograb; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, nortopixantrone hydrochloride; Olmesartan medoxomil, omalizumab, oral insulin, OrM3; Parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PCK-3145, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, pemetrexed disodium, pexelizumab, photochlor, pimecrolimus, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, polyphenon E; R-126638, R-411, resveratrol, roflumilast, RS-86, ruboxistaurin mesilate hydrate, rupatadine fumarate; Sipuleucel-T, somatropin, St. John's Wort extract; Tadalafil, Taxus

  16. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayes, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2004-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Know- ledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABI-007, Ad.Egr.TNF.11D, adefovir dipivoxil, AdPEDF.11, AES-14, albumex, alefacept, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvimopan hydrate, aAminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, anakinra, anti-IL-12 MAb, aprepitant, atazanavir sulfate, atrasentan, avanafil; Banoxantrone, BG-12, bimatoprost, bortezomib, bosentan; Calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate, caspofungin acetate, CBT-1, ciclesonide, clofarabine, conivaptan hydrochloride, CpG-7909, C-Vax, Cypher; DA-8159, DAC:GLP-1, darbepoetin alfa, darifenacin, duloxetine hydrochloride; Eculizumab, efalizumab, efaproxiral sodium, EGF vaccine, eletriptan, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, ETC-642, etoricoxib, everolimus, exenatide; Gefitinib, IV gamma-globulin; Human insulin, gamma-hydroxybutyrate sodium; IDN-6556, iguratimod, imatinib mesylate, indiplon, ixabepilone; Laquinimod, LB-80380, lidocaine/prilocaineliraglutide, lopinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, lucinactant; MAb-14.18, melatonin, MLN-591-DM1; NC-531, neridronic acid, nesiritide, neutrophil-inhibitory factor, niacin/lovastatin; Oblimersen sodium, olcegepant, oral Insulin, ORV-105; Palonosetron hydrochloride, PAmAb, pegaptanib sodium, peginterferon alfa-2a, pegvisomant, perifosine, pexelizumab, phenoxodiol, phenserine tartrate, pimecrolimus, pramlintide acetate, pregabalin, PRO-542, prostate cancer vaccine, PT-141; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rDNA insulin, reslizumab, rh-Lactoferrin, ribamidine hydrochloride, rosuvastatin calcium; S-8184l, SC-1, sorafenib, St. John's Wort extract, SU-11248; Taxus, telbivudine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, teriparatide

  17. Gateways to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X

    2008-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prouse Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 101M, 3F8; Abatacept, ABT-263, Adalimumab, AG-7352, Agatolimod sodium, Alfimeprase, Aliskiren fumarate, Alvimopan hydrate, Aminolevulinic acid hexyl ester, Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, Anakinra, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, AT-9283, Atomoxetine hydrochloride, AVE-1642, AVE-9633, Axitinib, AZD-0530; Becocalcidiol, Belotecan hydrochloride, Bevacizumab, BG-9928, BIBF-1120, BMS-275183, Bortezomib, Bosentan; Catumaxomab, Cetuximab, CHR-2797, Ciclesonide, Clevidipine, Cypher, Cytarabine/daunorubicin; Darifenacin hydrobromide, Darunavir, Denosumab, Desvenlafaxine succinate, Disufenton sodium, Duloxetine hydrochloride, Dutasteride; Eculizumab, Efalizumab, Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Eplerenone, Epratuzumab, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Ethynylcytidine, Etravirine, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Fulvestrant; Garenoxacin mesilate, Gefitinib, Gestodene; HI-164, Hydralazine hydrochloride/isosorbide dinitrate; Icatibant acetate, ICX-RHY, Idraparinux sodium, Indacaterol, Ispronicline, Ivabradine hydrochloride, Ixabepilone; KB-2115, KW-2449; L-791515, Lapatinib ditosylate, LGD-4665, Licofelone, Liposomal doxorubicin, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lumiracoxib; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Miglustat, Mipomersen sodium, Mitumprotimut-T, MK-0822A, MK-0974; Nelarabine; Obatoclax mesylate, Olmesartan medoxomil, Olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide; Paliperidone, Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panitumumab, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pemetrexed disodium, Perospirone hydrochloride, Pertuzumab, Pimecrolimus, Pitrakinra, Pixantrone maleate, Posaconazole, Pregabalin; Quercetin; RALGA, Raltegravir

  18. HLA-C and KIR combined genotype as new response marker for HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients treated with interferon-based combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Stelma, F; Jansen, L; Sinnige, M J; van Dort, K A; Takkenberg, R B; Janssen, H L A; Reesink, H W; Kootstra, N A

    2016-08-01

    Current treatment for chronic hepatitis B infection (CHB) consists of interferon-based therapy. However, for unknown reasons, a large proportion of patients with CHB do not respond to this treatment. Hence, there is a pressing need to establish response markers to select patients who will benefit from therapy and to spare potential nonresponders from unnecessary side effects of antiviral therapy. Here, we assessed whether HLA-C and KIR genotypes were associated with treatment outcome for CHB. Twelve SNPs in or near the HLA-C gene were genotyped in 86 CHB patients (41 HBeAg positive; 45 HBeAg negative) treated with peginterferon alfa-2a + adefovir. Genotyping of killer immunoglobin-like receptors (KIRs) was performed by SSP-PCR. One SNP in HLA-C (rs2308557) was significantly associated with combined response in HBeAg-positive CHB patients (P = 0.003). This SNP is linked to the HLA-C group C1 or C2 classification, which controls KIR binding. The combination of KIR2DL1 with its ligand HLA-C2 was observed significantly more often in HBeAg-positive patients with a combined response (13/14) than in nonresponders (11/27, P = 0.001). Patients with the KIR2DL1/C2 genotype had significantly higher baseline ALT levels (136 vs 50 U/L, P = 0.002) than patients without this combination. Furthermore, KIR2DL1-C2 predicted response independent of HBV genotype and ALT at baseline. HLA-C and KIR genotype is strongly associated with response in HBeAg-positive CHB patients treated with interferon-based therapy. In combination with other known response markers, HLA-C/KIR genotype could enable the selection of patients more likely to respond to interferon-based therapy. PMID:26945896

  19. Work productivity among treatment-naïve patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C infection receiving telaprevir combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, J; Vera-Llonch, M; Donepudi, M; Suthoff, E; Younossi, Z; Goss, T F

    2015-01-01

    Work productivity is impacted in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients and has been linked to treatment. In two Phase 3 trials, ADVANCE and ILLUMINATE, treatment-naïve genotype 1 chronic HCV-infected patients received 12-week telaprevir (T) with 24 (T12PR24)- or 48 (T12PR48)-week peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin. The objective of this analysis was to examine the impact of chronic HCV infection and its treatment with combination therapy on work productivity. The 5-item, self-reported work productivity questionnaire (WPQ) was administered in Phase 3 trials to assess unemployment status, days unable to work due to HCV/treatment, reduced hours worked and impact on productivity in prior 4 weeks. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses were employed in analyses of pooled trial data. About 1147 patients were included; 22% (n = 255) were unemployed at baseline, with 8% being unemployed due to health reasons. At week 12, there were no differences by treatment regimen in the number of days unable to work. At week 48, improvements were observed earlier among patients receiving the shorter duration of T combination treatment. Mean (95% CI) change from baseline in days unable to work was -0.48 (-0.85, -0.11) days for T12PR24, 1.43 (0.63, 2.24) days for T12PR48 and 1.24 (0.18, 2.30) days for PR48 with placebo. Predictors of days unable to work were identified and include demographic characteristics, pretreatment and on-treatment levels of fatigue, as well regional variation. In post hoc analyses of the ADVANCE and ILLUMINATE trials, work productivity decreased during the initial 12 weeks regardless of treatment group. PMID:24528927

  20. Testing Adjuvant Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with stage III or stage IV melanoma that has been completely resected will be randomly assigned to receive post-surgical treatment with either ipilimumab or high-dose interferon alfa-2b, the current standard of care.

  1. Quantitative Hepatitis B Core Antibody Level Is a New Predictor for Treatment Response In HBeAg-positive Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Receiving Peginterferon

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Feng-Qin; Song, Liu-Wei; Yuan, Quan; Fang, Lin-Lin; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Sheng, Ji-Fang; Xie, Dong-Ying; Shang, Jia; Wu, Shu-Huan; Sun, Yong-Tao; Wei, Shao-Feng; Wang, Mao-Rong; Wan, Mo-Bin; Jia, Ji-Dong; Luo, Guang-Han; Tang, Hong; Li, Shu-Chen; Niu, Jun-Qi; Zhou, Wei-dong; Sun, Li; Xia, Ning-Shao; Wang, Gui-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A recent study revealed that quantitative hepatitis B core antibody (qAnti-HBc) level could serve as a novel marker for predicting treatment response. In the present study, we further investigated the predictive value of qAnti-HBc level in HBeAg-positive patients undergoing PEG-IFN therapy. A total of 140 HBeAg-positive patients who underwent PEG-IFN therapy for 48 weeks and follow-up for 24 weeks were enrolled in this study. Serum samples were taken every 12 weeks post-treatment. The predictive value of the baseline qAnti-HBc level for treatment response was evaluated. Patients were further divided into 2 groups according to the baseline qAnti-HBc level, and the response rate was compared. Additionally, the kinetics of the virological and biochemical parameters were analyzed. Patients who achieved response had a significantly higher baseline qAnti-HBc level (serological response [SR], 4.52±0.36 vs. 4.19±0.58, p=0.001; virological response [VR], 4.53±0.35 vs. 4.22±0.57, p=0.005; combined response [CR], 4.50±0.36 vs. 4.22±0.58, p=0.009)). Baseline qAnti-HBc was the only parameter that was independently correlated with SR (p=0.008), VR (p=0.010) and CR(p=0.019). Patients with baseline qAnti-HBc levels ≥30,000 IU/mL had significantly higher response rates, more HBV DNA suppression, and better hepatitis control in PEG-IFN treatment. In conclusion, qAnti-HBc level may be a novel biomarker for predicting treatment response in HBeAg-positive patients receiving PEG-IFN therapy. PMID:25553110

  2. Amino acid substitutions in the hepatitis C virus core region of genotype 1b affect very early viral dynamics during treatment with telaprevir, peginterferon, and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Hirakawa, Miharu; Kawamura, Yusuke; Yatsuji, Hiromi; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Mariko; Saitoh, Satoshi; Arase, Yasuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2010-04-01

    Substitution of amino acid (aa) 70 and 91 in the core region of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b can predict the response to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN)/ribavirin combination therapy, but its impact on triple therapy of telaprevir/PEG-IFN/ribavirin is not clear. The aims of this study were to investigate the rate of HCV RNA loss following 12-week triple therapy, and determine the effect of aa substitutions on very early (within 48 hr) viral dynamics. Sixty-seven patients infected with HCV genotype 1b (HCV-1b) and high viral load who received 12-week triple therapy were studied. RNA loss could be achieved in 2%, 34%, 80%, 92%, 95%, 94%, and 90% of the patients after 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks of triple therapy, respectively. After 24-hr treatment, the proportion of patients with Arg70 and Leu91 substitutions with > or = 3.0 log fall in HCV RNA was significantly higher than those with < 3.0 log fall (P = 0.008). However, the aa substitution patterns in the core region did not influence the fall in HCV RNA after 48-hr treatment. Multivariate analysis identified substitutions of aa 70 and 91 (P = 0.014) and level of viremia at baseline (> or = 7.0 log IU/ml; P = 0.085) as independent parameters that determined the > or = 3.0 log fall in HCV RNA level after 24-hr triple therapy. It is concluded that 12-week triple therapy achieved high rates of loss of HCV RNA in Japanese patients infected with HCV-1b and high viral load, and that the aa substitution pattern in the core region seems to influence very early viral dynamics. PMID:20166188

  3. Amino acid substitution in the core protein has no impact on relapse in hepatitis C genotype 1 patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuko; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Oze, Tsugiko; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Kazuto; Mita, Eiji; Haruna, Yoshimichi; Inoue, Atsuo; Imai, Yasuharu; Hosui, Atsushi; Miyagi, Takuya; Yoshida, Yuichi; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Kiso, Shinichi; Kanto, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Akinori; Takehara, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Norio

    2011-03-01

    Previous reports demonstrated that amino acid (aa) substitutions in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein are predictors of non-virological responses to pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin combination therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of core aa substitutions on viral kinetics during the treatment and relapse after the treatment. The 187 patients with HCV genotype 1 enrolled in this study were categorized into four groups according to core aa substitution patterns: double-wild group (n=92), Arg70/Leu91; 70-mutant group (n=42), Gln70/Leu91; 91-mutant group (n=31), Arg70/Met91; and double-mutant group (n=22), Gln70/Met91. The relationship between the core aa substitutions and the virological response was examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that substitution at aa 70 was significantly associated with a poor virological response during the first 12 weeks (decline of <1 log from baseline at week 4, <2 log at week 12), and substitution at aa 91 was significantly associated with detectable HCV RNA at week 24. With respect to relapse, only the ribavirin exposure (odds ratio (OR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60-0.98) and HCV RNA disappearance between weeks 13 and 24 (OR, 23.69; 95% CI, 5.44-103.08) were associated independently with relapse, with no correlation being found with the core aa substitutions and relapse. In conclusion, the results showed that core aa substitutions can be strong predictive factors at pretreatment of the non-response, but not for relapse, for virological responders with HCV RNA disappearance during treatment. PMID:21264862

  4. Relationship between the hepatitis C viral load and the serum interferon concentration during the first week of peginterferon-alpha-2b-ribavirin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    François, Catherine; Descamps, Véronique; Brochot, Etienne; Bernard, Isabelle; Canva, Valérie; Mathurin, Philippe; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles

    2010-10-01

    In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, the current standard of care (combination therapy with pegylated alpha interferon (PEG-IFNalpha) and ribavirin) is only effective in around 50% of cases. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between the HCV load and the PEG-IFN concentration during the first week of treatment. Fifteen treatment-naive patients with chronic hepatitis C infection (genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4) underwent PEG-IFNα-2b/ribavirin combination therapy. Blood samples were collected before the first injection (T(0)) and then at different time points until the next injection a week later. The PEG-IFN concentration and the HCV load were assayed. The serum interferon concentration peaked 2 days after the first injection (mean value for the study population; T(max) = 40.9 hr; C(max) = 490 pg/ml) and a trough in viral load was seen at day 3. The PEG-IFNalpha-2b concentration decreased from day 2 to day 7, enabling a viral rebound in all patients. The change in viral load between day 0 and day 3 differed significantly according to whether the patients were responders at week 12 (Deltalog d(0)/d(3) = 2.729 +/- 1.419 log(10) IU/ml) or not (Deltalog d(0)/d(3) = 1.102 +/- 0.472 log(10) IU/ml). Our results emphasize the potential clinical importance of achieving viral decay immediately after initiation of interferon-ribavirin combination therapy. J. Med. Virol. 82:1640-1646, 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20827759

  5. Hyperinsulinaemia reduces the 24-h virological response to PEG-interferon therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bortoletto, G; Scribano, L; Realdon, S; Marcolongo, M; Mirandola, S; Franceschini, L; Bonisegna, S; Noventa, F; Plebani, M; Martines, D; Alberti, A

    2010-07-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) reduces response to pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN)/ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), but the mechanisms are still undefined. We examined the relationship between baseline insulin levels, the main component affecting homeostasis model of assessment - insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for assessment of IR in non-diabetic patients, and the 'acute' virological response to PEG-IFN measured 24 h after the first injection and taken as correlate of intracellular interferon signalling. In 62 patients treated with PEG-IFN/Ribavirin, serum insulin and HOMA-IR were assessed at baseline, while hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA was measured at baseline and 24 h, 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks after treatment initiation. Sustained virological response was examined 24 weeks after therapy discontinuation. Mean baseline insulin was 11.52 +/- 8.51 U/L and mean HOMA-IR was 2.65 +/- 2.01 both being significantly higher with advanced liver fibrosis. Hepatitis C virus-RNA decay observed 24 h after the first injection of PEG-IFN was significantly lower (0.7 +/- 0.8 log) in patients with HOMA > or =3 compared with those with HOMA <3 (1.7 +/- 0.8, P = 0.001). A highly significant (r = -0.42) inverse correlation was observed between baseline insulin levels and the 24-h HCV-RNA decay. The difference in early viral kinetics between patients with HOMA > or =3 or <3 resulted in a significant difference in the percentage of patients achieving rapid (week 4) and sustained virological response. Multivariate analysis, inclusive of patient age, HCV genotype and fibrosis stage, identified baseline insulin levels as the main independent variable affecting the 24-h response to PEG-IFN. Hyperinsulinaemia reduces the cellular response to Pegylated-interferon in CHC with IR. Strategies to reduce insulin levels before initiation of treatment should be pursued to improve efficacy of anti-viral treatment. PMID:19878535

  6. Retinopathy in chronic hepatitis C patients during interferon treatment with ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, K; Lam, W; Waheeb, S; Thai, Q; Heathcote, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the ocular effect of interferon alfa 2b prescribed with ribavirin in patients undergoing therapy for chronic hepatitis C.
METHODS—19 patients with chronic hepatitis C who satisfied the follow up criteria were assessed for ocular complications using slit lamp biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy before, during, and after the treatment at regular intervals.
RESULTS—8/19 patients, while on treatment, developed an asymptomatic retinopathy. Among these 3/8 were relapsers and 5/9 were non-responders to interferon monotherapy. All retinal changes faded, often while the patients continued the therapy. There was no significant association in occurrence of retinopathy with haematological and/or biochemical changes.
CONCLUSION—Retinopathy was more common in interferon monotherapy non-responders than relapsers when treated with interferon alfa 2b with the addition of ribavirin. The changes were transient, disappearing while the patients were still being treated.

 PMID:11567959

  7. Analysis of sequences of hepatitis C virus NS5A genotype 1 in HIV-coinfected patients with a null response to nitazoxanide or peg-interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Sede, M; Laufer, N; Ojeda, D; Gun, A; Cahn, P; Quarleri, J

    2013-09-01

    Even though new drugs have been approved for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the risk of drug-drug interactions and concern about overlapping toxicities has hindered the development of studies in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals. Traditional treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (peg-IFN + RBV) is very expensive and has a low rate of sustained virological response in coinfected patients, especially if they are infected with HCV genotype 1. Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a drug that is being evaluated for the treatment of chronic HCV infection, both in HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Understanding the NTZ resistance mechanism could allow the development of resistance to be minimized and would expand the treatment options, mainly in special populations such as HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Similarly to IFN, NTZ increases the activity of the cellular protein kinase activated by double-stranded RNA (PKR), a key kinase in the innate antiviral response. In order to elucidate whether sequence heterogeneity in the PKR-binding domain of HCV NS5A genotype 1 could influence the antiviral activity of either NTZ monotherapy or peg-IFN + RBV, baseline and end-of-therapy plasma samples from two groups of eleven non-responder HIV/HCV-coinfected patients that had received NTZ or peg-IFN + RBV were studied. Most of the HCV NS5A sequences examined at the end of therapy did not change from the baseline, even after 30 days course of antiviral therapy. An extensive comparison of HCV NS5A genotype 1 and 4 sequences from the database with reported IFN therapy outcome was performed in order to infer their phylogenetic relationships. The HCV genotype 1 NS5A nucleotide sequences from therapy-non-responder patients were intermingled amongst those from the database, irrespective of their IFN-therapy outcome. When comparing NS5A-PKRBD amino acid sequences, significant differences were observed in genotype 4, but not in genotype 1 (p < 0.0001 and p > 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, despite IFN and NTZ sharing the protein kinase activated by double-stranded RNA as their cellular target, the HCV genotype 1 strategy to counteract the IFN action mediated by NS5A ISDR/PKRBD does not explain drug resistance in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Other viral factors that are possibly involved are discussed as well. PMID:23553458

  8. Simeprevir

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rebetol) and peginterferon alfa (Pegasys) to treat chronic hepatitis C (an ongoing viral infection that damages the liver). ... inhibitors. It works by decreasing the amount of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the body. Simeprevir may not ...

  9. Boceprevir

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rebetol] and peginterferon alfa [Pegasys]) to treat chronic hepatitis C (an ongoing viral infection that damages the liver) ... inhibitors. It works by decreasing the amount of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the body. Boceprevir may not ...

  10. Sofosbuvir

    MedlinePlus

    Sofosbuvir is used along with ribavirin (Copegus, Rebetol) and sometimes another medication (peginterferon alfa [Pegasys] to treat ... an ongoing viral infection that damages the liver). Sofosbuvir is also used along with ribavirin (Copegus, Rebetol) ...

  11. Mechanism of action of guanfacine: a postsynaptic differential approach to the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (adhd).

    PubMed

    Alamo, Cecilio; López-Muñoz, Francisco; Sánchez-García, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The treatment of ADHD has focused on the use of psychostimulants drugs such as methylphenidate or amphetamine and derivatives, or not stimulants agents, such as atomoxetine. These agents act mainly on catecholaminergic presynaptic mechanisms. Recently the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has approved another not psychostimulant drug, guanfacine extended release (ER), as a new option to the treatment of ADHD, which acts at postsynaptic level. Guanfacine stimulates postsynaptic alfa-2A adrenergic receptors so it inhibits the production of cAMP and closes HCN channels enhancing the effectiveness of the signal of the pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), thus improving working memory and attention. In addition, stimulation of the alpha-2A receptors promotes growth and maturation of the dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons of the medial PFc, that are associated with brain function such as learning and memory. In contrast with psychostimulants or atomoxetine, guanfacine mimics noradrenaline stimulation of postsynaptic receptors alfa-2A on the PFC. PMID:27254403

  12. Thymalfasin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, Vinod K

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this review article is to examine previous and ongoing studies of thymalfasin in combination with peginterferon-alpha2a and peginterferon-alpha2a plus ribavirin in difficult-to-treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. The following studies will be reviewed in detail: (1) Sherman and colleagues conducted a study in 109 HCV RNA positive HVC patients comparing the combination of thymalfasin + IFN versus IFN alone versus placebo. (2) Rustgi et al. evaluated the efficacy and safety of thymalfasin and peg-IFN-alpha2a in 31 genotype 1, high viral load, HCV nonresponders in a 12-week viral kinetic study. (3) Di Bisceglie, Sherman et al. performed a study of previous HCV nonresponders being retreated with either peginterferon-alpha2a plus thymalfasin or peginterferon-alpha2a plus placebo. (4) Poo and colleagues in Mexico evaluated triple combination therapy using thymalfasin, peginterferon-alpha2a, and ribavirin for the treatment of Hispanic HCV nonresponders. PMID:17600289

  13. Hepatitis C virus: A global view

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Amal Ahmed; Elbedewy, Tamer A; El-Serafy, Magdy; El-Toukhy, Naglaa; Ahmed, Wesam; Ali El Din, Zaniab

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global challenge; 130-175 million are chronically infected. Over 350000 die each year from HCV. Chronic HCV is the primary cause of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and end-stage liver disease. Management of chronic HCV is aimed at preventing cirrhosis, reducing the risk of HCC, and treating extra hepatic complications. New treatments for chronic HCV has been devoted based on direct-acting antivirals, as pegylated interferon (peginterferon) is responsible for many side effects and limits treatment access. Sofosbuvir is the first compound to enter the market with Peginterferon-free combination regimens. PMID:26609344

  14. Hepatitis C virus: A global view.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amal Ahmed; Elbedewy, Tamer A; El-Serafy, Magdy; El-Toukhy, Naglaa; Ahmed, Wesam; Ali El Din, Zaniab

    2015-11-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global challenge; 130-175 million are chronically infected. Over 350000 die each year from HCV. Chronic HCV is the primary cause of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and end-stage liver disease. Management of chronic HCV is aimed at preventing cirrhosis, reducing the risk of HCC, and treating extra hepatic complications. New treatments for chronic HCV has been devoted based on direct-acting antivirals, as pegylated interferon (peginterferon) is responsible for many side effects and limits treatment access. Sofosbuvir is the first compound to enter the market with Peginterferon-free combination regimens. PMID:26609344

  15. Current status and emerging challenges in the treatment of hepatitis C virus genotypes 4 to 6

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 4, 5 and 6 are mainly present in Africa, the Middle East and Asia and they have been less extensively studied with respect to epidemiology, natural disease history and therapeutic endpoints. Response rates to a 48-wk combined peginterferon/ribavirin treatment range to 40%-69% for HCV 4, 55%-60% for HCV 5 and 60%-90% for HCV 6. Response-guided schedules are recommended to optimize the outcomes of peginterferon/ribavirin treatment in HCV 4 and, in form of preliminary data, for HCV 6, but no data are yet available to support such an individualization of therapy for HCV 5. Recently, the direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) with pan-genotypic activities simeprevir, sofosbuvir and daclatasvir have been recommended in triple regimens with peginterferon/ribavirin for the treatment of HCV genotypes 4 to 6 infections. In the future, DAA-based interferon-free therapies are awaited to drastically improve treatment outcomes in HCV. However, efforts to improve treatment outcomes with peginterferon/ribavirin should continue, as the HCV 4-6 infected population is mainly based in resource-limited settings with restricted access to the costly DAAs. PMID:25789294

  16. Current status and emerging challenges in the treatment of hepatitis C virus genotypes 4 to 6.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Karatapanis, Stylianos

    2015-03-16

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 4, 5 and 6 are mainly present in Africa, the Middle East and Asia and they have been less extensively studied with respect to epidemiology, natural disease history and therapeutic endpoints. Response rates to a 48-wk combined peginterferon/ribavirin treatment range to 40%-69% for HCV 4, 55%-60% for HCV 5 and 60%-90% for HCV 6. Response-guided schedules are recommended to optimize the outcomes of peginterferon/ribavirin treatment in HCV 4 and, in form of preliminary data, for HCV 6, but no data are yet available to support such an individualization of therapy for HCV 5. Recently, the direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) with pan-genotypic activities simeprevir, sofosbuvir and daclatasvir have been recommended in triple regimens with peginterferon/ribavirin for the treatment of HCV genotypes 4 to 6 infections. In the future, DAA-based interferon-free therapies are awaited to drastically improve treatment outcomes in HCV. However, efforts to improve treatment outcomes with peginterferon/ribavirin should continue, as the HCV 4-6 infected population is mainly based in resource-limited settings with restricted access to the costly DAAs. PMID:25789294

  17. 78 FR 57166 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... meeting. Agenda: The committee will discuss new drug application (NDA) 205123, simeprevir (a hepatitis C... the treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection, in combination with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin (two medicines approved to treat chronic hepatitis C) in adult patients with compensated...

  18. 76 FR 14026 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... application (NDA) 202-258, boceprevir (a hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor), manufactured by Merck & Co., Inc., with a proposed indication for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection, in combination with peginterferon alfa and ribavirin (two medicines approved to treat chronic hepatitis...

  19. Treatment of refractory low grade lymphoma with chlorambucil alternating with interferon and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Talavera, A; Guzmán, R; Cuadra, I

    1995-01-01

    We report the results of a clinical trial of chlorambucil (CB) alternating with interferon alfa 2b (IFN) in previously treated patients with low-grade lymphoma who were refractory to previous treatment. Patients received CB 10 mg/m2, po, daily, days 1-14, alternating with IFN 5.0 MU three times a week days 15-28 (six doses) by six monthly cycles. If partial response was achieved, patients received extended field radiotherapy to sites of nodal residual postchemotherapy disease. Forty-three patients were enrolled into the study, and 30 were evaluable for response and toxicity. Nineteen out of 39 (40%) achieved complete remission and 14 out of 39 (35%) had partial remission, thus the overall response was observed in 83% of the cases. Ten patients with partial response and residual nodal disease received radiotherapy and achieved complete response criteria. The median duration of response has not been achieved, yet, 23 patients remain in complete response after a median follow-up of 98.5 months. Toxicity was mild and 95% of the patients received the planned dose of CB and IFN. These results suggest that combination of CB and IFN and addition of radiotherapy to residual postchemotherapy nodal disease may be effective in patients with low-grade lymphoma without excessive toxicity and adequate quality of life. PMID:8590892

  20. Future treatment options for HCV: double, triple, what is the optimal combination?

    PubMed

    Kronenberger, Bernd; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Specifically Targeted Antiviral Therapy against hepatitis C virus (STAT-C) stands for a new era in the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Results from recent trials with protease and polymerase inhibitors indicate that therapy with a single HCV specific compound will not be sufficient to eradicate hepatitis C virus infection and that combination therapy will be necessary to improve sustained virologic response rates. The search for the optimal combination of STAT-C compounds with peginterferon alfa with or without ribavirin is currently under investigation in several clinical trials. Overall the current studies indicate that peginterferon alfa and ribavirin remain the backbone of antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C even in the era of STAT-C. Nevertheless, it can be anticipated that combination of STAT-C compounds with non-overlapping resistance profiles could improve response to antiviral therapy. Promising combinations are protease inhibitors plus nucleoside analogue and non-nucleoside analogue polymerase inhibitors. PMID:19187871

  1. Influence of IL28B Polymorphisms on Response to a Lower-Than-Standard Dose peg-IFN-α 2a for Genotype 3 Chronic Hepatitis C in HIV-Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Cortés, Luis F.; Ruiz-Valderas, Rosa; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis; González-Escribano, María F.; Torres-Cornejo, Almudena; Mata, Rosario; Rivero, Antonio; Pineda, Juan A.; Marquez-Solero, Manuel; Viciana, Pompeyo

    2012-01-01

    Background Data on which to base definitive recommendations on the doses and duration of therapy for genotype 3 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients are scarce. We evaluated the efficacy of a lower peginterferon-α 2a dose and a shorter duration of therapy than the current standard of care in genotype 3 HCV/HIV-coinfected patients. Methods and Findings Pilot, open-label, single arm clinical trial which involved 58 Caucasian HCV/HIV-coinfected patients who received weekly 135 µg peginterferon-α 2a plus ribavirin 400 mg twice daily during 20 weeks after attaining undetectable viremia. The relationships between baseline patient-related variables, including IL28B genotype, plasma HCV-RNA, ribavirin dose/kg, peginterferon-α 2a and ribavirin levels with virological responses were analyzed. Only 4 patients showed lack of response and 5 patients dropped out due to adverse events related to the study medication. Overall, sustained virologic response (SVR) rates were 58.3% by intention-to-treat and 71.4% by per protocol analysis, respectively. Among patients with rapid virologic response (RVR), SVR and relapses rates were 92.6% and 7.4%, respectively. No relationships were observed between viral responses and ribavirin dose/kg, peginterferon-α 2a concentrations, ribavirin levels or rs129679860 genotype. Conclusions Weekly 135 µg pegIFN-α 2a could be as effective as the standard 180 µg dose, with a very low incidence of severe adverse events. A 24-week treatment duration appears to be appropriate in patients achieving RVR, but extending treatment up to just 20 weeks beyond negativization of viremia is associated with a high relapse rate in those patients not achieving RVR. There was no influence of IL28B genotype on the virological responses. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00553930 PMID:22235243

  2. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus during Pregnancy, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2013

    PubMed Central

    El Masry, Karim Medhat; Ravi, Mini; Sayed, Falak

    2016-01-01

    As of June 19, 2015, the World Health Organization had received 1,338 notifications of laboratory-confirmed infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Little is known about the course of or treatment for MERS-CoV in pregnant women. We report a fatal case of MERS-CoV in a pregnant woman administered combination ribavirin–peginterferon-α therapy. PMID:26890613

  3. A Prospective Study of the Rate of Progression in Compensated, Histologically Advanced Chronic Hepatitis C (HEP-10-2210)

    PubMed Central

    Dienstag, Jules L.; Ghany, Marc G.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Kim, Hae-Young; Seeff, Leonard B.; Szabo, Gyongyi; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Sterling, Richard K.; Everson, Gregory T.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Lee, William M.; Lok, Anna S.; Morishima, Chihiro; Stoddard, Anne M.; Everhart, James E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The incidence of liver disease progression among subjects with histologically advanced but compensated, chronic hepatitis C is incomplete. METHODS The Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis Trial was a randomized study of 3.5 years of maintenance peginterferon treatment on liver disease progression among patients who had not cleared virus on peginterferon and ribavirin therapy. Patients were followed subsequently off therapy. Because maintenance peginterferon treatment did not alter liver disease progression, we analyzed treated and control patients together. Among 1,050 subjects (60% advanced fibrosis, 40% cirrhosis), we determined the rate of progression to cirrhosis over 4 years and of clinical outcomes over 8 years. RESULTS Among patients with fibrosis, the incidence of cirrhosis was 9.9% per year. 679 clinical outcomes occurred among 329 subjects. Initial clinical outcomes occurred more frequently among subjects with cirrhosis (7.5%/year) than with fibrosis (3.3%/year) (P <0.0001). Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) ≥7 was the most common first outcome, followed by hepatocellular carcinoma. Following occurrence of a score CTP ≥7, the rate of subsequent events increased to 12.9%/year, including a death rate of 10%/year. Age and sex did not influence outcome rates. Baseline platelet count was a strong predictor of all clinical outcomes. During the 8 years of follow-up, death or liver transplantation occurred among 12.2% of patients with advanced fibrosis and 31.5% of those with cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS Among patients with advanced hepatitis C who failed peginterferon and ribavirin, the rate of liver-related outcomes, including death and liver transplantation, is high, especially once CTP reaches at least 7. PMID:21520194

  4. Evaluation of Incremental Siliconization Levels on Soluble Aggregates, Submicron and Subvisible Particles in a Prefilled Syringe Product.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shujun; Landsman, Pavel; Spencer, Andrea; DeCollibus, Daniel; Vega, Fabian; Temel, Deniz B; Houde, Damian; Henderson, Olivia; Brader, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of stability with respect to particles in prefilled syringes is complicated by the presence of silicone oil. The mobility, colloidal characteristics, and kinetic instability of silicone oil in contact with a protein formulation may be influenced in unpredictable ways by pharmaceutical variables, storage, and handling conditions. To provide insight into the impact of these variables on silicone oil originating specifically from the siliconized prefillable syringe (PFS), a series of studies were conducted at incremental syringe barrel siliconization levels. Size-exclusion chromatography and particle counting methods were used to quantitate soluble aggregates and submicron and subvisible particles in peginterferon beta-1a in a PFS siliconized with a fixed nozzle spray-on siliconization process. The effect of silicone oil on the peginterferon beta-1a molecule was examined under pharmaceutically relevant conditions, accelerated degradation, and under denaturing conditions. Resonant mass measurement was used to discriminate silicone oil from protein particles establishing that silicone oil does not mask adverse trends in non-silicone oil particles. The peginterferon beta-1a molecule was shown to be stable in the presence of silicone oil and robust with respect to the formation of soluble aggregates and submicron and subvisible particles in its PFS siliconized over the range of 0-1.2 mg silicone oil per syringe barrel. PMID:26852839

  5. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C: anticipated impact of resistance in patients treated with protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kronenberger, Bernd; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2009-02-01

    A main target of specifically targeted antiviral therapy for hepatitis C (STAT-C) is the NS3-protease, which has key functions in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication cycle. HCV/NS3-protease inhibitors have shown high antiviral activity in vitro and in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Protease-resistant HCV variants occurred rapidly in patients receiving protease-inhibitor monotherapy. The development of resistance can be best explained by selection of preexisting resistant variants, which grow out under selective pressure. Numerous mutations associated with resistance were identified. Clinical trials showed that protease-resistant strains are sensitive to interferon and that a triple combination of protease inhibitors, peginterferon, and ribavirin may improve the sustained virologic response rate compared with standard peginterferon/ribavirin combination therapy. Overall, it can be anticipated that successful treatment with protease inhibitors will require either combination therapy with peginterferon/ribavirin or a combination of STAT-C compounds with distinct modes of action and resistance patterns. PMID:19166654

  6. A Lead-In with Silibinin Prior to Triple-Therapy Translates into Favorable Treatment Outcomes in Difficult-To-Treat HIV/Hepatitis C Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Dominique L.; Rauch, Andri; Aouri, Manel; Durisch, Nina; Eberhard, Nadia; Anagnostopoulos, Alexia; Ledergerber, Bruno; Müllhaupt, Beat; Metzner, Karin J.; Decosterd, Laurent; Böni, Jürg; Weber, Rainer; Fehr, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficacy of first-generation protease inhibitor based triple-therapy against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is limited in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with advanced liver fibrosis and non-response to previous peginterferon-ribavirin. These patients have a low chance of achieving a sustained virologic response (SVR) using first generation triple-therapy, with a success rate of only 20%. We investigated the efficacy and safety of lead-in therapy with intravenous silibinin followed by triple-therapy in this difficult-to-treat patient group. Methodology Inclusion criteria were HIV/HCV coinfection with advanced liver fibrosis and documented previous treatment failure on peginterferon-ribavirin. The intervention was a lead-in therapy with intravenous silibinin 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days, followed by triple-therapy (peginterferon-ribavirin and telaprevir) for 12 weeks, and peginterferon-ribavirin alone for 36 weeks. Outcome measurements were HCV-RNA after silibinin lead-in and during triple-therapy, SVR data at week 12, and safety and tolerability of silibinin. Results We examined sixteen HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with previous peginterferon-ribavirin failure, of whom 14 had a fibrosis grade METAVIR ≥F3. All were on successful antiretroviral therapy. Median (IQR) HCV-RNA decline after silibinin therapy was 2.65 (2.1–2.8) log10 copies/mL. Fifteen of sixteen patients (94%) had undetectable HCV RNA at weeks 4 and 12, eleven patients (69%) showed end-of-treatment response (i.e., undetectable HCV-RNA at week 48), and ten patients (63%) reached SVR at week 12 (SVR 12). Six of the sixteen patients (37%) did not reach SVR 12: One patient had rapid virologic response (RVR) (i.e., undetectable HCV-RNA at week 4) but stopped treatment at week 8 due to major depression. Five patients had RVR, but experienced viral breakthroughs at week 21, 22, 25, or 32, or a relapse at week 52. The HIV RNA remained below the limit of detection in all patients during the complete

  7. Racial differences in responses to therapy with interferon in chronic hepatitis C. Consensus Interferon Study Group.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K R; Hoofnagle, J H; Tong, M J; Lee, W M; Pockros, P; Heathcote, E J; Albert, D; Joh, T

    1999-09-01

    The likelihood of a sustained response to a course of interferon in patients with chronic hepatitis C correlates with several clinical and viral factors, including age, viral genotype and initial levels of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in serum. The role of race and ethnicity has not been assessed. We evaluated the association of race with response to interferon in a large randomized, controlled trial using either consensus interferon (9 microg) or interferon alfa-2b (3 million units) given three times weekly for 24 weeks. African-American patients participating in the study were similar to white patients in mean age (43 vs. 42 years) and baseline levels of HCV RNA (3.6 vs. 3.0 million copies/mL) but had lower rates of cirrhosis (5% vs. 12%) and more frequently had viral genotype 1 (88% vs. 66%: P =.004). Most strikingly, the rates of end-of-treatment and sustained virological responses were lower among the 40 African-American patients (5% and 2%) than among the 380 white patients (33% and 12%) (P =.04 and.07). Rates of response among Hispanic and Asian-American patients were not statistically different than non-Hispanic white patients. Median viral levels decreased by week 24 of therapy by 2.5 logs in white patients (from 3.0 to 0.012 million copies/mL) but by only 0.5 logs among African- American patients (from 3.6 to 1.8 million copies/mL). Thus, there are marked racial differences in virological responses to interferon in hepatitis C that must be considered in assessing trials of interferon therapy and in counseling patients regarding treatment. The differences in response rates are as yet unexplained. PMID:10462387

  8. Inherited DOCK2 Deficiency in Patients with Early-Onset Invasive Infections.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Kerry; Domínguez Conde, Cecilia; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Parolini, Silvia; Audry, Magali; Chou, Janet; Haapaniemi, Emma; Keles, Sevgi; Bilic, Ivan; Okada, Satoshi; Massaad, Michel J; Rounioja, Samuli; Alwahadneh, Adel M; Serwas, Nina K; Capuder, Kelly; Çiftçi, Ergin; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Pedergnana, Vincent; Boisson, Bertrand; Haskoloğlu, Şule; Ensari, Arzu; Schuster, Michael; Moretta, Alessandro; Itan, Yuval; Patrizi, Ornella; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Saarela, Janna; Knip, Mikael; Petrovski, Slavé; Goldstein, David B; Parrott, Roberta E; Savas, Berna; Schambach, Axel; Tabellini, Giovanna; Bock, Christoph; Chatila, Talal A; Comeau, Anne Marie; Geha, Raif S; Abel, Laurent; Buckley, Rebecca H; İkincioğulları, Aydan; Al-Herz, Waleed; Helminen, Merja; Doğu, Figen; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Boztuğ, Kaan; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2015-06-18

    Background Combined immunodeficiencies are marked by inborn errors of T-cell immunity in which the T cells that are present are quantitatively or functionally deficient. Impaired humoral immunity is also common. Patients have severe infections, autoimmunity, or both. The specific molecular, cellular, and clinical features of many types of combined immunodeficiencies remain unknown. Methods We performed genetic and cellular immunologic studies involving five unrelated children with early-onset invasive bacterial and viral infections, lymphopenia, and defective T-cell, B-cell, and natural killer (NK)-cell responses. Two patients died early in childhood; after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, the other three had normalization of T-cell function and clinical improvement. Results We identified biallelic mutations in the dedicator of cytokinesis 2 gene (DOCK2) in these five patients. RAC1 activation was impaired in the T cells. Chemokine-induced migration and actin polymerization were defective in the T cells, B cells, and NK cells. NK-cell degranulation was also affected. Interferon-α and interferon-λ production by peripheral-blood mononuclear cells was diminished after viral infection. Moreover, in DOCK2-deficient fibroblasts, viral replication was increased and virus-induced cell death was enhanced; these conditions were normalized by treatment with interferon alfa-2b or after expression of wild-type DOCK2. Conclusions Autosomal recessive DOCK2 deficiency is a new mendelian disorder with pleiotropic defects of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. Children with clinical features of combined immunodeficiencies, especially with early-onset, invasive infections, may have this condition. (Supported by the National Institutes of Health and others.). PMID:26083206

  9. Quality-of-life evaluation in an interferon therapy after radical surgery in cutaneous melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Rataj, Dorota; Jankowiak, Barbara; Krajewska-Kułak, Elzbieta; Van Damme-Ostapowicz, Katarzyna; Nowecki, Zbigniew I; Rutkowski, Piotr; Niczyporuk, Wiaczesław

    2005-01-01

    Melanoma is the fastest growing solid tumor in men and women, and despite accounting for only 4% of skin cancer cases, it accounts for more than 79% of skin cancer-related deaths. The present study was designed to evaluate the impact of interferon (IFN) treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL) after radical surgery of cutaneous melanoma. The tests were carried out in a group of patients treated in the Department of Soft Tissue and Bone Cancer, Institute of Oncology, in Warsaw. The present study included 2 groups of the patients, 110 persons each. One group consisted of patients who had been subjected to radical surgery of cutaneous melanoma, and the other one consisted of 110 patients treated with a supplementary interferon alfa-2b (IFN-alpha-2b) therapy. Data were collected by means of an anonymous QLQ-C30 (version 2.0.) questionnaire elaborated and provided by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer. The QLQ-C30 questionnaire consisted of 43 questions. The IFN-alpha-2b treatment significantly affected patients' physical condition, mental health, and social life. The emotional state of the patients was more affected during IFN-alpha-2b treatment. Somatic symptoms were also increased in those patients. The IFN-alpha-2b therapy also significantly affected family and social life. In spite of several adverse effects, the patients assessed their QOL as good. The IFN-alpha-2b treatment is troublesome for the melanoma patients. It is important that the treating physician and nurse should be aware of the 4 major categories of IFN-alpha-2b toxicity: constitutional, neuropsychiatric, hepatic, and hematologic. A number of steps can be taken to minimize the morbidity associated with IFN-alpha-2b therapy, resulting in an improvement in both QOL and patient compliance. PMID:15915059

  10. Mechanisms, indications and results of salvage systemic therapy for sporadic and von Hippel-Lindau related hemangioblastomas of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, Jody Filippo; Mazza, Elena; Motta, Micaela; Mortini, Pietro; Reni, Michele

    2013-04-01

    Hemangioblastomas (HBs) are rare indolent vascular tumors that may occur sporadically or in association with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Total neurosurgical resection is the standard upfront approach providing long-term tumor control. At time of tumor recurrence, second surgery, radiosurgery or radiotherapy are the main therapeutic strategies. Limited information is available on the role of pharmacological strategies. Anti-angiogenic agents, particularly multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitors (semaxanib, sunitinib, vatalanib), thalidomide and interferon alfa-2a are currently the most widely studied strategies to prolonge disease stability. Salvage therapy with anti-angiogenetic drugs may be of benefit in some patients who are not suitable for surgery, radiosurgery or radiotherapy, with progressive or recurrent hemangioblastoma especially those located in retina, since anti-angiogenetic therapy may delay tumor progression. This strategy warrants prospective evaluation in a clinical trial. PMID:23148943

  11. Evaluation of Dual Therapy in Real Life Setting in Treatment-Naïve Turkish Patients with HCV Infection: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gürbüz, Yunus; Tülek, Necla Eren; Tütüncü, Emin Ediz; Koruk, Süda Tekin; Aygen, Bilgehan; Demirtürk, Neşe; Kınıklı, Sami; Kaya, Ali; Yıldırmak, Taner; Süer, Kaya; Korkmaz, Fatime; Ural, Onur; Akhan, Sıla; Günal, Özgür; Tuna, Nazan; Köse, Şükran; Gönen, İbak; Örmen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin; Saltoğlu, Neşe; Batırel, Ayşe; Tuncer, Günay; Bulut, Cemal; Sırmatel, Fatma; Ulçay, Asım; Karagöz, Ergenekon; Tosun, Derviş; Şener, Alper; Aynıoğlu, Aynur; Altunok, Elif Sargın

    2016-01-01

    Background: Before the introduction of direct-acting antivirals in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients, the combination of peginterferon alpha and ribavirin was the standard therapy. Observational studies that investigated sustained virological response (SVR) rates by these drugs yielded different outcomes. Aims: The goal of the study was to demonstrate real life data concerning SVR rate achieved by peginterferon alpha plus ribavirin in patients who were treatment-naïve. Study Design: A multicenter, retrospective observational study. Methods: The study was conducted retrospectively on 1214 treatment naïve-patients, being treated with peginterferon alpha-2a or 2b plus ribavirin in respect of the current guidelines between 2005 and 2013. The patients’ data were collected from 22 centers via a standard form, which has been prepared for this study. The data included demographic and clinical characteristics (gender, age, body weight, initial Hepatitis C virus RNA (HCV RNA) level, disease staging) as well as course of treatment (duration of treatment, outcomes, discontinuations and adverse events). Renal insufficiency, decompensated liver disease, history of transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy or autoimmune liver disease were exclusion criteria for the study. Treatment efficacy was assessed according to the patient’s demographic characteristics, baseline viral load, genotype, and fibrosis scores. Results: The mean age of the patients was 50.74 (±0.64) years. Most of them were infected with genotype 1 (91.8%). SVR was achieved in 761 (62.7%) patients. SVR rate was 59.1% in genotype 1, 89.4% in genotype 2, 93.8% in genotype 3, and 33.3% in genotype 4 patients. Patients with lower viral load yielded higher SVR (65.8% vs. 58.4%, p=0.09). SVR rates according to histologic severity were found to be 69.3%, 66.3%, 59.9%, 47.3%, and 45.5% in patients with fibrosis stage 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. The predictors of SVR were male gender, genotype 2

  12. Treatment of Hepatitis C Infections with Interferon: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.; Contente, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Interferons were first described in 1957, but it was not until 34 years after their discovery that sufficient quantities of it were available for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, Clinicians now have an excellent understanding of the basis for the effectiveness of interferon alpha (IFN-α) in the therapy of this disease. Treatment with IFN-α is more efficient when it complemented by the antiviral ribavirin and the IFN-α is conjugated with polyethylene glycol to form peginterferon. In the near future treatment of HCV with IFN-α may involve new anti-HCV agents that are currently under development. PMID:21152181

  13. Treating hepatitis C - what's new?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alex J; Holmes, Jacinta A

    2015-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection causes cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, and is the most common indication for liver transplantation. Hepatitis C is curable and complications can be prevented. Until recently, treatment regimens involved peginterferon alfa. Although effective, their widespread use is limited by treatment-related toxicity. A number of direct-acting drugs for hepatitis C, such as sofosbuvir, have recently been developed and target multiple steps in the viral life cycle. These drugs are used in combination in interferon-free regimens. Short courses are highly effective with minimal toxicity. PMID:26843711

  14. Clinical pharmacology profile of boceprevir, a hepatitis C virus NS3 protease inhibitor: focus on drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Feng, Hwa-Ping; Hulskotte, Ellen G J; Wenning, Larissa A; Butterton, Joan R

    2015-06-01

    Boceprevir is a potent, orally administered ketoamide inhibitor that targets the active site of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural (NS) 3 protease. The addition of boceprevir to peginterferon plus ribavirin resulted in higher rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) than for peginterferon plus ribavirin alone in phase III studies in both previously treated and untreated patients with HCV infection. Because boceprevir is metabolized by metabolic routes common to many other drugs, and is an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/5, there is a high potential for drug-drug interactions when boceprevir is administered with other therapies, particularly when treating patients with chronic HCV infection who are often receiving other medications concomitantly. Boceprevir is no longer widely used in the US or EU due to the introduction of second-generation treatments for HCV infection. However, in many other geographic regions, first-generation protease inhibitors such as boceprevir continue to form an important treatment option for patients with HCV infection. This review summarizes the interactions between boceprevir and other therapeutic agents commonly used in this patient population, indicating dose adjustment requirements where needed. Most drug interactions do not affect boceprevir plasma concentrations to a clinically meaningful extent, and thus efficacy is likely to be maintained when boceprevir is coadministered with the majority of other therapeutics. Overall, the drug-drug interaction profile of boceprevir suggests that this agent is suitable for use in a wide range of HCV-infected patients receiving concomitant therapies. PMID:25787025

  15. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Spindelboeck, Walter; Horvath, Angela; Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. PMID:26938078

  16. Management of HCV in cirrhosis-a rapidly evolving landscape.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj A; Feld, Jordan J

    2015-05-01

    Despite the rapid progress in treatment, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains a growing cause of liver-related mortality globally. Patients who have been infected for decades are now presenting with advanced liver disease with the complications of cirrhosis and liver cancer. Early attempts at treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin were limited by toxicity, long treatment duration, and limited efficacy. This was especially relevant for patients with cirrhosis, where exposure to peginterferon-based therapy was relatively ineffective and led to high rates of toxicity. However, the recent development of multiple novel direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized the treatment of HCV. The majority of patients can now be cured with short courses of extremely well-tolerated all-oral regimens. However, the real test of these regimens comes in patients with more advanced liver disease, both in terms of safety and efficacy. Patients with cirrhosis have the greatest need for therapy and have traditionally been the most difficult to cure. The new therapies are rapidly changing this paradigm. Accumulating data suggest that high cure rates are achievable in patients with compensated cirrhosis and may even be possible in patients with signs of liver failure. This review will focus on the treatment of HCV in patients with cirrhosis, with an emphasis on the challenges that remain and strategies to deal with this important population. PMID:25896437

  17. Sensitive quantification of PEGylated compounds by second-generation anti-poly(ethylene glycol) monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Bing-Mae; Chuang, Kuo-Hsiang; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Roffler, Steve R

    2010-07-21

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often attached to compounds to increase serum half-life, reduce immunogenicity, and enhance bioavailability. Accurate and sensitive quantification of PEG conjugates is critical for product development, pharmacokinetic measurements, and efficacy studies. However, PEGylated compounds can be difficult to quantify due to epitope masking by PEG. We previously generated two monoclonal antibodies to PEG (AGP3, IgM and E11, IgG) for quantitative detection of PEGylated proteins. We now report the identification of two second-generation mAbs to PEG (AGP4, IgM and 3.3, IgG) that bind to the repeating subunits of the PEG backbone and facilitate more sensitive quantification of a wider range of PEGylated compounds. A sandwich ELISA in which AGP4/3.3-biotin was employed as the capture/detection antibodies allowed quantification of PEG-Qdot 525 with 14-50-fold greater sensitivity than the original AGP3/E11 combination. Pegasys (PEG-interferon alpha-2a), PEG-Intron (PEG-interferon alpha-2b), Neulasta (PEG-G-CSF), and Lipo-Dox (PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin) could also be quantified with low ng/mL detection limits. The assay tolerated the presence of 50% human serum or 20% free PEG molecules. These new anti-PEG antibodies appear useful for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a wide range of PEGylated compounds. PMID:20536171

  18. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E.; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545400 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545335 PMID:26938078

  19. Telaprevir may induce adverse cutaneous reactions by a T cell immune-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Federico, Alessandro; Aitella, Ernesto; Sgambato, Dolores; Savoia, Alfonso; De Bartolomeis, Fabio; Dallio, Marcello; Ruocco, Eleonora; Pezone, Luciano; Abbondanza, Ciro; Loguercio, Carmela; Astarita, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    The HCV protease inhibitor telaprevir associated with peginterferon-alpha and ribavirin, was widely used in the recent past as standard treatment in HCV genotype-1 infected patients. Telaprevir improves the sustained virology response rates, but at the same time increases the frequency of adverse cutaneous reactions. However, mechanisms through which telaprevir induces cutaneous lesions are not yet defined. A 50-year-old woman, affected by HCV genotype 1b, was admitted to our Department for a telaprevir-related severe cutaneous eruptions, eight weeks after starting a triple therapy (telaprevir associated with Peginterferon-alpha and ribavirin). Mechanisms of cutaneous reactions were investigated by skin tests with non-irritating concentrations of telaprevir and by activating in vitro T lymphocyte with different concentrations. Immediate and delayed responses to skin testing were negative, but the drug-induced lymphocytes activation was significantly higher as compared to patient's baseline values and to parallel results obtained in three healthy subjects (p < 0.05). In conclusion, adverse cutaneous reactions of our patient were caused by a telaprevir-induced T-cell dependent immune mechanism. PMID:25864225

  20. Inosine Triphosphatase Genetic Variants are Protective Against Anemia During Antiviral Therapy for HCV2/3 But Do Not Decrease Dose Reductions of RBV Or Increase SVR

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander J.; Santoro, Rosanna; Piazzolla, Valeria; Clark, Paul J.; Naggie, Susanna; Tillmann, Hans L.; Patel, Keyur; Muir, Andrew J.; Shianna, Kevin V.; Mottola, Leonardo; Petruzzellis, Daniela; Romano, Mario; Sogari, Fernando; Facciorusso, Domenico; Goldstein, David B.; McHutchison, John G.; Mangia, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Two functional variants in the inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) gene causing inosine triphos-phatase (ITPase) deficiency protect against ribavirin (RBV)-induced hemolytic anemia and the need for RBV dose reduction in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV). No data are available for genotype 2/3 HCV. We evaluated the association between the casual ITPA variants and on-treatment anemia in a well-characterized cohort of genotype 2/3 patients treated with variable-duration pegylated interferon alfa-2b (PEG-IFN-α2b) and RBV. Two hundred thirty-eight Caucasian patients were included in this retrospective study [185 (78%) with genotype 2 and 53 (22%) with genotype 3]. Patients were treated with PEG-IFN-α2b plus weight-based RBV (1000/1200 mg) for 12 (n = 109) or 24 weeks (n = 129). The ITPA polymorphisms rs1127354 and rs7270101 were genotyped, and an ITPase deficiency variable was defined that combined both ITPA variants according to their effect on ITPase activity. The primary endpoint was hemoglobin (Hb) reduction in week 4. We also considered Hb reduction over the course of therapy, the need for RBV dose modification, and the rate of sustained virological response (SVR). The ITPA variants were strongly and independently associated with protection from week 4 anemia (P = 10−6 for rs1127354 and P = 10−7 for rs7270101). Combining the variants into the ITPase deficiency variable increased the strength of association (P = 10−11). ITPase deficiency protected against anemia throughout treatment. ITPase deficiency was associated with a delayed time to an Hb level < 10 g/dL (hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% confidence interval = 0.08–0.84, P = 0.025) but not with the rate of RBV dose modification (required per protocol at Hb < 9.5 g/dL). There was no association between the ITPA variants and SVR. Conclusion Two ITPA variants were strongly associated with protection against treatment-related anemia in patients with genotype 2/3 HCV, but they did not decrease the need

  1. Interferon treatment for chronic hepatitis C infection in hemophiliacs--influence of virus load, genotype, and liver pathology on response.

    PubMed

    Hanley, J P; Jarvis, L M; Andrew, J; Dennis, R; Hayes, P C; Piris, J; Lee, R; Simmonds, P; Ludlam, C A

    1996-03-01

    In this study, we assessed the effectiveness of interferon treatment in 31 hemophiliacs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Interferon alfa-2a (3 MU three times weekly) was administered for 6 months. Response was assessed by both serial alanine transaminase (ALT) and HCV RNA levels measured by a sensitive semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. HCV genotype was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and evidence of changing genotypes during interferon therapy was sought. Severity of liver disease was assessed by both noninvasive and invasive methods, including laparoscopic liver inspection and biopsy. Sustained normalization of ALT levels occurred in eight patients (28%), and seven (24%) became nonviremic as assessed by PCR (<80 HCV/mL). Responders universally cleared HCV RNA within 2 months of starting interferon. Genotype 3a was associated with a favorable response to interferon. No evidence was found for a change in circulating genotype in patients who failed to respond to interferon or who relapsed. This study confirms that response rates to interferon are low in hemophiliacs as compared with other groups with chronic HCV infection. We have also demonstrated that virus load measurement over the first 8 to 12 weeks of treatment is an extremely useful method to identify responders at an early stage. PMID:8634415

  2. Efficient Source of Cells in Proximal Oviduct for Testing Non-Viral Expression Constructs in the Chicken Bioreactor Model and for Other in Vitro Studies.

    PubMed

    Stadnicka, Katarzyna; Bodnar, Magdalena; Marszałek, Andrzej; Bajek, Anna; Drewa, Tomasz; Płucienniczak, Grazyna; Chojnacka-Puchta, Luiza; Cecuda-Adamczewska, Violetta; Dunisławska, Aleksandra; Bednarczyk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the usefulness of chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC) in evaluating the efficacy of non-viral expression vectors carrying human therapeutic genes. Secondly, an efficient source of progenitor COEC for in vitro studies is described. Within the distal part of the oviduct, weak to moderate expression of a trans membrane glycoprotein (CD44) was observed. Single cells presenting only weak expression of CD44 were found in magnum sections. in vitro cultured oviduct cells originating from the distal oviduct were suitable for subculturing and showed a stable proliferation potential up to the 2nd passage. However, the pavimentous epithelial-like morphology of COEC was progressively lost over time and mainly a fibroblast-like monolayer was established in consecutive passages. Moreover, various commercial transfection agents including FuGENE6 and XtremeGENE9 DNA were used to optimize delivery of human interferon alfa-2a, (IFNα2a) a therapeutic protein gene under an ovalbumin promoter. The transfection efficiency of adherent COEC was estimated for up to 40% at a ratio of 6:1 of transfectant to pOVA5EIFN + GFP plasmid. Expression of IFNα2a was confirmed by western blotting in transformed COEC. In conclusion, the population of epithelial progenitor cells sourced from the distal oviduct can significantly contribute to in vitro culture of COEC, representing an efficient model to develop the production of avian bioreactors and other in vitro studies related to oviduct tissue. PMID:27172711

  3. Combination therapy with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in the treatment of hepatitis C virus-related thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Karakan, Tarkan; Cindoruk, Mehmet; Degertekin, Bulent; Dogan, Ibrahim; Sancak, Alper; Dumlu, Sukru; Gorgul, Ahmet; Unal, Selahattin

    2005-01-01

    Background: Isolated thrombocytopenia is a common manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. There is no established treatment modality for this condition. The efficacy of standard interferon (IFN) monotherapy has been reported in some studies. The major disadvantage of this treatment is the high rate of recurrence due to viral breakthrough during the first 12 weeks of treatment. Pegylated IFNs are now the standard regimen for chronic hepatic disease due to HCV infection. However, due to a lack of evidence, pegylated IFNs are not widely used for HCV-related isolated thrombocytopenia. Objective: The aim of this report was to present the case of a male patientwith severe symptomatic thrombocytopenia due to HCV infection. Methods: Thrombocytopenia was treated with pegylated IFN plus ribavirin. Results: Although standard IFN monotherapy failed to achieve virologic and hematologic improvement, therapy with pegylated IFN alfa-2a plus ribavirin was associated with both virologic and hematologic improvement without any significant adverse effects. Conclusions: Pegylated IFN plus ribavirin was effective in this patient for thetreatment of HCV-related thrombocytopenia. However, further research is needed to define the response rate in different patient populations. PMID:24764593

  4. Ledipasvir + sofosbuvir (Harvoni). A therapeutic advance in genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection, despite uncertainties.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Treatment for chronic hepatitis C depends on the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype and the patient's clinical characteristics. A fixed-dose combination of ledipasvir + sofosbuvir has been authorised in the European Union for adults with HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1), HCV-3 or HCV-4 infection. Ledipasvir targets the HCV protein NS5A, while sofosbuvir inhibits the HCV RNA polymerase NS5B. The ledipasvir+ sofosbuvircombination has not been compared directly with other antiviral drugs. No information is available on its ability to prevent hepatic complications, even in patients with cirrhosis. In four trials including over 1800 treatment-naive patients infected with HCV-1, a 12-week course of ledipasvir + sofosbuviryielded a sustained virological response in nearly every case. This is better than that reported with peginterferon alfa-based protocols. In four trials including more than 900 HCV-1-infected patients in whom treatments including peginterferon alfa had failed, a 24-week course of ledipasvir+ sofosbuvir yielded a sustained virological response in nearly every case, which is far better than reported with peginterferon alfa + ribavirin + protease inhibitor combinations, based on indirect comparison. In these trials, a 24-week course of the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination was effective in almost all patients with compensated cirrhosis. The same treatment also showed major efficacy in a non-comparative trial in 337 HCV-1-infected patients with decompensated cirrhosis or who had undergone liver transplantation. In mid-2015, very few data are available on the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination in HCV-1-infected patients in whom sofosbuvir combination therapy has failed, or in patients with HCV-3 or HCV-4 infection. Comparative data on the adverse effects of the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination are mainly based on a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 155 patients. Overall, serious adverse effects were infrequent in this and other trials. The main adverse

  5. Sofosbuvir treatment and hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Shin; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious problem worldwide. The use of interferon-based therapy has made HCV eradication challenging. The recent appearance of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has changed HCV therapy. Combining the use of DAAs with peginterferon and ribavirin has improved treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the combination of different orally administered DAAs has enabled interferon-free therapy with much higher efficacy and safety. In particular, sofosbuvir, a nucleotide-based NS5B inhibitor, prevents HCV RNA synthesis by acting as a "chain terminator". Treatment with sofosbuvir has attained an extremely high rate of sustained virologic response. The current review summarizes the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir therapy. PMID:26839641

  6. Sofosbuvir treatment and hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yasui, Shin; Arai, Makoto; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious problem worldwide. The use of interferon-based therapy has made HCV eradication challenging. The recent appearance of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has changed HCV therapy. Combining the use of DAAs with peginterferon and ribavirin has improved treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the combination of different orally administered DAAs has enabled interferon-free therapy with much higher efficacy and safety. In particular, sofosbuvir, a nucleotide-based NS5B inhibitor, prevents HCV RNA synthesis by acting as a “chain terminator”. Treatment with sofosbuvir has attained an extremely high rate of sustained virologic response. The current review summarizes the efficacy and safety of sofosbuvir therapy. PMID:26839641

  7. [Clinical aspects of hepatitis C in women of child-bearing age].

    PubMed

    Lombay, Béla; Gasztonyi, Beáta; Szalay, Ferenc

    2008-06-01

    It is difficult to define the optimal timing of antiviral treatment in women infected with viral hepatitis C, who have child-bearing potential. Antiviral treatment is strictly contraindicated during pregnancy and the breast-feeding period. Data are conflicting about the question of treatment with modern drugs (peginterferon and ribavirin) before or after pregnancy. The risk of vertical transmission from mother to child is estimated about 5%. The mother's viraemia seems to be the main transmission factor. There is a worse prognosis in nulliparous and postmenopausal women in the natural history of viral hepatitis C. Poor outcome in gestational age, maturity and Apgar score were not associated with hepatitis C virus infection. Combined treatment has frequent gynecological and other side effects. The timing of antiviral therapy in women in child-bearing period is recommended individually. PMID:18508735

  8. Pegylated Interferon Alpha–Associated Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Kathleen T.; Nelson, Bruce; Harrison, Andrew R.; McLoon, Linda K.; Lee, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C presented with painless, bilateral, simultaneous non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms began 19 weeks after starting peginterferon alpha-2a. The peripheral neuropathy and vision of the right eye improved, but the vision of the left eye worsened after stopping interferon. We identified 23 additional cases of NAION during interferon alpha therapy. At least 12 of these patients suffered bilateral NAION. Patients lost vision 1–40 weeks after initiating therapy. Of 21 eyes that had documented initial and follow-up acuities, 8 improved, 1 worsened, and the rest remained stable. One patient had a painful peripheral neuropathy. Treatment with interferon alpha may result in NAION. Discontinuation of therapy deserves consideration after weighing individual risks and benefits. PMID:20351572

  9. Pharmacogenetics of ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Ampuero, Javier; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacogenetics assesses inherited genetic differences in drug metabolic pathways and its role in medicine is growing. Ribavirin (RBV) and peginterferon were the standard of care therapy in hepatitis C virus infection during 15 years, with the addition of first-generation protease inhibitors at the beginning of 2010s. New direct-acting agents are the new standard of care, but RBV remains important in some scenarios. The main adverse effect of RBV is anemia, which requires dose reduction and even stopping treatment in some patients. Pharmacogenetics has identified ITPA and SLC28/29 genes to be closely related to RBV-induced anemia. The routine evaluation of these genes could help to identify those patients at risk of developing anemia during the hepatitis C virus treatment. PMID:27547881

  10. Demographic profile, host, disease & viral predictive factors of response in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection at a tertiary care hospital in north India

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Sreejith; Shalimar; Kavimandan, Amit; Kalra, Nancy; Nayak, Baibaswata; Thakur, Bhaskar; Das, Prasenjit; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Panda, Subrat Kumar; Acharya, Subrat Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Standard of care for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in India is peginterferon and ribavirin (RBV). The response to treatment in real life stetting is unclear. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the demographic profile and assess the virological response and predictors of response in CHC patients. Methods: Consecutive patients with CHC were included in this study. Detailed clinical history, risk factors, and predictive factors of response were noted. Patients were treated with peginterferon α2b (1.5 µg/kg/wk) and RBV (12 mg/kg/day) for 6 to 18 months based on response. Results: A total of 211 patients were included in the analysis, mean age 40.6±12.3 yr, 144 (68%) were males and 71 (34%) had compensated cirrhosis. Commonest risk factor for acquiring CHC was previous transfusion and surgery (51%). Genotype 3 (72%) was most common followed by genotype 1 (23%). Overall sustained virologic response (SVR) was 64 per cent [95% CI 57.1%-70.4%]. The SVR was 66.5 per cent [95% CI 58.34-73.89%] for genotype 3 and 61.2 per cent [95% CI 46.23 to 74.80%] for genotype 1. Non-cirrhotics had better SVR rates compared to cirrhotics (76 vs 41%, P<0.001). On multivariate analysis, BMI ≥23 kg/m2, HOMA-IR ≥2, compliance (≤80%), and fibrosis >2 were predictors of low SVR. Interpretation & conclusions: Genotype 3 was the commonest HCV genotype. The commonest source of infection was previous transfusion and surgery. SVR rates for genotypes 3 were better than genotype 1 patients. Predictors of non-response were high BMI, insulin resistance, significant fibrosis and inadequate compliance. PMID:27241647

  11. Low glomerular filtration rate is a risk factor for ribavirin-associated anaemia in old patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Borroni, G; Cazzaniga, M; Andreoletti, M; Ceriani, R; Guerzoni, P; Omazzi, B; Pich, M G L; Prada, A; Spinzi, G; Terreni, N; Salerno, F

    2013-04-01

    Elderly patients with chronic hepatitis C have a reduced responsiveness to antiviral therapy with Peg-interferon and ribavirin. The dose reduction or the discontinuation of ribavirin due to the occurrence of anaemia is one of the most important causes for the low sustained viral response observed in older patients. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between baseline renal function and the early onset of ribavirin-associated anaemia in older (≥60 years) patients. Using data from 348 patients with chronic hepatitis C consecutively treated with peg-interferon plus ribavirin, we investigated which factors were associated with the occurrence of anaemia in elderly patients (≥60 years). Ribavirin-induced anaemia occurred in 40.5% of patients. Older patients showed a rate of anaemia significantly higher than younger patients (51.5% vs 36.3%; P = 0.009). Consequently, the rate of ribavirin dose reduction or discontinuation due to anaemia was 35.1% in older patients and 23.5% in younger patients (P = 0.029). A significantly higher proportion of older patients had a low baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) compared with younger patients (56.7% vs 27.1%; P < 0.001). At the multivariate regression analysis, low baseline GFR (<70 mL/min) was associated with an increased risk of ribavirin-associated anaemia only in the older patients (OR: 3.526; 95% CI: 1.385-8.979; P = 0.008). In this subset, baseline GFR was significantly correlated with both absolute (r = -0.320; P < 0.001) and relative (r = -0.324; P < 0.001) haemoglobin decrease within the first 8 weeks of treatment. In patients aged >60 years, a low pre-treatment GFR was strongly associated with the risk to develop ribavirin-related anaemia with consequent reduction in ribavirin doses. PMID:23490395

  12. Hepatitis C in Argentina: epidemiology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gaite, Luis Alejandro; Marciano, Sebastián; Galdame, Omar Andrés; Gadano, Adrián Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C is the leading cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer in Argentina, where from 1.5% to 2.5% of adults are infected. Most of the infections were acquired 30–50 years ago. It is estimated that more than half of infected individuals are not aware of their infection. Even though the prevalence in blood donors has decreased to 0.45% at present, many high-prevalence populations still exist, where the reported prevalence ranges from 2.2% to 7.1%. Therapy is recommended for patients with fibrosis, in order to prevent disease progression, hepatic decompensation, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Great advances were achieved in the treatment of genotype 1 infection since the development and release of boceprevir and telaprevir. When either of these protease inhibitors is associated with peginterferon plus ribavirin, the sustained virological response (SVR) rate improves from 40%–50% to 67%–75%. For genotype 2 and 3 infection, treatment with peginterferon plus ribavirin is still the standard of care, with SVR rates of 70%–90%. There are significant new antivirals in development, and some of them are close to being released. These drugs will most likely be the future standard of care for all genotypes, and will be incorporated in better-tolerated and highly effective all-oral regimes. The impact that these new therapies might have in health-related economics is unpredictable, especially in developing countries. Each country must carefully evaluate the local situation in order to implement proper screening and treatment programs. Difficult-to-treat patients, such as those with decompensated cirrhosis, patients in hemodialysis, and those with other significant comorbidities, might not be able to receive these new therapeutic approaches and their management will remain challenging. PMID:24966701

  13. Boceprevir or telaprevir in hepatitis C virus chronic infection: The Italian real life experience

    PubMed Central

    CLEO Study Group; Ascione, Antonio; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; Amoroso, Pietro; Andriulli, Angelo; Armignacco, Orlando; Ascione, Tiziana; Babudieri, Sergio; Barbarini, Giorgio; Brogna, Michele; Cesario, Francesco; Citro, Vincenzo; Claar, Ernesto; Cozzolongo, Raffaele; D’Adamo, Giuseppe; D’Amico, Emilio; Dattolo, Pellegrino; De Luca, Massimo; De Maria, Vincenzo; De Siena, Massimo; De Vita, Giuseppe; Di Giacomo, Antonio; De Marco, Rosanna; De Stefano, Giorgio; De Stefano, Giulio; Di Salvo, Sebastiano; Di Sarno, Raffaele; Farella, Nunzia; Felicioni, Laura; Fimiani, Basilio; Fontanella, Luca; Foti, Giuseppe; Furlan, Caterina; Giancotti, Francesca; Giolitto, Giancarlo; Gravina, Tiziana; Guerrera, Barbara; Gulminetti, Roberto; Iacobellis, Angelo; Imparato, Michele; Iodice, Angelo; Iovinella, Vincenzo; Izzi, Antonio; Liberti, Alfonso; Leo, Pietro; Lettieri, Gennaro; Luppino, Ileana; Marrone, Aldo; Mazzoni, Ettore; Messina, Vincenzo; Monarca, Roberto; Narciso, Vincenzo; Nosotti, Lorenzo; Pellicelli, Adriano Maria; Perrella, Alessandro; Piai, Guido; Picardi, Antonio; Pierri, Paola; Pietromatera, Grazia; Resta, Francesco; Rinaldi, Luca; Romano, Mario; Rossini, Angelo; Russello, Maurizio; Russo, Grazia; Sacco, Rodolfo; Sangiovanni, Vincenzo; Schiano, Antonio; Sciambra, Antonio; Scifo, Gaetano; Simeone, Filomena; Sullo, Annarita; Tarquini, Pierluigi; Tundo, Paolo; Vallone, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To check the safety and efficacy of boceprevir/telaprevir with peginterferon/ribavirin for hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 in the real-world settings. METHODS This study was a non-randomized, observational, prospective, multicenter. This study involved 47 centers in Italy. A database was prepared for the homogenous collection of the data, was used by all of the centers for data collection, and was updated continuously. All of the patients enrolled in this study were older than 18 years of age and were diagnosed with chronic infection due to HCV genotype 1. The HCV RNA testing was performed using COBAS-TaqMan2.0 (Roche, LLQ 25 IU/mL). RESULTS All consecutively treated patients were included. Forty-seven centers enrolled 834 patients as follows: Male 64%; median age 57 (range 18-78), of whom 18.3% were over 65; mean body mass index 25.6 (range 16-39); genotype 1b (79.4%); diagnosis of cirrhosis (38.2%); and fibrosis F3/4 (71.2%). The following drugs were used: Telaprevir (66.2%) and PEG-IFN-alpha2a (67.6%). Patients were naïve (24.4%), relapsers (30.5%), partial responders (14.8%) and null responders (30.3%). Overall, adverse events (AEs) occurred in 617 patients (73.9%) during the treatment. Anemia was the most frequent AE (52.9% of cases), especially in cirrhotic. The therapy was stopped for 14.6% of the patients because of adverse events or virological failure (15%). Sustained virological response was achieved in 62.7% of the cases, but was 43.8% in cirrhotic patients over 65 years of age. CONCLUSION In everyday practice, triple therapy is safe but has moderate efficacy, especially for patients over 65 years of age, with advanced fibrosis, non-responders to peginterferon + ribavirin. PMID:27574549

  14. Consensus guidelines for the management of hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    2003-07-01

    At prevalence of 2.7% in the early 1990's, it is estimated that approximately 500,000 people in Saudi Arabia have been exposed to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Over 80% of such individuals remain infected and most of them progress to chronic hepatitis C (CHC), cirrhosis, and/or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The incidence of newly acquired hepatitis C infection in Saudi Arabia has declined with the recent reported prevalence of approximately 1%. This decline is largely due to the early implementation of testing of blood donors for HCV. However, it is pertinent that measures are taken to identify patients already infected and offer treatment to those with good prognostic factors. Hepatitis C genotype 4, the most predominant genotype in Saudi Arabia (62%) has been resistant to conventional interferon (IFN) therapy and sustained response rate to combination therapy with IFN plus ribavirin (RBV) has been poor. The recently completed Ministry of Health (MOH) clinical trial reports improved sustained virological response (SVR) rate of 65.2% among week 12 early responders of HCV genotype 4 chronic hepatitis patients using pegylated (PEG)-IFN alfa-2a (40 KD) plus RBV. This encouraging process calls for a change in patient management towards a more community-based approach. With the aim of assessing these changes and defining a management strategy for HCV infected patients in Saudi Arabia, a consensus conference was held and consensus guidelines issued. The final recommendation will be made available to all MOH, tertiary and non-government hospitals in the Kingdom to provide uniform care to all CHC patients. Based on the SVR of the above mentioned clinical trial, the committee recommends treatment for patients with histologically proven CHC, with elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and positive HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA). Patients with normal serum ALT may not be treated if liver histology is normal or reveals only minimal changes. Patients with decompensated

  15. Sustained Long-term Antiviral Maintenance Therapy in HCV/HIV Coinfected Patients (SLAM-C)

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E; Andersen, Janet W; Butt, Adeel A; Umbleja, Triin; Alston, Beverly; Koziel, Margaret J; Peters, Marion G; Sulkowski, Mark; Goodman, Zachary D; Chung, Raymond T

    2010-01-01

    Background HCV/HIV coinfection treatment is suboptimal with low SVR rates to standard therapies. A multicenter randomized clinical trial designed to assess the efficacy/safety of pegylated-interferon maintenance therapy was performed by the NIH-funded ACTG network. Methods HCV treatment naïve and non-responding interferon-experienced subjects with confirmed HCV and HIV, CD4>200 cells/mm3, and at least Stage 1 fibrosis were enrolled, and treated for 12 weeks with pegylated interferon alfa 2a 180 mcg/week (PEG) + weight-based ribavirin to determine response status. Non-responder subjects (failure to clear HCV RNA or achieve 2-log drop) underwent liver biopsy and were randomized to receive full dose PEG or observation only for 72 weeks. Paired biopsies were evaluated by a central pathologist. Results 330 subjects were enrolled; median age was 48 years; 43% White, 37% Black, non-Hispanic; 83% male; CD4+ 498 cells/mm3; 32% were interferon experienced; 74% had entry HIV RNA<50 cp/ml. EVR was observed in 55.9% and 42.5% achieved cEVR. A planned interim analysis of occurred when 84 subjects were randomized. With data on 40 paired biopsies available, a safety monitoring board stopped the trial due to lack of fibrosis progression (median = 0 Metavir units/year) in the observation arm. Conclusion Lack of fibrotic progression in the control arm was unexpected, and may represent a short-term PEG/ribavirin therapy effect, high levels of HIV viral suppression and use of antiretroviral regimens that may be less toxic than prior generations of therapy. PMID:20921898

  16. Remodeling of B-Cell Subsets in Blood during Pegylated IFNα-2a Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection.

    PubMed

    Aspord, Caroline; Bruder Costa, Juliana; Jacob, Marie-Christine; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Bertucci, Inga; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Zoulim, Fabien; Bourliere, Marc; Plumas, Joel; Leroy, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFN-α) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is HBsAg seroconversion. Even though B cells are major mediators of a positive clinical outcome, their modulation during Peg-IFN-α therapy has not yet been described. We investigated here the effects of Peg-IFN-α on eight circulating B-cell subsets thanks to an original multi-gating approach based on CD19, CD27, IgD, CD10, and CD38 markers in patients with CHB treated with nucleos(t)ide analog alone or in combination with Peg-IFN-α. These dynamic changes were analyzed during the 48-weeks of Peg-IFN-α therapy and up to 2 years after the cessation of treatment. The CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10+CD38high transitional B cells and the CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38high plasmablasts continuously increased, whereas the CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10-CD38low naive, CD19+CD27+IgD+ natural memory, and CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38low post-germinal center B cells decreased during the course of Peg-IFNα treatment. Such modulations correlated with a sustained increase in sCD30 levels and the decrease in plasma HBsAg. However, no seroconversion occurred and all parameters returned to baseline after the stop of the treatment. Peg-IFN-α therapy mediates a remodeling of B-cell compartmentalization, without clinical relevance. Our study provides new insights into the immunomodulatory effects of Peg-IFN-α on circulating B-cells, and questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment in CHB. PMID:27281019

  17. [Autoimmune hepatitis and membranous glomerulonephritis under immune therapy in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Paparoupa, Maria; Huy Ho, Ngoc Ahn; Schuppert, Frank

    2016-05-01

    A 63-year-old patient is evaluated for an unclear weight loss with general malaise and fatigue for several months. Serological examination reveales the first diagnosis of a hepatitis-C-virus-genotype-1b-infection with an initial viral load of 980 000 IU / ml. The duration of the infection is suggested to be more than 6 months. Because of the initially elevated anti-nuclear-antibodies (ANA) the diagnosis of an autoimmune hepatitis needs to be excluded. All other liver related autoantibodies and the immunoglobulins (Ig) IgG, IgA and IgM are normal. A liver biopsy is conducted. After a short test with non-pegylated interferon (IFN) liver enzymes remain stable and treatment with pegylated IFN-alfa-2a and ribavirin (RBV) is initiated. The patient is a "rapid viral responder" and his viral load is found under the detection limit within 4 weeks under therapy. On the 16th week, liver enzymes increase rapidly. ANA's and IgG-immunoglobulins are positive. A second lever biopsy does not confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis and the treatment is continued under careful observation of all relevant liver parameters. 21 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, massive peripheral edema, hypoproteinemia and proteinuria are observed. The renal biopsy reveales membranous glomerulonephritis. Because of the preserved renal function, no acute immunosuppression is initiated and the treatment gets completed after overall 24 weeks. Liver and renal parameters return quickly back to normal after treatment discharge. This is the first report of a combined autoimmune reaction with development of autoimmune hepatitis and glomerulonephritis under INF and RBV antiviral therapy for a chronic hepatitis-C-infection. The occurrence of autoimmune manifestations should especially be considered in genetically susceptible individuals or those with positive autoimmunity markers. The initiation of INF for the treatment of chronic hepatitis-C-infection has to be critically evaluated since

  18. Novel therapy in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Nambo, M Jesús; Cleto, Sergio; Castañeda, Claudia; González, Martha; Talavera, Alejandra; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith

    2005-10-01

    Treatment in patients with multiple myeloma remain to be defined. Younger patients (defined as a cut-off level < 65 years old) will be treated with chemotherapy and transplant procedures. However, most patients > 65 years old are not candidates for this therapeutic approach and the use of intensive chemotherapy could be associated to severe toxicity. We developed an new, not-cytotoxic regimen with dexamethasone 30 mg/m(2), iv, days 1 to 4, all trans retinoic acid 45 mg/m(2), po, days 5 to 14 and interferon alfa 2a 4.5 MU, sc, daily, days 5 to 14 (DAI regimen) administered every 28 days in number of 6 cycles, at this point patients were restaging, if they showed complete response, objective response or partial response they were conducted to received thalidomide 100-200 mg po, daily and dexamethasone 10 mg/2, po days 1 to 4 at monthly intervals, for 18 months. Forty one patients were enrolled in an Phase II study. In an intent to treat analysis all patients were evaluable. Complete response was observed in 18 cases (43%), objective response in 10 patients (24%) and partial response in 5 patients (12%), overall response rate was 80%. Eight patients were considered failures. At an median of 36 months, no relapse of progression disease has been observed, thus actuarial curves at 3-years showed that event free survival is 100% and overall survival is 91%. Toxicity was mild, all patients received the planned dose in time. This regimen appear to be useful in older patients with multiple myeloma, the response rate is higher and toxicity was mild. Controlled clinical trials comparing with conventional chemotherapy will be conducted to define the role of this therapeutic approach. PMID:16133792

  19. Implications of current therapeutic approaches in colorectal cancer for other gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C

    1991-02-01

    Novel immunotherapeutic strategies for combating colon cancer are also being explored in pancreatic, hepatic, and esophageal cancers. Preliminary clinical trials in patients with pancreatic cancer suggest a therapeutic role for anti-idiotypic antibodies against tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs)--eg, CO17-1A, BW 494/32--but not for MoAbs when used alone. Adding low doses of interferon gamma to CO17-1A enhances in vitro antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against pancreatic tumor cells; CO17-1A plus a regimen of 5-FU/doxorubicin/mitomycin has resulted in beneficial therapeutic effect. Treatments with immunotoxins, radiolabeled MoAbs, and adoptive immunotherapy are still being tested preclinically. In 105 patients with unresectable hepatocellular cancer, a 7% complete and 41% partial regression rate with 131I-labeled antiferritin has been reported. In several patients, radiolabeled antiferritin caused sufficient shrinkage of lesions to permit curative resection. Pretreatment with low-dose doxorubicin may improve the efficacy of low-dose radiolabeled antiferritin antibody therapy. Chemoembolization of primary hepatocellular carcinoma, based on the concept of regional therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer, has shown considerable palliative and survival benefit in patients with unresectable disease. Although adoptive immunotherapy has been used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, the results have been disappointing. The development of immunotherapeutic approaches to esophageal cancer is less advanced than that for other gastrointestinal malignancies. Paralleling the successful use of 5-FU/interferon alfa-2a in colon cancer are two phase II studies that have evaluated this combination in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. The objective response rate (27%) was encouraging. PMID:1992529

  20. Response Prediction and Treatment Tailoring for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Lindh, Magnus; Alestig, Erik; Arnholm, Birgitta; Eilard, Anders; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Lagging, Martin; Wahlberg, Thomas; Wejstål, Rune; Westin, Johan; Norkrans, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    We monitored early viral response during the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the aim of identifying predictors of treatment outcome. We studied 53 patients with genotype 1 infection who received 180 μg/week pegylated interferon alfa-2a and 1,000 or 1,200 mg/day ribavirin depending on body weight and serially assessed HCV RNA in serum, using the Cobas TaqMan assay. Thirty-one patients (58%) achieved sustained viral response (SVR). SVR was obtained in 100% (10/10) of patients with pretreatment viremia concentrations below 400,000 IU/ml, in 100% (14/14) of patients with more than 1.5 log reduction of HCV RNA after 4 days of treatment, and in 95% (22/23) of patients with a rate of decline in viremia higher than 0.70 log units/week during the second phase. Non-SVR was seen in all patients with a second-phase decline rate lower than 0.35 log units/week. Patients with slopes between 0.50 and 0.80 log units/week achieved SVR (4/4) unless the treatment dose was modified (3/3). We conclude that the second-phase slope appears to be an accurate and useful predictor of treatment response. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model of tailored treatment which takes into account the second-phase slope and the amount of HCV RNA after 21 days of treatment. PMID:17581934

  1. Remodeling of B-Cell Subsets in Blood during Pegylated IFNα-2a Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Marie-Christine; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Bertucci, Inga; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Zoulim, Fabien; Bourliere, Marc; Plumas, Joel; Leroy, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (Peg-IFN-α) therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is HBsAg seroconversion. Even though B cells are major mediators of a positive clinical outcome, their modulation during Peg-IFN-α therapy has not yet been described. We investigated here the effects of Peg-IFN-α on eight circulating B-cell subsets thanks to an original multi-gating approach based on CD19, CD27, IgD, CD10, and CD38 markers in patients with CHB treated with nucleos(t)ide analog alone or in combination with Peg-IFN-α. These dynamic changes were analyzed during the 48-weeks of Peg-IFN-α therapy and up to 2 years after the cessation of treatment. The CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10+CD38high transitional B cells and the CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38high plasmablasts continuously increased, whereas the CD19+CD27-IgD+CD10-CD38low naive, CD19+CD27+IgD+ natural memory, and CD19+CD27+IgD-CD10-CD38low post-germinal center B cells decreased during the course of Peg-IFNα treatment. Such modulations correlated with a sustained increase in sCD30 levels and the decrease in plasma HBsAg. However, no seroconversion occurred and all parameters returned to baseline after the stop of the treatment. Peg-IFN-α therapy mediates a remodeling of B-cell compartmentalization, without clinical relevance. Our study provides new insights into the immunomodulatory effects of Peg-IFN-α on circulating B-cells, and questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment in CHB. PMID:27281019

  2. Baseline MELD Score Predicts Hepatic Decompensation during Antiviral Therapy in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C and Advanced Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Dultz, Georg; Seelhof, Martin; Herrmann, Eva; Welker, Martin-Walter; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Teuber, Gerlinde; Kronenberger, Bernd; von Wagner, Michael; Vermehren, Johannes; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Hofmann, Wolf Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims In patients with advanced liver cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection antiviral therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin is feasible in selected cases only due to potentially life-threatening side effects. However, predictive factors associated with hepatic decompensation during antiviral therapy are poorly defined. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, 68 patients with HCV-associated liver cirrhosis (mean MELD score 9.18±2.72) were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin. Clinical events indicating hepatic decompensation (onset of ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, hospitalization) as well as laboratory data were recorded at baseline and during a follow up period of 72 weeks after initiation of antiviral therapy. To monitor long term sequelae of end stage liver disease an extended follow up for HCC development, transplantation and death was applied (240weeks, ±SD 136weeks). Results Eighteen patients (26.5%) achieved a sustained virologic response. During the observational period a hepatic decompensation was observed in 36.8%. Patients with hepatic decompensation had higher MELD scores (10.84 vs. 8.23, p<0.001) and higher mean bilirubin levels (26.74 vs. 14.63 µmol/l, p<0.001), as well as lower serum albumin levels (38.2 vs. 41.1 g/l, p = 0.015), mean platelets (102.64 vs. 138.95/nl, p = 0.014) and mean leukocytes (4.02 vs. 5.68/nl, p = 0.002) at baseline as compared to those without decompensation. In the multivariate analysis the MELD score remained independently associated with hepatic decompensation (OR 1.56, 1.18–2.07; p = 0.002). When the patients were grouped according to their baseline MELD scores, hepatic decompensation occurred in 22%, 59%, and 83% of patients with MELD scores of 6–9, 10–13, and >14, respectively. Baseline MELD score was significantly associated with the risk for transplantation/death (p<0.001). Conclusions Our data suggest that the

  3. HCV in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed; Hasan, Syed; Castro, Oswaldo; Giday, Samuel; Banks, Alpha; Smoot, Duane

    2003-01-01

    The sickle cell gene is common in the U.S. In fact 8% of African Americans are healthy carriers of the sickle cell trait (HbAS). People who are homozygous (HbSS) have severe disease. They have life-long anemia, chronic hemolysis, and also have at times hematological crises, which can worsen the anemia. Many patients require chronic transfusions and as a result, substantial proportions of sickle cell patients are at high risk for infection with blood-borne diseases-such as Hepatitis C Virus infection (HCV). The HCV antibody positivity is directly related to the number of transfusions given, and on average the prevalence rate in transfused patients is more than 10%. It is known that the combination of iron overload and HCV can lead to a more rapidly progressive liver disease. The treatment of HCV in sickle cell patients poses a challenge to clinicians. A novel approach described by some is the pre-treatment of these patients with hydroxyurea to increase the fetal hemoglobin, therefore decreasing the severity of Ribavirin-related hemolysis. Treatment with Peg-interferon alone has not been used to treat HCV in sickle cell patients, but in the setting of controlled clinical trials it would be feasible. This review explores the impact of HCV in sickle cell patients and the possible therapeutic options available to them. PMID:14527056

  4. Duplex High-Resolution Melting Assay for the Simultaneous Genotyping of IL28B rs12979860 and PNPLA3 rs738409 Polymorphisms in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Enache, Elena L.; Sin, Anca; Bancu, Ligia; Ramière, Christophe; Diaz, Olivier; André, Patrice; Enache, Liviu S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a major burden for public health worldwide. Although newer direct-acting antivirals show good efficacy, their cost precludes their wide adoption in resource-limited regions. Thus, strategies are being developed to help identify patients with high susceptibility to response to classic PEG-interferon + ribavirin therapy. IL28B polymorphism rs12979860 C/T is an important predictor for an efficient response to interferon-based therapy. A genetic variant in adiponutrin (PNPLA3) gene, rs738409 C/G, is associated with steatosis, severity, and progression of liver fibrosis in CHC patients, and predicts treatment outcome in difficult-to-cure HCV-infected patients with advanced fibrosis. We developed a rapid and inexpensive assay based on duplex high-resolution melting (HRM) for the simultaneous genotyping of these two polymorphisms. The assay validation was performed on synthetic DNA templates and 132 clinical samples from CHC patients. When compared with allele-specific PCR and sequencing, our assay showed 100% (95% CI: 0.9724–1) accuracy, with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Our assay was robust against concentration and quality of DNA samples, melting curve normalization intervals, HRM analysis algorithm, and sequence variations near the targeted SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). This duplex assay should provide useful information for patient-oriented management and clinical decision-making in CHC. PMID:26389885

  5. Natural interferon-beta treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Haga, Yuki; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Arai, Makoto; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-05-18

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can cause liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several studies have demonstrated that the eradication of HCV reduces the occurrence of HCC. In Japan, as many people live to an advanced age, HCV-infected patients are also getting older, and the age at HCC diagnosis has also increased. Although older HCV-infected patients have a risk of developing HCC, the treatment response to peginterferon-alpha plus ribavirin therapy is relatively poor in these patients because of drop-out or discontinuation of this treatment due to adverse events. It is established that the mechanism of action between interferon-alpha and interferon-beta is slightly different. Short-term natural interferon-beta monotherapy is effective for patients with acute hepatitis C and patients infected with HCV genotype 2 and low viral loads. Natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin for 48 wk or for 24 wk are also effective for some patients with HCV genotype 1 or HCV genotype 2. Natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin has been used for certain "difficult-to-treat" HCV-infected patients. In the era of direct-acting anti-virals, natural interferon-beta plus ribavirin may be one of the therapeutic options for special groups of HCV-infected patients. In the near future, signal transduction pathways of interferon-beta will inform further directions. PMID:26052401

  6. [How to use viral genomic analysis in clinical practice: chronic hepatitis B and C].

    PubMed

    Izumi, Namiki

    2006-04-01

    Viral genomic analysis has been developed recently, and is utilized in clinical practice. The genotype of HB virus has the most important clinical implication, and in Japan, genotype C shows worse prognosis than genotype B. Basic core promoter (BCP) mutation is associated with hepatic fibrosis, and HBe antigen seronegativity is frequently observed after lamivudine administration than wild type. Polymerase domain B mutation was shown to be associated with lamivudine resistance concomitantly with domain C mutation. In the treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1b infection, peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy was introduced, and this combination therapy has been shown to induce 50% sustained virological response (SVR). To predict the virological response to combination therapy, monitoring viral decline provides the most important information. Real-time PCR is expensive, therefore, highly sensitive core antigen quantitation is valuable in clinical practice. When patients treated by combination therapy achieve a 2 log drop in HCV antigen until twelve weeks, they are estimated to have obtained 75% SVR by monitoring the amount of serum core antigen. PMID:16722459

  7. Oritavancin Diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Cada, Dennis J.; Baker, Danial E.

    2014-01-01

    Each month, subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service receive 5 to 6 well-documented monographs on drugs that are newly released or are in late phase 3 trials. The monographs are targeted to Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees. Subscribers also receive monthly 1-page summary monographs on agents that are useful for agendas and pharmacy/nursing in-services. A comprehensive target drug utilization evaluation/medication use evaluation (DUE/MUE) is also provided each month. With a subscription, the monographs are sent in print and are also available on-line. Monographs can be customized to meet the needs of a facility. A drug class review is now published monthly with The Formulary Monograph Service. Through the cooperation of The Formulary, Hospital Pharmacy publishes selected reviews in this column. For more information about The Formulary Monograph Service, call The Formulary at 800-322-4349. The December 2014 monograph topics are olodaterol, peginterferon beta-1a, testosterone nasal gel, ferric citrate corredination complex, and safinamide. The Safety MUE is on olodaterol. PMID:25673895

  8. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-21

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  9. Chronic hepatitis C: an age wave of disease burden.

    PubMed

    McHutchison, John G; Bacon, Bruce R

    2005-10-01

    There are at least 2.7 million individuals in the United States, most of them in their 40s and 50s, who are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). As these infected individuals get older, about 20% will develop cirrhosis, and a significant fraction of those with cirrhosis (about 1 in 10) will then develop serious decompensated liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, HCV is the primary cause of death in 8000 to 12 000 people every year; the virus is also the primary reason for liver transplantation in the United States. Although the number of new cases of HCV infection has been dropping steadily since the introduction of improved blood-supply screening, the "age wave" of existing chronic HCV in baby boomers is expected to contribute to a substantial rise in morbidity, mortality, and costs over the next 2 decades. Although it is difficult to predict which HCV-infected patients will progress to serious liver disease, the availability of a combination drug regimen (peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin) that essentially "cures" the disease in more than half of treated patients now provides clinicians and pharmacists in managed care settings with the tools needed to diminish the impact of the anticipated wave of liver disease. This article reviews the epidemiology, natural history, clinical and economic burden, and screening and treatment options for HCV. PMID:16232012

  10. The Role of MicroRNAs in Response to Interferon Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Ahwany, Eman; Nagy, Faten; Zoheiry, Mona; ELGhannam, Maged; Shemis, Mohamed; Aboul-Ezz, Mohamed; Zada, Suher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of HCV using a combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin fails in about 40% of the patients with HCV genotype 4 infections, and it is physically and economically demanding. Thus, it is highly important to identify factors that can help to predict the likelihood that a patient will respond to this treatment. Methods In this study, five miRNAs, i.e., miRNA-122, miRNA-199, miRNA-192, miRNA-30, and miRNA-128, were selected according to previous studies that demonstrated their noticeable functions in viral replication, indicating that they potentially could be used by host cells to control viral infections. The five miRNAs were measured using real-time, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions. The data were analyzed using the t-test and chi-squared test. Results We found that the expression level of miRNA-122 was significantly increased in the responders’ group (p < 0.01) over that in the non-responders’ groups before and after treatment; both increased significantly (p < 0.01) compared with the normal control group. Conclusion miR-122 might be a useful predictor for virological responses to treatment with PEG-interferon plus ribavirin therapy in patients with HCV. PMID:27054010

  11. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Larrey, Dominique; Ripault, Marie-Pierre; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education. PMID:24920888

  12. Safety and efficacy of daclatasvir in the management of patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Zacharakis, George; Zissis, Miltiadis; Giannakopoulos, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Daclatasvir (Daklinza™), a new oral direct-acting antiviral, is an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS5A protein and has recently been approved in the United States, Europe and Japan in chronic hepatitis C. It shows potent pangenotypic activity and moderately high genetic barrier to resistance improving the sustained virological response (SVR) rates. In COMMAND phase 2 trials, daclatasvir demonstrated high SVR rates in HCV genotype 1-4 chronically infected patients treated with peginterferon-a (pegIFNα) plus ribavirin (RBV). Furthermore, it produced even higher response rates in all-oral combination with sofosbuvir, an interferon-free regimen, with or without ribavirin, in patients with advanced liver disease, HCV/HIV coinfection, liver transplantation in ALLY studies and other real-world studies. This narrative review provides information on the pharmacological properties, role, efficacy and safety of daclatasvir-containing regimens in chronic hepatitis C patients. Daclatasvir administered once-daily in combination with sofosbuvir is an effective 12-week treatment in adult patients with chronic hepatitis C and is generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:27366028

  13. [Silymarin in the treatment of chronic liver diseases: past and future].

    PubMed

    Fehér, János; Lengyel, Gabriella

    2008-12-21

    In the treatment of chronic liver diseases adequate therapy can be chosen only in the knowledge of pathogenetic processes. In the liver diseases caused by oxidative stress (alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis, drug and compound induced liver toxicity) the antioxidant drugs, like silymarin, in chronic hepatitis caused by hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus, combined peginterferon and nucleosid treatments are the primary therapy modalities to be selected. The main effects of silymarin are the membrane stabilising and antioxidant effects, it is able to help the liver cell regeneration, it can decrease the inflammatory reaction and inhibit the fibrogenesis in the liver. These results have been established by experimental and clinical trials. According to open studies, the long administration of silymarin significantly increased the survival time of patients with alcohol-induced liver cirrhosis. Recently it was demonstrated that high-dosage silibinin infusion treatment could significantly decrease the number of hepatitis C viruses after four-week application. On the basis of the results with the methods of molecular biology, silymarin is able to decrease significantly tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis as well as insulin resistance. These results support the administration of silymarin preparations in the therapy of chronic liver diseases, especially in alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in current clinical practice, and as it can be awaited, also in the future. In some neoplastic diseases they could also be administered as adjuvant therapy. PMID:19073452

  14. PEG conjugates in clinical development or use as anticancer agents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pasut, Gianfranco; Veronese, Francesco M

    2009-11-12

    During the almost forty years of PEGylation, several antitumour agents, either proteins, peptides or low molecular weight drugs, have been considered for polymer conjugation but only few entered clinical phase studies. The results from the first clinical trials have shared and improved the knowledge on biodistribution, clearance, mechanism of action and stability of a polymer conjugate in vivo. This has helped to design conjugates with improved features. So far, most of the PEG conjugates comprise of a protein, which in the native form has serious shortcomings that limit the full exploitation of its therapeutic action. The main issues can be short in vivo half-life, instability towards degrading enzymes or immunogenicity. PEGylation proved to be effective in shielding sensitive sites at the protein surface, such as antigenic epitopes and enzymatic degradable sequences, as well as in prolonging the drug half-life by decreasing the kidney clearance. In this review PEG conjugates of proteins or low molecular weight drugs, in clinical development or use as anticancer agents, will be taken into consideration. In the case of PEG-protein derivatives the most represented are depleting enzymes, which act by degrading amino acids essential for cancer cells. Interestingly, PEGylated conjugates have been also considered as adjuvant therapy in many standard anticancer protocols, in this regard the case of PEG-G-CSF and PEG-interferons will be presented. PMID:19671438

  15. Ribavirin: Past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Jacques, Jérémie; Alain, Sophie; Marquet, Pierre; Sautereau, Denis; Rousseau, Annick; Carrier, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Before the advent of direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) ribavirin, associated to pegylated-interferon played a crucial role in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, preventing relapses and breakthroughs. In the present era of new potent DAAs, a place is still devoted to the drug. Ribavirin associated with sofosbuvir alone is efficient in the treatment of most cases of G2 infected patients. All options currently available for the last difficult-to-treat cirrhotic G3 patients contain ribavirin. Reducing treatment duration to 12 wk in G1 or G4 cirrhotic compensated patients is feasible thanks to ribavirin. Retreating patients with acquired anti NS5A resistance-associated variants using ribavirin-based strategies could be useful. The addition of ribavirin with DAAs combinations however, leads to more frequent but mild adverse events especially in cirrhotic patients. Preliminary data with interferon-free second generation DAAs combinations without ribavirin suggest that future of the drug is jeopardized even in difficult-to-treat patients: The optimization of ribavirin dosage according to an early monitoring of blood levels has been suggested to be relevant in double therapy with peginterferon or sofosbuvir but not with very potent combinations of more than two DAAs. PMID:26807208

  16. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C with direct-acting antivirals: The role of resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González-Grande, Rocío; España Contreras, Pilar; Pinazo Martínez, Isabel; de la Cruz Lombardo, Jesús; Olmedo Martín, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    The use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) to treat chronic hepatitis C has resulted in a significant increase in rates of sustained viral response (around 90%-95%) as compared with the standard treatment of peginterferon/ribavirin. Despite this, however, the rates of therapeutic failure in daily clinical practice range from 10%-15%. Most of these cases are due to the presence of resistant viral variants, resulting from mutations produced by substitutions of amino acids in the viral target protein that reduce viral sensitivity to DAAs, thus limiting the efficacy of these drugs. The high genetic diversity of hepatitis C virus has resulted in the existence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs), sometimes even before starting treatment with DAAs, though generally at low levels. These pre-existing RAVs do not appear to impact on the sustained viral response, whereas those that appear after DAA therapy could well be determinant in virological failure with future treatments. As well as the presence of RAVs, virological failure to treatment with DAAs is generally associated with other factors related with a poor response, such as the degree of fibrosis, the response to previous therapy, the viral load or the viral genotype. Nonetheless, viral breakthrough and relapse can still occur in the absence of detectable RAVs and after the use of highly effective DAAs, so that the true clinical impact of the presence of RAVs in therapeutic failure remains to be determined. PMID:27547001

  17. Australian recommendations for the management of hepatitis C virus infection: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alexander J V

    2016-04-18

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects 230 000 Australians, who are at risk of progressive liver fibrosis leading to cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV infection is curable, and all Australians living with HCV should be considered for antiviral therapy. Interferon-free regimens involving combinations of sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, daclatasvir and/or ribavirin for 8, 12 or 24 weeks are now listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) for treating people with genotypes 1-3 HCV. Treatment for genotypes 4-6 HCV involves sofosbuvir plus peginterferon-alfa and ribavirin for 12 weeks. The PBS listing allows these therapies to be prescribed by specialists experienced in treating chronic HCV infection or by general practitioners in consultation with one of these specialists. People with cirrhosis and other special populations (eg, those with decompensated liver disease or renal impairment) should be referred for specialist care. Key issues during pre-treatment assessment include identifying HCV genotype, evaluating for cirrhosis and considering concomitant medications for risk of drug-drug interactions. PMID:27078601

  18. [New agents for the treatment of hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Buti, Maria; Homs, Maria

    2012-03-01

    The current treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC) is based on the combination of peginterferon alpha 2a or 2b and ribavirin. This treatment achieves Sustained Virological Response (SVR) rates in more than 50% of the patients. The SVR rates are higher in genotype 2 and 3 patients than in genotype 1, which account for more than 50%. For this reason, the development of new drugs is needed. The knowledge of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) replication cycle and the characterisation of the viral enzymes allow targets to be defined with the ability to inhibit HCV enzymes. The present overview analyses the first two NS3/NS4 protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of CHC, boceprevir and telaprevir. Both increase rates of SVR in naïve and in previously treated patients with the advantage that in some cases therapy can be shortened. However, these drugs have new side effects such as a rash and an increase in the rate of anaemia. PMID:22118805

  19. Sofosbuvir-Based Therapy for Genotype 4 HCV Recurrence Post-Liver Transplant Treatment-Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ajlan, A.; Al-Jedai, A.; Elsiesy, H.; Alkortas, D.; Al-Hamoudi, W.; Alarieh, R.; Al-Sebayel, M.; Broering, D.; Aba Alkhail, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. This is an open label prospective cohort study conducted at a tertiary care hospital. The primary endpoint is SVR12 in patients treated with sofosbuvir-based therapy in post-liver transplant patients with genotype 4 HCV recurrence. Methodology. Thirty-six treatment-experienced liver transplant patients with HCV recurrence received sofosbuvir and ribavirin ± peginterferon. Results. We report here safety and efficacy data on 36 patients who completed the follow-up period. Mean age was 56 years, and the cohort included 24 males and one patient had cirrhosis. Mean baseline HCV RNA was 6.2 log10 IU/mL. The majority of patients had ≥ stage 2 fibrosis. Twenty-eight patients were treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in addition to sofosbuvir for 12 weeks and the remaining were treated with sofosbuvir plus ribavirin only for 24 weeks. By week 4, only four (11.1%) patients had detectable HCV RNA. Of the 36 patients, 2 (5.5%) relapsed and one died (2.75%). Conclusion. Our results suggest that sofosbuvir + ribavirin ± pegylated interferon can be utilized successfully to treat liver transplant patients with HCV recurrence. PMID:27446833

  20. Duplex High-Resolution Melting Assay for the Simultaneous Genotyping of IL28B rs12979860 and PNPLA3 rs738409 Polymorphisms in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients.

    PubMed

    Enache, Elena L; Sin, Anca; Bancu, Ligia; Ramière, Christophe; Diaz, Olivier; André, Patrice; Enache, Liviu S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a major burden for public health worldwide. Although newer direct-acting antivirals show good efficacy, their cost precludes their wide adoption in resource-limited regions. Thus, strategies are being developed to help identify patients with high susceptibility to response to classic PEG-interferon + ribavirin therapy. IL28B polymorphism rs12979860 C/T is an important predictor for an efficient response to interferon-based therapy. A genetic variant in adiponutrin (PNPLA3) gene, rs738409 C/G, is associated with steatosis, severity, and progression of liver fibrosis in CHC patients, and predicts treatment outcome in difficult-to-cure HCV-infected patients with advanced fibrosis. We developed a rapid and inexpensive assay based on duplex high-resolution melting (HRM) for the simultaneous genotyping of these two polymorphisms. The assay validation was performed on synthetic DNA templates and 132 clinical samples from CHC patients. When compared with allele-specific PCR and sequencing, our assay showed 100% (95% CI: 0.9724-1) accuracy, with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Our assay was robust against concentration and quality of DNA samples, melting curve normalization intervals, HRM analysis algorithm, and sequence variations near the targeted SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). This duplex assay should provide useful information for patient-oriented management and clinical decision-making in CHC. PMID:26389885

  1. Safety and efficacy of daclatasvir in the management of patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Zacharakis, George; Zissis, Miltiadis; Giannakopoulos, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Daclatasvir (Daklinza™), a new oral direct-acting antiviral, is an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS5A protein and has recently been approved in the United States, Europe and Japan in chronic hepatitis C. It shows potent pangenotypic activity and moderately high genetic barrier to resistance improving the sustained virological response (SVR) rates. In COMMAND phase 2 trials, daclatasvir demonstrated high SVR rates in HCV genotype 1-4 chronically infected patients treated with peginterferon-a (pegIFNα) plus ribavirin (RBV). Furthermore, it produced even higher response rates in all-oral combination with sofosbuvir, an interferon-free regimen, with or without ribavirin, in patients with advanced liver disease, HCV/HIV coinfection, liver transplantation in ALLY studies and other real-world studies. This narrative review provides information on the pharmacological properties, role, efficacy and safety of daclatasvir-containing regimens in chronic hepatitis C patients. Daclatasvir administered once-daily in combination with sofosbuvir is an effective 12-week treatment in adult patients with chronic hepatitis C and is generally safe and well tolerated. PMID:27366028

  2. Challenges in Special Populations: HIV/HCV Coinfection, Liver Transplantation and Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Martín; Lens, Sabela; Mariño, Zoe; Forns, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the combination of PEG-interferon and ribavirin (RBV) was the main treatment for all genotypes of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Sustained virological response (SVR) rates varied signixFB01;cantly across patient subgroups and the concept of 'special populations' emerged. Now, in the era of direct acting antivirals, with a better safety profile and higher efficacy rates, those patients with comorbidities or conditions that limited IFN-based antiviral treatment but with unmet medical needs have been considered for therapy again. With the currently approved all-oral antivirals, patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus and HCV have SVR rates similar to patients with HCV monoinfection. However, drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with antiretroviral drugs are still challenging. In the setting of liver transplantation, with an accelerated course of hepatitis C, previous IFN-RBV treatments were poorly tolerated and attained low SVR rates. Today, all-oral therapies have proven to be efficacious and safe in this population. Nevertheless, questions such as the optimal treatment duration or the need for RBV still remain opened. In this population as well, DDIs are an issue, as some regimens require adjustments and monitoring of immunosuppressive drugs during therapy. Finally, preliminary data show promising results in terms of efficacy and safety in patients with end-stage renal disease. However, there is clear need for more clinical studies since treatment options are still very limited. PMID:27170384

  3. Oritavancin diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Cada, Dennis J; Baker, Danial E

    2014-12-01

    Each month, subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service receive 5 to 6 well-documented monographs on drugs that are newly released or are in late phase 3 trials. The monographs are targeted to Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees. Subscribers also receive monthly 1-page summary monographs on agents that are useful for agendas and pharmacy/nursing in-services. A comprehensive target drug utilization evaluation/medication use evaluation (DUE/MUE) is also provided each month. With a subscription, the monographs are sent in print and are also available on-line. Monographs can be customized to meet the needs of a facility. A drug class review is now published monthly with The Formulary Monograph Service. Through the cooperation of The Formulary, Hospital Pharmacy publishes selected reviews in this column. For more information about The Formulary Monograph Service, call The Formulary at 800-322-4349. The December 2014 monograph topics are olodaterol, peginterferon beta-1a, testosterone nasal gel, ferric citrate corredination complex, and safinamide. The Safety MUE is on olodaterol. PMID:25673895

  4. Comparative quantitative analysis of hepatitis C mutations at amino acids 70 and 91 in the core region by the Q-Invader assay.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Mariko; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Chie; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Nagano, Makoto; Egashira, Toru; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major worldwide public health problem, and mutations at amino acids 70 and 91 in the genotype 1b core region predict the effectiveness of combination therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin. An assay based on the Q-Invader technology was developed to determine the relative ratios of the mutant to wild-type virus with high sensitivity. The assay detected a minor type plasmid that constituted only 1% of a mixture of plasmids containing wild-type and mutant sequences. The calculated ratios agreed with those of the template DNA. A total of 123 serum samples of HCV in Japan were examined with the Q-Invader assay. The Q-Invader assay detected all of the mutations that were detected by direct sequencing and even some mutants that direct sequencing could not. PCR with mutant specific primers confirmed those mutations found by the Q-Invader assay and not by direct sequencing. The Q-Invader assay, thus, is a useful tool for detecting mutations at positions 70 and 91 in the HCV-1b core region. PMID:23124003

  5. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  6. Hepatitis C virus infection treatment: An era of game changer direct acting antivirals and novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Imran; ALMalki, Waleed Hassan; Hafeez, Muhammad Hassan; Hassan, Sajida

    2016-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and associated liver diseases represent a major health care burden all over the world. The current standard of care, i.e. peginterferon-alfa (PEG-IFNα) plus ribavirin (RBV) are associated with frequent and sometimes serious adverse effects and contraindications, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. The approval of first and second generation HCV protease inhibitors represents a major breakthrough in the development of novel direct acting antivirals (DAAs) against different HCV genotypes and establishes a new standard of care for chronically infected HCV genotypes 1 patients. Similarly, next generation protease inhibitors and HCV RNA polymerase inhibitors have shown better pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in terms of broader HCV genotypes coverage, better safety profile, fewer drug interactions and possible once daily administration than first generation direct acting antivirals. The testing of adenovirus-based vector vaccines, which escalates the innate and acquired immune responses against the most conserved regions of the HCV genome in chimpanzees and humans, may be a promising therapeutic approach against HCV infection in coming future. This review article presents up-to-date knowledge and recent developments in HCV therapeutics, insights the shortcomings of current HCV therapies and key lessons from the therapeutic potential of improved anti-HCV treatment strategies. PMID:25373616

  7. Insulin resistance and response to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    del Campo, José A; López, Reyes Aparcero; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been found to be an independent factor predicting sustained response to peginterferon plus ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Insulin resistance seems to be involved in decreased sensitivity to interferon and could block interferon intracellular signaling. Insulin resistance promotes steatosis and fibrosis progression, induces pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and increases adipose tissue, decreasing interferon availability. Moreover, suppressor of cytokines 3 and protein tyrosine-phosphatase seems to be able to block interferon and insulin signaling, building a feed-forward loop. Insulin resistance can be treated with exercise, diet or through the use of drugs that improve insulin sensitivity, like biguanides or glitazones. A recent controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trial (TRIC-1) examined the effect of adding metformin to standard therapy in the treatment of hepatitis C. This study demonstrated that women infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 and HOMA >2 treated with metformin showed a greater drop in viral load during the first 12 weeks and a doubled sustained viral response in comparison with females receiving placebo. Pioglitazone has been used in previous nonresponders and naïve patients with disappointing results in two pilot trials. The mechanisms by which the virus promotes insulin resistance seems to be genotype-dependent and could explain, at least in part, the discrepancies between insulin sensitizers. Insulin resistance is a new target in the challenging management of chronic hepatitis C. PMID:20460925

  8. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Study to Evaluate the Efficacy of Low-Dose Oral Interferon-Alpha in Preventing Hepatitis C Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chuan-Mo; Chen, Chi-Yi; Chien, Rong-Nan; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Tung, Shui-Yi; Fang, Yi-Jen; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Hung, Chao-Hung; Tsai, Tsung-Jang; Fang, Chien-Chung; Hsu, Chao-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose oral interferon could exert immune-modulating effects in human. We conducted a clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of oral interferon-alpha in preventing hepatitis C relapse. Totally 169 genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C patients having achieved end-of-therapy virological clearance were randomized to receive interferon-alpha lozenge 500 IU/day (n=59), 1,500 IU/day (n=53), or placebo (n=57) for 24 weeks. Overall, no significant differences were found for the relapse rates in the 3 groups (P>0.05). However, in patients with fibroindex 1.4–1.7, relapse occurred in 1/12 (8.3%) 500 IU-group patients versus 9/21 (42.9%) patients of the other groups (P=0.05). In 158 patients receiving at least 4 weeks of oral interferon, significantly higher platelet count was found at the end of trial in the 500 IU group (P=0.003). In thrombocytopenic patients, a significantly expedited recovery of platelet count was found in the 500 IU group (P=0.002). No drug-related severe adverse events were reported. In conclusion, at 500 IU/day, oral interferon exerted a borderline suppression effect of virological relapse in chronic hepatitis C patients with mild liver fibrosis. Additionally, it significantly expedited platelet count recovery after the end of peginterferon therapy. PMID:24237300

  9. [Renewed 2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Management of Hepatitis C by Korean Association for the Study of the Liver; What Has Been Changed? - Indications for Treatment].

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Ah

    2016-03-25

    The landscape of treatment for HCV infection has evolved substantially with the advent of highly effective direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA). The Korean Association for the Study of the Liver updated guideline for managemnt of hepatitis C in accordance with the introduction of DAA into practice in late 2015. Due to high effectiveness and few side effects of DAA, indications for treatment has been widened to include patients who had been contraindicated for the combination treatment of peginterferon-α and ribavirin, i.e. decompensated cirrhosis and pre- and post-liver transplant setting. As succeesul treatment of HCV can reduce complications of cirrhosis, development of hepatocelluar carcinoma and liver-related mortality, and improve extrahepatic manifestions, all HCV-infected patients with no contraindication should be considered for treatment. Considering the risk for morbidity and mortality and benefit of treatment, patients with advanced fibrosis ≥F3 including compensated and decompensated cirrhosis, those in the pre- and post-tranplasnt setting, and those with severe extrahepatic manifestations including HCV-related mixed cryoglobulinemia and glomerulonephritis should be given priority for treatment. PMID:26996180

  10. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C with direct-acting antivirals: The role of resistance.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González-Grande, Rocío; España Contreras, Pilar; Pinazo Martínez, Isabel; de la Cruz Lombardo, Jesús; Olmedo Martín, Raúl

    2016-08-01

    The use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) to treat chronic hepatitis C has resulted in a significant increase in rates of sustained viral response (around 90%-95%) as compared with the standard treatment of peginterferon/ribavirin. Despite this, however, the rates of therapeutic failure in daily clinical practice range from 10%-15%. Most of these cases are due to the presence of resistant viral variants, resulting from mutations produced by substitutions of amino acids in the viral target protein that reduce viral sensitivity to DAAs, thus limiting the efficacy of these drugs. The high genetic diversity of hepatitis C virus has resulted in the existence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs), sometimes even before starting treatment with DAAs, though generally at low levels. These pre-existing RAVs do not appear to impact on the sustained viral response, whereas those that appear after DAA therapy could well be determinant in virological failure with future treatments. As well as the presence of RAVs, virological failure to treatment with DAAs is generally associated with other factors related with a poor response, such as the degree of fibrosis, the response to previous therapy, the viral load or the viral genotype. Nonetheless, viral breakthrough and relapse can still occur in the absence of detectable RAVs and after the use of highly effective DAAs, so that the true clinical impact of the presence of RAVs in therapeutic failure remains to be determined. PMID:27547001

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygosis and low-density lipoproteins in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Petta, S; Bellia, C; Mazzola, A; Cabibi, D; Cammà, C; Caruso, A; Di Marco, V; Craxì, A; Ciaccio, M

    2012-07-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase status, homocysteine and lipoproteins levels have been associated with severity of disease and both rapid and sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We aimed to assess the association of homocysteine and MTHFR status with serum cholesterol levels and their potential links to both histological findings and virological response, in patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV). A total of 119 consecutive patients were evaluated by biopsy and metabolic measurements. A total of 103 healthy blood donors were used as controls. Serum homocysteine and MTHFR C677T mutation were also evaluated. All patients underwent antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN alfa-2a plus ribavirin. HCV-RNA was assessed at baseline, week 4, week 12, at the end of therapy and after 6 months of follow-up. Mean serum values of homocysteine were higher in patients than in controls (15.8 ± 5.8 μg/L vs 12.5 ± 5.8 μg/L; P < 0.001), with a similar CC, CT and TT MTHFR distribution (23.6%, 48.7% and 27.7% in G1-CHC vs 34%, 48.5% and 17.5% in controls; P = 0.14). In genotype 1, HCV MTHFR TT homozygosis was independently linked to higher LDL (OR 1.016; CI 1.002-1.031; P = 0.03), but not to homocysteine. No association were found between homocysteine, MTHFR and histological features or both rapid virological response (RVR) and SVR. Low cholesterol (OR 0.988, 95%CI 0.975-0.999, P = 0.04) was independently linked to severe fibrosis, and high LDL was the only independent positive predictors of both RVR and SVR (OR 1.036; 95%CI 1.017-1.055; P < 0.001; and OR 1.016; 95%CI 1.001-1.031; P = 0.04 respectively). In patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C, showing higher homocysteine serum levels than controls, MTHFR C677T homozygosis, via modulating cholesterol levels, could interfere with liver fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy. PMID:22676358

  12. Hepatitis E: an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gracia, María Teresa; Suay, Beatriz; Mateos-Lindemann, María Luisa

    2014-03-01

    Currently, the infection with the hepatitis E virus represents the most frequent cause for acute hepatitis and jaundice in the world. According to WHO estimations, around two billion people, representing one third of the world's population, live in endemic areas for HEV and, therefore, are at risk of infection. In developed countries, the circulation of the virus in both human and animal (swine, boar, deer) sewage has been confirmed; however, the incidence rate is low compared to that of developing countries where outbreaks of acute hepatitis transmitted via the fecal-oral route are originated, more frequently in the flooding season or after natural disasters, combined with deficient sanitary conditions. There are currently 4 known genotypes of HEV. Genotypes 1 and 2 are isolated in all human epidemic outbreaks in developing countries, while genotypes 3 and 4 are isolated not only in humans but also in animals, in both developing and industrialized countries. These data support genotypes 3 and 4 having zoonotic nature. The diagnosis of this disease is based in the detection of anti-HEV IgG and IgM in blood serum using enzyme-linked immunosorbent methods. However, the method that best confirms the diagnosis is the RT-PCR, which detects HEV RNA in blood serum and also provides the genotype. The clinical course is generally that of an acute hepatitis which in some cases may require hospitalization and that, in transplant patients or HIV infected individuals can become a chronic hepatitis. Furthermore, the virus constitutes an important risk for pregnant women. The hepatitis E can present a wide range of symptoms, from a subclinical case to chronic liver disease with extrahepatic manifestations. For this reason, the diagnostic is challenging if no differential diagnosis is included. There is no specific antiviral drug for hepatitis E, but satisfactory results have been observed in some patients treated with pegylated interferon alfa2a and/or ribavirin. This revision is

  13. The Association of Substitutions in the Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 1b Core Gene and IL28B Polymorphisms With the Response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV Combination Therapy in Azerbaijani Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Farzin; Esghaei, Maryam; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Fakhim, Shahin; Keyvani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been identified as a leading cause of progressive liver diseases worldwide. Despite new treatment strategies, pegylated interferon alfa-2a (Peg-IFNα-2a), in combination with ribavirin (RBV), still represents the gold standard of therapy for hepatitis C in developing countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association of substitutions in the HCV subtype 1b (HCV-1b) core protein and the rs12979860 polymorphism in the interleukin 28B gene (IL28B) with the response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV combination therapy in Azerbaijani patients. Patients and Methods A total of fifty-one chronically HCV-1b-infected Azerbaijani patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from March 2010 to June 2015. After RNA extraction from pre-treatment plasma, the core region of the HCV genome was amplified using the nested reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, followed by standard sequencing. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens, and the rs12979860 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was identified using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results In this study, a significant association was observed between the non-responders and relapsers to antiviral therapy and substitutions in the HCV-1b core region at positions 43 (R43K, P = 0.047), 70 (R70Q, P < 0.001), 91 (M91L, P = 0.037), and 106 (S106N, P = 0.018). Concerning the IL28B polymorphism, the results showed that sustained virological response was significantly associated with homozygous CC patients (P = 0.009) as compared with other genotypes, while homozygous TT subjects were associated with HCV relapse after therapy (P = 0.006). Conclusions The data of the present study suggest that amino acid substitutions at position 43, 70, 91, and 106 in the HCV-1b core protein are correlated with the response to the Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV treatment in

  14. Immune modulations during chemoimmunotherapy & novel vaccine strategies--in metastatic melanoma and non small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Trine Zeeberg

    2013-12-01

    This thesis describes the treatment of metastatic melanoma (MM) and non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from an immunotherapeutic approach. The purpose of the first part of the thesis was to assess how treatment with Temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy affects the immune system in patients with metastatic MM. Our results showed that the number of T lymphocytes was significantly reduced after 3 treatment cycles. Furthermore, the induced lymphopenia was positive correlated to achievement of clinical benefit. We demonstrated that the proportion of CD4+ and Treg lymphocytes decreased whereas the CD8+ T cells increased. In particular, we demonstrated that mature CD8+ T cells increased during treatment. Analyses of peripheral blood before and after treatment showed that T cell responses against common viral epitopes were conserved despite chemotherapy. Surprisingly, we found a significant increase in T cell responses against well-known MM tumour specific antigens. Overall, we have verified that TMZ in addition to being an alkylating and cytotoxic chemotherapy, also possess immune modulatory effect in MM patients treated with standard dosage of TMZ. In the second part of the thesis we examined how treatment with Interferon alfa-2b and Interleukin 2 (IFNα/IL2) affects the immune system. We demonstrated a significant induced lymphocytosis during treatment. Furthermore, we showed that the percentage increase in lymphocytes was positively correlated to clinical outcome. Moreover, we have seen that IFNα/IL2 leads to significant increase in NK and Treg cells in both patients with and without clincal effect. In general, T cell responses against common viral epitopes and well-known melanoma tumour specific antigens were low. Furthermore, the study confirmed that elevated LDH is negatively correlated with both treatment response and median overall survival. Overall, we have characterized changes of immune cells and correlated them with clinical efficacy during the couse of IFNα/IL2

  15. Belgian experience with triple therapy with boceprevir and telaprevir in genotype 1 infected patients who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Arain, A; Bourgeois, S; de Galocsy, C; Henrion, J; Deltenre, P; d'Heygere, F; George, C; Bastens, B; Van Overbeke, L; Verrando, R; Bruckers, L; Mathei, C; Buntinx, F; Van Vlierberghe, H; Francque, S; Laleman, W; Moreno, C; Janssens, F; Nevens, F; Robaeys, G

    2016-01-01

    No data have been reported yet on treatment outcome in persons who inject drugs (PWID) infected with hepatitis C virus treated with boceprevir or telaprevir in combination with peginterferon (Peg IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). Additionally, there are concerns about the safety of boceprevir and telaprevir in some subgroups of patients with hepatitis C (HCV). In a cohort of HCV patients infected with genotype 1 in Belgium, treatment outcome of patients infected due to IV drug use was analyzed and compared with patients who have no history of substance use. The study population consisted of 179 patients: 78 PWID and 101 controls treated with boceprevir (n = 79) or telaprevir (n = 100) additional to Peg IFN and RBV; 53 (30%) had advanced disease (F3, F4) and 79 (44%) had an antiviral therapy previously. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics between both groups, except that PWID patients were more frequently infected with genotype 1a (67% vs 21%), were younger and were predominantly male. Psychiatric complaints during follow-up occurred more frequently in the PWID patients: 24% versus 11% (P = .02). Treatment failure for other reasons than absence of viral response was 70% and 64% in PWID and non-PWID respectively. The sustained viral response (SVR) rates were similar in both groups (71% in PWID vs 72% in non-PWID); with a non-inferiority test with -5% margin there is a difference of -1% (95% CI [-15%, 13%]) and P = 0.30. There are no reasons to exclude PWID from treatment with boceprevir, telaprevir and novel antiviral therapies. PMID:26121975

  16. UPLC-MS/MS method with automated on-line SPE for the isomer-specific quantification of the first-generation anti-HCV protease inhibitors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    De Nicolò, Amedeo; Abdi, Adnan Mohamed; Boglione, Lucio; Baiett, Lorena; Allegra, Sarah; Di Perri, Giovanni; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2015-11-10

    HCV infection affects over 170 million people worldwide. The current standard for treatment of genotype 1 infection is the association of the first generation protease inhibitors boceprevir or telaprevir to ribavirin and peginterferon α. Although the response rate has been improved with these new drugs, some pharmacokinetic/pharmacodinamic issues emerged in the past years. To date, some analytical methods are available for the quantification of these drugs in plasma; however, the real active concentrations of the two drugs are those in hepatocytes. Being the withdrawal of hepatocytes too invasive, in this work we aimed to develop and validate a chromatographic method coupled with tandem mass spectrometry capable of quantifying boceprevir and telaprevir isomers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, used as an "in-vivo" cellular model of compartmentalization. The method used an on-line solid phase extraction protocol based on the new OSM(®) platform and was fully validated following FDA guidelines. This method showed mean intra- and inter-day inaccuracy and imprecision both lower than 15%, high and stable recovery and contained matrix effect, with a run time of 6min, comprehensive of SPE extraction. The method was then applied on 35 real samples from patients treated with boceprevir or telaprevir, with good analytical performances, thus assessing its eligibility for a possible future routine use. Peculiar pharmacokinetic data have been observed, suggesting the usefulness of investigating intracellular pharmacokinetics of these drugs. Further studies will be required to test the correlation of intracellular concentrations with effectiveness and toxicity of triple therapy. PMID:26291788

  17. Emergence of telaprevir-resistant variants detected by ultra-deep sequencing after triple therapy in patients infected with HCV genotype 1.

    PubMed

    Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Seko, Yuya; Kawamura, Yusuke; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Hara, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Mariko; Saitoh, Satoshi; Arase, Yasuji; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2013-06-01

    Using ultra-deep sequencing technology, the present was designed to investigate whether the emergence of telaprevir-resistant variants (amino acid substitutions of aa36, aa54, aa155, aa156, and aa170 positions in HCV NS3 region) after commencement of triple therapy of telaprevir/peginterferon (PEG-IFN)/ribavirin could be predicted at baseline in previous non-responders to dual therapy. Fourteen patients infected with HCV genotype 1 who did not respond to previous PEG-IFN/ribavirin, received a 24-week regimen of triple therapy, and were evaluated for appearance of telaprevir-resistant variants (amino acid substitutions of more than 0.2% among the total coverage) by ultra-deep sequencing. The sustained virological response rate was 28.6% (4 of 14 patients), which was significantly higher in patients with Arg70 (substitution at core aa70) and partial response (type of previous response to PEG-IFN/ribavirin) than in other patients. Telaprevir-resistant variants at baseline were detected in 7.1% (1 of 14 patients) by direct sequencing and in 21.4% (3 of 14 patients) by ultra-deep sequencing. The appearance of telaprevir-resistant variants was examined by ultra-deep sequencing in 10 who did not show sustained virological responders. De novo variants emerged at re-elevation of viral load, regardless of variant frequencies at baseline (one patient with very high frequency variants [T54S: 99.9%], two patients with very low frequency variants [V36A: 0.2%; and V170A: 0.4%], and seven patients of undetectable variants). It is concluded that it is difficult to predict at baseline the emergence of telaprevir-resistant variants after commencement of triple therapy in prior non-responders of HCV genotype 1, even with the use of ultra-deep sequencing. PMID:23588728

  18. Cytokine Response Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Clearance in HIV Coinfected Patients Initiating Peg Interferon-α Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Truong Tam; Niloofar, Reihani; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Nils, Kuster; Bollore, Karine; Ducos, Jacques; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Reynes, Jacques; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on peginterferon-α (pegIFNα) and ribavirin induces important changes in cytokine release and T cell activation. Objective Immune response to pegIFNα-ribavirin therapy was explored in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. Methods Concentrations of 25 cytokines and CD8+ T cell activation were monitored in HCV/HIV coinfected patients classified as sustained virological responders (SVR, n=19) and non-responders (NR, n=11). Results High pretreatment concentrations of IP-10 (CXCL-10) and MCP-1 (CCL-2) were associated with a poor anti-HCV response. PegIFNα-ribavirin therapy increased CD8+ T cell activation and induced significant changes in levels of eleven cytokines related to both Th1 and Th2 responses in SVR (IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, IP-10, eotaxin, MCP-1) but of only six cytokines in NR (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, eotaxin). The highest rise in MIP-1β and MCP-1 levels was observed four weeks after anti-HCV treatment initiation in SVR compared to NR (p=0.002 and p=0.03, respectively), whereas a decrease in IL-8 concentration was associated with treatment failure (p= 0.052). Conclusions Higher and broader cytokine responses to pegIFNα-ribavirin therapy were observed in SVR patients compared to NR. Changes in IL-8, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 serum concentrations may be associated with efficacy of pegIFNα- and ribavirin-based therapies in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. PMID:26740864

  19. HEP-09-0485: Coffee Intake Is Associated with Lower Rates of Liver Disease Progression in Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Neal D.; Everhart, James E.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Ghany, Marc G.; Curto, Teresa M.; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Lee, William M.; Lok, Anna S.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Hoefs, John C.; Dienstag, Jules L.; Morishima, Chihiro; Abnet, Christian C.; Sinha, Rashmi

    2009-01-01

    Higher coffee consumption has been associated inversely with the incidence of chronic liver disease in population studies. We examined the relationship of coffee consumption with liver disease progression in individuals with advanced hepatitis C related liver disease. Baseline coffee and tea intake was assessed in 766 participants of the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial who had hepatitis C-related bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis on liver biopsy and failed to achieve a sustained virological response to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment. Participants were followed for 3.8 years for clinical outcomes and for those without cirrhosis, a 2 point increase in Ishak fibrosis score on protocol biopsies. At baseline, higher coffee consumption was associated with less severe steatosis on biopsy, lower serum AST/ALT ratio, alpha-fetoprotein, insulin, and HOMA2 score, and higher albumin (p<0.05 for all). 230 patients had outcomes. Outcome rates declined with increasing coffee intake: 11.1/100 person-years for none, 12.1 for <1 cup/day, 8.2 for 1 to <3 cups/day, and 6.3 for ≥ 3 cups/day (p-trend=0.0011). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were 1.11 (0.76–1.61) for < 1 cup/day; 0.70 (0.48–1.02) for 1 to <3 cups/day; and 0.47 (0.27–0.85) for ≥3 cups/day (p-trend = 0.0003), versus not drinking. Risk estimates did not vary by treatment assignment or cirrhosis status at baseline. Tea intake was not associated with outcomes. Conclusion In a large prospective study of participants with advanced hepatitis-C related liver disease, regular coffee consumption was associated with lower rates of disease progression. PMID:19676128

  20. Quantitation of Pretreatment Serum IP-10 Improves the Predictive Value of an IL28B Gene Polymorphism for Hepatitis C Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Jama M.; Aerssens, Jeroen; Fanning, Gregory; McHutchison, John G.; Goldstein, David B.; Thompson, Alexander J.; Shianna, Kevin V.; Afdhal, Nezam H.; Hudson, Michael L.; Howell, Charles D.; Talloen, Willem; Bollekens, Jacques; De Wit, Mieke; Scholliers, Annick; Fried, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphisms of IL28B gene are highly associated with sustained virological response (SVR) in patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with peginterferon and ribavirin. Quantitation of Interferon-γ Inducible Protein-10 (IP-10) may also differentiate antiviral response. We evaluated IP-10 levels in pretreatment serum from 115 non-responders and 157 sustained responders in the VIRAHEP-C cohort, including African Americans (AA) and Caucasian Americans (CA). Mean IP-10 was lower in sustained responders compared to non-responders (460 ± 37 pg/ml vs 697 ± 49 pg/ml, p<0.001), both in AA and CA. The positive predictive value of low IP-10 levels (<600 pg/ml) for SVR was 69% while the negative predictive value of high IP-10 levels (>600 pg/ml) was 67%. We assessed the combination of pretreatment IP-10 levels with IL28B genotype as predictors of treatment response. The IL28B polymorphism rs12979860 was tested in 210 participants. CC, CT, or TT genotypes were found in 30%, 49%, and 21%, respectively, with corresponding SVR rates of 87%, 50%, and 39% (p<0.0001). Serum IP-10 levels within the IL28B genotype groups provided additional information regarding the likelihood of SVR (p< 0.0001). CT carriers with low IP-10 had 64% SVR versus 24% with high IP-10. Similarly, a higher SVR rate was identified for TT and CC carriers with low versus high IP-10 (TT: 48% versus 20%, CC: 89% versus 79%). IL28B genotype and baseline IP-10 levels were additive but independent when predicting SVR in both AA and CA. Conclusions When IL28B genotype is combined with pretreatment serum IP-10 measurement, the predictive value for discrimination between SVR and non-response is significantly improved, especially in non-CC genotypes. This relationship warrants further investigation to elucidate mechanisms of antiviral response and prospective validation. PMID:21254158

  1. EVOLUTION OF HEPATIC STEATOSIS IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED HEPATITIS C: RESULTS FROM THE HALT-C TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Anna S.; Everhart, James E.; Chung, Raymond T.; Kim, Hae-Young; Everson, Gregory T.; Hoefs, John C.; Greenson, Joel K.; Sterling, Richard K.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Lee, William M.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Ghany, Marc G.; Morishima, Chihiro

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is a common histologic feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) but there are no large longitudinal studies describing the progression of steatosis in CHC. We examined changes in steatosis on serial biopsies among CHC patients participating in the HALT-C Trial. All 1,050 patients in the trial had advanced fibrosis at baseline biopsy and were documented not to have had a sustained virological response to peginterferon and ribavirin. Most (94%) patients had genotype 1 infection. At least 1 protocol follow-up biopsy was read on 892 patients, and 699 had the last biopsy performed 3.5 years after randomization. At enrollment, 39% had cirrhosis and 61% had bridging fibrosis; 18%, 41%, 31% and 10% had steatosis scores of 0, 1, 2, and 3 or 4, respectively. Mean steatosis score decreased in the follow-up biopsies in both the interferon-treated patients and controls with no effect of treatment assignment (p=0.66). A decrease in steatosis score by ≥1 point was observed in 30% of patients and was associated with both progression to cirrhosis and continued presence of cirrhosis (p=0.02). Compared to patients without decrease in steatosis, those with decrease in steatosis had worse metabolic parameters at enrollment; and were more likely to have decrease in alcohol intake, improvement in metabolic parameters and worsening liver disease (cirrhosis, esophageal varices, and deterioration in liver function). In conclusion, serial biopsies demonstrated that in patients with chronic hepatitis C steatosis recedes during progression from advanced fibrosis to cirrhosis. Decreased alcohol intake and improved metabolic parameters are associated with decline in steatosis and may modulate hepatitis C progression. PMID:19291787

  2. The Impact of IL28B Genotype and Liver Fibrosis on the Hepatic Expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 and Their Association with Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Dybowska, Dorota; Tretyn, Andrzej; Halota, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    The strong impact of interleukin 28B (IL28B) polymorphisms on sustained virological response (SVR) after peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is well-known. We investigated IL28B variability and hepatic expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 in CHC patients, the relation of each with their clinical characteristics, and how they associated with responses to combined therapy. Genotyping and gene expression analysis were conducted in a selected cohort of treatment-naïve patients who underwent interferon and ribavirin treatment. Differential expression of IP10, IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 genes was assessed from pretreatment liver biopsies using quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of liver specimens was performed on the basis of the Scheuer’s modified scale. We showed that hepatic IFI27, ISG15, and MX1 expression was lower in the IL28B CC 12979860 and TT rs8099917 groups than in the CT-TT rs12979860 and TG-GG rs8099917 groups (P < 0.001). We found no differences in IP10 expression between the IL28B genotypes (P > 0.05); in contrast, IP10 expression was significantly affected by the progression of fibrosis (P = 0.007). We showed that the rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with successful treatment when compared to the rs12979860 CT-TT genotype (P = 0.004). Additionally, the expression levels of IP10, IFI27 and ISG15, but not MX1, were significantly higher in non-SVR patients than in SVR patients. The effect of variation in IL28B on the results of IFN-based treatment may be associated with changes in IFI27 and ISG15, but not with IP10. Silencing of IP10 is positive and independent from IL28B prediction of SVR, which is strongly associated with liver fibrosis in CHC patients. PMID:26115415

  3. The Impact of Interleukin 28b Gene Polymorphism on the Virological Response to Combined Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin Therapy in Chronic HCV Genotype 4 Infected Egyptian Patients Using Data Mining Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Marwa; Fouad, Rabab; Mabrouk, Mahassen; El-Akel, Wafaa; Awad, Abu Bakr; Salama, Rabab; Elnegouly, Mayada; Shaker, Olfat

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic HCV represents one of the common causes of chronic liver disease worldwide with Egypt having the highest prevalence, namely genotype 4. Interleukin IL-28B gene polymorphism has been shown to relate to HCV treatment response, mainly in genotype1. Objectives: We aim to evaluate the predictive power of the rs12979860 IL28B SNP and its protein for treatment response in genotype 4 Egyptian patients by regression analysis and decision tree analysis. Patients and Methods: The study included 263 chronic HCV Egyptian patients receiving peg-interferon and ribavirin therapy. Patients were classified into 3 groups; non responders (83patients), relapsers (76patients) and sustained virological responders (104 patients). Serum IL 28 B was performed, DNA was extracted and analyzed by direct sequencing of the SNP rs 12979860 of IL28B gene. Results: CT, CC and TT represented 56 %, 25 % and 19% of the patients, respectively. Absence of C allele (TT genotype) was significantly correlated with the early failure of response while CC was associated with sustained virological response. The decision tree showed that baseline alpha fetoprotein (AFP ≤ 2.68 ng/ml) was the variable of initial split (the strongest predictor of response) confirmed by regression analysis. Patients with TT genotype had the highest probability of failure of response. Conclusions: Absence of the C allele was significantly associated with failure of response. The presence of C allele was associated with a favorable outcome. AFP is a strong baseline predictor of HCV treatment response. A decision tree model is useful for predicting the probability of response to therapy. PMID:24065997

  4. Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for Treatment-Naive Hepatitis C Genotype 1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gui-Qi; Zou, Zhuo-Lin; Zheng, Ji-Na; Chen, Da-Zhi; Zou, Tian-Tian; Shi, Ke-Qing; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2016-03-01

    All possible direct-acting antiviral agent (DAA) regimens for treatment-naive hepatitis C genotype 1 were evaluated by many randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the optimum regimen remains inconclusive. We aim to compare interventions in terms of sustained virological response at 12 (SVR12) and 24 (SVR24) weeks after the end of treatment and adverse effects (AEs) (fatigue, headache, nausea, insomnia). PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for RCTs until July 31, 2015. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) between treatments on clinical outcomes. Twenty-two eligible RCTs were included. Compared with peginterferon-ribavirin (PR), daclatasvir plus PR (OR 8.90, P < 0.001), faldaprevir plus PR (OR 3.72, P < 0.001), simeprevir plus PR (OR 3.59, P < 0.001), sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 4.69, P < 0.001) yield a significant effect in improving SVR12. Consistently, simeprevir plus PR (OR 3.49, P < 0.001), sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 4.51, P < 0.001), daclatasvir plus PR (OR 4.77, P < 0.001) also improved the rates of SVR24 significantly compared with PR. With respect to AEs, compared with PR, ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 2.13, P < 0.001) confer a significant AE in nausea, whereas daclatasvir plus PR (OR 0.20, P < 0.001 and OR 0.18, P < 0.001, respectively) lowered the incidence of fatigue and nausea significantly when compared with ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir plus PR. Daclatasvir plus PR was the most effective in SVR12 and SVR24, but caused an increased AEs profile (headache and insomnia). Combined ledipasvir with sofosbuvir or combination of PR was associated with higher incidence of fatigue and nausea. PMID:26945424

  5. Erdheim Chester Disease treated successfully with cladribine

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh, Natalya; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Gotway, Michael B.; Mookadam, Farouk; Fonseca, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old previously healthy male with a history of progressive fatigue, lower extremity edema, and dyspnea for 4 months was hospitalized with pericardial and pleural effusions (Figure 1A, B). Lung, pleural, and pericardial biopsies were consistent with Erdheim-Chester disease. He was treated with systemic steroids, and ultimately tried on PEG-interferon. He deteriorated clinically and the disease progressed to include CNS manifestations. Ultimately he was treated with Cladribine, at a dose 0.014 mg/kg on day 1, followed by 0.09 mg/kg/day = 6.4 mg IV for 6 additional days. He received 2 further cycles of 0.14 mg kg/day for 7 days (1 month apart). After 3 cycles he improved significantly both clinically and radiographically. Six months post-treatment objective testing showed improvement in cardiac, neurologic, and pulmonary disease. Erdheim Chester Disease (ECD) is a rare non Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Only several hundred cases have been reported in the literature. Treatment for ECD is reserved for those with symptomatic disease, asymptomatic CNS involvement, or evidence of organ dysfunction. There is no standard treatment regimen: Current options include corticosteroids, Interferon alpha (IFN), systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The occurrence of the V600EBRAF mutation in about 50% of patients can make these patients amenable to targeted therapy with BRAF kinase inhibitors (e.g. Vemurafenib). More recently the presence of N/KRAS, and PIK3CA mutations have provided further rational for targeted therapies. The cytokine profile in patients with ECD suggests monocyte activation cladribine, a purine analogue toxic to monocytes, has also been studied as a treatment for ECD, especially in patients who test negative for the BRAF mutation. PMID:27144117

  6. Erdheim Chester Disease treated successfully with cladribine.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, Natalya; Tazelaar, Henry D; Gotway, Michael B; Mookadam, Farouk; Fonseca, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old previously healthy male with a history of progressive fatigue, lower extremity edema, and dyspnea for 4 months was hospitalized with pericardial and pleural effusions (Figure 1A, B). Lung, pleural, and pericardial biopsies were consistent with Erdheim-Chester disease. He was treated with systemic steroids, and ultimately tried on PEG-interferon. He deteriorated clinically and the disease progressed to include CNS manifestations. Ultimately he was treated with Cladribine, at a dose 0.014 mg/kg on day 1, followed by 0.09 mg/kg/day = 6.4 mg IV for 6 additional days. He received 2 further cycles of 0.14 mg kg/day for 7 days (1 month apart). After 3 cycles he improved significantly both clinically and radiographically. Six months post-treatment objective testing showed improvement in cardiac, neurologic, and pulmonary disease. Erdheim Chester Disease (ECD) is a rare non Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Only several hundred cases have been reported in the literature. Treatment for ECD is reserved for those with symptomatic disease, asymptomatic CNS involvement, or evidence of organ dysfunction. There is no standard treatment regimen: Current options include corticosteroids, Interferon alpha (IFN), systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The occurrence of the V600EBRAF mutation in about 50% of patients can make these patients amenable to targeted therapy with BRAF kinase inhibitors (e.g. Vemurafenib). More recently the presence of N/KRAS, and PIK3CA mutations have provided further rational for targeted therapies. The cytokine profile in patients with ECD suggests monocyte activation cladribine, a purine analogue toxic to monocytes, has also been studied as a treatment for ECD, especially in patients who test negative for the BRAF mutation. PMID:27144117

  7. A Systematic Review of Race and Ethnicity in Hepatitis C Clinical Trial Enrollment.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Julius; Saraswathula, Anirudh; Hasselblad, Vic; Muir, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    The African American/Black population in the United States (US) is disproportionately affected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and has lower response rates to current treatments. This analysis evaluates the participation of African American/Blacks in North American and European HCV clinical trials. The data source for this analysis was the PubMed database. Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCT) on HCV treatment with interferon 2a or 2b between January 2000 and December 2011 were reviewed. Inclusion criteria included English language and participants 18 years or older with chronic HCV. Exclusion criteria included non-randomized trials, case reports, cohort studies, ethnic specific studies, or studies not using interferon-alfa or PEG-interferon. Of the 588 trials identified, 314 (53.4%) fit inclusion criteria. The main outcome was the rate of African American/ Black participation in North American HCV clinical trials. A meta-analysis comparing the expected and observed rates was performed. Of the RCT's that met search criteria, 123 (39.2%) reported race. Clinical trials in North America were more likely to report racial data than European trials. Racial reporting increased over time. There was a statistically significant difference among the expected and observed participation of African Americans in HCV clinical trials in North America based on the prevalence of this disease within the population. The burden of HCV among African Americans in North America is not reflected in those clinical trials designed to treat HCV. Research on minority participation in clinical trials and how to increase minority participation in clinical trials is needed. PMID:26928485

  8. Combined therapy with danazol, pegilated interferon, and ribavirin improves thrombocytopenia and liver injury in rats with fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Guillermo Cabrera; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Jimenez-Mendez, Ricardo; Buitimea, Angel Leon; Román, Margarita Bahena; Cortez-Gomez, Rudyard; Esparza, Jorge Reyes; Rodríguez-Fragoso, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of combinations of pegilated-interferon (PEG-IFN), ribavirin, and danazol on thrombocytopenia and liver injury in rats with fibrosis. Male adult Wistar rats were treated with either mineral oil, danazol (0.83 mg/kg per day), PEG-interferon alpha-2a (PEG-IFN, 0.3 microg/ week) + ribavirin (12 mg/kg per day), PEG-IFN + ribavirin + danazol, CCl(4) (4 g/kg for eight weeks), CCl(4) + PEG-IFN + ribavirin, or CCl(4) + PEG-IFN + ribavirin+ danazol. The following assays were conducted: hematology, clinical chemistry, liver function, liver fibrosis, lymphocyte cytokine mRNA expression, and bone-marrow DNA content. Platelet counts were low in sham-treated animals and animals treated with PEG- IFN + ribavirin (30% and 25% respectively; P < 0.05). PEG-IFN + ribavirin + danazol reduced platelet counts of fibrotic animals by only 9% (P < 0.05). PEG- IFN + ribavirin reduced hepatic collagen content by 50%, whereas danazol + PEG-IFN + ribavirin reduced hepatic collagen content by 60% (P < 0.05). PEG-IFN + ribavirin reduced the total bilirubin concentration by 27%, alanine amino transferase (ALT) activity by 75% and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GTP) activity by 74% (P < 0.05). In contrast, danazol + PEG-IFN + ribavirin reduced total bilirubin levels by 61%, alkaline phosphatase activity by 45%, ALT activity by 76%, and gamma-GTP activity by 74% (P < 0.05). The only treatment that increased interleukin 10 (IL-10) mRNA in fibrotic rats was PEG-IFN + ribavirin. However, danazol + PEG-IFN + ribavirin reduced the expression of IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha and transforming growth factor ss. Bone-marrow DNA content was not altered by any treatment. In conclusion, PEG-IFN + ribavirin + danazol could be a new therapeutic option for patients with liver injury, fibrosis, and thrombocytopenia. PMID:18007553

  9. Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Gui-Qi; Zou, Zhuo-Lin; Zheng, Ji-Na; Chen, Da-Zhi; Zou, Tian-Tian; Shi, Ke-Qing; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract All possible direct-acting antiviral agent (DAA) regimens for treatment-naive hepatitis C genotype 1 were evaluated by many randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, the optimum regimen remains inconclusive. We aim to compare interventions in terms of sustained virological response at 12 (SVR12) and 24 (SVR24) weeks after the end of treatment and adverse effects (AEs) (fatigue, headache, nausea, insomnia). PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for RCTs until July 31, 2015. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) between treatments on clinical outcomes. Twenty-two eligible RCTs were included. Compared with peginterferon-ribavirin (PR), daclatasvir plus PR (OR 8.90, P < 0.001), faldaprevir plus PR (OR 3.72, P < 0.001), simeprevir plus PR (OR 3.59, P < 0.001), sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 4.69, P < 0.001) yield a significant effect in improving SVR12. Consistently, simeprevir plus PR (OR 3.49, P < 0.001), sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 4.51, P < 0.001), daclatasvir plus PR (OR 4.77, P < 0.001) also improved the rates of SVR24 significantly compared with PR. With respect to AEs, compared with PR, ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir plus PR (OR 2.13, P < 0.001) confer a significant AE in nausea, whereas daclatasvir plus PR (OR 0.20, P < 0.001 and OR 0.18, P < 0.001, respectively) lowered the incidence of fatigue and nausea significantly when compared with ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir plus PR. Daclatasvir plus PR was the most effective in SVR12 and SVR24, but caused an increased AEs profile (headache and insomnia). Combined ledipasvir with sofosbuvir or combination of PR was associated with higher incidence of fatigue and nausea. PMID:26945424

  10. Dynamic of Mixed HCV Infection in Plasma and PBMC of HIV/HCV Patients Under Treatment With Peg-IFN/Ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Bagaglio, Sabrina; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Di Serio, Clelia; Trentini, Filippo; Andolina, Andrea; Hasson, Hamid; Messina, Emanuela; Merli, Marco; Porrino, Lucy; Lazzarin, Adriano; Morsica, Giulia

    2015-10-01

    The extent of mixed hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype in different compartments (plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell, PBMC) and possible association with treatment efficacy in HIV/HCV coinfected patients remains to be unknown.The objective of this study was to elucidate the frequency of mixed genotype infection (MG), its profile in different compartments during anti-HCV treatment, and the possible influence of different genotypes on the response rate.The compartmentalization of HCV population was investigated by next-generation sequencing in 19 HIV/HCV coinfected patients under anti-HCV treatment with peginterferon/ribavirin (P-R). Ten individuals were nonresponder (NR) or relapser (RE) to P-R treatment and 9 had a sustained virological response (SVR).Eleven/nineteen (58%) patients had MG in plasma compartment. Ten or 12 patients infected by a difficult to treat genotype (DTG) 1 or 4 as dominant strain, had an MG, whereas only 1/7 individuals infected by easy to treat genotype (ETG) harbored a mixed genotype, P = 0.006. HCV-RNA was more frequently detected in PBMC of NR (10/10) than in those of SVR (5/9), P = 0.032. Mixed genotype infection was detected in 6/15 (40%) PBMC-positive cases and was not associated with P-R treatment response. By multivariate analysis, MG in plasma samples was the most important viral factor affecting the treatment response (P = 0.0237).Detection of MG in plasma of HIV/HCV coinfected patients seems to represent the major determinant of response to P-R treatment. This finding may have important clinical implication in light of the new therapeutic approach in HIV/HCV coinfected individuals suggesting that combination treatment with direct acting antivirals could be less effective in MG. PMID:26512601

  11. Antiviral treatment prioritization in HCV-infected patients with extrahepatic manifestations - An Egyptian perspective.

    PubMed

    El-Fishawy, Hussein; Saadi, Gamal; Hassaballa, May; Hussein, Mohamed; Doss, Wahid; Ragab, Gaafar; Barsoum, Rashad

    2016-05-01

    Egypt, the single country with highest incidence of HCV infection in the world, has embarked on a government-sponsored mass treatment program using several combinations of DAAs. Recognizing the importance of extrahepatic manifestations, independently of the hepatic, a subcommittee was assigned to develop national guidelines for respective prioritizing indications and protocols. It evaluated the benefit of treating patients with different extrahepatic manifestations, and reviewed relevant clinical trials and guidelines concerning DAA combinations available in Egypt. The latter included Sofosbuvir plus either peg-interferon, Simeprevir, Ledipasvir or daclatasvir, and the Viekera family comprising paritaprevir/ritonavir + ombitasvir with (GT-1) or without (GT-4) Dasabuvir. Any of these protocols may be used with or without Ribavirin according to indication. A blueprint was subjected to peer debate in dedicated workshops in two national meetings and subsequently to an online professional review, eventually leading to a final report that was adopted by the health authorities. Seven compelling and 10 optional indications were identified for treating patients with predominantly extrahepatic manifestations. The former include kidney disease at different stages, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Selected treatment protocols, were encoded and their use was prioritized on the basis of evidence of efficacy and safety. We concluded that any of the studied protocols may be used, preferably with ribavirin, for 12-week treatment in all patients with extrahepatic manifestations without cirrhosis and with eGFR above 30 ml/min/1.73 sqm. Ribavirin should be included in protocols for treating patients with compensated cirrhosis. Daclatasvir-based protocols are recommended for decompensated cirrhosis, while the Viekera family is recommended in patients with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 sqm, including those on dialysis. In kidney-transplanted patents, caution is due

  12. Racial Differences in Hepatitis C Treatment Eligibility

    PubMed Central

    Melia, Michael T.; Muir, Andrew J.; McCone, Jonathan; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; King, John W.; Herrine, Steven K.; Galler, Greg W.; Bloomer, Joseph R.; Nunes, Frederick A.; Brown, Kimberly A.; Mullen, Kevin D.; Ravendhran, Natarajan; Ghalib, Reem H.; Boparai, Navdeep; Jiang, Ruiyun; Noviello, Stephanie; Brass, Clifford A.; Albrecht, Janice K.; McHutchison, John G.; Sulkowski, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Black Americans are disproportionally infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and are less likely than whites to respond to treatment with peginterferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV). The impact of race on HCV treatment eligibility is unknown. We therefore performed a retrospective analysis of a phase 3B multicenter clinical trial conducted at 118 United States community and academic medical centers to evaluate the rates of and reasons for HCV treatment ineligibility according to self-reported race. In all, 4,469 patients were screened, of whom 1,038 (23.2%) were treatment ineligible. Although blacks represented 19% of treated patients, they were more likely not to be treated due to ineligibility and/or failure to complete required evaluations (40.2%) than were nonblack patients (28.5%; P < 0.001). After the exclusion of persons not treated due to undetectable HCV RNA or nongenotype 1 infection, blacks were 65% less likely than nonblacks to be eligible for treatment (28.1% > 17.0%; relative risk, 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.46–1.87; P< 0.001). Blacks were more likely to be ineligible due to neutropenia (14% versus 3%, P < 0.001), anemia (7% versus 4%, P = 0.02), elevated glucose (8% versus 3%, P < 0.001), and elevated creatinine (5% versus 1%, P < 0.001). Conclusion Largely due to a higher prevalence of neutropenia and uncontrolled medical conditions, blacks were significantly less likely to be eligible for HCV treatment. Increased access to treatment may be facilitated by less conservative neutrophil requirements and more effective care for chronic diseases, namely, diabetes and renal insufficiency. PMID:21488082

  13. Naturally occurring dominant resistance mutations to HCV protease and polymerase inhibitors in treatment-naïve patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuntzen, Thomas; Timm, Joerg; Berical, Andrew; Lennon, Niall; Berlin, Aaron M.; Young, Sarah K.; Lee, Bongshin; Heckerman, David; Carlson, Jonathan; Reyor, Laura L.; Kleyman, Marianna; McMahon, Cory M.; Birch, Christopher; Wiesch, Julian Schulze zur; Ledlie, Timothy; Koehrsen, Michael; Kodira, Chinnappa; Roberts, Andrew D.; Lauer, Georg M.; Rosen, Hugo R.; Bihl, Florian; Cerny, Andreas; Spengler, Ulrich; Liu, Zhimin; Kim, Arthur Y.; Xing, Yanming; Schneidewind, Arne; Madey, Margaret A.; Fleckenstein, Jaquelyn F.; Park, Vicki M.; Galagan, James E.; Nusbaum, Chad; Walker, Bruce D.; Lake-Bakaar, Gerond V.; Daar, Eric S.; Jacobson, Ira M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Edlin, Brian R.; Donfield, Sharyne M.; Chung, Raymond T.; Talal, Andrew H.; Marion, Tony; Birren, Bruce W.; Henn, Matthew R.; Allen, Todd M.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance mutations to HCV NS3 protease inhibitors in <1% of the viral quasispecies may still allow >1000-fold viral load reductions upon treatment, consistent with their reported reduced replicative fitness in vitro. Recently, however, an R155K protease mutation was reported as the dominant quasispecies in a treatment-naïve individual, raising concerns about possible full drug resistance. To investigate the prevalence of dominant STAT-C resistance mutations in the population we analyzed HCV genome sequences from 507 treatment-naïve HCV genotype 1 infected patients from the US, Germany and Switzerland. Phylogenetic sequence analysis and viral load data were used to identify the possible spread of replication competent, drug resistant viral strains in the population and to infer the consequences of these mutations upon viral replication in vivo. Mutations described to confer resistance to the protease inhibitors Telaprevir, BILN2061, ITMN-191, SCH6 and Boceprevir, the NS5B polymerase inhibitor AG-021541, and to the NS4A antagonist ACH-806 were observed mostly as sporadic, unrelated cases, at frequencies between 0.3% and 2.8% in the population, including two patients with possible multi-drug resistance. Collectively, however, 8.6% of the genotype 1a and 1.4% of the genotype 1b infected patients carried at least one dominant resistance mutation. Viral loads were high in the majority of these patients, suggesting that drug resistant viral strains might achieve replication levels comparable to non-resistant viruses in vivo. Conclusion: Naturally occurring dominant STAT-C resistance mutations are common in HCV genotype 1 infected treatment-naïve patients. Their influence on treatment outcome should further be characterized to evaluate possible benefits of drug resistance testing for individual tailoring of drug combinations when treatment options are limited due to previous non-response to peginterferon and ribavirin. PMID:19026009

  14. Protease inhibitors partially overcome the interferon nonresponse phenotype in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Rojo, A; Fischer, S E; Adeyi, O; Zita, D; Deneke, M G; Selzner, N; Chen, L; Malespin, M; Cotler, S J; McGilvray, I D; Feld, J J

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of triple therapy with protease inhibitors (PI) depends on the intrinsic response to interferon. Interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression differs by cell type in the liver and is a strong predictor of interferon responsiveness. Patients who respond well to interferon have low/absent ISG expression in hepatocytes but significant ISG expression in macrophages. Nonresponders (NRs) show the opposite pattern. We aimed to determine the association between cell-type-specific ISG staining and treatment outcome with PI-based triple therapy. Liver biopsy tissue from consecutive patients treated with boceprevir or telaprevir with peginterferon and ribavirin was stained for myxovirus A (MxA). Staining was scored 0-3 in macrophages (M-MxA) and hepatocytes (H-MxA), and IL28B genotyping was performed. Of 56 patients included 41 achieved SVR (73%) (sustained virological response), 2 (4%) relapsed, 10 (18%) were NRs, and 3 (5%) were lost to follow-up. Median M-MxA staining was stronger and H-MxA staining was weaker in patients who achieved SVR. MxA staining correlated with IL28B genotype and with the HCV RNA decline during lead-in phase. However, unlike with dual therapy, the negative predictive value (NPV) of absent or weak M-MxA staining was poor (42%), while the positive predictive value improved (93%). Although by multivariable logistic regression M-MxA staining was significantly associated with SVR (OR 4.35, 1.32-14.28, P = 0.012), the predictive ability was inadequate to withhold therapy. The interaction between macrophages and hepatocytes plays a critical role in interferon responsiveness; however, the addition of a PI at least partially overcomes the interferon nonresponse phenotype making the predictive ability of ISG staining less clinically useful. PMID:26710754

  15. Steatosis and insulin resistance in hepatitis C: a way out for the virus?

    PubMed

    Del Campo, José A; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2009-10-28

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces lipid accumulation in vitro and in vivo. The pathogenesis of steatosis is due to both viral and host factors. Viral steatosis is mostly reported in patients with genotype 3a, whereas metabolic steatosis is often associated with genotype 1 and metabolic syndrome. Several molecular mechanisms responsible for steatosis have been associated with the HCV core protein, which is able to induce gene expression and activity of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), increasing the transcription of genes involved in hepatic fatty acid synthesis. Steatosis has been also implicated in viral replication. In infected cells, HCV core protein is targeted to lipid droplets which serve as intracellular storage organelles. These studies have shown that lipid droplets are essential for virus assembly. Thus, HCV promotes steatosis as an efficient mechanism for stable viral replication. Chronic HCV infection can also induce insulin resistance. In patients with HCV, insulin resistance is more strongly associated with viral load than visceral obesity. HCV seems to lead to insulin resistance through interference of intracellular insulin signalling by HCV proteins, mainly, the serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1) and impairment of the downstream Akt signalling pathway. The HCV core protein interferes with in vitro insulin signalling by genotype-specific mechanisms, where the role of suppressor of cytokine signal 7 (SOCS-7) in genotype 3a and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in genotype 1 in IRS-1 downregulation play key roles. Steatosis and insulin resistance have been associated with fibrosis progression and a reduced rate of sustained response to peginterferon plus ribavirin. PMID:19859993

  16. Predictors of consent to pharmacogenomics testing in the IDEAL study

    PubMed Central

    Jazwinski, Alison B.; Clark, Paul J; Thompson, Alexander J; Gordon, Stuart C.; Lawitz, Eric J; Noviello, Stephanie; Brass, Clifford A; Pedicone, Lisa D; Albrecht, Janice K; Sulkowski, Mark S; Muir, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenomic (PG) testing is important in developing individualized therapeutic approaches. In the phase 3 IDEAL clinical trial, a subset of patients receiving peginterferon and ribavirin for treatment of chronic hepatitis C agreed to provide blood samples for genetic testing. Genome-wide association studies subsequently identified associations between IL28B polymorphism and sustained virologic response, and ITPA polymorphism and ribavirin-associated anemia. Objective To characterize the groups of patients who accepted or declined PG testing in the IDEAL study. Methods Clinical and demographic factors and treatment outcomes were compared at all sites that had approved PG testing. Differences between patients who consented to and declined PG testing were analyzed using Student t and chi-square tests. Results In total, 109 of 118 sites participated in the PG sub-study, and 1674 of 2949 (57%) patients enrolled at these sites consented to PG testing. More patients treated in academic medical centers than in community centers (60% vs. 52%, P < 0.001) provided consent. More males than females (58% vs. 54%, P = 0.04) consented to PG testing. There was no significant difference in PG participation between patients from different racial groups, including whites and African Americans (58% vs. 54%, P = 0.07). Treatment outcomes were also similar according to PG participation. Conclusions In the IDEAL study, patient consent to PG testing did not introduce selection bias. Treatment at an academic center and male gender were associated with higher rates of PG testing consent. Efficacy and safety outcomes were similar in patients who accepted and declined PG testing. PMID:24061202

  17. Costs and outcomes of treating chronic hepatitis C patients in routine care - results from a nationwide multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Stahmeyer, J T; Krauth, C; Bert, F; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, H; Alshuth, U; Hüppe, D; Mauss, S; Rossol, S

    2016-02-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. Long-term consequences are the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of the study was to assess outcomes and costs of treating patients with chronic hepatitis C in clinical practice in Germany. We carried out a prospective noninterventional study. Information on treatment outcomes, resource utilization and quality of life was provided by 281 physicians throughout Germany. Data of 3708 monoinfected HCV-patients treated between 2008 and 2011 were analysed. Therapy consisted of peginterferon/ribavirin. Mean age of patients was 43.7 years, 60.3% were male and estimated duration of infection was 13.6 years. Predominantly genotype 1 (61.3%) or 3 (28.5%) infections were observed. Sustained viral response (SVR)-rates in most frequently observed genotypes were 49.2% in GT-1 and 61.9% in GT-3 treatment-naive patients (Relapser: GT-1: 35.3% and GT-3: 57.3%; Nonresponder: GT-1: 25.0% and GT-3: 33.3%). Average treatment costs were lowest in treatment-naive patients (€18 965) and higher in patients who failed previous treatments (relapsers: €24 753; nonresponders: €19 511). Differences according to genotype were observed. Average costs per SVR in treatment-naive patients were €44 744 for GT-1 and €22 218 for GT-3. Treatment was associated with a decrease in quality of life; post-treatment quality of life was higher in patients achieving SVR. Our insight on real-life treatment outcomes and costs can serve as a reference for a comparison with other treatments. There is high need for short-term and long-term cost-effectiveness analysis in real-life settings as newly introduced treatment strategies with direct acting antivirals result in high SVR-rates but are more costly. PMID:26411532

  18. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis 2015.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hiroshi; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Sakaida, Isao; Shibuya, Akitaka; Seike, Masataka; Nagoshi, Sumiko; Segawa, Makoto; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Kato, Akinobu; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Michitaka, Kojiro; Murawaki, Toshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis in 2015. Eighty-three clinical questions were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases for the period between 1983 and June 2012. Manual searching of the latest important literature was added until August 2015. The guidelines were developed with use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This digest version in English introduces selected clinical questions and statements related to the management of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Branched-chain amino acids relieve hypoalbuminemia and hepatic encephalopathy and improve quality of life. Nucleoside analogues and peginterferon plus ribavirin combination therapy improve the prognosis of patients with hepatitis B virus related liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C related compensated liver cirrhosis, respectively, although the latter therapy may be replaced by direct-acting antivirals. For liver cirrhosis caused by primary biliary cirrhosis and active autoimmune hepatitis, urosodeoxycholic acid and steroid are recommended, respectively. The most adequate modalities for the management of variceal bleeding are the endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices and the balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration following endoscopic obturation with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices. Beta-blockers are useful for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. The V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan is a useful add-on therapy in careful diuretic therapy for ascites. Albumin infusion is useful for the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory disturbance and renal failure. In addition to disaccharides, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin is useful for the management of encephalopathy. Anticoagulation therapy is proposed for

  19. Novel Cell-Based Hepatitis C Virus Infection Assay for Quantitative High-Throughput Screening of Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zongyi; Lan, Keng-Hsin; He, Shanshan; Swaroop, Manju; Hu, Xin; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has advanced with the recent approval of direct-acting antivirals in combination with peginterferon and ribavirin. New antivirals with novel targets are still needed to further improve the treatment of hepatitis C. Previously reported screening methods for HCV inhibitors either are limited to a virus-specific function or apply a screening method at a single dose, which usually leads to high false-positive or -negative rates. We developed a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) assay platform with a cell-based HCV infection system. This highly sensitive assay can be miniaturized to a 1,536-well format for screening of large chemical libraries. All candidates are screened over a 7-concentration dose range to give EC50s (compound concentrations at 50% efficacy) and dose-response curves. Using this assay format, we screened a library of pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC). Based on the profile of dose-dependent curves of HCV inhibition and cytotoxicity, 22 compounds with adequate curves and EC50s of <10 μM were selected for validation. In two additional independent assays, 17 of them demonstrated specific inhibition of HCV infection. Ten potential candidates with efficacies of >70% and CC50s (compound concentrations at 50% cytotoxicity) of <30 μM from these validated hits were characterized for their target stages in the HCV replication cycle. In this screen, we identified both known and novel hits with diverse structural and functional features targeting various stages of the HCV replication cycle. The pilot screen demonstrates that this assay system is highly robust and effective in identifying novel HCV inhibitors and that it can be readily applied to large-scale screening of small-molecule libraries. PMID:24277038

  20. Comparison of Therapeutic Response and Clinical Outcome between HCV Patients with Normal and Abnormal Alanine Transaminase Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Kung; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Tseng, Po-Lin; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Chien-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Lin, Ming-Tsung; Yen, Yi-Hao; Hung, Chao-Hung; Hu, Tsung-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Patients with chronic hepatitic C (HCV) infection and normal serum alanine transaminase (ALT) levels were considered to have mild disease. In Taiwan, these patients were not suggested for interferon (IFN) based therapies. The aim of study is to compare therapeutic outcomes between HCV patients with normal and elevated ALT levels. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on 3241 HCV patients treated by IFN based therapies. Patients with normal ALT levels were classified as group A (n = 186) while those with elevated ALT levels were group B (n = 3055). Results At baseline, incidence of diabetes mellitus, low platelet counts and cirrhosis were significantly higher in group B patients. The sustained virologic response (SVR) rate was comparable between the 2 groups (65.3% vs. 65.3%, P = .993). But significantly higher incidence of HCC development after HCV treatment was observed in group B (7.4% vs. 3.2%, P = .032). No significant differences with respect to the outcome of liver decompensation, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and mortality were noted between 2 groups. Multivariate analysis showed younger age, female gender, non-HCV genotype 1, lower viral load, higher platelet counts and non-cirrhosis were favorable factors for achieving SVR, rather than ALT levels. Further analysis revealed older age, cirrhosis, lower platelet levels and non- peg-interferon treatment are risk factors of HCC development. Conclusions HCV patients with normal ALT levels had similar response to antiviral therapy and low rate of HCC development after therapy. Antiviral therapies begun at early course of HCV infection may be beneficial to prevent disease progression. PMID:26968010

  1. Antiviral treatment prioritization in HCV-infected patients with extrahepatic manifestations – An Egyptian perspective

    PubMed Central

    El-Fishawy, Hussein; Saadi, Gamal; Hassaballa, May; Hussein, Mohamed; Doss, Wahid; Ragab, Gaafar; Barsoum, Rashad

    2016-01-01

    Egypt, the single country with highest incidence of HCV infection in the world, has embarked on a government-sponsored mass treatment program using several combinations of DAAs. Recognizing the importance of extrahepatic manifestations, independently of the hepatic, a subcommittee was assigned to develop national guidelines for respective prioritizing indications and protocols. It evaluated the benefit of treating patients with different extrahepatic manifestations, and reviewed relevant clinical trials and guidelines concerning DAA combinations available in Egypt. The latter included Sofosbuvir plus either peg-interferon, Simeprevir, Ledipasvir or daclatasvir, and the Viekera family comprising paritaprevir/ritonavir + ombitasvir with (GT-1) or without (GT-4) Dasabuvir. Any of these protocols may be used with or without Ribavirin according to indication. A blueprint was subjected to peer debate in dedicated workshops in two national meetings and subsequently to an online professional review, eventually leading to a final report that was adopted by the health authorities. Seven compelling and 10 optional indications were identified for treating patients with predominantly extrahepatic manifestations. The former include kidney disease at different stages, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Selected treatment protocols, were encoded and their use was prioritized on the basis of evidence of efficacy and safety. We concluded that any of the studied protocols may be used, preferably with ribavirin, for 12-week treatment in all patients with extrahepatic manifestations without cirrhosis and with eGFR above 30 ml/min/1.73 sqm. Ribavirin should be included in protocols for treating patients with compensated cirrhosis. Daclatasvir-based protocols are recommended for decompensated cirrhosis, while the Viekera family is recommended in patients with eGFR < 30 ml/min/1.73 sqm, including those on dialysis. In kidney-transplanted patents, caution is due

  2. GB virus C (GBV-C) infection in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Influence on liver disease and on hepatitis virus behaviour: effect of interferon alfa therapy.

    PubMed

    Pawlotsky, J M; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Muerhoff, A S; Pellerin, M; Germanidis, G; Desai, S M; Bastie, A; Darthuy, F; Rémiré, J; Zafrani, E S; Soussy, C J; Mushahwar, I K; Dhumeaux, D

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in patients with chronic hepatitis C, 1) the prevalence and the epidemiological characteristics of GB virus C (GBV-C) infection, 2) the influence of GBV-C on hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, 3) the pathogenicity of GBV-C in the absence of treatment and under interferon therapy, and 4) the effect of interferon alfa on GBV-C and HCV replications. One hundred fifteen patients with chronic hepatitis C were studied. Before treatment, they were tested for GBV-C RNA by PCR and GBV-C genotype was determined for positive samples. Pretreatment information was collected, including age, gender, source of HCV, estimated duration of HCV infection, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activities, cirrhosis and Knodell's score on liver biopsy, HCV genotype, HCV viral burden and anti-HCV core IgM antibodies. The genetic complexity of the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of HCV was studied by PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism. All patients were treated with 3 to 9 mega units of interferon alfa-2a three times per week for 3 to 6 months. The influence of GBV-C on the evolution of ALT and HCV replication during and after treatment was studied, and GBV-C and HCV RNA were monitored monthly by PCR during this period. Eighteen patients (16%) were GBV-C RNA-positive. Among 11 samples studied, GBV-C genotype 2a was present in 9 cases, 2b in one case and type 3 in one case. GBV-C RNA-positive patients were significantly younger than GBV-C RNA-negative ones (38.4 +/- 11.5 vs. 47.4 +/- 14.0, P = 0.012), a result independent of the route of transmission and the disease duration. No difference between GBV-C RNA-positive and -negative patients was found for other epidemiological parameters (e.g. gender, risk factor for parenteral viral infections, disease duration and HCV genotypes), or for the characteristics of HCV infection and related liver disease (e.g. HCV RNA level, genetic complexity of the HVR1, anti-HCV core Ig

  3. Multicenter Experience with Boceprevir or Telaprevir to Treat Hepatitis C Recurrence after Liver Transplantation: When Present Becomes Past, What Lessons for Future?

    PubMed Central

    Coilly, Audrey; Dumortier, Jérôme; Botta-Fridlund, Danielle; Latournerie, Marianne; Leroy, Vincent; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Agostini, Hélène; Giostra, Emiliano; Moreno, Christophe; Roche, Bruno; Antonini, Teresa Maria; Guillaud, Olivier; Lebray, Pascal; Radenne, Sylvie; Saouli, Anne-Catherine; Calmus, Yvon; Alric, Laurent; Debette-Gratien, Maryline; De Ledinghen, Victor; Durand, François; Duvoux, Christophe; Samuel, Didier; Duclos-Vallée, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims First generation protease inhibitors (PI) with peg-interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) have been the only therapy available for hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection in most countries for 3 years. We have investigated the efficacy and tolerance of this triple therapy in transplanted patients experiencing a recurrence of HCV infection on the liver graft. Patients This cohort study enrolled 81 liver transplant patients (Male: 76%, mean age: 55.8±9.7 years) with severe HCV recurrence (F3 or F4: n = 34 (42%), treatment experienced: n = 44 (54%)), treated with boceprevir (n = 36; 44%) or telaprevir (n = 45; 56%). We assessed the percentages of patients with sustained virological responses 24 weeks after therapy (SVR24), and safety. Results The SVR24 rate was 47% (telaprevir: 42%; boceprevir: 53%, P = ns). At baseline, a normal bilirubin level (p = 0.0145) and albumin level >35g/L (p = 0.0372) and an initial RBV dosage of ≥800 mg/day (p = 0.0033) predicted SVR24. During treatment, achieving an early virological response after 12 weeks was the strongest independent factor to predict SVR24 (p<0.0001). A premature discontinuation of anti-HCV therapy due to a serious adverse event (SAE) was observed in 22 patients (27%). Hematological toxicity, infections and deaths were observed in 95%, 28% and 7% of patients, respectively. A history of post-LT antiviral therapy and thrombocytopenia (<50G/L) during treatment were both independent predictors of the occurrence of infections or SAE (p = 0.0169 and p = 0.011). Conclusions The use of first generation PI after liver transplantation enabled an SVR24 rate of 47% in genotype 1 patients, but induced a high rate of SAE. The identification of predictive factors for a response to treatment, and the occurrence of SAE, have enabled us to establish limits for the use of this anti-HCV therapy in the transplant setting. PMID:26394142

  4. Boceprevir in chronic hepatitis C infection: a perspective review.

    PubMed

    Ascione, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Boceprevir (Victrelis), from the oral α-ketoamide class of slow-binding reversible hepatitis C virus (HCV)-NS3 protease inhibitors, creates a new class of drugs: direct acting antivirals (DDAs). Boceprevir is highly selective against HCV serine protease. Its use is restricted to genotype 1 HCV infection and it must not be used as monotherapy. Boceprevir is given orally, rapidly absorbed, reaching plasma peak concentration within 1-2 h and is metabolized by aldo-ketoreductase and partly by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP3A4/5. Administration with drugs that induce or inhibit CYP3A4/5 could decrease or increase its plasma concentration. The optimal dosage is 800 mg three times daily; capsules should be taken with food. Boceprevir was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and is indicated in combination with peginterferon plus ribavirin for the treatment of patients with genotype 1 HCV who have not received previous treatment or whose condition has failed to respond to previous therapy. In the Serine Protease Inhibitor Therapy 2 (SPRINT-2) trial (treatment-naïve patients) and RESPOND-2 trial (patients whose condition relapsed or did not respond to previous treatment), the boceprevir-containing regimen was always more effective than standard of care (SOC). Adverse events were similar in the treatment groups, but in the boceprevir treated group, anemia was more frequent, requiring erythropoietin in nearly 40% of cases. Discontinuation of therapy because of adverse events was identical in all treated groups. As for cost effectiveness, two studies showed that boceprevir plus SOC is cost effective with regard to the lifetime incidence of liver complications, quality of life years, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The management of this therapy is more complex than before for physicians and patients. The educational role of the physician is crucial for successful therapy and counseling should be carefully given

  5. Variants in Interferon-α Pathway Genes and Response to Pegylated-Interferon-α2a plus Ribavirin for Treatment of Chronic HCV Infection in the HALT-C Trial

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Tania Mara; Morgan, Timothy R.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Naishadham, Deepa; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Hutchinson, Amy A.; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Bashirova, Arman; Carrington, Mary; Dotrang, Myhanh; Sterling, Richard K.; Lindsay, Karen L.; Fontana, Robert J.; Lee, William M.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Ghany, Marc G.; Gretch, David R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Raymond T.; O’Brien, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    Combination treatment with pegylated-interferon-α and ribavirin, the current recommended therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, results in a sustained virological response (SVR) in only about half of patients. Because genes involved in the interferon-α pathway may affect anti-viral responses, we analyzed the relationship between variants in these genes and SVR among participants in the HALT-C trial. Patients had advanced chronic hepatitis C and had previously failed to respond to interferon-based treatment. Participants were treated with peginterferon-α2a and ribavirin during the trial. Subjects with undetectable HCV RNA at week 72 were considered to have had an SVR. Subjects with detectable HCV RNA at week 20 were considered non-responders. We used TaqMan assays to genotype 56 polymorphisms found in 13 genes in the interferon-α pathway. This analysis compares genotypes for participants with an SVR to non-responders. The primary analysis was restricted to European American participants because a priori statistical power was low among the small number (n=131) of African American patients. We used logistic regression to control the effect of other variables that are associated with treatment response. Among 581 European American patients, SVR was associated with IFNAR1 IVS1-22G (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.57; p=0.02); IFNAR2 Ex2-33C (aOR, 2.09; p=0.02); JAK1 IVS22+112T (aOR, 1.66; p=0.04); and ADAR Ex9+14A (aOR, 1.67; p=0.03). For the TYK2 -2256A promoter region variant a borderline association was present among European American participants (OR, 1.51; p=0.05) and a strong relationship among African American patients; all 10 with SVR who were genotyped for TYK2-2256 carried the A variant compared to 68/120 (57%) non-responders (p=0.006). In conclusion, genetic polymorphisms in the interferon-α pathway may affect responses to antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C. PMID:19434718

  6. Hepatitis C Viral Kinetic Changes in a Retrospective Cohort Study of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Egyptian Patients on Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Esmat, Gamal Eldeen; Al Akel, Wafa; Abdel Aziz, Rasha Ahmed; Al Sayed Taha, Ahmed; Sabry, Dina; Rashed, Laila A; Mostafa, Aya; El Kazaz, Amany Y; Ahmed, Sahar H

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of the kinetics of antiviral response compared to baseline host and virological factors for predicting treatment outcome. A retrospective analysis of 285 chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients, encompassing genotypes 4 treated with peginterferon alpha-2a and ribavirin, was performed. Baseline characteristics were compared across HCV genotypes and pretreatment factors associated with rapid virological response (RVR) were identified. The relative significance of RVR compared to other baseline factors for predicting sustained virological response was analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Ninety-seven percent of the patients harbored HCV genotype 4a patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) of RVR for end-of-treatment response (ETR) was 88% and of early virological response (EVR) was 85%, which means that achievement of both RVR and EVR is a good positive predictive factor of response. The negative predictive value (NPV) of RVR for ETR was low and equals 26.77%, which means that approximately two-thirds of patients were able to achieve ETR despite not experiencing RVR, which means RVR is a bad negative predictive factor of response. The NPV of EVR for ETR was high and equals 90%, which means that only 10% of patients were able to achieve an ETR despite not experiencing EVR, which explains that EVR is a very good negative predictive factor of response. In univariate logistic regression analysis, which included the following: female gender, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, α-fetoprotein, baseline HCV-RNA levels, grade of activity, stage of fibrosis, and positive HCV-RNA, by polymerase chain reaction at week 4, none of the previous factors was a significant independent factor of failure of response to treatment. The current study demonstrated that a viremia at week 4 has a good PPV, but it has a very low NPV. The NPV of EVR was more robust for ETR (90%). EVR is regarded as

  7. German cohort of HCV mono-infected and HCV/HIV co-infected patients reveals relative under-treatment of co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current German and European HIV guidelines recommend early evaluation of HCV treatment in all HIV/HCV co-infected patients. However, there are still considerable barriers to initiate HCV therapy in everyday clinical practice. This study evaluates baseline characteristics, “intention-to-treat” pattern and outcome of therapy of HCV/HIV co-infected patients in direct comparison to HCV mono-infected patients in a “real-life” setting. Methods A large, single-center cohort of 172 unselected HCV patients seen at the Infectious Diseases Unit at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf from 2000–2011, 88 of whom HCV/HIV co-infected, was retrospectively analyzed by chart review with special focus on demographic, clinical and virologic aspects as well as treatment outcome. Results Antiviral HCV combination therapy with PEG-interferon plus weight-adapted ribavirin was initiated in 88/172 (52%) patients of the entire cohort and in n = 36 (40%) of all HCV/HIV co-infected patients (group A) compared to n = 52 (61%) of the HCV mono-infected group (group B) (p = 0.006). There were no significant differences of the demographics or severity of the liver disease between the two groups with the exception of slightly higher baseline viral loads in group A. A sustained virologic response (SVR) was observed in 50% (n = 18) of all treated HIV/HCV co-infected patients versus 52% (n = 27) of all treated HCV mono-infected patients (p = 0.859). Genotype 1 was the most frequent genotype in both groups (group A: n = 37, group B: n = 49) and the SVR rates for these patients were only slightly lower in the group of co-infected patients (group A: n = 33%, group B: 40% p = 0.626). During the course of treatment HCV/HIV co-infected patients received less ribavirin than mono-infected patients. Conclusion Overall, treatment was only initiated in half of the patients of the entire cohort and in an even smaller proportion of HCV/HIV co

  8. Anti-Viral Therapy and Decreased Sexual Desire in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Su, Kuan-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peg-interferon (PegIFN)α2a or PegIFNα2b plus ribavirin (RBV) is the standard therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Taiwan and Asia. It is commonly associated with adverse effects, but the issue of sexual and mental health is not well reported. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of anti-viral therapy with PegIFNα plus RBV on sexual desire and depression. Methods This prospective cohort study from 2009 to 2014 enrolled 181 patients with HCV who received PegIFNα2a (180 mcg/week) or PegIFNα2b (1.5 mcg/Kg/week) plus RBV (800–1200 mg/day) according to response-guide therapy for 24 to 48 weeks in a tertiary medical center. Patients with decreased sexual desire (DSD) before PegIFNα plus RBV were excluded. Patients were evaluated at baseline (week 0) and after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 weeks of PegIFNα plus RBV treatment using the structured Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, for the diagnosis of a major depressive episode, and the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), for monitoring depressive symptoms. The 21st item of the BDI was used to evaluate DSD. Results During therapy, 124 (68.5%) patients had DSD. The BDI score peaked at 14.8 weeks. The severity of DSD was greatest at 16 weeks of treatment. The average score of the 21st item of the BDI correlated with DSD. Depression history and the prevalence of subsequent major depressive disorder after anti-viral therapy was correlated to DSD (p = 0.05 and 0.001). Male patients complained of DSD more significantly than females (p = 0.031). Conclusions Decreased sexual desire is common but is usually neglected in patients with chronic hepatitis C undergoing anti-viral therapy, especially among male patients. Physicians must be monitoring the side effects of sexual health and depression. PMID:27505293

  9. Safety and Efficacy of Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir Plus Dasabuvir With or Without Ribavirin in HCV-Infected Patients Taking Concomitant Acid-Reducing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Mitchell L; Rustgi, Vinod; Bennett, Michael; Forns, Xavier; Asselah, Tarik; Planas Vila, Ramon; Liu, Li; Pedrosa, Marcos; Moller, Jonathan; Reau, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acid-reducing agents (ARAs) and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) that increase gastric pH can alter the bioavailability of antiviral drugs, particularly relevant in patients with advanced liver disease caused by chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection seeking therapy. Using integrated data from six phase 3 studies, we report the safety and efficacy of the 3-direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimen containing ombitasvir (OBV, an NS5A inhibitor), ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir (PTV/r, an NS3/4A protease inhibitor), and dasabuvir (DSV, an NS5B polymerase inhibitor) with or without ribavirin (RBV) for HCV genotype 1 patients taking concomitant ARAs and PPIs. METHODS: Treatment-naïve or peginterferon/RBV treatment-experienced patients with or without compensated cirrhosis received OBV/PTV/r and DSV with or without weight-based RBV. Rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), defined as HCV RNA below the lower limit of quantification, 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) and safety were evaluated in patients who were receiving concomitant ARAs. RESULTS: Among 2,053 patients enrolled and dosed with study drug, 410 (20%) were receiving concomitant ARAs; of these, 308 (15%) were taking concomitant PPIs. Rates of SVR12 were 95.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 93.5–97.4%) among patients receiving an ARA, and 96.3% (95% CI 95.3–97.2%) in patients not receiving a concomitant ARA. Similarly, among patients receiving a PPI or not, SVR12 was achieved in 95.1% (95% CI 92.1–97.0%) and 96.4% (95% CI 95.5–97.2%), respectively. Response rates were high regardless of treatment regimen (with or without RBV), and among patients receiving a standard or high dose of PPIs. Regarding safety, adverse events and serious adverse events were more frequently reported in patients taking concomitant ARAs, though baseline population differences may have played a role. CONCLUSIONS: In phase 3 trials of OBV/PTV/r plus DSV and RBV in HCV genotype 1-infected patients, SVR12 rates were high

  10. Most Patients of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in India Present Late for Interferon-Based Antiviral Treatment: An Epidemiological Study of 777 Patients from a North Indian Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Ashish; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Singla, Vikas; Arora, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Background Interferon-based antiviral therapy is offered only to those HCV patients who have either chronic hepatitis or early cirrhosis. Advanced cirrhotics do not tolerate interferon-based therapy. Since HCV is asymptomatic in early stages and usually presents late, the eligibility for interferon-based therapy is thus limited. There are scarce studies from India, which looked specifically the eligibility of interferon-based therapy in HCV patients. Aim To study the spectrum of presentation of HCV infection, determine their eligibility for interferon-based therapy, and follow for SVR. Methods The records of all consecutive patients of HCV, >14 years age, who presented to our department between 2008 and 2014, were analyzed for categorization into chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients with detectable HCV RNA who have chronic hepatitis or Child A cirrhosis were considered eligible for Peg-interferon and ribavirin. Patients who received treatment were followed for SVR. Results 777 patients (median age 49 [range 15–95] years, males 69%) were included. Cirrhosis was the most common presentation (56%, 439/777) followed by chronic hepatitis (37%, 287/777) and HCC (7%, 51/777). Of patients who had cirrhosis (including those with HCC), 36% (174/490) were Child A; 51% (250/490) were Child B and 14% (66/490) were Child C. Only 347/777 (45%) were eligible for Peg-interferon-alpha and Ribavirin. Among the remaining 430 patients, in 326 (76%) the disease was far too advanced. Of eligible patients only 54% actually received Peg-interferon-alpha and Ribavirin and 81% patients could complete the course. Of them only 70% could achieve SVR. Conclusions Most HCV patients in India present late and only about 45% are eligible for Interferon-based antiviral treatment. At presentation 56% patients already have cirrhosis and 7% have HCC. Since HCV is usually asymptomatic in early stages, awareness about screening should be increased so that more patients are

  11. Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin for Hepatitis C in Patients with HIV-1 Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, Mark S.; Naggie, Susanna; Lalezari, Jacob; Fessel, Walford Jeffrey; Mounzer, Karam; Shuhart, Margaret; Luetkemeyer, Anne F.; Asmuth, David; Gaggar, Anuj; Ni, Liyun; Svarovskaia, Evguenia; Brainard, Diana M.; Symonds, William T.; Subramanian, G. Mani; McHutchison, John G.; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Dieterich, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Importance Treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in HIV-1 co-infected patients has been limited due to the use of interferon and drug interactions with antiretroviral therapies (ART). Objective To determine the rates of HCV eradication (sustained virologic response, SVR) and adverse events in HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients receiving sofosbuvir and ribavirin treatment. Design Multicenter, open-label, non-randomized, uncontrolled phase 3 trial (PHOTON-1) conducted in the United States and Puerto Rico from August 2012 until November 2013 evaluating treatment with sofosbuvir and ribavirin. Setting Thirty-four academic, private practice, and community health centers with a median of 6 patients (range 1–17) enrolled at each site. Participants Patients with HCV genotypes 1, 2, or 3 and concurrent HIV-1 were eligible. Patients were required to be receiving antiretroviral treatment with an HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL and a CD4 T-cell count of >200 cells/mm3 or have untreated HIV-1infection with a CD4 T-cell count of >500 cells/mm3. In total, 223 participants (114 treatment-naïve participants with HCV genotype 1, 68 treatment-naïve participants with HCV genotype 2 or 3, and 41 peginterferon/ribavirin treatment-experienced participants with HCV genotype 2 or 3) were enrolled. Interventions Participants received sofosbuvir (400 mg) and weight-based ribavirin for 12 weeks (for treatment-naïve patients with HCV genotype 2 or 3) or for 24 weeks (for treatment-naïve patients with HCV genotype 1 or treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotype 2 or 3). Main Outcome and Measure The primary study outcome was proportion of patients with SVR (serum HCV <25 copies/mL) 12 weeks after cessation of HCV therapy (SVR12). Results Among treatment-naïve participants, SVR12 rates were 76% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67–84) for genotype 1 infection, 88% (95% CI, 70–98) for genotype 2 infection, and 67% (95% CI, 51–80) for genotype 3 infection. Among treatment

  12. Health policy model: long-term predictive results associated with the management of hepatitis C virus-induced diseases in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Mennini, Francesco Saverio; Marcellusi, Andrea; Andreoni, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Salomone, Salvatore; Craxì, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background At present, there are no specific nationwide epidemiological studies representing the whole Italian population. This study is aimed at describing the epidemiological and economic burden that HCV will generate in the next few years in Italy. Furthermore, the impact that future anti-HCV treatments may have on the burden of disease was considered. This analysis was developed for the period 2012–2030 from the perspective of the Italian National Health Service (NHS). Methods A published system dynamic model was adapted for Italy in order to quantify the HCV-infected population in terms of disease progression and the associated costs from 1950 to 2030. The model structure was based on transition probabilities reflecting the natural history of the disease. In order to estimate the efficacy of current anti-HCV treatment strategies for genotypes 1 and 4, the sustained virological response (SVR) rate in registration clinical trials for both boceprevir and telaprevir was estimated. It was assumed that the efficacy for patients treated with peginterferon + ribavirin was equal to the placebo arm of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) relating to boceprevir and telaprevir. For genotypes 2/3 patients it was assumed that treatment efficacy with dual therapy was equal to a SVR rate from the literature. According to the aim of this study, only direct health care costs (hospital admissions, drugs, treatment, and care of patients) incurred by the Italian NHS have been included in the model. Costs have been extrapolated using the published scientific literature available in Italy and actualized with the 2012 ISTAT (Istituto Nazionale di Statistica) Price Index system for monetary revaluation. Three different scenarios were assumed in order to evaluate the impact of future anti-HCV treatments on the burden of disease. Results Overall, in Italy, 1.2 million infected subjects were estimated in 2012. Of these, about 211,000 patients were diagnosed, while only about 11