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Sample records for alfa-9802 gm-csf study

  1. FEP regimen (epidoxorubicin, etoposide and cisplatin) in advanced gastric cancer, with or without low-dose GM-CSF: an Italian Trial in Medical Oncology (ITMO) study.

    PubMed Central

    Bajetta, E.; Di Bartolomeo, M.; Carnaghi, C.; Buzzoni, R.; Mariani, L.; Gebbia, V.; Comella, G.; Pinotti, G.; Ianniello, G.; Schieppati, G.; Bochicchio, A. M.; Maiorino, L.

    1998-01-01

    The new regimens developed over the last few years have led to an improvement in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and our previous experience confirmed the fact that the combination of etoposide, doxorubicin and cisplatin (EAP regimen) is an active treatment that leads to interesting complete remission rates. The primary end point of the present multicentre, randomized, parallel-group phase II study was to determine the activity of the simplified 2-day EAP schedule in patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer, and to verify whether the addition of low doses of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) made it possible to increase dose intensity. Of the 62 enrolled patients, 30 were randomized to receive epirubicin 35 mg m(-2), etoposide 120 mg m(-2) and cisplatin 45 mg m(-2) (FEP) on days 1 and 2 every 28 days and 32 to receive the same schedule plus subcutaneous GM-CSF (molgramostin) 150 microg day(-1) on days 5-14 every 21 days. The patients were stratified by age and the number of disease sites. The characteristics of the patients were well balanced between the two groups. The objective response rate of the patients as a whole was 34% (21 out of 62; 95% confidence interval 22-46), with only one complete remission. The median response duration was 4.5 months (range 1-24 months). The median time to treatment failure was 5 months (range 1-14 months), without any difference between the two groups. The median survival of the patients as a whole was 9 months. Full doses were administered in 92% and 94% of the cycles in the control and GM-CSF arms respectively. The average dose intensity calculated for all drugs was 0.96% in the control and 1.27% in the GM-CSF group. CTC-NCI grade 3-4 neutropenia was reported in 39% vs 45% of patients, thrombocytopenia in 11% vs 35% (P = 0.020) and anaemia in 7% vs 35% (P = 0.014). The FEP combination is as active (OR: 34%) in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer as the EAP

  2. Immunogenicity of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) products in patients undergoing combination therapy with GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, M; Skog, A L; Bird, C; Ragnhammar, P; Lilljefors, M; Gaines-Das, R; Mellstedt, H; Thorpe, R

    1999-06-01

    In this study, we have assessed the development of neutralizing and nonneutralizing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies in two groups of patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma receiving two different GM-CSF products. Three clinical trials were carried out, and a combination of GM-CSF and a colon carcinoma-reactive antibody was used in the absence of any concomitant chemotherapy. Two different GM-CSF products, both rDNA-derived and produced in Escherichia coli, were used. Patients in Trial 1 received product X, and those in Trials 2 and 3 received product Y. Patients in Trial 2 also received interleukin 2 in an attempt to potentiate immune responses. After the first cycle of treatment, no GM-CSF antibodies were detected, but on subsequent therapy, 28 of the 38 patients tested receiving product Y (Trials 2 and 3) developed antibodies that bound to the GM-CSF product used for therapy. However, none of the patients developed antibodies that neutralized the biological activity of GM-CSF, as assessed using an in vitro bioassay. Furthermore, there was no in vivo impairment in GM-CSF-induced expansion of leukocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils in the patients. In contrast, 19 of the 20 patients given product X (Trial 1) developed GM-CSF binding antibodies, and 9 of these patients were shown to develop antibodies that neutralized the biological activity of GM-CSF. The presence of the latter was associated with a significant reduction in GM-CSF-induced expansion of leukocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils in patients. Therefore, product X appears to be more immunogenic than product Y. Immunochemical characterization confirmed that the specificity of the antibody responses varied depending on the product used for therapy. Whereas sera from Trial 1 patients treated with product X showed the presence of antibodies with strong recognition of GM-CSF proteins, sera from patients treated with product Y showed varied recognition of GM-CSF

  3. Low doses of GM-CSF (molgramostim) and G-CSF (filgrastim) after cyclophosphamide (4 g/m2) enhance the peripheral blood progenitor cell harvest: results of two randomized studies including 120 patients

    PubMed Central

    Quittet, Philippe; Ceballos, Patrice; Lopez, Ernesto; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Latry, Pascal; Becht, Catherine; Legouffe, Eric; Fegueux, Nathalie; Exbrayat, Carole; Pouessel, Damien; Rouillé, Valérie; Daures, Jean-Pierre; Klein, Bernard; Rossi, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    The use of a combination of G-CSF and GM-CSF to G-CSF alone, after cyclophosphamide (4g/m2) was compared in 2 randomized phase III studies, including 120 patients. In study A, 60 patients received 5 × 2 μg/kg/day of G-CSF and GM-CSF compared to 5 μg/kg/day of G-CSF. In study B, 60 patients received 2.5 × 2 μg/kg/day G-CSF and GM-CSF compared to G-CSF alone (5 μg/kg/day). With the aim to collect at least 5 × 106/kg CD34 cells in a maximum of 3 large volume leukapherisis (LK), 123 LK were performed in study A, showing significant higher number of patients reaching 10 × 106/kg CD34 cells (21/29 in G+GM-CSF arm vs 11/27 in G-CSF arm, P= .00006). In study B, 109 LK were performed, with similar results (10/27 vs 15/26, P= .003). In both the study, the total harvest of CD34 cells/kg was 2-fold higher in G-CSF plus GM-CSF group (18.3 × 106 in study A and 15.85 × 106 in study B) than in G-CSF group (9 × 106 in study A and 8.1 × 106 in study B), a difference particularly seen in multiple myeloma, with no significant difference in terms of mobilized myeloma cells between G-CSF and GM-CSF groups. PMID:16883311

  4. Immune Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects Using Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) as a Vaccine Adjuvant: ACTG Study 5220

    PubMed Central

    Overton, ET; Kang, M; Peters, MG; Umbleja, T; Alston-Smith, BL; Bastow, B; Demarco-Shaw, D; Koziel, MJ; Mong-Kryspin, L; Sprenger, HL; Yu, JY; Aberg, JA

    2010-01-01

    HIV-infected persons are at risk for HBV co-infection which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, protective immunity following HBV vaccination in HIV-infected persons is poor. This randomized, phase II, open label study aimed to evaluate efficacy and safety of 40 mcg HBV vaccine with or without 250 mcg GM-CSF administered at day 0, weeks 4 and 12. HIV-infected individuals ≥18 years of age, CD4 count ≥200 cells/mm3, seronegative for HBV and HCV, and naïve to HBV vaccination were eligible. Primary endpoints were quantitative HBsAb titers and adverse events. The study enrolled 48 subjects. Median age and baseline CD4 were 41 years and 446 cells/mm3, 37 were on ART, and 26 subjects had undetectable VL. Vaccination was well tolerated. Seven subjects in the GM-CSF group reported transient Grade ≥2 signs/symptoms (six Grade 2, one Grade 3), mostly aches and nausea. GM-CSF had no significant effect on VL or CD4. Four weeks after vaccination, 26 subjects (59%) developed a protective antibody response (HBsAb ≥10mIU/mL; 52% in the GM-CSF arm and 65% in the control arm) without improved Ab titer in the GM-CSF versus control arm (median 11 mIU/mL vs. 92 mIU/mL, respectively). Response was more frequent in those with CD4 ≥350 cells/mm3 (64%) than with CD4 <350 cells/mm3 (50%), though not statistically significant. GM-CSF as an adjuvant did not improve the Ab titer or the development of protective immunity to HBV vaccination in those receiving an accelerated vaccine schedule. Given the common routes of transmission for HIV and HBV, additional HBV vaccine research is warranted. PMID:20600512

  5. GM-CSF alters dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Zhu; Ye, Qian-Ling; Xu, Wang-Dong; Li, Jie-Hua; Ye, Dong-Qing; Xu, Yuekang

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune diseases arise from an inappropriate immune response against self components, including macromolecules, cells, tissues, organs etc. They are often triggered or accompanied by inflammation, during which the levels of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are elevated. GM-CSF is an inflammatory cytokine that has profound impact on the differentiation of immune system cells of myeloid lineage, especially dendritic cells (DCs) that play critical roles in immune initiation and tolerance, and is involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although GM-CSF was discovered decades ago, recent studies with some new findings have shed an interesting light on the old hematopoietic growth factor. In the inflammatory autoimmune diseases, GM-CSF redirects the normal developmental pathway of DCs, conditions their antigen presentation capacities and endows them with unique cytokine signatures to affect autoimmune responses. Here we review the latest advances in the field, with the aim of demonstrating the effects of GM-CSF on DCs and their influences on autoimmune diseases. The summarized knowledge will help to design DC-based strategies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  6. Production of neutralizing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies in carcinoma patients following GM-CSF combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, M; Bird, C; Fagerberg, J; Gaines-Das, R; Ragnhammar, P; Mellstedt, H; Thorpe, R

    1996-05-01

    In this study, the development of neutralizing and non-neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies and the clinical consequences related to the induction of these antibodies were analysed in 20 patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma receiving a combination therapy of Escherichia coli-derived GM-CSF and a colon carcinoma-reactive MoAb in the absence of any concomitant chemotherapy. The recombinant human GM-CSF was administered subcutaneously for 10 days every month for 4 months. Following the first cycle of treatment, no GM-CSF antibodies were detected, but during subsequent therapy, 19 of the 20 patients studied developed GM-CSF binding antibodies. However, only a proportion (40%) of the 19 antibody-positive patients developed antibodies that neutralized the biological activity of GM-CSF in an in vitro bioassay. The presence of GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies was associated with a significant reduction in GM-CSF-induced expansion of leucocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils. Such clinical effects were not apparent in patients with non-neutralizing antibodies. Further characterization of sera from patients with neutralizing antibodies showed that, in most cases, the antibodies neutralized the biological activity of GM-CSF preparations derived using different expression systems (Chinese hamster ovary cells and yeast), suggesting that these antibodies may have the potential to cross-react with endogenously produced GM-CSF. These effects should be considered before therapeutic use of cytokines, particularly in patients who are not immunosuppressed, and therefore capable of mounting an effective immune response. Our results indicate that assessment of production of neutralizing antibodies induced during cytokine therapy can be used to predict diminished clinical response to further therapy.

  7. Expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in male germ cells: GM-CSF enhances sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Lourdes T; Rauch, M Cecilia; Mansilla, Alejandra; Zambrano, Angara; Brito, Mónica; Werner, Enrique; Alfaro, Víctor; Cox, José F; Concha, Ilona I

    2003-10-01

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine capable of stimulating proliferation, maturation and function of hematopoietic cells. Receptors for this cytokine are composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, and are expressed on myeloid progenitors and mature mononuclear phagocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and neutrophils, as well as in other nonhematopietic cells. We have recently demonstrated that bull spermatozoa express functional GM-CSF receptors that signal for increased glucose and Vitamin C uptake. In this study, we analyzed the expression of GM-CSF in bovine and human germ cells and its influence in bovine sperm motility. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that adult bovine and human testes expressed GM-CSF. In addition, immunolocalization studies confirmed the presence of GM-CSF in the germ cell line in bovine and human testes. Computer-assisted evaluation of patterns of sperm motility demonstrated that the addition of GM-CSF enhances several parameters of sperm motility in the presence of glucose or fructose substrates.

  8. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Ryusuke Oishi, Hisashi Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  9. GM-CSF produced by the airway epithelium is required for sensitization to cockroach allergen

    PubMed Central

    Sheih, Alyssa; Parks, William C.; Ziegler, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are among the first to encounter inhaled allergens and can initiate allergic responses by producing pro-Th2 innate cytokines. In this study, we investigated the role of epithelial-derived cytokines in sensitization to a clinically relevant allergen, cockroach allergen (CRA). Among the epithelial-derived cytokines, GM-CSF played a central role in the initiation of Th2 allergic responses to CRA. We show that initial exposure to CRA directly activated airway epithelial cells through a TLR4-MyD88-dependent pathway and MyD88 signaling in epithelial cells induced upregulation of GM-CSF during sensitization. Epithelial-derived GM-CSF was required for allergic sensitization and selectively restored Th2 responses in the absence of MyD88. Thus, we demonstrate that epithelial-derived GM-CSF is a critical early signal during allergic sensitization to CRA. PMID:27731325

  10. GM-CSF Enhances Macrophage Glycolytic Activity In Vitro and Improves Detection of Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parmanand; González-Ramos, Silvia; Mojena, Marina; Rosales-Mendoza, César Eduardo; Emami, Hamed; Swanson, Jeffrey; Morss, Alex; Fayad, Zahi A.; Rudd, James H.F.; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Paz-García, Marta; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo

    2016-01-01

    18F-FDG accumulates in glycolytically active tissues and is known to concentrate in tissues that are rich in activated macrophages. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a clinically used cytokine, increases macrophage glycolysis and deoxyglucose uptake in vitro and acutely enhances 18F-FDG uptake within inflamed tissues such as atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. Methods: In vitro experiments were conducted on human macrophages whereby inflammatory activation and uptake of radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose was assessed before and after GM-CSF exposure. In vivo studies were performed on mice and New Zealand White rabbits to assess the effect of GM-CSF on 18F-FDG uptake in normal versus inflamed arteries, using PET. Results: Incubation of human macrophages with GM-CSF resulted in increased glycolysis and increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake (P < 0.05). This effect was attenuated by neutralizing antibodies against tumor necrosis factor–α or after silencing or inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase. In vivo, in mice and in rabbits, intravenous GM-CSF administration resulted in a 70% and 73% increase (P < 0.01 for both), respectively, in arterial 18F-FDG uptake in atherosclerotic animals but not in nonatherosclerotic controls. Histopathologic analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between in vivo 18F-FDG uptake and macrophage staining (R = 0.75, P < 0.01). Conclusion: GM-CSF substantially augments glycolytic flux in vitro (via a mechanism dependent on ubiquitous type 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and tumor necrosis factor–α) and increases 18F-FDG uptake within inflamed atheroma in vivo. These findings demonstrate that GM-CSF can be used to enhance detection of inflammation. Further studies should explore the role of GM-CSF stimulation to enhance the detection of inflammatory foci in other disease states. PMID:27081166

  11. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  12. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  13. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F.

    2015-01-01

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs. PMID:26436700

  14. A Review of GM-CSF Therapy in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Brittany; Szpila, Benjamin E.; Moore, Frederick A.; Efron, Philip A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Determine what clinical role, if any, GM-CSF may have in the clinical treatment of sepsis in the adult patient. Advancements in the management of sepsis have led to significant decreases in early mortality; however, sepsis remains a significant source of long-term mortality and disability which places strain on healthcare resources with a substantial growing economic impact. Historically, early multiple organ failure (MOF) and death in patients with severe sepsis was thought to result from an exaggerated proinflammatory response called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Numerous prospective randomized controlled trials (PRCTs) tested therapies aimed at decreasing the organ injury associated with an exaggerated inflammatory response. With few exceptions, the results from these PRCTs have been disappointing, and currently no specific therapeutic agent is approved to counteract the early SIRS response in patients with severe sepsis. It has long been recognized that there is a delayed immunosuppressive state that contributes to long-term morbidity. However, recent findings now support a concurrent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory response present throughout sepsis. Multiple immunomodulating agents have been studied to combat the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis with the goal of decreasing secondary infection, reducing organ dysfunction, decreasing ICU stays, and improving survival. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a myelopoietic growth factor currently used in patients with neutropenia secondary to chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression, has been studied as a potential immune-activating agent. The applicability of GM-CSF as a standard therapy for generalized sepsis is still largely understudied; however, small-scale studies available have demonstrated some improved recovery from infection, decreased hospital length of stay, decreased days requiring mechanical ventilation, and decreased medical costs. PMID

  15. The relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 regulates lung epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Christian E; Schlingmann, Barbara; Dorsainvil White, StevenClaude; Ward, Christina; Fan, Xian; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Brown, Lou Ann S; Guidot, David M; Koval, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Lung barrier dysfunction is a cardinal feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Alcohol abuse, which increases the risk of ARDS two- to fourfold, induces transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, which increases epithelial permeability and impairs granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent barrier integrity in experimental models. We hypothesized that the relative balance of GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling regulates lung epithelial barrier function. GM-CSF and TGF-β1 were tested separately and simultaneously for their effects on lung epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. TGF-β1 alone caused an ∼ 25% decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER), increased paracellular flux, and was associated with projections perpendicular to tight junctions ("spikes") containing claudin-18 that colocalized with F-actin. In contrast, GM-CSF treatment induced an ∼ 20% increase in TER, decreased paracellular flux, and showed decreased colocalization of spike-associated claudin-18 with F-actin. When simultaneously administered to lung epithelial cells, GM-CSF antagonized the effects of TGF-β1 on epithelial barrier function in cultured cells. Given this, GM-CSF and TGF-β1 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia and correlated with markers for pulmonary edema and patient outcome. In patient BAL fluid, protein markers of lung barrier dysfunction, serum α2-macroglobulin, and IgM levels were increased at lower ratios of GM-CSF/TGF-β1. Critically, patients who survived had significantly higher GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratios than nonsurviving patients. This study provides experimental and clinical evidence that the relative balance between GM-CSF and TGF-β1 signaling is a key regulator of lung epithelial barrier function. The GM-CSF/TGF-β1 ratio in BAL fluid may provide a concentration-independent biomarker that can predict patient outcomes in ARDS.

  16. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  17. A randomized pilot phase I study of modified carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) peptide (CAP1-6D)/montanide/GM-CSF-vaccine in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CEA is expressed in >90% of pancreatic cancers (PC) and may be an appropriate immunotherapy target. CEA is poorly immunogenic due to immune tolerance; CAP1-6D, an altered peptide ligand can help bypass tolerance. We conducted a pilot randomized phase I trial in PC patients to determine the peptide dose required to induce an optimal CD8+ T cell response. Methods Patients with a PS 0-1, HLA-A2+ and CEA-expressing, previously-treated PC were randomized to receive 10 μg (arm A), 100 μg (arm B) or 1000 μg (arm C) of CEA peptide emulsified in Montanide and GM-CSF, given every 2 weeks until disease progression. Results Sixty-six patients were screened and 19 enrolled of whom 14 received at least 3 doses of the vaccine and thus evaluated for the primary immunologic endpoint. A median of 4 cycles (range 1-81) was delivered. Median and mean peak IFN-γ T cell response by ELISPOT (spots per 104 CD8+ cells, Arm A/B/C) was 11/52/271 (A vs. C, p = 0.028) for medians and 37/148/248 (A vs. C, p = 0.032) for means. T cell responses developed or increased in 20%/60%/100% of pts in Arms A/B/C. Seven of the 19 patients remain alive at a minimum 32 months from trial initiation, including three with unresectable disease. Conclusions The T cell response in this randomized phase I trial was dose-dependent with the 1 mg CEA peptide dose eliciting the most robust T cell responses. A signal of clinical benefit was observed and no significant toxicity was noted. Further evaluation of 1 mg CEA peptide with stronger adjuvants, and/or combined with agents to overcome immune inhibitory pathways, may be warranted in PC pts. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00203892 PMID:24829746

  18. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration. PMID:26376304

  19. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF) Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    PubMed

    Rho, Chang Rae; Park, Mi-young; Kang, Seungbum

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF). An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml). MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  20. Addition of sargramostim (GM-CSF) to imatinib results in major cytogenetic response in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Connor, Rebecca F; Hurd, David; Pettenati, Mark J; Koty, Patrick; Molnár, István

    2006-10-01

    Imatinib mesylate, an inhibitor of BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase, has remarkable activity in chronic myeloid leukemia resulting in an 87% major cytogenetic response. We describe a woman who failed to achieve any cytogenetic response after 2.5 years of imatinib, 400mg daily. When daily sargramostim (GM-CSF) 100 microg/m2 was added, cytogenetic studies revealed a gradual increase in percentage of normal cells from start, 4, 9, and 15 months at 0%, 10%, 55%, and 85%, respectively. She became transfusion independent after starting GM-CSF. The addition of GM-CSF to imatinib resulted in a clinical benefit and a major cytogenetic response in this patient.

  1. Variable effects of the co-administration of a GM-CSF-expressing plasmid on the immune response to flavivirus DNA vaccines in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Gao, Na; Wu, Jiangman; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Li, Jieqiong; Fan, Dongying; An, Jing

    2014-11-01

    As a cytokine adjuvant, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been demonstrated to play central roles in the enhancement of the immune response and protection elicited by experimental vaccines. However, in our previous work, the co-administration of GM-CSF produced untoward effects on the immune response induced by a Japanese encephalitis virus DNA vaccine candidate. This study aimed to elucidate the adjuvant roles of GM-CSF in several Flaviviridae virus DNA vaccine candidates. Our results showed that the effects of GM-CSF were diverse: co-inoculated GM-CSF caused significant suppression to the dengue virus type 1 and type 2 prM-E DNA vaccinations and influenced protective efficiency against virus challenge. In contrast, GM-CSF showed little effect or an enhancement on the immune response elicited by hepatitis C virus C or E1 DNA vaccine candidates. Notably, these effects of GM-CSF were highly durable. Our results suggested that the adjuvant roles of the GM-CSF plasmid were complex and diverse, ranging from enhancement to suppression, depending on the immunogen of Flaviviridae virus DNA vaccine candidates. Therefore, the application of GM-CSF as a vaccine adjuvant or a therapeutic agent should be evaluated carefully.

  2. G-CSF and GM-CSF in clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Antman, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors have now been purified, cloned, and produced in bacteria and yeast. Those that are currently in clinical study include erythropoietin, GM-CSF, G-CSF, M-CSF (also called CSF-1), and multi-CSF (also called interleukin 3). Growth factor appear likely to enhance the recovery and function of circulating white cells after standard-dose cancer therapy and high-bone-dose cancer therapy with marrow transplant and to restore leukocyte numbers and competence in the acquired immune deficiency syndromes and myelodysplastic syndromes. Phase I, II trials in AIDS, in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, in cases of myeloproliferative disease, and after bone marrow transplant have been published. The results of phase III studies are just becoming available. PMID:1705737

  3. Role of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the pathogenesis of adult pulmonary histiocytosis X.

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, A; Bonay, M; Bergeron, A; Grandsaigne, M; Hance, A J; Soler, P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary histiocytosis X is a disorder characterised by the presence of destructive granulomas preferentially involving distal bronchioles, that contain numerous activated Langerhans' cells. Recent studies have shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which is produced by normal bronchiolar epithelium, may play an important part in the distribution and differentiation of Langerhans' cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of this factor in the pathogenesis of pulmonary histiocytosis X. METHODS: Four patients with pulmonary histiocytosis X were examined by immunohistochemical techniques for GM-CSF and CD1a surface molecules. RESULTS: In early lesions the epithelium of bronchioles affected by the disease was strongly positive for GM-CSF and infiltrated by numerous CD1a+ Langerhans' cells organised into granulomas. In contrast, the expression of GM-CSF was substantially lower in bronchioles not affected by the disease, and these bronchioles contained few Langerhans' cells. When destruction by histiocytosis X lesions was more advanced, only remnants of bronchiolar epithelium could occasionally be identified; these remained strongly reactive for GM-CSF. Langerhans' cells within granulomas also moderately expressed this cytokine. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the hypothesis that GM-CSF could be one of the factors responsible for the local accumulation of lymphostimulatory Langerhans' cells in early lesions of pulmonary histiocytosis X. Images PMID:8693443

  4. [Biology and clinical applications of GM-CSF].

    PubMed

    Robak, T

    1994-01-01

    Granulocyte, macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte--colony--stimulating factor (G-CSF) are two of the growing number of recognized cytokines involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. The purification of these factors and the subsequent cloning of the DNAs which encode these proteins have led to their widespread clinical use in the setting up of therapy of disease-induced myelosuppression. GM-CSF has a broader spectrum of potential targets than G-CSF and promotes growth of progenitors of several myeloid lines and, to a lesser extent, of the megakaryocyte line. The pleiotropic effects of GM-CSF could therefore, theoretically, be an advantage compared with the more restricted activity of G-CSF. Its greatest potential use appears to be in the amelioration of neutropenia following myelosuppressive therapy. GM-CSF has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing the duration of neutropenia, decreasing the attendant infection, and enhancing the ability to deliver full doses of myelosuppressive therapy. GM-CSF can also reverse the neutropenia of myelodysplastic syndrome and aplastic anemia. It enhances recovery from bone marrow transplantation and thus reduce the attendant morbidity of this procedure. This hematopoietic growth factor may also enhance recruitment and harvest to peripheral stem cells. At clinically usefull dosages GM-CSF is generally well tolerated.

  5. GM-CSF in sickle cell anemia patients with elevated Hb F.

    PubMed

    Haider, M Z; Raghupathy, R; Azizieh, F; Abdelsalam, R; D'Souza, T M; Adekile, A D

    2000-01-01

    We estimated plasma GM-CSF levels in a group of 28 steady-state sickle cell anemia (SS) patients in Kuwait, using an ELISA technique. There were 24 age-matched Hb AA controls, 14 of whom were healthy while 10 were acutely ill at the time of the study. Five SS patients were also studied during 6 episodes of painful crisis. Among the SS patients, 82.1% were homozygous for the Saudi Arabia/India (SAI) haplotype with Hb F ranging from 15 to 35% and total Hb from 8.5 to 11 g/dl. Three patients (siblings) were SAI/Benin compound heterozygotes with Hb F of 9-23% and total Hb >10 g/dl. One patient each was homozygous for the Benin or the Bantu haplotype; they had Hb F <2% and total Hb of 6.6 and 7.2 g/dl, respectively. Four (14. 3%) steady-state SS patients had detectable plasma GM-CSF ranging from 75 to 1,817.6 pg/ml. These included the 2 patients with Hb F <2. 0% and 2 with the SAI/Benin compound heterozygotes with Hb F of 11 and 9%, respectively. Four (66.7%) SS patients in crisis, 6 (42.9%) healthy controls and 6 (60%) acutely ill controls had detectable plasma GM-CSF. A clearcut association of GM-CSF with Hb F level or degree of anemia in steady-state SS patients could not be established. The appearance of GM-CSF in the plasma of patients in crisis and also among control subjects raises the possibility that other factors are involved in the production of this cytokine in the subjects studied.

  6. GM-CSF contributes to aortic aneurysms resulting from SMAD3 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ping; Chen, Wenhao; Wu, Jie; Huang, Xiaofan; Li, Jun; Wang, Sihua; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Peng; Lv, Qiulun; Xia, Jiahong

    2013-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function SMAD3 (Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3) mutations lead to aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome (AOS). In the present study, we found that mice lacking Smad3 had a vascular phenotype similar to AOS, marked by the progressive development of aneurysms. These aneurysms were associated with various pathological changes in transmural inflammatory cell infiltration. Bone marrow transplants from Smad3–/– mice induced aortitis and aortic root dilation in irradiated WT recipient mice. Transplantation of CD4+ T cells from Smad3–/– mice also induced aortitis in Smad3+/+ recipient mice, while depletion of CD4+ T cells in Smad3–/– mice reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells in the aortic root. Furthermore, IFN-γ deficiency increased, while IL-17 deficiency decreased, disease severity in Smad3+/– mice. Cytokine secretion was measured using a cytokine quantibody array, and Smad3–/– CD4+ T cells secreted more GM-CSF than Smad3+/+ CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF induced CD11b+Gr-1+Ly-6Chi inflammatory monocyte accumulation in the aortic root, but administration of anti–GM-CSF mAb to Smad3–/– mice resulted in significantly less inflammation and dilation in the aortic root. We also identified a missense mutation (c.985A>G) in a family of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Intense inflammatory infiltration and GM-CSF expression was observed in aortas specimens of these patients, suggesting that GM-CSF is potentially involved in the development of AOS. PMID:23585475

  7. GM-CSF Grown Bone Marrow Derived Cells Are Composed of Phenotypically Different Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Na, Yi Rang; Jung, Daun; Gu, Gyo Jeong; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a role in inducing emergency hematopoiesis upon exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Although GM-CSF generated murine bone marrow derived cells have been widely used as macrophages or dendritic cells in research, the exact characteristics of each cell population have not yet been defined. Here we discriminated GM-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs) from dendritic cells (GM-BMDCs) in several criteria. After C57BL/6J mice bone marrow cell culture for 7 days with GM-CSF supplementation, two main populations were observed in the attached cells based on MHCII and F4/80 marker expressions. GM-BMMs had MHCIIlowF4/80high as well as CD11c+CD11bhighCD80−CD64+MerTK+ phenotypes. In contrast, GM-BMDCs had MHCIIhighF4/80low and CD11chighCD8α− CD11b+CD80+CD64−MerTKlow phenotypes. Interestingly, the GM-BMM population increased but GM-BMDCs decreased in a GM-CSF dose-dependent manner. Functionally, GM-BMMs showed extremely high phagocytic abilities and produced higher IL-10 upon LPS stimulation. GM-BMDCs, however, could not phagocytose as well, but were efficient at producing TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-6 as well as inducing T cell proliferation. Finally, whole transcriptome analysis revealed that GM-BMMs and GM-BMDCs are overlap with in vivo resident macrophages and dendritic cells, respectively. Taken together, our study shows the heterogeneicity of GM-CSF derived cell populations, and specifically characterizes GM-CSF derived macrophages compared to dendritic cells. PMID:27788572

  8. O-glycans and O-glycosylation sites of recombinant human GM-CSF derived from suspension-cultured rice cells, and their structural role.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Park, Heajin; Park, Byung Tae; Hwang, Hye Seong; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Dae Kyong; Kim, Ha Hyung

    2016-10-14

    Recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF) from yeast has been clinically applied to immunosuppressed patients. The production of suspension-cultured rice-cell-derived rhGM-CSF (rrhGM-CSF), which has a longer blood clearance time and the same bioactivity as yeast-derived rhGM-CSF, and the analysis of its N-glycans have been reported recently. However, there are no previous reports of the O-glycosylation of rhGM-CSF from plant cells, and so this study investigated O-glycans, O-glycosylation sites, and their structural role in rrhGM-CSF. Monosaccharide analysis revealed the presence of O-glycans comprising arabinose and galactose. Eight O-glycans comprising four arabinose residues with zero to seven galactose residues along with their relative quantities were analyzed. Analysis of pronase-digested glycopeptides indicated that the O-glycans are partially attached to Ser 5, Ser 7, Ser 9, or Thr 10 residues, and glycan heterogeneity was confirmed at each site. Pro-to-hydroxyproline conversions occurred at Pro 2, Pro 6, and Pro 8 residues. The preparation of deglycosylated rrhGM-CSFs revealed that deglycosylation greatly affects their α-helix structures. These findings indicate that O-glycans of rrhGM-CSF are essential for maintaining its structural stability and result in an extended in vivo half-life, but without affecting its biological function. This is the first report on the O-glycosylation of rhGM-CSF derived from plant cells.

  9. Kinetics and stability of GM-CSF production by recombinant yeast cells immobilized in a fibrous-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, S T; Shu, C H

    1996-01-01

    The continuous production of murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by recombinant yeast cells immobilized in a fibrous-bed bioreactor was studied. A high cell density of approximately 68 g/L and a GM-CSF productivity of approximately 3.5 mg/L.h were attained in the fibrous-bed bioreactor-fed with a rich (nonselective, pH 6.7) medium at a dilution rate of 0.16 h-1. The GM-CSF production was stable even though the fraction of plasmid-carrying cells in the reactor effluent gradually dropped below 5% over a period of 2 weeks. At the end of that period, the immobilized cells in the fibrous matrix still had a high fraction, approximately 26%, of plasmid-carrying cells. Similar results were obtained with reactors operated at 0.05 h-1 dilution rate and pH 4.0. Although the GM-CSF production was lower at pH 4, the reactor was stably operated for over 4 weeks without contamination or significant loss of productivity. The stable long-term GM-CSF production from the fibrous-bed bioreactor was attributed to the effect of cell immobilization on plasmid stability. Because GM-CSF production was growth-associated, as was found in batch fermentation with free cells, this stabilization effect cannot be attributed solely to the reduced cell growth in the immobilized cell environment. Plasmid-carrying cells were preferentially retained in the fibrous matrix, perhaps because their abilities to adhere to the fiber surface and to form cell aggregates were higher than those of plasmid-free cells.

  10. Delayed GM-CSF treatment stimulates axonal regeneration and functional recovery in paraplegic rats via an increased BDNF expression by endogenous macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bouhy, Delphine; Malgrange, Brigitte; Multon, Sylvie; Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Scholtes, Félix; Schoenen, Jean; Franzen, Rachelle

    2006-06-01

    Macrophages (monocytes/microglia) could play a critical role in central nervous system repair. We have previously found a synchronism between the regression of spontaneous axonal regeneration and the deactivation of macrophages 3-4 wk after a compression-injury of rat spinal cord. To explore whether reactivation of endogenous macrophages might be beneficial for spinal cord repair, we have studied the effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the same paraplegia model and in cell cultures. There was a significant, though transient, improvement of locomotor recovery after a single delayed intraperitoneal injection of 2 microg GM-CSF, which also increased significantly the expression of Cr3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) by macrophages at the lesion site. At longer survival delays, axonal regeneration was significantly enhanced in GM-CSF-treated rats. In vitro, BV2 microglial cells expressed higher levels of BDNF in the presence of GM-CSF and neurons cocultured with microglial cells activated by GM-CSF generated more neurites, an effect blocked by a BDNF antibody. These experiments suggest that GM-CSF could be an interesting treatment option for spinal cord injury and that its beneficial effects might be mediated by BDNF.

  11. IL-33-Induced Cytokine Secretion and Survival of Mouse Eosinophils Is Promoted by Autocrine GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Willebrand, Ralf; Voehringer, David

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are major effector cells during allergic responses and helminth infections. Recent studies further highlight eosinophils as important players in many other biological processes. Therefore it is important to understand how these cells can be modulated in terms of survival and effector function. In the present study we investigated how eosinophils respond to the alarmin IL-33. We show that IL-33 promotes eosinophil survival in a ST2- and MyD88-dependent manner. IL-33-mediated protection from apoptosis was dependent on autocrine GM-CSF release. In addition, GM-CSF increased the IL-33-induced secretion of IL-4 and IL-13 from eosinophils. Unexpectedly, this effect was further enhanced by cross-linking of Siglec-F, a proposed inhibitory and apopotosis-inducing receptor on eosinophils. Co-culture experiments with eosinophils and macrophages revealed that the IL-33-induced release of IL-4 and IL-13 from eosinophils was required for differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs). The differentiation of AAMs could be further increased in the presence of GM-CSF. These results indicate that cross-talk between Siglec-F and the receptors for IL-33, LPS and GM-CSF plays an important role for efficient secretion of IL-4 and IL-13. Deciphering the molecular details of this cross-talk could lead to the development of new therapeutic option to treat eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:27690378

  12. The Structure of the GM-CSF Receptor Complex Reveals a Distinct Mode of Cytokine Receptor Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Guido; Hercus, Timothy R.; McClure, Barbara J.; Stomski, Frank C.; Dottore, Mara; Powell, Jason; Ramshaw, Hayley; Woodcock, Joanna M.; Xu, Yibin; Guthridge, Mark; McKinstry, William J.; Lopez, Angel F.; Parker, Michael W.

    2008-08-11

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that controls the production and function of blood cells, is deregulated in clinical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia, yet offers therapeutic value for other diseases. Its receptors are heterodimers consisting of a ligand-specific {alpha} subunit and a {beta}c subunit that is shared with the interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 receptors. How signaling is initiated remains an enigma. We report here the crystal structure of the human GM-CSF/GM-CSF receptor ternary complex and its assembly into an unexpected dodecamer or higher-order complex. Importantly, mutagenesis of the GM-CSF receptor at the dodecamer interface and functional studies reveal that dodecamer formation is required for receptor activation and signaling. This unusual form of receptor assembly likely applies also to IL-3 and IL-5 receptors, providing a structural basis for understanding their mechanism of activation and for the development of therapeutics.

  13. Enhancement of the immunogenicity of DNA replicon vaccine of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A by GM-CSF gene adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2011-03-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage clony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an attractive adjuvant for a DNA vaccine on account of its ability to recruit antigen-presenting cells to the site of antigen synthesis as well as stimulate the maturation of dendritic cells.This study evaluated the utility of GM-CSF as a plasmid DNA replicon vaccine adjuvants for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in mouse model. In balb/c mice that received the plasmid DNA replicon vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) carrying the Hc gene of BoNT/A (AHc), both antibody and lymphoproliferative response specific to AHc were induced, the immunogenicity was enhanced by co-delivery or coexpress of the GM-CSF gene. In particular, when AHc and GM-CSF were coexpressed within the SFV based DNA vaccine, the anti-AHc antibody titers and survival rates of immunized mice after challenged with BoNT/A were significantly increased, and further enhanced by coimmunization with aluminum phosphate adjuvant.

  14. Spleen tyrosine kinase mediates the actions of EPO and GM-CSF and coordinates with TGF-β in erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Ching; Huang, Duen-Yi; Wu, Mai-Szu; Chu, Ching-Liang; Tzeng, Shiang-Jong; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2017-04-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and GM-CSF are involved in erythropoiesis, while TGF-β inhibits proliferation but potentiates differentiation of erythroblasts. Since Syk inhibitor may induce anemia side effect in clinic, here we investigated the role of Syk in the biological actions of EPO and GM-CSF in erythropoiesis. In human erythroleukemia cell line TF-1, Syk inhibitor R406 exerts an enhancement effect with TGF-β to decrease cell viability, either in the absence or presence of EPO or GM-CSF. Such effect of R406 results from the reduced cell cycle progression and increased cell apoptosis. Notably, unlike Syk, Src family kinases are not involved in the viability control of TF-1 cells. Signaling studies showed that Syk is required for STAT5 and ERK activation induced by EPO, and Akt and ERK activation induced by GM-CSF. Nevertheless, R406 does not change the Smad2/3 signal caused by TGF-β, and TGF-β neither affects above signal pathways of EPO and GM-CSF. Of note, Syk is constitutively associated with EPOR in plasma membrane and can bind to STAT5 at active status upon EPO stimulation. Furthermore, EPO-induced hemoglobin γ expression was reduced by R406. In BFU-E and CFU-E colony formation assays in Syk-deficient erythroid progenitor cells, we confirmed the essential role of Syk in erythropoiesis mediated by EPO. Taken together, Syk is a novel upstream signaling molecule of EPOR, and contributes to erythroblast proliferation, survival and differentiation.

  15. Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a MAR element in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Burkov, I A; Serova, I A; Battulin, N R; Smirnov, A V; Babkin, I V; Andreeva, L E; Dvoryanchikov, G A; Serov, O L

    2013-10-01

    Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under the control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a matrix attachment region (MAR) element from the Drosophila histone 1 gene was studied in four and eight transgenic mouse lines, respectively. Of the four transgenic lines carrying the transgene without MAR, three had correct tissues-specific expression of the hGM-CSF gene in the mammary gland only and no signs of cell mosaicism. The concentration of hGM-CSF in the milk of transgenic females varied from 1.9 to 14 μg/ml. One line presented hGM-CSF in the blood serum, indicating ectopic expression. The values of secretion of hGM-CSF in milk of 6 transgenic lines carrying the transgene with MAR varied from 0.05 to 0.7 μg/ml, and two of these did not express hGM-CSF. Three of the four examined animals from lines of this group showed ectopic expression of the hGM-CSF gene, as determined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses, as well as the presence of hGM-CSF in the blood serum. Mosaic expression of the hGM-CSF gene in mammary epithelial cells was specific to all examined transgenic mice carrying the transgene with MAR but was never observed in the transgenic mice without MAR. The mosaic expression was not dependent on transgene copy number. Thus, the expected "protective or enhancer effect" from the MAR element on the hGM-CSF gene expression was not observed.

  16. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity.

    PubMed

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14(+) monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity.

  17. IL-22, GM-CSF and IL-17 in peripheral CD4+ T cell subpopulations during multiple sclerosis relapses and remission. Impact of corticosteroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    Muls, Nathalie; Nasr, Zakia; Dang, Hong Anh; Sindic, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is thought to be a Th17-mediated dysimmune disease of the central nervous system. However, recent publications have questioned the pathogenicity of IL-17 per se and rather suggest the implication of other Th17-related inflammatory mediators. Therefore, we studied the expression of GM-CSF, IL-22, IL-24, IL-26 and CD39 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from MS patients during relapses, remission and following corticosteroid treatment. We performed qPCR to measure mRNA levels from ex vivo or in vitro-stimulated PBMCs. Cytokine levels were determined by ELISA. We used flow cytometry to assess GM-CSF+, IL-22+ and CD39+ cells in relationship to IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Our results showed that IL-22 mRNA and IL-22+CD4+ lymphocytes are increased in circulating cells of relapsing MS patients compared to remitting patients while GM-CSF was unchanged. We have further shown that 12.9, 39 and 12.4% of Th17 cells from MS patients during relapses expressed IL-22, GM-CSF and CD39 respectively. No changes in these proportions were found in stable MS patients. However, the majority of GM-CSF+ or IL-22+ T cells did not co-express IL-17. GM-CSF mRNA, but not IL-22 mRNA, was dramatically decreased ex vivo by ivMP. Our results contribute to a better characterisation of Th17, Th22 and ThGM-CSF cells in the setting of MS and according to disease activity. PMID:28301515

  18. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14+ monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity. PMID:28138327

  19. Expression of GM-CSF receptors in male germ cells and their role in signaling for increased glucose and vitamin C transport.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, A; Noli, C; Rauch, M C; Werner, E; Brito, M; Amthauer, R; Slebe, J C; Vera, J C; Concha, I I

    2001-01-01

    We studied the expression and function of the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor in male germ cells. RT-PCR showed expression of mRNAs encoding the alpha- and beta-subunits of the GM-CSF receptor in human testis, and the presence of the alpha- and beta-proteins was confirmed by immunoblotting with anti-alpha and anti-beta-antibodies. Immunolocalization studies showed the level of expression of GM-CSF alpha- and beta-subunits in the germ line in the testis and in ejaculated spermatozoa. Receptor binding studies using radiolabeled GM-CSF revealed that bull spermatozoa have about 105 high-affinity sites with a K(d) of 222 pM and approximately 1100 low-affinity sites with a K(d) of 10 nM. GM-CSF signaled, in a time- and dose-dependent manner, for an increased uptake of glucose and vitamin C.

  20. A Simplified Method for the Efficient Refolding and Purification of Recombinant Human GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Christy A.; Olson, Melanie; Jackson, Linda M.; Schrader, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) is a haematopoietic growth factor and proinflammatory cytokine. Recombinant hGM-CSF is important not only as a research tool but also as a biotherapeutic. However, rhGM-CSF expressed in E. coli is known to form inclusion bodies of misfolded, aggregated protein. Refolding and subsequent purification of rhGM-CSF from inclusion bodies is difficult with low yields of bioactive protein being produced. Here we describe a method for the isolation, refolding and purification of bioactive rhGM-CSF from inclusion bodies. The method is straightforward, not requiring extensive experience in protein refolding nor purification and using standard laboratory equipment. PMID:23166789

  1. Breast Cancer Cell-Derived GM-CSF Licenses Regulatory Th2 Induction by Plasmacytoid Predendritic Cells in Aggressive Disease Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ghirelli, Cristina; Reyal, Fabien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Zollinger, Raphaël; Sirven, Philémon; Michea, Paula; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Donnadieu, Marie-Hélène; Caly, Martial; Fourchotte, Virginie; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Soumelis, Vassili

    2015-07-15

    Reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment vitally impact tumor progression. In this study, we show that GM-CSF produced by primary breast tumor cells induced the activation of plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDC), a cell type critical to anti-viral immunity. pDC that expressed the GM-CSF receptor were increased in breast tumors compared with noninvolved adjacent breast tissue. Tumor-activated pDC acquired naïve CD4(+) T-cell stimulatory capacity and promoted a regulatory Th2 response. Finally, the concomitant increase of GM-CSF and pDC was significantly associated with relatively more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our results characterize the first tumor-derived factor that can activate pDC to promote a regulatory Th2 response, with implications for therapeutic targeting of a tumor-immune axis of growing recognition in its significance to cancer.

  2. The GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 cytokine receptor family: from ligand recognition to initiation of signaling.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Dhagat, Urmi; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Bonder, Claudine S; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W

    2012-11-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), and IL-5 are members of a discrete family of cytokines that regulates the growth, differentiation, migration and effector function activities of many hematopoietic cells and immunocytes. These cytokines are involved in normal responses to infectious agents, bridging innate and adaptive immunity. However, in certain cases, the overexpression of these cytokines or their receptors can lead to excessive or aberrant initiation of signaling resulting in pathological conditions, with chronic inflammatory diseases and myeloid leukemias the most notable examples. Recent crystal structures of the GM-CSF receptor ternary complex and the IL-5 binary complex have revealed new paradigms of cytokine receptor activation. Together with a wealth of associated structure-function studies, they have significantly enhanced our understanding of how these receptors recognize cytokines and initiate signals across cell membranes. Importantly, these structures provide opportunities for structure-based approaches for the discovery of novel and disease-specific therapeutics. In addition, recent biochemical evidence has suggested that the GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor family is capable of interacting productively with other membrane proteins at the cell surface. Such interactions may afford additional or unique biological activities and might be harnessed for selective modulation of the function of these receptors in disease.

  3. Single chain Fv fragment specific for human GM-CSF: selection and expression using a bacterial expression library.

    PubMed

    Tapryal, Suman; Pal Khasa, Yogender; Mukherjee, K J

    2010-10-01

    Single chain antibodies (scFvs) are replacing whole antibody molecules since they are easy to produce on large scale and amenable to genetic modifications. Here we report the development of an anti-human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) scFv as an immunoassay bio-reagent, utilizing an easily scalable bacterial expression system. For this, the V(H) and V(L) gene repertoires were amplified from the immunoglobulin complementary DNA, derived from total RNA of mice splenocytes, pre-sensitized with the antigen. The scFv library was expressed under the strong T7 promoter in BL21 (DE3) Escherichia coli cells. Preliminary screening led to the selection of four potential candidates, which were later subjected to light chain shuffling. Cross-reactivity analysis involving the original and shuffled candidates resulted in the selection of one scFv (scFv196) with no cross-reactivity against E. coli antigens. The binding affinity of the scFv196 for hGM-CSF, measured by surface plasmon resonance, was found to be within the physiological range (K(D) =1.5 μM). The refolded scFv was also shown to recognize and bind the glycosylated antigen, a closer mimic of the physiological GM-CSF, potentiating its use in immunoassays. Expression studies using shake flasks suggested periplasmic export of the scFv196 protein.

  4. Oncolytic and immunologic cancer therapy with GM-CSF-armed vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lili; Fan, Jun; Guo, Mingming; Huang, Biao

    2016-03-28

    Targeted oncolytic vaccinia viruses are being developed as a novel strategy in cancer therapy. Arming vaccinia viruses with immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance antitumor efficacy. Such engineered oncolytic viruses, like JX-594, a Wyeth strain vaccinia virus modified with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have shown promising results and have proceeded rapidly in clinical trials. However, the oncolytic potential of the Chinese vaccine strain Tian Tan (VTT) has not been explored. In this study, we constructed a targeted oncolytic vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9 (VG9) expressing murine GM-CSF (VG9-GMCSF) and evaluated the antitumor effect of this recombinant vaccinia virus in a murine melanoma model. In vitro, viral replication and cytotoxicity of VG9-GMCSF was as potent as VG9; in vivo, VG9-GMCSF significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted melanoma tumors, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, and produced an antitumor cytotoxic response. Such antitumor effect may be due to the lytic nature of virus as well as the stimulation of immune activity by GM-CSF production. Our results indicate that VG9-GMCSF induces strong tumoricidal activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for combating cancer.

  5. GM-CSF-Producing Th Cells in Rats Sensitive and Resistant to Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Given that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is identified as the key factor to endow auto-reactive Th cells with the potential to induce neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models, the frequency and phenotype of GM-CSF-producing (GM-CSF+) Th cells in draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and spinal cord (SC) of Albino Oxford (AO) and Dark Agouti (DA) rats immunized for EAE were examined. The generation of neuroantigen-specific GM-CSF+ Th lymphocytes was impaired in dLNs of AO rats (relatively resistant to EAE induction) compared with their DA counterparts (susceptible to EAE) reflecting impaired CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation and less supportive of GM-CSF+ Th cell differentiation dLN cytokine microenvironment. Immunophenotyping of GM-CSF+ Th cells showed their phenotypic heterogeneity in both strains and revealed lower frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+, IL-17+IFN-γ-, and IL-17-IFN-γ+ cells accompanied by higher frequency of IL-17-IFN-γ- cells among them in AO than in DA rats. Compared with DA, in AO rats was also found (i) slightly lower surface density of CCR2 (drives accumulation of highly pathogenic GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cells in SC) on GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 lymphocytes from dLNs, and (ii) diminished CCL2 mRNA expression in SC tissue, suggesting their impaired migration into the SC. Moreover, dLN and SC cytokine environments in AO rats were shown to be less supportive of GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cell differentiation (judging by lower expression of mRNAs for IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23/p19). In accordance with the (i) lower frequency of GM-CSF+ Th cells in dLNs and SC of AO rats and their lower GM-CSF production, and (ii) impaired CCL2 expression in the SC tissue, the proportion of proinflammatory monocytes among peripheral blood cells and their progeny (CD45hi cells) among the SC CD11b+ cells were reduced in AO compared with DA rats. Collectively, the results indicate that the strain specificities in efficacy of several mechanisms

  6. NSAIDs increase GM-CSF release by human synoviocytes: comparison with nitric oxide-donating derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zacharowski, Paula; Breese, Emma; Wood, Elizabeth; Del Soldato, Piero; Warner, Tim; Mitchell, Jane

    2005-01-31

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat the condition of rheumatoid arthritis, where levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are elevated in the synovial fluid. NO-NSAIDs are a new class of cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibitors developed by coupling a nitric oxide (NO)-donating moiety to conventional NSAIDs. We show that, in cytokine-treated synoviocytes (from non-rheumatic patients), NO-naproxen and NO-flurbiprofen like their parent compounds concentration-dependently reduce the levels of PGE2 (an index of COX-2 activity), with a corresponding rise in the release of GM-CSF. Unlike acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), NO-ASA reduces the levels of PGE2, without increasing GM-CSF release, although cell viability is reduced at the highest concentration (1 mM). The effects of NSAIDs and NO-NSAIDs on GM-CSF release were attributable to the PGE2 mediated cyclic (c) AMP pathway because PGE2 reversed the effects of COX blockade. Second, phosphodiesterase inhibitors 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and Ro-201724 (both of which elevate cAMP levels) decreased GM-CSF release, in the presence of PGE2. Finally, neither sodium nitroprusside nor zaprinast (both of which elevate cGMP levels) affected GM-CSF or PGE2 release. Our findings demonstrate that GM-CSF is regulated by NSAIDs and NO-NSAIDs via inhibition of COX and appears to be mediated via the cAMP pathway. NO-ASA is the exception, because it does not increase GM-CSF release, although at millimolar concentrations cell viability is reduced.

  7. GM-CSF is not essential for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis but promotes brain-targeted disease

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Emily R.; Goverman, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has been used as an animal model of multiple sclerosis to identify pathogenic cytokines that could be therapeutic targets. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is the only cytokine reported to be essential for EAE. We investigated the role of GM-CSF in EAE in C3HeB/FeJ mice that uniquely exhibit extensive brain and spinal cord inflammation. Unexpectedly, GM-CSF–deficient C3HeB/FeJ mice were fully susceptible to EAE because IL-17 activity compensated for the loss of GM-CSF during induction of spinal cord–targeted disease. In contrast, both GM-CSF and IL-17 were needed to fully overcome the inhibitory influence of IFN-γ on the induction of inflammation in the brain. Both GM-CSF and IL-17 independently promoted neutrophil accumulation in the brain, which was essential for brain-targeted disease. These results identify a GM-CSF/IL-17/IFN-γ axis that regulates inflammation in the central nervous system and suggest that a combination of cytokine-neutralizing therapies may be needed to dampen central nervous system autoimmunity.

  8. Incorporating the use of GM-CSF in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the clinical activity of GM-CSF in combination with standard dose rituximab in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The rationale for exploring this combination is provided by the ability of GM-CSF to increase surface expression of CD20 in CLL cells and potentially render them a better target for rituximab. GM-CSF also enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against CLL cells. The combination of GM-CSF and rituximab was evaluated as initial treatment in elderly patients with indication for treatment and in patients at high risk for progression identified by elevated beta(2) microglobulin. This combination was also evaluated in patients with recurrent CLL. On the basis of the results of 118 patients, we observed an overall response rate of 65 and 9% complete remission and these results compare favourably with the results obtained with rituximab single agent. This combination was well tolerated with the most common toxicity consisting in mild GM-CSF injection site erythema. On the basis of this experience, we are currently evaluating the use of GM-CSF in combination with the chemoimmunotherapy regimen fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab.

  9. Identification of a fourth ancient member of the IL-3/IL-5/GM-CSF cytokine family, KK34, in many mammals.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takuya; Schares, Susann; Fischer, Uwe; Dijkstra, Johannes M

    2016-12-01

    The related cytokine genes IL-3, IL-5 and GM-CSF map to the (extended) TH2 cytokine locus of the mammalian genome. For chicken an additional related cytokine gene, KK34, was reported downstream of the IL-3 plus GM-CSF cluster, but hitherto it was believed that mammalian genomes lack this gene. However, the present study identifies an intact orthologue of chicken KK34 gene in many mammals like cattle and pig, while remnants of KK34 can be found in human and mouse. Bovine KK34 was found to be transcribed, and its recombinant protein could induce STAT5 phosphorylation and proliferation of lymphocytes upon incubation with bovine PBMCs. This concludes that KK34 is a fourth functional cytokine of the IL-3/IL-5/GM-CSF/KK34-family (alias IL-5 family) in mammals. While analyzing KK34, the present study also made new identifications of cytokine genes in the extended TH2 cytokine loci for reptiles, birds and marsupials. This includes a hitherto unknown cytokine gene in birds and reptiles which we designated "IL-5famE". Other newly identified genes are KK34, GM-CSF(-like), IL-5, and IL-13 in reptiles, and IL-3 in marsupials.

  10. Enhancing immune responses of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine by co-inoculating plasmid IL-12 or GM-CSF expressing vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Li, J; Kong, L; Li, B; Ding, X

    2016-04-30

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative viral agent for large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in children and infants, yet there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment for severe EV71 infection. The immunogenicity of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of interleukin-12 (IL-12) or granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were investigated. DNA vaccine plasmids, pcDNA-VP1, pcDNA-IL-12 and pcDNA-GM-CSF were constructed and inoculated into BALB/c mice with or without pcDNA-IL-12 or pcDNA-GM-CSF by intramuscular injection. Cellular and humoral immune responses were assessed by indirect ELISA, lymphocyte proliferation assays, cytokine release assay and FACS. The VP1 DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and can induce specific humoral and cellular immunity in BALB/c mice, while IL-2 or GM-CSF plays an immunoadjuvant role and enhances specific immune responses. This study provides a frame of reference for the design of DNA vaccines against EV71.

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of a CTL multiepitope peptide vaccine for HIV with or without GM-CSF in a phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Spearman, Paul; Kalams, Spyros; Elizaga, Marnie; Metch, Barbara; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Allen, Mary; Weinhold, Kent J; Ferrari, Guido; Parker, Scott D; McElrath, M Juliana; Frey, Sharon E; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Keefer, Michael C; Lubeck, Michael D; Egan, Michael; Braun, Ralph; Eldridge, John H; Haynes, Barton F; Corey, Lawrence

    2009-01-07

    There is an urgent need for a vaccine capable of preventing HIV infection or the development of HIV-related disease. A number of approaches designed to stimulate HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses together with helper responses are presently under evaluation. In this phase 1, multi-center, placebo-controlled trial, we tested the ability of a novel multiepitope peptide vaccine to elicit HIV-specific immunity. To enhance the immunogenicity of the peptide vaccine, half of the vaccine recipients received recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) protein as a coadjuvant. The vaccine was safe; tolerability was moderate, with a number of adverse events related to local injection site reactogenicity. Anti-GM-CSF antibody responses developed in the majority of GM-CSF recipients but were not associated with adverse hematologic events. The vaccine was only minimally immunogenic. Six of 80 volunteers who received vaccine developed HIV-specific responses as measured by interferon-gamma ELISPOT assay, and measurable responses were transient. This study failed to demonstrate that GM-CSF can substantially improve the overall weak immunogenicity of a multiepitope peptide-based HIV vaccine.

  12. Combined administration of G-CSF and GM-CSF stimulates monocyte-derived pro-angiogenic cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefania; Bussolati, Benedetta; Scacciatella, Paolo; Marra, Sebastiano; Sanavio, Fiorella; Tarella, Corrado; Camussi, Giovanni

    2006-04-01

    Mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells has been suggested to contribute to neo-vascularization of ischemic organs. Aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF may influence the expansion of circulating KDR+ cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). KDR+ cells significantly increased in peripheral blood of AMI patients treated with G-CSF and GM-CSF compared to untreated patients. This KDR+ cells population was CD14+ but not CD34+ or CD133+. CD14+/KDR+ cells were also obtained in vitro by culturing mononuclear cells from healthy donors in a Rotary Cell Culture System in the presence of G-CSF + GM-CSF, but not of the individual growth factors. CD14+/KDR+ cells, obtained from patients or from in vitro culture, co-expressed hematopoietic (CD45, CD14) and endothelial markers (CD31, CD105, and VE-cadherin). CD14+/KDR+, but not CD14+/KDR- cells, stimulated the organization of human microvascular endothelial cells into capillary-like structures on Matrigel both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of G-CSF and GM-CSF induced a CD14+/KDR+ cell population with potential pro-angiogenic properties.

  13. A Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer with an Embedded Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Domain Induces Enhanced Antibody and T Cell Responses*

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Po-Ssu; Matthews, Katie; Michael, Elizabeth; Berkhout, Ben; Schief, William R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2011-01-01

    An effective HIV-1 vaccine should ideally induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses that provide sterilizing immunity over a prolonged period. Current HIV-1 vaccines have failed in inducing such immunity. The viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) can be targeted by neutralizing antibodies to block infection, but several Env properties limit the ability to induce an antibody response of sufficient quantity and quality. We hypothesized that Env immunogenicity could be improved by embedding an immunostimulatory protein domain within its sequence. A stabilized Env trimer was therefore engineered with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) inserted into the V1V2 domain of gp120. Probing with neutralizing antibodies showed that both the Env and GM-CSF components of the chimeric protein were folded correctly. Furthermore, the embedded GM-CSF domain was functional as a cytokine in vitro. Mouse immunization studies demonstrated that chimeric EnvGM-CSF enhanced Env-specific antibody and T cell responses compared with wild-type Env. Collectively, these results show that targeting and activation of immune cells using engineered cytokine domains within the protein can improve the immunogenicity of Env subunit vaccines. PMID:21515681

  14. Phorbol ester-treated human acute myeloid leukemia cells secrete G-CSF, GM-CSF and erythroid differentiation factor into serum-free media in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Scher, W; Eto, Y; Ejima, D; Den, T; Svet-Moldavsky, I A

    1990-12-10

    Upon treatment with the phorbol ester, tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (PMA), peripheral mononuclear blood cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia secrete into serum-free cell-conditioned media (PMA-CCM) at least three distinct nondialysable 'hematopoietic' factors: granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and erythroid differentiation factor (EDF, activin A). G-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a G-CSF-responsive cell line, NSF-60, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a G-CSF-specific monoclonal antibody (MAB). GM-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a GM-CSF-responsive line, TALL-101, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a GM-CSF-specific MAB. EDF was identified by its ability to stimulate erythroid differentiation in mouse erythroleukemia cell lines, its identical retention times to those of authentic EDF on three successive reverse-phase HPLC columns and characterization of its penultimate N-terminal residue as leucine which is the same as that of authentic EDF. Both authentic EDF and the erythroid-stimulating activity in PMA-CCM were found to act synergistically with a suboptimal inducing concentration of a well-studied inducing agent, dimethyl sulfoxide, in inducing erythroid differentiation. In addition, a fourth activity was observed in PMA-CCM: normal human fetal bone marrow cell-proliferation stimulating activity (FBMC-PSA). FBMC-PSA was identified by its ability to stimulate the growth of granulocytes and macrophages in FBMC suspension cultures, which neither recombinant G-CSF or GM-CSF were found to do.

  15. 11R-P53 and GM-CSF Expressing Oncolytic Adenovirus Target Cancer Stem Cells with Enhanced Synergistic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Sai-qun; Ye, Zhen-long; Liu, Pin-yi; Huang, Yao; Li, Lin-fang; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Hai-li; Jin, Hua-jun; Qian, Qi-jun

    2017-01-01

    Targeting cancer stem cells with oncolytic virus (OV) holds great potential for thorough elimination of cancer cells. Based on our previous studies, we here established 11R-P53 and mGM-CSF carrying oncolytic adenovirus (OAV) SG655-mGMP and investigated its therapeutic effect on hepatocellular carcinoma stem cells Hep3B-C and teratoma stem cells ECCG5. Firstly, the augmenting effect of 11R in our construct was tested and confirmed by examining the expression of EGFP with Fluorescence and FCM assays after transfecting Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells with OVA SG7605-EGFP and SG7605-11R-EGFP. Secondly, the expressions of 11R-P53 and GM-CSF in Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells after transfection with OAV SG655-mGMP were detected by Western blot and Elisa assays, respectively. Thirdly, the enhanced growth inhibitory and augmented apoptosis inducing effects of OAV SG655-mGMP on Hep3B-C and ECCG5 cells were tested with FCM assays by comparing with the control, wild type 5 adenovirus, 11R-P53 carrying OVA in vitro. Lastly, the in vivo therapeutic effect of OAV SG655-mGMP toward ECCG5 cell-formed xenografts was studied by measuring tumor volumes post different treatments with PBS, OAV SG655-11R-P53, OAV SG655-mGM-CSF and OAV SG655-mGMP. Treatment with OAV SG655-mGMP induced significant xenograft growth inhibition, inflammation factor AIF1 expression and immune cells infiltration. Therefore, our OAV SG655-mGMP provides a novel platform to arm OVs to target cancer stem cells. PMID:28243324

  16. CD14-dependent monocyte isolation enhances phagocytosis of listeria monocytogenes by proinflammatory, GM-CSF-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Neu, Caroline; Sedlag, Anne; Bayer, Carina; Förster, Sabine; Crauwels, Peter; Niess, Jan-Hendrik; van Zandbergen, Ger; Frascaroli, Giada; Riedel, Christian U

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are an important line of defence against invading pathogens. Human macrophages derived by different methods were tested for their suitability as models to investigate Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) infection and compared to macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Human primary monocytes were isolated by either positive or negative immunomagnetic selection and differentiated in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) into pro- or anti-inflammatory macrophages, respectively. Regardless of the isolation method, GM-CSF-derived macrophages (GM-Mφ) stained positive for CD206 and M-CSF-derived macrophages (M-Mφ) for CD163. THP-1 cells did not express CD206 or CD163 following incubation with PMA, M- or GM-CSF alone or in combination. Upon infection with Lm, all primary macrophages showed good survival at high multiplicities of infection whereas viability of THP-1 was severely reduced even at lower bacterial numbers. M-Mφ generally showed high phagocytosis of Lm. Strikingly, phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ was markedly influenced by the method used for isolation of monocytes. GM-Mφ derived from negatively isolated monocytes showed low phagocytosis of Lm whereas GM-Mφ generated from positively selected monocytes displayed high phagocytosis of Lm. Moreover, incubation with CD14 antibody was sufficient to enhance phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ generated from negatively isolated monocytes. By contrast, non-specific phagocytosis of latex beads by GM-Mφ was not influenced by treatment with CD14 antibody. Furthermore, phagocytosis of Lactococcus lactis, Escherichia coli, human cytomegalovirus and the protozoan parasite Leishmania major by GM-Mφ was not enhanced upon treatment with CD14 antibody indicating that this effect is specific for Lm. Based on these observations, we propose macrophages derived by ex vivo differentiation of negatively selected human primary monocytes as the most suitable model

  17. Mechanisms of suppression of alveolar epithelial cell GM-CSF expression in the setting of hyperoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Anne; Vollbrecht, Timothy; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; McManus, Michael; Wilcoxen, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary expression of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is critically important for normal functional maturation of alveolar macrophages. We found previously that lung GM-CSF is dramatically suppressed in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) are a major source of GM-CSF in the peripheral lung, and in vivo hyperoxia resulted in greatly reduced expression of GM-CSF protein by AEC ex vivo. We now explore the mechanisms responsible for this effect, using primary cultures of murine AEC exposed to hyperoxia in vitro. Exposure of AEC to 80% oxygen/5% CO2 for 48 h did not induce overt toxicity, but resulted in significantly decreased GM-CSF protein and mRNA expression compared with cells in normoxia. Similar effects were seen when AEC were stressed with serum deprivation, an alternative inducer of oxidative stress. The effects in AEC were opposite those in a murine lung epithelial cell line (MLE-12 cells), in which hyperoxia induced GM-CSF expression. Both hyperoxia and serum deprivation resulted in increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in AEC. Hyperoxia and serum deprivation induced significantly accelerated turnover of GM-CSF mRNA. Treatment of AEC with catalase during oxidative stress preserved GM-CSF protein and mRNA and was associated with stabilization of GM-CSF mRNA. We conclude that hyperoxia-induced suppression of AEC GM-CSF expression is a function of ROS-induced destabilization of GM-CSF mRNA. We speculate that AEC oxidative stress results in significantly impaired pulmonary innate immune defense due to effects on local GM-CSF expression in the lung. PMID:20034963

  18. GM-CSF Inhibits c-Kit and SCF Expression by Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Barroeta Seijas, Amairelys Belen; Simonetti, Sonia; Vitale, Sara; Runci, Daniele; Quinci, Angela Caterina; Soriani, Alessandra; Criscuoli, Mattia; Filippi, Irene; Naldini, Antonella; Sacchetti, Federico Maria; Tarantino, Umberto; Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Santoni, Angela; Di Rosa, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand of c-kit, is a key cytokine for hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic precursors express c-kit, whereas differentiated cells of hematopoietic lineage are negative for this receptor, with the exception of NK cells, mast cells, and a few others. While it has long been recognized that dendritic cells (DCs) can express c-kit, several questions remain concerning the SCF/c-kit axis in DCs. This is particularly relevant for DCs found in those organs wherein SCF is highly expressed, including the bone marrow (BM). We characterized c-kit expression by conventional DCs (cDCs) from BM and demonstrated a higher proportion of c-kit(+) cells among type 1 cDC subsets (cDC1s) than type 2 cDC subsets (cDC2s) in both humans and mice, whereas similar levels of c-kit expression were observed in cDC1s and cDC2s from mouse spleen. To further study c-kit regulation, DCs were generated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from mouse BM, a widely used protocol. CD11c(+) cells were purified from pooled non-adherent and slightly adherent cells collected after 7 days of culture, thus obtaining highly purified BM-derived DCs (BMdDCs). BMdDCs contained a small fraction of c-kit(+) cells, and by replating them for 2 days with GM-CSF, we obtained a homogeneous population of c-kit(+) CD40(hi) MHCII(hi) cells. Not only did BMdDCs express c-kit but they also produced SCF, and both were striking upregulated if GM-CSF was omitted after replating. Furthermore, a small but significant reduction in BMdDC survival was observed upon SCF silencing. Incubation of BMdDCs with SCF did not modulate antigen presentation ability of these cells, nor it did regulate their membrane expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. We conclude that the SCF/c-kit-mediated prosurvival circuit may have been overlooked because of the prominent use of GM-CSF in DC cultures in vitro, including those human DC cultures destined for the clinics. We speculate that DCs more

  19. GM-CSF Inhibits c-Kit and SCF Expression by Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barroeta Seijas, Amairelys Belen; Simonetti, Sonia; Vitale, Sara; Runci, Daniele; Quinci, Angela Caterina; Soriani, Alessandra; Criscuoli, Mattia; Filippi, Irene; Naldini, Antonella; Sacchetti, Federico Maria; Tarantino, Umberto; Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Santoni, Angela; Di Rosa, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand of c-kit, is a key cytokine for hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic precursors express c-kit, whereas differentiated cells of hematopoietic lineage are negative for this receptor, with the exception of NK cells, mast cells, and a few others. While it has long been recognized that dendritic cells (DCs) can express c-kit, several questions remain concerning the SCF/c-kit axis in DCs. This is particularly relevant for DCs found in those organs wherein SCF is highly expressed, including the bone marrow (BM). We characterized c-kit expression by conventional DCs (cDCs) from BM and demonstrated a higher proportion of c-kit+ cells among type 1 cDC subsets (cDC1s) than type 2 cDC subsets (cDC2s) in both humans and mice, whereas similar levels of c-kit expression were observed in cDC1s and cDC2s from mouse spleen. To further study c-kit regulation, DCs were generated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from mouse BM, a widely used protocol. CD11c+ cells were purified from pooled non-adherent and slightly adherent cells collected after 7 days of culture, thus obtaining highly purified BM-derived DCs (BMdDCs). BMdDCs contained a small fraction of c-kit+ cells, and by replating them for 2 days with GM-CSF, we obtained a homogeneous population of c-kit+ CD40hi MHCIIhi cells. Not only did BMdDCs express c-kit but they also produced SCF, and both were striking upregulated if GM-CSF was omitted after replating. Furthermore, a small but significant reduction in BMdDC survival was observed upon SCF silencing. Incubation of BMdDCs with SCF did not modulate antigen presentation ability of these cells, nor it did regulate their membrane expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. We conclude that the SCF/c-kit-mediated prosurvival circuit may have been overlooked because of the prominent use of GM-CSF in DC cultures in vitro, including those human DC cultures destined for the clinics. We speculate that DCs more prominently rely

  20. Binding of iodinated recombinant human GM-CSF to the blast cells of acute myeloblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, C.A.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.; Schendel, P.F.; Minden, M.D.; McCulloch, E.A.

    1988-04-01

    Granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an effective growth factor for the blasts of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Radioiodinated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-cell derived GM-CSF was prepared using Bolton-Hunter reagent to label free amino groups on the protein. Normal human neutrophils and the blast cells from AML patients were examined for binding. We found that there were fewer receptors of higher affinity on blast cells compared with neutrophils. After brief culture in suspension, receptor number increased and affinity decreased. Experiments provided evidence that GM-CSF from Escherichia coli had a higher affinity for neutrophils (kd = 20 pM) than the CHO-cell derived protein (kd = 500 pM-1 nM). This difference was reflected in the increased effectiveness of the E. coli protein over the CHO protein to stimulate colony formation in both normal bone marrow cells and AML blasts.

  1. Recombinant rabies viruses expressing GM-CSF or flagellin are effective vaccines for both intramuscular and oral immunizations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W; Li, Zhenguang; Chai, Qingqing; Yang, Yang; Leyson, Christina M; Wu, Wenxue; Cui, Min; Fu, Zhen F

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies indicated that recombinant rabies viruses (rRABV) expressing chemokines or cytokines (including GM-CSF) could enhance the immunogenicity by recruiting and/or activating dendritic cells (DC). In this study, bacterial flagellin was cloned into the RABV genome and recombinant virus LBNSE-Flagellin was rescued. To compare the immunogenicity of LBNSE-Flagellin with recombinant virus expressing GMCSF (LBNSE-GMCSF), mice were immunized with each of these rRABVs by intramuscular (i.m.) or oral route. The parent virus (LBNSE) without expression of any foreign molecules was included for comparison. The i.m.-immunized mice were bled at three weeks after the immunization for the measurement of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and then challenged with 50 LD50 challenge virus standard (CVS-24). Orally immunized mice were boosted after three weeks and then bled and challenged one week after the booster immunization. It was found that both LBNSE-GMCSF and LBNSE-Flagellin recruited/activated more DCs and B cells in the periphery, stimulated higher levels of adaptive immune responses (VNA), and protected more mice against challenge infection than the parent virus LBNSE in both the i.m. and the orally immunized groups. Together, these studies suggest that recombinant RABV expressing GM-CSF or flagellin are more immunogenic than the parent virus in both i.m. and oral immunizations.

  2. Gene therapy for human nasopharyngeal carcinoma by adenovirus-mediated transfer of human p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Su-Ping; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hua; Wu, Bin; Han, Ying; Wang, Li-Sheng; Wu, Chu-Tse

    2008-10-01

    Incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains high in endemic regions. Prevention of tumor recurrences and metastases is a crucial approach to improve therapeutic outcome in NPC patients. In this study, we investigated the effects of the cotransfer of the tumor suppressor gene, p53, in combination with the immunostimulatory genes, GM-CSF and B7-1, on tumor regression and subsequent tumor recurrence. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus carrying human wild-type p53, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and B7-1 genes (Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1), which mediated high-level expression of these three genes in NPC CNE-1 cells. Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 infection inhibited the growth of CNE-1 cells and induced tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in vitro. In CNE-1 xenograft tumor models in huPBL-nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, an intratumoral injection of Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 resulted in a reduced tumor burden, compared to normal saline (NS) and Ad-p53 controls. Tumors in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group displayed diffuse necrosis and infiltration of human T-cells. Further, the tumor occurrence of CNE-1 cell rechallenge largely decreased after the primary tumor was intratumorally injected with Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 in the HuPBL-NOD/SCID mice model. Only 2 of 8 (25%) animals in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group had developed measurable tumors, which demonstrated extensive necrosis and much more human T-cell infiltration, compared to 5 of 7 (71%) in the NS and Ad-p53 groups. Therefore, the adenovirus-mediated introduction of p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes could improve local control and prevent the recurrence or metastases of NPC tumors, which suggests a potential therapeutic value in NPC treatment.

  3. Systematic review: new serological markers (anti-glycan, anti-GP2, anti-GM-CSF Ab) in the prediction of IBD patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, J; Dumestre-Perard, C; Rinaudo-Gaujous, M; Genin, C; Sparrow, M; Roblin, X; Paul, S

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, IBD diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and histological criteria. Biomarkers are needed in cases of uncertain diagnosis, or to predict disease course and therapeutic response. No guideline recommends the detection of antibodies (including ASCA and ANCA) for diagnosis or prognosis of IBD to date. However, many recent data suggest the potential role of new serological markers (anti-glycan (ACCA, ALCA, AMCA, anti-L and anti-C), anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab). This review focuses on clinical utility of these new serological markers in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring of IBD. Literature review of anti-glycan, anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab and their impact on diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of therapeutic response was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE up to June 2014. Anti-glycan, anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab are especially associated with CD and seem to be correlated with complicated disease phenotypes even if results differ between studies. Although anti-glycan Ab and anti-GP2 Ab have low sensitivity in diagnosis of IBD, they could identify a small number of CD patients not detected by other tests such as ASCA. Anti-glycan Abs are associated with a progression to a more severe disease course and a higher risk for IBD-related surgery. Anti-GP2 Ab could particularly contribute to better stratify cases of pouchitis. Anti-GM-CSF Ab seems to be correlated with disease activity and could help predict relapses. These new promising biomarkers could particularly be useful in stratification of patients according to disease phenotype and risk of complications. They could be a valuable aid in prediction of disease course and therapeutic response but more prospective studies are needed.

  4. A novel recombinant protein of ephrinA1-PE38/GM-CSF activate dendritic cells vaccine in rats with glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wang, Bin; Wu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Jiadong; Shi, Xiwen; Cheng, Wenlan; Han, Shuangyin

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells loaded with tumor-associated antigens can effectively stimulate the antitumor immune response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the body, which facilitates the development of novel and effective treatments for cancer. In this study, the adenovirus-mediated ephrinA1-PE38/GM-CSF was successfully constructed using the overlap extension method, and verified with sequencing analysis. HEK293 cells were infected with the adenovirus and the cellular expression of ephrinA1-PE38/GM-CSF was measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The recombinant adenovirus was then delivered into the tumor-bearing rats and the results showed that such treatment significantly reduced the volumes of gliomas and improved the survival of the transplanted rats. The results from immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry suggested that this immunomodulatory agent cause activation of dendritic cells. The findings that ephrinA1-PE38/GM-CSF had a high efficacy in the activation of the dendritic cells would facilitate the development of in vivo dendritic-cell vaccines for the treatment of gliomas in rats. Our new method of DC vaccine production induces not only a specific local antitumor immune response but also a systemic immunotherapeutic effect. In addition, this method completely circumvents the risk of contamination related to the in vitro culture of DCs, thus greatly improving the safety and feasibility of clinical application of the DC vaccines in glioma.

  5. Dual Role of GM-CSF as a Pro-Inflammatory and a Regulatory Cytokine: Implications for Immune Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Budnick, Isadore; Singh, Medha; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Alharshawi, Khaled; Elshabrawy, Hatem; Holterman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is generally recognized as an inflammatory cytokine. Its inflammatory activity is primarily due its role as a growth and differentiation factor for granulocyte and macrophage populations. In this capacity, among other clinical applications, it has been used to bolster anti-tumor immune responses. GM-CSF-mediated inflammation has also been implicated in certain types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Thus, agents that can block GM-CSF or its receptor have been used as anti-inflammatory therapies. However, a review of literature reveals that in many situations GM-CSF can act as an anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine. We and others have shown that GM-CSF can modulate dendritic cell differentiation to render them “tolerogenic,” which, in turn, can increase regulatory T-cell numbers and function. Therefore, the pro-inflammatory and regulatory effects of GM-CSF appear to depend on the dose and the presence of other relevant cytokines in the context of an immune response. A thorough understanding of the various immunomodulatory effects of GM-CSF will facilitate more appropriate use and thus further enhance its clinical utility. PMID:25803788

  6. Construction and immunological characterization of CD40L or GM-CSF incorporated Hantaan virus like particle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Truax, Agnieszka D.; Ma, Ruixue; Liu, Ziyu; Lei, Yingfeng; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Wei; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Shang, Lei; Liu, Rongrong; Wang, Fang; Wu, Xingan

    2016-01-01

    Infection of Hantaan virus (HTNV) usually causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). China has the worst epidemic incidence of HFRS as well as high fatality. Inactivated whole virus has been used for HFRS vaccination, however there are still problems such as safety concerns. CD40 ligand (CD40L) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are well-known immune stimulating molecules that can enhance antigen presenting, lymphocytes activation and maturation, incorporation of CD40L and GM-CSF to the surface of virus like particles (VLPs) can greatly improve the vaccination effect. We constructed eukaryotic vectors expressing HTNV M segment and S segment, as well as vectors expressing HTNV M segment with CD40L or GM-CSF, our results showed successful production of CD40L or GM-CSF incorporated HTNV VLPs. In vitro stimulation with CD40L or GM-CSF anchored HTNV VLP showed enhanced activation of macrophages and DCs. CD40L/GM-CSF incorporated VLP can induce higher level of HTNV specific antibody and neutralizing antibody in mice. Immunized mice splenocytes showed higher ability of secreting IFN-γ and IL-2, as well as enhancing CTL activity. These results suggest CD40L/GM-CSF incorporated VLP can serve as prospective vaccine candidate. PMID:27542281

  7. GM-CSF upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis reverses cognitive impairment and amyloidosis in Alzheimer mice.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Tim D; Bennett, Steven P; Mori, Takashi; Governatori, Nicholas; Runfeldt, Melissa; Norden, Michelle; Padmanabhan, Jaya; Neame, Peter; Wefes, Inge; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Arendash, Gary W; Potter, Huntington

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a negative risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While it has been commonly assumed that RA patients' usage of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) helped prevent onset and progression of AD, NSAID clinical trials have proven unsuccessful in AD patients. To determine whether intrinsic factors within RA pathogenesis itself may underlie RA's protective effect, we investigated the activity of colony-stimulating factors, upregulated in RA, on the pathology and behavior of transgenic AD mice. 5 microg bolus injections of macrophage, granulocyte, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors (M-CSF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF) were administered unilaterally into the hippocampus of aged cognitively-impaired AD mice and the resulting amyloid load reductions determined one week later, using the artificial cerebrospinal fluid-injected contralateral sides as controls. G-CSF and more significantly, GM-CSF reduced amyloidosis throughout the treated brain hemisphere one week following bolus administration to AD mice. 20 daily subcutaneous injections of 5 microg of GM-CSF (the most amyloid-reducing CSF in the bolus experiment) were administered to balanced cohorts of AD mice after assessment in a battery of cognitive tests. Reductions in amyloid load and improvements in cognitive function were assessed. Subcutaneous GM-CSF administration significantly reduced brain amyloidosis and completely reversed the cognitive impairment, while increasing hippocampal synaptic area and microglial density. These findings, along with two decades of accrued safety data using Leukine, recombinant human GMCSF, in elderly leukopenic patients, suggest that Leukine should be tested as a treatment to reverse cerebral amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment in AD.

  8. GM-CSF and ipilimumab therapy in metastatic melanoma: Clinical outcomes and immunologic responses

    PubMed Central

    Kwek, Serena S.; Kahn, James; Greaney, Samantha K.; Lewis, Jera; Cha, Edward; Zhang, Li; Weber, Robert W.; Leonard, Lonnie; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Fong, Lawrence; Spitler, Lynn E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We conducted a phase II clinical trial of anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in 22 patients with metastatic melanoma and determined clinical outcomes and immunologic responses. The treatment consisted of a 3-mo induction with ipilimumab at 10 mg/kg administered every 3 weeks for four doses in combination with GM-CSF at 125 µg/m2 for 14 d beginning on the day of the ipilimumab infusion and then GM-CSF for 3 mo on the same schedule without ipilimumab. This was followed by maintenance therapy with the combination every 3 mo for up to 2 y or until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Blood samples for determination of immune subsets were obtained before treatment, at week 3 (end of cycle 1) and at week 6 (end of cycle 2). Blood samples were also obtained from seven subjects who were cancer-free. The immune response disease control (irDC) rate at 24 weeks was 41% and the overall response rate (ORR) was 32%. The median progression free-survival (PFS) was 3.5 mo and the median overall survival (OS) was 21.1 mo. 41% of the patients experienced Grade 3 to 4 adverse events. We conclude that this combination is safe and the results suggest the combination may be more effective than ipilimumab monotherapy. Further, the results suggest that lower levels of CD4+ effector T cells but higher levels of CD8+ T cells expressing PD-1 at pre-treatment could be a potential biomarker for disease control in patients who receive immunotherapy with ipilimumab and GM-CSF. Further trials of this combination are warranted. PMID:27141383

  9. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) plus GM-CSF as frontline treatment for patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Paolo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Lerner, Susan; O’Brien, Susan; Wierda, William; Keating, Michael J; Faderl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    FCR, the standard of care for frontline treatment of CLL patients, is associated with a high rate of neutropenia and infectious complications. GM-CSF reduces myelosuppression and can potentiate rituximab activity. We conducted a clinical trial combining GM-CSF with FCR for frontline treatment of 60 CLL patients. Eighty-six percent completed all 6 courses and 18% discontinued GM-CSF for toxicity; grade 3–4 neutropenia was observed in 30% of cycles, and severe infections in 16% of cases. ORR was 100%. Both median EFS and OS have not been reached. Longer EFS was associated with favorable cytogenetic. GM-CSF led to a lower frequency of infectious complications than the historical FCR group, albeit similar EFS and OS. PMID:23808813

  10. A human monoclonal IgG1 potently neutralizing the pro-inflammatory cytokine GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Krinner, Eva-Maria; Raum, Tobias; Petsch, Silke; Bruckmaier, Sandra; Schuster, Ioana; Petersen, Laetitia; Cierpka, Ronny; Abebe, Derege; Mølhøj, Michael; Wolf, Andreas; Sørensen, Poul; Locher, Mathias; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Hepp, Julia

    2007-02-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine GM-CSF is aberrantly produced in many autoimmune and chronic inflammatory human diseases. GM-CSF neutralization by antibodies has been shown to have a profound therapeutic effect in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory lung diseases, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Moreover, the absence of GM-CSF in null mutant mice ameliorates or prevents certain of these diseases. Here we describe the biophysical and biological properties of a human anti-GM-CSF IgG1 antibody designated MT203, which was derived by phage display guided selection. MT203 bound with picomolar affinity to an epitope on human and macaque GM-CSF involved in high-affinity receptor interaction. As a consequence, the antibody potently prevented both GM-CSF-induced proliferation of TF-1 cells with a sub-nanomolar IC50 value and the production of the chemokine IL-8 by U937 cells. MT203 neutralized equally well recombinant (r) human (h) GM-CSF from Escherichia coli and yeast, and also normally glycosylated GM-CSF secreted by human lung epithelial cells in response to IL-1beta stimulation. Furthermore, MT203 significantly reduced both survival and activation of peripheral human eosinophils as may be required for effective treatment of inflammatory lung diseases. The antibody did not show a detectable loss of neutralizing activity after 5 days in human serum at 37 degrees C. Based on its favorable properties, MT203 has been selected for development as a novel anti-inflammatory human monoclonal antibody with therapeutic potential in a multitude of human autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  11. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy.

    PubMed

    van de Laar, Lianne; Coffer, Paul J; Woltman, Andrea M

    2012-04-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as tolerogenic immune responses. Because of their limited lifespan, continuous replenishment of DC is required. Whereas the importance of GM-CSF in regulating DC homeostasis has long been underestimated, this cytokine is currently considered a critical factor for DC development under both steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Regulation of cellular actions by GM-CSF depends on the activation of intracellular signaling modules, including JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and canonical NF-κB. By directing the activity of transcription factors and other cellular effector proteins, these pathways influence differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of uncommitted hematopoietic progenitors, and DC subset-specific precursors, thereby contributing to specific aspects of DC subset development. The specific intracellular events resulting from GM-CSF-induced signaling provide a molecular explanation for GM-CSF-dependent subset distribution as well as clues to the specific characteristics and functions of GM-CSF-differentiated DCs compared with DCs generated by fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand. This knowledge can be used to identify therapeutic targets to improve GM-CSF-dependent DC-based strategies to regulate immunity.

  12. Neuroantigen-specific, tolerogenic vaccines: GM-CSF is a fusion partner that facilitates tolerance rather than immunity to dominant self-epitopes of myelin in murine models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaccination strategies that elicit antigen-specific tolerance are needed as therapies for autoimmune disease. This study focused on whether cytokine-neuroantigen (NAg) fusion proteins could inhibit disease in chronic murine models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and thus serve as potential therapeutic modalities for multiple sclerosis. Results A fusion protein comprised of murine GM-CSF as the N-terminal domain and the encephalitogenic MOG35-55 peptide as the C-terminal domain was tested as a tolerogenic, therapeutic vaccine (TTV) in the C57BL/6 model of EAE. Administration of GMCSF-MOG before active induction of EAE, or alternatively, at the onset of EAE blocked the development and progression of EAE. Covalent linkage of the GM-CSF and MOG35-55 domains was required for tolerogenic activity. Likewise, a TTV comprised of GM-CSF and PLP139-151 was a tolerogen in the SJL model of EAE. Conclusion These data indicated that fusion proteins containing GM-CSF coupled to myelin auto-antigens elicit tolerance rather than immunity. PMID:22208499

  13. GM-CSF Autoantibody-positive Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis with Simultaneous Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, Naoto; Harunori, Nakashima; Furukawa, Katsuya; Tange, Naoyuki; Murase, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Masaya; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Iwata, Yosuke; Kosugi, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is classified as autoimmune, secondary, or genetic. We herein describe a 69-year-old man with autoimmune PAP, simultaneously diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Two years after the diagnosis, the MPN progressed to acute myeloid leukemia, and the patient died from an alveolar hemorrhage during remission induction chemotherapy. Throughout the clinical course, no progression of PAP was observed, despite the progression to leukemia. There are few reports of autoimmune PAP with hematological malignancy, and this case demonstrated that an evaluation for GM-CSF autoantibodies is important for distinguishing the autoimmune and secondary forms of PAP, even if the patient has hematological malignancy. PMID:28202867

  14. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells shape myeloid cell function within the tumor microenvironment through IFN-γ and GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Spear, Paul; Barber, Amorette; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Sentman, Charles L

    2012-06-15

    The infiltration of suppressive myeloid cells into the tumor microenvironment restrains anti-tumor immunity. However, cytokines may alter the function of myeloid lineage cells to support tumor rejection, regulating the balance between pro- and anti-tumor immunity. In this study, it is shown that effector cytokines secreted by adoptively transferred T cells expressing a chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) shape the function of myeloid cells to promote endogenous immunity and tumor destruction. Mice bearing the ovarian ID8 tumor were treated with T cells transduced with a chimeric NKG2D receptor. GM-CSF secreted by the adoptively transferred T cells recruited peripheral F4/80(lo)Ly-6C(+) myeloid cells to the tumor microenvironment in a CCR2-dependent fashion. T cell IFN-γ and GM-CSF activated local, tumor-associated macrophages, decreased expression of regulatory factors, increased IL-12p40 production, and augmented Ag processing and presentation by host macrophages to Ag-specific T cells. In addition, T cell-derived IFN-γ, but not GM-CSF, induced the production of NO by F4/80(hi) macrophages and enhanced their lysis of tumor cells. The ability of CAR T cell therapy to eliminate tumor was moderately impaired when inducible NO synthase was inhibited and greatly impaired in the absence of peritoneal macrophages after depletion with clodronate encapsulated liposomes. This study demonstrates that the activation of host macrophages by CAR T cell-derived cytokines transformed the tumor microenvironment from immunosuppressive to immunostimulatory and contributed to inhibition of ovarian tumor growth.

  15. Coadministration of cruzipain and GM-CSF DNAs, a new immunotherapeutic vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Natacha; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Bivona, Augusto E; De Marzi, Mauricio C; Frank, Fernanda M; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccine research and development are especially important in Chagas disease considering the characteristics of the chronic infection and the number of people in the Americas living with a parasite infection for decades. We have previously reported the efficacy of attenuated Salmonella enterica (S) carrying plasmid encoding cruzipain (SCz) to protect against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In the present work we investigated whether Cz DNA vaccine immunotherapy could be effective in controlling an ongoing T. cruzi infection in mice. We here report the intramuscular administration of naked Cz DNA or the oral administration of Salmonella as Cz DNA delivery system as therapeutic vaccines in mice during acute or chronic infection. The coadministration of a plasmid encoding GM-CSF improved vaccine performance, indicating that the stimulation of innate immune cells is needed in the event of an ongoing infection. These therapeutic vaccines were able to address the response to a protective and sustained Th1 biased profile not only against Cz but also against a variety of parasite antigens. The combined therapeutic vaccine during the chronic phase of infection prevents tissue pathology as shown by a reduced level of enzyme activity characteristic of tissue damage and a tissue status compatible with normal tissue. The obtained results suggest that immunotherapy with Cz and GM-CSF DNAs, either alone or in combination with other drug treatments, may represent a promising alternative for Chagas disease therapy.

  16. Structural basis of GM-CSF and IL-2 sequestration by the viral decoy receptor GIF

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Jan; Kandiah, Eaazhisai; De Munck, Steven; Bloch, Yehudi; van Zundert, Gydo C.P.; Pauwels, Kris; Dansercoer, Ann; Novanska, Katka; Read, Randy J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Verstraete, Kenneth; Gutsche, Irina; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2016-01-01

    Subversion of the host immune system by viruses is often mediated by molecular decoys that sequester host proteins pivotal to mounting effective immune responses. The widespread mammalian pathogen parapox Orf virus deploys GIF, a member of the poxvirus immune evasion superfamily, to antagonize GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and IL-2 (interleukin-2), two pleiotropic cytokines of the mammalian immune system. However, structural and mechanistic insights into the unprecedented functional duality of GIF have remained elusive. Here we reveal that GIF employs a dimeric binding platform that sequesters two copies of its target cytokines with high affinity and slow dissociation kinetics to yield distinct complexes featuring mutually exclusive interaction footprints. We illustrate how GIF serves as a competitive decoy receptor by leveraging binding hotspots underlying the cognate receptor interactions of GM-CSF and IL-2, without sharing any structural similarity with the cytokine receptors. Our findings contribute to the tracing of novel molecular mimicry mechanisms employed by pathogenic viruses. PMID:27819269

  17. Structural basis of GM-CSF and IL-2 sequestration by the viral decoy receptor GIF.

    PubMed

    Felix, Jan; Kandiah, Eaazhisai; De Munck, Steven; Bloch, Yehudi; van Zundert, Gydo C P; Pauwels, Kris; Dansercoer, Ann; Novanska, Katka; Read, Randy J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Verstraete, Kenneth; Gutsche, Irina; Savvides, Savvas N

    2016-11-07

    Subversion of the host immune system by viruses is often mediated by molecular decoys that sequester host proteins pivotal to mounting effective immune responses. The widespread mammalian pathogen parapox Orf virus deploys GIF, a member of the poxvirus immune evasion superfamily, to antagonize GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and IL-2 (interleukin-2), two pleiotropic cytokines of the mammalian immune system. However, structural and mechanistic insights into the unprecedented functional duality of GIF have remained elusive. Here we reveal that GIF employs a dimeric binding platform that sequesters two copies of its target cytokines with high affinity and slow dissociation kinetics to yield distinct complexes featuring mutually exclusive interaction footprints. We illustrate how GIF serves as a competitive decoy receptor by leveraging binding hotspots underlying the cognate receptor interactions of GM-CSF and IL-2, without sharing any structural similarity with the cytokine receptors. Our findings contribute to the tracing of novel molecular mimicry mechanisms employed by pathogenic viruses.

  18. GM-CSF-neuroantigen fusion proteins reverse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and mediate tolerogenic activity in adjuvant-primed environments: association with inflammation-dependent, inhibitory antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Islam, S M Touhidul; Curtis, Alan D; Taslim, Najla; Wilkinson, Daniel S; Mannie, Mark D

    2014-09-01

    Single-chain fusion proteins comprised of GM-CSF and neuroantigen (NAg) are potent, NAg-specific inhibitors of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). An important question was whether GMCSF-NAg tolerogenic vaccines retained inhibitory activity within inflammatory environments or were contingent upon steady-state conditions. GM-CSF fused to the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein MOG35-55 peptide (GMCSF-MOG) reversed established paralytic disease in both passive and active models of EAE in C57BL/6 mice. The fusion protein also reversed EAE in CD4-deficient and B cell-deficient mice. Notably, GMCSF-MOG inhibited EAE when coinjected adjacent to the MOG35-55/CFA emulsion. GMCSF-MOG also retained dominant inhibitory activity when directly emulsified with MOG35-55 in the CFA emulsion in both C57BL/6 or B cell-deficient models of EAE. Likewise, when combined with proteolipid protein 139-151 in CFA, GM-CSF fused to proteolipid protein 139-151 peptide inhibited EAE in SJL mice. When deliberately emulsified in CFA with the NAg, GMCSF-NAg inhibited EAE even though NAg was present at >30-fold molar excess. In vitro studies revealed that the GM-CSF domain of GMCSF-MOG stimulated growth and differentiation of inflammatory dendritic cells (DC) and simultaneously targeted the MOG35-55 domain for enhanced presentation by these DC. These inflammatory DC presented MOG35-55 to MOG-specific T cells by an inhibitory mechanism that was mediated in part by IFN-γ signaling and NO production. In conclusion, GMCSF-NAg was tolerogenic in CFA-primed proinflammatory environments by a mechanism associated with targeted Ag presentation by inflammatory DC and an inhibitory IFN-γ/NO pathway. The inhibitory activity of GMCSF-NAg in CFA-primed lymphatics distinguishes GMCSF-NAg fusion proteins as a unique class of inflammation-dependent tolerogens that are mechanistically distinct from naked peptide or protein-based tolerogens.

  19. TGF-β Affects the Differentiation of Human GM-CSF+ CD4+ T Cells in an Activation- and Sodium-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Éliás, Szabolcs; Schmidt, Angelika; Kannan, Venkateshan; Andersson, John; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, the environmental cues promoting differentiation of GM-CSF producing T cells are unclear. Herein, we performed a broad experimental screening of cytokines and data-driven analysis assessing their ability to induce human GM-CSF+ CD4+ T cells and their subpopulations. TGF-β was discovered to induce GM-CSF production independently of proliferation and IL-2 signaling including STAT5. In contrast, IL-6 and IL-23 decreased GM-CSF production. On the population level, GM-CSF induction was highly correlated with expression of FOXP3 across cytokine stimulations but not with that of IL-17. However, on single-cell level GM-CSF and IFN-γ expression were most correlated, independently of the cytokine environment. Importantly, under low sodium conditions in the medium or upon stimulation with plate-bound instead of bead-bound anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, the effects of TGF-β on GM-CSF, but not on FOXP3, were reversed. Our analysis indicates a novel role for TGF-β in generating GM-CSF+ subsets of human CD4+ T cells. These results are important for understanding of autoimmune disease and therapeutic considerations. PMID:28066414

  20. GM-CSF induces neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory responses in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine intoxicated mice1

    PubMed Central

    Kosloski, Lisa M.; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A.; Olson, Katherine E.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune responses can speed nigrostriatal neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We posit that GM-CSF can attenuate such responses. In 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxicated mice, GM-CSF given prior to MPTP protected nigral dopaminergic neurons coincident with altered microglial morphologies and regulatory T cell (Treg) induction. Adoptive transfer of GM-CSF-induced Treg to MPTP mice protected nigral neurons and their striatal termini. Gene expression analyses revealed novel immune-based neuronal protection pathways. The results provide evidence that GM-CSF modulation of immunity could be of clinical benefit for PD. PMID:24210793

  1. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    SciTech Connect

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham; Wells, Greg; Barna, Barbara P.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and the PPAR{gamma}-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPAR{gamma}. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPAR{gamma} plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPAR{gamma} or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by

  2. Overview of use of G-CSF and GM-CSF in the treatment of acute radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Glen

    2014-06-01

    Depression of hematopoietic elements due to significant levels of whole-body or partial-body irradiation due to radiation-induced suppression of mitosis in the stem and progenitor cells can result in life-threatening injury. Successful administration of intensive care of patients experiencing acute radiation sickness (ARS; also called acute radiation syndrome) is dependent upon the ability to stimulate the recovery of surviving hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), assuming the non-hematopoietic injuries are also survivable with treatment. To date, there have been a number of studies involving radiation accidents where patients were treated with cytokines. Although the data overall seem to indicate that the period of neutropenia is shortened and survival prolonged, so far there is no statistically significant proof that cytokine administration actually decreases mortality in radiation-injured humans. Some studies have shown no improved survival when used in a mouse model; however, studies in canines and primates have shown improved survival. CSF therapy is considered a valuable adjunct to treatment with antibiotics and strict hygiene controls in certain irradiated patients. It appears that these drugs do shorten the periods of neutropenia in irradiated patients and must be considered part of the therapeutic armamentarium in the treatment of ARS in a mass casualty situation. Based on review of the human experience with G-CSF and GM-CSF, as well as some animal studies, current consensus opinions support the prompt administration of these materials to patients suffering significant bone marrow depression from exposure to ionizing radiation.

  3. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Ohms, Stephen J.; Shannon, Frances M.; Sun, Chao; Fan, Jun Y.

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  4. Protein engineering and preclinical development of a GM-CSF receptor antibody for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Minter, RR; Cohen, ES; Wang, B; Liang, M; Vainshtein, I; Rees, G; Eghobamien, L; Harrison, P; Sims, DA; Matthews, C; Wilkinson, T; Monk, P; Drinkwater, C; Fabri, L; Nash, A; McCourt, M; Jermutus, L; Roskos, L; Anderson, IK; Sleeman, MA

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose For antibody therapies against receptor targets, in vivo outcomes can be difficult to predict because of target-mediated clearance or antigen ‘sink’ effects. The purpose of this work was to engineer an antibody to the GM-CSF receptor α (GM-CSFRα) with pharmacological properties optimized for chronic, s.c. treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Experimental Approach We used an in silico model of receptor occupancy to guide the target affinity and a combinatorial phage display approach for affinity maturation. Mechanism of action and internalization assays were performed on the optimized antibody in vitro before refining the modelling predictions of the eventual dosing in man. Finally, in vivo pharmacology studies in cynomolgus monkeys were carried out to inform the predictions and support future clinical development. Key Results Antibody potency was improved 8600-fold, and the target affinity was reached. The refined model predicted pharmacodynamic effects at doses as low as 1 mg kg−1 and a study in cynomolgus monkeys confirmed in vivo efficacy at 1 mg kg−1 dosing. Conclusions and Implications This rational approach to antibody drug discovery enabled the isolation of a potent molecule compatible with chronic, s.c. self-administration by RA patients. We believe this general approach enables the development of optimal biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22913645

  5. IL-12-polarized Th1 cells produce GM-CSF and induce EAE independent of IL-23

    PubMed Central

    Grifka-Walk, Heather M.; Giles, David A.; Segal, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T-helper (Th) cells reactive against myelin antigens mediate the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). It is currently debated whether encephalitogenic Th cells are heterogeneous or arise from a single lineage. In the current study, we challenge the dogma that stimulation with the monokine IL-23 is universally required for the acquisition of pathogenic properties by myelin-reactive T cells. We show that IL-12-modulated Th1 cells readily produce IFN-γ and GM-CSF in the central nervous system (CNS) and induce a severe form of EAE via an IL-23-independent pathway. Th1-mediated EAE is characterized by monocyte-rich CNS infiltrates, elicits a strong proinflammatory cytokine response in the CNS, and is partially CCR2-dependent. Conversely, IL-23-modulated, stable Th17 cells induce EAE with a relatively mild course via an IL-12-independent pathway. These data provide definitive evidence that autoimmune disease can be driven by distinct CD4+ T helper cell subsets and polarizing factors. PMID:26220255

  6. Establishment of a GM-CSF-dependent megakaryoblastic cell line with the potential to differentiate into an eosinophilic lineage in response to retinoic acids.

    PubMed

    Ma, F; Koike, K; Higuchi, T; Kinoshita, T; Takeuchi, K; Mwamtemi, H H; Sawai, N; Kamijo, T; Shiohara, M; Horie, S; Kawa, S; Sasaki, Y; Hidaka, E; Yamagami, O; Yamashita, T; Koike, T; Ishii, E; Komiyama, A

    1998-02-01

    We recently established a human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent cell line (HML) from colony-constituent cells grown by peripheral blood cells of a patient with acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia. The HML cells possessed megakaryocytic features, as determined by cytochemical, electron microscopic and flow cytometric analysis. In the present study we examined the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on the development of HML cells. All-trans-RA, 13-cis-RA and 9-cis-RA at 10(-8) mol/l to 10(-5) mol/l inhibited the GM-CSF-dependent cell growth. Some of the RA-treated cells contained prominent azurophilic granules and were positive for peroxidase. They also reacted with Biebrich scarlet, Luxol fast blue and a monoclonal antibody against eosinophil peroxidase. In addition, exposure to RA increased the frequency and the intensity of major basic protein-positive cells. However, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin and eosinophil cationic protein were not detected or were only detected at a low level in the lysates of the HML cells treated with RA. Although IL-5 alone could not stimulate cell growth, the addition of IL-5 to the cultures containing stem cell factor + all-trans-RA was required for the expression of the eosinophilic phenotype. These results suggest that the HML cell line is a megakaryoblastic cell line with the potential to differentiate into the eosinophilic lineage. HML cells may be a useful model for elucidating the eosinophilic differentiation programme.

  7. GM-CSF treated F4/80+ BMCs improve murine hind limb ischemia similar to M-CSF differentiated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Go; Nishinakamura, Hitomi; Kojima, Daibo; Tashiro, Tadashi; Kodama, Shohta

    2014-01-01

    Novel cell therapy is required to treat critical limb ischemia (CLI) as many current approaches require repeated aspiration of bone marrow cells (BMCs). The use of cultured BMCs can reduce the total number of injections required and were shown to induce therapeutic angiogenesis in a murine model of hind limb ischemia. Blood flow recovery was significantly improved in mice treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent BMCs that secreted inflammatory cytokines. Angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and blood flow recovery ratio were significantly higher in the GM-CSF-cultured F4/80+ macrophage (GM-Mø)-treated group compared with controls. Furthermore, Foxp3+ cell numbers and tissue IL-10 concentrations were significantly increased compared with controls. There was no significant difference in blood flow recovery between GM-Mø and M-CSF-cultured F4/80+ macrophages (M-Mø). Thus, GM-Mø were associated with improved blood flow in hind limb ischemia similar to M-Mø. The selective methods of culturing and treating GM-Mø cells similar to M-Mø cells could be used clinically to help resolve the large number of cells required for BMC treatment of CLI. This study demonstrates a novel cell therapy for CLI that can be used in conjunction with conventional therapy including percutaneous intervention and surgical bypass.

  8. GM-CSF signalling blockade and chemotherapeutic agents act in concert to inhibit the function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gargett, Tessa; Christo, Susan N; Hercus, Timothy R; Abbas, Nazim; Singhal, Nimit; Lopez, Angel F; Brown, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Immune evasion is a recently defined hallmark of cancer, and immunotherapeutic approaches that stimulate an immune response to tumours are gaining recognition. However tumours may evade the immune response and resist immune-targeted treatment by promoting an immune-suppressive environment and stimulating the differentiation or recruitment of immunosuppressive cells. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been identified in a range of cancers and are often associated with tumour progression and poor patient outcomes. Pancreatic cancer in particular supports MDSC differentiation via the secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and MDSC are believed to contribute to the profoundly immune-suppressive microenvironment present in pancreatic tumours. MDSC-targeted therapies that deplete or inhibit this cell population have been proposed as a way to shift the balance in favour of a tumour-clearing immune response. In this study, we have modelled MDSC differentiation and function in vitro and this has provided us with the opportunity to test a range of potential MDSC-targeted therapies to identify candidates for further investigation. Using in vitro modelling we show here that the combination of GM-CSF-signalling blockade and gemcitabine suppresses both the MDSC phenotype and the inhibition of T-cell function by MDSC. PMID:28090321

  9. CCR2 defines in vivo development and homing of IL-23-driven GM-CSF-producing Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ervin E; McKenzie, Duncan R; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; Fenix, Kevin A; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Paton, James C; Mack, Matthias; Pombal, Diana R; Seillet, Cyrill; Dubois, Bénédicte; Liston, Adrian; MacDonald, Kelli P A; Belz, Gabrielle T; Smyth, Mark J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R

    2015-10-29

    IL-17-producing helper T (Th17) cells are critical for host defense against extracellular pathogens but also drive numerous autoimmune diseases. Th17 cells that differ in their inflammatory potential have been described including IL-10-producing Th17 cells that are weak inducers of inflammation and highly inflammatory, IL-23-driven, GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells. However, their distinct developmental requirements, functions and trafficking mechanisms in vivo remain poorly understood. Here we identify a temporally regulated IL-23-dependent switch from CCR6 to CCR2 usage by developing Th17 cells that is critical for pathogenic Th17 cell-driven inflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This switch defines a unique in vivo cell surface signature (CCR6(-)CCR2(+)) of GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells in EAE and experimental persistent extracellular bacterial infection, and in humans. Using this signature, we identify an IL-23/IL-1/IFNγ/TNFα/T-bet/Eomesodermin-driven circuit driving GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cell formation in vivo. Thus, our data identify a unique cell surface signature, trafficking mechanism and T-cell intrinsic regulators of GM-CSF/IFNγ-producing Th17 cells.

  10. DPP4 truncated GM-CSF & IL-3 manifest distinct receptor binding & regulatory functions compared to their full length forms.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, H A; Capitano, M; Cooper, S; Mantel, C; Boswell, H S; Kapur, R; Ramdas, B; Chan, R; Deng, L; Qu, C-K; Broxmeyer, H E

    2017-03-27

    Dipeptidylpeptidase 4 (DPP4/CD26) enzymatically cleaves select penultimate amino acids of proteins, including colony stimulating factors (CSFs), and has been implicated in cellular regulation. To better understand the role of DPP4 regulation of hematopoiesis, we analyzed the activity of DPP4 on the surface of immature blood cells and then comparatively assessed the interactions and functional effects of full-length (FL) and DPP4 truncated factors [(T)-GM-CSF and- IL-3] on both in vitro and in vivo models of normal and leukemic cells. T-GM-CSF and T-IL-3 had enhanced receptor binding, but decreased CSF activity, compared to their FL forms. Importantly, T-GM-CSF and T-IL-3 significantly, and reciprocally, blunted receptor binding and myeloid progenitor cell proliferation activity of both FL-GM-CSF and FL-IL-3 in vitro and in vivo. Similar effects were apparent in vitro using cluster forming cells from patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) regardless of cytogenetic or molecular alterations and in vivo utilizing animal models of leukemia. This suggests that DPP4 T-molecules have modified binding and functions compared to their FL counterparts and may serve regulatory roles in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 27 March 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.98.

  11. Local GM-CSF-Dependent Differentiation and Activation of Pulmonary Dendritic Cells and Macrophages Protect against Progressive Cryptococcal Lung Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; Teitz-Tennenbaum, Seagal; Neal, Lori M; Murdock, Benjamin J; Malachowski, Antoni N; Dils, Anthony J; Olszewski, Michal A; Osterholzer, John J

    2016-02-15

    Patients with acquired deficiency in GM-CSF are susceptible to infections with Cryptococcus neoformans and other opportunistic fungi. We previously showed that GM-CSF protects against progressive fungal disease using a murine model of cryptococcal lung infection. To better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which GM-CSF enhances antifungal host defenses, we investigated temporal and spatial relationships between myeloid and lymphoid immune responses in wild-type C57BL/6 mice capable of producing GM-CSF and GM-CSF-deficient mice infected with a moderately virulent encapsulated strain of C. neoformans (strain 52D). Our data demonstrate that GM-CSF deficiency led to a reduction in: 1) total lung leukocyte recruitment; 2) Th2 and Th17 responses; 3) total numbers of CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DC) and CD11b(-) and CD11b(+) macrophages (Mϕ); 4) DC and Mϕ activation; and 5) localization of DC and Mϕ to the microanatomic sites of alveolar infection. In contrast, GM-CSF deficiency resulted in increased accumulation of DC and Mϕ precursors, namely Ly-6C(high) monocytes, in the blood and lungs of infected mice. Collectively, these results show that GM-CSF promotes the local differentiation, accumulation, activation, and alveolar localization of lung DC and Mϕ in mice with cryptococcal lung infection. These findings identify GM-CSF as central to the protective immune response that prevents progressive fungal disease and thus shed new light on the increased susceptibility to these infections observed in patients with acquired GM-CSF deficiency.

  12. So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang, a herbal medicine, modulates inflammatory cell infiltration and prevents airway remodeling via regulation of interleukin-17 and GM-CSF in allergic asthma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Woo; Lim, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Bu-Yeo; Cho, Su-In

    2014-01-01

    Background: So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang (SCRT), herbal medicine, has been used for the control of respiratory disease in East Asian countries. However, its therapeutic mechanisms, especially an inhibitory effect on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway remodeling in allergic asthma are unclear. Objective: The present study investigated the mechanism of antiasthmatic effects of SCRT in allergic asthma in mice. Materials and Methods: We investigated the influence of SCRT on levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17), granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-4, and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE in serum, and histopathological changes in allergen-induced asthma. Results: So-Cheong-Ryong-Tang decreased levels of IL-17 and GM-CSF in BALF. IL-4, a Th2-driven cytokine, was also decreased by SCRT, but IFN-γ, a Th1-driven cytokine, was not changed. Levels of OVA-specific IgE in serum were also decreased by SCRT. With SCRT treatment, histopathological findings showed reduced tendency of inflammatory cell infiltration, and prevention from airway remodeling such as epithelial hyperplasia. Conclusion: In this study, we firstly demonstrated that regulation of IL-17 and GM-CSF production may be one of the mechanism contributed to a reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration and prevention from airway remodeling. PMID:25298667

  13. Isolation and characterization of a resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); confirmation of the GM-CSF amino acid sequence by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsarbopoulos, A.; Pramanik, B. N.; Labdon, J. E.; Reichert, P.; Gitlin, G.; Patel, S.; Sardana, V.; Nagabhushan, T. L.; Trotta, P. P.

    1993-01-01

    A trypsin-resistant core peptide of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was isolated and analyzed by high-energy Cs+ liquid secondary-ion (LSI) mass spectrometric analysis. This analysis provided successful detection of the high-mass disulfide-linked core peptide as well as information confirming the existence of disulfide pairing. Similarly, LSI mass spectrometric analysis of the peptide fragments isolated chromatographically from a Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digest of rhGM-CSF provided rapid confirmation of the cDNA-derived sequence and determination of the existing disulfide bonds between cysteine residues 54-96 and 88-121. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to measure the molecular weight of the intact protein and to determine the number of the disulfide bonds in the protein molecule by comparative analysis of the protein before and after reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol. PMID:8268804

  14. GM-CSF Production Allows the Identification of Immunoprevalent Antigens Recognized by Human CD4+ T Cells Following Smallpox Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Judkowski, Valeria; Bunying, Alcinette; Ge, Feng; Appel, Jon R.; Law, Kingyee; Sharma, Atima; Raja- Gabaglia, Claudia; Norori, Patricia; Santos, Radleigh G.; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Slifka, Mark K.; Douek, Daniel C.; Graham, Barney S.; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2011-01-01

    The threat of bioterrorism with smallpox and the broad use of vaccinia vectors for other vaccines have led to the resurgence in the study of vaccinia immunological memory. The importance of the role of CD4+ T cells in the control of vaccinia infection is well known. However, more CD8+ than CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by human subjects immunized with vaccinia virus have been reported. This could be, in part, due to the fact that most of the studies that have identified human CD4+ specific protein-derived fragments or peptides have used IFN-γ production to evaluate vaccinia specific T cell responses. Based on these findings, we reasoned that analyzing a large panel of cytokines would permit us to generate a more complete analysis of the CD4 T cell responses. The results presented provide clear evidence that TNF-α is an excellent readout of vaccinia specificity and that other cytokines such as GM-CSF can be used to evaluate the reactivity of CD4+ T cells in response to vaccinia antigens. Furthermore, using these cytokines as readout of vaccinia specificity, we present the identification of novel peptides from immunoprevalent vaccinia proteins recognized by CD4+ T cells derived from smallpox vaccinated human subjects. In conclusion, we describe a “T cell–driven” methodology that can be implemented to determine the specificity of the T cell response upon vaccination or infection. Together, the single pathogen in vitro stimulation, the selection of CD4+ T cells specific to the pathogen by limiting dilution, the evaluation of pathogen specificity by detecting multiple cytokines, and the screening of the clones with synthetic combinatorial libraries, constitutes a novel and valuable approach for the elucidation of human CD4+ T cell specificity in response to large pathogens. PMID:21931646

  15. Development of a successful antitumor therapeutic model combining in vivo dendritic cell vaccination with tumor irradiation and intratumoral GM-CSF delivery.

    PubMed

    Driessens, Gregory; Nuttin, Lise; Gras, Alain; Maetens, Julie; Mievis, Stephane; Schoore, Marylène; Velu, Thierry; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Préat, Véronique; Bruyns, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    Vaccination of dendritic cells (DC) combined with GM-CSF secreting tumor cells has shown good therapeutic efficacy in several tumor models. Nevertheless, the engineering of GM-CSF secreting tumor cell line could represent a tedious step limiting its application for treatment in patients. We therefore developed in rats, an "all in vivo" strategy of combined vaccination using an in vivo local irradiation of the tumor as a source of tumor antigens for DC vaccines and an exogenous source of GM-CSF. We report here that supplying recombinant mGM-CSF by local injections or surgical implantation of osmotic pumps did not allow reproducing the therapeutic efficacy observed with in vitro prepared combined vaccines. To bypass this limitation possibly due to the short half-life of recombinant GM-CSF, we have generated adeno-associated virus coding for mGM-CSF and tested their efficacy to transduce tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo vaccines combining local irradiation and AAV2/1-mGM-CSF vectors showed high therapeutic efficacy allowing to cure 60% of the rats with pre-implanted tumors, as previously observed with in vitro prepared vaccines. Same efficacy has been observed with a second generation of vaccines combining DC, local tumor irradiation, and the controlled supply of recombinant mGM-CSF in poloxamer 407, a biocompatible thermoreversible hydrogel. By generating a successful "all in vivo" vaccination protocol combining tumor radiotherapy with DC vaccines and a straightforward supply of GM-CSF, we have developed a therapeutic strategy easily translatable to clinic that could become accessible to a much bigger number of cancer patients.

  16. Abnormal Responses of Myeloid Progenitor Cells to GM-CSF (Granulocyte-Macrophage-Colony-Stimulating Factor) in Human Cyclic Neutropenia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Continut on reverse if necessar and jentify by bi).nrbe,; FIELD GROUP SUBG ROUP Ne utropen ia, granu Iocyte-macrop ae ofnyS imu £ating factor (GM...be _3 eosinophilic were also detected occasionally (< 5% of total col- , onies) among CFU-GM grown with > 1.0 nmol/liter rhGM- CSF. Whereas the clonal

  17. Incorporation of GM-CSF or CD40L Enhances the Immunogenicity of Hantaan Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lin-Feng; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Yu, Lan; Ye, Wei; Liu, Zi-Yu; Ying, Qi-Kang; Wu, Xing-An; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Zhang, Fang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective Hantaan virus (HTNV) vaccine is highly desirable because HTNV causes an acute and often fatal disease (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, HFRS). Since the immunity of the inactivated vaccine is weak and the safety is poor, HTNV virus-like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive and safe alternative. These particles lack the viral genome but are perceived by the immune system as virus particles. We hypothesized that adding immunostimulatory signals to VLPs would enhance their efficacy. To accomplish this enhancement, we generated chimeric HTNV VLPs containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or CD40 ligand (CD40L) and investigated their biological activity in vitro. The immunization of mice with chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L induced stronger humoral immune responses and cellular immune responses compared to the HTNV VLPs and Chinese commercial inactivated hantavirus vaccine. Chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L also protected mice from an HTNV challenge. Altogether, our results suggest that anchoring immunostimulatory molecules into HTNV VLPs can be a potential approach for the control and prevention of HFRS. PMID:28066721

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the ternary human GM-CSF receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Guido; Hercus, Timothy R.; Xu, Yibin; Lopez, Angel F.; Parker, Michael W.; McKinstry, William J.

    2008-07-28

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a haemopoietic growth factor that acts through a ternary receptor signalling complex containing specific {alpha} (GMR{alpha}) and common {beta} ({beta}c) receptor subunits. Human GM-CSF is encoded by the gene csf2, while the genes for GMR{alpha} and {beta}c are csf2ra and csf2rb, respectively. Crystals of the ternary ectodomain complex comprising GM-CSF and the soluble extracellular regions of both the GMR{alpha} subunit and either {beta}c or its glutamine-substitution mutant N346Q were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best diffracting crystals of the ternary complex were obtained using the N346Q mutation of the {beta}c subunit. These crystals grew using polyethylene glycol 3350 with a high concentration of proline, belonged to space group P6{sub 3}22 and diffracted to 3.3 {angstrom} resolution.

  19. Induction of protumoral CD11c(high) macrophages by glioma cancer stem cells through GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Tabu, Kouichi; Muramatsu, Nozomi; Wang, Wenqian; Murota, Yoshitaka; Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Jinushi, Masahisa; Taga, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained under special microenvironment called niche, and elucidation and targeting of the CSC niche will be a feasible strategy for cancer eradication. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are known to be involved in cancer progression and thus can be a component of CSC niche. Although TAMs are known to play multiple roles in tumor progression, involvement of CSCs in TAM development fully remains to be elucidated. Using rat C6 glioma side population (SP) cells as a model of glioma CSCs, we here show that CSCs induce the TAM development by promoting survival and differentiation of bone marrow-derived monocytes. CSC-induced macrophages can be separated into two distinct subsets of cells, CD11c(low) and CD11c(high) cells. Interestingly, only the CD11c(high) subset of cells have protumoral activity, as shown by intracranial transplantation into immune-deficient mice together with CSCs. These CD11c(high) macrophages were observed in the tumor formed by co-transplantation with CSCs. Furthermore, CSCs produced GM-CSF and anti-GM-CSF antibody inhibited CSC-induced TAM development. In conclusion, CSCs have the ability to self-create their own niche involving TAMs through CSC-derived GM-CSF, which can thus be a therapeutic target in view of CSC niche disruption.

  20. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis.

  1. Antibody responses to galectin-8, TARP and TRAP1 in prostate cancer patients treated with a GM-CSF-secreting cellular immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh C; Tu, Guang Huan; Koprivnikar, Kathryn E; Gonzalez-Edick, Melissa; Jooss, Karin U; Harding, Thomas C

    2010-09-01

    A critical factor in clinical development of cancer immunotherapies is the identification of tumor-associated antigens that may be related to immunotherapy potency. In this study, protein microarrays containing >8,000 human proteins were screened with serum from prostate cancer patients (N = 13) before and after treatment with a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-secreting whole cell immunotherapy. Thirty-three proteins were identified that displayed significantly elevated (P GM-CSF secreting cellular immunotherapy in prostate cancer patients and demonstrates the utility of using protein microarrays for the high-throughput screening of patient-derived antibody responses.

  2. Changes in chromatin accessibility across the GM-CSF promoter upon T cell activation are dependent on nuclear factor kappaB proteins.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha; Chen, Xinxin; Shannon, M Frances

    2003-02-17

    Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a key cytokine in myelopoiesis and aberrant expression is associated with chronic inflammatory disease and myeloid leukemias. This aberrant expression is often associated with constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation. To investigate the relationship between NF-kappaB and GM-CSF transcription in a chromatin context, we analyzed the chromatin structure of the GM-CSF gene in T cells and the role of NF-kappaB proteins in chromatin remodeling. We show here that chromatin remodeling occurs across a region of the GM-CSF gene between -174 and +24 upon T cell activation, suggesting that remodeling is limited to a single nucleosome encompassing the proximal promoter. Nuclear NF-kappaB levels appear to play a critical role in this process. In addition, using an immobilized template assay we found that the ATPase component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, brg1, is recruited to the GM-CSF proximal promoter in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner in vitro. These results suggest that chromatin remodeling across the GM-CSF promoter in T cells is a result of recruitment of SWI/SNF type remodeling complexes by NF-kappaB proteins binding to the CD28 response region of the promoter.

  3. Hierarchy of immunosuppressive strength among myeloid-derived suppressor cell subsets is determined by GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Ugel, Stefano; Marigo, Ilaria; Fernandez Gomez, Audry; Mesa, Circe; Geilich, Markus; Winkels, Gregor; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Casati, Anna; Grassi, Fabio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    CD11b+/Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to tumor immune evasion by restraining the activity of CD8+ T-cells. Two major MDSC subsets were recently shown to play an equal role in MDSC-induced immune dysfunctions: monocytic- and granulocytic-like. We isolated three fractions of MDSC, i.e. CD11b+/Gr-1high, CD11b+/Gr-1int, and CD11b+/Gr-1low populations that were characterized morphologically, phenotypically and functionally in different tumor models. In vitro assays showed that CD11b+/Gr-1int cell subset, mainly comprising monocytes and myeloid precursors, was always capable to suppress CD8+ T-cell activation, while CD11b+/Gr-1high cells, mostly granulocytes, exerted appreciable suppression only in some tumor models and when present in high numbers. The CD11b+/Gr-1int but not CD11b+/Gr-1high cells were also immunosuppressive in vivo following adoptive transfer. CD11b+/Gr-1low cells retained the immunosuppressive potential in most tumor models. Gene silencing experiments indicated that GM-CSF was necessary to induce preferential expansion of both CD11b+/Gr-1int and CD11b+/Gr-1low subsets in the spleen of tumor-bearing mice and mediate tumor-induced tolerance whereas G-CSF, which preferentially expanded CD11b+/Gr-1high cells, did not create such immunosuppressive environment. GM-CSF also acted on granulocyte-macrophage progenitors in the bone marrow inducing local expansion of CD11b+/Gr-1low cells. These data unveil a hierarchy of immunoregulatory activity among MDSC subsets that is controlled by tumor-released GM-CSF.

  4. [A Pichia pastoris with alpha-1, 6-mannosyltransferases deletion and its use in expression of HSA/GM-CSF chimera].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Gong, Xin; Chang, Shao-Hong; Liu, Bo; Song, Miao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Wu, Jun

    2007-09-01

    Yeast is a widely used host for recombinant protein expression. However, glycoproteins derived from yeast contain N-glycan of high mannose type and are usually hyperglycosylated. alpha-1,6-mannosyltransferases gene (och1) encodes the enzyme that initiates the first step of out-chain elongation of high mannose type N-glycan in yeast, which is different from that in human. So, a high efficient method to knockout target gene by two-step recombination was established and was used to delete och1. In the first recombinant, a plasmid with och1::ADE1 and ura3 gene was linearized in the downstream of och1 and inserted to the och1 site of P. pastoris genome, where the upstream and downstream of och1 were duplicated. In the second recombinant, the duplicated fragments of och1 were exchanged and the och1 deletion strains were selected on the plates containing 5-FOA, but no adenine. Then the och1 deletion strain was applied to express an human serum albumin (HSA) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) chimera. Different with the hyperglycosylated HSA/GM-CSF chimera expressed in wild type P. pastoris, the chimera expressed in the och1 deletion strain, contained smaller N-glycan. The results suggested that the och1 mutant yeast may be more suitable for production of recombinant glycoproteins. And the och 1 deletion strain could be used for further re-engineering to produce complex human glycoproteins.

  5. Slow-dissociation effect of common signaling subunit beta c on IL5 and GM-CSF receptor assembly.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Tetsuya; Harrington, Adrian E; Zaks-Zilberman, Meirav; Scibek, Jeffery J; Chaiken, Irwin

    2008-05-01

    Receptor activation by IL5 and GM-CSF is a sequential process that depends on their interaction with a cytokine-specific subunit alpha and recruitment of a common signaling subunit beta (betac). In order to elucidate the assembly dynamics of these receptor subunits, we performed kinetic interaction analysis of the cytokine-receptor complex formation by a surface plasmon resonance biosensor. Using the extracellular domains of receptor fused with C-terminal V5-tag, we developed an assay method to co-anchor alpha and betac subunits on the biosensor surface. We demonstrated that dissociation of the cytokine-receptor complexes was slower when both subunits were co-anchored on the biosensor surface than when alpha subunit alone was anchored. The slow-dissociation effect of betac had a similar impact on GM-CSF receptor stabilization to that of IL5. The effects were abolished by alanine replacement of either Tyr18 or Tyr344 residue in betac, which together constitute key parts of a cytokine binding epitope. The data argue that betac plays an important role in preventing the ligand-receptor complexes from rapidly dissociating. This slow-dissociation effect of betac explains how, when multiple betac cytokine receptor alpha subunits are present on the same cell surface, selective betac usage can be controlled by sequestration in stabilized cytokine-alpha-betac complexes.

  6. CD154-stimulated GM-CSF release by vascular smooth muscle cells elicits monocyte activation--role in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stojakovic, Milica; Krzesz, Robert; Wagner, Andreas H; Hecker, Markus

    2007-11-01

    During the early phase of atherosclerosis, T cells and monocytes attach to and migrate through the endothelium into the vessel wall. To provide an insight into the potential cross talk between T cells and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in atherogenesis, we investigated changes in gene expression caused by CD40 ligation in cultured vascular SMC and their consequences for monocyte activation. CD40 expression in human-cultured SMC was induced by 24-h treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha plus interferon-gamma followed by 12-h exposure to mouse myeloma cells stably expressing human CD154 or the corresponding control cells. DNA microarray analysis (Affymetrix HG-U952A chip) indicated 33 up-regulated genes in three individual experiments of which 19 encoded pro-inflammatory adhesion molecules, cytokines, chemokines, and receptors. One functional consequence of this change in gene expression was an activation of transformed human promonocytic-1 monocytes exposed to the conditioned medium of the stimulated SMC. Subsequent antibody neutralization experiments identified granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as the SMC-derived cytokine responsible for this effect. Thus, vascular SMC-like endothelial cells appear to contribute to the maintenance of an inflammatory response in the atherosclerotic vessel wall upon CD40-CD154 co-stimulation. Among 19 up-regulated pro-inflammatory gene products, GM-CSF plays an important role in SMC-dependent monocyte activation.

  7. PEGylated G-CSF (BBT-015), GM-CSF (BBT-007), and IL-11 (BBT-059) analogs enhance survival and hematopoietic cell recovery in a mouse model of the hematopoietic syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Plett, Paul Artur; Chua, Hui Lin; Sampson, Carol H; Katz, Barry P; Fam, Christine M; Anderson, Lana J; Cox, George N; Orschell, Christie M

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) are recommended therapy for high dose radiation exposure, but unfavorable administration schedules requiring early and repeat dosing limit the logistical ease with which they can be used. In this report, using a previously described murine model of H-ARS, survival efficacy and effect on hematopoietic recovery of unique PEGylated HGF were investigated. The PEGylated-HGFs possess longer half-lives and more potent hematopoietic properties than corresponding non-PEGylated-HGFs. C57BL/6 mice underwent single dose lethal irradiation (7.76-8.72 Gy, Cs, 0.62-1.02 Gy min) and were treated with various dosing regimens of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg kg of analogs of human PEG-G-CSF, murine PEG-GM-CSF, or human PEG-IL-11. Mice were administered one of the HGF analogs at 24-28 h post irradiation, and in some studies, additional doses given every other day (beginning with the 24-28 h dose) for a total of three or nine doses. Thirty-day (30 d) survival was significantly increased with only one dose of 0.3 mg kg of PEG-G-CSF and PEG-IL-11 or three doses of 0.3 mg kg of PEG-GM-CSF (p ≤ 0.006). Enhanced survival correlated with consistently and significantly enhanced WBC, NE, RBC, and PLT recovery for PEG-G- and PEG-GM-CSF, and enhanced RBC and PLT recovery for PEG-IL-11 (p ≤ 0.05). Longer administration schedules or higher doses did not provide a significant additional survival benefit over the shorter, lower dose, schedules. These data demonstrate the efficacy of BBT's PEG-HGF to provide significantly increased survival with fewer injections and lower drug doses, which may have significant economic and logistical value in the aftermath of a radiation event.

  8. IL-12 and GM-CSF in DNA/MVA Immunizations against HIV-1 CRF12_BF Nef Induced T-Cell Responses With an Enhanced Magnitude, Breadth and Quality

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ana María; Falivene, Juliana; Holgado, María Pía; Turk, Gabriela; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    In Argentina, the HIV epidemic is characterized by the co-circulation of subtype B and BF recombinant viral variants. Nef is an HIV protein highly variable among subtypes, making it a good tool to study the impact of HIV variability in the vaccine design setting. We have previously reported a specific cellular response against NefBF with low cross-reactivity to NefB in mice. The aim of this work was to analyze whether the co-administration of IL-12 and GM-CSF, using DNA and MVA vaccine vectors, could improve the final cellular response induced. Mice received three DNA priming doses of a plasmid that express NefBF plus DNAs expressing IL-12 and/or GM-CSF. Afterwards, all the groups were boosted with a MVAnefBF dose. The highest increase in the magnitude of the NefBF response, compared to that induced in the control was found in the IL-12 group. Importantly, a response with higher breadth was detected in groups which received IL-12 or GM-CSF, evidenced as an increased frequency of recognition of homologous (BF) and heterologous (B) Nef peptides, as well as a higher number of other Nef peptide pools representing different viral subtypes. However, these improvements were lost when both DNA cytokines were simultaneously administered, as the response was focused against the immunodominant peptide with a detrimental response towards subdominant epitopes. The pattern of cytokines secreted and the specific-T-cell proliferative capacity were improved in IL-12 and IL-12+GM-CSF groups. Importantly IL-12 generated a significant higher T-cell avidity against a B heterologous peptide. This study indicates that the incorporation of DNA expressing IL-12 in DNA/MVA schemes produced the best results in terms of improvements of T-cell-response key properties such as breadth, cross-reactivity and quality (avidity and pattern of cytokines secreted). These relevant results contribute to the design of strategies aimed to induce T-cell responses against HIV antigens with higher quality

  9. Novel insights in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients: review on the effects of GM-CSF in maintaining homeostasis of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Zhao, Manzhi; Song, Yuhu; Song, Jianxin; Huang, Yuancheng; Wang, Junshuai

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients with dysfunctional and/or low numbers of leukocytes are often infected with bacteria, especially Gram-negative bacteria, which is characterized by producing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that influences the production, maturation, function, and survival of various immune cells. In this paper, we reviewed not only Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway and its immunological effect, but also the specific stimulating function and autocrine performance of GM-CSF on hematopoietic cells, as well as the recent discovery of innate response activator-B cells in protection against microbial sepsis and the direct LPS-TLR4 signaling on hematopoiesis. Thus we concluded that GM-CSF might play important roles in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infections in cirrhotic patients through maintaining immune system functions and homeostasis.

  10. Expression of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, TNF-β and GM-CSF in peripheral blood leukocytes of rabbits experimentally infected with rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak-Ryczek, Alicja; Tokarz-Deptuła, Beata; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2016-04-15

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) is a highly morbid and mortal viral infection of European rabbits. This disease is one of the main causes of death in wild rabbits, and results in large economic losses in farms of rabbits worldwide. Although the first outbreak of this disease was noted in 1984, the pathogenesis of RHD and mechanisms of RHDV (rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus) pathogenecity have still not been fully elucidated. Recent studies indicate a role of the immune response, especially peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), in the pathogenesis of this disease. Thus, in the present study we investigated the expression of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, TNF-β and GM-CSF genes in PBL of RHDV-infected rabbits. We also compared the expression of genes encoding these cytokines in rabbits with different course of RHDV infection (in animals that died 36h postinfection or survived until 60th h after infection). The study revealed that three (IL-10, TNF-β and GM-CSF) out of five investigated genes encoding cytokines showed increased expression in PBL of RHDV-infected rabbits, and the level of expression depended on the course of RHD. The results indicate the potential role of these cytokines in RHDV infection and their influence on the survival time of infected rabbits.

  11. Peptide vaccination in Montanide adjuvant induces and GM-CSF increases CXCR3 and cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression by tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Clancy-Thompson, Eleanor; King, Laura K; Nunnley, Lenora D; Mullins, Irene M; Slingluff, Craig L; Mullins, David W

    2013-11-01

    T cell infiltration of melanoma is associated with enhanced clinical efficacy and is a desirable endpoint of immunotherapeutic vaccination. Infiltration is regulated, in part, by chemokine receptors and selectin ligands on the surface of tumor-specific lymphocytes. Therefore, we investigated the expression of two homing molecules--CXCR3 and CLA - on vaccine-induced CD8 T cells, in the context of a clinical trial of a melanoma-specific peptide vaccine. Both CXCR3 and CLA have been associated with T cell infiltration of melanoma. We demonstrate that a single subcutaneous/intradermal administration of peptide vaccine in Montanide adjuvant induces tumor-specific CD8 T cells that are predominantly positive for CXCR3, with a subpopulation of CXCR3(+)CLA(+) cells. Addition of GM-CSF significantly enhances CXCR3 expression and increases the proportion of CLA-expressing cells. Concurrent with CXCR3 and CLA expression, vaccine-induced CD8 cells express high levels of Tbet, IFN-γ, and IL-12Rβ1. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that peptide vaccination in adjuvant induces CD8 T cells with a phenotype that may support infiltration of melanoma.

  12. Combination of SCF, IL-6, IL-3, and GM-CSF increases the mitotic index in short term bone marrow cultures from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, B; Allan, D J

    1996-10-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized cytogenetically by the presence of a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 15 and 17 [t(15;17)(q22-q24;q11-q21)] in the bone marrow cells in the majority of patients. Cytogenetic evaluation of bone marrow cultures from patients with APL is often technically difficult, due to frequent difficult marrow aspiration and the suboptimal quality of cytogenetic preparations. This has important implications for the cytogenetic detection of residual disease. This study examined the proliferative ability of the recombinant human growth factors-stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-3 (IL-3), and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-to determine if they would provide a consistent improvement over the standard cytogenetic culturing techniques in terms of mitotic index (MI). In all cases, the MI of the growth factor stimulated cultures showed a considerably higher (3.5-198 fold) and statistically significant (p < 0.01) increase compared to the unstimulated cultures. We conclude that the use of recombinant human growth factors is potentially an effective way of increasing the MI in bone marrow cultures from APL patients for the purposes of diagnosis and residual disease detection.

  13. Absence of LTB4/BLT1 axis facilitates generation of mouse GM-CSF-induced long-lasting antitumor immunologic memory by enhancing innate and adaptive immune systems.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yosuke; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Yumiko; Nabeta, Haruka; Narusawa, Megumi; Watanabe, Ayumi; Sakamoto, Chika; Hijikata, Yasuki; Iga-Murahashi, Mutsunori; Takayama, Koichi; Sasaki, Fumiyuki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2012-10-25

    BLT1 is a high-affinity receptor for leukotriene B4 (LTB4) that is a potent lipid chemoattractant for myeloid leukocytes. The role of LTB4/BLT1 axis in tumor immunology, including cytokine-based tumor vaccine, however, remains unknown. We here demonstrated that BLT1-deficient mice rejected subcutaneous tumor challenge of GM-CSF gene-transduced WEHI3B (WGM) leukemia cells (KO/WGM) and elicited robust antitumor responses against second tumor challenge with WEHI3B cells. During GM-CSF-induced tumor regression, the defective LTB4/BLT1 signaling significantly reduced tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells, increased the maturation status of dendritic cells in tumor tissues, enhanced their CD4(+) T-cell stimulation capacity and migration rate of dendritic cells that had phagocytosed tumor-associated antigens into tumor-draining lymph nodes, suggesting a positive impact on GM-CSF-sensitized innate immunity. Furthermore, KO/WGM mice displayed activated adaptive immunity by attenuating regulatory CD4(+) T subsets and increasing numbers of Th17 and memory CD44(hi)CD4(+) T subsets, both of which elicited superior antitumor effects as evidenced by adoptive cell transfer. In vivo depletion assays also revealed that CD4(+) T cells were the main effectors of the persistent antitumor immunity. Our data collectively underscore a negative role of LTB4/BLT1 signaling in effective generation and maintenance of GM-CSF-induced antitumor memory CD4(+) T cells.

  14. Assaying the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as a mitogen of immature cells in fetal blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Borrell, A; Jou, J M; Besón, I; Soler, A; Carrió, A; Margarit, E; Caballín, R; Ballesta, F; Fortuny, A

    1999-01-01

    Based on the presence of immature cells in fetal blood, and in an attempt to shorten the cytogenetic reporting time, three simultaneous one-day culture regimes were established in 23 fetal blood samples: (a) the standard phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes culture, (b) a culture using the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an alternative mitogen, and (c) an unstimulated culture. Diagnostic success rates achieved by these three methods were as follows: 43 per cent (95 per cent CI: 23-64) (GM-CSF), 30 per cent (95 per cent CI: 12-49) (PHA) and 9 per cent (unstimulated). These three regimes were also assayed in three-day cultures giving 100 per cent diagnostic success rate for the PHA and GM-CSF, and 62 per cent (95 per cent CI: 41-83) for the unstimulated. A moderate correlation was found between the initial concentration of cultured erythroblasts and the metaphase count in one-day GM-CSF-stimulated (r=0.43, p=0.01) and unstimulated (r=0.35, p=0.05) cultures, suggesting that erythroblasts may be in part responsible for the mitotic index observed in these two regime cultures. In conclusion, our experience suggests that immature cells in fetal blood may be successfully cultured for diagnostic purposes.

  15. Rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3L exhibit distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    N'diaye, Marie; Warnecke, Andreas; Flytzani, Sevasti; Abdelmagid, Nada; Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja; Harris, Robert A; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells are professional APCs that play a central role in the initiation of immune responses. The limited ex vivo availability of dendritic cells inspires the widespread use of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells as an alternative in research. However, the functional characteristics of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared functional and phenotypic characteristics of rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3 ligand bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. A comparison of surface markers revealed that FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD103, and CD4 and baseline levels of MHC class II, CD40, and CD86, which were highly up-regulated upon stimulation. Conversely, GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells constitutively expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD11c, and CD11b but only mildly up-regulated MHC class II, CD40, or CD86 following stimulation. Expression of dendritic cell-associated core transcripts was restricted to FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells . GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were superior at phagocytosis but were outperformed by FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells at antigen presentation and T cell stimulation in vitro. Stimulated GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more TNF, CCL5, CCL20, and NO, whereas FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more IL-6 and IL-12. Finally, whereas GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants added to resting T cell cultures promoted forkhead box p3(+) regulatory T cell populations, FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants drove Th17 differentiation. We conclude that rat GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functionally distinct. Our data support the current rationale that FLT3

  16. Multi-response model for rheumatoid arthritis based on delay differential equations in collagen-induced arthritic mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gilbert; Wagner, Thomas; Plater-Zyberk, Christine; Lahu, Gezim; Schropp, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis, a human chronic inflammatory destructive disease. The therapeutic effect of neutralizing the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by an antibody was examined in the mouse disease in a view of deriving a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model. In CIA mice the development of disease is measured by a total arthritic score (TAS) and an ankylosis score (AKS). We present a multi-response PKPD model which describes the time course of the unperturbed and perturbed TAS and AKS. The antibody acts directly on GM-CSF by binding to it. Therefore, a compartment for the cytokine GM-CSF is an essential component of the mathematical model. This compartment drives the disease development in the PKPD model. Different known properties of arthritis development in the CIA model are included in the PKPD model. Firstly, the inflammation, driven by GM-CSF, dominates at the beginning of the disease and decreases after some time. Secondly, a destructive (ankylosis) part evolves in the TAS that is delayed in time. In order to model these two properties a delay differential equation was used. The PKPD model was applied to different experiments with doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg/kg. The influence of the drug was modeled by a non-linear approach. The final mathematical model consists of three differential equations representing the compartments for GM-CSF, inflammation and destruction. Our mathematical model described well all available dosing schedules by a simultaneous fit. We also present an equivalent and easy reformulation as ordinary differential equation which grants the use of standard PKPD software.

  17. Effect of monoclonal antibody 17-1A and GM-CSF in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma--long-lasting, complete remissions can be induced.

    PubMed

    Ragnhammar, P; Fagerberg, J; Frödin, J E; Hjelm, A L; Lindemalm, C; Magnusson, I; Masucci, G; Mellstedt, H

    1993-03-12

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is considered to be one of the effector functions of unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in tumor therapy. The antitumor activity of MAbs might therefore be augmented if the cytotoxic capability of the effector cells could be increased. In an in vitro system, the killing capacity of MAb was significantly enhanced by pre-treatment of the effector cells with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Based on these findings, the therapeutic effect of the combination of mouse MAb 17-1A (IgG2a) and GM-CSF was evaluated in 20 patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The patients received GM-CSF for 10 days and a single i.v. infusion of MAb 17-1A on day 3 of the cycle. Four cycles were given at 1-monthly intervals. There was a continuous increase in blood monocytes and lymphocytes during all 4 GM-CSF cycles. Neutrophils and eosinophils were also significantly augmented but in a biphasic manner and the cell counts on day 10 of cycle IV were significantly lower than in cycles I and II. GM-CSF-related side-effects were of no major clinical importance. During the third cycle, an immediate-type allergic reaction (ITAR) against MAb 17-1A occurred in most patients, necessitating reduction of the MAb dose as well as of the infusion rate. Two patients achieved complete remission. One patient had a minor response, and 3 other patients were considered to have stable disease > 3 months.

  18. DT388-GM-CSF, a novel fusion toxin consisting of a truncated diphtheria toxin fused to human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, prolongs host survival in a SCID mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hall, P D; Willingham, M C; Kreitman, R J; Frankel, A E

    1999-04-01

    Despite significant advances in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the majority of patients will succumb to drug-resistant AML. To overcome this resistance, we have developed a novel fusion toxin consisting of the catalytic and translocation subunits of diphtheria toxin (DT388) linked to human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In vitro, DT388-GM-CSF demonstrated significant activity against numerous AML cell lines and fresh AML blasts. To determine its in vivo efficacy, we developed an in vivo model of human AML in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice injected intravenously with 1 x 10(7) HL-60 cells (AML-M2 cell line). The SCID mice developed abdominal masses, infiltration of the liver and bone marrow, and peripheral blasts with a median survival of 42.5 days. We tested DT388-GM-CSF, ara-C, human GM-CSF, and DAB389IL-2, which were injected intraperitoneally on days 2-6 in this model. DT3-GM-CSF significantly improved survival of the SCID mice over Ara-C, DAB389IL-2, or control (P < 0.001). DT388-GM-CSF-treated mice who developed leukemia exhibited no difference in the number of GM-CSF receptors (P = 0.39), ligand affinity (P = 0.77), or sensitivity (P = 0.56) to DT388-GM-CSF as compared to the controls. Frank leukemia in DT388-GM-CSF-treated mice may be due to incomplete penetration of drug into tissues rather than cellular resistance. DT388-GM-CSF is an active therapeutic agent in our SCID mouse model of AML with a unique mechanism of action and differing toxicities than current cytotoxic agents.

  19. GM-CSF and MEF-conditioned media support feeder-free reprogramming of mouse granulocytes to iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Firas, Jaber; Liu, Xiaodong; Nefzger, Christian M; Polo, Jose M

    2014-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are characterised by their ability to differentiate into any cell type of the body. Accordingly, iPSCs possess immense potential for disease modelling, pharmaceutical screening and autologous cell therapies. The most common source of iPSCs derivation is skin fibroblasts. However, from a clinical point of view, skin fibroblasts may not be ideal, as invasive procedures such as skin biopsies are required for their extraction. Moreover, fibroblasts are highly heterogeneous with a poorly defined developmental pathway, which makes studying reprogramming mechanistics difficult. Granulocytes, on the other hand, are easily obtainable, their developmental pathway has been extensively studied and fluorescence activated cell sorting allows for the isolation of these cells at high purity; thus iPSCs derivation from granulocytes could provide an alternative to fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Previous studies succeeded in producing iPSC colonies from mouse granulocytes but with the use of a mitotically inactivated feeder layer, restricting their use for studying reprogramming mechanistics. As granulocytes display poor survival under culture conditions, we investigated the influence of haematopoietic cytokines to stabilise this cell type in vitro and allow for reprogramming in the absence of a feeder layer. Our results show that treatment with MEF-conditioned media and/or initial exposure to GM-CSF allows for reprogramming of granulocytes under feeder-free conditions. This work can serve as a basis for future work aimed at dissecting the reprogramming mechanism as well as obtaining large numbers of iPSCs from a clinically relevant cell source.

  20. GM-CSF-neuroantigen fusion proteins reverse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and mediate tolerogenic activity in adjuvant-primed environments: association with inflammation-dependent, inhibitory antigen presentation2

    PubMed Central

    Islam, S.M. Touhidul; Curtis, Alan D.; Taslim, Najla; Wilkinson, Daniel S.; Mannie, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain fusion proteins comprised of GM-CSF and neuroantigen (NAg) are potent, NAg-specific inhibitors of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). An important question was whether GMCSF-NAg tolerogenic vaccines retained inhibitory activity within inflammatory environments or were contingent upon steady-state conditions. A GMCSF-MOG fusion protein reversed established paralytic disease in both passive and active models of EAE in C57BL/6 mice. The fusion protein also reversed EAE in CD4-deficient and B cell-deficient mice. Notably, GMCSF-MOG inhibited EAE when co-injected adjacent to the MOG35-55/CFA emulsion. GMCSF-MOG also retained dominant inhibitory activity when directly emulsified with MOG35-55 in the CFA emulsion in both C57BL/6 or B cell-deficient models of EAE. Likewise, when combined with PLP139-151 in CFA, GMCSF-PLP inhibited EAE in SJL mice. When deliberately emulsified in CFA with the NAg, GMCSF-NAg inhibited EAE even though NAg was present at more than a 30-fold molar excess. In vitro studies revealed that the GMCSF domain of GMCSF-MOG stimulated growth and differentiation of inflammatory dendritic cells (DC) and simultaneously targeted the MOG35-55 domain for enhanced presentation by these DC. These inflammatory DC presented MOG35-55 to MOG-specific T cells by an inhibitory mechanism that was mediated in part by IFN-γ signaling and NO production. In conclusion, GMCSF-NAg was tolerogenic in CFA-primed pro-inflammatory environments by a mechanism associated with targeted antigen presentation by inflammatory DC and an inhibitory IFN-γ/ NO pathway. The inhibitory activity of GMCSF-NAg in CFA-primed lymphatics distinguishes GMCSF-NAg fusion proteins as a unique class of inflammation-dependent tolerogens that are mechanistically distinct from naked peptide or protein-based tolerogens. PMID:25049359

  1. Silencing of Foxp3 enhances the antitumor efficacy of GM-CSF genetically modified tumor cell vaccine against B16 melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Antonio; Sendra, Luis; Noé, Verónica; Ciudad, Carles J; Dasí, Francisco; Hervas, David; Herrero, María José; Aliño, Salvador F

    2017-01-01

    The antitumor response after therapeutic vaccination has a limited effect and seems to be related to the presence of T regulatory cells (Treg), which express the immunoregulatory molecules CTLA4 and Foxp3. The blockage of CTLA4 using antibodies has shown an effective antitumor response conducing to the approval of the human anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab by the US Food and Drug Administration. On the other hand, Foxp3 is crucial for Treg development. For this reason, it is an attractive target for cancer treatment. This study aims to evaluate whether combining therapeutic vaccination with CTLA4 or Foxp3 gene silencing enhances the antitumor response. First, the “in vitro” cell entrance and gene silencing efficacy of two tools, 2′-O-methyl phosphorotioate-modified oligonucleotides (2′-OMe-PS-ASOs) and polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs), were evaluated in EL4 cells and cultured primary lymphocytes. Following B16 tumor transplant, C57BL6 mice were vaccinated with irradiated B16 tumor cells engineered to produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and were intraperitoneally treated with CTLA4 and Foxp3 2′-OMe-PS-ASO before and after vaccination. Tumor growth, mice survival, and CTLA4 and Foxp3 expression in blood cells were measured. The following results were obtained: 1) only 2′-OMe-PS-ASO reached gene silencing efficacy “in vitro”; 2) an improved survival effect was achieved combining both therapeutic vaccine and Foxp3 antisense or CTLA4 antisense oligonucleotides (50% and 20%, respectively); 3) The blood CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ (Treg) and CD4+CTLA4+ cell counts were higher in mice that developed tumor on the day of sacrifice. Our data showed that tumor cell vaccine combined with Foxp3 or CTLA4 gene silencing can increase the efficacy of therapeutic antitumor vaccination. PMID:28176947

  2. Local delivery of CpG-B and GM-CSF induces concerted activation of effector and regulatory T cells in the human melanoma sentinel lymph node.

    PubMed

    van den Hout, Mari F C M; Sluijter, Berbel J R; Santegoets, Saskia J A M; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; van den Tol, M Petrousjka; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2016-04-01

    Impaired immune effector functions in the melanoma sentinel lymph node (SLN) may allow for early metastatic events. In an effort to determine the optimal way to strengthen immune defenses, 28 clinical stage I-II melanoma patients were randomized in a 3-arm Phase II study to receive, prior to excision and sampling of the SLN, i.d. injections of saline or low-dose CpG-B (CpG), alone or combined with GM-CSF (GM), around the melanoma excision site. We previously described the combined administration of these DC-targeting agents to result in activation and recruitment of potentially cross-presenting BDCA3(+) DCs to the SLN. In this report we describe the effects on effector and regulatory T and NK cell subsets. Local low-dose CpG administration resulted in lower CD4/CD8 ratios, Th1 skewing, increased frequencies of melanoma-specific CD8(+) T cells and possible recruitment of effector NK cells, irrespective of GM co-administration. These immune-potentiating effects were counterbalanced by increased IL-10 production by T cells and significantly higher levels of FoxP3 and CTLA4 in regulatory T cells (Tregs) with correspondingly higher suppressive activity in the SLN. Notably, CpG ± GM-administered patients showed significantly lower numbers of SLN metastases (saline: 4/9, CpG + GM: 1/9, CpG: 0/10, p = 0.04). These findings indicate that i.d. delivery of low-dose CpG ± GM potentially arms the SLN of early-stage melanoma patients against metastatic spread, but that antitumor efficacy may be further boosted by counteracting the collateral activation of Tregs.

  3. Fusion protein of mutant B7-DC and Fc enhances the antitumor immune effect of GM-CSF-secreting whole-cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masatsugu; Murata, Satoshi; Mekata, Eiji; Takebayashi, Katsushi; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Tani, Tohru

    2014-04-01

    B7-DC [also known as programmed death ligand 2 (PD-L2)] is a costimulatory molecule expressed predominantly on dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. In addition to its coinhibitory receptor, programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1), evidence suggests that B7-DC interacts with an unidentified costimulatory receptor on T cells. B7-DC mutants with selective binding capacity for the costimulatory receptor may be effective in stimulating antitumor immune responses, while avoiding the inhibitory effects of PD-1. In this study, we concomitantly administered a GM-CSF-secreting whole-cell vaccine together with a fusion protein of mutant B7-DC and Fc portion (mB7-DC-Fc), which binds selectively to the costimulatory receptor. This lead to an increased number of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes both in the spleen and at the tumor site and complete elimination of established tumors in vivo. In addition, mB7-DC-Fc increased IFN-γ and IL-2 production and decreased IL-4 and IL-10 production in vitro, indicating that mB7-DC-Fc tips the Th1/Th2 balance toward Th1 dominance, which is more favorable for antitumor immunity. Furthermore, mB7-DC-Fc decreased the PD-1(+) proportion of CD8(+) T cells in vitro and tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in vivo, suggesting that mB7-DC-Fc may maintain tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in a nonexhausted state. In conclusion, mB7-DC-Fc administration during the T-cell priming phase enhances antitumor effects of vaccine by generating more tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and leading to their accumulation at the tumor site. We suggest that this combination approach may be a promising strategy for antitumor immunotherapy.

  4. Evaluation of a DNA vaccine candidate expressing prM-E-NS1 antigens of dengue virus serotype 1 with or without granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in immunogenicity and protection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qun; Fan, Dongying; Gao, Na; Chen, Hui; Wang, Juan; Ming, Ying; Li, Jieqiong; An, Jing

    2011-01-17

    Dengue is one of the most important mosquito-borne viral diseases. In past years, although considerable effort has been put into the development of a vaccine, there is currently no licensed dengue vaccine. In this study, we constructed DNA vaccines that carried the prM-E-NS1 genes of dengue virus serotype 1 (DV1) with or without the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene, an attractive DNA vaccine adjuvant. Immunization with the plasmid pCAG-DV1/E/NS1, which expresses viral prM-E-NS1, or the bicistronic plasmid pCAG-DV1-GM, which co-expresses viral prM-E-NS1 and GM-CSF, resulted in long-term IgG response, high levels of splenocyte-secreted interferon-γ and interleukin-2, strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and sufficient protection in the DV1-challenged mice. This suggested that both humoral and cellular immune responses were induced by the immunizations and that they played important roles in protection against the DV1 challenge. Interestingly, the magnitude, quality and protective capacity of the immune responses induced by immunization with pCAG-DV1/E/NS1 or pCAG-DV1-GM seemed stronger than those induced by pCAG-DV1/E (expressing viral prM-E alone). Taken together, we demonstrated that prM/E plus NS1 would be a suitable solution for the development of a DNA vaccine against DV.

  5. Effect of cilomilast (Ariflo) on TNF-α, IL-8, and GM-CSF release by airway cells of patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Profita, M; Chiappara, G; Mirabella, F; Di, G; Chimenti, L; Costanzo, G; Riccobono, L; Bellia, V; Bousquet, J; Vignola, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by increased neutrophilic infiltration of the airways. Cilomilast, a novel selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor in clinical development for COPD treatment, exerts anti-inflammatory effects. The ability of cilomilast to inhibit the release of neutrophil chemoattractants such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-8, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by bronchial epithelial cells and sputum cells isolated from 10 patients with COPD, 14 normal controls, and 10 smokers was investigated. Methods: Bronchial epithelial cells obtained by bronchial brushing and sputum cells isolated from induced sputum samples were cultured for 24 hours in the presence or absence of cilomilast (1 µM). After incubation the supernatants were harvested and the levels of mediators measured by ELISA. Chemotactic activity in supernatants was also measured using a Boyden chamber. Results: TNF-α and IL-8 release by bronchial epithelial cells and sputum cells was higher in patients with COPD than in controls (p<0.0001) and smokers (p<0.0001). GM-CSF was only detectable in sputum cell supernatants and its level was higher in patients with COPD than in controls and smokers (p<0.0001, respectively). Cilomilast significantly reduced TNF-α release by bronchial epithelial cells and sputum cells (p=0.005) and GM-CSF release by sputum cells (p=0.003), whereas IL-8 release was not statistically inhibited. Supernatants of sputum cells and bronchial epithelial cells treated with cilomilast significantly decreased neutrophil chemotaxis (p<0.006 and p<0.008, respectively). Conclusions: Cilomilast inhibits the production of some neutrophil chemoattractants by airway cells. This drug may play a role in the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation associated with COPD and cigarette smoke. PMID:12832668

  6. Keratinocyte growth factor administration attenuates murine pulmonary mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophage activation and phagolysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Azad, Abul K; Gardner, Jason C; Schlesinger, Larry S; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-03-13

    Augmentation of innate immune defenses is an appealing adjunctive strategy for treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, especially those caused by drug-resistant strains. The effect of intranasal administration of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), an epithelial mitogen and differentiation factor, on M. tuberculosis infection in mice was tested in prophylaxis, treatment, and rescue scenarios. Infection of C57BL6 mice with M. tuberculosis resulted in inoculum size-dependent weight loss and mortality. A single dose of KGF given 1 day prior to infection with 10(5) M. tuberculosis bacilli prevented weight loss and enhanced pulmonary mycobacterial clearance (compared with saline-pretreated mice) for up to 28 days. Similar effects were seen when KGF was delivered intranasally every third day for 15 days, but weight loss and bacillary growth resumed when KGF was withdrawn. For mice with a well established M. tuberculosis infection, KGF given every 3 days beginning on day 15 postinoculation was associated with reversal of weight loss and an increase in M. tuberculosis clearance. In in vitro co-culture experiments, M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages exposed to conditioned medium from KGF-treated alveolar type II cell (MLE-15) monolayers exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent killing through mechanisms that included promotion of phagolysosome fusion and induction of nitric oxide. Alveolar macrophages from KGF-treated mice also exhibited enhanced GM-CSF-dependent phagolysosomal fusion. These results provide evidence that administration of KGF promotes M. tuberculosis clearance through GM-CSF-dependent mechanisms and enhances host defense against M. tuberculosis infection.

  7. Characterization of cis-regulatory elements of the c-myc promoter responding to human GM-CSF or mouse interleukin 3 in mouse proB cell line BA/F3 cells expressing the human GM-CSF receptor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Ishida, S; Koike, K; Arai, K

    1995-06-01

    Interleukin 3 (IL-3) or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activates c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc genes and proliferation in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Using a series of deletion mutants of the beta subunit of human GM-CSF receptor (hGMR) and inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, two distinct signaling pathways, one for activation of c-fos and c-jun genes, and the other for cell proliferation and activation of c-myc gene have been elucidated. In contrast to wealth of information on the pathway leading to activation of c-fos/c-jun genes, knowledge of the latter is scanty. To clarify the mechanisms of activation of c-myc gene by cytokines, we established a transient transfection assay in mouse proB cell line BA/F3 cells expressing hGMR. Analyses of hGMR beta subunit mutants revealed two cytoplasmic regions involved in activation of the c-myc promoter, one is essential and the other is dispensable but enhances the activity. These regions are located at the membrane proximal and the distal regions covering amino acid positions 455-544 and 544-589, respectively. Characterization of cis-acting regulatory elements of the c-myc gene showed that the region containing the P2 promoter initiation site is sufficient to mediate the response to mIL-3 or hGM-CSF. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay using an oligonucleotide corresponding to the distal putative E2F binding site revealed that p107/E2F complex, the negative regulator of E2F, decreased, and free E2F increased after mIL-3 stimulation. These results support the thesis that mIL-3 or hGM-CSF regulates the c-myc promoter by altering composition of the E2F complexes at E2F binding site.

  8. A murine model of acute myeloid leukemia with Evi1 overexpression and autocrine stimulation by an intracellular form of GM-CSF in DA-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Maria E; Simonson, Oscar E; Oprea, Iulian I; Moreno, Pedro M D; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Christensson, Birger; Gahrton, Gösta; Dilber, M Sirac; Smith, C I Edvard; Arteaga, H Jose

    2016-01-01

    The poor treatment response of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) overexpressing high-risk oncogenes such as EVI1, demands specific animal models for new treatment evaluations. Evi1 is a common site of activating integrations in murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced AML and in retroviral and lentiviral gene-modified HCS. Still, a model of overt AML induced by Evi1 has not been generated. Cell lines from MLV-induced AML are growth factor-dependent and non-transplantable. Hence, for the leukemia maintenance in the infected animals, a growth factor source such as chronic immune response has been suggested. We have investigated whether these leukemias are transplantable if provided with growth factors. We show that the Evi1(+)DA-3 cells modified to express an intracellular form of GM-CSF, acquired growth factor independence and transplantability and caused an overt leukemia in syngeneic hosts, without increasing serum GM-CSF levels. We propose this as a general approach for modeling different forms of high-risk human AML using similar cell lines.

  9. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Yeast-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Versus Peptide Vaccination Versus GM-CSF Plus Peptide Vaccination Versus Placebo in Patients With No Evidence of Disease After Complete Surgical Resection of Locally Advanced and/or Stage IV Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group–American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E4697)

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, David H.; Lee, Sandra; Zhao, Fengmin; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Margolin, Kim A.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Atkins, Michael B.; Cohen, Gary I.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Kirkwood, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and peptide vaccination (PV) on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with resected high-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients with completely resected stage IV or high-risk stage III melanoma were grouped by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -A2 status. HLA-A2–positive patients were randomly assigned to receive GM-CSF, PV, both, or placebo; HLA-A2–negative patients, GM-CSF or placebo. Treatment lasted for 1 year or until recurrence. Efficacy analyses were conducted in the intent-to-treat population. Results A total of 815 patients were enrolled. There were no significant improvements in OS (stratified log-rank P = .528; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% repeated CI, 0.77 to 1.15) or RFS (P = .131; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.04) in the patients assigned to GM-CSF (n = 408) versus those assigned to placebo (n = 407). The median OS times with GM-CSF versus placebo treatments were 69.6 months (95% CI, 53.4 to 83.5 months) versus 59.3 months (95% CI, 44.4 to 77.3 months); the 5-year OS probability rates were 52.3% (95% CI, 47.3% to 57.1%) versus 49.4% (95% CI, 44.3% to 54.3%), respectively. The median RFS times with GM-CSF versus placebo were 11.4 months (95% CI, 9.4 to 14.8 months) versus 8.8 months (95% CI, 7.5 to 11.2 months); the 5-year RFS probability rates were 31.2% (95% CI, 26.7% to 35.9%) versus 27.0% (95% CI, 22.7% to 31.5%), respectively. Exploratory analyses showed a trend toward improved OS in GM-CSF–treated patients with resected visceral metastases. When survival in HLA-A2–positive patients who received PV versus placebo was compared, RFS and OS were not significantly different. Treatment-related grade 3 or greater adverse events were similar between GM-CSF and placebo groups. Conclusion Neither adjuvant GM-CSF nor PV significantly improved RFS or OS in patients with high

  10. Lymph node-derived donor encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice adoptive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis highly express GM-CSF and T-bet.

    PubMed

    Cravens, Petra D; Hussain, Rehana Z; Zacharias, Tresa E; Ben, Li-Hong; Herndon, Emily; Vinnakota, Ramya; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Nessler, Stefan; Zamvil, Scott S; Eagar, Todd N; Stüve, Olaf

    2011-06-24

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a relevant animal model for the human demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), multiple sclerosis (MS). Induction of EAE by adoptive transfer allows studying the role of the donor T lymphocyte in disease pathogenesis. It has been challenging to reliably induce adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible and high yield protocol for adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice. A step-wise experimental approach permitted us to develop a protocol that resulted in a consistent relatively high disease incidence of ~70% in recipient mice. Donor mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)p35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) followed by pertussis toxin (PT). Only lymph node cells (LNC) isolated at day 12 post immunization, and restimulated in vitro for 72 hours with 10 μg/mL of MOGp35-55 and 0.5 ng/mL of interleukin-12 (IL-12) were able to transfer disease. The ability of LNC to transfer disease was associated with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the CNS at day 12. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) was produced at comparable levels in cell cultures prepared from mice at both day 6 and day 12 post immunization. By contrast, there was a trend towards a negative association between IL-17 and disease susceptibility in our EAE model. The amount of GM-CSF secreted was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from cells collected at day 12 post immunization versus those collected at day 6 post-immunization. Activated CD4+ T cells present in the day 12 LNC cultures maintained expression of the transcription factor T-bet, which has been shown to regulate the expression of the IL-23 receptor. Also, there was an increased prevalence of MOGp35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in day 12 LNC after in vitro re-stimulation. In summary, encephalitogenic LNC that adoptively transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice were not characterized

  11. Effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine GM-CSF and IL-8 on CMT score, somatic cell count, and milk mononuclear cell populations in Holstein cows with Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Kiku, Yoshio; Ozawa, Tomomi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kushibiki, Shiro; Inumaru, Shigeki; Shingu, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Yuya; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hata, Eiji; Hayashi, Tomohito

    2017-03-09

    The effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rbGM-CSF) and interleukin-8 (rbIL-8) on mononuclear cell populations in quarters, somatic cell count (SCC) and the California Mastitis Test (CMT) score were investigated. From the selected cows with naturally occurring Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis, one quarter of each cow were selected for the infusions of rbGM-CSF (400 μg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), rbIL-8 (1 mg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), and phosphate-buffered saline (5 mL/quarter, n = 7). The CMT score of both cytokines post infusion temporarily increased between days 0 and 1 and significantly decreased between days 7 and 14 compared to the preinfusion level. The SCC on day 14 after infusions of rbGM-CSF tended to be lower than that of the control group. The percentage of CD14+ cells increased on days 1 and 2 post infusion of rbGM-CSF. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells also increased on days 2 and 3, suggesting that the infusion of rbGM-CSF enhanced cellular immunity in the mammary gland. In contrast, the percentage of CD14+ cells decreased on days 0.25 and 1 post infusion of rbIL-8. No significant changes in the percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in milk after infusion of rbIL-8 were evident during the experimental period, which suggested that rbIL-8 had little effect on the function of T cells in the mammary gland. These results indicated that rbGM-CSF and rbIL-8 decreased the CMT score by a different mechanism and may have a potential as therapeutic agents for subclinical mastitis.

  12. Peptide insertions in domain 4 of hbeta(c), the shared signalling receptor subunit for GM-CSF, IL3 and IL5, induce ligand-independent activation.

    PubMed

    Jones, K L; Bagley, C J; Butcher, C; Barry, S C; Vadas, M A; D'Andrea, R J

    2001-06-21

    A mutant form of the common beta-subunit of the GM-CSF, interleukin-3 (IL3) and IL5 receptors is activated by a 37 residue duplicated segment which includes the WSXWS motif and an adjacent, highly conserved, aliphatic/basic element. Haemopoietic expression of this mutant, hbeta(c)FIDelta, in mice leads to myeloproliferative disease. To examine the mechanism of activation of this mutant we targetted the two conserved motifs in each repeat for mutagenesis. Here we show that this mutant exhibits constitutive activity in BaF-B03 cells in the presence of mouse or human GM-CSF receptor alpha-subunit (GMRalpha) and this activity is disrupted by mutations of the conserved motifs in the first repeat. In the presence of these mutations the receptor reverts to an alternative conformation which retains responsiveness to human IL3 in a CTLL cell line co-expressing the human IL3 receptor alpha-subunit (hIL3Ralpha). Remarkably, the activated conformation is maintained in the presence of substitutions, deletions or replacement of the second repeat. This suggests that activation occurs due to insertion of extra sequence after the WSXWS motif and is not dependent on the length or specific sequence of the insertion. Thus hbeta(c) displays an ability to fold into functional receptor conformations given insertion of up to 37 residues in the membrane-proximal region. Constitutive activation most likely results from a specific conformational change which alters a dormant, inactive receptor complex, permitting functional association with GMRalpha and ligand-independent mitogenic signalling.

  13. Batf3-Dependent CD11blow/− Peripheral Dendritic Cells Are GM-CSF-Independent and Are Not Required for Th Cell Priming after Subcutaneous Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Edelson, Brian T.; Bradstreet, Tara R.; KC, Wumesh; Hildner, Kai; Herzog, Jeremy W.; Sim, Julia; Russell, John H.; Murphy, Theresa L.; Unanue, Emil R.; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) subsets differ in precursor cell of origin, functional properties, requirements for growth factors, and dependence on transcription factors. Lymphoid-tissue resident CD8α+ conventional DCs (cDCs) and CD11blow/−CD103+ non-lymphoid DCs are developmentally related, each being dependent on FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L), and requiring the transcription factors Batf3, Irf8, and Id2 for development. It was recently suggested that granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was required for the development of dermal CD11blow/−Langerin+CD103+ DCs, and that this dermal DC subset was required for priming autoreactive T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Here, we compared development of peripheral tissue DCs and susceptibility to EAE in GM-CSF receptor deficient (Csf2rb−/−) and Batf3−/− mice. We find that Batf3-dependent dermal CD11blow/−Langerin+ DCs do develop in Csf2rb−/− mice, but that they express reduced, but not absent, levels of CD103. Further, Batf3−/− mice lacking all peripheral CD11blow/− DCs show robust Th cell priming after subcutaneous immunization and are susceptible to EAE. Our results suggest that defective T effector priming and resistance to EAE exhibited by Csf2rb−/− mice does not result from the absence of dermal CD11blow/−Langerin+CD103+ DCs. PMID:22065991

  14. Influenza induces IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion by human alveolar epithelial cells through HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Correll, Kelly; Zemans, Rachel L; Leslie, Christina C; Murphy, Robert C; Mason, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The most severe complication of influenza is viral pneumonia, which can lead to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) are the first cells that influenza virus encounters upon entering the alveolus. Infected epithelial cells produce cytokines that attract and activate neutrophils and macrophages, which in turn induce damage to the epithelial-endothelial barrier. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α)/epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are well known to regulate repair of damaged alveolar epithelium by stimulating cell migration and proliferation. Recently, TGF-α/EGFR signaling has also been shown to regulate innate immune responses in bronchial epithelial cells. However, little is known about whether HGF/c-Met signaling alters the innate immune responses and whether the innate immune responses in AECs are regulated by HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR. We hypothesized that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR would regulate innate immune responses to influenza A virus infection in human AECs. We found that recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) and rhTGF-α stimulated primary human AECs to secrete IL-8 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) strongly and IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 moderately. Influenza infection stimulated the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF by AECs plated on rat-tail collagen through EGFR activation likely by TGF-α released from AECs and through c-Met activated by HGF secreted from lung fibroblasts. HGF secretion by fibroblasts was stimulated by AEC production of prostaglandin E2 during influenza infection. We conclude that HGF/c-Met and TGF-α/EGFR signaling enhances the innate immune responses by human AECs during influenza infections.

  15. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane Inhibits Flt3L/GM-CSF-induced-bone Marrow-derived CD103+ Dendritic Cell Differentiation Regulating Phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ah-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ji; Jeong, So-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal immune system maintains oral tolerance to harmless antigens or nutrients. One mechanism of oral tolerance is mediated by regulatory T cell (Treg)s, of which differentiation is regulated by a subset of dendritic cell (DC)s, primarily CD103+ DCs. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, plays an important role in regulating immunity. The intestines are exposed to various AhR ligands, including endogenous metabolites and phytochemicals. It was previously reported that AhR activation induced tolerogenic DCs in mice or in cultures of bone marrow-derived DCs. However, given the variety of tolerogenic DCs, which type of tolerogenic DCs is regulated by AhR remains unknown. In this study, we found that AhR ligand 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) inhibited the development of CD103+ DCs from mouse bone marrow cells stimulated with Flt3L and GM-CSF. DIM interfered with phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5 inhibiting the expression of genes, including Id2, E2-2, IDO-1, and Aldh1a2, which are associated with DC differentiation and functions. Finally, DIM suppressed the ability of CD103+ DCs to induce Foxp3+ Tregs. PMID:26770182

  16. Signal transduction by the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor: two distinct cytoplasmic regions of the common beta subunit responsible for different signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, N; Sakamaki, K; Terada, N; Arai, K; Miyajima, A

    1993-01-01

    The high-affinity receptors for granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin 3 (IL-3) and IL-5 consist of two subunits, alpha and beta. The alpha subunits are specific to each cytokine and the same beta subunit (beta c) is shared by these three receptors. Although none of these receptor subunits has intrinsic kinase activity, these cytokines induce protein tyrosine phosphorylation, activation of Ras, Raf-1 and MAP kinase, and transcriptional activation of nuclear proto-oncogenes such as c-myc, c-fos and c-jun. In this paper, we describe a detailed analysis of the signaling potential of the beta c subunit by using a series of cytoplasmic deletion mutants. The human beta c consists of 881 amino acid residues. A C-terminal deletion mutant of beta c at amino acid 763 (beta 763) induced phosphorylation of Shc and activation of Ras, Raf-1, MAP kinase and p70 S6 kinase, whereas a deletion at amino acid 626 (beta 626) induced none of these effects. The beta 763 mutant, as well as the full-length beta c, induced transcription of c-myc, c-fos and c-jun. Deletions at amino acid 517 (beta 517) and 626 (beta 626) induced c-myc and pim-1, but no induction of c-fos and c-jun was observed. GM-CSF increased phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3-K) activity in anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates from cells expressing beta 763 as well as beta c, whereas it was only marginally increased from cells expressing beta 517 or beta 626. Thus, there are at least two distinct regions within the cytoplasmic domain of beta c that are responsible for different signals, i.e. a membrane proximal region of approximately 60 amino acid residues upstream of Glu517 is essential for induction of c-myc and pim-1, and a distal region of approximately 140 amino acid residues (between Leu626 and Ser763) is required for activation of Ras, Raf-1, MAP kinase and p70 S6 kinase, as well as induction of c-fos and c-jun. Images PMID:8223433

  17. The Effects of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection on GM-CSF- and M-CSF-Induced Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophage from Resistant and Susceptible Mice Strains

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Silva, Calliandra; Tavares, Aldo Henrique; Sousa Jeronimo, Marcio; Soares de Lima, Yasmin; da Silveira Derengowski, Lorena; Lorenzetti Bocca, Anamélia; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete

    2015-01-01

    Considering the importance of macrophages as the first line of defense against fungal infection and the different roles played by the two M1- and M2-like polarized macrophages, we decided to evaluate the effects of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection on GM-CSF- and M-CSF-induced bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) from the A/J and B10.A mouse strains, an established model of resistance/susceptibility to PCM, respectively. Upon differentiation, the generated GM- or M-BMMs were characterized by morphological analyses, gene expression profiles, and cytokines production. Our main results demonstrate that GM-BMMs derived from A/J and B.10 produced high levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that may contribute to generate an unbalanced early immune response. In accordance with the literature, the B10.A susceptible mice lineage has an innate tendency to polarize into M1-like phenotype, whereas the opposite phenotype occurs in A/J resistance mice. In this context, our data support that susceptibility and resistance are strongly correlated with M1 and M2 polarization, respectively. PMID:26543326

  18. The Effects of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection on GM-CSF- and M-CSF-Induced Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophage from Resistant and Susceptible Mice Strains.

    PubMed

    de Souza Silva, Calliandra; Tavares, Aldo Henrique; Sousa Jeronimo, Marcio; Soares de Lima, Yasmin; da Silveira Derengowski, Lorena; Bocca, Anamélia Lorenzetti; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete

    2015-01-01

    Considering the importance of macrophages as the first line of defense against fungal infection and the different roles played by the two M1- and M2-like polarized macrophages, we decided to evaluate the effects of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection on GM-CSF- and M-CSF-induced bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) from the A/J and B10.A mouse strains, an established model of resistance/susceptibility to PCM, respectively. Upon differentiation, the generated GM- or M-BMMs were characterized by morphological analyses, gene expression profiles, and cytokines production. Our main results demonstrate that GM-BMMs derived from A/J and B.10 produced high levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that may contribute to generate an unbalanced early immune response. In accordance with the literature, the B10.A susceptible mice lineage has an innate tendency to polarize into M1-like phenotype, whereas the opposite phenotype occurs in A/J resistance mice. In this context, our data support that susceptibility and resistance are strongly correlated with M1 and M2 polarization, respectively.

  19. A human high affinity interleukin-5 receptor (IL5R) is composed of an IL5-specific alpha chain and a beta chain shared with the receptor for GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, J; Devos, R; Cornelis, S; Tuypens, T; Van der Heyden, J; Fiers, W; Plaetinck, G

    1991-09-20

    cDNA clones encoding two receptor proteins involved in the binding of human interleukin 5 (hIL5) have been isolated. A first class codes for an IL5-specific chain (hIL5R alpha). The major transcript of this receptor gene, as analyzed in both HL-60 eosinophilic cells and eosinophilic myelocytes grown from cord blood, encodes a secreted form of this receptor. This soluble hIL5R alpha has antagonistic properties. A second component of the hIL5R is found to be identical to the beta chain of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) high affinity receptor. The finding that IL5 and GM-CSF share a receptor subunit provides a molecular basis for the observation that these cytokines can partially interfere with each other's binding and have highly overlapping biological activities on eosinophils.

  20. PyNTTTTGT and CpG Immunostimulatory Oligonucleotides: Effect on Granulocyte/Monocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Secretion by Human CD56+ (NK and NKT) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Juan M.; Marchicio, José; López, Mariela; Ziblat, Andrea; Elias, Fernanda; Fló, Juan; López, Ricardo A.; Horn, David; Zorzopulos, Jorge; Montaner, Alejandro D.

    2015-01-01

    CD56+ cells have been recognized as being involved in bridging the innate and acquired immune systems. Herein, we assessed the effect of two major classes of immunostimulatory oligonucleotides (ODNs), PyNTTTTGT and CpG, on CD56+ cells. Incubation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) with some of these ODNs led to secretion of significant amounts of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but only if interleukin 2 (IL2) was present. IMT504, the prototype of the PyNTTTTGT ODN class, was the most active. GM-CSF secretion was very efficient when non-CpG ODNs with high T content and PyNTTTTGT motifs lacking CpGs were used. On the other hand, CpG ODNs and IFNα inhibited this GM-CSF secretion. Selective cell type removal from hPBMC indicated that CD56+ cells were responsible for GM-CSF secretion and that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) regulate this process. In addition, PyNTTTTGT ODNs inhibited the IFNα secretion induced by CpG ODNs in PDCs by interference with the TLR9 signaling pathway. Since IFNα is essential for CD56+ stimulation by CpG ODNs, there is a reciprocal interference of CpG and PyNTTTTGT ODNs when acting on this cell population. This suggests that these synthetic ODNs mimic different natural alarm signals for activation of the immune system. PMID:25706946

  1. Suitable in vitro culture of Eimeria bovis meront II stages in bovine colonic epithelial cells and parasite-induced upregulation of CXCL10 and GM-CSF gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Carlos; Stamm, Ivonne; Menge, Christian; Taubert, Anja

    2015-08-01

    We here established a suitable in vitro cell culture system based on bovine colonic epithelial cells (BCEC) for the development of Eimeria bovis merozoites I and the characterization of early parasite-induced innate epithelial host cell reactions as gene transcription of proinflammatory molecules. Both primary and permanent BCEC (BCEC (rim) and BCEC(perm)) were suitable for E. bovis merozoite I invasion and subsequent development of meronts II leading to the release of viable merozoites II. E. bovis merozoite II failed to develop any further neither into gamont nor oocyst stages in BCEC in vitro. E. bovis merozoite I induced innate epithelial host cell reactions at the level of CXC/CCL chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL2), IL-6, and GM-CSF gene transcription. Overall, both BCEC types were activated by merozoite I infections since they showed significantly enhanced gene transcript levels of the immunomodulatory molecules CXCL10 and GM-CSF. However, gene transcription profiles of BCEC(prim) and BCEC(perm) revealed different reaction patterns in response to merozoite I infection with regard to quality and kinetics of chemokine/cytokine gene transcription. Although both BCEC types equally showed most prominent responses for CXCL10 and GM-CSF, the induction of CXCL1, CXCL8, CCL2, and IL-6 gene transcripts varied qualitatively and quantitatively. Our results demonstrate that BCEC seem capable to respond to E. bovis merozoite I infection by the upregulation of CXCL10 and GM-CSF gene transcription and therefore probably contribute to host innate effector mechanisms against E. bovis.

  2. Effect of intramammary injection of rboGM-CSF on milk levels of chemiluminescence activity, somatic cell count, and Staphylococcus aureus count in Holstein cows with S. aureus subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The effect of intramammary injection of recombinant bovine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rboGM-CSF, 400 μg/10 mL) on quarter milk levels of chemiluminescence (CL) activity, and somatic cell count (SCC) and shedding pattern of Staphylococcus aureus was investigated. Ten Holstein cows, naturally infected with S. aureus were used, with either early-stage or late-stage subclinical mastitis. Injection of rboGM-CSF caused a remarkable increase in milk CL activity with a peak at 6 h after the cytokine injection in the early- and late-stage groups. In the early-stage group, milk SCC stayed around preinjection level at 6 h, rose significantly on days 1 and 2, and was followed by a smooth and significant decline to an under preinjection level (below 200 000 cells/mL) on day 7 postinjection. Alternatively, in the late-stage group, milk SCC rose significantly at 6 h after the cytokine injection and maintained high levels thereafter. The milk S. aureus count decreased drastically by the cytokine injection in the early-stage group. The bacterial count was moderately decreased in the late-stage group, but increased back to preinoculation levels on day 7 after the cytokine injection. The results suggest that the rboGM-CSF has a potential as a therapeutic agent for S. aureus infection causing subclinical mastitis of dairy cows, if the cytokine is applied at the initial stage of infection. PMID:15352542

  3. GR-independent down-modulation on GM-CSF bone marrow-derived dendritic cells by the selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator Compound A

    PubMed Central

    Barcala Tabarrozzi, Andres E.; Andreone, Luz; Deckers, Julie; Castro, Carla N.; Gimeno, María L.; Ariolfo, Laura; Berguer, Paula M.; Antunica-Noguerol, María; Liberman, Ana C.; Vettorazzi, Sabine; Tuckermann, Jan P.; De Bosscher, Karolien; Perone, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) initiate the adaptive immune response. Glucocorticoids (GCs) down-modulate the function of DC. Compound A (CpdA, (2-(4-acetoxyphenyl)-2-chloro-N-methyl-ethylammonium chloride) is a plant-derived GR-ligand with marked dissociative properties. We investigated the effects of CpdA on in vitro generated GM-CSF-conditioned bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC). CpdA-exposed BMDC exhibited low expression of cell-surface molecules and diminution of the release of proinflammatory cytokines upon LPS stimulation; processes associated with BMDC maturation and activation. CpdA-treated BMDC were inefficient at Ag capture via mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis and displayed reduced T-cell priming. CpdA prevented the LPS-induced rise in pErk1/2 and pP38, kinases involved in TLR4 signaling. CpdA fully inhibited LPS-induced pAktSer473, a marker associated with the generation of tolerogenic DC. We used pharmacological blockade and selective genetic loss-of-function tools and demonstrated GR-independent inhibitory effects of CpdA in BMDC. Mechanistically, CpdA-mediated inactivation of the NF-κB intracellular signaling pathway was associated with a short-circuiting of pErk1/2 and pP38 upstream signaling. Assessment of the in vivo function of CpdA-treated BMDC pulsed with the hapten trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid showed impaired cell-mediated contact hypersensitivity. Collectively, we provide evidence that CpdA is an effective BMDC modulator that might have a benefit for immune disorders, even when GR is not directly targeted. PMID:27857212

  4. Cuscuta chinensis Ameliorates Immunosuppression and Urotoxic Effect of Cyclophosphamide by Regulating Cytokines - GM-CSF and TNF-Alpha.

    PubMed

    Raju, Nidhi; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Kannan, Narayanan; Vinod Prabhu, Venugopal; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is commonly used as anticancer drug which causes toxicity by its reactive metabolites such as acroline and phosphoramide mustard. In this study, Cuscuta chinensis (C. chinensis) (family: Convolvulaceae) was assessed for ability to restore mice against CTX-induced toxicity. Coadministration of C. chinensis extract (10 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) for ten consecutive days reduced CTX-induced (25 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) toxicity. Treatment with C. chinensis extract significantly (p < 0.01) increased the relative organ weight and body weight. Moreover, administration of C. chinensis extract significantly increased bone marrow cellulatity and α-esterase activity in CTX-treated mice which suggested its protective role on the hematopoietic system. The GSH content was drastically reduced by CTX administration in urinary bladder which was enhanced by treatment with C. chinensis extract, indicating that preventing acroline-mediated tissue damage or cell toxicity and also the extract decreased the urinary bladder nitric oxide (NO) level which proves recovery over urinary tract injury associated with CTX treatment. The administration of C. chinensis extract decreased serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin levels when compared to CTX-alone-treated group. Histopathological analysis of the urinary bladder of CTX-alone-treated group showed necrotic damage whereas the C. chinensis-treated group showed normal bladder architecture. The above data clearly demonstrates chemoprotective role of C. chinensis against CTX-induced toxicities by regulating antioxidant and inflammatory mediators.

  5. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Polarizes Both M-CSF- and GM-CSF-Differentiated Macrophages Toward an M1-Like Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Seif, Michelle; Philippi, Anja; Breinig, Frank; Kiemer, Alexandra K; Hoppstädter, Jessica

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages are a heterogeneous and plastic cell population with two main phenotypes: pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages (M1) and anti-inflammatory alternatively activated macrophages (M2). Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a promising vehicle for the delivery of vaccines. It is well established that S. cerevisiae is taken up by professional phagocytic cells. However, the response of human macrophages to S. cerevisiae is ill-defined. In this study, we characterized the interaction between S. cerevisiae and M1- or M2-like macrophages. M1-like macrophages had a higher yeast uptake capacity than M2-like macrophages, but both cell types internalized opsonized yeast to the same extent. The M1 surface markers HLAII and CD86 were upregulated after yeast uptake in M1- and M2-like macrophages. Moreover, mRNA expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-6, increased, whereas the expression of anti-inflammatory mediators did not change. These results demonstrate that S. cerevisiae can target both M1 and M2 macrophages, paralleled by skewing toward an M1 phenotype. Thus, the use of yeast-based delivery systems might be a promising approach for the treatment of pathologic conditions that would benefit from the presence of M1-polarized macrophages, such as cancer.

  6. High Doses of GM-CSF Inhibit Antibody Responses in Rectal Secretions and Diminish Modified Vaccinia Ankara/Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Protection in TRIM5α-Restrictive Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kannanganat, Sunil; Wyatt, Linda S; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Chamcha, Venkatesarlu; Chea, Lynette S; Kozlowski, Pamela A; LaBranche, Celia C; Chennareddi, Lakshmi; Lawson, Benton; Reddy, Pradeep B J; Styles, Tiffany M; Vanderford, Thomas H; Montefiori, David C; Moss, Bernard; Robinson, Harriet L; Amara, Rama Rao

    2016-11-01

    We tested, in rhesus macaques, the effects of a 500-fold range of an admixed recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing rhesus GM-CSF (MVA/GM-CSF) on the immunogenicity and protection elicited by an MVA/SIV macaque 239 vaccine. High doses of MVA/GM-CSF did not affect the levels of systemic envelope (Env)-specific Ab, but it did decrease the expression of the gut-homing receptor α4β7 on plasmacytoid dendritic cells (p < 0.01) and the magnitudes of Env-specific IgA (p = 0.01) and IgG (p < 0.05) in rectal secretions. The protective effect of the vaccine was evaluated using 12 weekly rectal challenges in rhesus macaques subgrouped by tripartite motif-containing protein 5α (TRIM5α) genotypes that are restrictive or permissive for infection by the challenge virus SIVsmE660. Eight of nine TRIM5α-restrictive animals receiving no or the lowest dose (1 × 10(5) PFU) of MVA/GM-CSF resisted all 12 challenges. In the comparable TRIM5α-permissive group, only 1 of 12 animals resisted all 12 challenges. In the TRIM5α-restrictive animals, but not in the TRIM5α-permissive animals, the number of challenges to infection directly correlated with the magnitudes of Env-specific rectal IgG (r = +0.6) and IgA (r = +0.6), the avidity of Env-specific serum IgG (r = +0.5), and Ab dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (r = +0.6). Titers of neutralizing Ab did not correlate with protection. We conclude that 1) protection elicited by MVA/SIVmac239 is strongly dependent on the presence of TRIM5α restriction, 2) nonneutralizing Ab responses contribute to protection against SIVsmE660 in TRIM5α-restrictive animals, and 3) high doses of codelivered MVA/GM-CSF inhibit mucosal Ab responses and the protection elicited by MVA expressing noninfectious SIV macaque 239 virus-like particles.

  7. Standardized serum GM-CSF autoantibody testing for the routine clinical diagnosis of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kanji; Nakata, Koh; Carey, Brenna; Chalk, Claudia; Suzuki, Takuji; Sakagami, Takuro; Koch, Diana E; Stevens, Carrie; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Trapnell, Bruce C

    2014-01-15

    Autoantibodies against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMAbs) cause autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and measurement of the GMAb level in serum is now commonly used to identify this disease, albeit, in a clinical research setting. The present study was undertaken to optimize and standardize serum GMAb concentration testing using a GMAb enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GMAb ELISA) to prepare for its introduction into routine clinical use. The GMAb ELISA was evaluated using serum specimens from autoimmune PAP patients, healthy people, and GMAb-spiked serum from healthy people. After optimizing assay components and procedures, its accuracy, precision, reliability, sensitivity, specificity, and ruggedness were evaluated. The coefficient of variation in repeated measurements was acceptable (<15%) for well-to-well, plate-to-plate, day-to-day, and inter-operator variation, and was not affected by repeated freeze-thaw cycles of serum specimens or the reference standards, or by storage of serum samples at -80°C. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of the PAP patient-derived polyclonal GMAb reference standard (PCRS) was 0.78ng/ml. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified a serum GMAb level of 5μg/ml (based on PCRS) as the optimal cut off value for distinguishing autoimmune PAP serum from normal serum. A pharmaceutical-grade, monoclonal GMAb reference standard (MCRS) was developed as the basis of a new unit of measure for GMAb concentration: one International Unit (IU) of GMAb is equivalent to 1μg/ml of MCRS. The median [interquartile range] serum GMAb level was markedly higher in autoimmune PAP patients than in healthy people (21.54 [12.83-36.38] versus 0.08 [0.05-0.14] IU; n=56, 38; respectively; P<0.0001). Results demonstrate that serum GMAb measurement using the GMAb ELISA was accurate, precise, reliable, had an acceptable LLOQ, and could be accurately expressed in standardized units. These findings support the

  8. Co-vaccination with adeno-associated virus vectors encoding human papillomavirus 16 L1 proteins and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF can elicit strong and prolonged neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dai-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Huang, Chien-Wei; Kuo, Shu-Wen; Chen, Show-Li

    2005-01-01

    Non-infectious human papillomavirus-like particles (VLPs), encoded by the major capsid gene L1, have been shown to be effective as vaccines to prevent cervical cancer. We have developed the genetic immunization of the L1 gene to induce a neutralizing antibody. We constructed and generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 L1 protein that could form virus-like particles in transduced cells. Previous reports have demonstrated that the formation of VLP is necessary to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies to protect an animal from viral challenge. Therefore, we carried out a single intramuscular (i.m.) injection with recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding HPV-16 L1 protein (rAAV-16L1) in BALB/c mice, which ultimately produced stronger and more prolonged neutralizing L1 antibodies, when compared to the DNA vaccine. Immunohistochemistry showed that the accumulation of antigen presenting cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, in rAAV-16L1 and L1 DNA-injected muscle fibers may be due to the L1 protein expression, but not to AAV infection. When compared to the L1 VLP vaccine, however, the titers of neutralizing L1 antibodies induced by VLP were higher than those induced by rAAV-16L1. Co-vaccinating with rAAV-16L1 and adenovirus encoding murine GM-CSF (rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF) induced comparable higher levels of neutralizing L1 antibodies with those of VLP. This implies that a single i.m. co-injection with rAAV-16L1/rAd-mGM-CSF can achieve the same vaccine effect as a VLP vaccine requiring 3 booster injections.

  9. Definition of a GC-rich motif as regulatory sequence of the human IL-3 gene: coordinate regulation of the IL-3 gene by CLE2/GC box of the GM-CSF gene in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Nishida, J; Yoshida, M; Arai, K; Yokota, T

    1991-03-01

    The human IL-3 gene, located on chromosome 5, contains several cis-acting DNA sequences, i.e. CLE (conserved lymphokine element) and a GC-rich region, similar to the GM-CSF gene. To investigate the role of these elements, the 5' flanking region of the IL-3 gene was attached to a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. The fusion plasmids were analyzed by an in vitro transcription system using Jurkat cell nuclear extract prepared from cells stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and calcium ionophore (PMA/A23187), introduced into Jurkat cells, expressed transiently, and stimulated by co-transfection of human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) encoded transactivator, p40tax. The GC-rich region enhanced TATA-dependent transcription in the in vitro transcription system and also strongly responded to p40tax stimulation in the in vivo cotransfection assay. Using this GC-rich region as a probe, we identified a constitutive DNA-protein complex, alpha, whose binding specificity correlates with transcription activity. However, this element is not sufficient for the expression of the IL-3 gene in response to T cell activation signals (PMA/A23187) and no sequence was found within the IL-3 gene which mediates the response to PMA/A23187. The enhancer sequence which responds to T cell activation signals may be located outside the IL-3 gene and may be shared by other lymphokines, possibly by GM-CSF. We propose that the GM-CSF enhancer (CLE2/GC box) which mediates the response to T cell activation signals may stimulate the expression of the IL-3 gene.

  10. A Kampo (traditional Japanese herbal) medicine, Hochuekkito, pretreatment in mice prevented influenza virus replication accompanied with GM-CSF expression and increase in several defensin mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Dan, Katsuaki; Akiyoshi, Hiroko; Munakata, Kaori; Hasegawa, Hideki; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    A Kampo medicine, Hochuekkito (TJ-41), with an influenza virus-preventing effect had life-extending effectiveness, and immunological responses other than interferon (IFN)-α release were examined. TJ-41 (1 g/kg) was given to C57BL/6 male mice orally once a day for 2 weeks. Mice were then intranasally infected with influenza virus. After infection, virus titers and various parameters, mRNA levels and protein expression, for immunoresponses in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or removed lung homogenate, were measured by plaque assay, quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. IFN-α and -β levels of TJ-41-treated mice were higher than those of the control. Toll-like receptor TLR7 and TLR9 mRNAs were elevated after infection, but retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG-1) family mRNA levels, RIG-1, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 and Leishmania G protein 2 showed no response in either TJ-41 or control groups. Interferon regulatory transcription factor (IRF)-3 mRNA levels to stimulate type I (α/β) IFN were increased, but IRF-7 did not change. Only granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) after Hochuekkito treatment was significantly elevated 2 and 3 days after infection. The mRNA levels of 7 defensins after infection increased compared to preinfection values. The key roles of TJ-41 were not only stimulation of type I IFN release but also GM-CSF-derived anti-inflammation activity. Furthermore, defensin (antimicrobial peptide) mRNA levels increased by infection and were further enhanced by TJ-41 treatment. Defensin might prevent influenza virus replication.

  11. CSL311, a novel, potent, therapeutic monoclonal antibody for the treatment of diseases mediated by the common β chain of the IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors.

    PubMed

    Panousis, Con; Dhagat, Urmi; Edwards, Kirsten M; Rayzman, Veronika; Hardy, Matthew P; Braley, Hal; Gauvreau, Gail M; Hercus, Timothy R; Smith, Steven; Sehmi, Roma; McMillan, Laura; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J; Fabri, Louis J; Vairo, Gino; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W; Nash, Andrew D; Wilson, Nicholas J; Wilson, Michael J; Owczarek, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    The β common-signaling cytokines interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 stimulate pro-inflammatory activities of haematopoietic cells via a receptor complex incorporating cytokine-specific α and shared β common (βc, CD131) receptor. Evidence from animal models and recent clinical trials demonstrate that these cytokines are critical mediators of the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway disease such as asthma. However, no therapeutic agents, other than steroids, that specifically and effectively target inflammation mediated by all 3 of these cytokines exist. We employed phage display technology to identify and optimize a novel, human monoclonal antibody (CSL311) that binds to a unique epitope that is specific to the cytokine-binding site of the human βc receptor. The binding epitope of CSL311 on the βc receptor was defined by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis. CSL311 has picomolar binding affinity for the human βc receptor, and at therapeutic concentrations is a highly potent antagonist of the combined activities of IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 on primary eosinophil survival in vitro. Importantly, CSL311 inhibited the survival of inflammatory cells present in induced sputum from human allergic asthmatic subjects undergoing allergen bronchoprovocation. Due to its high potency and ability to simultaneously suppress the activity of all 3 β common cytokines, CSL311 may provide a new strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases where the human βc receptor is central to pathogenesis. The coordinates for the βc/CSL311 Fab complex structure have been deposited with the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB 5DWU).

  12. Activating point mutations in the common beta subunit of the human GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5 receptors suggest the involvement of beta subunit dimerization and cell type-specific molecules in signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B J; D'Andrea, R; Gonda, T J

    1995-01-01

    We have combined retroviral expression cloning with random mutagenesis to identify two activating point mutations in the common signal-transducing subunit (h beta c) of the receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 by virtue of their ability to confer factor independence on the haemopoietic cell line, FDC-P1. One mutation (V449E) is located within the transmembrane domain and, by analogy with a similar mutation in the neu oncogene, may act by inducing dimerization of h beta c. The other mutation (I374N) lies in the extracellular, membrane-proximal portion of h beta c. Neither of these mutants, nor a previously described mutant of h beta c (FI delta, which has a small duplication in the extracellular region), was capable of inducing factor independence in CTLL-2 cells, while only V449E could induce factor independence in BAF-B03 cells. These results imply that the extracellular and transmembrane mutations act by different mechanisms. Furthermore, they imply that the mutants, and hence also wild-type h beta c, interact with cell type-specific signalling molecules. Models are presented which illustrate how these mutations may act and predict some of the characteristics of the putative receptor-associated signalling molecules. Images PMID:7556069

  13. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  14. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Metabolic Differences Between Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (M-CSF) Grown Macrophages Derived from Murine Bone Marrow Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Na, Yi Rang; Hong, Ji Hye; Lee, Min Yong; Jung, Jae Hun; Jung, Daun; Kim, Young Won; Son, Dain; Choi, Murim; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are crucial in controlling infectious agents and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages require a wide range of functional capabilities in order to fulfill distinct roles in our body, one being rapid and robust immune responses. To gain insight into macrophage plasticity and the key regulatory protein networks governing their specific functions, we performed quantitative analyses of the proteome and phosphoproteome of murine primary GM-CSF and M-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs and M-BMMs, respectively) using the latest isobaric tag based tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Strikingly, metabolic processes emerged as a major difference between these macrophages. Specifically, GM-BMMs show significant enrichment of proteins involving glycolysis, the mevalonate pathway, and nitrogen compound biosynthesis. This evidence of enhanced glycolytic capability in GM-BMMs is particularly significant regarding their pro-inflammatory responses, because increased production of cytokines upon LPS stimulation in GM-BMMs depends on their acute glycolytic capacity. In contrast, M-BMMs up-regulate proteins involved in endocytosis, which correlates with a tendency toward homeostatic functions such as scavenging cellular debris. Together, our data describes a proteomic network that underlies the pro-inflammatory actions of GM-BMMs as well as the homeostatic functions of M-BMMs. PMID:26229149

  15. Light chain (κ/λ) ratio of GM-CSF autoantibodies is associated with disease severity in autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Nei, Takahito; Urano, Shinya; Itoh, Yuko; Kitamura, Nobutaka; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takahiro; Motoi, Natsuki; Kaneko, Chinatsu; Tazawa, Ryushi; Nakagaki, Kazuhide; Arai, Toru; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Nakata, Koh

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antigranulocyte colony-stimulating factor autoantibody (GMAb) was consistently present in patients with autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (aPAP), and, thus, represented candidature as a reliable diagnostic marker. However, our large cohort study suggested that the concentration of this antibody was not correlated with disease severity in patients. We found that the κ/λ ratio of GMAb was significantly correlated with the degree of hypoxemia. The proportion of λ-type GMAb per total λ-type IgG was significantly higher in severely affected patients than those in mildly affected patients, but the proportion of κ-type was unchanged. The κ/λ ratio was significantly correlated with both KL-6 and SP-D, which have been previously reported as disease severity markers. Thus, the light chain isotype usage of GMAb may not only be associated with the severity of aPAP, but may also represent a useful disease severity marker.

  16. Autologous tumor cell vaccination plus infusion of GM-CSF by a programmable pump in the treatment of recurrent malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Clavreul, Anne; Piard, Nicole; Tanguy, Jean-Yves; Gamelin, Eric; Rousselet, Marie-Christine; Leynia, Pierre; Menei, Philippe

    2010-07-01

    We report on the safety and feasibility of autologous tumor cell vaccination combined with infusion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by a programmable pump in the treatment of recurrent malignant gliomas. The programmable pump is a promising tool used to infuse cytokines subcutaneously for vaccination. Our trial enrolled nine patients who had undergone surgery, radiation and had been successfully weaned off steroids. Unfortunately, only five patients completed the protocol and were monitored for side effects, local reactions, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and survival. The treatment was well tolerated. Two patients developed DTH reactions after vaccination and three patients had an unusually long survival without any other treatment. Despite the few patients treated, the results of this trial are encouraging. This study also highlights the specific difficulties encountered in vaccination programs for the treatment of glioma.

  17. Phase 2, randomised placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an anti-GM-CSF antibody (KB003) in patients with inadequately controlled asthma

    PubMed Central

    Molfino, Nestor A; Kuna, Piotr; Leff, Jonathan A; Oh, Chad K; Singh, Dave; Chernow, Marlene; Sutton, Brian; Yarranton, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We wished to evaluate the effects of an antigranulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor monoclonal antibody (KB003) on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), asthma control and asthma exacerbations in adult asthmatics inadequately controlled by long-acting bronchodilators and inhaled/oral corticosteroids. Settings 47 ambulatory asthma care centres globally. Primary outcome measures Change in FEV1 at week 24. Participants 311 were screened, 160 were randomised and 129 completed the study. Interventions 7 intravenous infusions of either 400 mg KB003 or placebo at baseline and weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20. Primary and secondary outcome measures FEV1 at week 24, asthma control, exacerbation rates and safety in all participants as well as prespecified subgroups. Main results In the KB003 treated group, FEV1 at week 24 improved to 118 mL compared with 54 mL in the placebo group (p=0.224). However, FEV1 improved to 253 vs 26 mL at week 24 (p=0.02) in eosinophilic asthmatics (defined as >300 peripheral blood eosinophils/mL at baseline) and comparable improvements were seen at weeks 20 (p=0.034) and 24 (p=0.077) in patients with FEV1 reversibility ≥20% at baseline and at weeks 4 (p=0.029), 16 (p=0.018) and 20 (p=0.006) in patients with prebronchodilator FEV1 ≤50% predicted at baseline. There were no effects on asthma control or exacerbation rates. The most frequent adverse events in the KB003 group were rhinosinusitis and headache. There was no significant difference in antidrug antibody response between placebo and treated groups. There were no excess infections or changes in biomarkers known to be associated with the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Conclusions Higher doses and/or further asthma phenotyping may be required in future studies with KB003. Trial registration number NCT01603277; Results. PMID:26739717

  18. Leukemia-associated mutations in SHIP1 inhibit its enzymatic activity, interaction with the GM-CSF receptor and Grb2, and its ability to inactivate PI3K/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Helena; Strauss, Julia; Wegner, Wiebke; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Horstmann, Martin; Jücker, Manfred

    2012-11-01

    The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 is a negative regulator of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which is constitutively activated in 50-70% of acute myeloid leukemias (AML). Ten different missense mutations in SHIP1 have been described in 3% of AML patients suggesting a functional role of SHIP1 in AML. Here, we report the identification of two new SHIP1 mutations T162P and R225W that were detected in 2 and 1 out of 96 AML patients, respectively. The functional analysis of all 12 AML-associated SHIP1 mutations, one ALL-associated SHIP1 mutation (Q1076X) and a missense SNP (H1168Y) revealed that two mutations i.e. Y643H and P1039S abrogated the ability of SHIP1 to reduce constitutive PI3K/AKT signaling in Jurkat cells. The loss of function of SHIP1 mutant Y643H which is localized in the inositol phosphatase domain was due to a reduction of the specific activity by 84%. Because all other SHIP1 mutants had a normal enzymatic activity, we assumed that these SHIP1 mutants may be functionally impaired due to a loss of interaction with plasma membrane receptors or adapter proteins. In agreement with this model, we found that the SHIP1 mutant F28L located in the FLVR motif of the SH2 domain was incapable of binding tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins including the GM-CSF receptor and that the SHIP1 mutant Q1076X lost its ability to bind to the C-terminal SH3 domain of the adapter protein Grb2. In addition, SHIP1 mutant P1039S which does not reduce PI3K/AKT signaling anymore is located in a PXXP SH3 domain consensus binding motif suggesting that mutation of the conserved proline residue interferes with binding of SHIP1 to a so far unidentified SH3 domain containing protein. In summary, our data indicate that SHIP1 mutations detected in human leukemia patients impair the negative regulatory function of SHIP1 on PI3K/AKT signaling in leukemia cells either directly by reduced enzymatic activity or indirectly by disturbed protein interaction with tyrosine-phosphorylated membrane receptors or

  19. Growth advantage of chronic myeloid leukemia CFU-GM in vitro: survival to growth factor deprivation, possibly related to autocrine stimulation, is a more common feature than hypersensitivity to GM-CSF/IL3 and is efficiently counteracted by retinoids +- alpha-interferon.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, D; Foli, C; Giaretta, F; Argentino, C; Rus, C; Pileri, A

    2001-03-01

    Bcr/abl fusion gene, in experimental models, induces survival to growth factor deprivation and hypersensitivity to IL3. However, conflicting data were reported about chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors. We investigated the responsiveness of purified CML CFU-GM to GM-CSF/IL3 and their survival to growth factor deprivation. CFU-GM hypersensitivity to IL3 and/or GM-CSF was found in 3/11 CML cases only. CML CFU-GM survived well in stroma-free 'mass' culture (5 x 10(4) cells/ml) without cytokine addition, up to day 11, average recovery being around 95% in medium + 10% fetal bovine serum and 67-81% in serum-free medium. Conversely, normal progenitors declined steadily, particularly after extensive purification (18 +/- 10% recovery at the 7th day), and in serum-free medium (4 +/- 6% recovery). By contrast, normal and CML CFU-GM declined in a similar way in limiting dilution cultures (1-10 cells/50 microl). We also investigated the effects of retinoic acid and alpha-interferon on CFU-GM survival. Both all-trans- and 13-cis retinoic acid, particularly in combination with alpha-interferon, reduced CML CFU-GM recovery down to normal progenitors' values. In conclusion, hypersensitivity to CSFs is rare in CML, whereas resistance to growth factor deprivation has been confirmed in mass, but not in limiting, dilution cultures. Both stereoisomers of retinoic acid, at therapeutic concentrations and in combination with alpha-interferon, can overcome the survival advantage of CML progenitors.

  20. Clinical trial in healthy malaria-naïve adults to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and efficacy of MuStDO5, a five-gene, sporozoite/hepatic stage Plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine combined with escalating dose human GM-CSF DNA

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Thomas L.; Charoenvit, Yupin; Wang, Ruobing; Epstein, Judith E.; Hedstrom, Richard C.; Kumar, Sanjai; Luke, Thomas C.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Aguiar, Joao C.; Sacci, Jr., John B.; Sedegah, Martha; Nosek, Jr., Ronald A.; De La Vega, Patricia; Berzins, Mara P.; Majam, Victoria F.; Abot, Esteban N.; Ganeshan, Harini; Richie, Nancy O.; Banania, Jo Glenna; Baraceros, Maria Fe B.; Geter, Tanya G.; Mere, Robin; Bebris, Lolita; Limbach, Keith; Hickey, Bradley W.; Lanar, David E.; Ng, Jennifer; Shi, Meng; Hobart, Peter M.; Norman, Jon A.; Soisson, Lorraine A.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Rogers, William O.; Doolan, Denise L.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    When introduced in the 1990s, immunization with DNA plasmids was considered potentially revolutionary for vaccine development, particularly for vaccines intended to induce protective CD8 T cell responses against multiple antigens. We conducted, in 1997−1998, the first clinical trial in healthy humans of a DNA vaccine, a single plasmid encoding Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), as an initial step toward developing a multi-antigen malaria vaccine targeting the liver stages of the parasite. As the next step, we conducted in 2000–2001 a clinical trial of a five-plasmid mixture called MuStDO5 encoding pre-erythrocytic antigens PfCSP, PfSSP2/TRAP, PfEXP1, PfLSA1 and PfLSA3. Thirty-two, malaria-naïve, adult volunteers were enrolled sequentially into four cohorts receiving a mixture of 500 μg of each plasmid plus escalating doses (0, 20, 100 or 500 μg) of a sixth plasmid encoding human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF). Three doses of each formulation were administered intramuscularly by needle-less jet injection at 0, 4 and 8 weeks, and each cohort had controlled human malaria infection administered by five mosquito bites 18 d later. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, inducing moderate antigen-specific, MHC-restricted T cell interferon-γ responses but no antibodies. Although no volunteers were protected, T cell responses were boosted post malaria challenge. This trial demonstrated the MuStDO5 DNA and hGM-CSF plasmids to be safe and modestly immunogenic for T cell responses. It also laid the foundation for priming with DNA plasmids and boosting with recombinant viruses, an approach known for nearly 15 y to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:23151451

  1. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Janice K. . E-mail: janice.ryu@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 {mu}g/m{sup 2} or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer.

  2. Gene expression profiles of some cytokines, growth factors, receptors, and enzymes (GM-CSF, IFNγ, MMP-2, IGF-II, EGF, TGF-β, IGF-IIR) during pregnancy in the cat uterus.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, Ozgecan Korkmaz; Agaoglu, Ali Reha; Guzeloglu, Aydin; Aslan, Selim; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Early pregnancy is one of the most critical periods of pregnancy, and many factors such as cytokines, enzymes, and members of the immune system have to cooperate in a balanced way. In the present study, the gene expression profiles of factors associated with pregnancy such as EGF, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon gamma, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 were analyzed in uterine tissues of female cats. The cats were assigned to five groups: G1 (embryo positive, n = 7; 7th day after mating), G2 (after implantation, n = 7; 20th day after mating), G3 (midgestation, n = 7; 24-25th day after mating), G4 (late gestation, n = 7; 30-45th day after mating), G5 (oocyte group, n = 7; 7th day after estrus). Tissue samples from the uterus and placenta were collected after ovariohysterectomy. Relative messenger RNA levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All the factors examined were detected in all tissue samples. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of EGF and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in G2 than in G1 was observed (P < 0.05). Insulin-like growth factor 2 expression was higher in all groups than in G1 (P < 0.05). Upregulation of EGF during implantation was detected. The expression of interferon gamma was significantly higher in G3 than in G1 (P < 0.05). Transforming growth factor beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were constantly expressed in all groups. In conclusion, the expressions of these factors in feline uterine tissue at different stages of pregnancy might indicate that these factors play roles in the development of pregnancy such as trophoblast invasion, vascularization, implantation, and placentation.

  3. Cosmos 2229 immunology study (Experiment K-8-07)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to further validate use of the rhesus monkey as a model for humans in future space flight testing. The areas of immunological importance examined in the Cosmos 2229 flight were represented by two sets of studies. The first set of studies determined the effect of space flight on the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to granulocyte/monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF is an important regulator in the differentiation of bone marrow cells of both monocyte/macrophage and granulocyte lineages and any change in the ability of these cells to respond to GM-CSF can result in altered immune function. A second set of studies determined space flight effects on the expression of cell surface markers on both spleen and bone marrow cells. Immune cell markers included in this study were those for T-cell, B-cell, natural killer cell, and interleukin-2 populations. Variations from a normal cell population percentage, as represented by these markers, can be correlated with alterations in immunological function. Cells were stained with fluorescein-labelled antibodies directed against the appropriate antigens, and then analyzed using a flow cytometer.

  4. Efficacy and safety/toxicity study of recombinant vaccinia virus JX-594 in two immunocompetent animal models of glioma.

    PubMed

    Lun, XueQing; Chan, Jennifer; Zhou, Hongyuan; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John J P; Stechishin, Owen Owen; Bell, John C; Parato, Kelley; Hu, Kang; Vaillant, Dominique; Wang, Jiahu; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Breitbach, Caroline; Kirn, David; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of the recombinant, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing vaccinia virus (VV) JX-594 in experimental malignant glioma (MGs) in vitro and in immunocompetent rodent models. We have found that JX-594 killed all MG cell lines tested in vitro. Intratumoral (i.t.) administration of JX-594 significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival in rats-bearing RG2 intracranial (i.c.) tumors and mice-bearing GL261 brain tumors. Combination therapy with JX-594 and rapamycin significantly increased viral replication and further prolonged survival in both immunocompetent i.c. MG models with several animals considered "cured" (three out of seven rats >120 days, terminated experiment). JX-594 infected and killed brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) from patient samples grown ex vivo, and did so more efficiently than other oncolytic viruses MYXV, Reovirus type-3, and VSV(ΔM51). Additional safety/toxicity studies in nontumor-bearing rodents treated with a supratherapeutic dose of JX-594 demonstrated GM-CSF-dependent inflammation and necrosis. These results suggest that i.c. administered JX-594 triggers a predictable GM-CSF-mediated inflammation in murine models. Before proceeding to clinical trials, JX-594 should be evaluated in the brains of nonhuman primates and optimized for the viral doses, delivery routes as well as the combination agents (e.g., mTOR inhibitors).

  5. Efficacy and Safety/Toxicity Study of Recombinant Vaccinia Virus JX-594 in Two Immunocompetent Animal Models of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lun, XueQing; Chan, Jennifer; Zhou, Hongyuan; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John JP; Stechishin, Owen Owen; Bell, John C; Parato, Kelley; Hu, Kang; Vaillant, Dominique; Wang, Jiahu; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Breitbach, Caroline; Kirn, David; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of the recombinant, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing vaccinia virus (VV) JX-594 in experimental malignant glioma (MGs) in vitro and in immunocompetent rodent models. We have found that JX-594 killed all MG cell lines tested in vitro. Intratumoral (i.t.) administration of JX-594 significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival in rats-bearing RG2 intracranial (i.c.) tumors and mice-bearing GL261 brain tumors. Combination therapy with JX-594 and rapamycin significantly increased viral replication and further prolonged survival in both immunocompetent i.c. MG models with several animals considered “cured” (three out of seven rats >120 days, terminated experiment). JX-594 infected and killed brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) from patient samples grown ex vivo, and did so more efficiently than other oncolytic viruses MYXV, Reovirus type-3, and VSVΔM51. Additional safety/toxicity studies in nontumor-bearing rodents treated with a supratherapeutic dose of JX-594 demonstrated GM-CSF-dependent inflammation and necrosis. These results suggest that i.c. administered JX-594 triggers a predictable GM-CSF-mediated inflammation in murine models. Before proceeding to clinical trials, JX-594 should be evaluated in the brains of nonhuman primates and optimized for the viral doses, delivery routes as well as the combination agents (e.g., mTOR inhibitors). PMID:20808290

  6. A Safety and Feasibility Study of an Allogeneic Colon Cancer Cell Vaccine Administered with a Granulocyte–Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor–Producing Bystander Cell Line in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lei; Edil, Barish H.; Soares, Kevin C.; El-Shami, Khaled; Uram, Jennifer N.; Judkins, Carol; Zhang, Zhe; Onners, Beth; Laheru, Daniel; Pardoll, Drew; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Schulick, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in earlier detection and improvements in chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma remains poor. Immunotherapy is a potentially effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Preclinical studies have supported the antitumor activity of immunization with a granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) producing murine colon tumor cell vaccine. Methods A novel colorectal cancer vaccine composed of irradiated, allogeneic human colon cancer cells and GM-CSF-producing bystander cells was developed and tested in combination with a single intravenous low dose of cyclophosphamide in a phase 1 study of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Results A total of nine patients were enrolled onto and treated in this study. Six patients had a history of colorectal adenocarcinoma hepatic metastases and underwent curative metastasectomy, while three other patients had unresectable stage IV disease. This study demonstrates the safety and feasibility of this vaccine administered in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. At last follow-up, the six patients who underwent curative metastasectomy survived longer than 36 months, and four of these six patients were without disease recurrence. Immunologic correlate results suggest that the GM-CSF-producing colon cancer vaccine enhances the production of anti-MUC1 antibodies. Conclusions This vaccine is feasible and safe. Future investigation of the efficacy and antitumor immunity of this vaccine is warranted. PMID:24943235

  7. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a complete response to GM-CSF therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barraclough, R; Gillies, A

    2001-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare condition traditionally requiring treatment with whole lung lavage. The case is presented of a young man who obtained complete remission following treatment with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, a new treatment option.

 PMID:11462071

  8. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    ZHAI, YONGZHEN; ZHOU, YAN; LI, XIMEI; FENG, GUOHE

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF. PMID:25738258

  9. Immunophenotypic and ultrastructural study in peripheral blood neutrophil granulocytes following bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Masat, T; Feliu, E; Villamor, N; Castellsagué, J; Ordi, J; Fabregues, M; Rozman, C

    1997-08-01

    Neutrophil studies after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) describe chemotactic and phagocytotic alterations and dyshaemopoiesis. Neutrophil granulocytes (NG) in peripheral blood after BMT were analysed in 28 patients. 14 patients (six receiving GM-CSF) underwent autologous BMT and 14 underwent allogeneic BMT. Immunophenotypic and electron microscopic studies were performed during post-BMT granulopoietic regeneration. Results were compared with NG from 15 healthy bone marrow donors (control group A) and from six patients receiving intensive chemotherapy before autologous BMT (control group B). A significant increase in CD15 and a decrease in 8C7 antigen expression was observed in peripheral blood NG from BMT patients compared with controls A. MPO-7 in NG after BMT did not differ from control group A. Autologous BMT patients showed a lower percentage of NG expressing 13F6, 31D8 and CD16 (Leu 11a) than allogeneic BMT patients, and a significant decrease in 8C7 antigen expression compared with patients receiving intensive chemotherapy. Ultrastructurally, a marked decrease of azurophilic granules was observed in NG from BMT patients compared with control groups A and B. These data indicate that repopulation after BMT was made by phenotypically less mature NG with dysgranulopoietic features. Differences between autologous and allogeneic BMT patients may be partly related to GM-CSF usage. In conclusion, NG present immunophenotypic and ultrastructural changes after BMT which may be involved in abnormal NG response against bacterial infections, although further investigation is needed.

  10. Analysis of the cytokine profiles of the synovial fluid in a normal temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Bum-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Yun; Yun, Pil-Young; Bae, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Ji-Su; Ahn, Jong-Mo; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sook-Young

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytokine profiles of the synovial fluid from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) spaces of normal individuals and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Thirty-four patients with planned orthognathic surgery did not present abnormalities of the TMJ on magnetic resonance images and radiographs and did not show the symptoms identified by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC-TMD); as a result, they were assigned to the control group. Twenty-two patients who sought treatment for TMD during the same period were assigned to the TMD group. Synovial fluid was collected from superior TMJ spaces, and cytokine expression was analysed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Significant differences were tested using Fisher's exact test (p<0.05). Granulocyte Macrophage Colony stimulating Factor (GM-CSF), interferon (INF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected in the TMD group, whereas no cytokines were detected in the control group. The most prevalent cytokines in the TMD group were IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF. IL-4 and IL-5 were not detected in either the TMD group or in the control group. None of the cytokines that were detected in patients with TMD were found in the articular spaces of normal individuals.

  11. Cosmos: 1989 immunology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1991-01-01

    The effects of flight on Cosmos mission 2044 on leukocyte subset distribution and the sensitivity of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factor-GM were determined. A parallel study with antiorthostatic suspension was also carried out. The study involved repetition and expansion of studies performed on Cosmos 1887. Spleen and bone marrow cells were obtained from flown, vivarium control, synchronous control, and suspended rats. The cells were stained with a series of monoclonal antibodies directed against rat leukocyte cell surface antigens. Control cells were stained with a monoclonal antibody directed against an irrelevant species or were unstained. Cells were then analyzed for fluorescence using a FACSCAN flow cytometer. Bone marrow cells were placed in culture with GM-CSF in McCoy's 5a medium and incubated for 5 days. Cultures were then evaluated for the number of colonies of 50 cells or greater.

  12. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Is Neuroprotective in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xin L.; Wright, David K.; Liu, Shijie J.; Semple, Bridgette D.; Johnston, Leigh; Jones, Nigel C.; Cook, Andrew D.; Hamilton, John A.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern with a complex pathogenesis resulting in major long-term neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although neuroinflammation has been identified as an important pathophysiological process resulting from TBI, the function of specific inflammatory mediators in the aftermath of TBI remains poorly understood. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been reported to have neuroprotective effects in various animal models of neurodegenerative disease that share pathological similarities with TBI. The importance of GM-CSF in TBI has yet to be studied, however. We examined the role of GM-CSF in TBI by comparing the effects of a lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury or sham injury in GM-CSF gene deficient (GM-CSF-/-) versus wild-type (WT) mice. After a 3-month recovery interval, mice were assessed using neuroimaging and behavioral outcomes. All mice given a LFP injury displayed significant brain atrophy and behavioral impairments compared with those given sham-injuries; however, this was significantly worse in the GM-CSF-/- mice compared with the WT mice. GM-CSF-/- mice given LFP injury also had reduced astrogliosis compared with their WT counterparts. These novel findings indicate that the inflammatory mediator, GM-CSF, may have significant protective properties in the chronic sequelae of experimental TBI and suggest that further research investigating GM-CSF and its potential benefits in the injured brain is warranted. PMID:24392832

  13. T Cell–Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Contributes to Dry Eye Disease Pathogenesis by Promoting CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Maturation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Thomas H.; Ding, Julia; Dana, Reza; Chauhan, Sunil K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Growing evidence suggests that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to T helper 17 (Th17) cell–associated immunoinflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of T cell–derived GM-CSF on CD11b+ myeloid cell function in dry eye disease (DED). Methods In a murine model of DED, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA were used to measure GM-CSF expression at the ocular surface, and flow cytometry was used to enumerate GM-CSF producing Th17 cells. A granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralizing antibody was used topically in vivo and in an in vitro culture system to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in recruiting and maturing CD11b+ cells. Clinical disease severity was evaluated after topical administration of GM-CSF neutralizing antibody. Results In dry eye disease, GM-CSF is significantly upregulated at the ocular surface and the frequency of GM-CSF producing Th17 cells is significantly increased in the draining lymph nodes. In vitro neutralization of GM-CSF from CD4+ T cells derived from DED mice suppresses major histocompatibility complex II expression by CD11b+ cells and CD11b+ cell migration. Topical neutralization of GM-CSF in a murine model of DED suppresses CD11b+ maturation and migration, as well as Th17 cell induction, yielding a reduction in clinical signs of disease. Conclusions T helper 17 cell–derived GM-CSF contributes to DED pathogenesis by promoting CD11b+ cell activation and migration to the ocular surface. PMID:28241321

  14. A GM-CSF and CD40L bystander vaccine is effective in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hatem; Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Antonia, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in using cancer vaccines to treat breast cancer patients in the adjuvant setting to prevent recurrence in high risk situations or in combination with other immunomodulators in the advanced setting. Current peptide vaccines are limited by immunologic compatibility issues, and engineered autologous cellular vaccines are difficult to produce on a large scale. Using standardized bystander cell lines modified to secrete immune stimulating adjuvant substances can greatly enhance the ability to produce immunogenic cellular vaccines using unmodified autologous cells or allogeneic medical grade tumor cell lines as targets. We investigated the efficacy of a cellular vaccine using B78H1 bystander cell lines engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and CD40 ligand (BCG) in a murine model of breast cancer. Methods Five-week-old female BALB/c mice were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad with 4T1 tumor cells. Treatment consisted of irradiated 4T1 ± BCG cells given subcutaneously every 4 days and was repeated three times per mouse when tumors became palpable. Tumors were measured two to three times per week for 25 days. The vaccine’s activity was confirmed in a second experiment using Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells in C57BL/6 mice to exclude a model specific effect. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunospots (ELISPOTS) were performed on splenic lymphocytes incubated with 4T1 lysates along with immunohistochemistry for CD3 on tumor sections. Results Tumor growth was significantly inhibited in the 4T1-BCG and LLC-BCG treatment groups when compared to 4T1 and LLC treatment groups. There were higher levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ secreting T-cells on ELISPOT for BCG treated groups, and a trend for higher numbers of tumor infiltrating CD3+ lymphocytes. Some tumors in the 4T1-BCG demonstrated organized lymphoid structures within the tumor microenvironment as well. Conclusion The use of BCG bystander cell lines demonstrates proof of concept for anti-tumor activity and immunogenicity in an immunocompetent murine model of breast cancer. This vaccine is being evaluated in lung cancer and should be explored further in clinical trials of breast cancer patients at high risk of recurrence or in combination with other immunomodulatory agents. PMID:26719725

  15. Intracerebral GM-CSF contributes to transendothelial monocyte migration in APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Shang, De S; Yang, Yi M; Zhang, Hu; Tian, Li; Jiang, Jiu S; Dong, Yan B; Zhang, Ke; Li, Bo; Zhao, Wei D; Fang, Wen G; Chen, Yu H

    2016-11-01

    Although tight junctions between human brain microvascular endothelial cells in the blood-brain barrier prevent molecules or cells in the bloodstream from entering the brain, in Alzheimer's disease, peripheral blood monocytes can "open" these tight junctions and trigger subsequent transendothelial migration. However, the mechanism underlying this migration is unclear. Here, we found that the CSF2RB, but not CSF2RA, subunit of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor was overexpressed on monocytes from Alzheimer's disease patients. CSF2RB contributes to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced transendothelial monocyte migration. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor triggers human brain microvascular endothelial cells monolayer tight junction disassembly by downregulating ZO-1 expression via transcription modulation and claudin-5 expression via the ubiquitination pathway. Interestingly, intracerebral granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor blockade abolished the increased monocyte infiltration in the brains of APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease model mice. Our results suggest that in Alzheimer's disease patients, high granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid induced blood-brain barrier opening, facilitating the infiltration of CSF2RB-expressing peripheral monocytes across blood-brain barrier and into the brain. CSF2RB might be useful as an Alzheimer's disease biomarker. Thus, our findings will help to understand the mechanism of monocyte infiltration in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

  16. Immunization With AFP + GM CSF Plasmid Prime and AFP Adenoviral Vector Boost in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hepatoma; Liver Cancer, Adult; Liver Cell Carcinoma; Liver Cell Carcinoma, Adult; Cancer of Liver; Cancer of the Liver; Cancer, Hepatocellular; Hepatic Cancer; Hepatic Neoplasms; Hepatocellular Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neoplasms, Hepatic; Neoplasms, Liver

  17. Studies on the immuno-modulating and anti-tumor activities of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Sen; Tsai, Yow-Fu; Lin, Steven; Lin, Chia-Ching; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Hung; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2004-11-01

    We describe here the isolation of Reishi polysaccharides for the study of their effect on cytokine expression in mouse splenocytes. A fraction (F3) has been shown to activate the expression of IL-1, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, G-CSF, and M-CSF, and from this three subfractions have been prepared where F3G1 activates IL-1, IL-12, TNF-alpha, and G-CSF, F3G2 activates all the cytokines as F3 does, and F3G3 activates only IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Together with previous studies, the mode of action on macrophages has been proposed where F3 binds to TLR4 receptor and activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 to induce IL-1 expression.

  18. Selective effects of aging on brain white matter microstructure: a diffusion tensor imaging tractography study.

    PubMed

    Michielse, Stijn; Coupland, Nick; Camicioli, Richard; Carter, Rawle; Seres, Peter; Sabino, Jennifer; Malykhin, Nikolai

    2010-10-01

    We examined age-related changes in the cerebral white matter. Structural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and diffusion tensor images (DTIs) were acquired from 69 healthy subjects aged 22-84 years. Quantitative DTI tractography was performed for nine different white matter tracts to determine tract volume, fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial, and radial diffusivities. We used automated and manual segmentation to determine volumes of gray matter (GM), white mater (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and intracranial space. The results showed significant effects of aging on WM, GM, CSF volumes, and selective effects of aging on structural integrity of different white matter tracts. WM of the prefrontal region was the most vulnerable to aging, while temporal lobe connections, cingulum, and parieto-occipital commissural connections showed relative preservation with age. This study was cross-sectional, and therefore, additional longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  19. The water-soluble extract from cultured medium of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) mycelia (Designated as MAK) ameliorates murine colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, R; Ueno, Y; Tanaka, S; Nagai, K; Onitake, T; Yoshioka, K; Chayama, K

    2011-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum Karst is well known as 'Reishi', a traditional food in China and Japan. It contains a polysaccharide component known to induce granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production from murine splenocytes. Moreover, GM-CSF may be a therapeutic agent for Crohn's disease. In this study, we investigated the water-soluble, polysaccharide components of Reishi (designated as MAK) in murine colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS). We examined the concentration of GM-CSF in peritoneal macrophage cells (PMs) of C57BL/6 mice during in vitro and in vivo stimulation with MAK. After feeding with chow or MAK for 2 weeks, 2 mg of TNBS/50% ethanol was administered to each mouse. After 3 days of TNBS treatment, intestinal inflammation was evaluated, and mononuclear cells of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and colon were cultured for ELISA. To determine the preventive role of GM-CSF, the mice were pre-treated with or without anti-GM-CSF antibody before TNBS administration. In vitro and in vivo MAK-stimulated PMs produced GM-CSF in a dose-dependent manner. Intestinal inflammation by TNBS was improved by feeding with MAK. MLNs of mice treated with TNBS produced IFN-γ, which was inhibited by feeding with MAK. In contrast, MLNs of mice treated with TNBS inhibited GM-CSF production, which was induced by feeding with MAK. The colon organ culture assay also revealed that IFN-γ was decreased and GM-CSF was increased by MAK. The preventive effect was blocked by the neutralization of GM-CSF. We concluded that the induction of GM-CSF by MAK may provide the anti-inflammatory effect.

  20. Granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor produced by recombinant avian poxviruses enriches the regional lymph nodes with antigen-presenting cells and acts as an immunoadjuvant.

    PubMed

    Kass, E; Panicali, D L; Mazzara, G; Schlom, J; Greiner, J W

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant avian poxviruses [fowlpox and canarypox (ALVAC)], restricted for replication in nonavian cell substrates and expressing granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (avipox-GM-CSF), were evaluated for their ability to enrich an immunization site with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and, in turn, function as biological vaccine adjuvants. Avipox-GM-CSF administered as a single s.c. injection significantly enhanced the percentage and absolute number of APCs in the regional lymph nodes that drain the injection site. Both the magnitude and duration of the cellular and phenotypic increases within the lymph nodes induced by the avipox-GM-CSF viruses were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those measured in mice treated with four daily injections of recombinant GM-CSF protein. Temporal studies revealed that the APC enrichment of regional lymph nodes was sustained for 21-28 days after injection of the recombinant avipox virus expressing GM-CSF and, moreover, three injections of the recombinant virus could be given without any appreciable loss of in vivo bioactivity. Mice expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a transgene (CEA.Tg) developed CEA-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity after being immunized with avipox-CEA. The coadministration of recombinant avipox viruses expressing CEA and GM-CSF significantly enhanced CEA-specific host immunity with an accompanying immunotherapeutic response in tumor-bearing CEA.Tg mice. The optimal use of avipox-GM-CSF, in terms of dose and dose schedule, especially when used with different immunogens, remains to be determined. Nonetheless, the present findings demonstrate: (a) the effective delivery of GM-CSF to an immunization site using a recombinant avian poxvirus; (b) the compatibility of delivering an antigen and GM-CSF in replication-defective viruses to enhance antigen-specific immunity; and (c) the combined use of recombinant avipox viruses expressing CEA and GM-CSF to generate antitumor

  1. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor produced in lesioned peripheral nerves induces the up-regulation of cell surface expression of MAC-2 by macrophages and Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is followed by Wallerian degeneration which is characterized by cellular and molecular events that turn the degenerating nerve into a tissue that supports nerve regeneration. One of these is the removal, by phagocytosis, of myelin that contains molecules which inhibit regeneration. We have recently documented that the scavenger macrophage and Schwann cells express the galactose- specific lectin MAC-2 which is significant to myelin phagocytosis. In the present study we provide evidence for a mechanism leading to the augmented expression of cell surface MAC-2. Nerve lesion causes noneuronal cells, primarily fibroblasts, to produce the cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In turn, GM- CSF induces Schwann cells and macrophages to up-regulate surface expression of MAC-2. The proposed mechanism is based on the following novel observations. GM-CSF mRNA was detected by PCR in in vitro and in vivo degenerating nerves, but not in intact nerves. The GM-CSF molecule was detected by ELISA in medium conditioned by in vitro and in vivo degenerating peripheral nerves as of the 4th h after injury. GM-CSF activity was demonstrated by two independent bioassays, and repressed by activity blocking antibodies. Significant levels of GM-CSF were produced by nerve derived fibroblasts, but neither by Schwann cells nor by nerve derived macrophages. Mouse rGM-CSF enhanced MAC-2 production in nerve explants, and up-regulated cell surface expression of MAC-2 by Schwann cells and macrophages. Interleukin-1 beta up-regulated GM-CSF production thus suggesting that injury induced GM-CSF production may be mediated by interleukin-1 beta. Our findings highlight the fact that fibroblasts, by producing GM-CSF and thereby affecting macrophage and Schwann function, play a significant role in the cascade of molecular events and cellular interactions of Wallerian degeneration. PMID:8601605

  2. Phase Ib trial of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor combined with murine monoclonal antibody R24 in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chachoua, A; Oratz, R; Liebes, L; Alter, R S; Felice, A; Peace, D; Vilcek, J; Blum, R H

    1994-08-01

    R24, a murine monoclonal antibody, has been shown to mediate complement- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of melanoma tumor targets. We conducted a Phase Ib clinical trial using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and R24 in 20 patients with metastatic melanoma. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that treatment with GM-CSF could up-regulate monocyte and granulocyte ADCC and that the combination of GM-CSF plus R24, which mediates ADCC, would lead to enhanced anti-tumor activity in patients with melanoma. GM-CSF was administered by subcutaneous injection daily for 21 days at a dose of 150 micrograms/m2/day. R24 was administered by continuous intravenous infusion on days 8-15 at three dose levels: 0, 10, and 50 mg/m2/day. All 20 patients received one cycle of treatment only. Immune parameters measured were monocyte and granulocyte direct cytotoxicity and ADCC. All patients were evaluable for toxicity. Fifteen patients were evaluable for immune response. Treatment with GM-CSF alone was well tolerated. Toxicity from the combination of GM-CSF plus R24 included diffuse urticaria, nausea and vomiting, hypertension, and hypotension. Hypotension was the dose-limiting toxicity. Two patients on the 50-mg/m2/day dose level of R24 achieved a partial response lasting 2+ and 5+ months. Treatment with GM-CSF led to a statistically significant enhancement of monocyte and granulocyte direct cytotoxicity and ADCC. The maximally tolerated dose of R24 given at this schedule combined with GM-CSF is < 50 mg/m2/day. We conclude that GM-CSF given by subcutaneous injection at 150 micrograms/m2 x 21 days can enhance effector cell ADCC and direct cytotoxicity and that the combination of GM-CSF and R24 can be therapeutic.

  3. Effects of free amino acids on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of feline T cells in an in vitro study using the cell line MYA-1.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Doherr, Marcus G; Zentek, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    In vitro studies might be an interesting screening method for targeted in vivo studies in the field of immunonutrition and help to reduce and refine animal studies. As the role of amino acids for immune function of cats has not been evaluated in detail so far, the present study aimed at investigating the effects of eight different amino acids (arginine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, glutamine, lysine, threonine and tryptophan) in six concentrations each (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 8x the cat blood level) on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of feline T cells (MYA-1) in vitro. The results demonstrated that high doses of arginine increased IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-α secretion of T cells, while increasing concentrations of lysine increased IL-10 secretion and proliferative activity of the T cells. High doses of leucine enhanced GM-CSF and IL-10 secretion, while concentrations of threonine in the cell culture media greater than blood concentration also increased GM-CSF and additionally TNF-α secretion of the cells. The effects of glutamine and isoleucine on T cell function were only small. In conclusion, the present in vitro study could evaluate the immunomodulating potential of specific amino acids for feline T cell function. High doses of arginine, lysine, leucine and threonine had a significant impact on cytokine secretion and proliferative activity of the T cells. Targeted in vivo studies should investigate the clinical relevance of dietary supplementation of those amino acids in healthy and diseased cats as a next step.

  4. The effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Steger, G. G.; Kaboo, R.; deKernion, J. B.; Figlin, R.; Belldegrun, A.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can induce specific and non-specific anti-tumour cytotoxicity and also stimulates the proliferation and function of peripheral lymphocytes and thymocytes. GM-CSF and interleukin 2 (IL-2) act synergistically on peripheral lymphocytes for the induction of a highly effective cytotoxic cell population. Thus, the goal of our investigation was to study the effects of GM-CSF upon expansion, proliferation and in vitro killing activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). TILs from seven consecutive tumours were cultured with GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1) without IL-2 supplementation, with suboptimal doses of IL-2 (8 and 40 U ml-1) plus GM-CSF (1000 nmol ml-1), and with a dose of IL-2 (400 U ml-1) which sufficed alone to induce TIL development plus GM-CSF (500 or 1000 nmol ml-1). GM-CSF alone or together with suboptimal doses of IL-2 was not able to induce or facilitate TIL development in these cultures. When GM-CSF at both concentrations studied was added to optimal doses of IL-2 the resulting TIL populations proliferated significantly better and faster (+66%), resulting in a higher cell yield (+24%) at the time of maximal expansion of the TIL cultures. The length of the culture periods of TILs was not affected by GM-CSF when compared with the control cultures supplemented with IL-2 alone. In vitro killing activity of TIL populations stimulated with IL-2 and GM-CSF remained unspecific, but lysis of the autologous tumour targets as well as the allogeneic renal tumour targets was significantly enhanced (+138%) as compared with the corresponding control TILs stimulated with IL-2 alone. Lysis of the natural killer (NK)-sensitive control cell line K562 and the NK-resistant Daudi cell line remained unchanged even though FACS analysis of TILs cultured with IL-2 and 1000 nmol of GM-CSF demonstrated a significantly higher proportion of cells expressing the CD56

  5. Delivery of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in bioadhesive hydrogel stimulates migration of dendritic cells in models of human papillomavirus-associated (pre)neoplastic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Pascale; Evrard, Brigitte; Maillard, Catherine; Franzen-Detrooz, Elizabeth; Delattre, Luc; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnes; Boniver, Jacques; Delvenne, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    Because of the central role of dendritic cells and/or Langerhans cells(DC/LC) in the induction of cellular immune responses, pharmacological agents that modulate the recruitment of these cells might have a clinical interest. The present study was designed to evaluate the capacity of several pharmaceutical formulations to topically deliver granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated genital (pre)neoplastic lesions. The formulations were evaluated for their bioactivity and for their potential to recruit DC in organotypic cultures of HPV-transformed keratinocytes. We found that a bioadhesive polycarbophil gel (Noveon) at pH 5.5 is able to maintain the bioactivity of GM-CSF at 4 or 37 degrees C for at least 7 days, whereas a decreased activity of GM-CSF was observed when the molecule is included in other polymer gels. GM-CSF incorporated in the polycarbophil gel was also a potent factor in enhancing the colonization of DC into organotypic cultures of HPV-transformed keratinocytes since the infiltration of DC in the in vitro-formed (pre)neoplastic epithelium was very low under basal conditions and dramatically increased in the presence of GM-CSF gel. We next demonstrated that GM-CSF incorporated in polycarbophil gel induces the recruitment of human DC in a human (pre)neoplastic epithelium grafted into NOD/SCID mice. The efficacy of GM-CSF in this formulation was equivalent to that observed with liquid GM-CSF. These results suggest that GM-CSF incorporated in polycarbophil gel could play an important role in the recruitment of DC/LC in mucosal surfaces and be useful as a new immunotherapeutic approach for genital HPV-associated (pre)neoplastic lesions.

  6. Temporal adaptation of neutrophil oxidative responsiveness to n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Acceleration by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    English, D; Broxmeyer, H E; Gabig, T G; Akard, L P; Williams, D E; Hoffman, R

    1988-10-01

    This investigation was undertaken to clarify the mechanism by which purified recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) potentiates neutrophil oxidative responses triggered by the chemotactic peptide, FMLP. Previous studies have shown that GM-CSF priming of neutrophil responses to FMLP is induced relatively slowly, requiring 90 to 120 min of incubation in vitro, is not associated with increased levels of cytoplasmic free Ca2+, but is associated with up-regulation of cell-surface FMLP receptors. We have confirmed these findings and further characterized the process of GM-CSF priming. We found that the effect of GM-CSF on neutrophil oxidative responsiveness was induced in a temperature-dependent manner and was not reversed when the cells were washed extensively to remove the growth factor before stimulation with FMLP. Extracellular Ca2+ was not required for functional enhancement by GM-CSF and GM-CSF alone effected no detectable alteration in the 32P-labeled phospholipid content of neutrophils during incubation in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF exerts its influence on neutrophils by accelerating a process that occurs spontaneously and results in up-regulation of both cell-surface FMLP receptors and oxidative responsiveness to FMLP. Thus, the results demonstrate that, with respect to oxidative activation, circulating endstage polymorphonuclear leukocytes are nonresponsive or hyporesponsive to FMLP; functional responsiveness increases dramatically as surface FMLP receptors are gradually deployed after the cells leave the circulation. Thus, as neutrophils mature, their responsiveness to FMLP changes in a manner which may be crucial for efficient host defense. At 37 degrees C, this process is markedly potentiated by GM-CSF. We conclude that endogenous GM-CSF, released systemically or at sites of infection and inflammation, potentially plays an important role in host defense by accelerating functional maturation of responding

  7. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor increases the infectivity of Leishmania amazonensis by protecting promastigotes from heat-induced death.

    PubMed Central

    Barcinski, M A; Schechtman, D; Quintao, L G; Costa, D de A; Soares, L R; Moreira, M E; Charlab, R

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the infectivity of promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis, an obligate intramacrophage parasite. We measured the capacity of the promastigotes to infect macrophages after preincubation at different temperatures (28, 34, and 37 degrees C) with recombinant murine GM-CSF, as well as the effect of an anti-murine GM-CSF antibody on the in vitro and in vivo infectivity of the parasite. GM-CSF increases the capacity of the promastigotes to infect cells when preincubated at 34 and 37 degrees C, whereas the anti-GM-CSF antibody exerts the opposite effect: it decreases the internalization rate and the progression of infection in macrophage cultures and slows the growth of the lesion in infected BALB/c mice. Neither of the described effects were observed when the in vitro and in vivo infections were made with amastigotes. Promastigotes die in a time-dependent manner when incubated at temperatures higher than 28 degrees C in the absence of GM-CSF. They are protected from this heat-induced death by incubation with the recombinant hormone. Our interpretation of these data is that the increase in the infectivity of promastigotes when incubated with GM-CSF at the temperatures at which infection occurs (34 and 37 degrees C) is due to the larger number of surviving forms within the infecting population. The decrease in infectivity when they are incubated with the antibody is due to inhibition of the protection conferred by the GM-CSF produced by the macrophages during the in vitro and in vivo infections. PMID:1500159

  8. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  9. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Monocyte activation following systemic administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Chachoua, A; Oratz, R; Hoogmoed, R; Caron, D; Peace, D; Liebes, L; Blum, R H; Vilcek, J

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-four patients with solid malignancies were treated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on a Phase 1b trial. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of GM-CSF on peripheral blood monocyte activation. GM-CSF was administered by subcutaneous injection daily for 14 days. Immune parameters measured were monocyte cytotoxicity against the human colon carcinoma (HT29) cell line, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta, and in vitro TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta induction. All patients were evaluable for toxicity. Fifteen patients were evaluable for immunologic response. Treatment with GM-CSF led to a statistically significant enhancement in direct monocyte cytotoxicity against HT29 cells. There was no increase in serum TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta and no consistent in vitro induction of TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta from monocytes posttreatment. Treatment was well tolerated overall. We conclude that treatment with GM-CSF can lead to enhanced monocyte cytotoxicity. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the effect of GM-CSF on other parameters of monocyte functions.

  11. An immunodominant epitope in a functional domain near the N-terminus of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor identified by cross-reaction of synthetic peptides with neutralizing anti-protein and anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Beffy, P; Rovero, P; Di Bartolo, V; Laricchia Robbio, L; Dané, A; Pegoraro, S; Bertolero, F; Revoltella, R P

    1994-12-01

    We produced polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and performed studies of epitope mapping by ELISA, using five synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences along this molecule. Additionally, anti-peptide MAbs were generated. The antibody ability to inhibit rhGM-CSF activity was determined using as bioassay the MO7e cell line, which is dependent on hGM-CSF for growth in vitro. An immunodominant epitope able to induce the highest neutralization antibody titers was identified near the N terminus of hGM-CSF. A synthetic peptide 14-24, homologous to a sequence including part of the first alpha-helix of the molecule, was recognized by neutralizing anti-protein antibodies. Similarly, MAbs anti- 14-24 cross-reacted with rhGM-CSF and specifically blocked its function. Replacement of Val16 or Asn17 with alanine greatly reduced the antibody-binding capacity to peptide 14-24, whereas substitution of Gln20 or Glu21 was less critical. Monoclonal antibodies generated against residues 30-41 (corresponding to an intrahelical loop) and 79-91 (homologous to a sequence including part of the third alpha-helix) or its analog [Ala88](79-91)beta Ala-Cys, were conformation dependent and nonneutralizing: they failed to react or bound poorly to rhGM-CSF in ELISA, but readily recognized the homologous sequence in the denatured protein, by Western blotting.

  12. Immunotherapy against metastatic bladder cancer by combined administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2 surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Hua, Rui; Liu, Li; Zhan, Xiaomin; Chen, Simei; Quan, Song; Chu, Qing-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Tong

    2017-02-16

    In previous studies, it has been shown that the granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-2 (IL-2) surface modified MB49 bladder cancer stem cells (MCSCs) vaccine could induce a specific antitumor immunity and against bladder cancer in mice model respectively. However, whether combined administration of GM-CSF and IL-2 could produce specific immune responses to cancer stem cells (CSCs) was uncertain. MCSCs were established and characterized. GM-CSF and IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared and bioactivity was evaluated. The therapeutic, protective, specific, and memorial immune response animal experiments were designed. Tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes assay, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry assay were performed to indentify whether vaccine caused an antitumor immunity. Streptavidin (SA)-GM-CSF and SA-IL-2 MCSCs vaccines were prepared successfully. Such vaccines inhibited the volume of tumor and prolonged the survival of the mice in animal experiments. The express of IgG or IFN-c, the portion of dendritic cells, CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were highest in the combined vaccines group than the SA-GM-CSF vaccine group, the SA-IL-2 vaccine group, the MCSCs group and the PBS group. The combined of GM-CSF and IL-2 vaccines could induce better antitumor immunity than a vaccine alone.

  13. Plasma Cytokine Levels in Chronic Asymptomatic HIV-1 Subtype C Infection as an Indicator of Disease Progression in Botswana: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Iketleng, Thato; Moyo, Sikhulile; Nyombi, Balthazar; Mitchell, Rebecca M.; Makhema, Joseph; Baum, Marianna K.; Marlink, Richard; Essex, Max; Musonda, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HIV infects cells of the immune system causing immune activation and proliferation of immune cells, leading to alteration of production and activity of a number of cytokines. These changes in cytokine levels can affect the immune function, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease. We characterized plasma cytokine concentration profiles in HIV-1 subtype C chronically infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive participants to establish their influence on disease progression and viremia. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-7, IL-12p40, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and interferon (IFN)-γ were quantified in samples from 60 treatment-naive participants in the placebo arm of the completed Micronutrient-HIV disease progressions study, “Dikotlana” (2004–2009) in Gaborone, Botswana. Participants were stratified into progressors (P) and nonprogressors (NP) based on their rates of CD4+ T cell depletion during the study period. Nonprogressors were those who had <1% CD4+ T cell depletion at 24 months postenrollment. Progressors were defined as those with CD4+ T cell depletion of >15% at 24 months postenrollment. Cytokine levels were compared between P and NP using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine if cytokines predicted disease progression. Correlations of cytokines with CD4+ T cell counts and viral loads were determined by the Spearman rank test. Median baseline CD4+ T cell counts were 453 (Q1, Q3; 401, 592) and 479 (Q1, Q3; 401–592) for nonprogressors and progressors, respectively. Nonprogressors had a higher viral set point than progressors. IL-12p40 levels were significantly higher in the P than in NP at enrollment and 24 months (p < 0.05). Levels of IL-1α, IL-7, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF did not differ significantly between the two groups. Except for IL-12p40, which displayed an inverse correlation with CD4+ T cell counts and a direct correlation with

  14. Active immunotherapy for cancer patients using tumor lysate pulsed dendritic cell vaccine: a safety study.

    PubMed

    Ovali, E; Dikmen, T; Sonmez, M; Yilmaz, M; Unal, A; Dalbasti, T; Kuzeyli, K; Erturk, M; Omay, S B

    2007-06-01

    Cancer vaccine therapy represents a promising therapeutical option. Consistently, with these new treatment strategies, the use of dendritic cell vaccines is becoming increasingly widespread and currently in the forefront for cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccine in patients with advanced cancers. For this purpose, eighteen patients with relapsed or refractory cancer were vaccinated with peripheral monocyte-derived DCs generated with GM-CSF and IL-4, and pulsed consequently with 100 microg/ml of tumor lysate before maturation in culture in the presence of IL-1beta, PGE2 and TNF alpha for two days. The first two vaccinations were given intradermally every two weeks while further injections were given monthly. Tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell injections were well-tolerated in all patients with no more than grade 1 injection-related toxicity. Local inflammatory response was mainly erythematous which subsided in 48 hrs time. No end organ toxicity or autoimmune toxicity was identified. Clinical responses observed in our study were satisfactory for a phase I clinical study. We observed 4 (22%) objective clinical responses. These responses are significantly correlated with delayed type hypersensitivity testing (DTH) (p < 0.01). The results showed that this active immunotherapy is feasible, safe, and may be capable of eliciting immune responses against cancer.

  15. Phase 1 study of intratumoral Pexa-Vec (JX-594), an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus, in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Timothy P; Ngo, Minhtran C; Geller, James I; Louis, Chrystal U; Currier, Mark A; Racadio, John M; Towbin, Alexander J; Rooney, Cliona M; Pelusio, Adina; Moon, Anne; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Burke, James M; Bell, John C; Kirn, David H; Breitbach, Caroline J

    2015-03-01

    Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirepvec, JX-594) is an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus designed to destroy cancer cells through viral lysis and induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-driven tumor-specific immunity. Pexa-Vec has undergone phase 1 and 2 testing alone and in combination with other therapies in adult patients, via both intratumoral and intravenous administration routes. We sought to determine the safety of intratumoral administration in pediatric patients. In a dose-escalation study using either 10(6) or 10(7) plaque-forming units per kilogram, we performed one-time injections in up to three tumor sites in five pediatric patients and two injections in one patient. Ages at study entry ranged from 4 to 21 years, and their cancer diagnoses included neuroblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and Ewing sarcoma. All toxicities were ≤ grade 3. The most common side effects were sinus fever and sinus tachycardia. All three patients at the higher dose developed asymptomatic grade 1 treatment-related skin pustules that resolved within 3-4 weeks. One patient showed imaging evidence suggestive of antitumor biological activity. The two patients tested for cellular immunoreactivity to vaccinia antigens showed strong responses. Overall, our study suggests Pexa-Vec is safe to administer to pediatric patients by intratumoral administration and could be studied further in this patient population.

  16. Comparative effect of recombinant IL-1, -2, -3, -4, and -6, IFN-gamma, granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and histamine-releasing factors on the secretion of histamine from basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, R.; Welter, J.B.; Forsythe, P.A.; Lett-Brown, M.A.; Grant, J.A. )

    1989-05-15

    Most cytokines possess multiple biologic activities. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of rIL-1 beta, -2, -3, -4 and -6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF on basophils from 16 donors and the amount of histamine released was compared with that by partially purified mononuclear cell-derived histamine-releasing factor (HRF) and anti-IgE. We found that only IL-3 and GM-CSF at relatively high doses (50 to 500 ng/ml) released small amounts of histamine (3 to 14%) from two allergic donors. In contrast, both HRF and anti-IgE released significant amounts of histamine from all donors. Other cytokines did not release any measurable quantity of histamine. Simultaneous addition of several cytokines to the basophils also failed to release histamine. IL-3, GM-CSF, and IL-1 can also release histamine at lower concentrations (less than 5 ng/ml) when incubated with basophils in the presence of D{sub 2}O. Basophils from 6 out of 13 allergic donors released histamine in response to IL-3, whereas three donors responded to IL-1 beta and two responded to GM-CSF. The results of this study demonstrated that although IL-3 and GM-CSF release small amounts of histamine only from a select group of allergic patients, mononuclear cell-derived HRF is more potent in their action and release histamine from normals as well as allergic patients.

  17. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor attenuates endothelial hyperpermeability after thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingling; Chen, Lei; Shu, Bin; Tang, Jinming; Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Julin; Liu, Xusheng; Xu, Yingbin; Qi, Shaohai

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular hyperpermeability followed by burn injury is the main cause of shock, and cardiovascular collapse can result if the condition is treated improperly. Our previous studies demonstrated that granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) clearly reduces microvascular permeability and protects microvessels against burn injury. However, the mechanism underlying the protective function of GM-CSF on burn-injured microvessels remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect and mechanism of GM-CSF on endothelial cells after exposure to burn serum. We demonstrated that GM-CSF reduced post-burn endothelial "capillary leak" by inhibiting the activity of RhoA and maintaining the membrane localization of VE-cadherin. Membranous VE-cadherin enhances adherens junctions between endothelial cells and co-localizes with and activates VEGFR2, which protect cells from burn serum-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the protective mechanism of GM-CSF on burn serum-injured endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability is achieved by strengthening cell adherens junctions and improving cell viability.

  18. Efficient Secretion of Recombinant Proteins from Rice Suspension-Cultured Cells Modulated by the Choice of Signal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Fen; Tan, Chia-Chun; Yeh, Ju-Fang; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Yu-Kuo; Ho, Shin-Lon; Lu, Chung-An

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based expression systems have emerged as a competitive platform in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins. By adding a signal peptide, αAmy3sp, the desired recombinant proteins can be secreted outside transgenic rice cells, making them easy to harvest. In this work, to improve the secretion efficiency of recombinant proteins in rice expression systems, various signal peptides including αAmy3sp, CIN1sp, and 33KDsp have been fused to the N-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and introduced into rice cells to explore the efficiency of secretion of foreign proteins. 33KDsp had better efficiency than αAmy3sp and CIN1sp for the secretion of GFP from calli and suspension-cultured cells. 33KDsp was further applied for the secretion of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from transgenic rice suspension-cultured cells; approximately 76%–92% of total rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was detected in the culture medium. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60. The extracellular yield of rmGM-CSF reached 31.7 mg/L. Our study indicates that 33KDsp is better at promoting the secretion of recombinant proteins in rice suspension-cultured cell systems than the commonly used αAmy3sp. PMID:26473722

  19. Plant-produced idiotype vaccines for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: safety and immunogenicity in a phase I clinical study.

    PubMed

    McCormick, A A; Reddy, S; Reinl, S J; Cameron, T I; Czerwinkski, D K; Vojdani, F; Hanley, K M; Garger, S J; White, E L; Novak, J; Barrett, J; Holtz, R B; Tusé, D; Levy, R

    2008-07-22

    Plant-made vaccines have been the subject of intense interest because they can be produced economically in large scale without the use of animal-derived components. Plant-made therapeutic vaccines against challenging chronic diseases, such as cancer, have received little research attention, and no previous human clinical trials have been conducted in this vaccine category. We document the feasibility of using a plant viral expression system to produce personalized (patient-specific) recombinant idiotype vaccines against follicular B cell lymphoma and the results of administering these vaccines to lymphoma patients in a phase I safety and immunogenicity clinical trial. The system allowed rapid production and recovery of idiotypic single-chain antibodies (scFv) derived from each patient's tumor and immunization of patients with their own individual therapeutic antigen. Both low and high doses of vaccines, administered alone or co-administered with the adjuvant GM-CSF, were well tolerated with no serious adverse events. A majority (>70%) of the patients developed cellular or humoral immune responses, and 47% of the patients developed antigen-specific responses. Because 15 of 16 vaccines were glycosylated in plants, this study also shows that variation in patterns of antigen glycosylation do not impair the immunogenicity or affect the safety of the vaccines. Collectively, these findings support the conclusion that plant-produced idiotype vaccines are feasible to produce, safe to administer, and a viable option for idiotype-specific immune therapy in follicular lymphoma patients.

  20. Optimal induction of hepatitis C virus envelope-specific immunity by bicistronic plasmid DNA inoculation with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Cho, J H; Sung, Y C

    1998-10-01

    In this study, we have constructed various DNA vaccine vectors that carried hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope genes without and with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene in several different ways. In Buffalo rats that received plasmids carrying the HCV envelope genes, which encode envelope proteins E1 and E2, both antibody and lymphoproliferative responses against these proteins were induced. These responses were greatly enhanced by the codelivery of the GM-CSF gene. In particular, inoculation with a bicistronic plasmid that independently expressed the GM-CSF gene and the envelope genes in the same construct generated the highest antibody titers and significantly increased lymphoproliferative responses against these proteins. Moreover, strong antibody responses to homologous and heterologous hypervariable region 1 peptides were elicited in the immunized rats.

  1. IL-3 Maintains Activation of the p90S6K/RPS6 Pathway and Increases Translation in Human Eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Esnault, Stephane; Kelly, Elizabeth A B; Shen, Zhong-Jian; Johansson, Mats W; Malter, James S; Jarjour, Nizar N

    2015-09-15

    IL-5 is a major therapeutic target to reduce eosinophilia. However, all of the eosinophil-activating cytokines, such as IL-5, IL-3, and GM-CSF, are typically present in atopic diseases, including allergic asthma. As a result of the functional redundancy of these three cytokines on eosinophils and the loss of IL-5R on airway eosinophils, it is important to take IL-3 and GM-CSF into account to efficiently reduce tissue eosinophil functions. Moreover, these three cytokines signal through a common β-chain receptor but yet differentially affect protein production in eosinophils. Notably, the increased ability of IL-3 to induce the production of proteins, such as semaphorin-7A, without affecting mRNA levels suggests a unique influence of IL-3 on translation. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanisms by which IL-3 distinctively affects eosinophil function compared with IL-5 and GM-CSF, with a focus on protein translation. Peripheral blood eosinophils were used to study intracellular signaling and protein translation in cells activated with IL-3, GM-CSF, or IL-5. We establish that, unlike GM-CSF or IL-5, IL-3 triggers prolonged signaling through activation of ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and the upstream kinase 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p90S6K). Blockade of p90S6K activation inhibited phosphorylation of RPS6 and IL-3-enhanced semaphorin-7A translation. Furthermore, in an allergen-challenged environment, in vivo phosphorylation of RPS6 and p90S6K was enhanced in human airway compared with circulating eosinophils. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying differential activation of eosinophils by IL-3, GM-CSF, and IL-5. These observations identify IL-3 and its downstream intracellular signals as novel targets that should be considered to modulate eosinophil functions.

  2. Influence of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor or Influenza Vaccination on HLA-DR, Infection and Delirium Days in Immunosuppressed Surgical Patients: Double Blind, Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Gunnar; Renius, Markus; von Haefen, Clarissa; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Bahra, Marcus; Schiemann, Alexander; Paupers, Marco; Meisel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Surgical patients are at high risk for developing infectious complications and postoperative delirium. Prolonged infections and delirium result in worse outcome. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and influenza vaccination are known to increase HLA-DR on monocytes and improve immune reactivity. This study aimed to investigate whether GM-CSF or vaccination reverses monocyte deactivation. Secondary aims were whether it decreases infection and delirium days after esophageal or pancreatic resection over time. Methods In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double dummy trial setting on an interdisciplinary ICU of a university hospital 61 patients with immunosuppression (monocytic HLA-DR [mHLA-DR] <10,000 monoclonal antibodies [mAb] per cell) on the first day after esophageal or pancreatic resection were treated with either GM-CSF (250 μg/m2/d), influenza vaccination (Mutagrip 0.5 ml/d) or placebo for a maximum of 3 consecutive days if mHLA-DR remained below 10,000 mAb per cell. HLA-DR on monocytes was measured daily until day 5 after surgery. Infections and delirium were followed up for 9 days after surgery. Primary outcome was HLA-DR on monocytes, and secondary outcomes were duration of infection and delirium. Results mHLA-DR was significantly increased compared to placebo (p < 0.001) and influenza vaccination (p < 0.001) on the second postoperative day. Compared with placebo, GM-CSF-treated patients revealed shorter duration of infection (p < 0.001); the duration of delirium was increased after vaccination (p = 0.003). Conclusion Treatment with GM-CSF in patients with postoperative immune suppression was safe and effective in restoring monocytic immune competence. Furthermore, therapy with GM-CSF reduced duration of infection in immune compromised patients. However, influenza vaccination increased duration of delirium after major surgery. Trial Registration www.controlled-trials.com ISRCTN27114642 PMID

  3. Efficacy and safety of talimogene laherparepvec versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with stage IIIB/C and IVM1a melanoma: subanalysis of the Phase III OPTiM trial

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Kevin J; Andtbacka, Robert HI; Collichio, Frances; Downey, Gerald; Chen, Lisa; Szabo, Zsolt; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Talimogene laherparepvec is the first oncolytic immunotherapy to receive approval in Europe, the USA and Australia. In the randomized, open-label Phase III OPTiM trial (NCT00769704), talimogene laherparepvec significantly improved durable response rate (DRR) versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in 436 patients with unresectable stage IIIB–IVM1c melanoma. The median overall survival (OS) was longer versus GM-CSF in patients with earlier-stage melanoma (IIIB–IVM1a). Here, we report a detailed subgroup analysis of the OPTiM study in patients with IIIB–IVM1a disease. Patients and methods The patients were randomized (2:1 ratio) to intralesional talimogene laherparepvec or subcutaneous GM-CSF and were evaluated for DRR, overall response rate (ORR), OS, safety, benefit–risk and numbers needed to treat. Descriptive statistics were used for subgroup comparisons. Results Among 249 evaluated patients with stage IIIB–IVM1a melanoma, DRR was higher with talimogene laherparepvec compared with GM-CSF (25.2% versus 1.2%; P<0.0001). ORR was also higher in the talimogene laherparepvec arm (40.5% versus 2.3%; P<0.0001), and 27 patients in the talimogene laherparepvec arm had a complete response, compared with none in GM-CSF-treated patients. The incidence rates of exposure-adjusted adverse events (AE) and serious AEs were similar with both treatments. Conclusion The subgroup of patients with stage IIIB, IIIC and IVM1a melanoma (57.1% of the OPTiM intent-to-treat population) derived greater benefit in DRR and ORR from talimogene laherparepvec compared with GM-CSF. Talimogene laherparepvec was well tolerated. PMID:27895500

  4. Calcineurin potentiates activation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene in T cells: involvement of the conserved lymphokine element 0.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, A; Masuda, E S; Naito, Y; Tokumitsu, H; Arai, K; Arai, N

    1994-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) are produced by stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore (A23187) in human T cell leukemia Jurkat cells. The expression of GM-CSF and IL-2 is inhibited by immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506. Earlier studies on the IL-2 gene expression showed that overexpression of calcineurin (CN), a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, can stimulate transcription from the IL-2 promoter through the NF-AT-binding site. In this study, we obtained evidence that transfection of the cDNAs for CN A (catalytic) and CN B (regulatory) subunits also augments transcription from the GM-CSF promoter and recovers the transcription inhibited by CsA. The constitutively active type of the CN A subunit, which lacks the auto-inhibitory and calmodulin-binding domains, acts in synergy with PMA to activate transcription from the GM-CSF promoter. We also found that the active CN partially replaces calcium ionophore in synergy with PMA to induce expression of endogenous GM-CSF and IL-2. By multimerizing the regulatory elements of the GM-CSF promoter, we found that one of the target sites for the CN action is the conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0), located at positions between -54 and -40. Mobility shift assays showed that the CLE0 sequence has an AP1-binding site and is associated with an NF-AT-like factor, termed NF-CLE0 gamma. NF-CLE0 gamma binding is induced by PMA/A23187 and is inhibited by treatment with CsA. These results suggest that CN is involved in the coordinated induction of the GM-CSF and IL-2 genes and that the CLE0 sequence of the GM-CSF gene is a functional analogue of the NF-AT-binding site in the IL-2 promoter, which mediates signals downstream of T cell activation. Images PMID:8186461

  5. Induction of cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 mRNAs in macrophages by Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium attachment requires different ligand-receptor systems.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Klein, T W; Friedman, H

    1996-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to macrophages is mediated by different ligands and receptors and induces various intracellular molecular responses. In the present study, induction of cytokines and chemokines, especially granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), was examined, following bacterial attachment, with regard to the ligand-receptor systems involved. Attachment of Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages increased the steady-state levels of cellular mRNAs for the cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and GM-CSF as well as the chemokines MIP-1beta, MIP-2, and KC. However, when macrophages were treated with alpha-methyl-D-mannoside (alphaMM), a competitor of glycopeptide ligands, induction of cytokine mRNAs was inhibited, but the levels of chemokine mRNAs were not. Pretreatment of the bacteria with fresh mouse serum enhanced the level of GM-CSF mRNA but not the level of MIP-2 mRNA. In addition, serum treatment reduced the inhibitory effect of alphaMM on GM-CSF mRNA. These results indicate that bacterial attachment increases the steady-state levels of the cytokine and chemokine mRNAs tested by at least two distinct receptor-ligand systems, namely, one linked to cytokine induction and involving mannose or other sugar residues and the other linked to chemokine induction and relatively alphaMM insensitive. Furthermore, opsonization with serum engages other pathways in the cytokine response which are relatively independent of the alphaMM-sensitive system. Regarding bacterial surface ligands involved in cytokine mRNA induction, evidence is presented that the flagellum may be important in stimulating cytokine GM-CSF message but not chemokine MIP-2 message. Analysis of cytokine GM-CSF and chemokine MIP-2 signaling pathways with protein kinase inhibitors revealed the involvement of calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase in GM-CSF but not MIP-2 m

  6. Online Haemodiafiltration Improves Inflammatory State in Dialysis Patients: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Ines; Llaudó, Ines; Fontova, Pere; Cerezo, Gema; Soto, Carlos; Javierre, Casimiro; Hueso, Miguel; Montero, Nuria; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Torras, Juan; Grinyó, Josep M.; Cruzado, Josep M.; Lloberas, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing conventional hemodialysis (C-HD) present a greater immuno-inflammatory state probably related to uremia, sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and /or membrane bioincompatibility, which could improve with a technique-switching to online hemodiafiltration (OL-HD). The antigen-independent pathway activation of this modified immunologic state turns dendritic cells (DC) into an accurate cell model to study these patients. The aim of this study is to further evaluate the immune-inflammatory state of patients in C-HD assessed by DC maturation. Methods 31 patients were submitted to C-HD and after 4 months switched to the OL-HD technique. Monocytes-derived DCs from HD patients were cultured in the presence of IL-4/GM-CSF. DC-maturation was evaluated by assessing the maturation phenotype by flow cytometry (FACs). DCs-functional capacity to elicit T-cell alloresponse was studied by mixed leucocyte reaction. Cytokine release was assessed by FACs and SNS was evaluated measuring renalase levels by ELISA. Results An up-regulation of maturation markers was observed in C-HD DCs which induced two fold more T cells proliferation than OL-HD DCs. Also, C-HD-mDCs presented with over-production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α) compared with OL-HD-mDC (P<0·05). Results were correlated with clinical data. When SNS was evaluated, hypotension events and blood pressure were significantly lower and renalase levels were significantly higher after conversion to OL-HD. Diabetes mellitus type 2 patients also found beneficial reduction of mDC when converted to OL-HD compared to non-diabetics. Conclusions OL-HD could interfere with immuno-inflammatory state in HD patients with an improvement of renalase levels as potential key mediators in the mechanistic pathway of down-regulation of DC maturation. PMID:27783636

  7. Dendritic cell-based vaccines in treating recurrent herpes labialis: Results of pilot clinical study.

    PubMed

    Leplina, Olga; Starostina, Nataliya; Zheltova, Olga; Ostanin, Alexandr; Shevela, Ekaterina; Chernykh, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent herpes simplex labialis caused predominantly with herpes simplexvirus 1(HSV-1) is a major problem, for which various treatments have minimal impact. Given the important role of the immune system in controlling virus infection, an activation of virus-specific immune responses, in particular,using dendritic cell (DCs) vaccines, seems to be a promising approach for the treatment of patients with frequent recurrences of herpes labialis. The current paper presents the results of a pilot study of the safety and efficacy of DC vaccines in 14 patients with recurrent HSV-1 infections. DCs were generated in presence of GM-CSF and IFN-alpha and were loaded with HSV-1 recombinant viral glycoprotein D (HSV1gD). DCs cells were injected subcutaneously as 2 courses of vaccination during 9 months. Immunotherapy with DCs did not induce any serious side effects and resulted in more than 2-fold reduction in the recurrence rate and significant enhancement of the inter-recurrent time during the 9 months of treatment and subsequent 6-month follow-up period. An obvious clinical improvement was accompanied with an induction of an antigen-specific response to HCV1gD and a normalization of reduced mitogenic responsiveness of mono-nuclear cells. According to long-term survey data (on average 48 months after the beginning of therapy), 87% of respondents reported the decreased incidence of recurrent infection. At this time, most patients (85.7%) responded to HCV1gD stimulation. The data obtained suggests that dendritic cell vaccines may be a promising new approach for the treatment of recurrent labial herpes.

  8. Establishing Porcine Monocyte-Derived Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Systems for Studying the Interaction with PRRSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Helen; Graham, Simon P.; Bodman-Smith, Katherine B.; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMØ) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) are two model systems well established in human and rodent systems that can be used to study the interaction of pathogens with host cells. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is known to infect myeloid cells, such as macrophages (MØ) and dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, this study aimed to establish systems for the differentiation and characterization of MoMØ and MoDC for subsequent infection with PRRSV-1. M-CSF differentiated MoMØ were stimulated with activators for classical (M1) or alternative (M2) activation. GM-CSF and IL-4 generated MoDC were activated with the well established maturation cocktail containing PAMPs and cytokines. In addition, MoMØ and MoDC were treated with dexamethasone and IL-10, which are known immuno-suppressive reagents. Cells were characterized by morphology, phenotype, and function and porcine MØ subsets highlighted some divergence from described human counterparts, while MoDC, appeared more similar to mouse and human DCs. The infection with PRRSV-1 strain Lena demonstrated different replication kinetics between MoMØ and MoDC and within subsets of each cell type. While MoMØ susceptibility was significantly increased by dexamethasone and IL-10 with an accompanying increase in CD163/CD169 expression, MoDC supported only a minimal replication of PRRSV These findings underline the high variability in the susceptibility of porcine myeloid cells toward PRRSV-1 infection. PMID:27313573

  9. Establishing Porcine Monocyte-Derived Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Systems for Studying the Interaction with PRRSV-1.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Helen; Graham, Simon P; Bodman-Smith, Katherine B; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMØ) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) are two model systems well established in human and rodent systems that can be used to study the interaction of pathogens with host cells. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is known to infect myeloid cells, such as macrophages (MØ) and dendritic cells (DC). Therefore, this study aimed to establish systems for the differentiation and characterization of MoMØ and MoDC for subsequent infection with PRRSV-1. M-CSF differentiated MoMØ were stimulated with activators for classical (M1) or alternative (M2) activation. GM-CSF and IL-4 generated MoDC were activated with the well established maturation cocktail containing PAMPs and cytokines. In addition, MoMØ and MoDC were treated with dexamethasone and IL-10, which are known immuno-suppressive reagents. Cells were characterized by morphology, phenotype, and function and porcine MØ subsets highlighted some divergence from described human counterparts, while MoDC, appeared more similar to mouse and human DCs. The infection with PRRSV-1 strain Lena demonstrated different replication kinetics between MoMØ and MoDC and within subsets of each cell type. While MoMØ susceptibility was significantly increased by dexamethasone and IL-10 with an accompanying increase in CD163/CD169 expression, MoDC supported only a minimal replication of PRRSV These findings underline the high variability in the susceptibility of porcine myeloid cells toward PRRSV-1 infection.

  10. Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage lines model inflammatory monocytic cells with important similarity to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Marcela; Osorio, Fabiola; Robinson, Matthew J; Davies, Luke C; Dierkes, Nicola; Jones, Simon A; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Taylor, Philip R

    2011-02-01

    We have examined the potential to generate bona fide macrophages (MØ) from conditionally immortalised murine bone marrow precursors. MØ can be derived from Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage precursor cell lines (MØP) using either M-CSF or GM-CSF. When differentiated in GM-CSF (GM-MØP) the resultant cells resemble GM-CSF bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) in morphological phenotype, antigen phenotype and functional responses to microbial stimuli. In spite of this high similarity between the two cell types and the ability of GM-MØP to effectively present antigen to a T-cell hybridoma, these cells are comparatively poor at priming the expansion of IFN-γ responses from naïve CD4(+) T cells. The generation of MØP from transgenic or genetically aberrant mice provides an excellent opportunity to study the inflammatory role of GM-MØP, and reduces the need for mouse colonies in many studies. Hence differentiation of conditionally immortalised MØPs in GM-CSF represents a unique in vitro model of inflammatory monocyte-like cells, with important differences from bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, which will facilitate functional studies relating to the many 'sub-phenotypes' of inflammatory monocytes.

  11. Large-scale immunomagnetic selection of CD14+ monocytes to generate dendritic cells for cancer immunotherapy: a phase I study.

    PubMed

    Babatz, J; Röllig, C; Oelschlägel, U; Zhao, S; Ehninger, G; Schmitz, M; Bornhäuser, M

    2003-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells that are widely used in the experimental immunotherapy of cancer. For clinical use GMP-like protocols for the preparation of functionally active dendritic cells (DC) in large numbers and at high purity are needed. However, the currently available protocols have certain disadvantages. In this study we tested the generation and clinical applicability of DC from monocyte preparations produced by immunomagnetic CD14(+) selection using a semiautomated clinical scale immunomagnetic column. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 10 patients with metastatic solid tumors were used. With the immunomagnetic separation, we obtained a cell suspension of high CD14(+) purity (median 97.4%, range 94.9-99.0) with a high monocyte yield (median 82.3%, range 63.9-100.0). Differentiation of CD14(+) cells into mature monocyte-derived DC was induced by incubation with IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, PGE(2), IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Mature DC showed a high expression of CD83, HLA-DR, and the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Overall CD83(+) yield was 12.1% (range 4.0-29.4). Allogeneic T stimulatory capacity could be demonstrated for all DC preparations in proliferation assays. No significant differences in marker expression or T cell stimulation was detected between fresh DC and those derived from cryopreserved immature DC. Clinical administration of autologous DC by three different parenteral routes was tolerated by all 10 patients without systemic signs of toxicity. Our results indicate that immunomagnetic isolation of CD14(+) monocytes using the CliniMACS device is a suitable method for clinical-scale generation of functional DC under GMP-grade conditions. The selection can be performed in a closed system. Therefore, immunomagnetic CD14(+) selection can be seen as an alternative way to generate DC for clinical tumor vaccination protocols.

  12. Co-expression of Japanese encephalitis virus prM-E-NS1 antigen with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances humoral and anti-virus immunity after DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Na; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Qun; Fan, Dong-ying; Zhang, Jun-lei; Chen, Hui; Gao, George F; Zhou, De-shan; An, Jing

    2010-03-10

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is an agent of Japanese encephalitis, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an attractive DNA vaccine adjuvant for its antigen presentation. In the present study, we have constructed DNA vaccines that carried JEV prM-E-NS1 genes with or without the GM-CSF gene. Immunization with the bicistronic plasmid pCAG-JEGM that co-expresses GM-CSF and viral prM-E-NS1, resulted in the highest IgG response and sufficient protection against virus-challenged BALB/c mice. However, much to our surprise, co-inoculation of the GM-CSF plasmid with the pCAG-JE plasmid expressing viral prM-E-NS1 lead to a low antibody titer and a relatively low survival rate. Moreover, anamnestic antibody-mediated protection played a dominant role in the mice JEV challenge model, according to the enhancement of post-challenge neutralizing antibody titers and further adoptive transfer experiments. Taken together, this study should encourage further development of JEV DNA vaccine strategies and caution against the use of cytokines as an adjuvant.

  13. In vivo transformation of factor-dependent hemopoietic cells: role of intracisternal A-particle transposition for growth factor gene activation.

    PubMed Central

    Dührsen, U; Stahl, J; Gough, N M

    1990-01-01

    Cells of the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or multi-lineage colony stimulating factor (Multi-CSF) dependent line FDC-P1 undergo leukemic transformation after injection into irradiated DBA/2 mice. About one third of factor-independent FDC-P1 variants isolated from leukemic animals express GM-CSF or Multi-CSF, assessed either by bioassay or by sensitive RNA detection using the polymerase chain reaction. All of the GM-CSF-secreting lines studied had a rearrangement in one allele of the GM-CSF gene, three of four Multi-CSF-secreting lines had Multi-CSF gene rearrangements, while factor-independent lines lacking evidence of growth factor production had no demonstrable CSF gene alterations. All rearrangements were characterized by insertions of novel DNA in the 5'-flanking regions of the CSF genes. The inserted segments of DNA varied in size between 0.35 and 6.5 kb and displayed restriction enzyme cleavage maps reminiscent of intracisternal A-particle (IAP) genomes. This was confirmed in two cases by molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis. In these instances, the insertion consisted of solitary IAP long terminal repeats. The transformation system described provides a model for the study of IAP transpositions and their effects on gene activation. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 9. PMID:2108861

  14. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  15. PU.1 (Spi-1) and C/EBP alpha regulate expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hohaus, S; Petrovick, M S; Voso, M T; Sun, Z; Zhang, D E; Tenen, D G

    1995-01-01

    Growth factor receptors play an important role in hematopoiesis. In order to further understand the mechanisms directing the expression of these key regulators of hematopoiesis, we initiated a study investigating the transcription factors activating the expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha gene. Here, we demonstrate that the human GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter directs reporter gene activity in a tissue-specific fashion in myelomonocytic cells, which correlates with its expression pattern as analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter contains an important functional site between positions -53 and -41 as identified by deletion analysis of reporter constructs. We show that the myeloid and B cell transcription factor PU.1 binds specifically to this site. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a CCAAT site located upstream of the PU.1 site between positions -70 and -54 is involved in positive-negative regulation of the GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter activity. C/EBP alpha is the major CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) form binding to this site in nuclear extracts of U937 cells. Point mutations of either the PU.1 site or the C/EBP site that abolish the binding of the respective factors result in a significant decrease of GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter activity in myelomonocytic cells only. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in myeloid and B cell extracts, PU.1 forms a novel, specific, more slowly migrating complex (PU-SF) when binding the GM-CSF receptor alpha promoter PU.1 site. This is the first demonstration of a specific interaction with PU.1 on a myeloid PU.1 binding site. The novel complex is distinct from that described previously as binding to B cell enhancer sites and can be formed by addition of PU.1 to extracts from certain nonmyeloid cell types which do not express PU.1, including T cells and epithelial cells, but not from erythroid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the PU

  16. Anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor autoantibodies are a risk factor for central nervous system infection by Cryptococcus gattii in otherwise immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Tomomi; Chen, Jianghan; Chen, Sharon C-A; Rosen, Lindsey B; Yi, Jin; Sorrell, Tania C; Bennett, John E; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2014-03-18

    not necessarily to that caused by C. neoformans. IMPORTANCE Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is the most serious central nervous system (CNS) infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans or C. gattii. Cryptococcus primarily infects immunocopromised patients but is also sporadically encountered in otherwise "immunocompetent" patients with no known risk. In a recent study, anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies were detected in the plasma of seven otherwise immunocompetent patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Four of seven (57%) cryptococcal isolates from these patients were identified as C. gattii, while three strains were unavailable for species confirmation. We collected plasma from 30 otherwise healthy patients with CNS cryptococcosis in China and Australia (multiethnic) and analyzed the samples for the presence of anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies. The results suggest that anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies are a risk factor for CNS infection by C. gattii but not C. neoformans. GM-CSF may have a specific role in host defense against C. gattii, thereby elevating the importance of determining the level of anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies which can impact clinical management.

  17. Transforming growth factor beta abrogates the effects of hematopoietins on eosinophils and induces their apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Hematopoietins, interleukin (IL)-3, IL-5, and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) have previously been shown to prolong eosinophil survival and abrogate apoptosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) on eosinophil survival and apoptosis. Eosinophils from peripheral blood of mildly eosinophilic donors were isolated to > 97% purity using discontinuous Percoll density gradient. Eosinophils were cultured with hematopoietins with or without TGF-beta for 4 d and their viability was assessed. We confirmed previous observations that hematopoietins prolonged eosinophil survival and inhibited apoptosis. TGF-beta at concentrations > or = 10(-12) M abrogated the survival- prolonging effects of hematopoietins in a dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis as determined by DNA fragmentation in agarose gels. The effect of TGF-beta was blocked by an anti-TGF-beta antibody. The anti-TGF-beta antibody also prolonged eosinophil survival on its own. The culture of eosinophils with IL-3 and GM-CSF stimulated the synthesis of GM-CSF and IL-5, respectively, suggesting an autocrine mechanism of growth factor production. TGF-beta inhibited the synthesis of GM-CSF and IL-5 by eosinophils. TGF-beta did not have any effect on the expression of GM-CSF receptors on eosinophils. We also studied the effect of TGF-beta on eosinophil function and found that TGF-beta inhibited the release of eosinophil peroxidase. Thus, TGF-beta seems to inhibit eosinophil survival and function. The inhibition of endogenous synthesis of hematopoietins may be one mechanism by which TGF-beta blocks eosinophil survival and induces apoptosis. PMID:8113672

  18. Induction of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Macrophages via the Production of Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor by Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Teizo; Imamichi, Tomozumi; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Sato, Miwa; Li, Liangzhu; Matsukawa, Akihiro; Wang, Ji Ming

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. We previously reported that in 4T1 murine breast cancer, non-tumor stromal cells, including macrophages, were the major source of MCP-1. In the present study, we analyzed the potential mechanisms by which MCP-1 is upregulated in macrophages infiltrating 4T1 tumors. We found that cell-free culture supernatants of 4T1 cells (4T1-sup) markedly upregulated MCP-1 production by peritoneal inflammatory macrophages. 4T1-sup also upregulated other MCPs, such as MCP-3/CCL7 and MCP-5/CCL12, but modestly upregulated neutrophil chemotactic chemokines, such as KC/CXCL1 or MIP-2/CXCL2. Physicochemical analysis indicated that an approximately 2–3 kDa 4T1 cell product was responsible for the capacity of 4T1-sup to upregulate MCP-1 expression by macrophages. A neutralizing antibody against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but not macrophage CSF, almost completely abrogated MCP-1-inducing activity of 4T1-sup, and recombinant GM-CSF potently upregulated MCP-1 production by macrophages. The expression levels of GM-CSF in 4T1 tumors in vivo were higher than other tumors, such as Lewis lung carcinoma. Treatment of mice with anti-GM-CSF antibody significantly reduced the growth of 4T1 tumors at the injection sites but did not reduce MCP-1 production or lung metastasis in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that 4T1 cells have the capacity to directly upregulate MCP-1 production by macrophages by releasing GM-CSF; however, other mechanisms are also involved in increased MCP-1 levels in the 4T1 tumor microenvironment. PMID:26834744

  19. trans activation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the interleukin-2 receptor in transgenic mice carrying the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 tax gene.

    PubMed

    Green, J E; Begley, C G; Wagner, D K; Waldmann, T A; Jay, G

    1989-11-01

    Three lines of transgenic mice carrying the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 tax gene have previously been reported to develop neurofibromas composed of perineural fibroblasts (S. H. Hinrichs, M. Nerenberg, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1340-1343, 1987; M. Nerenberg, S. H. Hinrichs, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1324-1329, 1987). Tumors from these mice and tumor cell lines derived from them expressed high levels of tax RNA and protein. They also expressed high levels of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene as measured by proliferative responses of FD-CP1 target cells using conditioned media from tumor cells and by Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from tumors and tumor cell lines. Although other tissues, such as salivary glands and muscles, in the transgenic mice also expressed high levels of tax, they did not express the gene for GM-CSF. This indicates that tissue-specific cellular factors, in addition to tax, are required for GM-CSF gene expression. Systemic effects of excessive GM-CSF production were demonstrated by infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into tumor tissues which are not necrotic, by peripheral granulocytosis, and by splenomegaly resulting from myeloid hyperplasia. The interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor was also found to be expressed by the tumors and tumor cell lines as measured by IL-2-binding and cross-linking studies. This is the first demonstration that the IL-2 receptor can be activated by tax in a nonlymphoid cell type. These in vivo findings are consistent with other reports which have demonstrated in vitro cis-regulatory elements within the 5'-flanking regions of the genes for GM-CSF and the IL-2 receptor which are responsive to trans activation by the tax gene.

  20. A randomised trial of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor for neonatal sepsis: childhood outcomes at 5 years

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Neil; Morris, Timothy; Brocklehurst, Peter; Carr, Robert; Cowan, Frances; Patel, Nishma; Petrou, Stavros; Redshaw, Margaret; Modi, Neena; Doré, Caroline J

    2015-01-01

    Objective We performed a randomised trial in very preterm, small for gestational age (SGA) babies to determine if prophylaxis with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) improves outcomes (the PROGRAMS trial). GM-CSF was associated with improved neonatal neutrophil counts, but no change in other neonatal or 2-year outcomes. As subtle benefits in outcome may not be ascertainable until school age we performed an outcome study at 5 years. Patients and methods 280 babies born at 31 weeks of gestation or less and SGA were entered into the trial. Outcomes were assessed at 5 years to determine neurodevelopmental and general health status and educational attainment. Results We found no significant differences in cognitive, general health or educational outcomes between 83 of 106 (78%) surviving children in the GM-CSF arm compared with 81 of 110 (74%) in the control arm. Mean mental processing composite (equivalent to IQ) at 5 years were 94 (SD 16) compared with 95 (SD 15), respectively (difference in means −1 (95%CI −6 to 4), and similar proportions were in receipt of special educational needs support (41% vs 35%; risk ratio 1.2 (95% CI 0.8 to 1.9)). Performance on Kaufmann-ABC subscales and components of NEPSY were similar. The suggestion of worse respiratory outcomes in the GM-CSF group at 2 years was replicated at 5 years. Conclusions The administration of GM-CSF to very preterm SGA babies is not associated with improved or more adverse neurodevelopmental, general health or educational outcomes at 5 years. Trial registration number ISRCTN42553489. PMID:25922190

  1. Biologic significance of constitutive and subliminal growth factor production by bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Kittler, E L; McGrath, H; Temeles, D; Crittenden, R B; Kister, V K; Quesenberry, P J

    1992-06-15

    The "stromal" or adherent cells of long-term murine Dexter explant bone marrow cultures provide the best in vitro model of the bone marrow microenvironment. Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) is produced constitutively by these cells and is easily detected, but most investigators have not found constitutive production of the other hemolymphopoietic cytokines. We have previously reported the detection of granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) in murine stromal cultures and its induction by the lectin Pokeweed mitogen. The present studies analyzing stromal cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) production by standard Northern blot analysis show constitutive production of mRNAs for CSF-1, GM-CSF, granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF), c-kit ligand (KL), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but not IL-3, IL-4, or IL-5 by 3-week irradiated or nonirradiated murine Dexter stromal cells. Exposure of stromal cells to Pokeweed mitogen or IL-1 16 hours before RNA harvest induces the messages for GM-CSF, G-CSF, KL, and IL-6, but not IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, or CSF-1. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNA made with reverse transcriptase from stromal RNA using two separate sets of IL-3-specific primers shows the presence of IL-3 message in irradiated stromal cells, which is only detectable with this more sensitive technique. The factor-dependent cell lines FDC-P1 and 32D are supported by the stromal cells without the addition of exogenous growth factors, demonstrating a cytokine activity in these cultures that is inhibited by the addition of anti-IL-3 or anti-GM-CSF antibodies. These data indicate that murine Dexter stromal cells constitutively produce CSF-1, GM-CSF, G-CSF, IL-6, KL, and IL-3. This growth factor production could explain the support of granulocyte, macrophage, and megakaryocyte production and stem cell maintenance in Dexter-type long-term murine bone marrow cultures.

  2. Treatment with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is associated with reduced indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity and kynurenine pathway catabolites in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Schefold, Joerg C; Zeden, Jan-Philip; Pschowski, Rene; Hammoud, Ben; Fotopoulou, Christina; Hasper, Dietrich; Fusch, Gerhard; Von Haehling, Stephan; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Meisel, Christian; Schütt, Christine; Reinke, Petra

    2010-03-01

    The immunoregulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) controls tryptophan metabolism and is induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. We investigated whether immunostimulatory treatment with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) influences IDO activity and tryptophan metabolism in sepsis. Thirty-six patients with severe sepsis/septic shock and sepsis-associated immunosuppression (assessed using monocytic human leukocyte antigen-DR (mHLA-DR) expression) were assessed in a controlled trial of GM-CSF or placebo treatment for 8 days. Using tandem mass spectrometry, levels of tryptophan, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, quinolinic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, and estimated IDO activity were determined in a blinded fashion over a 9-day interval. At baseline, tryptophan and metabolite levels did not differ between the study groups. Although tryptophan levels were unchanged in both groups over the treatment interval (all p>0.8), IDO activity was markedly reduced after GM-CSF treatment (35.4 +/- 21.0 vs 21.6 +/-9.9 (baseline vs day 9), p = 0.02). IDO activity differed significantly between the 2 groups after therapy (p = 0.03). Metabolites downstream of IDO (kynurenine, quinolinic acid, kynurenic acid) were all induced in sepsis and declined in the GM-CSF group, but not in controls. Serotonin pathway metabolites remained unchanged in both groups (all p>0.15). Moreover, IDO activity correlated with procalcitonin (p< 0.0001, r = 0.56) and mHLA-DR levels (p = 0.005, r = -0.28) in the overall samples group. Thus, GM-CSF therapy is associated with decreased IDO activity and reduced kynurenine pathway catabolites in sepsis. This may be due to an improved antibacterial defence.

  3. E-ring 8-isoprostanes are agonists at EP2- and EP4-prostanoid receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells and regulate the release of colony-stimulating factors by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Deborah L; Belvisi, Maria G; Hardaker, Elizabeth; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2005-02-01

    8-Isoprostanes are bioactive lipid mediators formed via the nonenzymatic peroxidation of arachidonic acid by free radicals and reactive oxygen species. However, their cognate receptors, biological actions, and signaling pathways are poorly studied. Here, we report the effect of a variety of E- and Falpha-ring 8-isoprostanes on the release of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) from human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells stimulated with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The elaboration of GM-CSF and G-CSF by IL-1beta was inhibited and augmented, respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner by 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG) E(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2), but not by 8-iso-PGF(1alpha), 8-iso-PGF(2alpha), and 8-iso-PGF(3)alpha. AH 6809 (6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthine-2-carboxylic acid), an EP(1)-/EP(2)-/DP-receptor blocking drug, antagonized the inhibitory effect of 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2) on GM-CSF output with an affinity consistent with an interaction at prostanoid receptors of the EP(2)-subtype. In contrast, the facilitation by 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2) of G-CSF release was unaffected by AH 6809 and the selective EP(4)-receptor antagonist L-161,982 [4'-[3-butyl-5-oxo-1-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-1,5-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazol-4-ylmethyl]-biphenyl-2-sulfonic acid (3-methyl-thiophene-2-carbonyl)-amide]. However, when used in combination, AH 6809 and L-161,982 displaced 5-fold to the right the 8-iso-PGE and 8-iso-PGE concentration-response curves. The opposing (1)effect of E-ring (2)8-isoprostanes on GM-CSF and G-CSF release was mimicked by 8-bromo-cAMP and abolished in cells infected with an adenovirus vector encoding an inhibitor protein of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Together, these data demonstrate that E-ring 8-isoprostanes regulate the secretion of GM-CSF and G-CSF from HASM cells by a cAMP- and PKA-dependent mechanism. Moreover, antagonist studies revealed that 8-iso-PGE(1) and 8-iso-PGE(2

  4. TNF-α alters the inflammatory secretion profile of human first trimester placenta.

    PubMed

    Siwetz, Monika; Blaschitz, Astrid; El-Heliebi, Amin; Hiden, Ursula; Desoye, Gernot; Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Implantation and subsequent placental development depend on a well-orchestrated interaction between fetal and maternal tissues, involving a fine balanced synergistic cross-talk of inflammatory and immune-modulating factors. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been increasingly recognized as pivotal factor for successful pregnancy, although high maternal TNF-α levels are associated with a number of adverse pregnancy conditions including gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes mellitus. This study describes effects of exogenously applied TNF-α, mimicking increased maternal TNF-α levels, on the secretion profile of inflammation associated factors in human first trimester villous placenta. Conditioned culture media from first trimester villous placental explants were analyzed by inflammation antibody arrays and ELISA after 48 h culture in the presence or absence of TNF-α. Inflammation antibody arrays identified interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL4, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as the most abundantly secreted inflammation-associated factors under basal culture conditions. In the presence of TNF-α, secretion of GM-CSF, CCL5, and IL-10 increased, whereas IL-4 and macrophage CSF levels decreased compared with controls. ELISA analysis verified antibody arrays by showing significantly increased synthesis and release of GM-CSF and CCL5 by placental explants in response to TNF-α. Immunohistochemistry localized GM-CSF in the villous trophoblast compartment, whereas CCL5 was detected in maternal platelets adhering to perivillous fibrin deposits on the villous surface. mRNA-based in situ padlock probe approach localized GM-CSF and CCL5 transcripts in the villous trophoblast layer and the villous stroma. Results from this study suggest that the inflammatory secretion profile of human first trimester placenta shifts towards increased levels of GM-CSF, CCL5, and IL10 in response to elevated maternal

  5. Cytokines in chronic inflammatory arthritis. II. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in rheumatoid synovial effusions.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W D; Firestein, G S; Taetle, R; Kaushansky, K; Zvaifler, N J

    1989-01-01

    A liquid culture technique was used to study 23 synovial fluids (SF) (21 from inflammatory joint diseases and 2 noninflammatory SF) and supernatants of two cultured rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissues for colony-stimulating factor (CSF). The proliferative responses of human peripheral blood macrophage-depleted non-T cells treated with synovial fluids, supernatants of synovial tissue explants, and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage (rGM)-CSF were compared. Aggregates of cells that formed in long-term cultures (15 d) were similar for each applied agent and consisted of macrophages, eosinophils, and large blasts. Tritiated thymidine incorporation was proportional to the concentration of rGM-CSF and was accompanied by an increase in number and size of cellular aggregates formed in the cultures. CSF activity was observed in inflammatory SF, with tritiated thymidine uptake of 3,501 +/- 1,140 cpm in the presence of RA samples (n = 15) compared to 1,985 +/- 628 for non-RA inflammatory SF (n = 7) (P less than 0.05) and 583 +/- 525 for medium (n = 6) (P less than 0.01). The proliferative response to RA SF was often more apparent when the samples were diluted, because at higher concentrations the RA SF was inhibitory. Two RA SF were fractionated by Sephadex G100 column chromatography; low levels of CSF activity were detected in fractions corresponding to Mr of 70-100 kD, but the major CSF activity was found in the 20-24-kD fractions. A polyclonal rabbit anti-GM-CSF antibody eliminated the stimulating activity from both rGM-CSF and RA SF. Finally, a specific RIA identified significant levels of GM-CSF (40-140 U/ml) in the culture supernatants of 3 additional RA synovial tissues. These data document the local production of GM-CSF in rheumatoid synovitis and are the first description of this cytokine at a site of disease activity. Images PMID:2646320

  6. Comparative measurement of cell-mediated immune responses of swine to the M and N proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun-Jeong; Song, Young-Jo; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Ha, Gun-Woo; Oh, Jin-Sik; Oh, Youn-Kyoung; Choi, In-Soo

    2010-04-01

    The principal objectives of this study were to develop autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and to characterize the antigen-specific T-cell responses to the M and N proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) by using those APCs in outbred pigs. The orf6 and orf7 genes fused with porcine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were cloned into the mammalian expression vector to generate two plasmid DNAs, namely, pcDNA3.1-GM-CSF-PRRSV-M and pcDNA3.1-GM-CSF-PRRSV-N. Three of six pigs in two groups were repeatedly immunized with either plasmid DNA construct, and four pigs were used as controls. The recombinant M and N proteins fused with the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transactivator of transcription protein were employed to generate major histocompatibility complex-matched autologous APCs from each pig. The levels of T-cell proliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) synthesis were compared between pigs immunized with the two plasmid DNAs after stimulation of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of each pig with the autologous antigen-presenting dendritic cells and PBMCs. Higher levels of T-cell proliferation and IFN-gamma synthesis were identified in PBMCs isolated from the pigs immunized with pcDNA3.1-GM-CSF-PRRSV-M than in those isolated from the pigs immunized with pcDNA3.1-GM-CSF-PRRSV-N. By way of contrast, serum antibodies were detected only in pigs immunized with pcDNA3.1-GM-CSF-PRRSV-N. However, no T-cell response or antibody production was detected in the control pigs. These results suggest that the M protein of PRRSV is a more potent T cell-stimulating antigen than the N protein. Nevertheless, it should be emphasized that the N protein substantially induces both cellular and humoral immune responses. The newly developed protocol for generating self APCs may prove effective in further efforts to characterize additional PRRSV proteins involved in

  7. A pilot study evaluating non-contact low-frequency ultrasound and underlying molecular mechanism on diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Min; Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Gu, Guosheng; Garcia-Lavin, Silvia; Fabbi, Matteo; Park, Nanjin; Hayashi, Hisae; Attala, Khaled; French, Michael A; Driver, Vickie R

    2014-12-01

    Non-contact low-frequency ultrasound (NCLF-US) devices have been increasingly used for the treatment of chronic non-healing wounds. The appropriate dose for NCLF-US is still in debate. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the relationship between dose and duration of treatment for subjects with non-healing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and to explore the correlation between wound healing and change of cytokine/proteinase/growth factor profile. This was a prospective randomised clinical study designed to evaluate subjects with non-healing DFUs for 5 weeks receiving standard of care and/or NCLF-US treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: application of NCLF-US thrice per week (Group 1), NCLF-US once per week (Group 2) and the control (Group 3) that received no NCLF-US. All subjects received standard wound care plus offloading for a total of 4 weeks. Percent area reduction (PAR) of each wound compared with baseline was evaluated weekly. Profiles of cytokines/proteinase/growth factors in wound fluid and biopsied tissue were quantified to explore the correlation between wound healing and cytokines/growth factor expression. Twelve DFU patients, 2 (16·7%) type 1 and 10 (83·3%) type 2 diabetics, with an average age of 58 ± 10 years and a total of 12 foot ulcers were enrolled. Average ulcer duration was 36·44 ± 24·78 weeks and the average ABI was 0·91 ± 0·06. Group 1 showed significant wound area reduction at weeks 3, 4 and 5 compared with baseline, with the greatest PAR, 86% (P < 0·05); Groups 2 and 3 showed 25% PAR and 39% PAR, respectively, but there were no statistically significant differences between Groups 2 and 3 over time. Biochemical and histological analyses indicated a trend towards reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, TNF-α and GM-CSF), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and macrophages in response to NCLF-US consistent with wound reduction, when

  8. Localization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 gag proviral sequences in dermato-immunological disorders with eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Marschalkó, Márta; Kemény, B; Horváth, A

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to the development of eosinophilia were investigated in 65 patients with immunodermatological disorders, including the role of eosinophilotactic cytokines and the possible involvement of human T-cell leukemia virus, HTLV. HTLV-1 gag proviral sequences were revealed in two cases of lymphoproliferative disorders such as angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) and CD4+ cutaneous lymphoma, respectively. Increased level of GM-CSF was detected in 33% of disorders studied. Elevated level of IL-5 and eotaxin was detected in 27% and 30%, respectively, of patients with bullous diseases. Elevated level of GM-CSF and eotaxin was found in 33% and 46%, respectively, of patients with inflammatory diseases. Neither of the four cytokines, however proved to be responsible alone or together for the induction of eosinophilia. The possible indirect role of human retroviruses through induction of eosinophilic chemotactic cytokines is hypothesized.

  9. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats. PMID:27934903

  10. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-12-09

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats.

  11. Spotlight on mavrilimumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Chiara; Raimondo, Maria Gabriella; Becciolini, Andrea; Biggioggero, Martina; Favalli, Ennio Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of biological therapies into clinical practice has dramatically modified the natural history of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a systemic autoimmune disease that causes articular damage and has a great negative impact on patients’ quality of life. Despite the wide spectrum of available biological treatments, ~30% of RA patients are still unresponsive, resulting in high disability and increased morbidity and mortality. In the last few decades, the scientific knowledge on RA pathogenesis vastly improved, leading to the identification of new proinflammatory molecules as potential therapeutic targets. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), known to be a hematopoietic factor, is also one of the proinflammatory cytokines involved in macrophage activation, crucial for the pathogenic network of RA. Mavrilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the subunit α of GM-CSF receptor, was recently developed as a competitive antagonist of GM-CSF pathway and successfully adopted in human trials for mild to moderate RA. Mavrilimumab phase I and phase II studies reported an overall good efficacy and safety profile of the drug, and these encouraging results promoted the initiation of worldwide phase III studies. In particular, 158-week results of phase II trials did not show long-term lung toxicity, addressing the major concern about this target of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis development. However, further clinical studies conducted in larger RA populations are needed to confirm these promising results. This review summarizes the biological role of GM-CSF in RA and the preclinical and clinical data on mavrilimumab and other monoclonal antibodies targeted on this pathway as an alternative therapeutic option in RA patients who are unresponsive to conventional biological drugs. PMID:28144129

  12. Modulation of T-Cell Activation in an Experimental Model of Mammary Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    combination of CTLA-4 blockade and a GM-CSF-expressing vaccine was effective for treatment of recently established tumors. This funded year, these...depigmentation, reminiscent of the vitiligo that occurs in melanoma patients undergoing immunotherapy (3). In the transgenic prostate cancer model, we...the immunotherapy of mammary carcinoma. Our initial studies using a transplantable mammary carcinoma demonstrated that treatment of mice with anti

  13. Targeting metastatic cancer from the inside: a new generation of targeted gene delivery vectors enables personalized cancer vaccination in situ.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Erlinda M; Levy, John P; Reed, Rebecca A; Petchpud, W Nina; Liu, Liqiong; Wendler, Carlan B; Hall, Frederick L

    2008-10-01

    The advent of pathotropic (disease-seeking) targeting technologies, combined with advanced gene delivery vectors, provides a unique opportunity for the systemic delivery of immunomodulatory cytokine genes to remote sites of cancer metastasis. When injected intravenously, such pathotropic nanoparticles seek out and accumulate selectively at sites of tumor invasion and neo-angiogenesis, resulting in enhanced gene delivery, and thus cytokine production, within the tumor nodules. Used in conjunction with a primary tumoricidal agent (e.g., Rexin-G) that exposes tumor neoantigens, the tumor-targeted immunotherapy vector is intended to promote the recruitment and activation of host immune cells into the metastastic site(s), thereby initiating cancer immunization in situ. In this study, we examine the feasibility of cytokine gene delivery to cancerous lesions in vivo using intravenously administered pathotropically targeted nanoparticles bearing the gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; i.e., Reximmune-C). In vitro, transduction of target cancer cells with Reximmune-C resulted in the quantitative production of bioactive and immunoreactive GM-CSF protein. In tumor-bearing nude mice, intravenous infusions of Reximmune-C-induced GM-CSF production by transduced cancer cells and paracrine secretion of the cytokine within the tumor nodules, which promoted the recruitment of host mononuclear cells, including CD40+ B cells and CD86+ dendritic cells, into the tumors. With the first proofs of principle established in preclinical studies, we generated an optimized vector configuration for use in advanced clinical trial designs, and extended the feasibility studies to the clinic. Targeted delivery and localized expression of the GM-CSF transgene was confirmed in a patient with metastatic cancer, as was the recruitment of significant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Taken together, these studies provide the first demonstrations of cytokine gene

  14. Treatment of complete spinal cord injury patients by autologous bone marrow cell transplantation and administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Chun; Shim, Yoo Shik; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune; Park, Hyun Seon

    2005-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells into the injured spinal cord has been found to improve neurologic functions in experimental animal studies. However, it is unclear whether bone marrow cells can similarly improve the neurologic functions of complete spinal cord injury (SCI) in human patients. To address this issue, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of autologous bone marrow cell transplantation (BMT) in conjunction with the administration of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in six complete SCI patients. BMT in the injury site (1.1 x 10(6) cells/microL in a total of 1.8 mL) and subcutaneous GM-CSF administration were performed on five patients. One patient was treated with GM-CSF only. The follow-up periods were from 6 to 18 months, depending on the patients. Sensory improvements were noted immediately after the operations. Sensory recovery in the sacral segment was noted mainly 3 weeks to 7 months postoperatively. Significant motor improvements were noted 3 to 7 months postoperatively. Four patients showed neurologic improvements in their American Spiral Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades (from A to C). One patient improved to AIS grade B from A and the last patient remained in AIS grade A. No immediate worsening of neurologic symptoms was found. Side effects of GMCSF treatment such as a fever (>38 degrees C) and myalgia were noted. Serious complications increasing mortality and morbidity were not found. The follow-up study with magnetic resonance imaging 4-6 months after injury showed slight enhancement within the zone of BMT. Syrinx formation was not definitely found. BMT and GM-CSF administration represent a safe protocol to efficiently manage SCI patients, especially those with acute complete injury. To demonstrate the full therapeutic value of this protocol, long-term and more comprehensive case-control clinical studies are required.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYTOKINE-INDUCED MYELOID-DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS FROM NORMAL HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Melissa G.; Liebertz, Daniel J.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). In cancer patients, increased MDSC correlate with more aggressive disease and a poor prognosis. Experimental Design Expression of 15 immune factors (TGFβ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, IDO, FLT3L, c-kit L, iNOS, ARG-1, TNFα, COX2, VEGF) by MDSC-inducing human solid tumor cell lines was evaluated by RT-PCR. Based upon these data, cytokine mixtures were then tested for their ability to generate suppressive CD33+ cells from healthy donor PBMC in vitro by measuring their ability to inhibit the proliferation of, and IFNγ production by, fresh autologous human T cells after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Induced MDSC were characterized with respect to their morphology, surface phenotype, and gene expression profile. Results MDSC-inducing cancer cell lines demonstrated multiple pathways for MDSC generation, including over-expression of IL-6, IL-1β, COX2, M-CSF, and IDO. CD33+ cells with potent suppressive capacity were best generated in vitro by GM-CSF and IL-6, and secondarily by GM-CSF + IL-1β, PGE2, TNFα, or VEGF. Characterization studies of cytokine-induced suppressive cells revealed CD33+CD11b+CD66b+HLA-DRlowIL-13Rα2int large mononuclear cells with abundant basophilic cytoplasm. Expression of iNOS, TGFβ, NOX2, VEGF, and/or ARG-1 was also up-regulated and transwell studies showed suppression of autologous T cells to be contact dependent. Conclusion Suppressive CD33+ cells generated from PBMC by GM-CSF and IL-6 were consistent with human MDSC. This study suggests that these cytokines are potential therapeutic targets for the inhibition of MDSC induction in cancer patients. PMID:20644162

  16. Effect of Pore Structure of Macroporous Poly(Lactide-co-Glycolide) Scaffolds on the in Vivo Enrichment of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo enrichment of dendritic cells (DCs) in implanted macroporous scaffolds is an emerging strategy to modulate the adaptive immune system. The pore architecture is potentially one of the key factors in controlling enrichment of DCs. However, there have been few studies examining the effects of scaffold pore structure on in vivo DC enrichment. Here we present the effects of surface porosity, pore size, and pore volume of macroporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) scaffolds encapsulating granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an inflammatory chemoattractant, on the in vivo enrichment of DCs. Although in vitro cell seeding studies using PLG scaffolds without GM-CSF showed higher cell infiltration in scaffolds with higher surface porosity, in vivo results revealed higher DC enrichment in GM-CSF loaded PLG scaffolds with lower surface porosity despite a similar level of GM-CSF released. The diminished compressive modulus of high surface porosity scaffolds compared to low surface porosity scaffolds lead to the significant shrinkage of these scaffolds in vivo, suggesting that the mechanical strength of scaffolds was critical to maintain a porous structure in vivo for accumulating DCs. The pore volume was also found to be important in total number of recruited cells and DCs in vivo. Varying the pore size significantly impacted the total number of cells, but similar numbers of DCs were found as long as the pore size was above 10–32 μm. Collectively, these results suggested that one can modulate in vivo enrichment of DCs by altering the pore architecture and mechanical properties of PLG scaffolds. PMID:24844318

  17. Influence of cetirizine and levocetirizine on two cytokines secretion in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Mei-Yin; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Weng, Yueh-Shan; Fu, Lin-Shien

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that several second-generation antihistamines can modulate various inflammatory reactions besides their H(1)-receptor antagonism. The antihistamine cetirizine is a racemic mixture of levocetirizine and dextrocetirizine. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these two antihistamines (cetirizine and levocetirizine) on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-8 secretion in A549 human airway epithelial cells. A549 cells were preincubated with cetirizine (0.1, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 microM) or levocetirizine (0.1, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 microM) individually for 16 hours and were then stimulated with IL-1beta for 8 hours. The levels of GM-CSF and IL-8 in cultured supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our data showed that cetirizine (5 and 10 microM) and levocetirizine (2.5, 5, and 10 microM) significantly suppressed GM-CSF secretion from A549 cells stimulated with IL-1beta (p<0.05). Cetirizine (10 microM) and levocetirizine (5 and 10 microM) significantly suppressed IL-8 secretion after A549 was stimulated. The suppressive effect was comparable between levocetirizine, 2.5 microM, and cetirizine, 5 microM, as well as levocetirizine, 5 microM, and cetirizine, 10 microM. Moreover, levocetirizine, 5 microM, was better than cetirizine, 5 microM, on suppressing IL-8 secretion, but such a difference did not appear in other conditions. Our results suggest that cetirizine and levocetirizine at higher concentrations can reduce the release of GM-CSF and IL-8 from A549 cells stimulated with IL-1beta. These observations indicate that the two second-generation antihistamines may exert anti-inflammatory effects beyond histamine H(1)-receptor antagonist, and levocetirizine plays a major role in terms of this activity.

  18. In Vitro Studies on the Trafficking of Dendritic Cells Through Endothelial Cells and Extra-Cellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Giancarlo; D'amico, Giovanna; Varone, Luisella; Sozzani, Silvano; Mantovania, Alberto

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are antigen presenting cells (APC) with the unique ability to initiate an immune response. Immature DC are localized in peripheral tissues where they exert a sentinel function for incoming antigens (Ag). After Ag capture and exposure to inflammatory stimuli DC undergo maturation and migrate to regional lymph nodes where the presentation of antigenic peptides to T lymphocytes takes place. Thus their correct functioning as APC involves localization in tissues and trafficking via the lymph or blood to lymphoid organs. In the present study we have investigated the ability of DC to interact in vitro with human vascular endothelial cells (EC) and extracellular matrix (ECM). DC are differentiated from monocytes by in vitro exposure to GM-CSF and IL-13 for 7 days. In adhesion assays a considerable proportion of DC binds to resting EC monolayers and this adhesion is inhibited by anti-CD11a and CD11b, but not anti-CD11c mAbs. Binding to a natural ECM, derived from cultured EC involves VLA-4 and VLA-5 integrins. In a transmigration assay, 10 % of input cells are able to cross the EC monolayer in the absence of exogenous stimuli. The amount of DC transmigrated through a monolayer of EC was increased of 2-3 fold by C-C chemokines RANTES, MIP1α, and MIP-1β. Most importantly, in view of the trafficking pattern of these cells, a significant proportion of DC can migrate in a reverse transmigration assay, i.e. across the endothelial basement membrane and subsequently, across endothelial cells. Upon exposure to immune or inflammatory signals peripheral DC undergo maturation and migration to lymphoid organs. Functional maturation is associated with loss of responsiveness to chemokines present at sites of inflammation (e.g. MIP1α, MIP1β and RANTES) and acquisition of a receptor repertoire which renders these cells responsive to signals which guide their localization in lymphoid organs (e.g. MIP3β). A better understanding of the molecular basis of DC

  19. Poly(ethylene carbonate) microspheres: manufacturing process and internal structure characterization.

    PubMed

    Lambert, O; Nagele, O; Loux, V; Bonny, J D; Marchal-Heussler, L

    2000-06-15

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a water-soluble cytokine, was encapsulated in poly(ethylene carbonate) microspheres (MS) by a double emulsion w(1)/o/w(2) solvent evaporation method. Poly(ethylene carbonate) is a new polymer of high molecular weight (MW) and forms polymer matrices that are exclusively surface bioerodible. In the frame of this study, the influence of the polymer molecular weight and the polymer concentration in the organic phase on the physico-chemical characteristics of the microspheres were investigated. Ninety percent of the microspheres had a diameter ranging between 4 and 136 microm, with a mean value of 30 microm. The encapsulation ratios ranged from 2.22 to 2.51% (w/w) depending on the molecular weight of the polymer corresponding to an encapsulation efficiency of 70 to 100%, respectively. Independent of the polymer molecular weight used, the in vitro drug release was very low, ranging from 5.61 to less than 1% of the total encapsulated GM-CSF amount. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed microparticles with spherical shapes and smooth surfaces containing a few small globules. The inner structure of the microspheres appeared to consist of a polymeric matrix surrounding numerous globules. These globules have different sizes, shape and distribution in the polymeric matrix, depending on the concentration of the polymer solution and on the polymer molecular weight. In addition, it was demonstrated that the GM-CSF lowered the interfacial tension between the GM-CSF aqueous solution and the methylene chloride organic phase. The active critical concentration was as low as 0.008 mg/ml. It was therefore suggested that this particular behavior contributed to the stabilization of the primary emulsion during the formation of the microspheres, leading to rather high encapsulation efficiency.

  20. Prevention and reversal of tumor cell-induced monocyte deactivation by cytokines, purified protein derivative (PPD), and anti-IL-10 antibody.

    PubMed

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jaroslaw; Szatanek, Rafal; Stankiewicz, Danuta; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2004-08-25

    Upon contact with tumor cells when cocultured in vitro, human monocytes become unresponsive (deactivated) to restimulation and demonstrate decreased production of TNF-alpha and IL-12, and enhanced IL-10 secretion. The present study was undertaken to determine whether immunomodulatory agents (proinflammatory cytokines and PPD of tuberculin) could either prevent or reverse the deactivation of monocytes. Monocytes were treated with the agents either before or after being cocultured with tumor cells. Pretreatment of monocytes with IFN-gamma, either alone or in combination with TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, or PPD, significantly enhanced TNF-alpha and IL-12 production by deactivated monocytes. TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and PPD alone were inactive. Treatment of monocytes following coculture with IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, PPD or IFN-gamma in combination with these agents reversed the depressed TNF-alpha release, whereas IL-12 production was enhanced by IFN-gamma alone. All the agents had no or only a limited effect on the enhanced IL-10 secretion by deactivated monocytes. However, treatment of cocultured monocytes with anti-IL-10 mAb significantly increased the production of TNF-alpha and IL-12 by deactivated monocytes. Moreover, coengraftment of deactivated monocytes with human pancreatic carcinoma cells into SCID mice caused an enhancement of the tumor growth that was alleviated by the treatment of monocytes in vitro with IFN-gamma alone or in combination with GM-CSF or PPD. These results suggest that activation of monocytes with certain proinflammatory cytokines and/or selective inhibition of IL-10 by a mAb may prevent or reverse monocyte deactivation caused by tumor cells.

  1. A novel approach to induce human DCs from monocytes by triggering 4-1BBL reverse signaling.

    PubMed

    Ju, Songwen; Ju, Songguang; Ge, Yan; Qiu, Hongxia; Lu, Binfeng; Qiu, Yuhua; Fu, Jingxiang; Liu, Gaoqin; Wang, Qin; Hu, Yumin; Shu, Yongqian; Zhang, Xueguang

    2009-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are responsible for the initiation of immune responses. Our study demonstrates a new pathway for generating a large quantity of stimulatory monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs) from human monocytes using anti-4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) mAb to trigger reverse signaling. The anti-4-1BBL-driven Mo-DCs (DCs(alpha-4-1BBL)) not only express higher levels of CD86, CD83 and HLA-DR, when compared with the Mo-DCs matured by tumor necrosis factor alpha, but also exhibit a unique phenotype that expresses lower levels of PD-L1. High levels of GM-CSF, M-CSF and Flt3 ligand (FL) were found in the anti-4-1BBL-differentiation culture. Neutralizing M-CSF, GM-CSF and FL inhibited Mo-DC proliferation stimulated by anti-4-1BBL mAb, suggesting that M-CSF, GM-CSF and FL are involved in cell proliferation stimulated by anti-4-1BBL. Further analysis of the DCs(alpha-4-1BBL) showed increased secretion of T(h)1-type cytokines IL-12 and IFN-gamma and decreased secretion of IL-10. DCs(alpha-4-1BBL) induced much stronger proliferative responses in the mixed lymphocyte reaction assay when compared with DCs derived by GM-CSF. Moreover, DCs(alpha-4-1BBL) preferentially induced T(h)1 responses. We have further demonstrated that anti-4-1BBL antibody stimulated nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm in monocytes, suggesting that reverse signaling by 4-1BBL is likely responsible for mediating DC differentiation. Collectively, we have found that reverse signaling of 4-1BBL promotes the differentiation of potent T(h)1-inducing DCs from human monocytes.

  2. Colony-stimulating factors for the treatment of the hematopoietic component of the acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS): a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Newman, Victoria L; Seed, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest national security threats to the United States is the detonation of an improvised nuclear device or a radiological dispersal device in a heavily populated area. As such, this type of security threat is considered to be of relatively low risk, but one that would have an extraordinary high impact on health and well-being of the US citizenry. Psychological counseling and medical assessments would be necessary for all those significantly impacted by the nuclear/radiological event. Direct medical interventions would be necessary for all those individuals who had received substantial radiation exposures (e.g., >1 Gy). Although no drugs or products have yet been specifically approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) to treat the effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and pegylated G-CSF have been used off label for treating radiation accident victims. Recent threats of terrorist attacks using nuclear or radiologic devices makes it imperative that the medical community have up-to-date information and a clear understanding of treatment protocols using therapeutically effective recombinant growth factors and cytokines such as G-CSF and GM-CSF for patients exposed to injurious doses of ionizing radiation. Based on limited human studies with underlying biology, we see that the recombinants, G-CSF and GM-CSF appear to have modest, but significant medicinal value in treating radiation accident victims. In the near future, the US FDA may approve G-CSF and GM-CSF as ‘Emergency Use Authorization’ (EUA) for managing radiation-induced aplasia, an ARS-related pathology. In this article, we review the status of growth factors for the treatment of radiological/nuclear accident victims.

  3. Identification of peptide mimotopes of gp96 using single-chain antibody library.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Arulkumaran; Suriano, Robert; Goswami, Neha; Chaudhuri, Devyani; Ashok, Badithe T; Rajoria, Shilpi; George, Andrea L; Mittelman, Abraham; Tiwari, Raj K

    2011-03-01

    Heat shock proteins such as gp96 are immunogenic and are widely used as vaccines in immunotherapy of cancers. The present study focuses on the use of peptide mimotopes as immunotherapeutic vaccines for prostate cancer. To this end, we developed a 15-mer gp96 peptide mimotope specifically reactive to MAT-LyLu gp96-peptide complex using combinatorial single-chain antibody and peptide phage display library. The immunogenicity of the synthesized gp96 mimotope was analyzed initially in normal BALB/c mice in combination with various adjuvants such as complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), aluminum salts (ALUM), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and liposome, of which CFA served as a positive control. The antibody response was determined and found that the gp96 mimotope with ALUM showed a significant increase in antibody titer, followed by GM-CSF and liposomes. Further, the T cell (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) populations from splenocytes, as well as IgG isotypes, interleukin-4, and interleukin-5 of gp96 mimotope with ALUM-immunized animals, were analyzed. The results suggest that the gp96 mimotope may elicit a potent and effective antitumor antibody response. Further, the study identifies ALUM and GM-CSF as adjuvant options to drive an appropriate protective immune response as these adjuvants have prior use in humans.

  4. Liver myeloid-derived suppressor cells expand in response to liver metastases in mice and inhibit the anti-tumor efficacy of anti-CEA CAR-T.

    PubMed

    Burga, Rachel A; Thorn, Mitchell; Point, Gary R; Guha, Prajna; Nguyen, Cang T; Licata, Lauren A; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Ayala, Alfred; Joseph Espat, N; Junghans, Richard P; Katz, Steven C

    2015-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell (CAR-T) technology, a promising immunotherapeutic tool, has not been applied specifically to treat liver metastases (LM). While CAR-T delivery to LM can be optimized by regional intrahepatic infusion, we propose that liver CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (L-MDSC) will inhibit the efficacy of CAR-T in the intrahepatic space. We studied anti-CEA CAR-T in a murine model of CEA+ LM and identified mechanisms through which L-MDSC expand and inhibit CAR-T function. We established CEA+ LM in mice and studied purified L-MDSC and responses to treatment with intrahepatic anti-CEA CAR-T infusions. L-MDSC expanded threefold in response to LM, and their expansion was dependent on GM-CSF, which was produced by tumor cells. L-MDSC utilized PD-L1 to suppress anti-tumor responses through engagement of PD-1 on CAR-T. GM-CSF, in cooperation with STAT3, promoted L-MDSC PD-L1 expression. CAR-T efficacy was rescued when mice received CAR-T in combination with MDSC depletion, GM-CSF neutralization to prevent MDSC expansion, or PD-L1 blockade. As L-MDSC suppressed anti-CEA CAR-T, infusion of anti-CEA CAR-T in tandem with agents targeting L-MDSC is a rational strategy for future clinical trials.

  5. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Supplementation in Culture Media for Subfertile Women Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Technologies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Salamalekis, George; Creatsa, Maria; Vrachnis, Nikos; Glujovsky, Demián; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Chrelias, Charalampos

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine/growth factor produced by epithelial cells that exerts embryotrophic effects during the early stages of embryo development. We performed a systematic review, and six studies that were performed in humans undergoing assisted reproduction technologies (ART) were located. We wanted to evaluate if embryo culture media supplementation with GM-CSF could improve success rates. As the type of studies and the outcome parameters investigated were heterogeneous, we decided not to perform a meta-analysis. Most of them had a trend favoring the supplementation with GM-CSF, when outcomes were measured in terms of increased percentage of good-quality embryos reaching the blastocyst stage, improved hatching initiation and number of cells in the blastocyst, and reduction of cell death. However, no statistically significant differences were found in implantation and pregnancy rates in all apart from one large multicenter trial, which reported favorable outcomes, in terms of implantation and live birth rates. We propose properly conducted and adequately powered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to further validate and extrapolate the current findings with the live birth rate to be the primary outcome measure. PMID:23509457

  6. Substance P enhances tissue factor release from granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induces procoagulant activity of macrophages. Tissue factor (TF) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein and substance P (SP) is a pro-inflammatory neuropeptide involved in the formation of membrane blebs. This study investigated the role of SP in TF release by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. SP significantly decreased TF levels in whole-cell lysates of GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. TF was detected in the culture supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after stimulation of macrophages by SP. Aprepitant (an SP/neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist) reduced TF release from macrophages stimulated with SP. Pretreatment of macrophages with a radical scavenger(pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) also limited the decrease of TF in whole-cell lysates after stimulation with SP. A protein kinase C inhibitor (rottlerin) partially blocked this macrophage response to SP, while it was significantly inhibited by a ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632) or a dynamin inhibitor (dinasore). An Akt inhibitor (perifosine) also partially blocked this response. Furthermore, siRNA targeting p22phox, β-arrestin 2, or Rho A, blunted the release of TF from macrophages stimulated with SP. In other experiments, visceral adipocytes derived from cryopreserved preadipocytes were found to produce SP. In conclusion, SP enhances the release of TF from macrophages via the p22phox/β-arrestin 2/Rho A signaling pathway.

  7. Biological mechanisms underlying the ultraviolet radiation-induced formation of skin wrinkling and sagging II: over-expression of neprilysin plays an essential role.

    PubMed

    Imokawa, Genji; Nakajima, Hiroaki; Ishida, Koichi

    2015-04-08

    Our previous studies strongly indicated that the up-regulated activity of skin fibroblast-derived elastase plays a pivotal role in wrinkling and/or sagging of the skin via the impairment of elastic fiber configuration and the subsequent loss of skin elasticity. Fortunately, we succeeded in identifying human skin fibroblast-derived elastase as a previously known enzyme, neprilysin or neutral endopeptidase (NEP). We have also characterized epithelial-mesenchymal paracrine cytokine interactions between UVB-exposed-keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts and found that interleukin-1α and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulatory factor (GM-CSF) are intrinsic cytokines secreted by UVB-exposed keratinocytes that stimulate the expression of neprilysin by fibroblasts. On the other hand, direct UVA exposure of human fibroblasts significantly stimulates the secretion of IL-6 and also elicits a significant increase in the gene expression of matrix metallo-protease(MMP)-1 as well as neprilysin (to a lesser extent), which is followed by distinct increases in their protein and enzymatic activity levels. Direct UVA exposure of human keratinocytes also stimulates the secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF but not of IL-1 and endothelin-1. These findings suggest that GM-CSF secreted by UVA-exposed keratinocytes as well as IL-6 secreted by UVA-exposed dermal fibroblasts play important and additional roles in UVA-induced sagging and wrinkling by up-regulation of neprilysin and MMP-1, respectively, in dermal fibroblasts.

  8. Identification of differentiation-inducing activity produced by human bone marrow stromal cell line LP101.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Masaki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Nabeshima, Ryusuke; Shima, Daisuke; Handa, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Shin

    2004-11-01

    We have previously reported that human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate into mature granulocytes when HL-60 co-cultivated with human bone marrow stromal LP101 cells. In the present study, we investigated which factors produced by LP101 cells induce HL-60 cells to differentiate into mature granulocytes. The expression of the cell surface antigen CD11b on HL-60 cells was increased after a 72-h culture with the conditioned medium (CM) obtained from LP101 cells. LP101 cells were observed to produce various cytokines, including TNF-alpha, GM-CSF and IL-6. The neutralizing antibodies against these cytokines partially suppressed the CM-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells. Recombinant TNF-alpha induced the differentiation of HL-60 cells, and GM-CSF and IL-6 additionally enhanced the effect of TNF-alpha. When the CM was divided into a low molecular weight (LMW) fraction and a high molecular weight (HMW) fraction by ultrafiltration, the LMW fraction synergistically enhanced the differentiation inducible activity of TNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that LP101 cells induce the differentiation of HL-60 cells by producing various cytokines including TNF-alpha, IL-6, and GM-CSF, and that unknown low molecular weight factors also participate.

  9. Spermatozoa and seminal plasma induce a greater inflammatory response in the ovine uterus at oestrus than dioestrus.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jennifer L; Ketheesan, Natkunam; Summers, Phillip M

    2009-01-01

    Leukocyte infiltration and increased synthesis of cytokines in response to insemination is considered to enhance reproductive success. The present study investigated the inflammatory response to whole semen, spermatozoa and seminal plasma, with and without the addition of antibiotics, in the ovine uterus at oestrus and dioestrus. Seminal plasma and spermatozoa both contributed to increased IL-8 secretion (P < 0.01) by endometrial epithelial cells and a concurrent infiltration by neutrophils (P < 0.01). Increased GM-CSF secretion (P < 0.01) occurred in response to whole semen and spermatozoa when antibiotics were not used. Macrophages and eosinophils increased (P < 0.05) in the endometrial stroma when antibiotics were not used, and fewer mast cells were detected in the deep endometrial stroma after treatments containing antibiotics (P < 0.05). Neutrophil and IL-8 responses to insemination were greater at oestrus (P < 0.01) than at dioestrus and the GM-CSF response followed a similar trend. Eosinophil numbers were increased at oestrus (P < 0.01) but minimally affected by insemination. More macrophages were located in the superficial endometrial stroma at oestrus. These results indicate that spermatozoa, seminal plasma and possibly bacteria contribute to the post-insemination inflammatory response, and that leukocytes, GM-CSF and IL-8 secretion in the ovine uterus are influenced by ovarian hormones.

  10. Interleukin 10 modulation of pathogenic Th17 cells during fatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kulcsar, Kirsten A; Baxter, Victoria K; Greene, Ivorlyne P; Griffin, Diane E

    2014-11-11

    Mosquito-borne alphaviruses are important causes of epidemic encephalomyelitis. Neuronal cell death during fatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis is immune-mediated; however, the types of cells involved and their regulation have not been determined. We show that the virus-induced inflammatory response was accompanied by production of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, and in the absence of IL-10, paralytic disease occurred earlier and mice died faster. To determine the reason for accelerated disease in the absence of IL-10, immune responses in the CNS of IL-10(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were compared. There were no differences in the amounts of brain inflammation or peak virus replication; however, IL-10(-/-) animals had accelerated and increased infiltration of CD4(+)IL-17A(+) and CD4(+)IL-17A(+)IFNγ(+) cells compared with WT animals. Th17 cells infiltrating the brain demonstrated a pathogenic phenotype with the expression of the transcription factor, Tbet, and the production of granzyme B, IL-22, and GM-CSF, with greater production of GM-CSF in IL-10(-/-) mice. Therefore, in fatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis, pathogenic Th17 cells enter the CNS at the onset of neurologic disease and, in the absence of IL-10, appear earlier, develop into Th1/Th17 cells more often, and have greater production of GM-CSF. This study demonstrates a role for pathogenic Th17 cells in fatal viral encephalitis.

  11. Innate Response Activator (IRA) B Cells Reside in Human Tonsils and Internalize Bacteria In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pancotto, Laura; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rosa, Domenico; Manetti, Andrea; Romano, Antonio; Montagnani, Francesca; Bertholet, Sylvie; Castellino, Flora; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Innate response activator (IRA) B cells have been described in mice as a subset of B-1a B cells that produce granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and have been found in the spleen upon activation. In humans, identification, tissue localization and functionality of these lymphocytes are poorly understood. We hypothesized that IRA B cells could reside in human palatine tonsils, which are a first line of defense from infection of the upper respiratory tract. In the present work, we used flow cytometry and confocal microscopy to identify and characterize human IRA (hIRA) B cells in tonsils. We show that CD19+CD20+GM-CSF+ B cells are present in the tonsils of all the subjects studied at a frequency ranging between ~0.2% and ~0.4% of the conventional CD19+CD20+GM-CSF- B cells. These cells reside within the B cell follicles, are mostly IgM+IgD+, express CD5 and show phagocytic activity. Our results support a role for hIRA B cells in the effector immune response to infections in tonsils. PMID:26066485

  12. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor: Evaluation of biopharmaceutical formulations by stability-indicating RP-LC method and bioassay.

    PubMed

    Leal, Diogo Paim; Souto, Ricardo Bizogne; Schutkoski, Renato; Bergamo, Ana Cláudia; Dalmora, Sérgio Luiz

    2011-07-01

    The granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that regulates the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells and activates granulocytes and macrophages. A reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) method was validated for the assessing of the stability of non-glycosylated recombinant rhGM-CSF (Molgramostim) in biopharmaceutical formulations. The RP-LC method was carried out on a Jupiter C(4) column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d.), maintained at 45 °C. The mobile phase A consisted of 0.1% TFA and the mobile phase B was acetonitrile with 0.1% TFA in acetonitrile, run at a flow rate of 1 mL/min, and using photodiode array (PDA) detection at 214 nm. Chromatographic separation was obtained with a retention time of 29.2 min, and was linear over the concentration range of 2-300 μg/mL (r(2) = 0.9992). Specificity was established in degradation studies. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxicity test of the degraded products showed significant differences (p < 0.05). The method was applied to the assessment of rhGM-CSF and related proteins in biopharmaceutical dosage forms, and the results were correlated to those of a bioassay. It is concluded that the employment of RP-LC in conjunction with current methods allows a great improvement in monitoring stability, quality control and thereby assures the therapeutic efficacy.

  13. Post-5-fluorouracil human marrow: stem cell characteristics and renewal properties after autologous marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, F M; Temeles, D; Lowry, P; Thraves, T; Grosh, W W; Quesenberry, P J

    1993-05-01

    The effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) pretreatment on human bone marrow (BM) progenitor/stem cells and recovery of hematopoiesis after autologous marrow transplant was studied. Twenty-one patients were treated with 5-FU (15 mg/kg to 45 mg/kg) intravenously (IV) for 1 to 3 days administered 6 to 22 days before BM harvest. Post-FU marrow was infused into 15 patients after high-dose cyclophosphamide, carmustine (BCNU), and VP-16 (CBV). Seventeen patients (historical controls) were treated with CBV and autologous BM transplantation but did not receive 5-FU before marrow harvest. The groups were comparable for diagnosis and prior therapy. In the 5-FU-treated group and control group, median recovery times for platelet count to 50,000/mm3 were 20 and 30 days, respectively (P = .007), and for platelet count to 100,000/mm3, 23 and 38 days, respectively (P = .007), while neutrophil recovery was not significantly altered. In vitro cultures with 1 to 7 growth factors (interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, colony-stimulating factor-1 [CSF-1], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and G-CSF) were performed. In 8 of 10 patients whose marrow was studied before and after 5-FU treatment, the numbers of CFU-C responsive to the combination of GM-CSF and IL-3 was increased 6.15-fold by 5-FU pretreatment. In 4 of these patients, thymidine suicide of GM-CSF- and IL-3-stimulated CFU-C ranged from 17% to 42%. High proliferative potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC) was observed in low frequency in normal marrow and patient's marrow before 5-FU treatment. In 11 of 16 patients pretreated with 5-FU, increased numbers of HPP-CFC were noted. GM-CSF and IL-3 interacted synergistically to stimulate HPP-CFC. Multifactor combinations, especially GM-CSF + G-CSF + IL-3 + IL-6 + IL-1 + CSF-1 did not increase total colony count or classic HPP-CFC but did result in altered morphology, producing huge, loose colonies. The marrow from patients pretreated with 5-FU is enriched with

  14. Expression of CD86 on human marrow CD34(+) cells identifies immunocompetent committed precursors of macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ryncarz, R E; Anasetti, C

    1998-05-15

    Macrophages and dendritic cells derive from a hematopoietic stem cell and the existence of a common committed progenitor has been hypothesized. We have recently found in normal human marrow a subset of CD34(+) cells that constitutively expresses HLA-DR and low levels of CD86, a natural ligand for the T cell costimulation receptor CD28. This CD34(+) subset can elicit responses from allogeneic T cells. In this study, we show that CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells can also present tetanus toxoid antigen to memory CD4(+) T cells. CD86 is expressed at low levels in macrophages and high levels in dendritic cells. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells are the common precursors of both macrophages and dendritic cells. CD34(+)/CD86(+) marrow cells cultured in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-generated macrophages. In contrast, CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells cultured in GM-CSF generated a predominant population of granulocytes. CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells cultured in GM-CSF plus tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) generated almost exclusively CD1a+/CD83(+) dendritic cells. In contrast, CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells cultured in GM-CSF plus TNF-alpha generated a variety of cell types, including a small population of dendritic cells. In addition, CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells cultured in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor failed to generate CD15(+) granulocytes. Therefore, CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells are committed precursors of both macrophages and dendritic cells. The ontogeny of dendritic cells was recapitulated by stimulation of CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells with TNF-alpha that induced expression of CD86. Subsequent costimulation of CD86(+) cells with GM-CSF plus TNF-alpha lead to expression of CD83 and produced terminal dendritic cell differentiation. Thus, expression of CD86 on hematopoietic progenitor cells is regulated by TNF-alpha and denotes differentiation towards the macrophage or dendritic cell lineages.

  15. Murine Anti-GD2 Monoclonal Antibody 3F8 Combined With Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and 13-Cis-Retinoic Acid in High-Risk Patients With Stage 4 Neuroblastoma in First Remission

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Cheung, Irene Y.; Kushner, Brian H.; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Chamberlain, Elizabeth; Kramer, Kim; Modak, Shakeel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) combined with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has shown efficacy against neuroblastoma (NB). Prognostic variables that could influence clinical outcome were explored. Patients and Methods One hundred sixty-nine children diagnosed with stage 4 NB (1988 to 2008) were enrolled onto consecutive anti-GD2 murine MoAb 3F8 ± GM-CSF ± 13-cis-retinoic acid (CRA) protocols after achieving first remission (complete remission/very good partial remission). Patients enrolled in regimen A (n = 43 high-risk [HR] patients) received 3F8 alone; regimen B (n = 41 HR patients), 3F8 + intravenous GM-CSF + CRA, after stem-cell transplantation (SCT); and regimen C (n = 85), 3F8 + subcutaneous GM-CSF + CRA, 46 of 85 after SCT, whereas 28 of 85 required additional induction therapy and were deemed ultra high risk (UHR). Marrow minimal residual disease (MRD) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Survival probability was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and prognostic variables were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression model. Results At 5 years from the start of immunotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS) improved from 44% for HR patients receiving regimen A to 56% and 62% for those receiving regimens B and C, respectively. Overall survival (OS) was 49%, 61%, and 81%, respectively. PFS and OS of UHR patients were 36% and 75%, respectively. Relapse was mostly at isolated sites. Independent adverse prognostic factors included UHR (PFS) and post–cycle two MRD (PFS and OS), whereas the prognostic factors for improved outcome were missing killer immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand (PFS and OS), human antimouse antibody response (OS), and regimen C (OS). Conclusion Retrospective analysis of consecutive trials from a single center demonstrated that MoAb 3F8 + GM-CSF + CRA is effective against chemotherapy-resistant marrow MRD. Its positive impact on long-term survival can only

  16. Primary analysis of a prospective, randomized, single-blinded phase II trial evaluating the HER2 peptide GP2 vaccine in breast cancer patients to prevent recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Ardavanis, Alexandros; Litton, Jennifer K.; Shumway, Nathan M.; Hale, Diane F.; Murray, James L.; Perez, Sonia A.; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Baxevanis, Constantin N.; Papamichail, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GP2 is a HER2-derived, HLA-A2+ restricted peptide. Phase I studies showed GP2 administered with GM-CSF to be safe and immunogenic. Here we report the primary analysis of a prospective, randomized, multicenter phase II adjuvant trial conducted to determine the vaccine's efficacy. The trial enrolled HLA-A2+, clinically disease-free, node-positive and high-risk node-negative breast cancer patients with tumors expressing HER2 (immunohistochemistry[IHC] 1+-3+). Patients were randomized to GP2+GM-CSF versus GM-CSF alone. Disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed in intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-treatment cohorts; pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed for patients with IHC 3+ or FISH+ disease. The trial enrolled 180 patients; 89 received GP2+GM-CSF and 91 received GM-CSF alone. The groups were well-matched for clinicopathologic characteristics. Toxicities have been minimal. The Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year DFS rate in the ITT analyses was 88% (95% CI:78-94%) in vaccinated vs. 81% (95% CI:69-89%) (P = 0.43) in control patients after a 34 month median follow-up. In the per-treatment analysis, the estimated 5-year DFS rates were 94% (95% CI:83-98%) and 85% (73-92%) (P = 0.17). In IHC 3+/FISH+ patients, the estimated 5-year DFS rate was 94% (82-98%) in vaccinated patients (n = 51) vs. 89% (71-96%) in control patients (n = 50), (P = 0.86) in the ITT analyses and 100% vs. 89% (71-96%) in vaccinated vs. control patients in the per-treatment analyses (P = 0.08). While the overall ITT analysis did not demonstrate benefit to vaccination, this trial confirmed that the GP2 vaccine is safe and suggests that vaccination may have clinical activity, particularly in patients with HER2 overexpression who received the full vaccine series (ie per-treatment group). PMID:27589688

  17. [Packaging of lentivirus carrying gene hβc and overexpression of gene hβc in NB4 cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Hui; Wu, Yong; Zi, You-Mei; Li, Xian-Fang; Liao, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Yuan-Zhong

    2011-06-01

    This study was aimed to overexpress gene hβc in NB4 cells via the method of lentivirus-mediated gene transfer, to observe the differentiation behaviour change of hβc over-expressing NB4 cells treated with IL-3 or GM-CSF, to explore the relationship between hβc gene and the differentiation behaviour of NB4 cells. The targeted hβc gene was amplified by PCR from the cloned vector carrying ORF of hβc. The PCR product containing PmeI and BstBI site introduced by primer was digested, and then cloned into lentivirus vector pRRLSIN.cPPT.PGK/IRES/GFP.WPRE to construct a lentiviral vector carrying hβc, named pLV-hβc. And the pLV-hβc plasmid was confirmed by restriction and sequencing. The recombinant lentivirus was produced by co-transfecting three plasmids into 293T packing cells. After transfection, the lentiviral supernatant was collected to transfect NB4 cells. GFP expression was examined by fluorescent microscope and the expression of hβc gene was detected by Western blot. Then, the NB4 cells over-expressing hβc were treated with IL-3 (10 ng/ml), GM-CSF (10 ng/ml), ATRA (1 µmol/L) respectively, and the CD11b expression, morphology and differentiation behaviour changes of every groups were observed by flow cytometry and microscopy, while NB4 cells transfected with blank lentivirus (NB4-blank cells) were used as controls. The results showed that the recombinant lentivirus vector carrying hβc gene could efficiently transfect NB4 cells and made NB4 cells to stably over-express hβc gene. The expression of CD11b was up-regulated in NB4-hβc cells treated with of IL-3 or GM-CSF, but it was not as obvious as the effect of ATRA, and no morphological change was observed in NB4 hβc cells treated with the IL-3 or GM-CSF. It is concluded that IL-3 or GM-CSF can induce NB4 cells over-expressing hβc to differentiate to neutrophils, but can not make them fully matured.

  18. Vitamin D and Serum Cytokines in a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yusupov, Eleanor; Li-Ng, Melissa; Pollack, Simcha; Yeh, James K.; Mikhail, Mageda; Aloia, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Background. The role of vitamin D in the body's ability to fight influenza and URI's may be dependent on regulation of specific cytokines that participate in the host inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that vitamin D can influence intracellular signaling to regulate the production of cytokines. Subjects and Methods. This study was a 3-month prospective placebo-controlled trial of vitamin D3 supplementation in ambulatory adults [Li-Ng et al., 2009]. 162 volunteers were randomized to receive either 50 μg/d (2000 IU) of vitamin D3 or matching placebo. 25(OH)D and the levels of 10 different cytokines (IL-2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 13, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α) were measured in the serum of participants at baseline and the final visit. There were 6 drop-outs from the active vitamin D group and 8 from the placebo group. Results. In the active vitamin D group, we found a significant median percent decline in levels of GM-CSF (−62.9%, P < .0001), IFN-γ (−38.9%, P < .0001), IL-4 (−50.8%, P = .001), IL-8 (−48.4%, P < .0001), and IL-10 (−70.4%, P < .0001). In the placebo group, there were significant declines for GM-CSF (−53.2%, P = .0007) and IFN-γ (−34.4%, P = .0011). For each cytokine, there was no significant difference in the rate of decline between the two groups. 25(OH)D levels increased in the active vitamin D group from a mean of 64.3 ± 25.4 nmol/L to 88.5 ± 23.2 nmol/L. Conclusions. The present study did not show that vitamin D3 supplementation changed circulating cytokine levels among healthy adults. PMID:20871847

  19. Polymorphisms in key pulmonary inflammatory pathways and the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Samuel M.; Grissom, Colin K.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Hoidal, John R.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Wolff, Roger K.; Morris, Alan H.; Paine, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Aim Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is an important clinical and public health problem. Why some at-risk individuals develop ARDS and others do not is unclear but may be related to differences in inflammatory and cell signaling systems. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) and Granulocyte-Monocyte Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) pathways have recently been implicated in pulmonary pathophysiology; whether genetic variation within these pathways contributes to ARDS risk or outcome is unknown. Materials and Methods We studied 842 patients from three centers in Utah and 14 non-Utah ARDS Network centers. We studied patients at risk for ARDS and patients with ARDS to determine whether Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RAGE and GM-CSF pathways were associated with development of ARDS. We studied 29 SNPs in 5 genes within the two pathways and controlled for age, sepsis as ARDS risk factor, and severity of illness, while targeting a false discovery rate of ≤5%. In a secondary analysis we evaluated associations with mortality. Results Of 842 patients, 690 had ARDS, and 152 were at-risk. Sepsis was the risk factor for ARDS in 250 (30%) patients. When controlling for age, APACHE III score, sepsis as risk factor, and multiple comparisons, no SNPs were significantly associated with ARDS. In a secondary analysis, only rs743564 in CSF2 approached significance with regard to mortality (OR 2.17, unadjusted p = 0.005, adjusted p = 0.15). Conclusions Candidate SNPs within 5 genes in the RAGE and GM-CSF pathways were not significantly associated with development of ARDS in this multi-centric cohort. PMID:25513711

  20. Age-specific MRI templates for pediatric neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Carmen E.; Richards, John E.; Almli, C. Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study created a database of pediatric age-specific MRI brain templates for normalization and segmentation. Participants included children from 4.5 through 19.5 years, totaling 823 scans from 494 subjects. Open-source processing programs (FSL, SPM, ANTS) constructed head, brain and segmentation templates in 6 month intervals. The tissue classification (WM, GM, CSF) showed changes over age similar to previous reports. A volumetric analysis of age-related changes in WM and GM based on these templates showed expected increase/decrease pattern in GM and an increase in WM over the sampled ages. This database is available for use for neuroimaging studies (blindedforreview). PMID:22799759

  1. Immunity to onchocerciasis: cells from putatively immune individuals produce enhanced levels of interleukin-5, gamma interferon, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in response to Onchocerca volvulus larval and male worm antigens.

    PubMed

    Turaga, P S; Tierney, T J; Bennett, K E; McCarthy, M C; Simonek, S C; Enyong, P A; Moukatte, D W; Lustigman, S

    2000-04-01

    Antigen-specific interleukin-5 (IL-5), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) responses in individuals living in an area of hyperendemicity for onchocerciasis in Cameroon were examined. The responses against antigens prepared from Onchocerca volvulus third-stage larvae (L3), molting L3 (mL3), and crude extract from adult males (M-OvAg) were compared to the responses against antigens from adult female worms and skin microfilariae. Cytokine responses for the putatively immune individuals (PI) and the infected individuals (INF) were compared. A differential cytokine profile of IL-5 (Th2 phenotype) and IFN-gamma (Th1 phenotype) was found in these individuals in response to the antigens. In both the PI and the INF, Th2 responses against all the antigens tested were dominant. However, in the PI group as a whole, there was an enhanced Th2 response against the larval antigens and the adult male and adult female antigens, and a Th1 response in a subgroup of the PI (27 to 54.5%) against L3, mL3, and M-OvAg antigens was present. While the PI produced significantly higher levels of GM-CSF against L3, mL3, and M-OvAg antigens than the INF, there was no difference in the GM-CSF responses of the groups against the other antigens. The present study indicated that, in comparison to the INF, the PI have distinct larva-specific and adult male-specific cytokine responses, thus supporting the premise that immunological studies of the PI would lead to the identification of immune mechanisms and the target genes that play a role in protective immunity.

  2. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil migration in 3D collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kayleigh J S; Muessel, Michelle J; Pullar, Christine E; Willars, Gary B; Wardlaw, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The entry of neutrophils into tissue has been well characterised; however the fate of these cells once inside the tissue microenvironment is not fully understood. A variety of signal transduction pathways including those involving class I PI3 Kinases have been suggested to be involved in neutrophil migration. This study aims to determine the involvement of PI3 Kinases in chemokinetic and chemotactic neutrophil migration in response to CXCL8 and GM-CSF in a three-dimensional collagen gel, as a model of tissue. Using a three-dimensional collagen assay chemokinetic and chemotactic migration induced by CXCL8 was inhibited with the pan PI3 Kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Analysis of the specific Class I PI3 Kinase catalytic isoforms alpha, delta and gamma using the inhibitors PIK-75, PIK-294 and AS-605240 respectively indicated differential roles in CXCL8-induced neutrophil migration. PIK-294 inhibited both chemokinetic and chemotactic CXCL8-induced migration. AS-605240 markedly reduced CXCL8 induced chemokinetic migration but had no effect on CXCL8 induced chemotactic migration. In contrast PIK-75 inhibited chemotactic migration but not chemokinetic migration. At optimal concentrations of GM-CSF the inhibitors had no effect on the percentage of neutrophil migration in comparison to the control however at suboptimal concentrations wortmannin, AS-605240 and PIK-294 inhibited chemokinesis. This study suggests that PI3 Kinase is necessary for CXCL8 induced migration in a 3D tissue environment but that chemokinetic and chemotactic migration may be controlled by different isoforms with gamma shown to be important in chemokinesis and alpha important in chemotaxis. Neutrophil migration in response to suboptimal concentrations of GM-CSF is dependent on PI3 Kinase, particularly the gamma and delta catalytic isoforms.

  3. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: Experience from a tertiary care center and systematic review of Indian literature

    PubMed Central

    Hadda, Vijay; Tiwari, Pawan; Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Bharti, Sachidanand Jee; Kumar, Vinod; Garg, Rakesh; Trikha, Anjan; Jain, Deepali; Arava, Sudheer; Khilnani, Gopi C; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterized by deposition of lipoproteinaceous material within alveoli, with a variable clinical course. Here, we report an experience of management of PAP at our center. A systematic review of previously reported cases from India is also included in the article. Materials and Methods: This study included patients with primary PAP managed at our center from 2009 to 2015. Diagnosis of primary PAP was based on histopathologic diagnosis on bronchoalveolar lavage or transbronchial lung biopsy and absence of causes of secondary PAP. For systematic review of Indian publications, the literature search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases using the terms “pulmonary alveolar proteinosis'” or “alveolar proteinosis” and “India” or “Indian.” Results: During the above-specified period, five patients with diagnosis of PAP were admitted at our center. Median age of patients was 32 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30.5–59); 80% were female. Mean duration (± standard deviation) of symptoms was 6.2 (±1.79) months. Anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies were elevated in 4 out of 5 patients (80%). For management, whole lung lavage (WLL) was done for four patients with median volume of 32.5 (IQR 18–74) L per patient. All the patients showed significant symptomatic as well as improvement in physiological parameters. Subcutaneous GM-CSF and ambroxol were given to 3 patients and 1 patient, respectively. The median follow-up of all patients was 18 (IQR 5–44) months. A systematic review of all Indian studies of PAP revealed thirty publications. Conclusions: WLL is the most common, effective, and safe therapy in patients with PAP. GM-CSF administration is an efficacious treatment for patients with incomplete response after WLL. PMID:27890991

  4. Inhalation of diesel exhaust enhances allergen-related eosinophil recruitment and airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Takano, H; Ichinose, T; Miyabara, Y; Shibuya, T; Lim, H B; Yoshikawa, T; Sagai, M

    1998-06-01

    We have previously shown that intratracheal instillation of suspension of diesel exhaust particles enhances allergen-related eosinophilic airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and local expression of interleukin (IL)-5 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in mice. The present study was designed to elucidate the effects of daily inhalation of diesel exhaust (DE) on the allergen-related respiratory disease. ICR mice were exposed for 40 weeks to clean air or DE at a soot concentration of 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 with aerosol allergen challenges (1% ovalbumin in isotonic saline for 6 min) at 3-week intervals during the last 24 weeks of exposures. Exposure to DE enhanced allergen-related eosinophil recruitment to the submucosal layers of the airways and to the bronchoalveolar space, and increased protein levels of GM-CSF and IL-5 in the lung in a dose-dependent manner compared to exposure to clean air. There were strong correlations between the number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and IL-5 concentrations in BAL supernatants and lung tissue supernatants. In addition, the increases in eosinophil recruitment and local cytokine expression were accompanied by goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium and airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled acetylcholine. In contrast, the control mice exposed for 40 weeks to clean air or DE at a soot concentration of 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 without allergen provocation showed no eosinophil recruitment to the submucosal layers of the airways nor to the bronchoalveolar space and few goblet cells in the bronchial epithelium. The present study provides experimental evidence that daily inhalation of DE can enhance allergen-related respiratory diseases such as allergic asthma. This effect may be mediated by the enhanced local expression of IL-5 and GM-CSF. Increased ambient levels of DE may be implicated in the increasing prevalence of bronchial asthma in recent years.

  5. Liver myeloid-derived suppressor cells expand in response to liver metastases in mice and inhibit the anti-tumor efficacy of anti-CEA CAR-T

    PubMed Central

    Burga, Rachel A.; Thorn, Mitchell; Point, Gary R.; Guha, Prajna; Nguyen, Cang T.; Licata, Lauren A.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Ayala, Alfred; Espat, N. Joseph; Junghans, Richard P.; Katz, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor modified T cell (CAR-T) technology, a promising immunotherapeutic tool, has not been applied specifically to treat liver metastases (LM). While CAR-T delivery to LM can be optimized by regional intrahepatic infusion, we propose that liver CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (L-MDSC) will inhibit the efficacy of CAR-T in the intrahepatic space. We studied anti-CEA CAR-T in a murine model of CEA+ LM and identified mechanisms through which L-MDSC expand and inhibit CAR-T function. We established CEA+ LM in mice and studied purified L-MDSC and responses to treatment with intrahepatic anti-CEA CAR-T infusions. L-MDSC expanded three-fold in response to LM and their expansion was dependent on GM-CSF, which was produced by tumor cells. L-MDSC utilized PD-L1 to suppress anti-tumor responses through engagement of PD-1 on CAR-T. GM-CSF, in cooperation with STAT3, promoted L-MDSC PD-L1 expression. CAR-T efficacy was rescued when mice received CAR-T in combination with MDSC depletion, GM-CSF neutralization to prevent MDSC expansion, or PD-L1 blockade. As L-MDSC suppressed anti-CEA CAR-T, infusion of anti-CEA CAR-T in tandem with agents targeting L-MDSC is a rational strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25850344

  6. Harnessing RNA sequencing for global, unbiased evaluation of two new adjuvants for dendritic-cell immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mathan, Till S M; Textor, Johannes; Sköld, Annette E; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; van Oorschot, Tom; Brüning, Mareke; Figdor, Carl G; Buschow, Sonja I; Bakdash, Ghaith; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2017-02-08

    Effective stimulation of immune cells is crucial for the success of cancer immunotherapies. Current approaches to evaluate the efficiency of stimuli are mainly defined by known flow cytometry-based cell activation or cell maturation markers. This method however does not give a complete overview of the achieved activation state and may leave important side effects unnoticed. Here, we used an unbiased RNA sequencing (RNA-seq)-based approach to compare the capacity of four clinical-grade dendritic cell (DC) activation stimuli used to prepare DC-vaccines composed of various types of DC subsets; the already clinically applied GM-CSF and Frühsommer meningoencephalitis (FSME) prophylactic vaccine and the novel clinical grade adjuvants protamine-RNA complexes (pRNA) and CpG-P. We found that GM-CSF and pRNA had similar effects on their target cells, whereas pRNA and CpG-P induced stronger type I interferon (IFN) expression than FSME. In general, the pathways most affected by all stimuli were related to immune activity and cell migration. GM-CSF stimulation, however, also induced a significant increase of genes related to nonsense-mediated decay, indicating a possible deleterious effect of this stimulus. Taken together, the two novel stimuli appear to be promising alternatives. Our study demonstrates how RNA-seq based investigation of changes in a large number of genes and gene groups can be exploited for fast and unbiased, global evaluation of clinical-grade stimuli, as opposed to the general limited evaluation of a pre-specified set of genes, by which one might miss important biological effects that are detrimental for vaccine efficacy.

  7. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a pooled analysis of 42,510 cases and 40,577 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B; Behrens, Sabine; Goode, Ellen L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Wang, Qin; Benitez, Javier; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; González-Neira, Anna; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Van Dijck, Laurien; Smeets, Ann; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Eilber, Ursula; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Winqvist, Robert; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Pharoah, Paul D P; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ambrosone, Christine B; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according to estrogen receptor (ER) status, were assessed using multiple logistic regression models. Gene-level associations were assessed based on principal component analysis. Gene expression analyses were conducted using RNA sequencing level 3 data from The Cancer Genome Atlas for 989 breast tumor samples and 113 matched normal tissue samples. SNP rs1905339 (A>G) in the STAT3 region was associated with an increased breast cancer risk (per allele odds ratio 1.05, 95 % confidence interval 1.03-1.08; p value = 1.4 × 10(-6)). The association did not differ significantly by ER status. On the gene level, in addition to TGFBR2 and CCND1, IL5 and GM-CSF showed the strongest associations with overall breast cancer risk (p value = 1.0 × 10(-3) and 7.0 × 10(-3), respectively). Furthermore, STAT3 and IL5 but not GM-CSF were differentially expressed between breast tumor tissue and normal tissue (p value = 2.5 × 10(-3), 4.5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry.

  8. Assessing the Role of STAT3 in DC Differentiation and Autologous DC Immunotherapy in Mouse Models of GBM

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hikmat; Espinosa, Jaclyn; Suprise, Sarah; Sofroniew, Michael; Doherty, Robert; Zamler, Daniel; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular microenvironments, particularly those found in tumors, elicit a tolerogenic DC phenotype which can attenuate immune responses. Central to this process is the STAT3-mediated signaling cascade. As a transcription factor and oncogene, STAT3 promotes the expression of genes which allow tumor cells to proliferate, migrate and evade apoptosis. More importantly, activation of STAT3 in tumor infiltrating immune cells has been shown to be responsible, in part, for their immune-suppressed phenotype. The ability of STAT3 to orchestrate a diverse set of immunosuppressive instructions has made it an attractive target for cancer vaccines. Using a conditional hematopoietic knockout mouse model of STAT3, we evaluated the impact of STAT3 gene ablation on the differentiation of dendritic cells from bone marrow precursors. We also assessed the impact of STAT3 deletion on phagocytosis, maturation, cytokine secretion and antigen presentation by GM-CSF derived DCs in vitro. In addition to in vitro studies, we compared the therapeutic efficacy of DC vaccination using STAT3 deficient DCs to wild type counterparts in an intracranial mouse model of GBM. Our results indicated the following pleiotropic functions of STAT3: hematopoietic cells which lacked STAT3 were unresponsive to Flt3L and failed to differentiate as DCs. In contrast, STAT3 was not required for GM-CSF induced DC differentiation as both wild type and STAT3 null bone marrow cells gave rise to similar number of DCs. STAT3 also appeared to regulate the response of GM-CSF derived DCs to CpG. STAT3 null DCs expressed high levels of MHC-II, secreted more IL-12p70, IL-10, and TNFα were better antigen presenters in vitro. Although STAT3 deficient DCs displayed an enhanced activated phenotype in culture, they elicited comparable therapeutic efficacy in vivo compared to their wild type counterparts when utilized in vaccination paradigms in mice bearing intracranial glioma tumors. PMID:24806510

  9. Increased reactive oxygen species production and p47phox phosphorylation in neutrophils from myeloproliferative disorders patients with JAK2 (V617F) mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Csillag-Grange, Marie-José; Boussetta, Tarek; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Fay, Michèle; Cassinat, Bruno; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Dang, Pham My-Chan; El-Benna, Jamel

    2013-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders are associated with increased risk of thrombosis and vascular complications. The pathogenesis of these complications is not completely known. Reactive oxygen species produced by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase could have a role in this process. The aim of this study was to evaluate reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils of myeloproliferative disorder patients. Patients with or without the JAK2 V617F mutation were characterized. Reactive oxygen species production was assessed by chemiluminescence, and phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase subunit p47phox was analyzed by Western blots. In a comparison of controls and myeloproliferative disorder patients without the JAK2 V617F mutation, reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils from patients with the JAK2 V617F mutation was dramatically increased in non-stimulated and in stimulated conditions. This increase was associated with increased phosphorylation of the p47phox on Ser345 and of the uspstream kinase ERK1/2. In neutrophils from healthy donors, JAK2 can be activated by GM-CSF. GM-CSF-induced p47phox phosphorylation and priming of reactive oxygen species production are inhibited by the selective JAK2 inhibitors AG490 and lestaurtinib (CEP-701), supporting a role for JAK2 in the upregulation of NADPH oxidase activation. These findings show an increase in reactive oxygen species production and p47phox phosphorylation in neutrophils from myeloproliferative disorder patients with the JAK2 V617F mutation, and demonstrate that JAK2 is involved in GM-CSF-induced NADPH oxidase hyperactivation. As neutrophil hyperactivation could be implicated in the thrombophilic status of patients with myeloproliferative disorders, aberrant activation of JAK2 V617F, leading to excessive neutrophil reactive oxygen species production might play a role in this setting. PMID:23975181

  10. Timing of the loss of Pten protein determines disease severity in a mouse model of myeloid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Webster, Cody; Shao, Lijian; Lensing, Shelly Y.; Ni, Hongyu; Feng, Wei; Colorado, Natalia; Pathak, Rupak; Xiang, Zhifu; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Li, Shaoguang; Zhou, Daohong; Emanuel, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive pediatric mixed myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN). JMML leukemogenesis is linked to a hyperactivated RAS pathway, with driver mutations in the KRAS, NRAS, NF1, PTPN11, or CBL genes. Previous murine models demonstrated how those genes contributed to the selective hypersensitivity of JMML cells to granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a unifying characteristic in the disease. However, it is unclear what causes the early death in children with JMML, because transformation to acute leukemia is rare. Here, we demonstrate that loss of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) protein at postnatal day 8 in mice harboring Nf1 haploinsufficiency results in an aggressive MPN with death at a murine prepubertal age of 20 to 35 days (equivalent to an early juvenile age in JMML patients). The death in the mice was due to organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. There were elevated activities of protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cells at physiological concentrations of GM-CSF. These were more pronounced in mice with Nf1 haploinsufficiency than in littermates with wild-type Nf1, but this model is insufficient to cause cells to be GM-CSF hypersensitive. This new model represents a murine MPN model with features of a pediatric unclassifiable mixed MDS/MPN and mimics many clinical manifestations of JMML in terms of age of onset, aggressiveness, and organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. Our data suggest that the timing of the loss of PTEN protein plays a critical role in determining the disease severity in myeloid malignancies. This model may be useful for studying the pathogenesis of pediatric diseases with alterations in the Ras pathway. PMID:26764354

  11. Propofol pretreatment attenuates LPS-induced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in cultured hepatocytes by suppressing MAPK/ERK activity and NF-{kappa}B translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Jawan, Bruno; Kao, Y.-H.; Goto, Shigeru; Pan, M.-C.; Lin, Y.-C.; Hsu, L.-W.; Nakano, Toshiaki; Lai, C.-Y.; Sun, C.-K.; Cheng, Y.-F.; Tai, M.-H.

    2008-06-15

    Propofol (PPF), a widely used intravenous anesthetic for induction and maintenance of anesthesia during surgeries, was found to possess suppressive effect on host immunity. This study aimed at investigating whether PPF plays a modulatory role in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in a cell line of rat hepatocytes. Morphological observation and viability assay showed that PPF exhibits no cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 300 {mu}M after 48 h incubation. Pretreatment with 100 {mu}M PPF for 24 h prior to LPS stimulation was performed to investigate the modulatory effect on LPS-induced inflammatory gene production. The results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that PPF pretreatment significantly suppressed the LPS-induced toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, CD14, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene expression. Western blotting analysis showed that PPF pretreatment potentiated the LPS-induced TLR-4 downregulation. Flow cytometrical analysis revealed that PPF pretreatment showed no modulatory effect on the LPS-upregulated CD14 expression on hepatocytes. In addition, PPF pretreatment attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) and I{kappa}B{alpha}, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B primed by LPS. Moreover, addition of PD98059, a MAPK kinase inhibitor, significantly suppressed the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and GM-CSF production, suggesting that the PPF-attenuated GM-CSF production in hepatocytes may be attributed to its suppressive effect on MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, PPF as an anesthetic may clinically benefit those patients who are vulnerable to sepsis by alleviating sepsis-related inflammatory response in livers.

  12. Calcium dependent and independent cytokine synthesis by air pollution particle-exposed human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Noriho; Hayashi, Shizu; Gosselink, John; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Mukae, Hiroshi; Hogg, James C.; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2007-12-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution particles with a diameter of < 10 {mu}m (PM{sub 10}) has been associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. We have shown that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) exposed to PM{sub 10} produce pro-inflammatory mediators that contribute to a local and systemic inflammatory response. Changes in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) have been demonstrated to regulate several functions of the airway epithelium including the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The aim of the present study was to determine the nature and mechanism of calcium responses induced by PM{sub 10} in HBECs and its relationship to cytokine synthesis. Methods: Primary HBECs were exposed to urban air pollution particles (EHC-93) and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} responses were measured using the fluoroprobe (Fura-2). Cytokine levels were measured at mRNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results: PM{sub 10} increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in a dose-dependent manner. This calcium response was reduced by blocking the influx of calcium into cells (i.e. calcium-free medium, NiCl{sub 2}, LaCl{sub 3}). PM{sub 10} also decreased the activity of calcium pumps. PM{sub 10} increased the production of IL-1{beta}, IL-8, GM-CSF and LIF. Preincubation with intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA-AM) attenuated IL-1{beta} and IL-8 production, but not GM-CSF and LIF production. Conclusion: We conclude that exposure to PM{sub 10} induces an increase in cytosolic calcium and cytokine production in bronchial epithelial cells. Our results also suggest that PM{sub 10} induces the production of pro-inflammatory mediators via either intracellular calcium-dependent (IL-1{beta}, IL-8) or -independent (GM-CSF, LIF) pathways.

  13. Multiplex Analysis of Pro- or Anti-Inflammatory Serum Cytokines and Chemokines in relation to Gender and Age among Tanzanian Tuberculous Lymphadenitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Tehmina; Brokstad, Karl Albert; Mfinanga, Sayoki G.; Wiker, Harald G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Tuberculous lymphadenitis is the most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) with a female and paediatric preponderance, postulated to be due to differences in the immune response. The aim of this study was to analyze the differences in the serum cytokine levels of tuberculous lymphadenitis patients with respect to age and gender. Methods. A multiplex bead-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure IFN-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15, and IL-17 levels in sera of patients (n = 86) and healthy controls (n = 23). Results. Levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 were higher in adult patients than in controls, while those of IL-12 were lower (P < 0.05). Children had lower levels of TNF-α, GM-CSF, and IL-5 and higher levels of IL-2 compared with adult patients (P < 0.05). The male adult patients had higher levels of IL-17 and lower levels of IL-12 compared with female adult patients (P < 0.05).  Conclusion. There were significant differences in the levels of circulating cytokines with respect to gender and age. Children had generally lower levels of cytokines as compared to adults, which could make them more susceptible. Findings do not support that female preponderance is due to differences in immune response. PMID:26060581

  14. Adherent cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture system are qualified dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Gong-Bo; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2010-01-01

    A widely-used method for generating dendritic cell (DC) is to culture bone marrow cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-containing medium for 6-10 days. Usually, non-adherent cells are used as qualified dendritic cells while the adherent ones are discarded as "non-dendritic cells" or macrophages. In this study, we show that the adherent cells are nearly identical to the non-adherent cells in both dendritic cell surface markers expression and main dendritic cell-related functions, hence to prove that these "junk cells" are actually qualified dendritic cells.

  15. MOUSE MODEL FOR PRE-CLINICAL STUDY OF HUMAN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Ya, Zhiya; Hailemichael, Yared; Overwijk, Willem; Restifo, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    This unit describes protocols for developing tumors in mice including subcutaneous growth, pulmonary metastases of B16 melanoma, and spontaneous melanoma in B-Raf V600E/PTEN deletion transgenic mouse models. Two immunization methods to prevent B16 tumor growth are described using B16.GM-CSF and recombinant vaccinia virus. A therapeutic approach is also included that uses adoptive transfer of tumor antigen-specific T cells. Methods including CTL induction, isolation, testing, and genetic modification of mouse T cells for adoptive transfer by using retrovirus expressing genes of interest are provided. Additional sections, including growing B16 melanoma, enumerating pulmonary metastases, tumor imaging technique and use of recombinant viruses for vaccination, are discussed together with safety concerns. PMID:25640991

  16. Death Receptor 5—Targeted Depletion of Interleukin-23—Producing Macrophages, Th17, and Th1/17 Associated With Defective Tyrosine Phosphatase in Mice and Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yang, PingAr; Wu, Qi; Li, Hao; Ding, Yana; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Spalding, David M.; Mountz, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Bidirectional interactions between granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor–positive (GM-CSF+) T cell and interferon regulatory factor 5–positive (IRF-5+) macrophages play a major role in autoimmunity. In the absence of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), GM-CSF–stimulated cells are resistant to death receptor (DR)–mediated apoptosis. The objective of this study was to determine whether TRA-8, an anti-DR5 agonistic antibody, can eliminate inflammatory macrophages and CD4 T cells in the SHP-1–defective condition. Methods. Ubiquitous Cre (Ubc.Cre) human/mouse-chimeric DR5-transgenic mice were crossed with viable SHP-1–defective motheaten (mev/mev) mice. TRA-8 was administered weekly for up to 4 weeks. The clinical scores, histopathologic severity, and macrophage and CD4 T cell phenotypes were evaluated. The role of TRA-8 in depleting inflammatory macrophages and CD4 T cells was also evaluated, using synovial fluid obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results. The levels of Inflammatory macrophages (interleukine-23–positive [IL-23+] IRF5+) and CD4 T (IL-17+GM-CSF+) cells were elevated in mev/mev mice. In DR5-transgenic mev/mev mice, DR5 expression was up-regulated in these 2 cell populations. TRA-8 treatment depleted these cells and resulted in a significant reduction of inflammation and in the titers of autoantibodies. In synovial cells from patients with RA, the expression of IRF5 and DR5 was negatively correlated with the expression of PTPN6. TRA-8, but not TRAIL, suppressed RA inflammatory macrophages and Th17 cells under conditions in which the expression of SHP-1is low. Conclusion. In contrast with TRAIL, which lacks the capability to counteract the survival signal in the absence of SHP-1, TRA-8 eliminated both IRF5+ IL-23+ M1 macrophages and pathogenic GM-CSF+ IL-17+ CD4 T cells in a SHP-1-independent manner. The results of the current study suggest that TRA-8 can deplete inflammatory cell populations

  17. Size-partitioning of an urban aerosol to identify particle determinants involved in the proinflammatory response induced in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramgolam, Kiran; Favez, Olivier; Cachier, Hélène; Gaudichet, Annie; Marano, Francelyne; Martinon, Laurent; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2009-01-01

    Background The contribution of air particles in human cardio-respiratory diseases has been enlightened by several epidemiological studies. However the respective involvement of coarse, fine and ultrafine particles in health effects is still unclear. The aim of the present study is to determine which size fraction from a chemically characterized background aerosol has the most important short term biological effect and to decipher the determinants of such a behaviour. Results Ambient aerosols were collected at an urban background site in Paris using four 13-stage low pressure cascade impactors running in parallel (winter and summer 2005) in order to separate four size-classes (PM0.03–0.17 (defined here as ultrafine particles), PM0.17–1 (fine), PM1–2.5(intermediate) and PM2.5–10 (coarse)). Accordingly, their chemical composition and their pro-inflammatory potential on human airway epithelial cells were investigated. Considering isomass exposures (same particle concentrations for each size fractions) the pro-inflammatory response characterized by Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) release was found to decrease with aerosol size with no seasonal dependency. When cells were exposed to isovolume of particle suspensions in order to respect the particle proportions observed in ambient air, the GM-CSF release was maximal with the fine fraction. In presence of a recombinant endotoxin neutralizing protein, the GM-CSF release induced by particles is reduced for all size-fractions, with exception of the ultra-fine fraction which response is not modified. The different aerosol size-fractions were found to display important chemical differences related to the various contributing primary and secondary sources and aerosol age. The GM-CSF release was correlated to the organic component of the aerosols and especially its water soluble fraction. Finally, Cytochrome P450 1A1 activity that reflects PAH bioavailability varied as a function of the season

  18. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor: More Than a Hemopoietin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    functional activities of peripheral blood neutrophils, eosinophils , and monocytes/macrophages. In addi- tion. GM-CSF induces several key inflammatory...containing GM-CSF formed predominantly monocyte/macrophage colonies with an increased frequency of eosinophil colo- nies (16). At higher doses of GM-CSF...other pe- ripheral blood leukocytes. Absolute monocyte, eosinophil , and lymphocyte counts are increased in response to treatment. In the primate, the

  19. Cytokine Production but Lack of Proliferation in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Chronic Chagas' Disease Cardiomyopathy Patients in Response to T. cruzi Ribosomal P Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Silvia A.; Atienza, Augusto; Perez Prados, Graciela; Buying, Alcinette; Balouz, Virginia; Buscaglia, Carlos A.; Santos, Radleigh; Tasso, Laura M.; Bonato, Ricardo; Chiale, Pablo; Gómez, Karina A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P proteins, P2β and P0, induce high levels of antibodies in patients with chronic Chagas' disease Cardiomyopathy (CCC). It is well known that these antibodies alter the beating rate of cardiomyocytes and provoke apoptosis by their interaction with β1-adrenergic and M2-muscarinic cardiac receptors. Based on these findings, we decided to study the cellular immune response to these proteins in CCC patients compared to non-infected individuals. Methodology/Principal findings We evaluated proliferation, presence of surface activation markers and cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with P2β, the C-terminal portion of P0 (CP0) proteins and T. cruzi lysate from CCC patients predominantly infected with TcVI lineage. PBMC from CCC patients cultured with P2β or CP0 proteins, failed to proliferate and express CD25 and HLA-DR on T cell populations. However, multiplex cytokine assays showed that these antigens triggered higher secretion of IL-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF by PBMC as well as both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subsets of CCC subjects. Upon T. cruzi lysate stimulation, PBMC from CCC patients not only proliferated but also became activated within the context of Th1 response. Interestingly, T. cruzi lysate was also able to induce the secretion of GM-CSF by CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results showed that although the lack of PBMC proliferation in CCC patients in response to ribosomal P proteins, the detection of IL-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF suggests that specific T cells could have both immunoregulatory and pro-inflammatory potential, which might modulate the immune response in Chagas' disease. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate for the first time that GM-CSF was produced by PBMC of CCC patients in response not only to recombinant ribosomal P proteins but also to parasite lysate, suggesting the value of this cytokine to evaluate T cells responses in T. cruzi infection. PMID

  20. Growth and differentiation of eosinophils from human peripheral blood CD 34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Shalit, M

    1997-01-01

    Small numbers of CD34+ primitive hematopoietic progenitors are found in normal human peripheral blood. These cells differentiate to myeloid or lymphoid lineage under the influence of growth factors. We investigated the effects of IL5 and other growth factors on the production of eosinophils from peripheral blood CD34+ cells. CD34+ cells were plated in agarose with different combinations of cytokines. At 14 days of growth a triple stain technique was used to identify eosinophil, monocyte and neutrophil colonies. IL5 alone did not support colony growth. In contrast GM-CSF and IL3 alone or together supported the generation of more than 50% eosinophil colonies. Addition of IL5 increased the fraction of eosinophil colonies to over 70%. Under the best conditions (IL3 + GM-CSF + IL5), the addition of interferon-a or LPS inhibited colony growth by 51% and 58%, respectively. Since IL5 alone did not support colony growth from CD34+ cells, we determined when IL5 responsive cells appeared in culture. Cells were grown initially with IL3 + GM-CSF, washed, and plated with IL5 alone. Only when progenitors were grown at least 3 days, could IL5 serve as the single growth factor supporting pure eosinophil colony growth (47 colonies/104 cells plated at day 3 and 134 colonies/104 cells at day 7). Growth of CD34+ in liquid culture for 28 days in the presence of IL3, GM-CSF and IL5 resulted in almost 250 fold increase in cell number, yielding a population of 83% maturing eosinophils. We used our culture system and the sensitive technique of RT-PCR to analyze the kinetics of production of mRNA transcripts encoding several eosinophil proteins. Freshly isolated CD34+ cells contained no eosinophil granule protein transcripts and barely detectable amounts of some oxidase protein transcripts. At day 3 of culture no cells recognizable by histochemical staining as eosinophils could be detected, but transcripts for all five eosinophil granule proteins were present. These transcripts increased

  1. A murine stromal cell line promotes the proliferation of the human factor-dependent leukemic cell line UT-7.

    PubMed

    Auffray, I; Dubart, A; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1994-05-01

    In long-term human bone marrow cultures, stromal cells of human origin are usually used on the assumption that human primitive progenitor cells do not respond to cytokines produced by stromal cells from other species. There is accumulating evidence, however, that murine stromal cells also promote maintenance and differentiation of very primitive human stem cells, which suggests the existence of novel stromal activities that cross species barriers. In this study, we show that a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line, MS-5, allows the proliferation of the human leukemic cell line UT-7. The long-term growth of UT-7 is usually supported only by human interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or erythropoietin (Epo). None of these three cytokines was involved in the observed effect, since murine GM-CSF and IL-3 do not act on human cells and MS-5 cells do not produce Epo. Soluble stem cell factor (SCF) induced UT-7 cell proliferation. However, S1/S1 mutant fibroblasts also supported UT-7 cell growth and anti-c-kit antibodies only partially abolished UT-7 cell proliferative response to MS-5 cells. These observations excluded a major role of SCF in this system. MS-5-derived growth-promoting activity was diffusible, but attempts to grow UT-7 cells in high levels of known soluble murine stromal-derived cytokines active on human cells showed no or minimal response, suggesting that MS-5's proliferative effect was not mediated by known cytokines. Finally, involvement of an autocrine loop of activation induced by MS-5 was excluded: RT-PCR analysis did not detect increased transcripts for GM-CSF, IL-3, IL-6, SCF, or Epo in UT-7 cells cocultured for 2 to 6 days with MS-5. In addition, UT-7 cell proliferation on MS-5 was not inhibited by neutralizing antibodies against the human GM-CSF receptor or the human IL-6 receptor alpha chain. Whether UT-7 cell proliferation triggered by MS-5 reflects the existence of novel stromal cytokines or

  2. Production and secretion of biologically active human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic tomato suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Ho; Kim, Young-Sook; Lee, Jae-Hwa; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2003-09-01

    A complementary DNA encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) was cloned and introduced into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Seokwang) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic PCR and Northern blot analysis demonstrated the integration of the construction into the plant nuclear genome and expression of the hGM-CSF in transgenic tomato. The cell suspension culture was established from leaf-derived calli of the transgenic tomato plants transformed with the hGM-CSF gene. Recombinant hGM-CSF was synthesized by the transgenic cell culture and secreted into the growth medium at 45 microg l(-1) after 10 d' cultivation.

  3. Immunotherapeutic Strategies in Breast Cancer: Preclinical and Clinical Trials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    CpG - 7909 adjuvant to be supplied by Pfizer as PF3512676 for this clinical trial.  Submission of revised clinical protocol...three treatment arms: 3-peptide vaccine emulsified in Montanide ISA- 51 with (1) GM-CSF, (2) CpG - 7909 (PF-3512676), or (3) GM-CSF and CpG - 7909 ...Registration and randomization Treat every four weeks x 6 doses Relapse? Arm A Peptides GM-CSF Arm B Peptides PF3512676 ( CpG - 7909 ) Arm C Peptides GM-CSF & PF3512676 No Observation x 2 years Yes

  4. Key Role of MicroRNA in the Regulation of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor Expression in Murine Alveolar Epithelial Cells during Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Anne; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Baker, Jessica; Rowley, Jesse; Paine, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GM-CSF is an endogenous pulmonary cytokine produced by normal alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) that is a key defender of the alveolar space. AEC GM-CSF expression is suppressed by oxidative stress through alternations in mRNA turnover, an effect that is reversed by treatment with recombinant GM-CSF. We hypothesized that specific microRNA (miRNA) would play a key role in AEC GM-CSF regulation. A genome-wide miRNA microarray identified 19 candidate miRNA altered in primary AEC during oxidative stress with reversal by treatment with GM-CSF. Three of these miRNA (miR 133a, miR 133a*, and miR 133b) are also predicted to bind the GM-CSF 3′-untranslated region (UTR). PCR for the mature miRNA confirmed induction during oxidative stress that was reversed by treatment with GM-CSF. Experiments using a GM-CSF 3′-UTR reporter construct demonstrated that miR133a and miR133b effects on GM-CSF expression are through interactions with the GM-CSF 3′-UTR. Using lentiviral transduction of specific mimics and inhibitors in primary murine AEC, we determined that miR133a and miR133b suppress GM-CSF expression and that their inhibition both reverses oxidant-induced suppression of GM-CSF expression and increases basal expression of GM-CSF in cells in normoxia. In contrast, these miRNAs are not active in regulation of GM-CSF expression in murine EL4 T cells. Thus, members of the miR133 family play key roles in regulation of GM-CSF expression through effects on mRNA turnover in AEC during oxidative stress. Increased understanding of GM-CSF gene regulation may provide novel miRNA-based interventions to augment pulmonary innate immune defense in lung injury. PMID:24371146

  5. Effect of space flight on cytokine production and other immunologic parameters of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Davis, S.; Taylor, G. R.; Mandel, A. D.; Konstantinova, I. V.; Lesnyak, A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Peres, C.; Tkackzuk, J.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During a recent flight of a Russian satellite (Cosmos #2229), initial experiments examining the effects of space flight on immunologic responses of rhesus monkeys were performed to gain insight into the effect of space flight on resistance to infection. Experiments were performed on tissue samples taken from the monkeys before and immediately after flight. Additional samples were obtained approximately 1 month after flight for a postflight restraint study. Two types of experiments were carried out throughout this study. The first experiment determined the ability of leukocytes to produce interleukin-1 and to express interleukin-2 receptors. The second experiment examined the responsiveness of rhesus bone marrow cells to recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Human reagents that cross-reacted with monkey tissue were utilized for the bulk of the studies. Results from both studies indicated that there were changes in immunologic function attributable to space flight. Interleukin-1 production and the expression of interleukin-2 receptors was decreased after space flight. Bone marrow cells from flight monkeys showed a significant decrease in their response to GM-CSF compared with the response of bone marrow cells from nonflight control monkeys. These results suggest that the rhesus monkey may be a useful surrogate for humans in future studies that examine the effect of space flight on immune response, particularly when conditions do not readily permit human study.

  6. Characterization of the MUC1.Tg/MIN Transgenic Mouse as a Model for Studying Antigen-Specific Immunotherapy of Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Akporiaye, Emmanuel T.; Bradley-Dunlop, Deborah; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Madsen, Cathy S.; Hahn, Tobias; Besselsen, David G.; Dial, Sharon M.; Cui, Haiyan; Trevor, Katrina

    2007-01-01

    A bigenic MUC1.Tg/MIN mouse model was developed by crossing Apc/MIN/+ (MIN) mice with human MUC1 transgenic mice to evaluate MUC1 antigen-specific immunotherapy of intestinal adenomas. The MUC1.Tg/MIN mice developed adenomas at a rate comparable to that of MIN mice and had similar levels of serum MUC1 antigen. A MUC1-based vaccine consisting of MHC class I-restricted MUC1 peptides, a MHC class II-restricted pan-helper peptide, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide and GM-CSF caused flattening of adenomas and significantly reduced the number of large adenomas. Immunization was successful in generating a MUC1-directed immune response evidenced by increased MUC1 peptide-specific anti-tumor cytotoxicity and IFN-γ secretion by lymphocytes. PMID:17707958

  7. Clinical Development of the E75 Vaccine in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Guy T.; Gall, Victor; Peoples, George E.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary E75 is an immunogenic peptide derived from the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein. A large amount of preclinical work evaluated the immunogenicity of E75, after which phase I trials investigated using E75 mixed with an immunoadjuvant as a vaccine. Those studies showed the vaccine to be safe and capable of stimulating an antigen-specific immune response. Subsequent to that, our group conducted trials evaluating E75 + granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the adjuvant setting. The studies enrolled node-positive and high-risk node-negative breast cancer patients, with the goal being to determine if vaccination could decrease the recurrence risk. The studies included 187 evaluable patients: 108 vaccinated ones and 79 controls. The 5-year disease-free survival for the vaccinated patients was 89.7% compared to 80.2% for the control patients, a 48% reduction in relative risk of recurrence. Based on these data, E75 + GM-CSF, now known as NeuVax™, is being evaluated in a phase III trial. In this article, we review preclinical data and results of the early-phase trials and provide an update on the ongoing phase III study. We also present additional strategies for employing the vaccine to be included as a component of combination immunotherapy as well as in the setting of ductal carcinoma in situ as an initial step towards primary prevention. PMID:27239173

  8. Characterization of Inflammatory Response in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure and Relationship with Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Cristina; Solà, Elsa; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Fernàndez, Guerau; Huelin, Patricia; Graupera, Isabel; Moreira, Rebeca; de Prada, Gloria; Ariza, Xavier; Pose, Elisa; Fabrellas, Núria; Kalko, Susana G.; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Ginès, Pere

    2016-01-01

    ACLF is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response, but the cytokines involved in this process have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to characterize the systemic inflammatory response in patients with cirrhosis and ACLF and its relationship with prognosis. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis, 26 with ACLF, were studied prospectively. Systemic inflammatory response was analyzed by measuring a large array of plasma cytokines by using a multiplex kit. A principal component analysis show noticeable differences between ACLF and decompensated cirrhosis without ACLF. Patients with ACLF had significant abnormal levels of 12 cytokines compared to those without ACLF, including: VCAM-1, VEGF-A, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, Eotaxin, IP-10, RANTES, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-2, ICAM-1, and MCP-1. Cytokines showing the most marked relationship with ACLF were VCAM-1 and VEGF-A (AUCROC 0.77; p = 0.001). There was a significant relationship between some of inflammatory mediators and 3-month mortality, particularly VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and GM-CSF (AUCROC>0.7; p < 0.05). Functional Enrichment Analysis showed that inflammatory markers differentially expressed in ACLF patients were enriched in leukocyte migration, particularly monocytes and macrophages, and chemotaxis pathways. In conclusion, ACLF is characterized by a marked inflammatory reaction with activation of mediators of adhesion and migration of leukocytes. The intensity of the inflammatory reaction correlates with prognosis. PMID:27578545

  9. A comparative study of the cell cycle status and primitive cell adhesion molecule profile of human CD34+ cells cultured in stroma-free versus porcine microvascular endothelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Chute, J P; Saini, A A; Kampen, R L; Wells, M R; Davis, T A

    1999-02-01

    Porcine microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) plus cytokines support a rapid proliferation and expansion of human CD34+CD38- cells that are capable of multilineage engraftment within the bone marrow of a secondary host. CD34+CD38- cells contain the self-renewing, long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) that are ideal targets for retroviral gene transfer experiments. Previous experiments attempting retroviral infection of CD34+CD38- cells have failed partly because these cells do not enter cell cycle in response to cytokine combinations. In this study, we determined the cell cycle status and the cell adhesion molecule profile on purified CD34+ cells and the CD34+CD38- subset before and after ex vivo expansion on PMVECs. Purified human CD34+ cells were cocultured with PMVECs for 7 days in the presence of optimal concentrations of granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) + interleukin (IL)-3 + IL-6 + stem cell factor (SCF) + Flt-3 ligand. The total CD34+ population and the CD34+CD38- subset increased 8.4- and 67-fold, respectively, with absolute increases in the number of colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) (28.2-fold), CFU-Mix (8.7 fold), and burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) (4.0-fold) progenitor cells. After 7 days of coculture with PMVECs, 44% of the CD34+CD38+ subset were found to be in G1, and 51% were in G2/S/M phase of the cell cycle. More remarkably, 53% of the CD34+CD38- subset were in G1, and 17% were in G2/S/M phase after 7 days of PMVEC coculture. In contrast, only 22% of the CD34+CD38- subset remaining after 7 days of stroma-free culture were in G1, and 6% were in G2/S/M phase. Despite the high level of cellular activation and proliferation induced by PMVEC coculture, the surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11a (LFA-1), CD11b, CD15s (sialyl-Lewis x), CD43, and CD44 (HCAM) on the total CD34+ population was maintained, and the surface expression of CD49d (VLA-4), CD54 (ICAM), CD58, and CD62L (L selectin

  10. Injectable, Pore-Forming Hydrogels for In Vivo Enrichment of Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, C. S.; Paulson, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials-based vaccines have emerged as a powerful method to evoke potent immune responses directly in vivo, without the need for ex vivo cell manipulation, and modulating dendritic cell (DC) responses in a non-inflammatory context could enable the development of tolerogenic vaccines to treat autoimmunity. This study describes the development of a non-inflammatory, injectable hydrogel system to locally enrich DCs in vivo without inducing their maturation or activation, as a first step towards this goal. Alginate hydrogels that form pores in situ were characterized and used as a physical scaffold for cell infiltration. These gels were also adapted to control the release of GM-CSF, a potent inducer of DC recruitment and proliferation. In vivo, sustained release of GM-CSF from the pore-forming gels led to the accumulation of millions of cells in the material. These cells were highly enriched in CD11b+ CD11c+ DCs, and further analysis of cell surface marker expression indicated these DCs were immature. This study demonstrates that a polymeric delivery system can mediate the accumulation of a high number and percentage of immature DCs, and may provide the basis for further development of materials-based, therapeutic vaccines. PMID:26474318

  11. Aspergillus fumigatus germ tube growth and not conidia ingestion induces expression of inflammatory mediator genes in the human lung epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Millon, Laurence; Khoufache, Khaled; Rivollet, Danièle; Bièche, Ivan; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Vidaud, Michel; Botterel, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of conidia is the main cause of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) and the respiratory epithelium is the first line of defence. To explore the triggering factor for the inflammatory response to Aspergillus fumigatus, the species mainly responsible for IPA, this study analysed the differential expression of three inflammatory genes in A549 cells after challenge with live and killed conidia. The influence of steroids, one of the main risk factors for developing IPA, was also investigated. Quantification of mRNAs of the inflammatory mediator genes encoding interleukin (IL)-8, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was carried out using real-time PCR. Ingestion rates were studied for the conidia of A. fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum using a fluorescence brightener. Similar results were obtained for both species, with ingestion rates ranging from 35 to 40 %. Exposure of A549 cells to live A. fumigatus conidia only induced a four- to fivefold increase in the mRNA levels of the three genes, starting 8 h after the initial contact. Both inactivation of live A. fumigatus conidia and treatment by dexamethasone (10(-7) M) prevented the overexpression of TNF-alpha, IL-8 and GM-CSF. Fungal growth, rather than conidia ingestion, appears to be the main stimulus for the production of inflammatory mediators by epithelial cells, and this production is inhibited by steroid therapy. These results underline the role that the epithelium plays in the innate response against IPA.

  12. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-10-04

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML.

  13. Inhibitory effects of simvastatin on migration and invasion of rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes by preventing geranylgeranylation of RhoA.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Youjun; Liang, Liuqin; Pan, Yunfeng; Lian, Fan; Li, Long; Lin, Haobo; Fu, Di; Fan, Jinjin; Yang, Xiuyan; Sun, Lin; Xu, Hanshi

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effect of simvastatin on the migration and invasion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its cellular signal mechanisms, FLS from active RA patients were stimulated with 3 % FBS or GM-CSF in the presence or absence of simvastatin. Cells migration and invasion in vitro were measured by the Boyden chamber method. RhoA activity was assessed by a pull-down assay. Matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) activity was evaluated by zymography. Simvastatin inhibits FBS- or GM-CSF-induced migration in a dose-dependent manner by RA FLS, and this inhibitory effect is independent of cell apoptosis. We also found that simvastatin suppressed in vitro invasion, adhesion, MMP-2 activity, cytoskeletal reorganization and RhoA activation. Furthermore, mevalonate or GGPP treatment reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin not only on migration and invasion in vitro but also on RhoA activation, and inhibition of RhoA by specific siRNA transfection reduced migration, adhesion and invasion of RA FLS. This study shows that simvastatin reduces RA FLS migration and invasion through the prevention of protein geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation. These findings provide a novel evidence that statin may be benefit for preventing RA arthritic destruction, and also indicate that RhoA may be a new target for the modulation of RA FLS migration and invasion.

  14. Impact of Kefir Derived Lactobacillus kefiri on the Mucosal Immune Response and Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Carasi, P.; Racedo, S. M.; Jacquot, C.; Romanin, D. E.; Serradell, M. A.; Urdaci, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of the impact of probiotics on host health could help to understand how they can be used in the prevention of diseases. On the basis of our previous studies and in vitro assays on PBMC and Caco-2 ccl20:luc reporter system presented in this work, the strain Lactobacillus kefiri CIDCA 8348 was selected and administrated to healthy Swiss mice daily for 21 days. The probiotic treatment increased IgA in feces and reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators in Peyer Patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, where it also increased IL-10. In ileum IL-10, CXCL-1 and mucin 6 genes were upregulated; meanwhile in colon mucin 4 was induced whereas IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-1β genes were downregulated. Moreover, ileum and colon explants showed the anti-inflammatory effect of L. kefiri since the LPS-induced increment of IL-6 and GM-CSF levels in control mice was significantly attenuated in L. kefiri treated mice. Regarding fecal microbiota, DGGE profiles allowed differentiation of experimental groups in two separated clusters. Quantitative PCR analysis of different bacterial groups revealed only significant changes in Lactobacillus population. In conclusion, L. kefiri is a good candidate to be used in gut inflammatory disorders. PMID:25811034

  15. Impact of kefir derived Lactobacillus kefiri on the mucosal immune response and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Carasi, P; Racedo, S M; Jacquot, C; Romanin, D E; Serradell, M A; Urdaci, M C

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of the impact of probiotics on host health could help to understand how they can be used in the prevention of diseases. On the basis of our previous studies and in vitro assays on PBMC and Caco-2 ccl20:luc reporter system presented in this work, the strain Lactobacillus kefiri CIDCA 8348 was selected and administrated to healthy Swiss mice daily for 21 days. The probiotic treatment increased IgA in feces and reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators in Peyer Patches and mesenteric lymph nodes, where it also increased IL-10. In ileum IL-10, CXCL-1 and mucin 6 genes were upregulated; meanwhile in colon mucin 4 was induced whereas IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-1β genes were downregulated. Moreover, ileum and colon explants showed the anti-inflammatory effect of L. kefiri since the LPS-induced increment of IL-6 and GM-CSF levels in control mice was significantly attenuated in L. kefiri treated mice. Regarding fecal microbiota, DGGE profiles allowed differentiation of experimental groups in two separated clusters. Quantitative PCR analysis of different bacterial groups revealed only significant changes in Lactobacillus population. In conclusion, L. kefiri is a good candidate to be used in gut inflammatory disorders.

  16. Vaccine therapy with sipuleucel-T (Provenge) for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B; Pinski, Jacek K; Quinn, David I

    2011-08-01

    As the most common malignancy among North American males, prostate cancer causes more than 30,000 deaths each year. After local and hormonal treatments, a great number of patients ultimately progressed to castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), in which chemotherapy provides a small survival advantage, but with significant toxicities. In the past decade, prostate cancer has become a target for several immunotherapeutic approaches. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge®, or APC8015) is a novel cancer vaccine developed from autologous dendritic cells (DC) loaded with engineered fusion protein of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Phase I and Phase II trials show that the vaccine is safe and effective in creating immune responses toward the fusion-protein target antigen, PAP-GM-CSF also call PA2024. Recent Phase III studies also demonstrated sipuleucel-T's efficacy in prolonging median survival in patients with CRPC, despite little or no effect on clinical disease progression or surrogates such as serum PSA kinetics. Subsequently, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved sipuleucel-T for the treatment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic CRPC in April 2010. Filings are projected with international regulatory agencies in 2011. While the development of sipuleucel-T provides an option for patients with early CRPC, it also introduces physicians and researchers to new unanswered questions regarding its optimal clinical use and questions about mechanism of action and combination and sequencing with other agents.

  17. Transcriptional and functional characterization of CD137L-dendritic cells identifies a novel dendritic cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Harfuddin, Zulkarnain; Dharmadhikari, Bhushan; Wong, Siew Cheng; Duan, Kaibo; Poidinger, Michael; Kwajah, Shaqireen; Schwarz, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    The importance of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) is evidenced by the fact that they are essential for the elimination of pathogens. Although in vitro DCs can be generated by treatment of monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4, it is unknown what stimuli induce differentiation of DCs in vivo. CD137L-DCs are human monocyte-derived DC that are generated by CD137 ligand (CD137L) signaling. We demonstrate that the gene signature of in vitro generated CD137L-DCs is most similar to those of GM-CSF and IL-4-generated immature DCs and of macrophages. This is reminiscent of in vivo inflammatory DC which also have been reported to share gene signatures with monocyte-derived DCs and macrophages. Performing direct comparison of deposited human gene expression data with a CD137L-DC dataset revealed a significant enrichment of CD137L-DC signature genes in inflammatory in vivo DCs. In addition, surface marker expression and cytokine secretion by CD137L-DCs resemble closely those of inflammatory DCs. Further, CD137L-DCs express high levels of adhesion molecules, display strong attachment, and employ the adhesion molecule ALCAM to stimulate T cell proliferation. This study characterizes the gene expression profile of CD137L-DCs, and identifies significant similarities of CD137L-DCs with in vivo inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs and macrophages. PMID:27431276

  18. Age-related alterations in blood and colonic dendritic cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Lydia; Reddi, Durga; Hart, Ailsa L.; Fell, John M. E.; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Knight, Stella C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DC) determine initiation, type and location of immune responses and, in adults, show decreased Toll-like receptors and some increased cytokine levels on ageing. Few studies in children have characterised DC or explored DC-related mechanisms producing age-related immune changes. Results The pDC marker BDCA2 (but not CD123) was absent in pre-pubertal children and numbers of pDC decreased with age. Blood and colonic DC were more mature and activated in adults. Decrease in pDC numbers correlated with reduced GM-CSF levels with aging, but increasing IL-4 and IL-8 levels correlated with a more activated DC profile in blood. CXCL16 levels decreased with age. Methods Blood and colonic DC phenotypes were determined in healthy adults and children by flow cytometry and correlated with aging. Blood DC were divided into plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) while only mDC were identified in colon. Serum cytokine levels were determined by multiplex cytokine assays and correlated with DC properties. Conclusions In children, lack of BDCA2, a receptor mediating antigen capture and inhibiting interferon induction, may be immunologically beneficial during immune development. Conversely, reduced pDC numbers, probably secondary to decreasing GM-CSF and increasing cytokine-induced maturation of DC are likely to determine deteriorating immunity with ageing. PMID:26942871

  19. Interferon-γ enhances both the anti-bacterial and the pro-inflammatory response of human mast cells to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Swindle, Emily J; Brown, Jared M; Rådinger, Madeleine; DeLeo, Frank R; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2015-01-01

    Human mast cells (huMCs) are involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses where they release mediators including amines, reactive oxygen species (ROS), eicosanoids and cytokines. We have reported that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enhances FcγR-dependent ROS production. The aim of this study was to extend these observations by investigating the effect of IFN-γ on the biological responses of huMCs to Staphylococcus aureus. We found that exposure of huMCs to S. aureus generated intracellular and extracellular ROS, which were enhanced in the presence of IFN-γ. IFN-γ also promoted bacteria killing, β-hexosaminidase release and eicosanoid production. Interferon-γ similarly increased expression of mRNAs encoding CCL1 to CCL4, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumour necrosis factor-α and CXCL8 in S. aureus-stimulated huMCs. The ability of IFN-γ to increase CXCL8 and GM-CSF protein levels was confirmed by ELISA. Fibronectin or a β1 integrin blocking antibody completely abrogated IFN-γ-dependent S. aureus binding and reduced S. aureus-dependent CXCL8 secretion. These data demonstrate that IFN-γ primes huMCs for enhanced anti-bacterial and pro-inflammatory responses to S. aureus, partially mediated by β1 integrin. PMID:26288256

  20. Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA cationic-lipid complexed autologous tumour cell vaccination in the treatment of canine B-cell multicentric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Turek, M M; Thamm, D H; Mitzey, A; Kurzman, I D; Huelsmeyer, M K; Dubielzig, R R; Vail, D M

    2007-12-01

    This study describes the development of an human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor DNA cationic-lipid complexed autologous tumour cell vaccine (hGM-CSF CLDC ATCV) and its implementation, following a chemotherapy treatment protocol, in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial in pet dogs with naturally occurring lymphoma. We hypothesized that the use of this vaccine would result in an antitumour immune response leading to improved first remission duration and overall survival in dogs with B-cell lymphoma when compared with chemotherapy alone. Immune stimulation generated by hGM-CSF CLDC ATCV was assessed by means of surrogate in vivo analysis (delayed-type hypersensitivity [DTH]) as well as an ex vivo cellular assay (lymphocyte proliferation assay). The vaccine approach considered in the current report did not result in clinically improved outcomes. A small measure of immunomodulation was documented by DTH and several modifications to the approach are suggested. This report illustrates the feasibility of clinical trials with vaccine strategies using companion animals with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  1. Assessment of lymphocyte subpopulations and cytokine secretion in children exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Soto-Peña, Gerson A; Luna, Ana L; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor; Conde, Patricia; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Cebrián, Mariano E; Bastida, Mariana; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Vega, Libia

    2006-04-01

    Exposure of several human populations to arsenic has been associated with a high incidence of detrimental dermatological and carcinogenic effects. To date, studies examining the immunotoxic effects of arsenic in humans, and specifically in children, are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated several parameters of immunological status in a group of children exposed to arsenic through their drinking water. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 90 children (6 to 10 years old) were collected. Proportions of lymphocyte subpopulations, PBMC mitogenic proliferative response, and urinary arsenic levels were evaluated. Increased urine arsenic levels were associated with a reduced proliferative response to phytohemaglutinin (PHA) stimulation (P=0.005), CD4 subpopulation proportion (P=0.092), CD4/CD8 ratio (P=0.056), and IL-2 secretion levels (P=0.003). Increased arsenic exposure was also associated with an increase in GM-CSF secretion by mononucleated cells (P=0.000). We did not observe changes in CD8, B, or NK cell proportions, nor did we observe changes in the secretion of IL-4, IL-10, or IFN-gamma by PHA-activated PBMCs. These data indicate that arsenic exposure could alter the activation processes of T cells, such that an immunosuppression status that favors opportunistic infections and carcinogenesis is produced together with increased GM-CSF secretion that may be associated with chronic inflammation.

  2. Serum Cytokine Signature That Discriminates Helicobacter pylori Positive and Negative Juvenile Gastroduodenitis

    PubMed Central

    Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Abdulkhakov, Sayar; Khalikova, Alsu; Safina, Dilyara; Martynova, Ekaterina V.; Davidyuk, Yuriy; Khuzin, Felix; Faizullina, Rezeda; Lombardi, Vincent C.; Cherepnev, Georgi V.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroduodenitis caused by H. pylori, often acquired in early childhood, is found in about 50% of the adult population. Although H. pylori infections can remain asymptomatic, its virulence factors usually trigger epithelial vacuolization and degeneration, loss of microvilli, disintegration of cytoplasm, and leukocyte accumulation. It is believed that leukocyte infiltration is driven by cytokines produced locally in infected tissue. However, so far little is known about changes in serum cytokines in juvenile patients infected with H. pylori. Serum cytokine profiles were analyzed in 62 juvenile patients diagnosed with gastroduodenitis using the Bio-Plex multiplex assay. H. pylori infection was confirmed in 32 patients, while 30 patients were H. pylori-free. Cytokines CXCL5 and CXCL6, potent neutrophil chemoattractants, were upregulated in all patients diagnosed with gastroduodenitis. Serum levels of IL8, a prototype neutrophil attractant, remained unchanged in subjects with gastroduodenitis relative to controls. Therefore, our data suggest that CXCL5 and CXCL6 play a role in directing neutrophil trafficking into inflamed gastroduodenal tissue. In addition, the CCL25/GM-CSF ratio differed significantly between H. pylori-positive and -negative juveniles. Further, study is needed to evaluate the role of CCL25 and GM-CSF in the pathogenesis of the different etiologies of gastroduodenitis. PMID:28018296

  3. Kras is required for adult hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Damnernsawad, Alisa; Kong, Guangyao; Wen, Zhi; Liu, Yangang; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; You, Xiaona; Wang, Jinyong; Zhou, Yun; Ranheim, Erik A.; Luo, Hongbo R.; Chang, Qiang; Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that Kras is dispensable for fetal liver hematopoiesis, but its rolein adult hematopoiesis remains unclear. Here, we generated a Kras conditional knockout allele to address this question. Deletion of Kras in adult bone marrow is mediated by Vav-Cre or inducible Mx1-Cre. We find that loss of Kras leads to greatly reduced TPO signaling in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors (MPPs), while SCF-evoked ERK1/2 activation is not affected. The compromised TPO signaling is associated with reduced long term- and intermediate-term HSC compartments and a bias towards myeloid differentiation in MPPs. Although GM-CSF-evoked ERK1/2 activation is only moderately decreased in Kras−/− myeloid progenitors, it is blunted in neutrophils and neutrophil survival is significantly reduced in vitro. At 9–12 months old, Kras conditional knockout mice develop profound hematopoietic defects, including splenomegaly, an expanded neutrophil compartment, and reduced B cell number. In a serial transplantation assay, the reconstitution potential of Kras−/− bone marrow cells is greatly compromised, which is attributable to defects in the self-renewal of Kras−/− HSCs and defects in differentiated hematopietic cells. Our results demonstrate that Kras is a major regulator of TPO and GM-CSF signaling in specific populations of hematopoietic cells and its function is required for adult hematopoiesis. PMID:26972179

  4. IL-1β promotes the differentiation of polyfunctional human CCR6+CXCR3+ Th1/17 cells that are specific for pathogenic and commensal microbes.

    PubMed

    Duhen, Thomas; Campbell, Daniel J

    2014-07-01

    In humans, Th1/17 cells, identified by coexpression of the chemokine receptors CCR6 and CXCR3, are proposed to be highly pathogenic in several autoimmune disorders due in part to their expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-17, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF. However, their developmental requirements, relationship with "classic" Th17 and Th1 cells and physiological role in normal immune responses are not well understood. In this study, we examined CCR6+ CXCR3+ Th1/17 cells from healthy individuals and found that ex vivo these cells produced the effector cytokines IL-17, IL-22, and IFN-γ in all possible combinations and were highly responsive to both IL-12 and IL-23. Moreover, although the Ag specificity of CCR6+ CXCR3+ Th1/17 cells showed substantial overlap with that of Th1 and Th17 cells, this population was enriched in cells recognizing certain extracellular bacteria and expressing the intestinal homing receptor integrin β7. Finally, we identified IL-1β as a key cytokine that renders Th17 cells sensitive to IL-12, and both cytokines together potently induced the differentiation of cells that produce IL-17, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF. Therefore, interfering with IL-1β and IL-12 signaling in Th17 cells during inflammation may be a promising therapeutic approach to reduce their differentiation into "pathogenic" CCR6+ CXCR3+ Th1/17 cells in patients with autoimmune diseases.

  5. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML. PMID:27579617

  6. Human and mouse monocytes display distinct signalling and cytokine profiles upon stimulation with FFAR2/FFAR3 short-chain fatty acid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Zhiwei; Er, Jun Zhi; Tan, Nguan Soon; Lu, Jinhua; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Grosse, Johannes; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2016-01-01

    Knockout mice studies implicate the mammalian short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) receptors, FFAR2 and FFAR3– in colitis, arthritis and asthma. However, the correlation with human biology is uncertain. Here, we detected FFAR2 and FFAR3 expression in human monocytes via immunohistochemistry. Upon treatment with acetate SCFA or FFAR2- and FFAR3-specific synthetic agonists, human monocytes displayed elevated p38 phosphorylation and attenuated C5, CCL1, CCL2, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-1β and ICAM-1 inflammatory cytokine expression. Acetate and FFAR2 agonist treatment also repressed Akt and ERK2 signalling. Surprisingly, mouse monocytes displayed a distinct response to acetate treatment, elevating GM-CSF, IL-1α, and IL-1β cytokine expression. This effect persisted in FFAR2/3-knockout mouse monocytes and was not reproduced by synthetic agonists, suggesting a FFAR2/3 independent mechanism in mice. Collectively, we show that SCFAs act via FFAR2/3 to modulate human monocyte inflammatory responses– a pathway that is absent in mouse monocytes. PMID:27667443

  7. A phase I clinical study of vaccination of melanoma patients with dendritic cells loaded with allogeneic apoptotic/necrotic melanoma cells. Analysis of toxicity and immune response to the vaccine and of IL-10 -1082 promoter genotype as predictor of disease progression

    PubMed Central

    von Euw, Erika M; Barrio, María M; Furman, David; Levy, Estrella M; Bianchini, Michele; Peguillet, Isabelle; Lantz, Olivier; Vellice, Alejandra; Kohan, Abraham; Chacón, Matías; Yee, Cassian; Wainstok, Rosa; Mordoh, José

    2008-01-01

    Background Sixteen melanoma patients (1 stage IIC, 8 stage III, and 7 stage IV) were treated in a Phase I study with a vaccine (DC/Apo-Nec) composed of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with a mixture of apoptotic/necrotic allogeneic melanoma cell lines (Apo-Nec), to evaluate toxicity and immune responses. Also, IL-10 1082 genotype was analyzed in an effort to predict disease progression. Methods PBMC were obtained after leukapheresis and DCs were generated from monocytes cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 in serum-free medium. Immature DCs were loaded with gamma-irradiated Apo-Nec cells and injected id without adjuvant. Cohorts of four patients were given four vaccines each with 5, 10, 15, or 20 × 106 DC/Apo-Nec cell per vaccine, two weeks apart. Immune responses were measured by ELISpot and tetramer analysis. Il-10 genotype was measured by PCR and corroborated by IL-10 production by stimulated PBMC. Results Immature DCs efficiently phagocytosed melanoma Apo-Nec cells and matured after phagocytosis as evidenced by increased expression of CD83, CD80, CD86, HLA class I and II, and 75.2 ± 16% reduction in Dextran-FITC endocytosis. CCR7 was also up-regulated upon Apo-Nec uptake in DCs from all patients, and accordingly DC/Apo-Nec cells were able to migrate in vitro toward MIP-3 beta. The vaccine was well tolerated in all patients. The DTH score increased significantly in all patients after the first vaccination (Mann-Whitney Test, p < 0.05). The presence of CD8+T lymphocytes specific to gp100 and Melan A/MART-1 Ags was determined by ELISpot and tetramer analysis in five HLA-A*0201 patients before and after vaccination; one patient had stable elevated levels before and after vaccination; two increased their CD8 + levels, one had stable moderate and one had negligible levels. The analysis of IL-10 promoter -1082 polymorphism in the sixteen patients showed a positive correlation between AA genotype, accompanied by lower in vitro IL-10 production by

  8. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor therapy for pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Ruchira P; Sampat, Bhavin K; Prabhudesai, Pralhad; Kulkarni, Satish

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of 58 year old female diagnosed with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis (PAP) with recurrence of PAP after 5 repeated whole lung lavage, responding to subcutaneous injections of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor therapy (GM-CSF). Thus indicating that GM-CSF therapy is a promising alternative in those requiring repeated whole lung lavage

  9. Production of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by gateway technology and transgenic rice cell culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Kuo; Huang, Li-Fen; Ho, Shin-Lon; Liao, Chun-Yu; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Ying-Hui; Yu, Su-May; Lu, Chung-An

    2012-05-01

    To establish a production platform for recombinant proteins in rice suspension cells, we first constructed a Gateway-compatible binary T-DNA destination vector. It provided a reliable and effective method for the rapid directional cloning of target genes into plant cells through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We used the approach to produce mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) in a rice suspension cell system. The promoter for the αAmy3 amylase gene, which is induced strongly by sugar depletion, drove the expression of mGM-CSF. The resulting recombinant protein was fused with the αAmy3 signal peptide and was secreted into the culture medium. The production of rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was scaled up successfully in a 2-L bioreactor, in which the highest yield of rmGM-CSF was 24.6 mg/L. Due to post-translational glycosylation, the molecular weight of rmGM-CSF was larger than that of recombinant mGM-CSF produced in Escherichia coli. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60.

  10. Structure of the chromosomal gene for granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor: comparison of the mouse and human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, S; Otsuka, T; Yokota, T; Lee, F; Arai, K

    1985-01-01

    A cDNA clone that expresses granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity in COS-7 cells has been isolated from a pcD library prepared from mRNA derived from concanavalin A-activated mouse helper T cell clones. Based on homology with the mouse GM-CSF cDNA sequence, the mouse GM-CSF gene was isolated. The human GM-CSF gene was also isolated based on homology with the human GM-CSF cDNA sequence. The nucleotide sequences determined for the genes and their flanking regions revealed that both the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are composed of three introns and four exons. The organization of the mouse and human GM-CSF genes are highly homologous and strong sequence homology between the two genes is found both in the coding and non-coding regions. A 'TATA'-like sequence was found 20-25 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. In the 5'-flanking region, there is a highly homologous region extending 330 bp upstream of the putative TATA box. This sequence may play a role in regulation of expression of the GM-CSF gene. These structures are compared with those of different lymphokine genes and their regulatory regions. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3876930

  11. A DNA vaccine encoding the 42 kDa C-terminus of merozoite surface protein 1 of Plasmodium falciparum induces antibody, interferon-gamma and cytotoxic T cell responses in rhesus monkeys: immuno-stimulatory effects of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjai; Villinger, Francois; Oakley, Miranda; Aguiar, Joao C; Jones, Trevor R; Hedstrom, Richard C; Gowda, Kalpana; Chute, John; Stowers, Anthony; Kaslow, David C; Thomas, Elaine K; Tine, John; Klinman, Dennis; Hoffman, Stephen L; Weiss, Walter W

    2002-04-01

    We have constructed a DNA plasmid vaccine encoding the C-terminal 42-kDa region of the merozoite surface protein 1 (pMSP1(42)) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf3D7). This plasmid expressed recombinant MSP1(42) after in vitro transfection in mouse VM92 cells. Rhesus monkeys immunized with pMSP1(42) produced antibodies reactive with Pf3D7 infected erythrocytes by IFAT, and by ELISA against yeast produced MSP1(19) (yMSP1(19)). Immunization also induced antigen specific T cell responses as measured by interferon-gamma production, and by classical CTL chromium release assays. In addition, immunization with pMSP1(42) primed animals for an enhanced antibody response to a subsequent boost with the recombinant yMSP1(19). We also evaluated Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) as an adjuvant for pMSP1(42.) We tested both rhesus GM-CSF expressed from a DNA plasmid, and E. coli produced recombinant human GM-CSF. Plasmids encoding rhesus GM-CSF (prhGM-CSF) and human GM-CSF (phuGM-CSF) were constructed; these plasmids expressed bio-active recombinant GMCSF. Co-immunization with a mixture of prhGM-CSF and pMSP1(42) induced higher specific antibody responses after the first dose of plasmid, but after three doses of DNA monkeys immunized with or without prhGM-CSF had the same final antibody titers and T cell responses. In comparison, rhuGM-CSF protein did not lead to accelerated antibody production after the first DNA dose. However, antibody titers were maintained at a slightly higher level in monkeys receiving GM-CSF protein, and they had a higher response to boosting with recombinant MSP1(19). The GM-CSF plasmid or protein appears to be less potent as an adjuvant in rhesus monkeys than each is in mice, and more work is needed to determine if GM-CSF can be a useful adjuvant in DNA vaccination of primates.

  12. Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: Relevance for human safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Patricia C.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Rebelatto, Marlon; Wang, Bing; Lu, Hong; Chen, Xiaomin; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Roskos, Lorin; Towers, Heidi; McKeever, Kathleen; Dixit, Rakesh

    2014-09-01

    Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26 weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11 weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (≥ 30 mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFRα signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress. - Highlights: • Mavrilimumab is a MAB targeting GM-CSFRα being developed for RA therapy. • Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys.

  13. Redox state and O2*- production in neutrophils of Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Chiara; Favilli, Fabio; Catarzi, Serena; Marcucci, Tommaso; Fazi, Marilena; Tonelli, Francesco; Vincenzini, Maria T; Iantomasi, Teresa

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the intracellular redox state and respiratory burst (RB) in neutrophils of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The intracellular redox state and RB in neutrophils was assessed by the superoxide anion (O2*-) production induced in these cells after stimulation by various factors related to the molecular mechanisms that, if altered, may be responsible for an abnormal immune response. This can, in part, cause the onset of inflammation and tissue damage seen in CD. This study demonstrated a decreased glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio index of an increased oxidative state in CD patient neutrophils. Moreover, our findings showed a decrease in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha)- or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced O2*- production in CD patient neutrophils adherent to fibronectin as compared with controls. A decreased adhesion was also demonstrated. For this reason, the involvement of altered mechanisms of protein kinase C (PKC) and beta-integrin activation in CD patient neutrophils is suggested. These data also showed that the harmful effects of TNF-alpha cannot be caused by excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by neutrophils. Decreased cell viability after a prolonged time of adhesion (20 hrs) was also measured in CD patient neutrophils. The findings of this study demonstrate, for the first time, that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a compound recently used in CD therapy, is able to activate the RB for a prolonged time both in control and CD patient neutrophils. Increased viability of CD patient neutrophils caused by GM-CSF stimulation was also observed. In conclusion, our results indicate that decreased O2*- production and adhesion, caused, in part, by an anomalous response to TNF-alpha, together with low GSH level and low cell viability, may be responsible for the defective neutrophil function found in CD patients. This can contribute to the

  14. Clinical effects of a chimeric anti-EpCAM monoclonal antibody in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liljefors, Maria; Nilsson, Bo; Fagerberg, Jan; Ragnhammar, Peter; Mellstedt, Håkan; Frödin, Jan-Erik

    2005-06-01

    The EpCAM antigen is highly expressed on colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells. Murine anti-EpCAM MAb (anti-EpCAM mMAb) alone or in combination with cytokines may induce clinical responses including long-lasting complete remissions (CR) in patients with metastatic disease. The chimeric variant of anti-EpCAM MAb (anti-EpCAM cMAb) interacts more efficiently with human effector cells (ADCC) than the murine counterpart in the killing of colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro, an important mechanism of action for antibody in vivo. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) augments immune effector cell functions in vivo and may enhance the therapeutic effect of MAbs. In this study, the therapeutic efficacy of the combination of anti-EpCAM cMAb and GM-CSF was evaluated in 24 patients with metastatic CRC. GM-CSF was given s.c. once daily for 10 consecutive days and on day 3, anti-EpCAM cMAb was given i.v. A treatment cycle was repeated every 4th week. Five patients achieved stable disease > 3 months (overall response rate 21%). Responding patients survived significantly longer than non-responding patients (p = 0.030). The frequency of patients with an immediate-type allergic reaction (ITAR) against anti-EpCAM cMAb at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th treatment cycles was as 13%, 29%, 25% and 19% respectively. Compared to a previous study where anti-EpCAM mMAb was used in a similar treatment regimen, the present protocol did not augment the overall or progression-free survival. The overall response rate was also similar to anti-EpCAM mMAb treated patients (6/22, 27%), but the anti-EpCAM mMAb treatment protocol induced two CR, one MR and three SD. Further studies are warranted to establish the role of EpCAM as a target for antibody therapy, specifically the significance of chimeric or humanized anti-EpCAM MAbs.

  15. Bovine alpha s1-casein gene sequences direct high level expression of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the milk of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Oukari, M; Hyttinen, J M; Korhonen, V P; Västi, A; Alhonen, L; Jänne, O A; Jänne, J

    1997-01-01

    The generation is reported of transgenic mice expressing human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or human erythropoietin (EPO) under the control of bovine alpha s1-casein regulatory sequences. GM-CSF expression was specific to the mammary gland, and levels of human GM-CSF in transgenic mouse milk were in the range of mg ml-1. The specific activity of the milk GM-CSF was similar to that of the recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli, and the glycosylation-derived size heterogeneity corresponded to that of the native human protein. In spite of the identical bovine regulatory sequences of the fusion genes, the levels of human EPO in transgenic mouse milk were 10(3)-10(6) times lower than those of GM-CSF, ranging from 0.003 to 3 micrograms ml-1. There appeared to be a positive correlation between the amount of EPO in the milk of lactating females and blood haematocrit values. In view of this, other type of constructs should be used to achieve more efficient EPO expression and to circumvent concomitantly-occurring adverse effects. In contrast, the high-level production of recombinant GM-CSF, its resemblance to the native mammalian protein, and mild adverse consequences of transgene expression imply that the current construct could be used for generation of larger GM-CSF transgenic animals to produce this protein in quantities sufficient for therapeutic purposes.

  16. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1988-06-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGM-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet miniosmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated in this paper.

  17. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation-exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGm-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet mini-osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated.

  18. Synergistic action of the benzene metabolite hydroquinone on myelopoietic stimulating activity of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Colagiovanni, D. B.; Henry, V. A.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The effects of in vitro pretreatment with benzene metabolites on colony-forming response of murine bone marrow cells stimulated with recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) were examined. Pretreatment with hydroquinone (HQ) at concentrations ranging from picomolar to micromolar for 30 min resulted in a 1.5- to 4.6-fold enhancement in colonies formed in response to rGM-CSF that was due to an increase in granulocyte/macrophage colonies. The synergism equaled or exceeded that reported for the effects of interleukin 1, interleukin 3, or interleukin 6 with GM-CSF. Optimal enhancement was obtained with 1 microM HQ and was largely independent of the concentration of rGM-CSF. Pretreatment with other authentic benzene metabolites, phenol and catechol, and the putative metabolite trans, trans-muconaldehyde did not enhance growth factor response. Coadministration of phenol and HQ did not enhance the maximal rGM-CSF response obtained with HQ alone but shifted the optimal concentration to 100 pM. Synergism between HQ and rGM-CSF was observed with nonadherent bone marrow cells and lineage-depleted bone marrow cells, suggesting an intrinsic effect on recruitment of myeloid progenitor cells not normally responsive to rGM-CSF. Alterations in differentiation in a myeloid progenitor cell population may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia secondary to drug or chemical exposure.

  19. Anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor autoantibodies in patients with cryptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Lindsey B.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Yang, Lauren M.; Jutivorakool, Kamonwan; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Bennett, John E.; Pyrgos, Vasilios; Williamson, Peter R.; Ding, Li; Holland, Steven M.; Browne, Sarah K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal meningitis has been described in immunocompromised patients as well as in those for whom no immune defect has been identified. GM-CSF regulates the function of phagocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages, critical elements in cryptococcal control. Methods We performed clinical histories, immunological evaluation, and anticytokine autoantibody screening in 4 current patients with cryptococcal meningitis, and identified and tested 103 archived plasma/CSF samples from patients with cryptococcal meningitis. We assessed the ability of anti-GM-CSF autoantibody containing plasmas to inhibit GM-CSF signaling. Results We recognized anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies in an otherwise healthy female with cryptococcal meningitis who later developed pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Her diagnosis prompted screening of patients with cryptococcal meningitis for anticytokine autoantibodies. We identified 7 HIV uninfected patients with cryptococcal meningitis who tested positive for high-titer anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies. Two of the 7 later developed evidence of PAP. Plasma from all patients prevented GM-CSF-induced STAT-5 phosphorylation and MIP-1α production in normal PBMC. This effect was limited to their IgG fraction. Conclusions Anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies are associated with some cases of cryptococcal meningitis in otherwise immunocompetent patients. These cases need not have associated pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. PMID:23509356

  20. Functional NF-IL6/CCAAT enhancer-binding protein is required for tumor necrosis factor alpha-inducible expression of the granulocyte colony- stimulating factor (CSF), but not the granulocyte/macrophage CSF or interleukin 6 gene in human fibroblasts [retracted by Adler G. In: J Exp Med 1997 Jul 7;186(1):171

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha participates in the regulation of the acute-phase, immune, and inflammatory responses. Target genes known to be transcriptionally activated by TNF-alpha include the granulocyte (G)- colony-stimulating factor (CSF) gene, the granulocyte/macrophage (GM)- CSF gene, as well as the interleukin (IL) 6 gene. Functional nuclear factor (NF)-IL6 recognition sites have been identified in regulatory regions of these genes by transient transfection studies using deleted promoter constructs. In addition, NF-IL6 is known to form heterodimeric complexes with the NF-kappa B transcription factor, which is also engaged in the transcriptional regulation of these genes. The indispensable importance of NF-IL6 for regulating gene expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes in response to inflammatory stimuli in vivo remains, however, unclear. We here report, by using both antisense (AS) oligodesoxyribonucleotide (ODN) and ribozyme (RZ)-mediated specific elimination of NF-IL6 transcripts in human fibroblasts, that TNF-alpha-induced synthesis of G-CSF, but not of GM-CSF or IL-6, is abolished in the absence of functional NF-IL6 in vivo. Both AS ODN and RZ targeting of the NF-IL6 transcript eliminate NF-IL6 protein, as shown in Western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Similarly, fibroblasts exposed to either the AS NF-IL6 ODN or the NF-IL6 RZ, but not to the sense or nonsense ODN or a mutated ribozyme, also failed to respond with functional activation of NF-IL6 as assayed in transient transfection studies using heterologous promoter constructs harboring the NF-IL6 recognition site. In contrast, protein synthesis, DNA-binding activity, and transcriptional activation capacity of the NF-kappa B transcription factor is not impaired upon exposure to either ODN or RZ. Fibroblasts that had been cultured in the presence of the AS NF-IL6 ODN or the NF-IL6RZ failed to synthesize G- CSF protein in response to TNF-alpha, while TNF

  1. AAV2-mediated in vivo immune gene therapy of solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many strategies have been adopted to unleash the potential of gene therapy for cancer, involving a wide range of therapeutic genes delivered by various methods. Immune therapy has become one of the major strategies adopted for cancer gene therapy and seeks to stimulate the immune system to target tumour antigens. In this study, the feasibility of AAV2 mediated immunotherapy of growing tumours was examined, in isolation and combined with anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods Immune-competent Balb/C or C57 mice bearing subcutaneous JBS fibrosarcoma or Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumour xenografts respectively were treated by intra-tumoural administration of AAV2 vector encoding the immune up-regulating cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the co-stimulatory molecule B7-1 to subcutaneous tumours, either alone or in combination with intra-muscular (IM) delivery of AAV2 vector encoding Nk4 14 days prior to tumour induction. Tumour growth and survival was monitored for all animals. Cured animals were re-challenged with tumourigenic doses of the original tumour type. In vivo cytotoxicity assays were used to investigate establishment of cell-mediated responses in treated animals. Results AAV2-mediated GM-CSF, B7-1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth and an increase in survival in both tumour models. Cured animals were resistant to re-challenge, and induction of T cell mediated anti-tumour responses were demonstrated. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes to naïve animals prevented tumour establishment. Systemic production of Nk4 induced by intra-muscular (IM) delivery of Nk4 significantly reduced subcutaneous tumour growth. However, combination of Nk4 treatment with GM-CSF, B7-1 therapy reduced the efficacy of the immune therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrates the potential for in vivo AAV2 mediated immune gene therapy, and provides data on the inter-relationship between tumour vasculature and

  2. Functional evaluation of circulating hematopoietic progenitors in Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    TIMEUS, FABIO; CRESCENZIO, NICOLETTA; BALDASSARRE, GIUSEPPINA; DORIA, ALESSANDRA; VALLERO, STEFANO; FOGLIA, LUISELDA; PAGLIANO, SARA; ROSSI, CESARE; SILENGO, MARGHERITA CIRILLO; RAMENGHI, UGO; FAGIOLI, FRANCA; DI MONTEZEMOLO, LUCA CORDERO; FERRERO, GIOVANNI BATTISTA

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by short stature, multiple dysmorphisms and congenital heart defects. A myeloproliferative disorder (NS/MPD), resembling juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), is occasionally diagnosed in infants with NS. In the present study, we performed a functional evaluation of the circulating hematopoietic progenitors in a series of NS, NS/MPD and JMML patients. The different functional patterns were compared with the aim to identify a possible NS subgroup worthy of stringent hematological follow-up for an increased risk of MPD development. We studied 27 NS and 5 JMML patients fulfilling EWOG-MDS criteria. The more frequent molecular defects observed in NS were mutations in the PTPN11 and SOS genes. The absolute count of monocytes, circulating CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, their apoptotic rate and the number of circulating CFU-GMs cultured in the presence of decreasing concentrations or in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were evaluated. All JMML patients showed monocytosis >1,000/μl. Ten out of the 27 NS patients showed monocytosis >1,000/μl, which included the 3 NS/MPD patients. In JMML patients, circulating CD34+ cells were significantly increased (median, 109.8/μl; range, 44–232) with a low rate of apoptosis (median, 2.1%; range, 0.4–12.1%), and circulating CFU-GMs were hyper-responsive to GM-CSF. NS/MPD patients showed the same flow cytometric pattern as the JMML patients (median, CD34+ cells/μl, 205.7; range, 58–1374; median apoptotic rate, 1.4%; range, 0.2–2.4%) and their circulating CFU-GMs were hyper-responsive to GM-CSF. These functional alterations appeared 10 months before the typical clinical manifestations in 1 NS/MPD patient. In NS, the CD34+ absolute cell count and circulating CFU-GMs showed a normal pattern (median CD34+ cells/μl, 4.9; range, 1.3–17.5), whereas the CD34+ cell apoptotic rate was significantly decreased in

  3. Functional evaluation of circulating hematopoietic progenitors in Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Timeus, Fabio; Crescenzio, Nicoletta; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Doria, Alessandra; Vallero, Stefano; Foglia, Luiselda; Pagliano, Sara; Rossi, Cesare; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ramenghi, Ugo; Fagioli, Franca; Cordero di Montezemolo, Luca; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista

    2013-08-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by short stature, multiple dysmorphisms and congenital heart defects. A myeloproliferative disorder (NS/MPD), resembling juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), is occasionally diagnosed in infants with NS. In the present study, we performed a functional evaluation of the circulating hematopoietic progenitors in a series of NS, NS/MPD and JMML patients. The different functional patterns were compared with the aim to identify a possible NS subgroup worthy of stringent hematological follow-up for an increased risk of MPD development. We studied 27 NS and 5 JMML patients fulfilling EWOG-MDS criteria. The more frequent molecular defects observed in NS were mutations in the PTPN11 and SOS genes. The absolute count of monocytes, circulating CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, their apoptotic rate and the number of circulating CFU-GMs cultured in the presence of decreasing concentrations or in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were evaluated. All JMML patients showed monocytosis>1,000/µl. Ten out of the 27 NS patients showed monocytosis>1,000/µl, which included the 3 NS/MPD patients. In JMML patients, circulating CD34+ cells were significantly increased (median, 109.8/µl; range, 44-232) with a low rate of apoptosis (median, 2.1%; range, 0.4-12.1%), and circulating CFU-GMs were hyper-responsive to GM-CSF. NS/MPD patients showed the same flow cytometric pattern as the JMML patients (median, CD34+ cells/µl, 205.7; range, 58-1374; median apoptotic rate, 1.4%; range, 0.2-2.4%) and their circulating CFU-GMs were hyper-responsive to GM-CSF. These functional alterations appeared 10 months before the typical clinical manifestations in 1 NS/MPD patient. In NS, the CD34+ absolute cell count and circulating CFU-GMs showed a normal pattern (median CD34+ cells/µl, 4.9; range, 1.3-17.5), whereas the CD34+ cell apoptotic rate was significantly decreased in comparison with the

  4. Wheatgrass Extract Ameliorates Hypoxia-induced Mucin Gene Expression in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Ju hwan; Choi, Moon-Hee; Shin, Hyun-Jae; Lee, Ji-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Wheatgrass is known to have antioxidant, antiaging, and anti-inflammatory effect. However, its protective effect against hypoxia is not yet evaluated. Objective: In this study, we evaluated the protective and anti-inflammatory effect of wheatgrass against the hypoxia in airway epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were incubated in a hypoxic condition (CO2 5%/O2 1%) for 24 hr in the presence of different concentration of wheatgrass 50, 75, 100, and 150 μg/mL, and the magnitude of each immunologic response produced by the A549 cells was compared. The mRNA expression level of mucin gene (MUC), 5A, 5B, 8, GM-CSF, TNF-α, and VEGF were evaluated by using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The MUC proteins level before and after knocking out the hypoxia-inducible factor (hif)-1α via short interfering (si) RNA transfection were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Accordingly, the involved cell signaling pathway was evaluated by immunoblot analysis. Results: The inflammatory cytokines (GM-CSF, TNF- α) and the expressions of MUC 5A, 5B, and 8 were augmented by hypoxia. The augmented MUC expression was decreased by the wheatgrass extract administration. Hif-1α gene expression after hypoxia exposure was decreased by wheatgrass. Knockdown of hif-1α by siRNA reduced the mucin gene expression and which was more enhanced by wheatgrass extract. Conclusion: Theses results suggest that wheatgrass may be useful in the treatment of sinonasal disease by inhibiting mucus hypersecretion in airway epithelium. SUMMARY Wheatgrass extract decreases the hypoxia-induced MUC 5A, 5B and 8 expression.Hif-1α gene expression after hypoxia exposure was decreased by wheatgrass.Wheatgrass inhibits p44/42 phosphorylation in hypoxia-exposed airway epithelial cells. Abbreviations used: A549: human lung adenocarcinoma cells, GM-CSF: granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, HIF: hypoxia inducible factor, IL: interleukin, MUC: mucin, MTT: 3

  5. Human adipose tissue-resident monocytes exhibit an endothelial-like phenotype and display angiogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue has the unique property of expanding throughout adult life, and angiogenesis is required for its growth. However, endothelial progenitor cells contribute minimally to neovascularization. Because myeloid cells have proven to be angiogenic, and monocytes accumulate in expanding adipose tissue, they might contribute to vascularization. Methods The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells from human adipose tissue were magnetically separated according to CD45 or CD14 expression. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were obtained from SVF CD45- cells. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells and then cultured with SVF-derived MSCs. Freshly isolated or cultured cells were characterized with flow cytometry; the conditioned media were analyzed for the angiogenic growth factors, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with Luminex Technology; their angiogenic capacity was determined in an in vivo gelatinous protein mixture (Matrigel) plug angiogenesis assay. Results CD45+ hematopoietic cells within the SVF contain CD14+ cells that co-express the CD34 progenitor marker and the endothelial cell antigens VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR), VEGFR1/Flt1, and Tie2. Co-culture experiments showed that SVF-derived MSCs promoted the acquisition of KDR and Tie-2 in PB monocytes. MSCs secreted significant amounts of Ang-2 and HGF, but minimal amounts of bFGF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF, whereas the opposite was observed for SVF CD14+ cells. Additionally, SVF CD14+ cells secreted significantly higher levels of VEGF and bFGF than did MSCs. Culture supernatants of PB monocytes cultured with MSCs contained significantly higher concentrations of VEGF, HGF, G-CSF, and GM-CSF than did the supernatants from cultures without MSCs

  6. Cytokines and progenitor cells of granulocytopoiesis in peripheral blood of patients with bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Selig, C; Nothdurft, W

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the physiological role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the adaptation mechanisms of myelopoiesis to enhanced demand, we studied both cytokines and their myeloid target cells in hematologically healthy patients suffering from acute bacterial infections. Endogenous serum levels of G-CSF and GM-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) concentrations, and differential counts were determined for the peripheral blood of 57 patients with clinically apparent bacterial infections (26 males and 31 females aged 16 to 89 years) and 18 healthy controls (8 males and 10 females aged 23 to 84 years). Patients were selected for acute-phase protein and at least two additional clinical signs reflecting a bacterial infection. Patients showed significantly higher numbers of myeloid progenitor cells than controls (median, 68 versus 26 GM-CFC/ml; P < or = 0.01). G-CSF but not GM-CSF levels were found to be elevated (> or = 50 to 863 pg/ml). In the acute stage of infection, progenitor and cytokine levels were not influenced by gender, differences in therapy, or localization of the infection. Progenitor and G-CSF levels were not associated with absolute neutrophil counts or C-reactive protein. However, a negative correlation between number of GM-CFC per milliliter and age (R = -0.47; P < or = 0.001) and an inverse relationship between the incidence of high GM-CFC concentrations and elevated G-CSF levels (phi = -0.34; P < or = 0.01) were found. Combining both parameters into a cytokine-progenitor pattern, we observed a highly significant age-dependent response of myelopoiesis to inflammation (P < or = 0.001). Younger patients had high progenitor counts (> 75 GM-CFC/ml) associated with G-CSF levels below 50 pg/ml, whereas for the older patients, the reverse pattern was predominant. The results indicate that the age-dependent myelopoietic response to acute bacterial infections is

  7. Recombinant NDV expressing cytokines or fliC confers a quick immune response against NDV challenge and resistance to maternal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyuan; Liu, Yunye; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Shenglong; Xu, Pengfei; Yin, Jiechao; Ren, Guiping; Liu, Jingli; Li, Deshan

    2016-11-30

    Currently, there are two major bottleneck problems which seriously affect prevention of the Newcastle disease (ND): interference of maternal antibody on NDV vaccination and slow production of neutralization antibody. To overcome these problems, in present study, four rNDV vaccine strains expressing bio-adjuvants chIL2, chIL15, chGM-CSF or fliC gene were constructed and rescued using reverse genetics approach. The HI antibody titers of SPF birds immunized with rNDV reached to 5.5log2, 4.7log2, 6.5log2 and 5.8log2, respectively at the 8th day post immunization, while the antibody titers of the parental virus and control were 3.3log2 and 1log2, respectively. The immunized chickens were challenged by 10(4)ELD50 dose of the virulent NDV BJ strains at the 7th day post immunization. The protection rate of the four rNDVs bio-adjuvant groups was 100%, while the protection rate of the parental group was 80%. We also examined the anti-maternal antibody activity of these adjuvant vaccines by detection HI titer after vaccination of chickens with high (8.4log2) or low (5log2) maternal antibody levels. In chicken flock with higher maternal antibody, parental strain could not resist the influence of the maternal antibody and induce any notable change of HI antibody kinetics. However, both rClon30-chGM-CSF and rClon30-flic were able to resist the influence of the maternal antibody and maintained the HI antibody above the protection level during the 14day's experiment. In chicken flock with lower maternal antibody, the parental rclone30 strain could not induce HI titer to the protection level until the 14th day, but both rClon30-GM-CSF and clone30-fliC raised the HI antibody to above the protection level at the 7th day post vaccination.

  8. Immunosuppressive activity enhances central carbon metabolism and bioenergetics in myeloid-derived suppressor cells in vitro models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The tumor microenvironment contains a vast array of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that alter myelopoiesis and lead to the maturation of immunosuppressive cells known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Incubating bone marrow (BM) precursors with a combination of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) generated a tumor-infiltrating MDSC-like population that impaired anti-tumor specific T-cell functions. This in vitro experimental approach was used to simulate MDSC maturation, and the cellular metabolic response was then monitored. A complementary experimental model that inhibited L-arginine (L-Arg) metabolizing enzymes in MSC-1 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from primary MDSCs, was used to study the metabolic events related to immunosuppression. Results Exposure of BM cells to GM-CSF and IL-6 activated, within 24 h, L-Arg metabolizing enzymes which are responsible for the MDSCs immunosuppressive potential. This was accompanied by an increased uptake of L-glutamine (L-Gln) and glucose, the latter being metabolized by anaerobic glycolysis. The up-regulation of nutrient uptake lead to the accumulation of TCA cycle intermediates and lactate as well as the endogenous synthesis of L-Arg and the production of energy-rich nucleotides. Moreover, inhibition of L-Arg metabolism in MSC-1 cells down-regulated central carbon metabolism activity, including glycolysis, glutaminolysis and TCA cycle activity, and led to a deterioration of cell bioenergetic status. The simultaneous increase of cell specific concentrations of ATP and a decrease in ATP-to-ADP ratio in BM-derived MDSCs suggested cells were metabolically active during maturation. Moreover, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was activated during MDSC maturation in GM-CSF and IL-6–treated cultures, as revealed by the continuous increase of AMP-to-ATP ratios and the phosphorylation of AMPK. Likewise, AMPK activity was decreased in MSC-1

  9. Immunobiological effects of gemcitabine and capecitabine combination chemotherapy in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Gary; Greenhalf, William; Costello, Eithne; Shaw, Victoria; Cox, Trevor; Ghaneh, Paula; Palmer, Daniel H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preclinical studies suggest that chemotherapy may enhance the immune response against pancreatic cancer. Methods: The levels of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the associated inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed in 38 patients receiving gemcitabine and capecitabine combination chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer within the TeloVac trial. Apoptosis (M30) and total immune response (delayed-type hypersensitivity and/or T-cell response) were also assessed and levels of apoptosis induction correlated with immune response. The telomerase GV1001 vaccine was given either sequentially (n=18) or concomitantly (n=24) with the combination chemotherapy. Results: There were no differences between baseline and post-treatment levels of CRP (P=0.19), IL-6 (P=0.19) and GM-CSF (P=0.71). There was a positive correlation between post-chemotherapy CRP and IL-6 levels (r=0.45, P=0.005) and between CRP with carbohydrate antigen-19-9 (CA19-9) levels at baseline (r=0.45, P=0.015) and post treatment (r=0.40, P=0.015). The change in CRP and IL-6 levels was positively correlated (r=0.40, P=0.012). Hazard ratios (95% CI) for baseline CA19-9 (1.30 (1.07–1.59), P=0.009) and CRP (1.55 (1.00–2.39), P=0.049) levels were each independently predictive of survival. The M30 mean matched differences between pre- and post-chemotherapy showed evidence of apoptosis in both the sequential (P=0.058) and concurrent (P=0.0018) chemoimmunotherapy arms. Respectively, 5 of 10 and 9 of 20 patients had a positive immune response but there was no association with apoptosis. Conclusions: Combination gemcitabine and capecitabine chemotherapy did not affect circulating levels of GM-CSF, IL-6 and CRP. Chemotherapy-induced apoptosis was not associated with the immunogenicity induced by the GV1001 vaccine in advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26931369

  10. Interleukin 18 inhibits osteoclast formation via T cell production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, N J; Udagawa, N; Elliott, J; Grail, D; Okamura, H; Kurimoto, M; Dunn, A R; Martin, T; Gillespie, M T

    1998-01-01

    IL-18 inhibits osteoclast (OCL) formation in vitro independent of IFN-gamma production, and this was abolished by the addition of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. We now establish that IL-18 was unable to inhibit OCL formation in cocultures using GM-CSF-deficient mice (GM-CSF -/-). Reciprocal cocultures using either wild-type osteoblasts with GM-CSF -/- spleen cells or GM-CSF -/- osteoblasts with wild-type spleen cells were examined. Wild-type spleen cells were required to elicit a response to IL-18 indicating that cells of splenic origin were the IL-18 target. As T cells comprise a large proportion of the spleen cell population, the role of T cells in osteoclastogenesis was examined. Total T cells were removed and repleted in various combinations. Addition of wild-type T cells to a GM-CSF -/- coculture restored IL-18 inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Major subsets of T cells, CD4+ and CD8+, were also individually depleted. Addition of either CD4+ or CD8+ wild-type T cells restored IL-18 action in a GM-CSF -/- background, while IL-18 was ineffective when either CD4+ or CD8+ GM-CSF -/- T cells were added to a wild-type coculture. These results highlight the involvement of T cells in IL-18-induced OCL inhibition and provide evidence for a new OCL inhibitory pathway whereby IL-18 inhibits OCL formation due to action upon T cells promoting the release of GM-CSF, which in turn acts upon OCL precursors. PMID:9449693

  11. Neuroprotective Activities of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Following Controlled Cortical Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Matthew L.; Elliott, Bret R.; Haverland, Nicole A.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is facilitated by innate and adaptive immunity and can be harnessed to effect brain repair. In mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) we show that treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) affects regulatory T cell numbers coincident with decreased lesion volumes and increased cortical tissue sparing. This paralleled increases in neurofilament and diminished reactive microglial staining. Transcriptomic analysis showed that GM-CSF induces robust immune neuroprotective responses seven days following CCI. Together, these results support the therapeutic potential of GM-CSF for TBI. PMID:25468272

  12. Assessing Immune Function by Profiling Cytokine Release from Stimulated Blood Leukocytes and the Risk of Infection in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Megan L.; Davis, John M.; Knutson, Keith L.; Strausbach, Michael A.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Therneau, Terry M.; Wettstein, Peter J.; Matteson, Eric L.; Gabriel, Sherine E.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer a high burden of infections, but currently no biomarkers are available to identify individuals at greatest risk. A prospective longitudinal study was therefore conducted to determine the association between the responsiveness of ex vivo cytokine production and 6-month risk of infections. Infections were identified by billing codes and validated by medical record review. At baseline, the release of 17 cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation, or media alone, was measured using multiplexed cytokine analysis. Production of IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF, induced by various conditions, was significantly associated with the occurrence of infections. A multivariable prediction model based on these data provided new information on the risk of infection beyond standard assessments of disease activity, severity, and treatment. Future studies could utilize this information to devise new biomarkers for the prediction of infection in patients with RA. PMID:21703930

  13. Bjcul, a snake venom lectin, modulates monocyte-derived macrophages to a pro-inflammatory profile in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dias-Netipanyj, M F; Boldrini-Leite, L M; Trindade, E S; Moreno-Amaral, A N; Elifio-Esposito, S

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages are cells of high plasticity and can act in different ways to ensure that the appropriate immune response remains controlled. This study shows the effects of the C-type Bothrops jararacussu venom lectin (BJcuL) on the activation of human macrophages derived from the U937 cell line. BJcuL binds on the cell surface, and this event is inhibited by its specific carbohydrate. It induced phagocytosis and production of H2O2, and expression of antigen presentation molecules. It also enhanced the production of TNF-α, GM-CSF and IL-6 by macrophages and indirectly induced T cells to an increased production of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 in the presence of LPS. Our results suggest that BJcuL can modulate macrophage functional activation towards an M1 state.

  14. Cytokine profiling of young overweight and obese female African American adults with prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rudolf; Parikh, Samip J; Sridhar, Supriya; Guo, De-Huang; Bhagatwala, Jigar; Dong, Yutong; Caldwell, Ruth; Mellor, Andrew; Caldwell, William; Zhu, Haidong; Dong, Yanbin

    2013-10-01

    Approximately 5-10% of subjects with prediabetes become diabetic every year. Inflammation is involved in the development of obesity-related type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, to date, the relationship between inflammation and prediabetes, defined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥5.7 and <6.5%, remains largely unexplored, especially in African Americans. Therefore, in this study we examined a comprehensive panel of 13 cytokines involved in the inflammatory response in overweight/obese subjects with prediabetes. A total of 21 otherwise healthy, overweight/obese, young adult African American females with prediabetes, together with 20 matched overweight/obese controls, were selected for this study. Plasma cytokines were assessed by multiplex cytokine profiling. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-7, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were significantly higher in the prediabetic group, as compared to the control group (all p<0.05). Plasma concentrations of all the other cytokines, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70 and IL-13, seemed to be elevated in the prediabetic group, but failed to reach statistical significances. Upon merging both groups, HbA1c was found to be positively correlated with IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-7, IL-8, TNF-α and GM-CSF. This study demonstrates elevated levels of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in overweight/obese young subjects with prediabetes, which place them at higher risk of developing T2D and cardiovascular diseases. Our data also call for further investigations in animal models and population cohorts to establish the roles of a variety of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the early development of obesity-related T2D.

  15. Interleukin-3 priming in acute myeloid leukaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Tafuri, A; de Felice, L; Goodacre, A; Fenu, S; Petrucci, M T; Valentini, T; Alimena, G; Petti, M C; Meloni, G; Mandelli, F

    1995-09-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that G-CSF, GM-CSF and, in particular, IL-3 can effectively recruit acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts into the cell cycle, resulting in a significant increase in cytosine-arabinoside (Ara-C) mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Since IL-3 has shown biological and clinical activity, we investigated the cell kinetic effects of rIL-3 and high-dose Ara-C/idarubicin in three patients with refractory AML selected for the presence of chromosome 7 monosomy; this enabled differentiation between the effects of IL-3 on leukaemic and on normal cells. The in vivo administration of rhIL-3 (250 micrograms/m2d s.c. for 6-10d) recruited AML blasts into the cell cycle in two of the three patients, and this effect resulted in an increase in in vitro growth of clonogenic cells (CFU-L) and of their S-phase fraction. The percentage of leukaemic cells with monosomy 7 increased only in the two cases who showed a proliferative response. Normal cells were not recruited, even when rhIL-3 was administered for up to 10 d. In vitro studies showed an increased Ara-C cytotoxicity on clonogenic AML cells, in particular with IL-3 plus GM-CSF, thus confirming the priming effects of IL-3 in the two responding cases. The results of this study suggest that rhIL-3 can selectively recruit leukaemic cells into the cell cycle. Although leukaemic blasts can be sensitized to Ara-C, other mechanisms of primary blast resistance may limit the clinical benefit of kinetic-based approaches.

  16. Enhancing toxic protein expression in Escherichia coli fed-batch culture using kinetic parameters: Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as a model system.

    PubMed

    Khasa, Yogender Pal; Khushoo, Amardeep; Mukherjee, Krishna Jyoti

    2013-03-01

    The kinetics of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) expression was studied under the strong T7 promoter in continuous culture of Escherichia coli using complex medium to design an optimum feeding strategy for high cell density cultivation. Continuous culture studies were done at different dilution rates and the growth and product formation profiles were monitored post-induction. Recombinant protein expression was in the form of inclusion bodies with a maximum specific product formation rate (q(p)) of 63.5 mg g(-1) DCW h(-1) at a dilution rate (D) of 0.3 h(-1). The maximum volumetric product concentration achieved at this dilution rate was 474 mg l(-1), which translated a ~1.4 and ~1.75 folds increase than the values obtained at dilution rates of 0.2 h(-1) and 0.4 h(-1) respectively. The specific product yield (Y(P/x)) peaked at 138 mg g(-1) DCW, demonstrating a ~1.6 folds increase in the values obtained at other dilution rates. A drop in q(p) was observed within 5-6 h of induction at all the dilution rates, possibly due to protein toxicity and metabolic stress associated with protein expression. The data from the continuous culture studies allowed us to design an optimal feeding strategy and induction time in fed-batch cultures which resulted in a maximum product concentration of 3.95 g l(-1) with a specific hGM-CSF yield (Y(P/x)) of 107 mg g(-1) DCW.

  17. Minor changes in serum levels of cytokines after removal of amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Lars; Brokstad, Karl A; Moen, Ketil; Jonsson, Roland

    2012-06-01

    Dental amalgam restorations release mercury and silver which is absorbed and distributed in the body. Animal studies have shown that both elements may interfere with the host by activation of the immune system in genetically susceptible strains at exposure levels relevant to those from dental amalgam restorations. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of no change over time in concentrations of a number of immune mediators in serum after removal of all dental amalgam restorations in patients with health complaints attributed to their amalgam restorations and compare with a healthy reference group. Twenty patients previously examined at a specialty unit for health complaints attributed to dental materials were included in a clinical trial and had all amalgam restorations replaced with other dental restorative materials. Serum samples were collected before amalgam removal and 3 and 12 months after the removal was finished. Twenty blood donors matched for age and gender were used as comparison group. A fluorescent bead-based (Luminex) immunoassay kit was used to measure cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in serum. At baseline, the patient group had slightly higher values for GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-2R, IFN-alpha, IL-7, and IL-12p40/p70 compared with the reference group. After amalgam removal a decrease towards the median value of the reference group was found for GM-CSF, IL-8, and IL-7. In conclusion, removal of all dental amalgam restorations and replacement with other dental restorative materials was associated with decreased concentrations of Th1-type proinflammatory markers in serum.

  18. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models

    PubMed Central

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2013-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  19. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models.

    PubMed

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2014-02-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  20. The signalling imprints of nanoparticle uptake by bone marrow derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Karlson, Tanya De L; Kong, Ying Ying; Hardy, Charles L; Xiang, Sue Dong; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) possess remarkable adjuvant and carrier capacity, therefore are used in the development of various vaccine formulations. Our previous studies demonstrated that inert non-toxic 40-50 nm polystyrene NP (PS-NP) can promote strong CD8 T cell and antibody responses to the antigen, in the absence of observable inflammatory responses. Furthermore, instillation of PS-NP inhibited the development of allergic airway inflammation by induction of an immunological imprint via modulation of dendritic cell (DC) function without inducing oxidative stress in the lungs in mice. This is in contrast to many studies which show that a variety of ambient and man-made NP promote lung immunopathology, raising concerns generally about the safe use of NPs in biomedicine. Most NPs are capable of inducing inflammatory pathways in DC largely mediated by signalling via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK). Herein, we investigate whether PS-NPs also activate ERK in DC in vitro. Our data show that PS-NP do not induce ERK activation in two different types of bone marrow derived (BM) DC cultures (expanded with GM-CSF or with GM-CSF together with IL-4). The absence of such signalling was not due to lack of PS-NP uptake by BM-DC as confirmed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The process of NP uptake by DC usually initiates ERK signalling, suggesting an unusual uptake pathway may be engaged by PS-NPs. Indeed, data herein showns that uptake of PS-NP by BM-DC was substantially inhibited by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) but not cytochalasin D (CCD), suggesting an uptake pathway utilising caveole for PS-NP. Together these data show that BM-DC take up PS-NP via a caveole-dependent pathway which does not trigger ERK signalling which may explain their efficient uptake by DC, without the concomitant activation of conventional inflammatory pathways.

  1. Excessive Pro-Inflammatory Serum Cytokine Concentrations in Virulent Canine Babesiosis

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Amelia; Leisewitz, Andrew L.; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Kristensen, Annemarie T.; Schoeman, Johan P.

    2016-01-01

    Babesia rossi infection causes a severe inflammatory response in the dog, which is the result of the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in cytokine concentrations were present in dogs with babesiosis and whether it was associated with disease outcome. Ninety-seven dogs naturally infected with B. rossi were studied and fifteen healthy dogs were included as controls. Diagnosis of babesiosis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and reverse line blot. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at admission, prior to any treatment. Cytokine concentrations were assessed using a canine-specific multiplex assay on an automated analyser. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured. Twelve of the Babesia-infected dogs died (12%) and 85 survived (88%). Babesia-infected dogs were also divided into those that presented within 48 hours from displaying clinical signs, and those that presented more than 48 hours after displaying clinical signs. Cytokine concentrations were compared between the different groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. IL-10 and MCP-1 concentrations were significantly elevated for the Babesia-infected dogs compared to the healthy controls. In contrast, the IL-8 concentration was significantly decreased in the Babesia-infected dogs compared to the controls. Concentrations of IL-6 and MCP-1 were significantly increased in the non-survivors compared to the survivors. Concentrations for IL-2, IL-6, IL-18 and GM-CSF were significantly higher in those cases that presented during the more acute stage of the disease. These findings suggest that a mixed cytokine response is present in dogs with babesiosis caused by B. rossi, and that an excessive pro-inflammatory response may result in a poor outcome. PMID:26953797

  2. Impact of Whole-Blood Processing Conditions on Plasma and Serum Concentrations of Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Kim, Jong-Wan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Shin, So-Youn

    2016-02-01

    Pre-analytical variations in plasma and serum samples can occur because of variability in whole-blood processing procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of delayed separation of whole blood on the plasma and serum concentrations of cytokines. The concentrations of 16 cytokines were measured in plasma and serum samples when the centrifugation of whole blood at room temperature was delayed for 4, 6, 24, or 48 h, and the values were compared with those observed after separation within 2 h of whole-blood collection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was also performed for cytokines to determine whether cytokine levels in plasma and serum samples can be used to assess delayed separation of whole blood. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) and serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and MIP-1β increased significantly (>2-fold) when separation was delayed at room temperature for 24 h. The concentrations of 6 of these cytokines (all except serum IL-1β and IL-6) demonstrated high diagnostic performance (area under the ROC curve >0.8) for delayed separation of whole blood. Furthermore, these cytokine concentrations typically exhibited high sensitivity and specificity at each optimal cutoff point. Conversely, IL-17A was stable in both plasma and serum samples, even when whole-blood centrifugation was delayed at room temperature for 48 h. This study shows that certain cytokines (IL-1β, GM-CSF, sCD40L, IL-8, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β) could be used for assessing the quality of plasma or serum samples.

  3. TLR4-dependent immune response promotes radiation-induced liver disease by changing the liver tissue interstitial microenvironment during liver cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhi-Feng, Wu; Le-Yuan, Zhou; Xiao-Hui, Zhou; Ya-Bo, Gao; Jian-Ying, Zhang; Yong, Hu; Zhao-Chong, Zeng

    2014-12-01

    Liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) a special microenvironment around liver cells, which may play a vital role in cell communication during liver injury. Moreover, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important trigger of the immune response that may also play a role in liver injuries, including radiation-induced liver disease (RILD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the roles of the TLR4-dependent immune response and TIFs in RILD after radiation therapy (RT) for liver cancer. This study consisted of two phases, and in the primary phase, the livers of TLR4 mutant (TLR4(-)) and normal (TLR4(+)) mice were irradiated with 30 Gy. TIF was then obtained from mouse livers and assessed by cytokine array analysis 20 days after irradiation, and cytokines in the TIFs, TLR4 and RILD were analyzed. In the second or validation phase, hepatocytes were isolated from TLR4(+) or TLR4(-) mice irradiated with 8 Gy and were co-cultured with TIFs from mouse livers, apoptosis of the hepatocytes was then measured using flow cytometry. We found that severe RILD was accompanied by higher expression of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2(VEGFR-2) in liver TIFs, from in TLR4(+) mice compared with TLR4(-) mice (P < 0.05). In both TLR4(+) and TLR4(-) hepatocytes, apoptosis after irradiaton was increased significantly after co-culture in TIFs from TLR4(+) mice that had their livers irradiated, compared with TIFs from TLR4(-) mice that had their livers irradiated or TIFs from unirradiated mice (P < 0.05). In summary, these findings indicate that the TLR4-dependent immune response may promote RILD by enhancing the expression of GM-CSF, VEGFR-2 and TRAIL in liver TIFs.

  4. Interleukin 2 interacts with myeloid growth factors in serum-free long-term bone marrow culture.

    PubMed

    Douay, L; Giarratana, M C; Mary, J Y; Gorin, N C

    1994-03-01

    IL2 infusion may benefit patients with haematological malignancies by lowering the disease burden. However, conflicting data have been reported on IL2 effects on myelopoiesis, in vitro as well as in vivo. In the present study we investigated the ability of IL2 to act on committed and primitive bone marrow progenitor cells in defined serum-free (SF) culture conditions which avoid many technical biases such as interference by exogenous stimulating or inhibiting factors. Low doses of IL2 (0.1-1000 U/ml) were studied without or in combination with recombinant IL3, GM-CSF and erythropoietin, in SF long-term marrow culture (LTMC). We report data in favour of an inhibitory activity of IL2 limited to committed progenitors and excluding more primitive haemopoietic stem cells, as shown by an alteration of CFU-GM proliferation during the first 5 weeks of LTMC, decreasing with time, unaffected BFU-E and increased nucleated cell production. Beyond week 5, no difference was observed between IL2 supplemented cultures and the SF control cultures. In parallel, IL2 induced the adherence of fibroblastic cells and their progeny. In addition to the inhibitory effect, IL2 appeared to limit the stimulating effect on granulopoiesis and erythropoiesis of myeloid growth factors (GF) such as combination of IL3, GM-CSF and EPO. Indeed, in SF-LTMC conditions, IL2 inhibitory effect is effective on CFU-GM production throughout the 7 weeks of LTMC and on BFU-E during the first 2 weeks only. These data confirm the interaction of IL2 with other GFs in the complex interplay of the cytokine network.

  5. Expression of natural antimicrobial peptide beta-defensin-2 and Langerhans cell accumulation in epidermis from human non-healing leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Galkowska, Hanna; Olszewski, Waldemar L; Wojewodzka, Urszula

    2005-01-01

    Chronic wounds like venous calf and diabetic foot ulcers are frequently contaminated and colonized by bacteria and it remains unclear whether there is sufficient expression of defensins and recruitment of epidermal Langerhans cells in the margin of ulcer compared to normal skin. The aim of this study was to examine immunohistochemically the expression of beta-defensin-2 (hBD2), GM-CSF, VEGF growth factors and accumulation of CD1a+ Langerhans cells (LC) in epidermis from chronic skin ulcers and to compare it to normal skin from the corresponding areas. Studies were carried out in 10 patients with diabetic foot, 10 patients with varicous ulcers of the calf and 10 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery (normal skin for control). Biopsy specimens were immunostained using specific primary antibodies, LSAB+ kit based on biotin-avidin-peroxidase complex technique and DAB chromogen. Results were expressed as a mean staining intensity. Statistical analysis of staining showed significantly higher staining of hBD2 in both normal and ulcerated epidermis from foot sole skin compared to calf skin (normal and ulcerated, p < 0.05). Chronic ulcers showed the same expression of hBD2 as normal skin. There was significantly lower accumulation of CD1a+ LC in normal epidermis from foot sole skin compared to normal calf skin (p<0.05). Accumulation of CD1a+ LC and GM-CSF upregulation at the border area of diabetic foot ulcer and reduction of LC concentration at the margin of venous calf ulcer compared to normal skin were observed. It seems that normal calf and sole epidermis is, unlike in the mechanisms of innate immunity, influenced by the different keratinocyte turnover and bacterial flora colonizing these regions. Insufficient upregulation of hBD2 in both diabetic foot and venous calf ulcers may suggest the pathological role of this protein in the chronicity of ulcers.

  6. Favorable alteration of tumor microenvironment by immunomodulatory cytokines for efficient T-cell therapy in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tähtinen, Siri; Kaikkonen, Saija; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Kanerva, Anna; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I) therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-α2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience.

  7. Isolation of healthy individuals' and rheumatoid arthritis patients' peripheral blood neutrophils by the gelatin and Ficoll-Hypaque methods: comparative efficiency and impact on the neutrophil oxidative metabolism and Fcγ receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Paoliello-Paschoalato, A B; Azzolini, A E C S; Cruz, M F C; Marchi, L F; Kabeya, L M; Donadi, E A; Lucisano-Valim, Y M

    2014-10-01

    In vitro assessment of the functional responses of leukocytes sometimes requires their isolation from blood, joint and tissues. In this study, we compared the efficiency of two procedures - the gelatin method and Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation gradient - to isolate peripheral blood neutrophils of healthy individuals and patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We also assessed whether these procedures affect the neutrophil activation status. Both purification procedures were concluded in 90min, and yielded cell populations with similar degrees of purity (80-90%), number of neutrophils (1-2×10(6) cells per mL of blood), and viability (97-100%). In vitro neutrophil priming with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) significantly increased the reactive oxygen species producing ability of the cells stimulated with n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (n-fMLP), soluble immune complexes (s-ICs), and insoluble immune complexes (i-ICs). Isolated neutrophils not treated with GM-CSF responded to n-fMLP and i-IC, but not to s-IC. Almost all of the neutrophils (98-100%) purified by both methods expressed FcγRII/CD32 and FcγRIII/CD16, but they did not express significant levels of FcγRI/CD64. Similar results were obtained for healthy individuals' and RA patients' neutrophils. In summary, the gelatin method was comparable to Ficoll-Hypaque gradient in terms of purity, yield, and viability of the neutrophil preparations. Both methods neither primed or activated the neutrophils, nor affected their functional responsiveness. Therefore, both methods are suitable to isolate peripheral blood neutrophils of healthy individuals and RA patients.

  8. Selective and efficient generation of functional Batf3-dependent CD103+ dendritic cells from mouse bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian Thomas; Ghorbani, Peyman; Nandan, Amrita; Dudek, Markus; Arnold-Schrauf, Catharina; Hesse, Christina; Berod, Luciana; Stüve, Philipp; Puttur, Franz; Merad, Miriam; Sparwasser, Tim

    2014-11-13

    Multiple subsets of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FLT3L)-dependent dendritic cells (DCs) control T-cell tolerance and immunity. In mice, Batf3-dependent CD103(+) DCs efficiently enter lymph nodes and cross-present antigens, rendering this conserved DC subset a promising target for tolerance induction or vaccination. However, only limited numbers of CD103(+) DCs can be isolated with current methods. Established bone marrow culture protocols efficiently generate monocyte-derived DCs or produce a mixture of FLT3L-dependent DC subsets. We show that CD103(+) DC development requires prolonged culture time and continuous action of both FLT3L and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), explained by a dual effect of GM-CSF on DC precursors and differentiating CD103(+) DCs. Accordingly, we established a novel method to generate large numbers of CD103(+) DCs (iCD103-DCs) with limited presence of other DC subsets. iCD103-DCs develop in a Batf3- and Irf8-dependent fashion, express a CD8α/CD103 DC gene signature, cross-present cell-associated antigens, and respond to TLR3 stimulation. Thus, iCD103-DCs reflect key features of tissue CD103(+) DCs. Importantly, iCD103-DCs express high levels of CCR7 upon maturation and migrate to lymph nodes more efficiently than classical monocyte-derived DCs. Finally, iCD103-DCs induce T cell-mediated protective immunity in vivo. Our study provides insights into CD103(+) DC development and function.

  9. N,N-Dimethylacetamide Significantly Attenuates LPS- and TNFα-Induced Proinflammatory Responses Via Inhibition of the Nuclear Factor Kappa B Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pekson, Ryan; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Gorasiya, Samir; Sundaram, Sruthi; Ashby, Charles R; Vancurova, Ivana; Reznik, Sandra E

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) prevents inflammation-induced preterm birth in a murine model, inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increases in placental proinflammatory cytokines and upregulates the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). However, DMA’s mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigate how DMA produces its antiinflammatory effect. Using in vitro and ex vivo models, we show that DMA suppresses secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 cells, TNFα-challenged JEG-3 cells and LPS-stimulated human placental explants. DMA significantly attenuated secretion of TNFα, IL-6, IL-10 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells; IL-6 secretion from TNFα-stimulated JEG-3 cells; and TNFα, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) from LPS-stimulated human placental explants. We further investigated whether DMA’s effect on cytokine expression involves the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. DMA (10 mM) significantly inhibited degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cell inhibitor α (IκBα) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, but there was no significant change in the expression of phosphorylated or native forms of downstream proteins in the MAPK pathway. In addition, DMA significantly attenuated luciferase activity in cells co-transfected with NF-κB-Luc reporter plasmid, but not with AP-1-Luc or CEBP-Luc reporters. Overall, our findings suggest that the antiinflammatory activity of DMA is mediated by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway via decreased IκBα degradation. PMID:27782292

  10. Use of DNA and recombinant canarypox viral (ALVAC) vectors for equine herpes virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Minke, J M; Fischer, L; Baudu, Ph; Guigal, P M; Sindle, T; Mumford, J A; Audonnet, J C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, experimental canarypox virus (ALVAC) and plasmid DNA recombinant vaccines expressing the gB, gC and gD glycoproteins of EHV-1 were assessed for their ability to protect conventional ponies against a respiratory challenge with EHV-1. In addition, potential means of enhancing serological responses in horses to ALVAC and DNA vaccination were explored. These included co-administration of the antigen with conventional adjuvants, complexation with DMRIE-DOPE and co-expression of the antigen along with equine GM-CSF. Groups of EHV primed ponies were vaccinated twice intra-muscularly with one dose of the appropriate test vaccine at an interval of 5 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after the second vaccination, ponies were infected intra-nasally with the virulent Ab4 strain of EHV-1 after which they were observed clinically and sampled for virological investigations. The results demonstrated that DNA and ALVAC vaccination markedly reduced virus excretion after challenge in terms of duration and magnitude, but failed to protect against cell-associated viremia. Noteworthy was the almost complete absence of virus excretion in the group of ponies vaccinated with ALVAC-EHV in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant or DNA plasmid formulated with aluminium phosphate. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of GM-CSF and formulated in DMRIE-DOPE and of the ALVAC vaccine in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant significantly improved virus neutralising antibody responses to EHV-1. These findings indicate that DNA and ALVAC vaccination is a promising approach for the immunological control of EHV-1 infection, but that more research is needed to identify the immunodominant protective antigens of EHV-1 and their interaction with the equine immune system.

  11. Exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes results in aggravation of airway inflammation and remodeling and in increased production of epithelium-derived innate cytokines in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ronzani, Carole; Casset, Anne; Pons, Françoise

    2014-02-01

    With the development of nanotechnologies, the potential adverse effects of nanomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) on the respiratory tract of asthmatics are questioned. Furthermore, investigations are necessary to understand how these effects might arise. In the present study, we hypothesized that epithelium-derived innate cytokines that are considered as important promoting factors in allergy may contribute to an aggravating effect of MWCNT on asthma. We investigated in the mouse the effect of MWCNT on systemic immune response and airway inflammation and remodeling induced by the most frequent allergen so far associated with asthma, house dust mite (HDM), and we examined the production of the innate cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), IL-25, IL-33, and GM-CSF. Mice exposed to HDM exhibited specific IgG1 in serum and inflammatory cell infiltration, and increased Th2 cytokine production, mucus hyperproduction, and collagen deposition in the airways when compared to naïve animals. Levels of total IgG1 and HDM-specific IgG1, influx of macrophages, eosinophils and neutrophils, production of collagen, TGF-β1, and mucus, as well as levels of IL-13, eotaxin, and TARC, were dose-dependently increased in mice exposed to HDM and MWCNT compared to HDM alone. These effects were associated with an increased production of TSLP, IL-25, IL-33, and GM-CSF in the airways. Our data demonstrate that MWCNT increase in a dose-dependent manner systemic immune response, as well as airway allergic inflammation and remodeling induced by HDM in the mouse. Our data suggest also a role for airway epithelium and innate cytokines in these effects.

  12. A dairy bacterium displays in vitro probiotic properties for the pharyngeal mucosa by antagonizing group A streptococci and modulating the immune response.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Taverniti, Valentina; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; Zanoni, Ivan; Stuknyte, Milda; Granucci, Francesca; Karp, Matti; Mora, Diego

    2010-11-01

    The probiotic approach represents an alternative strategy in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, not only at the intestinal level but also at other sites of the body where the microbiota plays a role in the maintenance of physiological homeostasis. In this context, we evaluated in vitro the potential abilities of probiotic and dairy bacteria in controlling Streptococcus pyogenes infections at the pharyngeal level. Initially, we analyzed bacterial adhesion to FaDu hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells and the ability to antagonize S. pyogenes on FaDu cell layers and HaCat keratinocytes. Due to its promising adhesive and antagonistic features, we studied the dairy strain Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5, also through in vitro immunological experiments. First, we performed quantification of several cytokines and measurement of NF-κB activation in FaDu cells. MIMLh5 efficiently reduced the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in a dose-dependent manner. After stimulation of cells with IL-1β, active NF-κB was still markedly lowered. Nevertheless, we observed an increased secretion of IL-6, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) under these conditions. These effects were associated with the ability of MIMLh5 to enhance the expression of the heat shock protein coding gene hsp70. In addition, MIMLh5 increased the GM-CSF/G-CSF ratio. This is compatible with a switch of the immune response toward a TH1 pathway, as supported by our observation that MIMLh5, once in contact with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, triggered the secretion of TNF-α and IL-2. In conclusion, we propose MIMLh5 as a potential probiotic bacterium for the human pharynx, with promising antagonistic and immunomodulatory properties.

  13. A Dairy Bacterium Displays In Vitro Probiotic Properties for the Pharyngeal Mucosa by Antagonizing Group A Streptococci and Modulating the Immune Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, Simone; Taverniti, Valentina; Minuzzo, Mario; Arioli, Stefania; Zanoni, Ivan; Stuknyte, Milda; Granucci, Francesca; Karp, Matti; Mora, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The probiotic approach represents an alternative strategy in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases, not only at the intestinal level but also at other sites of the body where the microbiota plays a role in the maintenance of physiological homeostasis. In this context, we evaluated in vitro the potential abilities of probiotic and dairy bacteria in controlling Streptococcus pyogenes infections at the pharyngeal level. Initially, we analyzed bacterial adhesion to FaDu hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells and the ability to antagonize S. pyogenes on FaDu cell layers and HaCat keratinocytes. Due to its promising adhesive and antagonistic features, we studied the dairy strain Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5, also through in vitro immunological experiments. First, we performed quantification of several cytokines and measurement of NF-κB activation in FaDu cells. MIMLh5 efficiently reduced the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in a dose-dependent manner. After stimulation of cells with IL-1β, active NF-κB was still markedly lowered. Nevertheless, we observed an increased secretion of IL-6, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) under these conditions. These effects were associated with the ability of MIMLh5 to enhance the expression of the heat shock protein coding gene hsp70. In addition, MIMLh5 increased the GM-CSF/G-CSF ratio. This is compatible with a switch of the immune response toward a TH1 pathway, as supported by our observation that MIMLh5, once in contact with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, triggered the secretion of TNF-α and IL-2. In conclusion, we propose MIMLh5 as a potential probiotic bacterium for the human pharynx, with promising antagonistic and immunomodulatory properties. PMID:20732995

  14. VIP impairs acquisition of the macrophage proinflammatory polarization profile.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Mar; Pérez-García, Selene; Martínez, Carmen; Juarranz, Yasmina; Estrada-Capetillo, Lizbeth; Puig-Kröger, Amaya; Gomariz, Rosa P; Gutiérrez-Cañas, Irene

    2016-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is able to modify the macrophage inflammatory profile, thus supporting its therapeutic role in autoimmune diseases. Macrophages are innate immune cells that display a variety of functions and inflammatory profiles in response to the environment that critically controls their polarization. Deregulation between the pro- and anti-inflammatory phenotypes has been involved in different pathologies. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, in which macrophages are considered central effectors of synovial inflammation, displaying a proinflammatory profile. VIP is a pleiotropic neuropeptide with proven anti-inflammatory actions. As modulation of the macrophage phenotype has been implicated in the resolution of inflammatory diseases, we evaluated whether VIP is able to modulate human macrophage polarization. In vitro-polarized macrophages by GM-CSF (GM-MØ), with a proinflammatory profile, expressed higher levels of VIP receptors, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptors 1 and 2 (VPAC1 and VPAC2, respectively), than macrophages polarized by M-CSF (M-MØ) with anti-inflammatory activities. RA synovial macrophages, according to their GM-CSF-like polarization state, expressed both VPAC1 and VPAC2. In vitro-generated GM-MØ exposed to VIP exhibited an up-regulation of M-MØ gene marker expression, whereas their proinflammatory cytokine profile was reduced in favor of an anti-inflammatory function. Likewise, in GM-MØ, generated in the presence of VIP, VIP somehow changes the macrophages physiology profile to a less-damaging phenotype. Therefore, these results add new value to VIP as an immunomodulatory agent on inflammatory diseases.

  15. Additive anti-inflammatory effect of formoterol and budesonide on human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Spoelstra, F; Postma, D; Hovenga, H; Noordhoek, J; Kauffman, H

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that treatment with a long acting ß2 agonist in addition to a glucocorticoid is beneficial in the treatment of asthma. In asthma inflammatory cells, particularly eosinophils, migrate into the pulmonary tissue and airway lumen by means of adhesion molecules expressed on resident tissue cells—that is, fibroblasts—and become activated by cytokines and adhesive interactions. A study was undertaken to determine whether an interaction exists between the long acting ß2 agonist formoterol and the glucocorticoid budesonide on inhibition of adhesion molecule expression, as well as chemo/cytokine production by human lung fibroblasts. Methods: Lung fibroblasts were preincubated with therapeutically relevant drug concentrations of 10-8 M to 10-10 M. Cells were stimulated with interleukin (IL)-1ß (1 or 10 U/ml) for 8 hours and supernatants were collected for measurement of GM-CSF and IL-8 concentrations. The cells were fixed and subjected to a cell surface ELISA technique to measure the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Results: Formoterol exerted an additive effect on the inhibition of IL-1ß stimulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 upregulation and GM-CSF production by budesonide in concentrations of 10-9 M and above (p<0.05). IL-8 production was not influenced by formoterol. Conclusion: Formoterol exerts an additive effect on the anti-inflammatory properties of budesonide. In vitro data support the finding that the combination of budesonide and formoterol in asthma treatment strengthens the beneficial effect of either drug alone. PMID:11867828

  16. Local cytokine production in a murine model of Escherichia coli pyelonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rugo, H S; O'Hanley, P; Bishop, A G; Pearce, M K; Abrams, J S; Howard, M; O'Garra, A

    1992-01-01

    Cytokines may play an important role in the regulation of host defense against local bacterial infections. We have evaluated the local production of cytokines in a BALB/c mouse model of Escherichia coli pyelonephritis. Kidneys, draining lymph nodes, and spleens, were harvested at specific time intervals after bladder inoculation with E. coli corresponding to the stages of renal infection, infiltration, and bacterial clearance seen in this model. The presence of messenger RNA for specific cytokines (interleukins 1 through 6, chemotactic factors, granulocyte and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha) and beta, IFN gamma, transforming growth factor (TGF beta), and cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor (CSIF)/IL-10) was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of reverse transcribed RNA. We have demonstrated mRNA encoding IL-1, IL-6, G-CSF, GM-CSF, TNF alpha, H400 (a protein homologous to a family of chemotactic factors and identical to MIP-1 beta), and CSIF/IL-10 in the kidney at 12 h and 1, 2, and 3 d after bacterial challenge. No signal was seen in normal animals or in mice after 5 d. This pattern of cytokine expression was observed only in renal tissues suggesting a localized response. IL-6 was present in the urine at 4 h with rapid resolution to baseline levels by 24 to 48 h. In contrast, IL-6 was not usually detectable in the serum. TNF alpha was not detectable in the serum or urine during the course of the infection. By immunohistochemical staining of kidney sections we have shown that IL-6 is produced predominantly by mesangial cells rather than by the inflammatory infiltrate. This study provides additional evidence utilizing novel techniques that specific cytokines are produced locally in response to bacterial infections. The time course of production demonstrated in this model supports the important role of cytokines in natural host resistance to local infection. Images PMID:1541664

  17. Synergistic enhancement of cytokine-induced human monocyte matrix metalloproteinase-1 by C-reactive protein and oxidized LDL through differential regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yahong; Wahl, Larry M

    2006-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) are associated with inflammatory lesions, such as coronary artery disease, in which monocytes and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may play a major role in the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Monocytes are recruited to inflammation sites by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), which may also participate in the activation of monocytes. The objective of this study was to compare the individual and combined effect of CRP and ox-LDL on human monocyte MMP-1 and the role of MCP-1 in this effect. Although CRP or ox-LDL failed to induce MMP-1 in control monocytes, these molecules enhanced MMP-1 production induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with a synergistic increase in MMP-1 occurring in the presence of both mediators. Enhancement of MMP-1 by CRP and ox-LDL was attributable to a differential increase in MCP-1 and prostaglandin E2(PGE2). CRP, at physiological concentrations, induced high levels of MCP-1 and relatively low levels of PGE2, whereas ox-LDL caused a significant enhancement of PGE2 with little affect on MCP-1. Accordingly, CRP- and ox-LDL-induced MMP-1 production by monocytes was inhibited by anti-MCP-1 antibodies and indomethacin, respectively. Moreover, addition of exogenous MCP-1 or PGE2 enhanced MMP-1 production by TNF-alpha- and GM-CSF-stimulated monocytes. These results show that the combination of CRP and ox-LDL can cause a synergistic enhancement of the role of monocytes in inflammation, first, by increasing MCP-1, which attracts more monocytes and directly enhances MMP-1 production by activated monocytes, and second, by elevating PGE2 production, which also leads to higher levels of MMP-1.

  18. Engineering of double recombinant vaccinia virus with enhanced oncolytic potential for solid tumor virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kochneva, Galina; Sivolobova, Galina; Tkacheva, Anastasiya; Grazhdantseva, Antonina; Troitskaya, Olga; Nushtaeva, Anna; Tkachenko, Anastasiya; Kuligina, Elena; Richter, Vladimir; Koval, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) oncolytic therapy has been successful in a number of tumor models. In this study our goal was to generate a double recombinant vaccinia virus (VV-GMCSF-Lact) with enhanced antitumor activity that expresses exogenous proteins: the antitumor protein lactaptin and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Lactaptin has previously been demonstrated to act as a tumor suppressor in mouse hepatoma as well as MDA-MB-231 human adenocarcinoma cells grafted into SCID mice. VV-GMCSF-Lact was engineered from Lister strain (L-IVP) vaccinia virus and has deletions of the viral thymidine kinase and vaccinia growth factor genes. Cell culture experiments revealed that engineered VV-GMCSF-Lact induced the death of cultured cancer cells more efficiently than recombinant VACV coding only GM-CSF (VV-GMCSF-dGF). Normal human MCF-10A cells were resistant to both recombinants up to 10 PFU/cell. The selectivity index for breast cancer cells measured in pair cultures MCF-7/MCF-10A was 200 for recombinant VV-GMCSF-Lact coding lactaptin and 100 for VV-GMCSF-dGF. Using flow cytometry we demonstrated that both recombinants induced apoptosis in treated cells but that the rate in the cells with active caspase −3 and −7 was higher after treatment with VV-GMCSF-Lact than with VV-GMCSF-dGF. Tumor growth inhibition and survival outcomes after VV-GMCSF-Lact treatment were estimated using immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice models. We observed that VV-GMCSF-Lact efficiently delays the growth of sensitive and chemoresistant tumors. These results demonstrate that recombinant VACVs coding an apoptosis-inducing protein have good therapeutic potential against chemoresistant tumors. Our data will also stimulate further investigation of coding lactaptin double recombinant VACV in clinical settings. PMID:27708236

  19. Effect of an extract based on the medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill on expression of cytokines and calprotectin in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Førland, D T; Johnson, E; Saetre, L; Lyberg, T; Lygren, I; Hetland, G

    2011-01-01

    An immunomodulatory extract (AndoSan™) based on the medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill (AbM) has shown to reduce blood cytokine levels in healthy volunteers after 12 days' ingestion, pointing to an anti-inflammatory effect. The aim was to study whether AndoSan™ had similar effects on cytokines in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Calprotectin, a marker for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), was also measured. Patients with CD (n = 11) and with UC (n = 10) consumed 60 ml/day of AndoSan™. Patient blood plasma was harvested before and after 6 h LPS (1 ng/ml) stimulation ex vivo. Plasma and faecal calprotectin levels were analysed using ELISA and 17 cytokines [IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12 (Th1), IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 (Th2), IL-7, IL-17, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, MIP-1β, MCP-1, G-CSF, GM-CSF and IL-10] by multiplex assay. After 12 days' ingestion of AndoSan™, baseline plasma cytokine levels in UC was reduced for MCP-1 (40%) and in LPS-stimulated blood for MIP-1β (78%), IL-6 (44%), IL-1β (41%), IL-8 (30%), G-CSF (29%), MCP-1 (18%) and GM-CSF (17%). There were corresponding reductions in CD: IL-2 (100%), IL-17 (55%) and IL-8 (29%) and for IL-1β (35%), MIP-1β (30%), MCP-1 (22%), IL-8 (18%), IL-17 (17%) and G-CSF (14%), respectively. Baseline concentrations for the 17 cytokines in the UC and CD patient groups were largely similar. Faecal calprotectin was reduced in the UC group. Ingestion of an AbM-based medicinal mushroom by patients with IBD resulted in interesting anti-inflammatory effects as demonstrated by declined levels of pathogenic cytokines in blood and calprotectin in faeces.

  20. The Inhibitory Effects of Anti-Oxidants on Ultraviolet-Induced Up-Regulation of the Wrinkling-Inducing Enzyme Neutral Endopeptidase in Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroaki; Terazawa, Shuko; Niwano, Takao; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Imokawa, Genji

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that the over-expression of skin fibroblast-derived neutral endopeptidase (NEP) plays a pivotal role in impairing the three-dimensional architecture of dermal elastic fibers during the biological mechanism of ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin wrinkling. In that process, a UVB-associated epithelial-mesenchymal cytokine interaction as well as a direct UVA-induced cellular stimulation are associated with the up-regulation of NEP in human fibroblasts. In this study, we characterized the mode of action of ubiquinol10 which may abrogate the up-regulation of NEP by dermal fibroblasts, resulting in a reported in vivo anti-wrinkling action, and compared that with 3 other anti-oxidants, astaxanthin (AX), riboflavin (RF) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Post-irradiation treatment with all 4 of those anti-oxidants elicited an interrupting effect on the UVB-associated epithelial-mesenchymal cytokine interaction leading to the up-regulation of NEP in human fibroblasts but with different modes of action. While AX mainly served as an inhibitor of the secretion of wrinkle-inducing cytokines, such as interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulatory factor (GM-CSF) in UVB-exposed epidermal keratinocytes, ubiquinol10, RF and FMN predominantly interrupted the IL-1α and GM-CSF-stimulated expression of NEP in dermal fibroblasts. On the other hand, as for the UVA-associated mechanism, similar to the abrogating effects reported for AX and FMN, ubiquinol10 but not RF had the potential to abrogate the increased expression of NEP and matrix-metalloproteinase-1 in UVA-exposed human fibroblasts. Our findings strongly support the in vivo anti-wrinkling effects of ubiquinol10 and AX on human and animal skin and provide convincing proof of the UV-induced wrinkling mechanism that essentially focuses on the over-expression of NEP by dermal fibroblasts as an intrinsic causative factor. PMID:27648570

  1. CALCIUM OXALATE STONE FRAGMENT AND CRYSTAL PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Dominguez-Gutierrez, Paul R.; Canales, Benjamin K.; Bird, Vincent G.; Vieweg, Johannes; Khan, Saeed R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In murine and human hyperoxaluric conditions, macrophages can be seen surrounding renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal deposits. We hypothesize that macrophages play a role in degrading and destroying these deposits and investigated inflammatory response and phagocytic mechanisms when macrophages are exposed to human kidney stones and inorganic crystals. Materials and Methods Human monocytes were differentiated into resting, fully-differentiated macrophages by treating with recombinant human M-CSF or GM-CSF for 6 days. After confirming phenotype by flow cytometry, macrophages were exposed for 20 hours to fragments of sterile human CaOx stones or CaOx crystals. Crystal uptake was determined, and supernatant cytokine and chemokine profiles were analyzed using antibody arrays. qRT-PCR was used to validate mRNA profile expression. Results Under direct-vision fluorescent microscopy, activated human macrophages were noted to surround both stone fragments and synthesized crystals and destroy them in a step-by-step process that involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis. An inflammatory cascade was released by macrophages, including chemokines CCL2, CCL3, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), complement component C5/C5a and IL-8. The response patterns to stone and crystal material was dependent on macrophage phenotype and activation status. Conclusions In our in vitro study, macrophages differentiated with M-CSF displayed a greater ability to phagocytize crystal deposits than those treated with GM-CSF. Following clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macrophages released a number of cytokines crucial for inflammatory immune response, suggesting that tissue macrophages play an important role in preventing kidney stone disease by removing and digesting interstitial renal crystal deposits. PMID:26626217

  2. Immune response to sipuleucel-T in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B; Averia-Suboc, Monica; Luther, Michael; Reed, Mary E; Pinski, Jacek K; Quinn, David I

    2012-04-18

    Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients' own antigen presenting cells (APCs) to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The optimal timing for

  3. Effect of dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate on hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate (DCP) has previously been shown to inhibit MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenographs in nude mice in a manner correlated with increases in plasma IL-12 and IL-4 concentrations, and decreases in plasma IL-6 levels. DCP also inhibits indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an immuno-inhibitory enzyme, in human PBMCs (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells). Methods In the present study, DCP was administered per os, once daily for 14 days to hepatitis B virus (HBV) transgenic mice at 23, 7.3, and 2.3 mg/(kg d). Multivariate stepwise regression and MANOVA analyses, by gender and treatment, of liver HBV DNA and RNA measures, liver core and serum HBe antigen assays, serum cytokine/chemokine profiles, and IDO metabolite measurements were performed. Results DCP caused a significant dose-response reduction of log liver HBV DNA as measured by PCR in the female HBV mice. The gender dependence of the anti-HBV DNA activity was explained by the DCP Effects Model (DCP-EM) (p = .001) which includes three serum biomarker changes caused by DCP: 1) decreased MCP-1; 2) decreased Kyn/Trp (an estimation of IDO activity); and 3) increased GM-CSF. Conclusions Immunomodulation via IDO or TDO (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase) pathways, along with serum MCP-1 and GM-CSF are proposed to play roles in the anti-HBV mechanism of DCP based upon their coordinated modulation in the reduction of viral DNA replication in HBV mice. PMID:20356392

  4. High efficiency retroviral mediated gene transduction into single isolated immature and replatable CD34(3+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from human umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood is rich in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and has recently been used successfully in the clinic as an alternative source of engrafting and marrow repopulating cells. With the likelihood that cord blood stem/progenitor cells will be used for gene therapy to correct genetic disorders, we evaluated if a TK-neo gene could be directly transduced in a stable manner into single isolated subsets of purified immature hematopoietic cells that demonstrate self-renewed ability as estimated by colony replating capacity. Sorted CD34(3+) cells from cord blood were prestimulated with erythropoietin (Epo), steel factor (SLF), interleukin (IL)-3, and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and transduced with the gene in two ways. CD34(3+) cells were incubated with retroviral-containing supernatant from TK-neo vector-producing cells, washed, and plated directly or resorted as CD34(3+) cells into single wells containing a single cell or 10 cells. Alternatively, CD34(3+) cells were sorted as a single cell/well and then incubated with viral supernatant. These cells were cultured with Epo, SLF, IL-3, and GM-CSF +/- G418. The TK-neo gene was introduced at very high efficiency into low numbers of or isolated single purified CD34(3+) immature hematopoietic cells without stromal cells as a source of virus or accessory cells. Proviral integration was detected in primary G418-resistant(R) colonies derived from single immature hematopoietic cells, and in cells from replated colonies derived from G418R-colony forming unit-granulocyte erythroid macrophage megakaryocyte (CFU-GEMM) and -high proliferative potential colony forming cells (HPP-CFC). This demonstrates stable expression of the transduced gene into single purified stem/progenitor cells with replating capacity, results that should be applicable for future clinical studies that may utilize selected subsets of stem/progenitor cells for gene therapy. PMID:7504056

  5. Erythromycin prevents the pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Mikura, Shinichiro; Wada, Hiroo; Higaki, Manabu; Yasutake, Tetsuo; Ishii, Haruyuki; Kamiya, Shigeru; Goto, Hajime

    2011-07-01

    The effect of erythromycin on the inflammation caused by exposure to cigarette smoke was investigated in this study. Mice were exposed either to cigarette smoke or to environmental air (control), and some mice exposed to cigarette smoke were treated with oral erythromycin (100 mg/kg/day for 8 days). Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by determining the cellular content of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of various mediators, including keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, surfactant protein (SP)-D, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 in lung tissue were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. The exposure to cigarette smoke increased significantly the numbers of neutrophils (P = 0.029), macrophages (P = 0.029), and lymphocytes (P = 0.029) recovered in BAL fluid. Moreover, mRNA levels of KC (P = 0.029), MIP-2 (P = 0.029), SP-D (P = 0.029), and GM-CSF (P = 0.057) in the lung tissue were higher in mice exposed to cigarette smoke than in mice exposed to environmental air. In the erythromycin-treated mice that were exposed also to cigarette smoke, both neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were significantly lower in the BAL fluid than those in the vehicle-treated mice (P = 0.029). Erythromycin-treated mice exposed to cigarette smoke showed a trend of lower mRNA levels of KC and TNF-α in the lung tissue than those in the vehicle-treated mice, although the statistical significance was not achieved (P = 0.057). Our data demonstrated that erythromycin prevented lung inflammation induced by cigarette smoke, in parallel to the reduced mRNA levels of KC and TNF-α.

  6. Enhancement of intracellular signaling associated with hematopoietic progenitor cell survival in response to SDF-1/CXCL12 in synergy with other cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghee; Gotoh, Akihiko; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; You, Minute; Kohli, Lisa; Mantel, Charlie; Cooper, Scott; Hangoc, Giao; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2002-06-15

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) is a multifunctional cytokine. We previously reported that myelopoiesis was enhanced in SDF-1 alpha transgenic mice, probably due in part to SDF-1 alpha enhancement of myeloid progenitor cell (MPC) survival. To understand signaling pathways involved in this activity, we studied the effects on factor-dependent cell line MO7e cells incubated with SDF-1 alpha alone or in combination with other cytokines. SDF-1 alpha induced transient activation of extracellular stress-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK) and Akt, molecules implicated in cell survival. Moreover, ERK1/2, p90RSK, and Akt were synergistically activated by SDF-1 alpha in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), Steel factor (SLF), or thrombopoietin (TPO). Similar effects were seen after pretreatment of MO7e cells with SDF-1 alpha followed by stimulation with the other cytokines, suggesting a priming effect of SDF-1 alpha. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) did not appear to be involved in SDF-1 alpha actions, alone or in combination with other cytokines. These intracellular effects were consistent with enhanced myeloid progenitor cell survival by SDF-1 alpha after delayed addition of growth factors. SDF-1 alpha alone supported survival of highly purified human cord blood CD34(+++) cells, less purified human cord blood, and MO7e cells; this effect was synergistically enhanced when SDF-1 alpha was combined with low amounts of other survival-promoting cytokines (GM-CSF, SLF, TPO, and FL). SDF-1 may contribute to maintenance of MPCs in bone marrow by enhancing cell survival alone and in combination with other cytokines.

  7. Immune Response to Sipuleucel-T in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B.; Averia-Suboc, Monica; Luther, Michael; Reed, Mary E.; Pinski, Jacek K.; Quinn, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients’ own antigen presenting cells (APCs) to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The optimal timing for

  8. The proliferative effects of asbestos-exposed peripheral blood mononuclear cells on mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    MAKI, YUHO; NISHIMURA, YASUMITSU; TOYOOKA, SHINICHI; SOH, JUNICHI; TSUKUDA, KAZUNORI; SHIEN, KAZUHIKO; FURUKAWA, MASASHI; MURAOKA, TAKAYUKI; UENO, TSUYOSHI; TANAKA, NORIMITSU; YAMAMOTO, HIROMASA; ASANO, HIROAKI; MAEDA, MEGUMI; KUMAGAI-TAKEI, NAOKO; LEE, SUNI; MATSUZAKI, HIDENORI; OTSUKI, TAKEMI; MIYOSHI, SHINICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is thought to arise from the direct effect of asbestos on mesothelial cells. However, MM takes a long time to develop following exposure to asbestos, which suggests that the effects of asbestos are complex. The present study examined the effects of asbestos exposure on the cell growth of MeT-5A human mesothelial cells via cytokines produced by immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with antibodies against cluster of differentiation (CD)3 and CD28 upon exposure to the asbestos chrysotile A (CA) or crocidolite (CR); the growth of MeT-5A cells in media supplemented with PBMC culture supernatants was subsequently examined. MeT-5A cells exhibited an increase in proliferation when grown in supernatant from the 7-day PBMC culture exposed to CA or CR. Analysis of cytokine production demonstrated increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-3, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-17A in supernatants. Individual administration of these cytokines, excluding G-CSF and GM-CSF, led to an increase in cell growth of MeT-5A, whereas this effect was not observed following the combined administration of these cytokines. The results indicate that cytokines secreted by immune cells upon exposure to asbestos cause an increase in the growth activity of mesothelial cells, suggesting that alterations in the production of cytokines by immune cells may contribute to tumorigenesis in individuals exposed to asbestos. PMID:27123108

  9. Potential Role of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Joint Damage Induced by Brucella abortus Infection through Production and Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Scian, Romina; Barrionuevo, Paula; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; De Simone, Emilio A.; Vanzulli, Silvia I.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.; Delpino, M. Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Arthritis is one of the most common complications of human brucellosis, but its pathogenic mechanisms have not been elucidated. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are known to be central mediators of joint damage in inflammatory arthritides through the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade collagen and of cytokines and chemokines that mediate the recruitment and activation of leukocytes. In this study we show that Brucella abortus infects and replicates in human FLS (SW982 cell line) in vitro and that infection results in the production of MMP-2 and proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1], and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). Culture supernatants from Brucella-infected FLS induced the migration of monocytes and neutrophils in vitro and also induced these cells to secrete MMP-9 in a GM-CSF- and IL-6-dependent fashion, respectively. Reciprocally, culture supernatants from Brucella-infected monocytes and neutrophils induced FLS to produce MMP-2 in a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-dependent fashion. The secretion of proinflammatory mediators and MMP-2 by FLS did not depend on bacterial viability, since it was also induced by heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) and by a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19). These responses were mediated by the recognition of B. abortus antigens through Toll-like receptor 2. The intra-articular injection of HKBA or L-Omp19 into the knee joint of mice resulted in the local induction of the proinflammatory mediators MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in the generation of a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. These results suggest that FLS, and phagocytes recruited by them to the infection focus, may be involved in joint damage during brucellar arthritis through the production of MMPs and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:21730088

  10. Systemic inflammatory responses in patients with type 2 diabetes with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mesia, Ruben; Gholami, Fatemeh; Huang, Hong; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Wallet, Shannon M; Shaddox, Luciana M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this case–control study was to quantify the immune responsiveness in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) as compared with patients without diabetes (NT2D) diagnosed with periodontitis. Research Design and Methods Peripheral blood was collected from 20 patients with moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis (10 T2D, 10 NT2D). Blood samples were stimulated with ultrapure Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 24 hours. 14 cytokines/chemokines were quantified in culture supernatants using multiplex technology. Results T2D individuals demonstrated higher unstimulated levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, IL-10, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP1α), and 1β (MIP1β), and higher stimulated levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MIP1α and MIP1β, along with lower unstimulated and stimulated levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) when compared with NT2D (p<0.05). Importantly, the LPS-induced levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and MIP1α strongly correlated with severity of disease, measured by pocket depths (PD), within the T2D group (r2≥0.7, p<0.05), but not within NT2D. Conclusions Among patients with chronic periodontitis, patients with T2D seem to have an enhanced LPS-induced immune responsiveness than individuals without diabetes, which correlates with periodontal disease severity, concomitant with a less robust GM-CSF response. This data may in part explain the higher predisposition to periodontitis in this population. PMID:27651910

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT6 and CPF10 Induce Adenosine Deaminase 2 mRNA Expression in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Mi Jung; Ryu, Suyeon; Kim, Ha-Jeong; Cha, Seung Ick

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed hypersensitivity plays a large role in the pathogenesis of tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE). Macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) increase the levels of adenosine deaminase2 (ADA2) in the pleural fluid of TPE patients. However, it is as yet unclear whether ADA2 can be produced by macrophages when challenged with MTB antigens alone. This study therefore evaluated the levels of ADA2 mRNA expression, using monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) stimulated with MTB antigens. Methods Purified monocytes from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers were differentiated into macrophages using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The MDMs were stimulated with early secretory antigenic target protein 6 (ESAT6) and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP10). The mRNA expression levels for the cat eye syndrome chromosome region, candidate 1 (CECR1) gene encoding ADA2 were then measured. Results CECR1 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in MDMs stimulated with ESAT6 and CFP10, than in the unstimulated MDMs. When stimulated with ESAT6, M-CSF-treated MDMs showed more pronounced CECR1 mRNA expression than GM-CSF-treated MDMs. Interferon-γ decreased the ESAT6- and CFP10-induced CECR1 mRNA expression in MDMs. CECR1 mRNA expression levels were positively correlated with mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 10, respectively. Conclusion ADA2 mRNA expression increased when MDMs were stimulated with MTB antigens alone. This partly indicates that pleural fluid ADA levels could increase in patients with culture-negative TPE. Our results may be helpful in improving the understanding of TPE pathogenesis. PMID:28119750

  12. Cytotoxic activity of Justicia spicigera is inhibited by bcl-2 proto-oncogene and induces apoptosis in a cell cycle dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Cortés, J R; Cantú-Garza, F A; Mendoza-Mata, M T; Chavez-González, M A; Ramos-Mandujano, G; Zambrano-Ramírez, I R

    2001-12-01

    Identification of organic compounds from plants is of clinical significance because of the effect that they might have in patients with haematopoietic disorders. We studied the effect of the plant extract Justicia spicigera (Acanthaceae) in different haematopoietic cells: human leukaemic cell lines, umbilical cord blood cells, and mouse bone marrow cells. By examining colony formation and performing the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay it was shown that the plant extract of Justicia spicigera contains cytotoxic factors for leukaemic cells and has no proliferative activity on normal haematopoietic progenitor cells. Our results show that this plant extract induces apoptosis in the human leukaemia cell line TF-1, but not in the bcl-2 transfectant cell line TB-1. Similar results were obtained using a haemopoietic cell line 32D and 32DBcl2. The cultures of umbilical cord blood cells and mouse bone marrow that contain granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) do not proliferate or become terminally differentiated in the presence of the infusion of Justicia spicigera. GM-CSF that acts by abrogating programmed cell death is not sufficient to inhibit the apoptotic stimulus in TF-1 and 32D cells. Moreover mouse fibroblasts (3T3) and two cervical carcinoma cell lines CALO and INBL, undergo apoptosis in the presence of different concentrations of an infusion from the plant. Our data show that there is a strong correlation between the cytotoxic effect and cell proliferation. Together, these results indicate that the plant infusion of Justicia spicigera does not contain any haematopoietic activity, induces apoptosis inhibited by bcl-2 and is linked to cell proliferation.

  13. Active Idiotypic Vaccination Versus Control Immunotherapy for Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Ronald; Ganjoo, Kristen N.; Leonard, John P.; Vose, Julie M.; Flinn, Ian W.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Connors, Joseph M.; Berinstein, Neil L.; Belch, Andrew R.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Nichols, Craig; Emmanouilides, Christos E.; Timmerman, John M.; Gregory, Stephanie A.; Link, Brian K.; Inwards, David J.; Freedman, Arnold S.; Matous, Jeffrey V.; Robertson, Michael J.; Kunkel, Lori A.; Ingolia, Diane E.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Liu, Chih Long; Tibshirani, Robert; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Denney, Dan W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Idiotypes (Ids), the unique portions of tumor immunoglobulins, can serve as targets for passive and active immunotherapies for lymphoma. We performed a multicenter, randomized trial comparing a specific vaccine (MyVax), comprising Id chemically coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) plus granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to a control immunotherapy with KLH plus GM-CSF. Patients and Methods Patients with previously untreated advanced-stage follicular lymphoma (FL) received eight cycles of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone. Those achieving sustained partial or complete remission (n = 287 [44%]) were randomly assigned at a ratio of 2:1 to receive one injection per month for 7 months of MyVax or control immunotherapy. Anti-Id antibody responses (humoral immune responses [IRs]) were measured before each immunization. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included IR and time to subsequent antilymphoma therapy. Results At a median follow-up of 58 months, no significant difference was observed in either PFS or time to next therapy between the two arms. In the MyVax group (n = 195), anti-Id IRs were observed in 41% of patients, with a median PFS of 40 months, significantly exceeding the median PFS observed in patients without such Id-induced IRs and in those receiving control immunotherapy. Conclusion This trial failed to demonstrate clinical benefit of specific immunotherapy. The subset of vaccinated patients mounting specific anti-Id responses had superior outcomes. Whether this reflects a therapeutic benefit or is a marker for more favorable underlying prognosis requires further study. PMID:24799467

  14. Engineering HSV-1 vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Goins, William F; Huang, Shaohua; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications, and with the approval of Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20: 1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a fatal form of brain cancer, and in malignant melanoma. In fact, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly known as OncoVex GM-CSF) displayed efficacy in a recent Phase III trial when compared to standard GM-CSF treatment alone (Andtbacka et al. J Clin Oncol 31: sLBA9008, 2013) and may soon become the second FDA-approved gene therapy product used in standard patient care. In addition to the replication-competent oncolytic HSV vectors like T-VEC, replication-defective HSV vectors have been employed in Phase I-II human trials and have been explored as delivery vehicles for disorders such as pain, neuropathy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Research during the last decade on the development of HSV vectors has resulted in the engineering of recombinant vectors that are totally replication defective, nontoxic, and capable of long-term transgene expression in neurons. This chapter describes methods for the construction of recombinant genomic HSV vectors based on the HSV-1 replication-defective vector backbones, steps in their purification, and their small-scale production for use in cell culture experiments as well as preclinical animal studies.

  15. Eotaxin and IL-4 levels are increased in induced sputum and correlate with sputum eosinophils in patients with nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Luo, Wei; Liang, Zhenyu; Tan, Yaxia; Chen, Ruchong; Lu, Wenju; Zhong, Nanshan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis (NAEB) is characterized by chronic cough and airway eosinophilic inflammation. Airway and systemic inflammation cytokine profile have not been comprehensively described in patients with NAEB. The aim of the study was to identify the cytokine profile in sputum and serum of NAEB patients. Furthermore, the relationship between cytokines and clinical features would be evaluated. Induced sputum and serum were collected from untreated NAEB patients and healthy subjects. The cytokine profile in sputum and serum was analyzed by a bead-based multiplex cytokine assay including 21 cytokines. The levels of EGF, eotaxin, GM-CSF, GRO, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IP-10, MIP-1α, and TNF-α in sputum were significantly higher in NAEB patients than that in healthy subjects (all P < 0.05). Values of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of these cytokines were all above 0.750. The concentrations of eotaxin and IL-4 were positively correlated with sputum eosinophil percentage (r = 0.726, P = 0.002; r = 0.511, P = 0.043; respectively). No significant correlations between other cytokines (EGF, GM-CSF, GRO, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IP-10, MIP-1α, and TNF-α) in sputum and sputum eosinophil percentage were found. The level of IL-4 in serum was slightly higher in NAEB patients than in healthy subjects. However, there was no correlation between serum IL-4 levels and sputum eosinophil percentage. We identified the cytokine profile in sputum and serum from NAEB patients. Sputum eotaxin and IL-4 could have the potential to become the biomarkers for NAEB and might be useful to assist in the diagnosis of NAEB. PMID:28353595

  16. Role of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Inflammatory Cytokines in Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Tecilazich, Francesco; Dinh, Thanh; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Leal, Ermelindo; Tellechea, Ana; Kafanas, Antonios; Gnardellis, Charalambos; Magargee, Mary L.; Dejam, Andre; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Tigges, John C.; Carvalho, Eugenia; Lyons, Thomas E.; Veves, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate changes in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and cytokines in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) in association with wound healing. Methods We studied healthy subjects, diabetic patients not at risk of DFU, at risk of DFU and with active DFU. We prospectively followed the DFU patients over a 12-week period. We also investigated similar changes in diabetic rabbit and mouse models of wound healing. Results All EPC phenotypes except the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR)+CD133+ were reduced in the at risk and the DFU groups compared to the controls. There were no major EPC differences between the control and not at risk group, and between the at risk and DFU groups. Serum stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and stem cell factor (SCF) were increased in DFU patients. DFU patients who healed their ulcers had lower CD34+KDR+ count at visits 3 and 4, serum c-reactive protein (CRP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) at visit 1, interleukin-1 (IL-1) at visits 1 and 4. EPCs tended to be higher in both diabetic animal models when compared to their non-diabetic counterparts both before and ten days after wounding. Conclusions Uncomplicated diabetes does not affect EPCs. EPCs are reduced in patients at risk or with DFU while complete wound healing is associated with CD34+KDR+ reduction, suggesting possible increased homing. Low baseline CRP, IL-1α and GM-CSF serum levels were associated with complete wound healing and may potentially serve as prognostic markers of DFU healing. No animal model alone is representative of the human condition, indicating the need for multiple experimental models. PMID:24358275

  17. Novel insights into the relationships between dendritic cell subsets in human and mouse revealed by genome-wide expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Scott H; Walzer, Thierry; Dembélé, Doulaye; Thibault, Christelle; Defays, Axel; Bessou, Gilles; Xu, Huichun; Vivier, Eric; Sellars, MacLean; Pierre, Philippe; Sharp, Franck R; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Dalod, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Lymph-node resident DCs (LN-DCs) are subdivided into conventional DC (cDC) subsets (CD11b and CD8α in mouse; BDCA1 and BDCA3 in human) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). It is currently unclear if these various DC populations belong to a unique hematopoietic lineage and if the subsets identified in the mouse and human systems are evolutionary homologs. To gain novel insights into these questions, we sought conserved genetic signatures for LN-DCs and in vitro derived granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) DCs through the analysis of a compendium of genome-wide expression profiles of mouse or human leukocytes. Results We show through clustering analysis that all LN-DC subsets form a distinct branch within the leukocyte family tree, and reveal a transcriptomal signature evolutionarily conserved in all LN-DC subsets. Moreover, we identify a large gene expression program shared between mouse and human pDCs, and smaller conserved profiles shared between mouse and human LN-cDC subsets. Importantly, most of these genes have not been previously associated with DC function and many have unknown functions. Finally, we use compendium analysis to re-evaluate the classification of interferon-producing killer DCs, lin-CD16+HLA-DR+ cells and in vitro derived GM-CSF DCs, and show that these cells are more closely linked to natural killer and myeloid cells, respectively. Conclusion Our study provides a unique database resource for future investigation of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways governing the ontogeny and functions of leukocyte subsets, especially DCs. PMID:18218067

  18. Effect of Blood Component Coatings of Enosseal Implants on Proliferation and Synthetic Activity of Human Osteoblasts and Cytokine Production of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulejova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Riedel, Tomas; Pesakova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    The study monitored in vitro early response of connective tissue cells and immunocompetent cells to enosseal implant materials coated by different blood components (serum, activated plasma, and plasma/platelets) to evaluate human osteoblast proliferation and synthetic activity and inflammatory response presented as a cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions imitating the situation upon implantation. The cells were cultivated on coated Ti-plasma-sprayed (Ti-PS), Ti-etched (Ti-Etch), Ti-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA), and ZrO2 surfaces. The plasma/platelets coating supported osteoblast proliferation only on osteoconductive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch whereas activated plasma enhanced proliferation on all surfaces. Differentiation (BAP) and IL-8 production remained unchanged or decreased irrespective of the coating and surface; only the serum and plasma/platelets-coated ZrO2 exhibited higher BAP and IL-8 expression. RANKL production increased on serum and activated plasma coatings. PBMCs produced especially cytokines playing role in inflammatory phase of wound healing, that is, IL-6, GRO-α, GRO, ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, EGF, and MCP-1. Cytokine profiles were comparable for all tested surfaces; only ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, and MCP-1 expression depended on materials and coatings. The activated plasma coating led to uniformed surfaces and represented a favorable treatment especially for bioinert Ti-PS and ZrO2 whereas all coatings had no distinctive effect on bioactive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch. PMID:27651560

  19. Constitutive production of multiple cytokines and a human chorionic gonadotrophin beta-subunit by a human bladder cancer cell line (KU-19-19): possible demonstration of totipotential differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, M.; Miyakawa, A.; Nakashima, J.; Murai, M.; Nakamura, K.; Kubo, A.; Hata, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Bladder cancer cells have been shown to secrete a variety of factors that are not related to cells of urothelial origin. The histogenesis of these tumour developments is uncertain, and a variety of theories have been previously reported. In the present manuscript, we identify the factors constitutively produced by a human bladder cancer cell line (KU-19-19) that was found to produce beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin 1alpha (IL-1alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 8 (IL-8). The cells were obtained from a case of metastatic carcinoma that was originally diagnosed to be a grade 3 (WHO classification), invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. On microscopic observation, the cultured cells exhibited an epithelial appearance with vacuole formation in their cytoplasm. Ultrastructural observations revealed relatively marked microvilli and a tight junction. Significant amounts of beta-hCG, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1alpha, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations in the supernatant from cultured cells were demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, while the expression of mRNA of these marker proteins in cancer cells was also significantly exhibited by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, the expression of G-CSF receptor and IL-6 receptor mRNA was also shown by RT-PCR. Xenograft transplantability using nude mice was observed in association with the presence of severe neutrophilia in the peripheral blood. These results indicate that this cell line appears to be an effective model for the study of transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder with multipotent differentiation potentials. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9231915

  20. Measurement of Phenotype and Absolute Number of Circulating Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and Purified Protein Derivative Antigen-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Discriminate Active from Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barkham, Timothy M. S.; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M.; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T.

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154+ TNF-α+ cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154+ TNF-α+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ and CD154+ TNF-α+ CXCR3+. Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  1. Preliminary evaluation of DNA vaccine candidates encoding dengue-2 prM/E and NS1: their immunity and protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Gao, Na; Fan, Dong-Ying; Wang, Juan; An, Jing

    2013-06-01

    Public health is still seriously threatened by dengue virus (DENV) and no vaccine against DENV is yet available for clinical use till now. In this study, DNA vaccine candidates encoding DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2) prM/E (premembrane and envelope proteins) and NS1 (non-structural 1 protein) with or without a gene adjuvant, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), were evaluated in the aspects of immunity and protective efficacy in mice. We constructed three plasmids, pCAG-prM/E (which only expressed DENV2 prM/E), pCAG-prM/E/NS1 (which only expressed DENV2 prM/E/NS1) and pCAG-DG (which co-expressed DENV2 prM/E/NS1 and GM-CSF). The expressions of the recombined plasmids were analyzed by immuno-staining in Vero cells. Antibody responses and neutralization activity of the sera from the mice were assayed by ELISA and plaque reduction neutralization test after immunization with the plasmids. Immunized BALB/c mice were intracerebrally challenged with DENV2 to evaluate protective efficacy of the plasmids. The recombinant plasmids could be efficiently expressed in Vero cells and induced different levels of specific anti-DENV2 immune responses. The immunized mice were partially protected. The highest survival rate was observed in the pCAG-DG group although the anti-DENV2 titer and neutralization antibody titer were not the highest among the three groups. Our data suggested that pCAG-DG offered better protection against DENV2 infection.

  2. Favorable Alteration of Tumor Microenvironment by Immunomodulatory Cytokines for Efficient T-Cell Therapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tähtinen, Siri; Kaikkonen, Saija; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Kanerva, Anna; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I) therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-α2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience. PMID:26107883

  3. A multi-trimeric fusion of CD40L and gp100 tumor antigen activates dendritic cells and enhances survival in a B16-F10 melanoma DNA vaccine model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M; Rivas, Yaelis; Otero, Miguel; Raffa, Francesca N; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2015-09-11

    Vaccination with tumor-associated antigens can induce cancer-specific CD8+ T cells. A recent improvement has been the targeting of antigen to dendritic cells (DC) using antibodies that bind DC surface molecules. This study explored the use of multi-trimers of CD40L to target the gp100 melanoma tumor antigen to DC. The spontaneously-multimerizing gene Surfactant Protein D (SPD) was used to fuse gp100 tumor antigen and CD40L, creating the recombinant protein SPD-gp100-CD40L. This "third generation" DC-targeting vaccine was designed to both target antigen to DC and optimally activate dendritic cells by aggregating CD40 trimers on the DC membrane surface. SPD-gp100-CD40L expressed as a 110kDa protein. Analytical light scattering analysis gave elution data corresponding to 4-trimer and multi-trimer SPD-gp100-CD40L oligomers. The protein was biologically active on dendritic cells and induced CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. DNA vaccination with SPD-gp100-CD40L plasmid, together with plasmids encoding IL-12p70 and GM-CSF, significantly enhanced survival and inhibited tumor growth in a B16-F10 melanoma model. Expression of gp100 and SPD-CD40L as separate molecules did not enhance survival, highlighting the requirement to encode gp100 within SPD-CD40L for optimal vaccine activity. These data support a model where DNA vaccination with SPD-gp100-CD40L targets gp100 to DC in situ, induces activation of these DC, and generates a protective anti-tumor response when given in combination with IL-12p70 and GM-CSF plasmids.

  4. TNF-α and Tumor Lysate Promote the Maturation of Dendritic Cells for Immunotherapy for Advanced Malignant Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Shinji; Nishida, Hideji; Tanzawa, Yoshikazu; Takata, Munetomo; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Norio; Shirai, Toshiharu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Igarashi, Kentaro; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Kaneko, Shuichi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the immune system. There are many reports concerning DC-based immunotherapy. The differentiation and maturation of DCs is a critical part of DC-based immunotherapy. We investigated the differentiation and maturation of DCs in response to various stimuli. Methods Thirty-one patients with malignant bone and soft tissue tumors were enrolled in this study. All the patients had metastatic tumors and/or recurrent tumors. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were suspended in media containing interleukin-4 (IL-4) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). These cells were then treated with or without 1) tumor lysate (TL), 2) TL + TNF-α, 3) OK-432. The generated DCs were mixed and injected in the inguinal or axillary region. Treatment courses were performed every week and repeated 6 times. A portion of the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry to determine the degree of differentiation and maturation of the DCs. Serum IFN-γ and serum IL-12 were measured in order to determine the immune response following the DC-based immunotherapy. Results Approximately 50% of PBMCs differentiated into DCs. Maturation of the lysate-pulsed DCs was slightly increased. Maturation of the TL/TNF-α-pulsed DCs was increased, commensurate with OK-432-pulsed DCs. Serum IFN-γ and serum IL-12 showed significant elevation at one and three months after DC-based immunotherapy. Conclusions Although TL-pulsed DCs exhibit tumor specific immunity, TL-pulsed cells showed low levels of maturation. Conversely, the TL/TNF-α-pulsed DCs showed remarkable maturation. The combination of IL-4/GM-CSF/TL/TNF-α resulted in the greatest differentiation and maturation for DC-based immunotherapy for patients with bone and soft tissue tumors. PMID:23300824

  5. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab plus granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor as frontline treatment for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Strati, Paolo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Lerner, Susan; O'Brien, Susan; Wierda, William; Keating, Michael J; Faderl, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab (FCR), the standard of care for the frontline treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), is associated with a high rate of neutropenia and infectious complications. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) reduces myelosuppression and can potentiate rituximab activity. We conducted a clinical trial combining GM-CSF with FCR for frontline treatment of 60 patients with CLL. Eighty-six percent completed all six courses and 18% discontinued GM-CSF for toxicity: grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 30% of cycles, and severe infections in 16% of cases. The overall response rate was 100%. Both median event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) have not been reached. Longer EFS was associated with favorable cytogenetics. GM-CSF led to a lower frequency of infectious complications than in the historical FCR group, albeit similar EFS and OS.

  6. Pharmacological administration of granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor is of significant importance for the induction of a strong humoral and cellular response in patients immunized with recombinant carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Samanci, A; Yi, Q; Fagerberg, J; Strigård, K; Smith, G; Rudén, U; Wahren, B; Mellstedt, H

    1998-11-01

    Eighteen colorectal carcinoma patients without macroscopic disease after surgery were immunized using recombinant (r) human (h) carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with (n=9) or without (n=9) the addition of soluble granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The dose of rhCEA per immunization was 100 microg (n=6), 316 microg (n=6) or 1000 microg (n=6). rhCEA was given s.c. on day 1 and 80 microg/day of GM-CSF s.c. on days 1-4. The schedule was repeated six times during a period of 9 months. All patients in the GM-CSF group developed a strong rhCEA-dose-dependent IgG antibody response while only one-third of the non-GM-CSF patients mounted a weak antibody response. All patients (9/9) in the GM-CSF group developed a strong rhCEA-specific proliferative T cell response as well as type I T cells (interferon gamma secretion). In 45% of the patients also a weak type II T cell response (interleukin-4 secretion) was evoked. Both MHC-class-I- and -II restricted rhCEA-specific T cells were noted. A specific cellular response (proliferation and/or cytokine secretion) against native hCEA could be found in 8/9 patients in the GM-CSF group, although at a significantly lower level than against rhCEA. In the non-GM-CSF group a weak rhCEA-specific T cell response was induced. Three patients had a proliferative response, 4 patients type I T cells and 6 patients type II T cells. No signs of autoimmune reactions were noted. Local pharmacological administration of GM-CSF seemed to be a prerequisite for the induction of a strong immunity against baculovirus-produced hCEA protein. However, the cellular response against native CEA was of a significantly lower magnitude.

  7. [Signaling of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor and its clinical application: host-defense and organ protection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kanji

    2013-03-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine with multipotent properties. It has not only an activity to generate both granulocyte and macrophage lineages in the bone marrow, but also is capable of inducing terminal maturation of alveolar macrophages that is central for pulmonary host defense and pulmonary surfactant homeostasis. GM-CSF can stimulate mature myeloid cells (i.e. neutrophils and monocytes) with a known mechanism called "priming" to efficiently eliminate invading pathogens. Several clinical trials to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of GM-CSF in patients with diseases related to functional impairment of mature myeloid cells were reported. Inhalation of GM-CSF improved clinical severity of pulmonary alveolar proteionosis. Administration of GM-CSF for patients with immune compromised situation such as sepsis showed marginal benefits so far. Several animal experiments indicated neuroprotective effect of GM-CSE In the clinical setting, establishing reliable biomarkers to distinguish patients who will have benefit by administering GM-CSF may maximize its clinical efficacy.

  8. Antibodies binding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor produced by cord blood-derived B cell lines immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Revoltella, R P; Laricchia Robbio, L; Liberati, A M; Reato, G; Foa, R; Funaro, A; Vinante, F; Pizzolo, G

    2000-09-15

    We detected natural antibodies (auto-Abs) binding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in umbilical cord blood (CB) (23 of 94 samples screened) and peripheral blood of women at the end of pregnancy (6 of 42 samples tested). To demonstrate that Abs detected in CB were produced by the fetus, CB mononuclear cells were infected with Epstein-Barr virus in vitro. Ten cell lines producing constitutively anti-recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF) Abs were isolated and characterized. These cells displayed a male karyotype, an early activated B cell phenotype, coexpressed surface IgM and IgD, and secreted only IgM with prevailing lambda clonal restriction. Specific cell surface binding of biotinylated rhGM-CSF and high-level anti-rhGM-CSF IgM Ab production were typical features of early cell cultures. In late cell passages the frequency of more undifferentiated B cells increased. Serum Abs of either maternal or fetal origin or Abs produced in culture did not affect the granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating activity of rhGM-CSF from bone marrow progenitors in soft agar, suggesting that the Abs produced were nonneutralizing.

  9. Is Cryptococcus gattii a Primary Pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.; Saijo, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    The two etiologic agents of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii, have been commonly designated as either an opportunistic pathogen for the first species or as a primary pathogen for the second species. Such a distinction has been based on epidemiological findings that the majority of patients presenting meningoencephalitis caused by C. neoformans are immunocompromised while C. gattii infection has been reported more often in immunocompetent patients. A recent report, however, showed that GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) neutralizing antibodies were prevalent in the plasma of “apparently immunocompetent” C. gattii patients with meningoencephalitis. Because GM-CSF is essential for differentiation of monocytes to macrophages and modulating the immune response, it is not surprising that the lack of GM-CSF function predisposes otherwise healthy individuals to infection via inhalation of environmental pathogens such as C. gattii. Since the test for anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies is not included in routine immunological profiling at most hospitals, healthy patients with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies are usually categorized as immunocompetent. It is likely that a comprehensive immunological evaluation of patients with C. gattii meningoencephalitis, who had been diagnosed as immunocompetent, would reveal a majority of them had hidden immune dysfunction. This paper reviews the relationship between GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies and the risk for C. gattii infection with CNS involvement. PMID:27795955

  10. In vivo effect of human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on megakaryocytopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Aglietta, M.; Monzeglio, C.; Sanavio, F.; Apra, F.; Morelli, S.; Stacchini, A.; Piacibello, W.; Bussolino, F.; Bagnara, G.; Zauli, G. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production was investigated in patients with normal hematopoiesis. Three findings indicated that GM-CSF plays a role in megakaryocytopoiesis. During treatment with GM-CSF (recombinant mammalian, glycosylated; Sandoz/Schering-Plough, 5.5 micrograms protein/kg/d, subcutaneously for 3 days) the percentage of megakaryocyte progenitors (megakaryocyte colony forming unit (CFU-Mk)) in S phase (evaluated by the suicide technique with high 3H-Tdr doses) increased from 31% +/- 16% to 88% +/- 11%; and the maturation profile of megakaryocytes was modified, with a relative increase in more immature stage I-III forms. Moreover, by autoradiography (after incubation of marrow cells with 125I-labeled GM-CSF) specific GM-CSF receptors were detectable on megakaryocytes. Nevertheless, the proliferative stimulus induced on the progenitors was not accompanied by enhanced platelet production (by contrast with the marked granulomonocytosis). It may be suggested that other cytokines are involved in the regulation of the intermediate and terminal stages of megakaryocytopoiesis in vivo and that their intervention is an essential prerequisite to turn the GM-CSF-induced proliferative stimulus into enhanced platelet production.

  11. A role for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the regulation of CD8{sup +} T cell responses to rabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Wanjalla, Celestine N.; Goldstein, Elizabeth F.; Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2012-05-10

    Inflammatory cytokines have a significant role in altering the innate and adaptive arms of immune responses. Here, we analyzed the effect of GM-CSF on a RABV-vaccine vector co-expressing HIV-1 Gag. To this end, we immunized mice with RABV expressing HIV-1 Gag and GM-CSF and analyzed the primary and recall CD8{sup +} T cell responses. We observed a statistically significant increase in antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen and draining lymph nodes in response to GM-CSF. Despite the increase in APCs, the primary and memory anti HIV-1 CD8{sup +} T cell response was significantly lower. This was partly likely due to lower levels of proliferation in the spleen. Animals treated with GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies restored the CD8{sup +} T cell response. These data define a role of GM-CSF expression, in the regulation of the CD8{sup +} T cell immune responses against RABV and has implications in the use of GM-CSF as a molecular adjuvant in vaccine development.

  12. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  13. Effects of histamine and its antagonists on murine T-cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiufen; Zafar, Mohammad Ishraq; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of histamine and its antagonists on the surface marker expression of dendritic cells (DCs) and the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), histamine, and histamine receptor antagonists on DCs and T-cells. The bone marrow was extracted from the femurs and tibiae of 6- to 8-week-old female Balb/c mice and cultured in medium containing penicillin, streptomycin, L-glutamine, fetal calf serum, or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) alone or with interleukin (IL)-4. The cells received three different doses of LPS and histamine, plus three different doses of descarboethoxyloratadine (DCL). We assayed the supernatant for various cytokines. The spleen cells of DO11.10 mice were examined by flow cytometry, which included labeling and sorting CD4+ T-cells, as well as coculture of DCs and T-cells with ovalbumin (OVA)323-339 peptide. Histamine or histamine plus DCL did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD11c, CD11b, CD86, and CD80. However, GM-CSF increased the expression of all markers except CD80. Histamine increased interferon-γ production in GM-CSF + IL-4-cultured cells; it also enhanced IL-10 production, but suppressed IL-12 production in LPS-stimulated DCs with no DCL. Cimetidine inhibited IL-10 production and restored IL-12 secretion in LPS-treated DCs. LPS increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 levels. GM-CSF + IL-4-generated DCs had a stronger stimulatory effect on DO11.10 T-cell proliferation than GM-CSF-generated DCs. Inducible costimulator ligand expression was higher in GM-CSF + IL-4- than in GM-CSF-generated DC groups after 2 days of coculture, but decreased 4 days later. IL-13 production was higher in bone marrow DCs generated with GM-CSF than in those generated with GM-CSF + IL-4. OVA-pulsed DCs and OVA-plus-DCL DCs showed increased IL-12 levels. OVA plus LPS increased both IL-10 and interferon-α. Although histamine or histamine receptor-1 antagonists did not influence DC LPS

  14. Expression of murine and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors in S. cerevisiae: mutagenesis of the potential glycosylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Miyajima, A; Otsu, K; Schreurs, J; Bond, M W; Abrams, J S; Arai, K

    1986-01-01

    Murine (m) and human (h) granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSF) have been expressed in large quantities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a secretion vector containing the promoter and leader sequences of the mating pheromone alpha-factor. Functionally active mGM-CSF was identified by a proliferation assay with a factor-dependent cell line and by a granulocyte--macrophage colony formation assay using bone marrow cells. The activity of hGM-CSF was confirmed by stimulation of granulocyte--macrophage colony formation using human cord blood cells. Murine GM-CSF with various apparent mol. wts (13, 18, 24, 34 and 40 kd, as well as a smear of higher mol. wts) was detected in yeast culture medium by protein blotting using a rat monoclonal antibody specific for the mGM-CSF N-terminal region peptide. Protein blotting using a rat monoclonal antibody specific for the hGM-CSF N-terminal region demonstrated that a 15.6-kd and higher mol. wt heterogeneous species were secreted. Mutations introduced at each of the two potential N-linked glycosylation sites in mGM-CSF showed that the 13-kd protein is not glycosylated and the major 18-kd protein is mainly glycosylated at the more C-terminal site, whereas the heterogeneous higher mol. wt species were not affected by the mutations. The N-terminal amino acid of the 13-kd protein was shown to be Ser which was four amino acids in the C-terminal direction from the fusion point. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3525148

  15. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in 66 Patients with Myeloid or Lymphoid Neoplasms and Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Invasive Fungal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Amar; Rodriguez, Gilhen; Zuniga, Jorge; Akhrass, Fadi Al; Georgescu, Georgia; Pande, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Adding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) may improve the response to antifungal therapy in immunosuppressed patients with invasive fungal disease (IFD). Methods We retrospectively assessed 66 patients in whom GM-CSF was given during antifungal therapy. Results Severe neutropenia (77%) and refractory/relapsed cancer (65%) were common in the group. Prior to GM-CSF therapy, 15% of patients received high-dose corticosteroids for a median of 30 ± 16 days (median cumulative dose [c.d.], 1184 ± 1019 mg), and 9 received steroids during GM-CSF therapy for a median of 16 ± 12 days (median c.d., 230 ± 1314 mg). Mild toxic effects were noted in 9% of patients; there were no cases of cardiopulmonary toxicity. All cause deaths were observed in 68% and 48% of patients died of progressive IFD. High-dose corticosteroids prior to GM-CSF (OR, 24; 95% CI, 2.21–264.9; P ≤ 0.009), GM-CSF started in the intensive care unit (OR, 10; 95% CI, 1.66–63.8; P ≤ 0.01), concurrent granulocyte transfusions (OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.27–16.8; P ≤ 0.02), and proven/probable IFD (OR, 4; 95% CI, 1–16.2; P ≤ 0.05) predicted antifungal treatment failure. Conclusions GM-CSF adjuvant therapy was tolerated without serous toxicity and antifungal treatment failure remained a challenge in patients treated with high-dose systemic corticosteroids. PMID:23038157

  16. Suppression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor expression by glucocorticoids involves inhibition of enhancer function by the glucocorticoid receptor binding to composite NF-AT/activator protein-1 elements.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Cousins, D J; Jee, Y K; Staynov, D Z; Lee, T H; Lavender, P

    2001-09-01

    Increased expression of a number of cytokines including GM-CSF is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions such as bronchial asthma. Glucocorticoid therapy results in suppression of cytokine levels by a mechanism(s) not yet fully understood. We have examined regulation of GM-CSF expression by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone in human T cells. Transient transfection assays with reporter constructs revealed that dexamethasone inhibited the function of the GM-CSF enhancer, but had no effect on regulation of GM-CSF expression occurring through the proximal promoter. Activation of the GM-CSF enhancer involves cooperative interaction between the transcription factors NF-AT and AP-1. We demonstrate here that glucocorticoid-mediated inhibition of enhancer function involves glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding to the NF-AT/AP-1 sites. These elements, which do not constitute recognizable glucocorticoid response elements, support binding of the GR, primarily as a dimer. This binding correlates with the ability of dexamethasone to inhibit enhancer activity of the NF-AT/AP-1 elements, suggesting a competition between NF-AT/AP-1 proteins and GR.

  17. Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-Activated Eosinophils Promote Interleukin-23 Driven Chronic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Griseri, Thibault; Arnold, Isabelle C; Pearson, Claire; Krausgruber, Thomas; Schiering, Chris; Franchini, Fanny; Schulthess, Julie; McKenzie, Brent S; Crocker, Paul R; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-07-21

    The role of intestinal eosinophils in immune homeostasis is enigmatic and the molecular signals that drive them from protective to tissue damaging are unknown. Most commonly associated with Th2 cell-mediated diseases, we describe a role for eosinophils as crucial effectors of the interleukin-23 (IL-23)-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) axis in colitis. Chronic intestinal inflammation was characterized by increased bone marrow eosinopoiesis and accumulation of activated intestinal eosinophils. IL-5 blockade or eosinophil depletion ameliorated colitis, implicating eosinophils in disease pathogenesis. GM-CSF was a potent activator of eosinophil effector functions and intestinal accumulation, and GM-CSF blockade inhibited chronic colitis. By contrast neutrophil accumulation was GM-CSF independent and dispensable for colitis. In addition to TNF secretion, release of eosinophil peroxidase promoted colitis identifying direct tissue-toxic mechanisms. Thus, eosinophils are key perpetrators of chronic inflammation and tissue damage in IL-23-mediated immune diseases and it suggests the GM-CSF-eosinophil axis as an attractive therapeutic target.

  18. TRAF6 regulates the effects of polarized maturation of tolerability: Marrow-derived dendritic cells on collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Chenchen; Hong, Xuezhi; Liu, Jia; Luo, Xiaohong; Mo, Hanyou

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the relationship between tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and a differentially mature dendritic cell (mDC) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice and to determine whether or not TRAF6 regulates the activation of an immature dendritic cell (iDC) and inhibits iDC maturation to induce immune tolerance. The mouse bone marrow stem cells were induced with recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) and recombinant interleukin-4 (rmIL-4) to differentiate immature dendritic cells (DCs), which were divided into four groups with different maturation states: rmGM-CSF, rmIL-4; TNF-α; LPS; and FK506 group. The levels of the cell surfaces of CD80, CD86, and MHI-II were analyzed by flow cytometry to prove DCs at different levels of maturity. The expression of IL-12 in DCs at different maturation states was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of TRAF6 mRNA and protein in each group of DCs was detected by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. The results revealed that the differentiation of bone marrow cells into iDCs was significantly induced by cytokines (rmGM-CSF, IL-4). CD80, CD86, MHC-II were expressed in the four groups, and the difference between them was statistically significant (P<0.05). A higher degree of DC differentiation led to a gradual increase of IL-12 secretion in the four groups. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05) for this secretion (group D, 10,620.73±276.73 pg/ml). The expression levels of TRAF6 mRNA were significantly higher in group D than those in the other three groups (P<0.01). Although there was no significant difference in the expression levels of TRAF6 mRNA between groups B and C, the expression levels of TRAF6 mRNA between groups B and C were higher than those of the control group. The TRAF6 protein expression was higher in group D than that in the other three

  19. The impact of weight loss on circulating cytokines in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Berenice C; Patil, Avinash; Satyaraj, Ebenezer

    2015-02-15

    Chronic low-grade inflammation in obesity is characterized by an increased production of pro-inflammatory and chemotactic cytokines that are contributing to insulin resistance and related co-morbidities. Cytokines act in networks and exhibit pleiotropic effects so we investigated the circulating levels of a wide array of cytokines (pro and anti-inflammatory, chemotactic and growth factors) in a canine model of weight loss. The dogs served as their own control in order to study the impact of weight loss independent of potential confounding factors, such as history of excess weight or gender. While low-grade inflammation had been previously investigated in obese dogs by measuring changes in adipokines, acute phase proteins and key pro-inflammatory cytokines, to the best of our knowledge this is the first study to evaluate how weight loss impacts a wide array of circulating cytokines. Eighteen overweight Beagle dogs were recruited (six spayed females and 12 neutered males), and none of them were grossly obese according to the body condition score (BCS). All the dogs reached an ideal weight by the end of the program. Parameters were assessed before (baseline), at mid-point (month 3) and at end-point (month 6). Plasma GM-CSF, IL-2, Il-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IL-18, IFNγ, IP-10, TNFα, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), keratinocyte chemokine (KC) were measured with canine multiplex immunoassays. Fat mass was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorption (DEXA). Several cytokines decreased throughout the weight loss program (p<0.01) and were correlated with the percentage of fat measured by DEXA (p<0.05): chemotactic (MCP-1), growth factors (GM-CSF, IL-7 and IL-2), and pro-inflammatory (KC and IL-18). We could not show trends for several cytokines, possibly because their level may be lower than the assay sensitivity: anti-inflammatory (IL-4 and IL-10), and pro-inflammatory (IL-6 and TNFα). In conclusion, while our findings for several pro-inflammatory and

  20. 2003-2013, a valuable study: Autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell immunotherapy with cytokine-induced killer cells improves survival in stage IV breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao; Liang, Shuzhen; Jiang, Feng; Xu, Jiongyuan; Zhu, Weibing; Qian, Wei; Hu, Yong; Zhou, Zhanchun; Chen, Jibing; Niu, Lizhi; Xu, Kecheng; Lv, Youyong

    2017-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have both shown activity as immunotherapy in some malignancies. Our aim was to prospective assess the effect of this immunotherapy in patients with stage IV breast cancer. Between Aug 2003 and Dec 2013, we collected 368 patients who met inclusion criteria and divided into immunotherapy group (treatment group: 188 patients) and chemotherapy group (control group: 180 patients). DCs were prepared from the mononuclear cells isolated from patients in the treatment group using IL-2/GM-CSF and were loaded with tumour antigens; CIK cells were prepared by incubating peripheral blood lymphocytes with IL-2, IFN-γ, and CD3 antibodies. After the patients had received low-dose chemotherapy, those in the treatment group also received the DC-CIK therapy, which was repeated four times in a fortnight to form one cycle. At least three cycles of DC-CIK therapy were given. Immune function was measured in treatment group patients' sera. Disease-free survival (DFS) and Overall survival (OS) after the diagnosis of stage IV breast cancer was assessed after a 10-year follow-up. The result demonstrated that immune function is obviously enhanced after DC-CIK therapy. By Cox regression analysis, DC-CIK therapy reduced the risk of disease progression (p<0.01) with an increased OS (p<0.01). After low-dose chemotherapy, active immunization with DC-CIK immunotherapy is a potentially effective approach for the control of tumour growth in stage IV breast cancer patients.

  1. The effect of inhibition of leukotriene synthesis on the activity of interleukin-8 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Pizzey, A. R.; Linch, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    The cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhanced the extracellular release of arachidonate metabolites from ionophore-stimulated neutrophils by 145 ± 10% (mean ± S.E.M., n = 13) and 182 ± 11% (n = 16), respectively. To determine whether enhanced leukotriene production mediates the effects of these cytokines on neutrophil activity, two different specific arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors, piriprost and MK-886, were used to inhibit leukotriene synthesis. Neither inhibitor affected the upregulation of CD11b β2-integrin expression or priming of superoxide generation stimulated by IL-8 and GM-CSF. It is concluded that leukotrienes do not mediate either the direct or priming effects of these cytokines and that these classes of anti-inflammatory drugs are therefore unlikely to inhibit the effects of IL-8 and GM-CSF on neutrophil activation. PMID:18475524

  2. Low TLR7 gene expression in atherosclerotic plaques is associated with major adverse cardio- and cerebrovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Karadimou, Glykeria; Folkersen, Lasse; Berg, Martin; Perisic, Ljubica; Discacciati, Andrea; Roy, Joy; Hansson, Göran K.; Persson, Jonas; Paulsson-Berne, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Aims Processes in the development of atherosclerotic lesions can lead to plaque rupture or erosion, which can in turn elicit myocardial infarction or ischaemic stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) gene expression levels influence patient outcome and to explore the mechanisms linked to TLR7 expression in atherosclerosis. Methods and results Atherosclerotic plaques were removed by carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and subjected to gene array expression analysis (n = 123). Increased levels of TLR7 transcript in the plaques were associated with better outcome in a follow-up study over a maximum of 8 years. Patients with higher TLR7 transcript levels had a lower risk of experiencing major cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) during the follow-up period after CEA (hazard ratio: 2.38, P = 0.012, 95% CI 1.21–4.67). TLR7 was expressed in all plaques by T cells, macrophages and endothelial cells in capillaries, as shown by immunohistochemistry. In short-term tissue cultures, ex vivo treatment of plaques with the TLR7 ligand imiquimod elicited dose-dependent secretion of IL-10, TNF-α, GM-CSF, and IL-12/IL-23p40. This secretion was blocked with a TLR7 inhibitor. Immunofluorescent tissue analysis after TLR7 stimulation showed IL-10 expression in T cells, macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells. TLR7 mRNA levels in the plaques were correlated with IL-10 receptor (r = 0.4031, P < 0.0001) and GM-CSF receptor A (r = 0.4354, P < 0.0001) transcripts. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that TLR7 is abundantly expressed in human atherosclerotic plaques. TLR7 ligation elicits the secretion of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and high TLR7 expression in plaques is associated with better patient outcome, suggesting that TLR7 is a potential therapeutic target for prevention of complications of atherosclerosis. PMID:27864310

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of myrtol standardized and other essential oils on alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Myrtol standardized is established in the treatment of acute and chronic bronchitis and sinusitis. It increases mucociliar clearance and has muco-secretolytic effects. Additional anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties have been confirmed for Myrtol standardized, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil in several in vitro studies. Objective The aim of this study was to prove the ability of essential oils to reduce cytokines release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production derived from ex vivo cultured alveolar macrophages. Material and methods Alveolar macrophages from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, n = 26, GOLD III-IV) were pre-cultured with essential oils (10-3-10-8%) for 1 h and then stimulated with LPS (1 μg/ml). After 4 h and 20 h respectively a) cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), and b) TNF-α, IL-8, and GM-CSF secretion were quantified. Results In comparison with negative controls, pre-cultured Myrtol, eucalyptus oil and orange oil (10-4%) reduced in the LPS-activated alveolar macrophages ROS release significantly after 1+20 h as follows: Myrtol - 17.7% (P = 0.05), eucalyptus oil -21.8% (P < 0.01) and orange oil -23.6% (P < 0.01). Anti-oxidative efficacy was comparable to NAC (1 mmol/l). Essential oils also induced a TNF-α reduction: Myrtol (-37.3%, P < 0.001), eucalyptus oil (-26.8%, P < 0.01) and orange oil (-26.6%, P < 0.01). TNF-α reduction at 1+4 h and 1+20 h did not vary (Myrtol: -31.9% and -37.3% respectively, P = 0.372) indicating that this effect occurs early and cannot be further stimulated. Myrtol reduced the release of GMCSF by -35.7% and that of IL-8 only inconsiderably. Conclusions All essential oils tested have effective antioxidative properties in ex vivo cultured and LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Additionally, Myrtol inhibited TNF-α and GM-CSF release best indicating additional potent anti-inflammator y activity. PMID:20156758

  4. Strong stimulation of recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli by combining stimulatory control elements in an expression cassette

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The XylS/Pm expression system has been used to produce recombinant proteins at industrial levels in Escherichia coli. Activation of transcription from the Pm promoter takes place in the presence of benzoic acid or derivatives of it. Previous mutagenesis studies resulted in identification of several variants of the expression control elements xylS (X), Pm (P) and the 5'-untranslated region (U) that individually gave rise to strongly stimulated expression. The goal of this study was to test if combination of such stimulatory mutations in the same expression vectors would lead to further increase of expression levels. Results We combined X, P and U variants that were originally identified due to their ability to strongly stimulate expression of the reporter gene bla (resistance to penicillin). Combination of optimized elements stimulated bla expression up to 75-fold (X, P and U combined) relative to the wild-type system, while accumulated transcript levels increased about 50-fold. This is much more than for the elements individually. We also tested combination of the variant elements on two other and unrelated genes, celB (encoding phosphoglucomutase) and the human growth factor gene gm-csf. Protein production from these genes is much more efficient than from bla in the wild-type system, but expression was still significantly stimulated by the combination of X, P and U variants, although not to the same extent as for bla. We also integrated a single copy of the expression cassette with each gene into the E. coli chromosome and found that the expression level from this single copy was higher for bla than for the wild-type plasmid system, while it was lower for celB and gm-csf. Conclusion Our results show that combination of stimulatory expression control elements can be used to further increase production of different proteins in E. coli. For one reporter gene (bla) this allowed for more protein production from a single gene copy integrated on the chromosome

  5. Prevention of multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) diabetes in mice by an extract from gum resin of Boswellia serrata (BE).

    PubMed

    Shehata, Ahmed M; Quintanilla-Fend, L; Bettio, Sabrina; Singh, C B; Ammon, H P T

    2011-09-15

    Type 1-diabetes is an autoimmune disease, where a chronic inflammatory process finally causes β-cell death and insulin deficiency. Extracts from gum resin of Boswellia serrata (BE) have been shown to posses anti-inflammatory properties especially by targeting factors/mediators related to autoimmune diseases. Multiple low dose-streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) treatment is a method to induce diabetes in animals similar to Type 1 diabetes in humans. It was aimed to study whether or not a BE could prevent hyperglycemia, inflammation of pancreatic islets and increase of proinflammatory cytokines in the blood in MLD-STZ treated mice. In BK+/+ wild type mice, 5 days of daily treatment with 40 mg/kg STZ i.p. produced permanent increase of blood glucose, infiltration of lymphocytes into pancreatic islets (CD3-stain), apoptosis of periinsular cells (staining for activated caspase 3) after 10 days as well as shrinking of islet tissue after 35 days (H&E staining). This was associated with an increase of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1A, IL-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α) in the blood. Whereas BE alone did not affect blood glucose in non diabetic mice, in STZ treated mice simultaneous i.p. injection of 150 mg/kg of BE over 10 days prevented animals from increase of blood glucose levels. Histochemical studies showed, that i.p. injection of 150 mg/kg BE for 10 days starting with STZ treatment, avoided lymphocyte infiltration into islets, apoptosis of periinsular cells and shrinking of islet size 35 days after STZ. As far as the cytokines tested are concerned, there was a significant inhibition of the increase of G-CSF and GM-CSF. BE also significantly prevented the increase of IL-1A, IL-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF-α. It is concluded that extracts from the gum resin of Boswellia serrata prevent islet destruction and consequent hyperglycemia in an animal model of type 1

  6. Biomarker-based diagnosis of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infections: A prospective, multicentre, case-control evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Vrazic, Hrvoje; Haller, Bernhard; Braun, Siegmund; Petzold, Tobias; Ott, Ilka; Lennerz, Agnes; Michel, Jonathan; Blažek, Patrick; Deisenhofer, Isabel; Whittaker, Peter; Kolb, Christof

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) has risen steadily, yet the rate of cardiac device infections (CDI) has disproportionately increased. Amongst all cardiac device infections, the pocket infection is the most challenging diagnosis. Therefore, we aimed to improve diagnosis of such pocket infection by identifying relevant biomarkers. Methods We enrolled 25 consecutive patients with invasively and microbiologically confirmed pocket infection. None of the patients had any confounding conditions. Pre-operative levels of 14 biomarkers were compared in infected and control (n = 50) patients. Our selected biomarkers included white blood cell count (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), lipopolysaccharide binding protein, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP), polymorphonuclear-elastase, presepsin, various interleukins, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Results Of the 25 patients with isolated pocket infection (70±13years, 76% male, 40% ICDs), none presented with leukocytosis. In contrast, they had higher serum levels of HS-CRP (p = 0.019) and PCT (p = 0.010) than control patients. Median PCT-level was 0.06 ng/mL (IQR 0.03–0.07 ng/mL) in the study group versus 0.03 ng/mL (IQR 0.02–0.04 ng/mL) in controls. An optimized PCT cut-off value of 0.05 ng/mL suggests pocket infection with a sensitivity of 60% and specificity of 82%. In addition TNF-α- and GM-CSF-levels were lower in the study group. Other biomarkers did not differ between groups. Conclusion Diagnosis of isolated pocket infections requires clinical awareness, physical examination, evaluation of blood cultures and echocardiography assessment. Nevertheless, measurement of PCT- and HS-CRP-levels can aid diagnosis. However, no conclusion can be drawn from normal WBC-values. Clinical trial registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01619267 PMID:28264059

  7. Exposure to Palladium Nanoparticles Affects Serum Levels of Cytokines in Female Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Corbi, Maddalena; Leso, Veruscka; Marinaccio, Alessandro; Leopold, Kerstin; Schindl, Roland; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Information currently available on the impact of palladium on the immune system mainly derives from studies assessing the biological effects of palladium salts. However, in the last years, there has been a notable increase in occupational and environmental levels of fine and ultrafine palladium particles released from automobile catalytic converters, which may play a role in palladium sensitization. In this context, the evaluation of the possible effects exerted by palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) on the immune system is essential to comprehensively assess palladium immunotoxic potential. Aim Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Pd-NPs on the immune system of female Wistar rats exposed to this xenobiotic for 14 days, by assessing possible quantitative changes in a number of cytokines: IL-1α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, GM-CSF, INF-γ and TNF-α. Methods Twenty rats were randomly divided into four exposure groups and one of control. Animals were given a single tail vein injection of vehicle (control group) and different concentrations of Pd-NPs (0.012, 0.12, 1.2 and 12 μg/kg). A multiplex biometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate cytokine serum levels. Results The mean serum concentrations of all cytokines decreased after the administration of 0.012 μg/kg of Pd-NPs, whereas exceeded the control levels at higher exposure doses. The highest concentration of Pd-NPs (12 μg/kg) induced a significant increase of IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, GM-CSF and INF-γ compared to controls. Discussion and Conclusions These results demonstrated that Pd-NP exposure can affect the immune response of rats inducing a stimulatory action that becomes significant at the highest administered dose. Our findings did not show an imbalance between cytokines produced by CD4+ T helper (Th) cells 1 and 2, thus suggesting a generalized stimulation of the immune system with a simultaneous activation and polarization of the

  8. Lead effects on development and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells promote Th2 immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Donghong; Mondal, Tapan K.; Lawrence, David A. . E-mail: lawrencd@wadsworth.org

    2007-07-01

    Although lead (Pb) has significant effects on the development and function of macrophages, B cells, and T cells and has been suggested to promote allergic asthma in mice and humans, Pb modulation of bone marrow (BM)-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and the resultant DC effects on Th1 and Th2 development have not been examined. Accordingly, we cultured BM cells with murine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) {+-} PbCl{sub 2}. At day 10, culture supernatant (SN) and non-adherent cells were harvested for analysis. Additionally, day 10 non-adherent BM-DCs were harvested and recultured with mGM-CSF + LPS {+-} Pb for 2 days. The day 10 Pb exposure significantly inhibited BM-DC generation, based on CD11c expression. Although fewer DCs were generated with Pb, the existing Pb-exposed DCs had significantly greater MHC-II expression than did the non-Pb-exposed DCs. However, these differences diminished upon LPS stimulation. After LPS stimulation, CD80, CD86, CD40, CD54, and MHC-II were all up-regulated on both Pb-DCs and DCs, but Pb-DCs expressed significantly less CD80 than did DCs. The CD86:CD80 ratio suggests a Pb-DC potential for Th2 cell development. After LPS stimulation, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), and TNF-{alpha} levels significantly increased with both Pb-DCs and DCs, but Pb-DCs produced significantly less cytokines than did DCs, except for IL-10, which further supports Pb-DC preferential skewing toward type-2 immunity. In vitro studies confirm that Pb-DCs have the ability to polarize antigen-specific T cells to Th2 cells. Pb-DCs also enhanced allogeneic and autologous T cell proliferation in vitro, and in vivo studies suggested that Pb-DCs inhibited Th1 effects on humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The Pb effect was mainly on DCs, rather than on T cells, and Pb's modification of DC function appears to be the main cause of Pb's promotion of type-2-related immunity, which may relate to Pb's enhanced activation of the Erk/MAP kinase pathway.

  9. Altered esophageal histamine receptor expression in Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE): implications on disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Merves, Jamie; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Benitez, Alain J; Muir, Amanda B; Lee, Anna J; Lim, Diana M; Dods, Kara; Mehta, Isha; Ruchelli, Eduardo D; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Spergel, Jonathan M; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic allergic disorder, whose pathobiology is incompletely understood. Histamine-producing cells including mast cells and basophils have been implicated in EoE. However, very little is currently known about the role of histamine and histamine receptor (HR) expression and signaling in the esophageal epithelium. Herein, we characterized HR (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) expression in human esophageal biopsies and investigate the role of histamine signaling in inducible cytokine expression in human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro. HR expression was quantified in esophageal biopsies from non-EoE control (N = 23), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf, N = 26) and active EoE (>15 eos/hpf, N = 22) subjects using qRT-PCR and immunofluorescent localization. HR expression and histamine-mediated cytokine secretion were evaluated in human primary and telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells. H1R, H2R, and H4R expression were increased in active EoE biopsies compared to inactive EoE and controls. H2R was the most abundantly expressed receptor, and H3R expression was negligible in all 3 cohorts. Infiltrating eosinophils expressed H1R, H2R, and H4R, which contributed to the observed increase in HR in active subjects. H1R and H2R, but not H3R or H4R, were constitutively expressed by primary and immortalized cells, and epithelial histamine stimulation induced GM-CSF, TNFα, and IL-8, but not TSLP or eotaxin-3 secretion. Epithelial priming with the TLR3 ligand poly (I:C) induced H1R and H2R expression, and enhanced histamine-induced GM-CSF, TNFα, and IL-8 secretion. These effects were primarily suppressed by H1R antagonists, but unaffected by H2R antagonism. Histamine directly activates esophageal epithelial cytokine secretion in vitro in an H1R dependent fashion. However, H1R, H2R and H4R are induced in active inflammation in EoE in vivo. While systemic antihistamine (anti-H1R) therapy may not induce clinical remission in EoE, our study

  10. Evaluation of cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory responses of nanoparticles from photocopiers in three human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Photocopiers emit nanoparticles with complex chemical composition. Short-term exposures to modest nanoparticle concentrations triggered upper airway inflammation and oxidative stress in healthy human volunteers in a recent study. To further understand the toxicological properties of copier-emitted nanoparticles, we studied in-vitro their ability to induce cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, DNA damage, and apoptosis in relevant human cell lines. Methods Three cell types were used: THP-1, primary human nasal- and small airway epithelial cells. Following collection in a large volume photocopy center, nanoparticles were extracted, dispersed and characterized in the cell culture medium. Cells were doped at 30, 100 and 300 μg/mL administered doses for up to 24 hrs. Estimated dose delivered to cells, was ~10% and 22% of the administered dose at 6 and 24 hrs, respectively. Gene expression analysis of key biomarkers was performed using real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in THP-1 cells at 5 μg nanoparticles/mL for 6-hr exposure for confirmation purposes. Results Multiple cytokines, GM-CSF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFNγ, MCP-1, TNF-α and VEGF, were significantly elevated in THP-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression analysis confirmed up-regulation of the TNF-α gene in THP-1 cells, consistent with cytokine findings. In both primary epithelial cells, cytokines IL-8, VEGF, EGF, IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-6 and GM-CSF were significantly elevated. Apoptosis was induced in all cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with the significant up-regulation of key apoptosis-regulating genes P53 and Casp8 in THP-1 cells. No significant DNA damage was found at any concentration with the comet assay. Up-regulation of key DNA damage and repair genes, Ku70 and Rad51, were also observed in THP-1 cells, albeit not statistically significant. Significant up-regulation of the key gene HO1 for oxidative stress, implicates oxidative stress induced by

  11. Disparate regulation of human fetal erythropoiesis by the microenvironments of the liver and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Muench, M O; Namikawa, R

    2001-01-01

    The liver and the bone marrow (BM) are the major organs that support hematopoiesis in the human fetus. Although both tissues contain the spectrum of hematopoietic cells, erythropoiesis dominates the liver. Previous studies suggested that a unique responsiveness of fetal burst-forming units erythroid (BFU-E) to erythropoietin (EPO) obviates the need for cytokines with burst-promoting activity (BPA) in fetal erythropoiesis. This potential regulatory mechanism whereby fetal erythropoiesis is enhanced was further investigated. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to isolate liver and BM progenitors based on their levels of CD34 and CD38 expression. The most mature population of CD34+ lineage (Lin-) cells was also the most prevalent of the three subpopulations and contained BFU-E responsive to EPO alone under serum-deprived conditions. Kit ligand (KL) also strongly synergized with EPO in stimulating the growth of these BFU-E. An intermediate subset of CD34++CD38+Lin- cells contained erythroid progenitors responsive to EPO alone, but also displayed synergism between EPO and KL, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or interleukin (IL)-3, demonstrating that erythroid progenitors that respond to cytokines with BPA do exist in fetal tissues as in the adult BM. Candidate stem cells (CD34++CD38-Lin- cells) did not respond to EPO. Synergisms among KL, GM-CSF, and IL-3, and to a lesser extent granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and FLK-2/FLT-3 ligand (FL), supported the growth of primitive multipotent progenitors that became responsive to EPO. These data define the limits of EPO activity in fetal erythropoiesis to cells that express CD38 and demonstrate the potential for various cytokine interactions to be involved in regulating fetal erythropoiesis. Furthermore, a comparison of the responses of liver and BM erythroid progenitors revealed similarity in their responses to cytokines but a difference in the frequency of BFU-E among the three

  12. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor/diphtheria toxin receptor expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vinante, F; Rigo, A; Papini, E; Cassatella, M A; Pizzolo, G

    1999-03-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is an EGF family member expressed by numerous cell types that binds to EGF receptor 1 (HER-1) or 4 (HER-4) inducing mitogenic and/or chemotactic activities. Membrane-bound HB-EGF retains growth activity and adhesion capabilities and the unique property of being the receptor for diphtheria toxin (DT). The interest in studying HB-EGF in acute leukemia stems from these mitogenic, chemotactic, and receptor functions. We analyzed the expression of HB-EGF in L428, Raji, Jurkat, Karpas 299, L540, 2C8, HL-60, U937, THP-1, ML-3, and K562 cell lines and in primary blasts from 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases, by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot and by the evaluation of sensitivity to DT. The release of functional HB-EGF was assessed by evaluation of its proliferative effects on the HB-EGF-sensitive Balb/c 3T3 cell line. HB-EGF was expressed by all myeloid and T, but not B (L428, Raji), lymphoid cell lines tested, as well as by the majority (8 of 12) of ex vivo AML blasts. Cell lines (except for the K562 cell line) and AML blasts expressing HB-EGF mRNA underwent apoptotic death following exposure to DT, thus demonstrating the presence of the HB-EGF molecule on their membrane. Leukemic cells also released a fully functional HB-EGF molecule that was mitogenic for the Balb/c 3T3 cell line. Factors relevant to the biology of leukemic growth, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), 1alpha,25-(OH)2D3, and especially all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), upregulated HB-EGF mRNA in HL-60 or ML-3 cells. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced HB-EGF mRNA and acquisition of sensitivity to DT in one previously HB-EGF-negative leukemia case. Moreover, the U937 and Karpas 299 cell lines expressed HER-4 mRNA. This work shows that HB-EGF is a growth factor produced by primary leukemic cells and regulated by ATRA, 1alpha, 25-(OH)2D3, and GM-CSF.

  13. Absence of IFN-γ increases brain pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-susceptible DRB1*0301.DQ8 HLA transgenic mice through secretion of proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 and induction of pathogenic monocytes/microglia into the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Luo, Ningling; Luckey, David; Papke, Louisa; Hubbard, Alyssa; Wussow, Arika; Smart, Michele; Giri, Shailendra; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella

    2014-11-15

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS of presumed autoimmune origin. Of all the genetic factors linked with multiple sclerosis, MHC class II molecules have the strongest association. Generation of HLA class II transgenic (Tg) mice has helped to elucidate the role of HLA class II genes in chronic inflammatory and demyelinating diseases. We have shown that the human HLA-DRB1*0301 gene predisposes to proteolipid protein (PLP)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), whereas HLA-DQβ1*0601 (DQ6) was resistant. We also showed that the DQ6 molecule protects from EAE in DRB1*0301.DQ6 double-Tg mice by producing anti-inflammatory IFN-γ. HLA-DQβ1*0302 (DQ8) Tg mice were also resistant to PLP(91-110)-induced EAE, but production of proinflammatory IL-17 exacerbated disease in DRB1*0301.DQ8 mice. To further confirm the role of IFN-γ in protection, we generated DRB1*0301.DQ8 mice lacking IFN-γ (DRB1*0301.DQ8.IFN-γ(-/-)). Immunization with PLP(91-110) peptide caused atypical EAE in DRB1*0301.DQ8.IFN-γ(-/-) mice characterized by ataxia, spasticity, and dystonia, hallmarks of brain-specific disease. Severe brain-specific inflammation and demyelination in DRB1*0301.DQ8.IFN-γ(-/-) mice with minimal spinal cord pathology further confirmed brain-specific pathology. Atypical EAE in DRB1*0301.DQ8.IFN-γ(-/-) mice was associated with increased encephalitogenicity of CD4 T cells and their ability to produce greater levels of IL-17 and GM-CSF compared with DRB1*0301.DQ8 mice. Further, areas with demyelination showed increased presence of CD68(+) inflammatory cells, suggesting an important role for monocytes/microglia in causing brain pathology. Thus, our study supports a protective role for IFN-γ in the demyelination of brain through downregulation of IL-17/GM-CSF and induction of neuroprotective factors in the brain by monocytes/microglial cells.

  14. Inflammatory cytokine levels correlate with amyloid load in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikunj S; Paris, Daniel; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Quadros, Amita N; Crawford, Fiona C; Mullan, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Background Inflammation is believed to play an important role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cytokine production is a key pathologic event in the progression of inflammatory cascades. The current study characterizes the cytokine expression profile in the brain of two transgenic mouse models of AD (TgAPPsw and PS1/APPsw) and explores the correlations between cytokine production and the level of soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ. Methods Organotypic brain slice cultures from 15-month-old mice (TgAPPsw, PS1/APPsw and control littermates) were established and multiple cytokine levels were analyzed using the Bio-plex multiple cytokine assay system. Soluble and insoluble forms of Aβ were quantified and Aβ-cytokine relationships were analyzed. Results Compared to control littermates, transgenic mice showed a significant increase in the following pro-inflammatory cytokines: TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-1β, IL-1α and GM-CSF. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α and GM-CSF showed a sequential increase from control to TgAPPsw to PS1/APPsw suggesting that the amplitude of this cytokine response is dependent on brain Aβ levels, since PS1/APPsw mouse brains accumulate more Aβ than TgAPPsw mouse brains. Quantification of Aβ levels in the same slices showed a wide range of Aβ soluble:insoluble ratio values across TgAPPsw and PS1/APPsw brain slices. Aβ-cytokine correlations revealed significant relationships between Aβ1–40, 1–42 (both soluble and insoluble) and all the above cytokines that changed in the brain slices. Conclusion Our data confirm that the brains of transgenic APPsw and PS1/APPsw mice are under an active inflammatory stress, and that the levels of particular cytokines may be directly related to the amount of soluble and insoluble Aβ present in the brain suggesting that pathological accumulation of Aβ is a key driver of the neuroinflammatory response. PMID:15762998

  15. Treatment of murine visceral leishmaniasis using an 8-hyd