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Sample records for alfalfa red clover

  1. 7 CFR 202.44 - Proceedings under section 305(b) to determine whether foreign alfalfa or red clover seed is not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... foreign alfalfa or red clover seed is not adapted for general agricultural use in the United States. 202... Proceedings under section 305(b) to determine whether foreign alfalfa or red clover seed is not adapted for... for the purpose of determining whether seed of alfalfa or red clover from any foreign country...

  2. Meat goat kids finished on alfalfa, red clover, or orchardgrass pastures: Carcass merit and meat quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was conducted in 2005-2007 to evaluate carcass and meat quality parameters when meat goat kids were finished on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L; ALF); red clover (Trifolium pretense L.; RCG); or orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L; OGR) pastures. Final shrunk body weights were similar whe...

  3. Inhibitory potential of pure isoflavonoids, red clover, and alfalfa extracts on hemoglobin glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohsen; Asgary, Sedigheh; Najafi, Somayeh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-enzymatic glycosylation of hemoglobin is complications of diabetes. Antioxidant system imbalance can result in the emergence of free radicals’ destructive effects in the long-term. Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) contain isoflavonoids and have antioxidant activity. This experimental study evaluated the inhibitory activity of pure isoflavonoids (daidzein and genistein), red clover and alfalfa extracts on hemoglobin glycosylation. METHODS This study was performed in Iran. Stock solution of hydroalcoholic extracts of red clover and alfalfa in concentrations of 1 and 10 g/100 ml and stock solution of daidzein and genistein in concentrations of 250 ng, 500 ng, 25 µg and 250 µg/100 ml were prepared as case groups. Control group was without hydroalcoholic extracts of plants and pure isoflavonoids. All experiments were performed in triplicate. Hemoglobin was prepared and antioxidant activities were investigated to estimate degree of nonenzymatic hemoglobin glycosylation. RESULTS There was no significantly difference between used extracts (extract of red clover and alfalfa) and control of the hemoglobin glycosylation but using daidzein (P = 0.046, 0.029 and 0.021, respectively) and genistein (P = 0.034, 0.036 and 0.028) significantly inhibited (P < 0.050) this reaction in 25 µg/100 ml, 250 and 500 ng/100 ml concentrations when compared to control. in 25 µg/100 ml, 250 ng and 500 ng/100 ml concentrations percentage of inhibition were 32, 80 and 74.5% respectively with used of daidzein and were 21, 83 and 76% respectively with consumption of genistein. CONCLUSION According to decrease of glycation of hemoglobin with isoflavonoids, two used plant in this study containing isoflavonoid may be useful on diabetes. PMID:26405442

  4. Soluble phenolic compounds in different cultivars of red clover and alfalfa, and their implication for protection against proteolysis and ammonia production in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover contains phenolic compounds with roles in inhibiting proteolysis and loss of amino acids as ammonia. Alfalfa has been found to have lower concentrations of phenolic compounds, but few alfalfa and red clover cultivars have been compared for phenolic content. Total soluble phenolic compou...

  5. Infection of Seedlings of Alfalfa and Red Clover by Concomitant Populations of Meloidogyne incognita and Pratylenchus penetrans

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Deborah R.; Chapman, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Invasion of 2-day-old seedlings of 'Buffalo' alfalfa and 'Kenland' red clover by larvae of M. incognita and adults of P. penetrans, during 1-3 day periods of incubation at 24 C, was investigated in 50-mm petri dishes on 1% agar. Penetration by both nematodes increased arithmetically with increased numbers in inocula. P. penetrans invaded alfalfa more readily than red cover, but M. incognita invaded red clover more readily than alfalfa. Both nematodes inhibited root-elongation of alfalfa more than that of red clover. In combinations of 10 and 50 of both nematodes, invasion of both plants by both nematodes was the same as for each nematode alone. Penetration by M. incognita into alfalfa, but not into red clover, was significantly reduced when combinations of 50 M. incognita and 200 P. penetrans were inoculated simultaneously. In the presence of large numbers of entrant P. penetrans in both plants, penetration by M. incognita was highly significantly reduced. Penetration by P. penetrans was unaffected in the reciprocal situations. PMID:19319281

  6. Replacing alfalfa or red clover silage with birdsfoot trefoil silage in total mixed rations increases production of lactating dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare effects of feeding silage made from birdsfoot trefoil (BFT), selected for low (LBFT), normal (NBFT) and high (HBFT) levels of condensed tannins (CT), to feeding silage made from alfalfa (AL) or red clover (RC) on milk production and nutrient utilization in ...

  7. Supplementing rumen-protected Met and Lys in alfalfa and red clover silage diets fed to lactating dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The action of polyphenol oxidase reduces NPN formation in red clover silage (RCS). In seven previous trials, RCS averaged (% of total N) 36% NPN vs. 54% NPN in alfalfa silage (AS). Feeding RCS has been found to increase intestinal protein absorption but with no improvement in N utilization, suggesti...

  8. Meat goat kids finished on alfalfa, red clover or orchardgrass pastures: carcass merit and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Turner, K E; Cassida, K A; Zerby, H N

    2014-12-01

    This experiment was conducted in 2005-2007 to evaluate carcass and chevon (goat meat) quality parameters when meat-goat kids (n=72) were finished on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L; ALF); red clover (Trifolium pratense L.; RCG); or orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.; OGR) pastures. Carcass conformation score was greater (P=0.08) when meat-goat kids were finished on ALF compared to OGR with RCG intermediate. Chevon meat samples from goats finished on the three pasture treatments did not differ in ash, intramuscular fat, or crude protein content or in concentrations of omega6 and omega3 fatty acids, or the omega6 to omega3 ratio. Goats finished on OGR had higher (P<0.001) 18:1 trans-11 fatty acids (FA) compared to ALF or RCG. Overall, meat-goat kids finished on ALF, RCG, or ORG produced desirable carcass weights for most niche markets in the USA. Chevon is a low-fat meat option with high desirable fatty acids for human diets.

  9. Weight gains, blood parameters, and fecal egg counts when meat-goat kids were finished on alfalfa, red clover, or orchardgrass pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was conducted in 2005-2007 to evaluate weight gain, blood parameters associated with forage nutrient-use and anemia from gastrointestinal (GI) parasite infection, and fecal egg counts (FEC) patterns of meat goat kids finished on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L; ALF); red clover (Trifolium...

  10. Cutting Management Effects on Yield, Fiber, and Protein Degradability of Red Clover Conserved as Silage.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With adequate soil moisture, forage yields of red clover can equal or exceed alfalfa in many temperate regions. Red clover also boasts superior fiber digestibility and greater rumen-undegradable protein than alfalfa, but milk yields from cattle fed red clover diets are often below expectations. Coup...

  11. De novo transcriptome assembly and dynamic spatial gene expression analysis in red clover (Trifolium pratense)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a cool season forage legume, grown throughout the Northeastern USA and is the most widely planted forage legume after alfalfa. Red clover provides high value feed to the livestock because of high protein content and easy digestibility. To date, genomic resources...

  12. The hidden benefits of red clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A paper was presented at the annual meeting of the Missouri Forage and Grassland Conference on the benefits of biochanin A, an isoflavone produced by red clover, on animal performance and well-being. A selective antimicrobial can kill the hyper-ammonia producing bacteria without harming fiber-digest...

  13. Evaluation of a diverse red clover collection for clover rot resistance (Sclerotinia trifoliorum).

    PubMed

    Vleugels, T; Baert, J; Van Bockstaele, E

    2013-01-01

    Sclerotinia trifoliorum Erikks. causes clover rot (clover cancer, Sclerotinia crown and root rot), an important disease in European red clover crops (Trifolium pratense L). The fungus infects plants in autumn through ascospores and entire fields can be destroyed by early spring. Although previous studies have evaluated various red clover populations for clover rot resistance, screening was often performed with one local isolate on just a few local varieties, often cultivars. Until today, no large collections of diverse red clover accessions have been screened. In this study, we studied the variation in clover rot susceptibility among 122 red clover accessions, including 85 accessions from the NPGS-USDA core collection. Cultivars (both diploid and tetraploid), landraces and wild accessions were included and different S. trifoliorum isolates were used. In a field experiment, plant yield, branching and susceptibility to mildew, rust and virus disease were scored for 122 red clover accessions. A similar collection of germplasm was screened for clover rot resistance by a bio-test on young plants using a mixture of five aggressive S. trifoliorum isolates. The effects of the variety type, ploidy level, growth habit, resistance to other diseases and levels of isoflavones (available for the NPGS-USDA collection) on clover rot susceptibility were determined. Possible sources of resistance were identified. Our red clover accessions differed significantly in susceptibility but no accession was completely resistant Three accessions (Maro, Tedi and No. 292) were significantly less susceptible than the other accessions. Intensive branching or a prostrate growth habit did not render plants more resistant. Accessions resistant to mildew or viruses were not more resistant to clover rot and accessions with high levels of isoflavones were not better protected against clover rot. On the other hand, tetraploid cultivars were on average 10% less susceptible than diploid cultivars

  14. Red clover polyphenol oxidase and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Van Ranst, G; Lee, M R F; Fievez, V

    2011-02-01

    Increasing the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of milk is acknowledged to be of benefit to consumer health. Despite the high PUFA content of forages, milk fat contains only about 3% of PUFA and only about 0.5% of n-3 fatty acids. This is mainly due to intensive lipid metabolism in the rumen (lipolysis and biohydrogenation) and during conservation (lipolysis and oxidation) such as drying (hay) and ensiling (silage). In red clover, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been suggested to protect lipids against degradation, both in the silage as well as in the rumen, leading to a higher output of PUFA in ruminant products (meat and milk). PPO mediates the oxidation of phenols and diphenols to quinones, which will readily react with nucleophilic binding sites. Such binding sites can be found on proteins, resulting in the formation of protein-bound phenols. This review summarizes the different methods that have been used to assess PPO activity in red clover, and an overview on the current understanding of PPO activity and activation in red clover. Knowledge on these aspects is of major importance to fully harness PPO's lipid-protecting role. Furthermore, we review the studies that evidence PPO-mediated lipid protection and discuss its possible importance in lab-scale silages and further in an in vitro rumen system. It is demonstrated that high (induction of) PPO activity can lead to lower lipolysis in the silage and lower biohydrogenation in the rumen. There are three hypotheses on its working mechanism: (i) protein-bound phenols could directly bind to enzymes (e.g. lipases) as such inhibiting them; (ii) binding of quinones in and between proteins embedded in a lipid membrane (e.g. in the chloroplast) could lead to encapsulation of the lipids; (iii) direct binding of quinones to nucleophilic sites in polar lipids also could lead to protection. There is no exclusive evidence on which mechanism is most important, although there are strong indications that only lipid

  15. HERITABILITY OF CLOVER ROT RESISTANCE (SCLEROTINIA SPP.) IN RED CLOVER (TRIFOLIUM PRATENSE) POPULATIONS.

    PubMed

    Vleugels, T; Van Bockstaele, E

    2014-01-01

    European red clover (Trifolium pratense) crops are susceptible to clover rot, a destructive disease caused by Sclerotinia trifoliorum or S. sclerotiorum. The lack of knowledge on the heritability of clover rot resistance is, among other reasons, responsible for the slow progress of resistance breeding. In this paper, we acquired insight in the heritability of clover rot resistance through divergent selection by our high-throughput bio-test on an experimental diploid population. The disease susceptibility indices of the first generation after selection for susceptibility and the first and the second generation after selection for resistance were compared with the susceptibility of the original population. The susceptible population (79.2%), the original population (70.5%) and the first generation resistant population (62.3%) differed significantly in susceptibility (p < 0.001). The first (62.3%) and second generation resistant population (60.0%) did not differ significantly in susceptibility. The heritability (h2) of clover rot resistance was low: 0.34 and 0.07 in the first and second cycle of selection respectively. This indicates that mass selection is not suitable to improve clover rot resistance. Family selection may allow a sustained increase in resistance for multiple generations.

  16. HCT2, a Novel Hydroxycinnamoyl-Malate Transferase, is Responsible for Phaselic Acid (2-O-Caffeoyl-L-Malate) Biosynthesis in Red Clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In red clover, post-harvest oxidation of o-diphenol caffeic acid derivatives to o-quinones by an endogenous polyphenol oxidase (PPO) prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage (1). Agronomically important forages like alfalfa lack both PPO and o-diphenols. Consequently, breakdown of their p...

  17. Red clover: An alternative to antibiotic growth promoters?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted at the Forage-Animal Production Research Unit to discover a growth-promoting natural product from red clover (Trifolium pratense). Previously published work included a bioassay for antimicrobial activity of phytochemicals. The bioassay was used to discover th...

  18. A mowing strategy to convert red clover to annual crops in organic farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers are interested in no-till cropping systems. In this study, we found that perennial clover can be converted to corn without tillage. Conversion tactics involved fall mowing in the third year of red clover, followed by between-row mowing of weeds and volunteer red clover in corn gr...

  19. Mapping candidate QTLs related to plant persistency in red clover.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, Irina; Razgulayeva, Nadejda; Gau, Mitsuru; Okumura, Kenji; Nakaya, Akihiro; Tabata, Satoshi; Kozlov, Nicolay N; Isobe, Sachiko

    2010-04-01

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a diploid (2n = 14), self-incompatible legume that is widely cultivated as a forage legume in cold geographical regions. Because it is a short-lived perennial species, improvement of plant persistency is the most important objective for red clover breeding. To develop a marker-assisted selection (MAS) approach for red clover, we identified candidate QTLs related to plant persistency. Two full-sib mapping populations, 272 x WF1680 and HR x R130, were used for QTL identification. Resistance to Sclerotinia trifoliorum and Fusarium species, as well as to winter hardiness, was investigated in the laboratory and in field experiments in Moscow region (Russia), and Sapporo (Japan). With the genotype data derived from microsatellite and other DNA markers, candidate QTLs were identified by simple interval mapping (SIM), Kruskal-Wallis analysis (KW analysis) and genotype matrix mapping (GMM). A total of 10 and 23 candidate QTL regions for plant persistency were identified in the 272 x WF1680 and the HR x R130 mapping populations, respectively. The QTLs identified by multiple mapping approaches were mapped on linkage group (LG) 3 and LG6. The significant QTL interactions identified by GMM explained the higher phenotypic variation than single effect QTLs. Identification of haplotypes having positive effect QTLs in each parent were first demonstrated in this study for pseudo-testcross mapping populations in plant species using experimental data.

  20. Ensifer, Phyllobacterium and Rhizobium species occupy nodules of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and Melilotus alba (sweet clover) grown at a Canadian site without a history of cultivation.

    PubMed

    Bromfield, E S P; Tambong, J T; Cloutier, S; Prévost, D; Laguerre, G; van Berkum, P; Thi, T V Tran; Assabgui, R; Barran, L R

    2010-02-01

    Phage-resistant and -susceptible bacteria from nodules of alfalfa and sweet clover, grown at a site without a known history of cultivation, were identified as diverse genotypes of Ensifer, Rhizobium and Phyllobacterium species based on sequence analysis of ribosomal (16S and 23S rRNA) and protein-encoding (atpD and recA) genes, Southern hybridization/RFLP and a range of phenotypic characteristics. Among phage-resistant bacteria, one genotype of Rhizobium sp. predominated on alfalfa (frequency approximately 68 %) but was recovered infrequently ( approximately 1 %) from sweet clover. A second genotype was isolated infrequently only from alfalfa. These genotypes fixed nitrogen poorly in association with sweet clover and Phaseolus vulgaris, but were moderately effective with alfalfa. They produced a near-neutral reaction on mineral salts agar containing mannitol, which is atypical of the genus Rhizobium. A single isolate of Ensifer sp. and two of Phyllobacterium sp. were recovered only from sweet clover. All were highly resistant to multiple antibiotics. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Ensifer sp. strain T173 is closely related to, but separate from, the non-symbiotic species 'Sinorhizobium morelense'. Strain T173 is unique in that it possesses a 175 kb symbiotic plasmid and elicits ineffective nodules on alfalfa, sweet clover, Medicago lupulina and Macroptilium atropurpureum. The two Phyllobacterium spp. were non-symbiotic and probably represent bacterial opportunists. Three genotypes of E. meliloti that were symbiotically effective with alfalfa and sweet clover were encountered infrequently. Among phage-susceptible isolates, two genotypes of E. medicae were encountered infrequently and were highly effective with alfalfa, sweet clover and Medicago polymorpha. The ecological and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  1. Red Clover Coumarate 3'-Hydroxylase (CYP98A44) is Capable of Hydroxylating P-Coumaroyl-Shikimate but not P-Coumaroyl-Malate: Implications for the Biosynthesis of Phaselic Acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves accumulate several µmol of phaselic acid [2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate] per gram fresh weight. Post-harvest oxidation of such o-diphenols to o-quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage. Forages like alfalfa (Medicag...

  2. Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:Malate Hydroxycinnamoyl Transferase is Crucial for 2-O-Caffeoyl-L-Malate Biosynthesis in Red Clover and Defines a New Pathway for Hydroxycinnamoyl-Malate Ester Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) leaves accumulate several µmol of phaselic acid [2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate] per gram fresh weight. Post-harvest oxidation of such o-diphenols to o-quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage. Forages like alfalfa (Medi...

  3. MULTIPLE HYDROXYCINNAMOYL TRANSFERASES FROM RED CLOVER DIFFER IN SEQUENCE, EXPRESSION PATTERN, AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenylpropanoid o-diphenols accumulate in tissues of many plants, functioning as defensive molecules and antioxidants. Red clover leaves accumulate high levels of two o-diphenols, phasalic acid [2-O-(caffeoyl)-L-malate, see Fig. 1] and clovamide [N-(caffeoyl)-L-DOPA]. In red clover, post-harvest oxi...

  4. Towards integrated pest management in red clover seed production.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Ola; Rundlöf, Maj; Smith, Henrik G; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2012-10-01

    The development of integrated pest management is hampered by lack of information on how insect pest abundances relate to yield losses, and how pests are affected by control measures. In this study, we develop integrated pest management tactics for Apion spp. weevils (Coleoptera: Brentidae) in seed production of red clover, Trifolium pratense L. We tested a method to forecast pest damage, quantified the relationship between pest abundance and yield, and evaluated chemical and biological pest control in 29 Swedish red clover fields in 2008 and 2011. Pest inflorescence abundance, which had a highly negative effect on yield, could be predicted with pan trap catches of adult pests. In 2008, chemical control with typically one application of pyrethroids was ineffective both in decreasing pest abundances and in increasing yields. In 2011, when chemical control included applications of the neonicotinoid thiacloprid, pest abundances decreased and yields increased considerably in treated field zones. A post hoc analysis indicated that using pyrethroids in addition to thiacloprid was largely redundant. Infestation rates by parasitoids was higher and reached average levels of around 40% in insecticide treated field zones in 2011, which is a level of interest for biological pest control. Based on the data presented, an economic threshold for chemical control is developed, and guidelines are provided on minimum effective chemical pest control.

  5. Genetic Map-Based Location of the Red Clover (Trifolium pratense L.) Gametophytic Self-incompatibility Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover is a hermaphadidic allogamous diploid (2n = 2x = 14) with a homomorphic gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). Red clover GSI has long been studied and it is thought that the genetic control of GSI constitutes a single locus. Although GSI gene...

  6. Field testing Northern U.S. adapted 2,4-D resistant red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) resistant red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) varieties would offer producers more weed control options, particularly in mixed grass/red clover pastures. In the 1980s, work was initiated in Florida to select for 2,4-D tolerant red clover (Taylor, 1989). This Flo...

  7. Ensifer, Phyllobacterium and Rhizobium species occupy nodules of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and Melilotus alba (sweet clover) grown at a Canadian site without a history of cultivation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phage resistant and susceptible bacteria from nodules of alfalfa and sweet clover grown at a site without a known history of cultivation, were identified as Ensifer, Rhizobium and Phyllobacterium species based on sequence analysis of ribosomal (16S and 23S rRNA)and protein encoding (atpD and recA) g...

  8. Encapsidation of nanoparticles by red clover necrotic mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Loo, LiNa; Guenther, Richard H; Lommel, Steven A; Franzen, Stefan

    2007-09-12

    Icosahedral virus capsids demonstrate a high degree of selectivity in packaging cognate nucleic acid genome components during virion assembly. The 36 nm icosahedral plant virus Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) packages its two genomic ssRNAs via a specific capsid protein (CP) genomic RNA interaction. A 20-nucleotide hairpin structure within the genomic RNA-2 hybridizes with RNA-1 to form a bimolecular complex, which is the origin of assembly (OAS) in RCNMV that selectively recruits and orients CP subunits initiating virion assembly. In this Article, an oligonucleotide mimic of the OAS sequence was attached to Au, CoFe2O4, and CdSe nanoparticles ranging from 3 to 15 nm, followed by addition of RNA-1 to form a synthetic OAS to direct the virion-like assembly by RCNMV CP. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements were consistent with the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs) comparable in size to native RCNMV. Attempts to encapsidate nanoparticles with diameters larger than 17 nm did not result in well-formed viral capsids. These results are consistent with the presence of a 17 nm cavity in native RCNMV. Covalent linkage of the OAS to nanoparticles directs RNA-dependent encapsidation and demonstrates that foreign cargo can be packaged into RCNMV virions. The flexibility of the RCNMV CP to encapsidate different materials, as long as it is within encapsidation constraint, is a critical factor to be considered as a drug delivery and diagnostic vehicle in biomedical applications.

  9. Dietary red clover (Trifolium pratense) induces oviduct growth and decreases ovary and testes growth in Japanese quail chicks

    PubMed Central

    Rochester, Johanna R.; Klasing, Kirk C.; Stevenson, Lindsay; Denison, Michael S.; Berry, Wallace; Millam, James R.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether drought-stress alters phytoestrogens in red clover and whether red clover in the diet influences sexual development in Japanese quail, we fed chicks diets containing irrigated or non-irrigated clover. Irrigation altered phytoestrogenic activity of red clover (determined using an in vitro bioassay), with extracts of irrigated clover diet containing more estrogenic activity than extracts of non-irrigated clover diet. Chick growth was negatively correlated with the amount of irrigated or non-irrigated clover in the diet. Dietary red clover also depressed both absolute and relative gonad weights; however, relative oviduct weight was increased by the irrigated diet. Diets did not affect serum vitellogenin. These results reveal a negative influence of drought-stress on phytoestrogenic potency of clover, and that red clover in the diet can inhibit avian growth and development independent of irrigation state. Thus, phytoestrogens may affect reproductive development in wild birds, and environmental stressors may influence levels of phytoestrogens in the field. PMID:19103282

  10. Polyphenol oxidase affects normal nodule development in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) may have multiple functions in tissues, depending on its cellular or tissue localization. We used PPO RNAi transformants of red clover (Trifolium pratense) to determine the role PPO plays in normal development of plants, and especially in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In red clov...

  11. Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) draft genome provides a platform for trait improvement

    PubMed Central

    De Vega, Jose J.; Ayling, Sarah; Hegarty, Matthew; Kudrna, Dave; Goicoechea, Jose L.; Ergon, Åshild; Rognli, Odd A.; Jones, Charlotte; Swain, Martin; Geurts, Rene; Lang, Chunting; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Rössner, Stephan; Yates, Steven; Webb, Kathleen J.; Donnison, Iain S.; Oldroyd, Giles E. D.; Wing, Rod A.; Caccamo, Mario; Powell, Wayne; Abberton, Michael T.; Skøt, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a globally significant forage legume in pastoral livestock farming systems. It is an attractive component of grassland farming, because of its high yield and protein content, nutritional value and ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Enhancing its role further in sustainable agriculture requires genetic improvement of persistency, disease resistance, and tolerance to grazing. To help address these challenges, we have assembled a chromosome-scale reference genome for red clover. We observed large blocks of conserved synteny with Medicago truncatula and estimated that the two species diverged ~23 million years ago. Among the 40,868 annotated genes, we identified gene clusters involved in biochemical pathways of importance for forage quality and livestock nutrition. Genotyping by sequencing of a synthetic population of 86 genotypes show that the number of markers required for genomics-based breeding approaches is tractable, making red clover a suitable candidate for association studies and genomic selection. PMID:26617401

  12. Red clover necrotic mosaic virus: Biophysics and Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockney, Dustin M.

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a highly robust (Tm=60 °C), 36 nm icosahedral plant virus. The capsid of RCNMV is assembled from 180 chemically equivalent coat proteins (CPs). The CPs arrange in a T=3 symmetry, in 1 of 3 conformations forming the asymmetric subunit (ASU). There are two Ca(II) binding sites per CP; the removal of divalent cations causes the CP subunits of the ASU to rotate away from each other forming a ˜13 A channel. These channels lead to the highly organized bipartite genome of RCNMV and can be closed by adding back Ca(II). Titrimetric analysis and tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine the affinity of RCNMV for Ca(II) to be ˜Kd < 300 nM. It has been shown that doxorubicin (Dox) can be infused into the capsid at a mole ratio of ˜1000:1, Dox-to-virus, and unlike other nanoparticles, there is no detectable leakage. The high loading of Dox is most likely due to intercalation into the genome and significant intercalation or exposure to denaturants was observed to cause loss of capsid stability. To better understand the limitations of cargo loading, Dox and other intercalating molecules (rhodamine 800, ethidium bromide, and propidium iodide) were assayed to determine optimum infusion conditions. Dox was observed to have a propensity to aggregate. In order to manage the Dox aggregation, the infusion buffer was changed from 50 mM Tris-HCl/50 mM NaOAc/50 mM EDTA or 200 mM EDTA at pH 8.0 to 5 mM HEPES/5 mM Na4EDTA/10 mM NaCl pH 7.8. The Dox:RCNMV infusion mole ratio was also lowered from 5000:1 to 500:1 and the incubation temperature was changed from 4 °C to 22 °C for <12 hours, opposed to 24 hours. To impart targeting functionality to RCNMV, biomimetic peptides were conjugated to either the surface capsid lysines or cysteines using standard bioconjugation methods. For all of the biomimetic peptides screened, sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) was used to orthogonally attach the

  13. Absorption in humans of isoflavones from soy and red clover is similar.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Nobuyo; Pomeroy, Sylvia; Nestel, Paul

    2002-08-01

    The absorption of isoflavones varies substantially among individuals. It is unknown whether isoflavone absorption differs between those originating from soy and those from red clover, which contain different mixtures of isoflavones. Because both soy and red clover are increasingly used in foods and supplements, these issues were studied in 14 subjects in a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Soybean isoflavone glycosides and red clover isoflavone aglycones were incorporated into a breakfast cereal and eaten daily for 2 wk each, separated by a 2-wk control or washout period. The 24-h excretions of isoflavones in urine were measured; approximately 25% of each isoflavone was recovered in urine, suggesting that similar amounts were absorbed irrespective of their glycoside/aglycone nature or the differing compositions of their sources (daidzein and genistein in soy and formononetin and biochanin in red clover). Although interindividual variability was high, there was less intraindividual variability; the amounts excreted when subjects consumed the two sources of isoflavone were correlated (r = 0.69; P = 0.007).

  14. Gene expression patterns, localization, and substrates of polyphenol oxidase in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes and their corresponding enzyme activity occur in many plants; natural PPO substrates and enzyme/substrate localization are less well characterized. Leaf and root PPO activity in Arabidopsis and five legumes were compared with high-PPO red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)...

  15. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF HYDROXYCINNAMOYL TRANSFERASES INVOLVED IN O-DIPHENOL BIOSYNTHESIS IN RED CLOVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover leaves accumulate high levels of two o-diphenols, phasalic acid (caffeoyl ester of malic acid) and clovamide (caffeoyl amide of L-DOPA). Post-harvest oxidation of these o-diphenols by an endogenous polyphenol oxidase (PPO) prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage. Understanding...

  16. A novel red clover virus associated with root colonization by Olpidium sp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseased red clover (Trifolium pratense) was observed in 2-year-old plants in a variety trial seeded at Prairie du Sac, WI. Similar symptoms were observed in space-plant nurseries at multiple disparate locations (Arlington, WI; Lancaster, WI; Marshfield, WI; Prairie du Sac, WI). Often healthy plants...

  17. Suppressing weed growth after wheat harvest with underseeded red clover in organic farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers are seeking alternative tactics for weed control so that they can reduce their need for tillage. In this study, we examined cover crop strategies for suppressing weed growth after harvest of wheat. Two cover crop treatments, red clover (mammoth type) or a mixture of oat and dry p...

  18. No effect on pharmacokinetics of tamoxifen and 4-hydroxytamoxifen by multiple doses of red clover capsule in rats.

    PubMed

    Raju, Kanumuri Siva Rama; Taneja, Isha; Valicherla, Guru Raghavendra; Challagundla, Murali Krishna; Rashid, Mamunur; Syed, Anees Ahmed; Gayen, Jiaur Rahman; Singh, Sheelendra Pratap; Wahajuddin, Muhammad

    2015-11-04

    Tamoxifen is used in clinical practice for breast cancer patients and to prevent osteoporosis. Red clover (Trifolium pratense) preparations are consumed worldwide as dietary supplements for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. In the present study we investigated the possible herb-drug interaction between red clover and tamoxifen in rats. 15 days pre-treatment with red clover did not alter the tamoxifen and its active metabolite 4-hydroxytamoxifen pharmacokinetics significantly (p > 0.05). Therefore the therapeutic efficacy of the tamoxifen may not be compromised by the co-administration with red clover. Tamoxifen metabolism is primarily mediated by CYP2D6, CYP3A4 with minor contribution from CYP2C9, CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 isoforms. Although, red clover pre-treatment significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the mRNA expression and activity of CYP3a2, no effect on CYP2d4 and increased expression and activity of CYP2c11 could be the plausible reasons for lack of effect on tamoxifen and its metabolite pharmacokinetics in rats. CYP1a1 and CYP2b2 mRNA expression and activity were also significantly reduced by red clover. To extend the clinical utility of the present study, effect of red clover extract on major CYPs using human liver microsomes and HepG2 cell lines were also determined. Similar finding were observed in the human liver preparations as in rats.

  19. Floral procyanidins of the forage legume red clover (Trifolium pratense L.).

    PubMed

    Sivakumaran, Subathira; Meagher, Lucy P; Foo, Lai Yeap; Lane, Geoffrey A; Fraser, Karl; Rumball, William

    2004-03-24

    The chemical characteristics of the purified procyanidin polymers of the flowers of the forage legume red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) were studied by (13)C NMR, acid-catalyzed degradation with benzyl mercaptan, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The (13)C NMR showed that the fraction consisted of predominantly procyanidin polymers. The thiolysis reaction products indicated a mean degree of polymerization (mDP) of 9.3 with epicatechin (81%) as the abundant flavan-3-ol extension unit and the terminating units dominated by catechin (95%). ESI-MS showed a range of oligomeric procyanidin ions (DP of 2-11). The white clover floral prodelphinidins consist of terminal units with nearly equal proportions of epigallocatechin (52%) and gallocatechin (48%) and extender units showing epigallocatechin (56%) and gallocatechin (39%). The dramatic difference in the stereochemistry of the terminal and extender units observed for the red clover floral procyanidins contrasts with the mixture of cis and trans stereochemistry observed for white clover floral prodelphinidins.

  20. Soy, Red Clover, and Isoflavones and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Heidi; Seely, Dugald; Flower, Gillian; Skidmore, Becky; Fernandes, Rochelle; Vadeboncoeur, Sarah; Kennedy, Deborah; Cooley, Kieran; Wong, Raimond; Sagar, Stephen; Sabri, Elham; Fergusson, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Background Soy and red clover isoflavones are controversial due to purported estrogenic activity and possible effects on breast cancer. We conducted a systematic review of soy and red clover for efficacy in improving menopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer, and for potential impact on risk of breast cancer incidence or recurrence. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and AMED from inception to March 2013 for human interventional or observational data pertaining to the safety and efficacy of soy and red clover isoflavones in patients with or at risk of breast cancer. Results Of 4179 records, we included a total of 131 articles: 40 RCTs, 11 uncontrolled trials, and 80 observational studies. Five RCTs reported on the efficacy of soy for hot flashes, showing no significant reductions in hot flashes compared to placebo. There is lack of evidence showing harm from use of soy with respect to risk of breast cancer or recurrence, based on long term observational data. Soy intake consistent with that of a traditional Japanese diet (2-3 servings daily, containing 25-50mg isoflavones) may be protective against breast cancer and recurrence. Human trials show that soy does not increase circulating estradiol or affect estrogen-responsive target tissues. Prospective data of soy use in women taking tamoxifen does not indicate increased risk of recurrence. Evidence on red clover is limited, however existing studies suggest that it may not possess breast cancer-promoting effects. Conclusion Soy consumption may be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer incidence, recurrence, and mortality. Soy does not have estrogenic effects in humans. Soy intake consistent with a traditional Japanese diet appears safe for breast cancer survivors. While there is no clear evidence of harm, better evidence confirming safety is required before use of high dose (≥100mg) isoflavones can be recommended for breast cancer patients. PMID:24312387

  1. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Red Clover and Its Rhizobial Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Janine; Okupnik, Annette; Gogos, Alexander; Knauer, Katja; Bucheli, Thomas D.; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Widmer, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are in consideration to be used in plant protection products. Before these products can be placed on the market, ecotoxicological tests have to be performed. In this study, the nitrogen fixing bacterium Rhizobium trifolii and red clover were exposed to two TiO2 NPs, i.e., P25, E171 and a non-nanomaterial TiO2. Growth of both organisms individually and their symbiotic root nodulation were investigated in liquid and hydroponic systems. While 23 and 18 mg l-1 of E171 and non-nanomaterial TiO2 decreased the growth rate of R. trifolii by 43 and 23% respectively, P25 did not cause effects. Shoot length of red clover decreased between 41 and 62% for all tested TiO2 NPs. In 21% of the TiO2 NP treated plants, no nodules were found. At high concentrations certain TiO2 NPs impaired R. trifolii as well as red clover growth and their symbiosis in the hydroponic systems. PMID:27171465

  2. Effects of dietary red clover on blood factors and cardiovascular fatty streak formation in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Asgary, S; Moshtaghian, J; Naderi, G; Fatahi, Z; Hosseini, M; Dashti, G; Adibi, S

    2007-08-01

    Phytoestrogens with a biological activity like estradiol are naturally found in many plants. This study was designed to investigate the effect of red clover, a phytoestrogen-rich member of the legume family (Trifolium pratense) on the development of atherosclerosis in male hyperlipidemic rabbits. Twenty rabbits were semi-randomly distributed into four groups of five each. Two groups received either normal diet or normal diet supplemented with red clover. Two other groups received similar diets to both of which 1% cholesterol was added. Dietary use of red clover (RC) in hyperlipidemic rabbits significantly decreased C-reactive protein (CRP), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) whereas, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly increased in those animals (p < 0.05). Fatty streak formation was also significantly lower in aorta and left and right coronary arteries in the same animals due to use of dietary RC supplementation. These findings suggest that dietary RC may reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  3. Seasonal variation of red clover (Trifolium pratense L., Fabaceae) isoflavones and estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Booth, Nancy L; Overk, Cassia R; Yao, Ping; Totura, Steve; Deng, Yunfan; Hedayat, A S; Bolton, Judy L; Pauli, Guido F; Farnsworth, Norman R

    2006-02-22

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L., Fabaceae) dietary supplements are currently used to treat menopausal symptoms because of their high content of the mildly estrogenic isoflavones daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and biochanin A. These compounds are estrogenic in vitro and in vivo, but little information exists on the best time to harvest red clover fields to maximize content of the isoflavones and thus make an optimal product. Samples of cultivated red clover above-ground parts and flower heads were collected in parallel over one growing season in northeastern Illinois. Generally, autohydrolytic extracts of above-ground parts contained more isoflavones and had more estrogenic activity in Ishikawa endometrial cells as compared with extracts of flower heads. Daidzein and genistein contents peaked around June to July, while formononetin and biochanin A contents peaked in early September. Flower head and total above-ground parts extracts exhibited differential estrogenic activity in an Ishikawa (endometrial) cell-based alkaline phosphatase induction assay, whereas nondifferential activity was observed for most extracts tested in an MCF-7 (breast) cell proliferation assay when tested at the same final concentrations. Ishikawa assay results could be mapped onto the extracts' content of individual isoflavones, but MCF-7 results did not show such a pattern. These results suggest that significant metabolism of isoflavones may occur in MCF-7 cells but not in Ishikawa cells; therefore, caution is advised in the choice of bioassay used for the biological standardization of botanical dietary supplements.

  4. Alfalfa

    MedlinePlus

    ... your health provider.Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs)Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. Large doses of alfalfa might also increase your ...

  5. Lipid metabolism in mixtures of red clover (Trifolium repens) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in lab scale silages and in vitro rumen incubations.

    PubMed

    Van Ranst, G; Vandewalle, M; Gadeyne, F; De Riek, J; Fievez, V

    2013-09-01

    Most often, farmers consider red clover an unattractive forage because of its low ensilability. Nevertheless, several in vivo and in vitro experiments also showed advantages of red clover silages such as decreased rumen biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. This has been attributed to a possible protective role of protein-bound phenols, with polyphenol oxidase playing a key role in their formation. This enzyme is active in red clover, but not in other green forages, such as, for example, perennial ryegrass. Therefore, the aim was to study the lipid metabolism within red clover/ryegrass mixtures in lab scale silages and during in vitro rumen batch incubations. Ensilability of red clover increased with higher proportions of ryegrass in the silage mixture. However, the lipid-protecting mechanism of red clover does not seem to occur in the co-ensiled ryegrass as lipolysis of polar lipids linearly increased with increasing proportions of ryegrass (86.0%, 91.6%, 89.9%, 93.1% and 95.6% in 60-day-old silages with 100/0, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75 and 0/100 red clover/ryegrass, respectively). Rumen lipolysis and biohydrogenation of C18:3n-3 and C18:2n-6 were negatively related to red clover proportions in the silage mixtures. The lipid-protective mechanism in red clover silages is confirmed, but it seems not to be transferred to lipids in co-ensiled forages.

  6. The use of an alternative food source (red clover) as a means of reducing slug pest damage to winter wheat: towards field implementation.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Andrew S; Wilcox, Andrew; Cook, Richard T; James, Katherine L; Crook, Mitchell J

    2006-03-01

    Slugs are major pests of many crops in the UK, including winter wheat, yet current methods of control are often unreliable. The aim of this study was to investigate three issues key to the successful field implementation of a control strategy that uses red clover as an alternative food source to reduce the amount of damage caused to winter wheat by the field slug, Deroceras reticulatum (Müller). A series of three experiments was designed to assess this aim. Firstly, under laboratory conditions, red clover was consumed in greater quantities than wheat, even when wheat was presented as a novel food. Secondly, red clover had no significant effects on the emergence and early growth of wheat in a polytunnel experiment. Both these results are crucial to the successful implementation of a strategy that uses red clover as an alternative food source. Lastly, the results of a field experiment were consistent with the results of the polytunnel experiment, in that red clover did not significantly affect wheat emergence. However, plots in which red clover was left to grow until the time of wheat harvest resulted in significantly lower (43%) wheat yields than plots without red clover. These results suggest that red clover must be removed from the field after the wheat has passed its vulnerable seedling stage. Recommendations for the potential use of red clover as an alternative food source for reducing damage to winter wheat in field conditions are discussed and opportunities for further work are suggested.

  7. De novo and reference transcriptome assembly of transcripts expressed during flowering provide insight into seed setting in tetraploid red clover

    PubMed Central

    Kovi, Mallikarjuna Rao; Amdahl, Helga; Alsheikh, Muath; Rognli, Odd Arne

    2017-01-01

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is one of the most important legume forage species in temperate livestock agriculture. Tetraploid red clover cultivars are generally producing less seed than diploid cultivars. Improving the seed setting potential of tetraploid cultivars is necessary to utilize the high forage quality and environmentally sustainable nitrogen fixation ability of red clover. In the current study, our aim was to identify candidate genes involved in seed setting. Two genotypes, ‘Tripo’ with weak seed setting and ‘Lasang’ with strong seed setting were selected for transcriptome analysis. De novo and reference based analyses of transcriptome assemblies were conducted to study the global transcriptome changes from early to late developmental stages of flower development of the two contrasting red clover genotypes. Transcript profiles, gene ontology enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis indicate that genes related to flower development, pollen pistil interactions, photosynthesis and embryo development are differentially expressed between these two genotypes. A significant number of genes related to pollination were overrepresented in ‘Lasang’, which might be a reason for its good seed setting ability. The candidate genes detected in this study might be used to develop molecular tools for breeding tetraploid red clover varieties with improved seed yield potentials. PMID:28287176

  8. Effects of feeding grass or red clover silage cut at two maturity stages in dairy cows. 1. Nitrogen metabolism and supply of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, A; Kuoppala, K; Ahvenjärvi, S; Rinne, M

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of plant species (red clover vs. timothy-meadow fescue) and forage maturity at primary harvest (early vs. late cut silage) on rumen fermentation, nutrient digestion, and nitrogen metabolism including omasal canal AA flow and plasma AA concentration in lactating cows. Five dairy cows equipped with rumen cannulas were used in a study designed as a 5 x 5 Latin square with 21-d periods. The diets consisted of early-cut and late-cut grass and red clover silage, respectively, and a mixture of late-cut grass and early-cut red clover silages given ad libitum with 9 kg/d of a standard concentrate. Grass silage dry matter intake tended to decrease but that of red clover silages tended to increase with advancing maturity. Milk yields were unchanged among treatments, milk protein and fat concentrations being lower for red clover than for grass silage diets. Rumen fluid pH was unchanged but volatile fatty acid and ammonia concentrations were higher for red clover than for grass silage diets. Intake of N, and omasal canal flows of total nonammonia N (NAN), microbial NAN, and dietary NAN were higher for red clover than for grass silage diets but were not affected by forage maturity. However, microbial NAN flow and amount of N excreted in the feces decreased with advancing maturity for grass diets but increased for red clover diets. Apparent ruminal N degradability of the diets was unchanged, but true ruminal N degradability decreased and efficiency of microbial synthesis increased with red clover diets compared with grass silage diets. Omasal canal flows of AA, except those for Met and Cys, were on average 20% higher for red clover than grass silage diets. Omasal canal digesta concentrations of Leu, Phe, branched-chain, and essential AA were higher but those of Met lower for red clover than for grass silage diets. Plasma AA concentrations, except for His (unchanged) and Met (lower), were higher for red clover than for grass diets. However, none

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of red clover necrotic mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stanton L.; Guenther, Richard H.; Sit, Tim L.; Swartz, Paul D.; Meilleur, Flora; Lommel, Steven A.; Rose, Robert B.

    2010-11-12

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a species that belongs to the Tombusviridae family of plant viruses with a T = 3 icosahedral capsid. RCNMV virions were purified and were crystallized for X-ray analysis using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Self-rotation functions and systematic absences identified the space group as I23, with two virions in the unit cell. The crystals diffracted to better than 4 {angstrom} resolution but were very radiation-sensitive, causing rapid decay of the high-resolution reflections. The data were processed to 6 {angstrom} in the analysis presented here.

  10. Gene Classification and Mining of Molecular Markers Useful in Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Ištvánek, Jan; Dluhošová, Jana; Dluhoš, Petr; Pátková, Lenka; Nedělník, Jan; Řepková, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense) is an important forage plant worldwide. This study was directed to broadening current knowledge of red clover's coding regions and enhancing its utilization in practice by specific reanalysis of previously published assembly. A total of 42,996 genes were characterized using Illumina paired-end sequencing after manual revision of Blast2GO annotation. Genes were classified into metabolic and biosynthetic pathways in response to biological processes, with 7,517 genes being assigned to specific pathways. Moreover, 17,727 enzymatic nodes in all pathways were described. We identified 6,749 potential microsatellite loci in red clover coding sequences, and we characterized 4,005 potential simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers as generating polymerase chain reaction products preferentially within 100–350 bp. Marker density of 1 SSR marker per 12.39 kbp was achieved. Aligning reads against predicted coding sequences resulted in the identification of 343,027 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, providing marker density of one SNP marker per 144.6 bp. Altogether, 95 SSRs in coding sequences were analyzed for 50 red clover varieties and a collection of 22 highly polymorphic SSRs with pooled polymorphism information content >0.9 was generated, thus obtaining primer pairs for application to diversity studies in T. pratense. A set of 8,623 genome-wide distributed SNPs was developed and used for polymorphism evaluation in individual plants. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0 to 0.375. Temperature switch PCR was successfully used in single-marker SNP genotyping for targeted coding sequences and for heterozygosity or homozygosity confirmation in validated five loci. Predicted large sets of SSRs and SNPs throughout the genome are key to rapidly implementing genome-based breeding approaches, for identifying genes underlying key traits, and for genome-wide association studies. Detailed knowledge of genetic relationships among

  11. Comparison of the in vitro estrogenic activities of compounds from hops (Humulus lupulus) and red clover (Trifolium pratense).

    PubMed

    Overk, Cassia R; Yao, Ping; Chadwick, Lucas R; Nikolic, Dejan; Sun, Yongkai; Cuendet, Muriel A; Deng, Yunfan; Hedayat, A S; Pauli, Guido F; Farnsworth, Norman R; van Breemen, Richard B; Bolton, Judy L

    2005-08-10

    Because the prevailing form of hormone replacement therapy is associated with the development of cancer in breast and endometrial tissues, alternatives are needed for the management of menopausal symptoms. Formulations of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) are being used to alleviate menopause-associated hot flashes but have shown mixed results in clinical trials. The strobiles of Humulus lupulusL. (hops) have been reported to contain the prenylflavanone, 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), as the most estrogenic constituent, and this was confirmed using an estrogen receptor ligand screening assay utilizing ultrafiltration mass spectrometry. Extracts of hops and red clover and their individual constituents including 8-PN, 6-prenylnaringenin (6-PN), isoxanthohumol (IX), and xanthohumol (XN) from hops and daidzein, formononetin, biochanin A, and genistein from red clover were compared using a variety of in vitro estrogenic assays. The IC50 values for the estrogen receptor alpha and beta binding assays were 15 and 27 microg/mL, respectively, for hops and 18.0 and 2.0 microg/mL, respectively, for the red clover extract. Both of the extracts, genistein, and 8-PN activated the estrogen response element (ERE) in Ishikawa cells while the extracts, biochanin A, genistein, and 8-PN, significantly induced ERE-luciferase expression in MCF-7 cells. Hop and red clover extracts as well as 8-PN up-regulated progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA in the Ishikawa cell line. In the MCF-7 cell line, PR mRNA was significantly up-regulated by the extracts, biochanin A, genistein, 8-PN, and IX. The two extracts had EC50 values of 1.1 and 1.9 microg/mL, respectively, in the alkaline phosphatase induction assay. On the basis of these data, hops and red clover could be attractive for the development as herbal dietary supplements to alleviate menopause-associated symptoms.

  12. Effects of high-sugar ryegrass silage and mixtures with red clover silage on ruminant digestion. 2. Lipids.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R F; Connelly, P L; Tweed, J K S; Dewhurst, R J; Merry, R J; Scollan, N D

    2006-11-01

    The experiment investigated the digestion of lipids from different forage silages in beef steers. Six Hereford x Friesian steers prepared with rumen and duodenal cannulas were given ad libitum access to a high-sugar grass silage, control grass silage, red clover silage, or mixtures of the red clover and each of the grass silages (50:50, DM basis). The experiment was conducted as an incomplete 5 x 5 Latin square, with an additional randomly repeated sequence. Total fatty acid and C18:3n-3 concentrations were greater (P < 0.05) for the high-sugar grass silage than the control grass silage or the red clover silage. Dry matter and total fatty acid intake were less (P < 0.05) for steers fed the control grass silage than for steers fed the other diets. Duodenal flow of C18:3n-3 was greater (P < 0.05), and flows of C18:0 and total C18:1 trans were less (P < 0.05), for the red clover silage compared with the 2 grass silage diets, with the mixtures intermediate. These results were supported by a reduction (P < 0.05) in biohydrogenation of C18:3n-3 for the red clover silage, with the mixtures again being intermediate. Flows of total branched- and odd-chain fatty acids were greater (P < 0.05) for the high-sugar grass silage diet, possibly as a result of greater microbial flow, because these fatty acids are associated with bacterial lipid. Duodenal flows of the chlorophyll metabolite, phytanic acid, were greater (P < 0.05) for animals fed the high-sugar grass silage treatments compared with the other treatments. These results confirm the potential for modifying the fatty acid composition of ruminant products by feeding red clover silage.

  13. A laboratory-based comparison of a molluscicide and an alternative food source (red clover) as means of reducing slug damage to winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Andrew S; Wilcox, Andrew; Cook, Richard T; Crook, Mitchell J

    2005-07-01

    Slugs are major pests of many crops in the UK, including winter wheat, yet current methods of control are often unreliable. This study investigates the potential use of red clover, as an alternative food source, to reduce the amount of damage caused to winter wheat by the field slug, Deroceras reticulatum (Müller). Two laboratory-based studies, each conducted over a 7-day period, investigated the effects of red clover seedlings and commercial metaldehyde pellets on damage to winter wheat seeds and seedlings. The results indicate that metaldehyde applications, in the form of commercially available pellets, resulted in significantly greater protection to wheat seeds compared with red clover, whereas metaldehyde and red clover were equally as effective in reducing damage to wheat seedlings. A further laboratory experiment investigated the effect of two slug population densities (48 and 16 adults m(-2)) and high and low red clover seed rates (125% and 75% of a standard rate) on damage to wheat seeds. Results showed that, at the highest slug population density, red clover sown at 125% of the standard rate gave 99% protection to wheat seeds, compared with the 75% seed rate which gave 55%. At the lower slug population density, both seed rates of red clover resulted in similar levels of protection. Implications for the potential use of red clover as an alternative food source for reducing damage to winter wheat in field conditions are discussed.

  14. Assessment of dietary ratios of red clover and corn silages on milk production and milk quality in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Moorby, J M; Ellis, N M; Davies, D R

    2016-10-01

    Twenty-four multiparous Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square changeover design experiment to test the effects of changing from corn (Zea mays) silage to red clover (Trifolium pratense) silage in graded proportions on feed intakes, milk production, and whole-body N and P partitioning. Three dietary treatments with ad libitum access to 1 of 3 forage mixtures plus a standard allowance of 4kg/d dairy concentrates were offered. The 3 treatment forage mixtures were, on a dry matter (DM) basis: (1) R10: 90% corn silage and 10% red clover silage, (2) R50: 50% corn silage and 50% red clover silage, and (3) R90: 10% corn silage and 90% red clover silage. In each of 3 experimental periods, there were 21d for adaptation to diets, and 7d for measurements. Diet crude protein intakes increased, and starch intakes decreased, as the silage mixture changed from 90% corn to 90% red clover, although the highest forage DM intakes and milk yields were achieved on diet R50. Although milk fat yields were unaffected by diet, milk protein yields were highest with the R 0250 diet. Whole-body partitioning of N was measured in a subset of cows (n=9), and both the daily amount and proportion of N consumed that was excreted in feces and urine increased as the proportion of red clover silage in the diet increased. However, the apparent efficiency of utilization of feed N for milk protein production decreased from 0.33g/g for diet R10 to 0.25g/g for diet R90. The urinary excretion of purine derivatives (sum of allantoin and uric acid) tended to increase, suggesting greater flow of microbial protein from the rumen, as the proportion of red clover silage in the diet increased, and urinary creatinine excretion was affected by diet. Fecal shedding of E. coli was not affected by dietary treatment. In conclusion, even though microbial protein flow may have been greatest from the R 0450 diet, optimum feed intakes and milk yields were achieved on a diet that contained a

  15. Polyphenol oxidase affects normal nodule development in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    PubMed Central

    Webb, K. Judith; Cookson, Alan; Allison, Gordon; Sullivan, Michael L.; Winters, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) may have multiple functions in tissues depending on its cellular or tissue localization. Here we use PPO RNAi transformants of red clover (Trifolium pratense) to determine the role PPO plays in normal development of plants, and especially in N2-fixing nodules. In red clover, PPO was not essential for either growth or nodule production, or for nodule function in plants grown under optimal, N-free conditions. However, absence of PPO resulted in a more reduced environment in all tissues, as measured by redox potential, and caused subtle developmental changes in nodules. Leaves and, to a lesser extent nodules, lacking PPO tended to accumulate phenolic compounds. A comparison of nodules of two representative contrasting clones by microscopy revealed that nodules lacking PPO were morphologically and anatomically subtly altered, and that phenolics accumulated in different cells and tissues. Developing nodules lacking PPO were longer, and there were more cell layers within the squashed cell layer (SCL), but the walls of these cells were less thickened and the cells were less squashed. Within the N2-fixing zone, bacteroids appeared more granular and were less tightly packed together, and were similar to developmentally compromised bacteroids elicited by catalase mutant rhizobia reported elsewhere. PMID:25566275

  16. In vivo metabolic tracking of 14C-radiolabelled isoflavones in kudzu (Pueraria lobata) and red clover (Trifolium pratense) extracts.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jonathan G; Grannan, Michael D; Lachcik, Pamela J; Reppert, Adam; Yousef, Gad G; Rogers, Randy B; Janle, Elsa M; Weaver, Connie M; Lila, Mary Ann

    2009-11-01

    Absorption, distribution and elimination of 14C-labelled isoflavone-containing extracts from kudzu (Pueraria lobata) root culture and red clover (Trifolium pratense) cell culture were investigated in an in vivo rat model. The predominant isoflavones in the kudzu extract were the glycosides puerarin, daidzin and malonyl daidzin, while in the red clover extract, the major isoflavones were formononetin and its derivatives, genistein and biochanin A, with radioactivities of 3.770 and 7.256 MBq/g, respectively. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, implanted with a jugular catheter and a subcutaneous ultrafiltrate probe, were orally administered with 14C-labelled isoflavone extracts from either kudzu or clover cell cultures. Serum, interstitial fluid (ISF), urine and faeces were collected using a Culex Automated Blood Collection System for 24 h. Analysis of bone tissues revealed that radiolabel accumulated in the femur, tibia and vertebrae at 0.04, 0.03 and 0.01 % of the administered dose, respectively, in both kudzu and red clover treatments. The liver accumulated the greatest concentration of radiolabel among the tissues tested, at 1.99 and 1.54 % of the administered kudzu and red clover extracts, respectively. Serum and ISF analysis showed that both extracts were rapidly absorbed, distributed in various tissues, and largely eliminated in the urine and faeces. Urine and faeces contained 8.53 and 9.06 % of the kudzu dose, respectively, and 3.60 and 5.64 % of the red clover dose, respectively. Serum pharmacokinetics suggest that extracts from kudzu may undergo enterohepatic circulation.

  17. Red clover coumarate 3'-hydroxylase (CYP98A44) is capable of hydroxylating p-coumaroyl-shikimate but not p-coumaroyl-malate: implications for the biosynthesis of phaselic acid.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael L; Zarnowski, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves accumulate several mumol of phaselic acid [2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate] per gram fresh weight. Post-harvest oxidation of such o-diphenols to o-quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPO) prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage. Forages like alfalfa (Medicago sativa) lack both foliar PPO activity and o-diphenols. Consequently, breakdown of their protein upon harvest and storage results in economic losses and release of excess nitrogen into the environment. Understanding how red clover synthesizes o-diphenols such as phaselic acid will help in the development of forages utilizing this natural system of protein protection. We have proposed biosynthetic pathways in red clover for phaselic acid that involve a specific hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:malate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase. It is unclear whether the transfer reaction to malate to form phaselic acid involves caffeic acid or p-coumaric acid and subsequent hydroxylation of the resulting p-coumaroyl-malate. The latter would require a coumarate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) capable of hydroxylating p-coumaroyl-malate, an activity not previously described. Here, a cytochrome P450 C3'H (CYP98A44) was identified and its gene cloned from red clover. CYP98A44 shares 96 and 79% amino acid identity with Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana C3'H proteins that are capable of hydroxylating p-coumaroyl-shikimate and have been implicated in monolignol biosynthesis. CYP98A44 mRNA is expressed in stems and flowers and to a lesser extent in leaves. Immune serum raised against CYP98A44 recognizes a membrane-associated protein in red clover stems and leaves and cross-reacts with C3'H proteins from other species. CYP98A44 expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is capable of hydroxylating p-coumaroyl-shikimate, but not p-coumaroyl-malate. This finding indicates that in red clover, phaselic acid is likely formed by transfer of a caffeoyl moiety to malic acid, although the existence of a second C

  18. Effects of feeding grass or red clover silage cut at two maturity stages in dairy cows. 2. Dry matter intake and cell wall digestion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kuoppala, K; Ahvenjärvi, S; Rinne, M; Vanhatalo, A

    2009-11-01

    This study examined the effects of red clover or grass silages cut at 2 stages of growth on feed intake, cell wall digestion, and ruminal passage kinetics in lactating dairy cows. Five dairy cows equipped with rumen cannulas were used in a study designed as a 5 x 5 Latin square with 21-d periods. Diets consisted of early-cut and late-cut grass and red clover silages and a mixture of late-cut grass and early-cut red clover silages offered ad libitum. All diets were supplemented with 9 kg/d of concentrate. Ruminal digestion and passage kinetics were assessed by the rumen evacuation technique. Apparent total-tract digestibility was determined by total fecal collection. The silage dry matter intake was highest when the mixed forage diet was fed and lowest with the early-cut red clover diet. Delaying the harvest tended to decrease DMI of grass and increase that of red clover. The intake of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and potentially digestible NDF (pdNDF) was lower but the intake of indigestible NDF (iNDF) was higher for red clover diets than for grass diets. The rumen pool size of iNDF and the ratio of iNDF to pdNDF in the rumen contents were larger, and pool sizes of NDF and pdNDF were smaller for red clover than for grass silage diets. Outflow of iNDF and the ratio of iNDF to pdNDF in digesta entering the omasal canal were larger, and the outflow of pdNDF was smaller for red clover than for grass silage diets. The digestion rate (k(d)) of pdNDF was faster for red clover diets than for grass silage diets. Delaying the harvest decreased k(d) for grass but increased it for red clover silage diets. Observed differences in fiber characteristics of red clover and grass silages were reflected in ruminal digestion and passage kinetics of these forages. The low intake of early-cut red clover silage could not be explained by silage digestibility, fermentation quality, or rumen fill, but was most likely related to nutritionally suboptimal composition because inclusion of

  19. Genetic manipulation of miR156 for improvement of biomass production and forage quality in red clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense) is an important forage legume in the United States. Improving forage quality and biomass yield is an important goal of forage breeding programs. Plant development, particularly the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth, is an important factor affecting bio...

  20. Phenolic profiles and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene expression of red clover (Trifolium pratense) selected for decreased postharvest browning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is a legume forage abundant in phenolic compounds. It tends to brown when cut for hay, due to oxidation of phenolic compounds catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and subsequent binding to proteins. Selecting for a greener hay may provide information about the re...

  1. Use of the polymerase chain reaction to help determine the presence of blackpatch (Rhizoctonia leguminicola) in inoculated red clover leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia leguminicola, the causal agent of blackpatch of red clover, produces alkaloids that cause livestock to salivate excessively. Its presence is generally confirmed by microscopy, disappearance of symptoms after removal of the suspect forage, and chromatographic analysis of slaframine in ext...

  2. Forage Management Effects on Protein and Fiber Fractions, Protein Degradability, and Dry Matter Yield of Red Clover Conserved as Silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the action of o-quinones formed via polyphenol oxidase, conserved red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) contains abundant rumen undegradable protein (RUP), but inadequate rumen degradable protein (RDP) for dairy cattle. This study examined how forage management influences RDP, RUP, crude protein...

  3. Carcass parameters and meat quality in meat-goat kids finished on chicory, birdsfoot trefoil, or red clover pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted in 2009-2010 to assess carcass parameters and chevon (goat meat) quality when meat-goat kids (n = 72) were finished on pastures of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.; RCL), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.; BFT), or chicory (Cichorium intybus L.; CHIC). Final body we...

  4. Determination of the isoflavone composition and estrogenic activity of commercial dietary supplements based on soy or red clover.

    PubMed

    Andres, Susanne; Hansen, Ulf; Niemann, Birgit; Palavinskas, Richard; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    Dietary supplements high in isolated isoflavones are commercially available for human consumption primarily to alleviate menopausal symptoms in women. The isoflavone composition, quantity and importantly their estrogenic potency are poorly standardised and can vary considerably between different products. The aim of this study was to analyse the isoflavone composition of 11 dietary supplements based on soy or red clover using the HPLC/MS/MS technique. Furthermore, we investigated the transactivational potential of the supplements on the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, performing luciferase reporter gene assays. As expected, we found that the isoflavone composition varies between different products. The measured total isoflavone contents in various supplements were mostly comparable to those claimed by the manufacturers in their product information. However expressing the isoflavone content as isoflavone aglycone equivalents, soy-based supplements had a clearly lower quantity compared to the manufacturer information. All supplements transactivated more or less ERα and ERβ with a preference for ERβ. The transactivational efficiency exceeded partly the maximal 17β-estradiol induced ER activation. While the different soy-based supplements revealed similar transactivation potential to both ERs, red clover-based supplements differed considerably. We conclude that different commercial dietary supplements based on soy or red clover vary in their isoflavone composition and quantity. They are estrogenically active, although especially the red clover-based supplements show considerable differences in their estrogenic potential to ERα and ERβ. Thus, different isoflavone-rich products cannot be necessarily compared regarding possible biological effects.

  5. Effect of feeding fresh or conditioned red clover on milk fatty acids and nitrogen utilization in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R F; Theobald, V J; Tweed, J K S; Winters, A L; Scollan, N D

    2009-03-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in conditioned red clover (ensiled or cut and crushed) reduces both proteolysis and lipolysis in the herbage, which has led to increases in N use efficiency and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of milk when offered to dairy cows. In damaged plant cells, PPO is activated and binds protein through the formation of protein-bound phenols. This study investigated a) whether freshly cut red clover could increase N use efficiency and milk PUFA concentrations in dairy cows or whether PPO enzymes require prior activation before feeding to elicit a response, and b) apparent whole-tract amino acid digestibility to help determine the effect of PPO on amino acid utilization. Six multiparous Holstein x Friesian dairy cows in mid-lactation were allocated at random to 1 of 3 dietary treatments in a 3 x 3 Latin square: a control treatment of grass (low PPO, G); red clover (high PPO, RC), and conditioned red clover (high fully activated PPO, CRC). The CRC herbage was cut and chopped in the field and then transported with the G and RC herbages to the animal house. Each period consisted of a 2-wk adaptation to diet and a week of measuring dietary effects (N balance and milk collection). The PPO activity was greatest in the RC treatment as fed, whereas activation of latent PPO enzyme and protein-bound phenol levels were greatest in the CRC diet. Dry matter and total fatty acid intakes were comparable across treatments (18.8 kg/d and 550 g/d, respectively). Milk yields and total fatty acid content were similar across treatments (32.6 kg/d and 34.8 mg/mL, respectively). Cows offered either RC or CRC had greater levels of protein, C18 PUFA and total long-chain PUFA in their milk than animals offered grass with no difference between RC and CRC. Nitrogen intakes, and output in milk, urine, and feces were greater in cows offered the 2 red clover treatments than G, with no difference between RC and CRC. However, there were no differences in N use efficiency

  6. In planta protein interactions of three alphacryptoviruses and three betacryptoviruses from White Clover, Red Clover and Dill by bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lesker, Till; Maiss, Edgar

    2013-10-09

    Plant-infecting viruses of the genera Alpha- and Betacryptovirus within the family Partitiviridae cause no visible effects on their hosts and are only transmitted by cell division and through gametes. The bipartite dsRNA genome is encoding a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and a coat protein (CP). Aside from sequence and structural analysis, the investigation of protein interactions is another step towards virus characterization. Therefore, ORFs of two type members White Clover Cryptic Virus 1 and 2 (WCCV-1 and WCCV-2), as well as the related viruses from Red Clover and Dill were introduced into a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. We showed CP-CP dimerization for all tested viruses with localization for alphacryptoviruses at the nuclear membrane and for betacryptoviruses close to cell walls within the cytoplasm. For CPs of WCCV-1 and WCCV-2, deletion mutants were created to determine internal interaction sites. Moreover, RdRp self-interaction was found for all viruses, whereas CP-RdRp interactions were only detectable for the alphacryptoviruses. An intra-genus test of CPs was successful in various virus combinations, whereas an inter-genus interaction of WCCV-1CP and WCCV-2CP was absent. This is the first report of in vivo protein interactions of members in the family Partitiviridae, indicating distinct features of the alpha- and betacryptoviruses.

  7. Salivary syndrome in horses: identification of slaframine in red clover hay.

    PubMed Central

    Hagler, W M; Behlow, R F

    1981-01-01

    An outbreak of salivary syndrome in horses in North Carolina was investigated. Rhizoctonia leguminicola was the predominant fungus isolated from toxic red clover hay. The fungus was less prevalent in the hay after 10 months of storage, and the hay had also decreased in biological activity after 10 months. Toxic hay caused extreme salivation, piloerection, respiratory distress, and increased frequency of defecation when fed to guinea pigs, and purified extracts of toxic hay and pure slaframine elicited these same responses when injected intraperitoneally into guinea pigs. The freshly acquired hay, based on the biological (slobber-producing) activity in hay and in purified extracts, contained the equivalent to 50 to 100 ppm (50 to 100 microgram/g) of slaframine, but this level had decreased after 10 months by about 10-fold to about 7 ppm. Slaframine and seven synthetic derivates of slaframine were used in presumptive gas-liquid chromatographic identification of this mycotoxin. Slaframine (1-acetoxy-6-amino-octahydroindolizine) was identified in purified extracts of toxic hay by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry after preparative thin-layer chromatography. This was the first direct identification of slaframine in toxic red clove hay. PMID:7316513

  8. Effects of aqueous soybean, mistletoe and red clover extracts on activities of adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Namuslu, M; Kocaoglu, H; Celik, H T; Avci, A; Devrim, E; Genc, Y; Gocmen, E; Erguder, I B; Durak, I

    2014-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max), mistletoe (Viscum album) and red clover (Trifolium pratence) have been argued to have anti-cancer effects. In the present study it was aimed to investigate possible effects of these plant extracts on the activities of DNA turn-over enzymes, namely adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xanthine oxidase (XO) in cancerous and non-cancerous gastric and colon tissues. For this aim, 6 cancerous and 6 non-cancerous adjacent human gastric tissues, and 7 cancerous and 7 non-cancerous adjacent colon tissues were obtained by surgical operations. Our results suggest that aqueous soybean, mistletoe and red clover extracts may exhibit anti-tumoral activity by depleting hypoxanthine concentration in the cancer cells through XO activation, which may lead to lowered salvage pathway activity necessary for the cancer cells to proliferate in the cancerous colon tissue. Some foods like soybean, mistletoe and red clover may provide nutritional support to medical cancer therapy through inhibiting and/or activating key enzymes in cancer metabolism (Tab. 4, Ref. 33).

  9. Type and distribution of sensilla in the antennae of the red clover root borer, Hylastinus obscurus.

    PubMed

    Palma, Rubén; Mutis, Ana; Isaacs, Rufus; Quiroz, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine the type, distribution, and structures of sensilla, the antennae of the red clover root borer, Hylastinus obscurus Marsham (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), were examined by light and electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission). Four different types of sensilla were identified in the club, and one type of chaetica was found in the scape and funicle of both male and female individuals. Chaetica and basiconica were the most abundant sensilla types in the club. They were present in the three sensory bands described, totaling approximately 80% of sensilla in the antennal club of H. obscurus. Chaetica were predominantly mechanoreceptors, although gustatory function could not be excluded. Basiconica forms showed characteristics typical of olfactory sensilla. Trichoidea were not found in the proximal sensory band, and they exhibited abundant pores, suggesting olfactory function. Styloconica were the least abundant sensillum type, and their shape was similar to that reported as having hygro- and thermoreceptor functions. There was no difference in the relative abundance of antennal sensilla between males and females. Finally, the sensillar configuration and abundance of receptors in the H. obscurus antennae suggest that these sensilla have chemoreceptive and other functions.

  10. Type and Distribution of Sensilla in the Antennae of the Red Clover Root Borer, Hylastinus obscurus

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Rubén; Mutis, Ana; Isaacs, Rufus; Quiroz, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine the type, distribution, and structures of sensilla, the antennae of the red clover root borer, Hylastinus obscurus Marsham (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), were examined by light and electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission). Four different types of sensilla were identified in the club, and one type of chaetica was found in the scape and funicle of both male and female individuals. Chaetica and basiconica were the most abundant sensilla types in the club. They were present in the three sensory bands described, totaling approximately 80% of sensilla in the antennal club of H. obscurus. Chaetica were predominantly mechanoreceptors, although gustatory function could not be excluded. Basiconica forms showed characteristics typical of olfactory sensilla. Trichoidea were not found in the proximal sensory band, and they exhibited abundant pores, suggesting olfactory function. Styloconica were the least abundant sensillum type, and their shape was similar to that reported as having hygro- and thermoreceptor functions. There was no difference in the relative abundance of antennal sensilla between males and females. Finally, the sensillar configuration and abundance of receptors in the H. obscurus antennae suggest that these sensilla have chemoreceptive and other functions. PMID:24787008

  11. Effect of Red Clover Isoflavones over Skin, Appendages, and Mucosal Status in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Lipovac, Markus; Chedraui, Peter; Gruenhut, Christine; Gocan, Anca; Kurz, Christine; Neuber, Benedikt; Imhof, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of red clover extract (RCE) isoflavones over subjective status of skin, appendages, and several mucosal sites. Method. Postmenopausal women (n = 109) were randomly assigned to receive either two daily capsules of the active compound (80 mg RCE, Group A) or placebo of equal appearance (Group B) for a 90-day period. After a washout period of 7 days, medication was crossed over and taken for 90 days more. Subjective improvement of skin, appendages, and several mucosal site status was assessed for each studied group at 90 and 187 days using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In addition, libido, tiredness, and urinary, sleep, and mood complaints were also evaluated. Results. Women after RCE intervention (both groups) reported better subjective improvement of scalp hair and skin status, libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness. Improvement of urinary complaints, nail, body hair, and mucosa (oral, nasal, and ocular) status did not differ between treatment phases (intra- and intergroup). Overall satisfaction with treatment was reported higher after RCE intervention (both groups) as compared to placebo. Conclusion. RCE supplementation exerted a subject improvement of scalp hair and skin status as well as libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness in postmenopausal women. PMID:22135679

  12. Intake of Novel Red Clover Supplementation for 12 Weeks Improves Bone Status in Healthy Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Thorup, Anne Cathrine; Lambert, Max Norman; Kahr, Henriette Strøm; Bjerre, Mette; Jeppesen, Per Bendix

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect by which daily consumption of a novel red clover (RC) extract influences bone health, inflammatory status, and cardiovascular health in healthy menopausal women. Design. A 12-week randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial involving 60 menopausal women receiving a daily dose of 150 mL RC extract containing 37.1 mg isoflavones (33.8 mg as aglycones) or placebo. Methods. Bone parameters were changes in bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and T-score at the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Bone turnover (CTx) and inflammatory markers were measured in plasma and finally blood pressure (BP) was evaluated. Results. RC extract had positive effect on bone health, and only the women receiving the placebo experienced a decline in BMD (p < 0.01) at the lumbar spine. T-score at the lumbar spine only decreased in the placebo group (p < 0.01). CTx decreased in the RC group with −9.94 (±4.93)%, although not significant. Conclusion. Daily consumption of RC extract over a 12-week period was found to have a beneficial effect on bone health in menopausal women based on BMD and T-score at the lumbar spine and plasma CTx levels. No changes in BP or inflammation markers were found and no side effects were observed. PMID:26265926

  13. Effect of Red Clover Isoflavones over Skin, Appendages, and Mucosal Status in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Lipovac, Markus; Chedraui, Peter; Gruenhut, Christine; Gocan, Anca; Kurz, Christine; Neuber, Benedikt; Imhof, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of red clover extract (RCE) isoflavones over subjective status of skin, appendages, and several mucosal sites. Method. Postmenopausal women (n = 109) were randomly assigned to receive either two daily capsules of the active compound (80 mg RCE, Group A) or placebo of equal appearance (Group B) for a 90-day period. After a washout period of 7 days, medication was crossed over and taken for 90 days more. Subjective improvement of skin, appendages, and several mucosal site status was assessed for each studied group at 90 and 187 days using a visual analogue scale (VAS). In addition, libido, tiredness, and urinary, sleep, and mood complaints were also evaluated. Results. Women after RCE intervention (both groups) reported better subjective improvement of scalp hair and skin status, libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness. Improvement of urinary complaints, nail, body hair, and mucosa (oral, nasal, and ocular) status did not differ between treatment phases (intra- and intergroup). Overall satisfaction with treatment was reported higher after RCE intervention (both groups) as compared to placebo. Conclusion. RCE supplementation exerted a subject improvement of scalp hair and skin status as well as libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness in postmenopausal women.

  14. The effect of cutting, mulching and applications of farmyard manure on nitrogen fixation in a red clover/grass sward.

    PubMed

    Hatch, D J; Goodlass, G; Joynes, A; Shepherd, M A

    2007-12-01

    In organic farming, maximising the amount of nitrogen (N) which is fixed and retained within the soil is of paramount importance for the yield of the following crop. The aim of this study was to establish the extent to which increased soil fertility, farmyard manure (FYM) applications and/or mulching, could adversely affect fixation. At two sites, situated in the South West (SW) and North East (NE) of England, N(2) fixation was estimated in 'organically' managed red clover/grass plots, both with and without green manure (i.e. surface mulched) and/or the addition of FYM. The FYM was incorporated into the seedbeds at both sites in autumn 2002 at the rate of 170 kg total Nha(-1), as either well-composted (SW site), or not actively-composted (NE site) manures. The same FYM application rate was repeated as top-dressings to both sites in autumn 2003. The plots were cut three or four times each year over two growing seasons. In the first harvest year (2003), incorporation of FYM had beneficial effects of increasing dry matter and N yields significantly at the first cut, but there were no significant differences in subsequent cuts. The same pattern was found in the second harvest year (2004) after the top dressings of FYM, suggesting that most of the N in both types of FYM was in recalcitrant forms. Over the two growing seasons, mulching did not affect red clover/grass dry matter or N yields, but did reduce the proportion of N(2) fixed, by up to 60 kg Nha(-1) when compared with plots from which the clover/grass herbage was cut and removed. Thus, the gain in N from FYM or green manure tended to be offset by a similar reduction in N(2) fixation. These results demonstrate the close association between the availability of soil N and the feed-back system which operates on N(2) fixation by red clover.

  15. Associative effects between orchardgrass and red clover silages on voluntary intake and digestion in sheep: Evidence of a synergy on digestible dry matter intake.

    PubMed

    Niderkorn, V; Martin, C; Rochette, Y; Julien, S; Baumont, R

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the associative effects between orchardgrass () and red clover () silages as a model of preserved grass-legume mixture on voluntary intake parameters and digestive efficiency in sheep. Ten sheep were assigned to a repeated 5 × 5 Latin square design, in which 5 proportions of orchardgrass and red clover silages were tested (0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25, and 0:100, on a DM basis). Measurements were performed simultaneously on intake, feeding behavior (eating time and chewing activity), digestive parameters (nutrient digestibility and rumen parameters), nitrogen balance, and enteric methane (CH) emissions using the SF6 tracer technique. Positive associative effects were observed on daily voluntary DMI ( < 0.001), which was greater when sheep were fed with at least 50% red clover (1.56-1.59 kg/d) compared with those fed with 0 or 25% red clover (1.29 and 1.45 kg/d, respectively; < 0.001). This synergy between forages was not observed on nutrient digestibility, as these parameters linearly decreased with increasing proportions of red clover ( < 0.001). As a result, positive associative effects were observed on daily voluntary intake of digestible DM ( < 0.001). Taken together, the results indicate that the synergy on voluntary intake was due to a greater motivation of animals to eat mixtures (seen in increased intake rates) rather than a positive associative effect on digestive efficiency. Methane yield decreased linearly with increasing proportion of red clover ( < 0.001) and ranged from 20.0 g/kg DMI for sheep fed 100% orchardgrass to 16.1 g/kg DMI for sheep fed 100% red clover. Mixtures of orchardgrass and red clover quadratically ( = 0.03) decreased urinary nitrogen losses and tended ( = 0.099) to quadratically increase nitrogen retention. This synergy between orchardgrass and red clover silages could improve animal performances in addition to the known agronomic benefits of grass-legume mixtures.

  16. Latent and active polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in red clover (Trifolium pratense) and use of a low PPO mutant to study the role of PPO in proteolysis reduction.

    PubMed

    Winters, Ana L; Minchin, Frank R; Michaelson-Yeates, Terry P T; Lee, Michael R F; Morris, Phillip

    2008-04-23

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in leaf extracts of wild type (WT) red clover and a mutant line expressing greatly reduced levels of PPO (LP red clover) has been characterized. Both latent and active forms of PPO were present, with the latent being the predominant form. PPO enzyme and substrate (phaselic acid) levels fluctuated over a growing season and were not correlated. Protease activation of latent PPO was demonstrated; however, the rate was too low to have an immediate effect following extraction. A novel, more rapid PPO activation mechanism by the enzyme's own substrate was identified. Rates of protein breakdown and amino acid release were significantly higher in LP red clover extracts compared with WT extracts, with 20 versus 6% breakdown of total protein and 1.9 versus 0.4 mg/g FW of free amino acids released over 24 h, respectively. Inclusion of ascorbic acid increased the extent of protein breakdown. Free phenol content decreased during a 24 h incubation of WT red clover extracts, whereas protein-bound phenol increased and high molecular weight protein species were formed. Inhibition of proteolysis occurred during wilting and ensilage of WT compared with LP forage (1.9 vs 5 and 17 vs 21 g/kg of DM free amino acids for 24 h wilted forage and 90 day silage, respectively). This study shows that whereas constitutive red clover PPO occurs predominantly in the latent form, this fraction can contribute to reducing protein breakdown in crude extracts and during ensilage.

  17. Relationship of red and photographic infrared spectral radiances to alfalfa biomass, forage water content, percentage canopy cover, and severity of drought stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1979-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral data were collected using a handheld radiometer for two cuttings of alfalfa. Significant linear and non-linear correlation coefficients were found between the spectral variables and plant height, biomass, forage water content, and estimated canopy cover for the earlier alfalfa cutting. The alfalfa of later cutting experienced a period of severe drought stress which limited growth. The spectral variables were found to be highly correlated with the estimated drought scores for this alfalfa cutting.

  18. Effects of red clover on hot flash and circulating hormone concentrations in menopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfarpour, Masumeh; Sadeghi, Ramin; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Mirzaii Najmabadi, Khadijeh; mousavi bazaz, Mojtaba; abdolahian, Somayeh; Khadivzadeh, Talat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To critically evaluate the effect of red clover on hot flash, endometrial thickness, and hormones status in postmenopausal and peri- and post-menopausal women. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE (1966 to July 2014), Scopus (1990 to July 2014), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library issue 1, 2014) were searched for published randomized controlled Trials (RCTs). Results: Of 183 relevant publication trials, 11 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The mean hot flashes frequency in red clover was lower than the control groups (MD -1.99; p=0.067). There was larger decrease in FSH (SMD -0.812; CI: -1.93 to 0.312; p=0.157) and SHBG (SMD -0.128; CI-0.425 to 0.170; P=0.4) in red clover group, compared with placebo, which was not however statistically significant. LH (SMD 0.144; CI-0.097 to 0.384, p=0.242), estradiol (SMD 0.240; CI-0.001 to 0.482, p=0.051), testosterone (MD 0.083; CI: -0.560 to 0.726; p=0.901), and endometrial thickness (SDM 0.022; CI: -0.380 to 0.424, p=0.915) showed greater increase in red clover, compared with placebo, although the effect of estradiol was only significant. Conclusion: Red clover had a positive effect of alleviating hot flash in menopausal women. Our data, however, suggested very slight changes in FSH, LH, testosterone, and SHBG and significant effect in estrogen status by red clover consumption. However, the interpretation of results of the current study is limited due to methodological flaws of the included studies, menopause status, and large heterogeneity among them. Further trials are still needed to confirm the current finding. PMID:26693407

  19. Red clover HCT2, a hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A:malate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase, plays a crucial role in biosynthesis of phaselic acid and other hydroxycinnamoyl-malate esters in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves, phaselic acid (2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate) accumulates to several mmol kg-1 fresh weight and is a crucial component of a natural system that prevents protein breakdown during harvest and storage of this forage crop. Previously, we identified HCT2, a red clover g...

  20. Analysis of genetic diversity in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) breeding populations as revealed by RAPD genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Odeth; Ortega, Fernando; Campos, Hugo

    2003-08-01

    Red clover is an important forage legume species for temperate regions and very little is known about the genetic organization of its breeding populations. We used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) genetic markers to address the genetic diversity and the distribution of variation in 20 breeding populations and cultivars from Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Switzerland. Genetic distances were calculated for all possible pairwise combinations. A high level of polymorphism was found and the proportion of polymorphic loci across populations was 74.2%. A population derived from a non-certified seedlot displayed a higher proportion of polymorphic loci than its respective certified seedlot. Gene diversity values and population genetics parameters suggest that the populations analyzed are diverse. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that the largest proportion of variation (80.4%) resides at the within population level. RAPD markers are a useful tool for red clover breeding programs. A dendrogram based on genetic distances divided the breeding populations analyzed into three distinct groups. The amount and partition of diversity observed can be of value in identifying the populations that parents of synthetic cultivars are derived from and to exploit the variation available in the populations analyzed.

  1. Phosphorus deficiency in red clover promotes exudation of orobanchol, the signal for mycorrhizal symbionts and germination stimulant for root parasites.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Kaori; Yoneyama, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yasutomo; Sekimoto, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Plant derived sesquiterpene strigolactones, which have previously been characterized as germination stimulants for root parasitic plants, have recently been identified as the branching factors which induce hyphal branching morphogenesis, a critical step in host recognition by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. We show here that, in red clover plants (Trifolium pratense L.), which is known as a host for both AM fungi and the root holoparasitic plant Orobanche minor Sm., reduced supply of phosphorus (P) but not of other elements examined (N, K, Mg, Ca) in the culture medium significantly promotes the release of a strigolactone, orobanchol, by the roots of this plant. In red clover plants, the level of orobanchol exudation appeared to be regulated by P availability and was in good agreement with germination stimulation activity of the root exudates. This implies that under P deficiency, plant roots attract not only symbiotic fungi but also root parasitic plants through the release of strigolactones. This is the first report demonstrating that nutrient availability influences both symbiotic and parasitic interactions in the rhizosphere.

  2. Genome mapping of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and comparative analysis within the Trifolieae using cross-species SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Sledge, Mary K.; Bouton, Joe H.

    2007-01-01

    Allotetraploid white clover (Trifolium repens L.), a cool-season perennial legume used extensively as forage for livestock, is an important target for marker-assisted breeding. A genetic linkage map of white clover was constructed using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers based on sequences from several Trifolieae species, including white clover, red clover (T. pratense L.), Medicago truncatula (Gaertn.) and soybean (Glycine max L.). An F1 population consisting of 179 individuals, from a cross between two highly heterozygous genotypes, GA43 and Southern Regional Virus Resistant, was used for genetic mapping. A total of 1,571 SSR markers were screened for amplification and polymorphism using DNA from two parents and 14 F1s of the mapping population. The map consists of 415 loci amplified from 343 SSR primer pairs, including 83 from white clover, 181 from red clover, 77 from M. truncatula, and two from soybean. Linkage groups for all eight homoeologous chromosome pairs of allotetraploid white clover were detected. Map length was estimated at 1,877 cM with 87% genome coverage. Map density was approximately 5 cM per locus. Segregation distortion was detected in six segments of the genome (homoeologous groups A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, and D1). A comparison of map locations of markers originating from white clover, red clover, and alfalfa (M. sativa L.) revealed putative macro-colinearity between the three Trifolieae species. This map can be used to link quantitative trait loci with SSR markers, and accelerate the improvement of white clover by marker-assisted selection and breeding. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-007-0523-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17356868

  3. Oxidation of ortho-diphenols in red clover with and without polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and their role in PPO activation and inactivation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation of phenol to quinone with its subsequent binding and complexing with protein in red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) to be fed to ruminant livestock has been shown to improve nitrogen use efficiency and improve the deposition of polyunsaturated fats into animal products. This oxidation has a...

  4. Isolation of Burkholderia cepacia JB12 from lead- and cadmium-contaminated soil and its potential in promoting phytoremediation with tall fescue and red clover.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhong Min; Sha, Wei; Zhang, Yan Fu; Zhao, Jing; Ji, Hongyang

    2013-07-01

    Phytoremediation combined with suitable microorganisms and biodegradable chelating agents can be a means of reclaiming lands contaminated by toxic heavy metals. We investigated the ability of a lead- and cadmium-resistant bacterial strain (JB12) and the biodegradable chelator ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) to improve absorption of these metals from soil by tall fescue and red clover. Strain JB12 was isolated from contaminated soil samples, analysed for lead and cadmium resistance, and identified as Burkholderia cepacia. Tall fescue and red clover were grown in pots to which we added JB12, (S,S)-EDDS, combined JB12 and EDDS, or water only. Compared with untreated plants, the biomass of plants treated with JB12 was significantly increased. Concentrations of lead and cadmium in JB12-treated plants increased significantly, with few exceptions. Plants treated with EDDS responded variably, but in those treated with combined EDDS and JB12, heavy metal concentrations increased significantly in tall fescue and in the aboveground parts of red clover. We conclude that JB12 is resistant to lead and cadmium. Its application to the soil improved the net uptake of these heavy metals by experimental plants. The potential for viable phytoremediation of lead- and cadmium-polluted soils with tall fescue and red clover combined with JB12 was further enhanced by the addition of EDDS.

  5. Biochanin A, an isoflavone produced by red clover, promotes weight gain of steers grazed in mixed grass pastures and fed dried-distillers' grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochanin A (BCA) is an isoflavone produced by red clover (Trifloium pratense L.) that can inhibit hyper-ammonia producing bacteria (HAB) to reduce deamination in the rumen and increase the feed amino acids available for gastric digestion. An in vitro experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect...

  6. Auto-Oxidation of Ortho-Diphenolic Substrate and Deactivation of Polyphenol Oxidases (Catecholase) During Wilting and Post Harvest Damage in Red Clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPO) in red clover convert diphenolic substrate to highly reactive quinones which, through their reaction with proteins, increase the efficiency of N utilization and increase the proportion of beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids in bovine products (meat and milk). Auto-oxidat...

  7. Utility of bioassays (lettuce, red clover, red fescue, Microtox, MetSTICK, Hyalella, bait lamina) in ecological risk screening of acid metal (Zn) contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Chapman, E Emily V; Hedrei Helmer, Stephanie; Dave, Göran; Murimboh, John D

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess selected bioassays and ecological screening tools for their suitability in a weight of evidence risk screening process of acidic metal contaminated soil. Intact soil cores were used for the tests, which minimizes changes in pH and metal bioavailability that may result from homogenization and drying of the soil. Soil cores were spiked with ZnCl(2) or CaCl(2). Leachate collected from the soil cores was used to account for the exposure pathways through pore water and groundwater. Tests assessed included MetSTICK in soil cores and Microtox in soil leachate, lettuce (Lactuca sativa), red fescue (Festuca rubra) and red clover (Trifolium pratense) in the soil cores and lettuce and red clover in soil leachate, Hyallella azteca in soil leachate, and an ecological soil function test using Bait Lamina in soil cores. Microtox, H. azteca, lettuce and red fescue showed higher sensitivity to low pH than to Zn concentrations and are therefore not recommended as tests on intact acidic soil cores and soil leachate. The Bait Lamina test appeared sensitive to pH levels below 3.7 but should be investigated further as a screening tool in less acidic soils. Among the bioassays, the MetSTICK and the T. pratense bioassays in soil cores were the most sensitive to Zn, with the lowest nominal NOEC of 200 and 400mg Zn/kg d.w., respectively. These bioassays were also tolerant of low pH, which make them suitable for assessing hazards of metal contaminated acid soils.

  8. Effects of mixtures of red clover and maize silages on the partitioning of dietary nitrogen between milk and urine by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, R J; Davies, L J; Kim, E J

    2010-05-01

    Eight multiparous lactating Holstein-Friesian cows were used to evaluate the partitioning of dietary nitrogen (N) from diets based on mixtures of red clover and maize silages in comparison with diets based on ryegrass silage. All cows received 4 kg/day of a standard dairy concentrate with one of four forage treatments in an incomplete changeover design with three 4-week periods. Three treatments were based on mixtures of red clover and maize silage. N intake was altered both by varying the ratio of these silages (40/60 and 25/75 on a dry matter (DM) basis) and by an additional treatment for which the DM intake of the 40/60 mixture was restricted to the level achieved with grass silage. Rumen passage rates were estimated from faecal excretion curves following a pulse oral dose of Dysprosium-labeled silage and urinary excretion of purine derivatives (PD) was used as an index of rumen microbial protein synthesis. Red clover silage mixtures led to significantly increased feed intake (21.5, 20.7 and 15.2 kg DM/day for 40/60 and 25/75 red clover/maize silage mixtures and grass silage, respectively), milk production (25.8, 27.8 and 20.0 kg/day for the same treatments, respectively) and milk component yields, but were without effect on milk fat and protein concentrations. The large increase in the yield of milk (24.5 kg/day) and milk components for the restricted red clover/maize silage treatment, in comparison with the grass silage treatment, was proportionately greater than the increase in DM intake (16.6 kg DM/day). There were no significant treatment effects on diet digestibility, while the higher intakes of red clover silage mixtures were associated with higher rumen passage rates (5.82%, 6.24% and 4.55%/h, respectively). There were significant effects of both N intake and forage source on the partitioning of dietary N between milk and urine. When dietary protein was diluted by the inclusion of maize silage, red clover silage led to increased milk N and reduced

  9. Effect of fish oil on ruminal biohydrogenation of C18 unsaturated fatty acids in steers fed grass or red clover silages.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R F; Shingfield, K J; Tweed, J K S; Toivonen, V; Huws, S A; Scollan, N D

    2008-12-01

    Red clover and fish oil (FO) are known to alter ruminal lipid biohydrogenation leading to an increase in the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of ruminant-derived foods, respectively. The potential to exploit these beneficial effects were examined using eight Hereford × Friesian steers fitted with rumen and duodenal cannulae. Treatments consisted of grass silage or red clover silage fed at 90% of ad libitum intake and FO supplementation at 0, 10, 20 or 30 g/kg diet dry matter (DM). The experiment was conducted with two animals per FO level and treatments formed extra-period Latin squares. Flows of fatty acids at the duodenum were assessed using ytterbium acetate and chromium ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid as indigestible markers. Intakes of DM were higher (P < 0.001) for red clover silage than grass silage (5.98 v. 5.09 kg/day). There was a linear interaction effect (P = 0.004) to FO with a reduction in DM intake in steers fed red clover silage supplemented with 30 g FO/kg diet DM. Apparent ruminal biohydrogenation of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 were lower (P < 0.001) for red clover silage than grass silage (0.83 and 0.79 v. 0.87 and 0.87, respectively), whilst FO increased the extent of biohydrogenation on both diets. Ruminal biohydrogenation of C20:5n-3 and C22:6n-3 was extensive on both silage diets, averaging 0.94 and 0.97, respectively. Inclusion of FO in the diet enhanced the flow of total CLA leaving the rumen with an average across silages of 0.22, 0.31, 0.41 and 0.44 g/day for 0, 10, 20 or 30 g FO/kg, respectively, with a linear interaction effect between the two silages (P = 0.03). FO also showed a dose-dependent increase in the flow of trans-C18:1 intermediates at the duodenum from 4.6 to 15.0 g/day on grass silage and from 9.4 to 22.5 g/day for red clover silage. Concentrations of trans-C18:1 with double bonds from Δ4-16 in duodenal digesta were all elevated in response to FO in both diets, with trans-11 being

  10. Antioxidant Activity and Total Phenolic and Flavonoid Content of Various Solvent Extracts from In Vivo and In Vitro Grown Trifolium pratense L. (Red Clover)

    PubMed Central

    Mat Taha, Rosna; Banisalam, Behrooz

    2015-01-01

    In the present study the extracts of in vivo and in vitro grown plants as well as callus tissue of red clover were tested for their antioxidant activities, using different extraction solvent and different antioxidant assays. The total flavonoid and phenolic contents as well as extraction yield of the extracts were also investigated to determine their correlation with the antioxidant activity of the extracts. Among all the tested extracts the highest amounts of total phenolic and total flavonoids content were found in methanol extract of in vivo grown plants. The antioxidant activity of tested samples followed the order in vivo plant extract > callus extract > in vitro extract. The highest reducing power, 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging, and chelating power were found in methanol extracts of in vivo grown red clover, while the chloroform fraction of in vivo grown plants showed the highest 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging and hydrogen peroxide scavenging compared to the other tested extracts. A significant correlation was found between the antioxidant activity of extracts and their total phenolic and total flavonoid content. According to the findings, the extract of in vitro culture of red clover especially the callus tissue possesses a comparable antioxidant activity to the in vivo cultured plants' extract. PMID:26064936

  11. Changes in electrophoretic patterns of soluble and membrane proteins during cold acclimation of red clover seedlings. [Trifolium pratense

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfraim, L.; Dhindsa, R.S.

    1987-04-01

    Two-week old seedlings of a cold-hardy cultivar of red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Florex) were grown under 12 h photoperiod and day/night temperatures of 25/20C. They were cold-acclimated at 4C for 0, 7 and 14 days, and slowly frozen to -8C for 4h. They were then allowed to thaw gradually to room temperature. Survival was estimated 3 days after thawing. Acclimation for 0, 7 and 14 days resulted in 2, 55 and 64% survival respectively. Seedlings, acclimated for 0, 3, 7, 10, 14 and 20 days were labeled in vivo with (/sup 35/S)Met for 4h. Soluble and membrane proteins were prepared and analyzed by SDS-PAGE coupled with autoradiography. Four soluble proteins, M/sub r/ 15, 15.5, 23 and 25 kd, were found to specific to cold-acclimated seedlings and were present throughout the acclimation period. Two soluble proteins, M/sub r/ 41, 60 kd, appeared transiently in plants acclimated for 3 days. One membrane protein, M/sub r/ 29 kd, appears on day-3 and peaks on day 14 of acclimation. It declines thereafter. Studies are in progress to determine whether these cold acclimation-specific proteins are required for cold acclimation.

  12. Protection of polyunsaturated oils against ruminal biohydrogenation and oxidation during storage using a polyphenol oxidase containing extract from red clover.

    PubMed

    Gadeyne, F; Van Ranst, G; Vlaeminck, B; Vossen, E; Van der Meeren, P; Fievez, V

    2015-03-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) are to a large extent subject to biohydrogenation in a ruminal environment, which results to the healthy value of these PUFA being lost upon dietary addition to ruminants. PUFA are also prone to lipid oxidation upon storage. Therefore, it was tested whether emulsions could be protected against in vitro ruminal biohydrogenation and oxidation during storage by using protein extracts rich in polyphenol oxidase, an enzyme responsible for browning of plant tissues. PUFA rich emulsions were made with a protein extract from red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) before adding a synthetic diphenol (4-methylcatechol) to induce protection. Results after in vitro incubation confirmed the hypothesis and indicated the potential to prevent PUFA in linseed or fish oil from ruminal biohydrogenation and oxidation during storage through addition of 4-methylcatechol to the emulsions. Protection depended on the amount of oil present and protein concentrations in the emulsions. Protection efficiency increased with increasing the amounts of diphenol present in the emulsion per unit interfacial surface area. It is suggested that protection is caused by an effective encapsulation by cross-linking of the protein layer at the emulsion interface. For the first time, a method is described to protect PUFA using an enzyme abundantly available in nature, polyphenol oxidase, in combination with 4-methylcatechol.

  13. Carcass parameters and meat quality in meat-goat kids finished on chicory, birdsfoot trefoil, or red clover pastures.

    PubMed

    Turner, K E; Cassida, K A; Zerby, H N; Brown, M A

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted during the 2009 and 2010 grazing seasons to assess carcass parameters and chevon (goat meat) quality when meat-goat kids (n=72) were finished on pastures of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.; RCL), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.; BFT), or chicory (Cichorium intybus L.; CHIC). Final live weight (P<0.05) and carcass weight (P=0.10) were greater when goats were finished on RCL compared to CHIC with BFT being intermediate. Ribeye area, backfat thickness, body wall thickness, internal fat score, and leg score were not different (P>0.10) among treatments when adjusted for the covariate of carcass weight. Finishing meat-goat kids on RCL, BFT, or CHIC impacted concentrations of fatty acids (FAs) 18:1 trans-10, 18:1 cis-11, 18:2, 18:3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), omega-6, omega-3, and PUFA:saturated fatty acid ratio in longissimus lumborum samples. Finishing meat-goat kids on CHIC, RCL, or BFT pastures produced carcass weights acceptable for most ethnic markets in the USA.

  14. Dried Pomegranate Potentiates Anti-Osteoporotic and Anti-Obesity Activities of Red Clover Dry Extracts in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su Jin; Choi, Beom Rak; Kim, Seung Hee; Yi, Hae Yeon; Park, Hye Rim; Kim, Dong Chul; Choi, Seong Hun; Han, Chang Hyun; Park, Soo Jin; Song, Chang Hyun; Ku, Sae Kwang; Lee, Young Joon

    2015-01-01

    Red clover (RC) shows potential activity against menopausal symptoms and pomegranates have antioxidative and beneficial effects on postmenopausal symptoms; thus, we investigated whether the anti-climacteric activity of RC could be enhanced by the addition of dried pomegranate concentrate powder (PCP) extracts in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Regarding the anti-osteoporotic effects, bone mineral density increased significantly in OVX induced rats treated with 60 and 120 mg/kg of an RC:PCP 2:1 mixture, respectively, compared with OVX control rats. Additionally, femoral, tibia, and L4 bone resorption was decreased in OVX induced control rats treated with the RC:PCP 2:1 mixture (60 and 120 mg/kg), respectively, compared with OVX control rats. Regarding anti-obesity effects, the OVX induced rats treated with 60 and 120 mg/kg of the RC:PCP 2:1 mixture showed a decrease in total fat pad thickness, the mean diameters of adipocytes and the body weights gain compared with OVX induced control rats. The estradiol and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly increased in OVX induced rats treated with the RC:PCP 2:1 mixture (120 mg/kg) compared with OVX induced control rats, also, the uterine atrophy was significantly inhibited in 60 and 120 mg/kg of the RC:PCP 2:1 mixture treatment compared with OVX control rats. In conclusion, our results indicate that PCP enhanced the anti-climacteric effects of RC in OVX rats. The RC:PCP 2:1 mixture used in this study may be a promising new potent and protective agent for relieving climacteric symptoms. PMID:25912038

  15. Interactions between the Bumblebee Bombus pascuorum and Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) Are Mediated by Plant Genetic Background

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Richard J.; Rowntree, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    Wildflower mixes are often planted around field margins to provide forage for pollinators. Although seed for these mixtures is often wild-sourced, for species where agricultural cultivars are available, for example red clover (Trifolium pratense), cultivars can also be included. Previous evidence suggests that plant genetic background can have a strong influence on plant-arthropod interactions and therefore the provenance and genetic background of the plants included in wildflower mixes could impact plant-pollinator interactions. We tested the performance of five individual T. pratense cultivars against two commercially available wild-sourced T. pratense populations in terms of their ability to attract potential pollinator species (focusing on bumblebees) and their floral traits using greenhouse and garden experiments. The main bumblebee observed interacting with T. pratense was Bombus pascuorum and we found no difference in the absolute number of B. pascuorum visiting the cultivars or wild populations. However, we found variation among cultivars and between wild populations in their ability to attract bumblebees, which seems to be related to their relative investment in different floral traits. There was a positive relationship between biomass and number of inflorescences produced by the wild populations of T. pratense, which was not apparent for the cultivars. This suggests that artificial selection on the cultivars has changed the G-matrix of correlated traits. We show that agricultural cultivars of T. pratense can be as effective as wild populations at attracting pollinators such as bumblebees, but that the genetic background of both cultivars and wild populations can have a significant impact on the attractiveness of the plant to pollinators. We also show divergence in the correlated traits of T. pratense cultivars and wild populations that could lead to outbreeding depression if the plants interbreed. PMID:27552193

  16. Measuring Groundwater Storage Potential in Mountain Meadows using Geophysical Methods at Red Clover Meadow Complex, Sierra Nevada, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, J.; Cornwell, K.

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT The Dotta Canyon meadow, located in the Red Clover Meadow complex, upper Feather River Watershed, Plumas County, California, was studied to measure sediment volume and groundwater storage capacity in this mountain meadow environment. Groundwater resources in mountain meadows play an important role in providing baseflow to local stream systems during dry summer months. Degraded meadows reduce baseflow contributions to local streams throughout the year impacting the local flora and fauna and water resources downstream. Groundwater storage potential of meadows is a function of the total volume of meadow sediments, the types of sediment present and the effective porosity of those materials. Assessing these properties in meadows is difficult though as meadow environments are commonly sensitive to investigative disturbances like drill rigs and backhoes. We applied seismic refraction techniques to measure the thickness of meadow sediments in the 8.3 km2 Dotta Canyon. Specifically we conducted 42 seismic surveys, utilizing forward and reverse profiles to create a depth to bedrock isopach map of the Dotta Canyon meadow. Using ArcGIS software, aerial photographs and field GPS data to measure and calculate the meadow area and limited hand augering, we were able to calculate the volume of sediment in the meadow to be about 2.5E7 cubic meters. Hand augering in the meadow produced a record of meadow stratigraphy and helped determine appropriate locations for the collection of representative core samples. Representative cores were processed for effective porosity using the water porosimetry method. A mean effective porosity of 38%.was applied to volumetric calculations with results suggesting a groundwater storage capacity of 9.4E6 cubic meters.

  17. Performance, Blood Parameters, and Fecal Egg Counts When Meat Goats Were Finished on Alfalfa, Red Clover, or Orchardgrass Pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Appalachian Region of the USA, meat goat industries are growing rapidly on small farms to help produce meats for ethnic markets. This experiment was conducted to evaluate weight gain, blood parameters (measurements of nutrient use and anemia resulting from infection with the GI parasite Haem...

  18. Comparison of buckwheat, red clover, and purple tansy as potential surrogate plants for use in semi-field pesticide risk assessments with Bombus impatiens

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, G. Christopher; Frewin, Andrew J.; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bumble bees (Bombus spp.) are important wild and managed pollinators. There is increased interest in incorporating data on bumble bees into risk assessments for pesticides, but standardized methods for assessing hazards of pesticides in semi-field and field settings have not yet been established for bumble bees. During semi-field studies, colonies are caged with pesticide-treated flowering surrogate plants, which must be attractive to foragers to ensure colony exposure to the test compound, and must produce an ample nectar and pollen to sustain colonies during testing. However, it is not known which plant(s) are suitable for use in semi-field studies with bumble bees. Materials and Methods. We compared B. impatiens foraging activity and colony development on small plots of flowering buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum, var. common), red clover (Trifolium pratense), and purple tansy (Phacelia tanacetifolia) under semi-field conditions to assess their suitability as surrogate plants for pesticide risk assessment studies with bumble bees. We also compared the growth characteristics and input requirements of each plant type. Results. All three plant types generally established and grew well. Red clover and purple tansy experienced significant weed pressure and/or insect pest damage. In contrast, pest pressure was extremely low in buckwheat. Overall, B. impatiens foraging activity was significantly greater on buckwheat plots than red clover or purple tansy, but plant type had no effect on number of individuals produced per colony or colony weight. Discussion. Because of the consistently high foraging activity and successful colony development observed on buckwheat plots, combined with its favourable growth characteristics and low maintenance requirements, we recommend buckwheat as a surrogate plant for use in semi-field pesticide toxicity assessments with B. impatiens. PMID:27478712

  19. Identification of an extensive gene cluster among a family of PPOs in Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) using a large insert BAC library

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in plants is a trait with potential economic, agricultural and environmental impact. In relation to the food industry, PPO-induced browning causes unacceptable discolouration in fruit and vegetables: from an agriculture perspective, PPO can protect plants against pathogens and environmental stress, improve ruminant growth by increasing nitrogen absorption and decreasing nitrogen loss to the environment through the animal's urine. The high PPO legume, red clover, has a significant economic and environmental role in sustaining low-input organic and conventional farms. Molecular markers for a range of important agricultural traits are being developed for red clover and improved knowledge of PPO genes and their structure will facilitate molecular breeding. Results A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library comprising 26,016 BAC clones with an average 135 Kb insert size, was constructed from Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), a diploid legume with a haploid genome size of 440–637 Mb. Library coverage of 6–8 genome equivalents ensured good representation of genes: the library was screened for polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes. Two single copy PPO genes, PPO4 and PPO5, were identified to add to a family of three, previously reported, paralogous genes (PPO1–PPO3). Multiple PPO1 copies were identified and characterised revealing a subfamily comprising three variants PPO1/2, PPO1/4 and PPO1/5. Six PPO genes clustered within the genome: four separate BAC clones could be assembled onto a predicted 190–510 Kb single BAC contig. Conclusion A PPO gene family in red clover resides as a cluster of at least 6 genes. Three of these genes have high homology, suggesting a more recent evolutionary event. This PPO cluster covers a longer region of the genome than clusters detected in rice or previously reported in tomato. Full-length coding sequences from PPO4, PPO5, PPO1/5 and PPO1/4 will facilitate functional studies and provide

  20. [ITS-polymorphism of salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive native isolates of Sinorhizoblum meliloti--symbionts of alfalfa, clover and fenugreek plants].

    PubMed

    Rumiantseva, M L; Muntian, V S; Mengoni, A; Simarov, B V

    2014-04-01

    Polymorphism of rrs-rrl sequence of ribosomal operons (intergenic sequence, ITS) was studied among 81 isolates of Sinorhizobium meliloti (AK001-AK210) derived from the collection of alfalfa nodulating bacteria of the Laboratory of genetics of ARRIAM, by using species-specific primers FGPS 1490/FGPL132VM. Isolates were obtained from nodules of different species of wild host plants from Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella genera grown in salinized North-Western region of Kazakhstan. The typical structure of ITS, similar to that of test strain Rm1021, was dominant in native rhizobia population, while in one third of the isolates (33.3%) this sequence was divergent. Among the latter, the ITS type of strain AK83 (RCAM00182) was dominant. Here, we show for the first time that isolates with reduced level of salt-tolerance had more diverse intergenic sequences of rrn-operons. No phylogenetic separation was observed between isolates grouped on the basis of their tolerance or sensitivity towards 0.6 M NaCl. However, the frequency of divergent ITS types within the two groups of rhizobia depended on the host symbiotic preference observed in natural environment, allowing to speculate about the existence of a chromosome types specific for S. meliloti isolates with differential salt tolerance. In conclusion, we propose that in the area subjected to secondary salinization, which are also the centre of introgressive hybridization of alfalfa, micro-evolutionary processes, affecting rrn-operons and associated with salt adaptation, are also occurring in symbiotic root nodule bacteria populations.

  1. Immunogold Labelling to Localize Polyphenol Oxidase (PPO) During Wilting of Red Clover Leaf Tissue and the Effect of Removing Cellular Matrices on PPO Protection of Glycerol-Based Lipid in the Rumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) reduces the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis within red clover fed to ruminants. PPO catalyses the conversion of phenols to quinones which can react with nucleophilic cellular constituents (e.g. proteins), forming protein-phenol complexes that may reduce protei...

  2. Effect of casein infusion in the rumen, duodenum or both sites on factors affecting forage intake and performance of dairy cows fed red clover-grass silage.

    PubMed

    Khalili, H; Huhtanen, P

    2002-04-01

    Four lactating dairy cows were used in a balanced 4 x 4 Latin square design to examine the effects of casein infusion in the rumen, duodenum, or both on the intake of red clover-grass silage, chewing behavior, diet digestion, microbial protein synthesis, rumen fermentation, digestion, and passage kinetics, milk production, and milk composition. Duodenal infusion increased eating time, silage intake, rumen neutral detergent fiber pool, yields of milk, protein, and lactose, and concentration of milk protein, and tended to decrease that of milk fat. Ruminal infusion tended to decrease eating time, and increased significantly microbial protein synthesis, rumen ammonia-N concentration, molar proportions of isovalerate and valerate, digestion rate of digestible neutral detergent fiber, passage rate of indigestible neutral detergent fiber, and milk urea content, and decreased rumen neutral detergent fiber pool. Silage intake, and yields of milk, protein, and lactose were highest when casein was simultaneously infused in both sites.

  3. Clover Biotechnology Research at FAPRU

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Randy Dinkins (USDA-ARS-FAPRU) is conducting research to determine the utility of using the Medicago Affymetrix Genechip for use with red clover (Trifolium pretense). The Medicago Affymetrix Genechip contains approximately 51,000 probe sets that are derived from Medicago truncatula, 1,800 from Medi...

  4. Dairy cow responses to graded levels of rapeseed and soya bean expeller supplementation on a red clover/grass silage-based diet.

    PubMed

    Rinne, M; Kuoppala, K; Ahvenjärvi, S; Vanhatalo, A

    2015-12-01

    The effects of rapeseed and soya bean expeller (SBE) supplementation on digestion and milk production responses in dairy cows were investigated in an incomplete Latin square design using five cows and four 3-week periods. The experimental diets consisted of five concentrate treatments fed at a rate of 9 kg/day: a mixture of barley and oats, which was replaced with rapeseed or SBE at two levels (CP concentration (g/kg dry matter (DM)) of 130 for the control concentrate and 180 and 230 for the two protein supplemented levels). A mixture of grass and red clover silage (1:1) was fed ad libitum and it had a CP concentration of 157 g/kg DM. Supply of nutrients to the lower tract was measured using the omasal canal sampling technique, and total digestion from total faecal collection. Protein supplementation increased omasal canal amino acid (AA) flows and plasma concentrations of AA, and was also reflected as increased milk production. However, N use efficiency (NUE) decreased with increased protein supplementation. Rapeseed expeller (RSE) tended to increase silage DM intake and elicited higher milk production responses compared with SBE and also resulted in a higher NUE. The differences between the protein supplements in nitrogen metabolism were relatively small, for example, there were no differences in the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis or omasal canal flows of nitrogenous components between them, but plasma methionine concentration was lower for soya bean-fed cows at the high CP level in particular. The lower milk protein production responses to SBE than to RSE supplementation were at least partly caused by increased silage DM and by the lower methionine supply, which may further have been amplified by the use of red clover in the basal diet. Although feed intake, diet digestion, AA supply and milk production were all consistently improved by protein supplementation, there was a simultaneous decrease in NUE. In the current study, the milk protein production

  5. Weed Suppression by Seven Clover Species

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; O'Donovan, John T.

    2001-01-01

    Used as cover crops, clover species may differ in their ability to suppress weed growth. Field trials were conducted in Alberta, Canada to measure the growth of brown mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.], in mowed and nonmowed production, as influenced by alsike (Trifolium hybridum L.), balansa [T. michelianum Savi var. balansae (Boiss.) Azn.], berseem (T. alexandrinum L.), crimson [T. incarnatum (Boiss.) Azn.], berseem (T. alexandrinum L.), crimson (T. incarnatum L.), Persian (T. resupinatum L.), red (T. pratense L.), and white Dutch (T. repens L.) clover and fall rye (Secale cereale L.). In 1997, clovers reduced mustard biomass in nonmowed treatments by 29% on a high- fertility soil (Typic Cryoboroll) at Edmonton and by 57% on a low- fertility soil (Typic Cryoboralf) at Breton. At Edmonton, nonmowed mustard biomass was reduced by alsike and berseem clover in 1996 and by alsike, balansa, berseem, and crimson clover in 1997. At Breton, all seven clover species suppressed weed biomass. A negative correlation was noted among clover and mustard biomass at Edmonton but not at Breton. The effects of mowing varied with location, timing, and species. Mowing was beneficial to crop/weed proportion at Edmonton but not at Breton. Mowing at early flowering of mustard large-seeded legumes and sweetclover (Melilotus offici) produced greater benefit than mowing at late flowering. With early mowing, all clover species suppressed mustard growth at Edmonton. Clovers reduced mustard regrowth (g plant21 ) and the number of mustard plants producing regrowth. The characteristics of berseem clover (upright growth, long stems, high biomass, and late flowering) would support its use as a cover crop or forage in north-central Alberta.

  6. Expression of β-Amylase from Alfalfa Taproots1

    PubMed Central

    Gana, Joyce A.; Kalengamaliro, Newton E.; Cunningham, Suzanne M.; Volenec, Jeffrey J.

    1998-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) roots contain large quantities of β-amylase, but little is known about its role in vivo. We studied this by isolating a β-amylase cDNA and by examining signals that affect its expression. The β-amylase cDNA encoded a 55.95-kD polypeptide with a deduced amino acid sequence showing high similarity to other plant β-amylases. Starch concentrations, β-amylase activities, and β-amylase mRNA levels were measured in roots of alfalfa after defoliation, in suspension-cultured cells incubated in sucrose-rich or -deprived media, and in roots of cold-acclimated germ plasms. Starch levels, β-amylase activities, and β-amylase transcripts were reduced significantly in roots of defoliated plants and in sucrose-deprived cell cultures. β-Amylase transcript was high in roots of intact plants but could not be detected 2 to 8 d after defoliation. β-Amylase transcript levels increased in roots between September and October and then declined 10-fold in November and December after shoots were killed by frost. Alfalfa roots contain greater β-amylase transcript levels compared with roots of sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). Southern analysis indicated that β-amylase is present as a multigene family in alfalfa. Our results show no clear association between β-amylase activity or transcript abundance and starch hydrolysis in alfalfa roots. The great abundance of β-amylase and its unexpected patterns of gene expression and protein accumulation support our current belief that this protein serves a storage function in roots of this perennial species. PMID:9847126

  7. Selection of the Optimal Herbal Compositions of Red Clover and Pomegranate According to Their Protective Effect against Climacteric Symptoms in Ovariectomized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su Jin; Choi, Beom Rak; Kim, Seung Hee; Yi, Hae Yeon; Park, Hye Rim; Song, Chang Hyun; Ku, Sae Kwang; Lee, Young Joon

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to ascertain the optimal range of red clover dry extracts (RC) and dried pomegranate concentrate powder (PCP) to induce anti-climacteric effects. Thus, the dose ranges showing protective effect of mixed formulae consisting of RC and PCP were examined in ovariectomized mice. At 28 days after bilateral ovariectomy (OVX), mixed herbal compositions (RC:PCP = 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:8, 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1) were administered orally, at 120 mg/kg once daily for 84 days. We evaluated that RC and PCP mixture attenuate OVX-caused obesity, hyperlipidemia, hepatic steatosis, and osteoporosis. Compared to OVX-induced control mice, body weight and abdominal fat weight in OVX-induced mice were significantly decreased, concomitantly with increase of uterus weight by RC:PCP mixture. Additionally, significant increases in serum estradiol levels were observed in all RC:PCP-treated mice. RC:PCP mixture also showed protective effect against OVX-induced hyperlipidemia, hepatic steatosis. Total body and femur mean bone mineral density (BMD), osteocalcin, bALP contents were effectively increased by RC:PCP mixture. Taken together, RC:PCP mixture (2:1, 1:1, and 4:1) has remarkable protective effects against the changes induced by OVX. In particular, RC:PCP mixture (2:1) shows the strongest effect and may be considered as a potential protective agent against climacteric symptoms. PMID:27455321

  8. Challenges of Mating Disruption Using Aerosol-Emitting Pheromone Puffers in Red Clover Seed Production Fields to Control Coleophora deauratella (Lepidoptera: Coleophoridae).

    PubMed

    Mori, Boyd A; Evenden, Maya L

    2015-02-01

    Sex pheromone-mediated mating disruption using pheromone puffer dispensers was evaluated to control Coleophora deauratella (Lepidoptera: Coleophoridae) at three red clover seed production fields in Alberta, Canada. The objectives of the study were to determine aspects of the biology of C. deauratella which may affect successful mating disruption, evaluate the ability of aerosol-emitting pheromone puffers to reduce male moth catch in small-plot trials, and evaluate the ability of puffers to reduce male capture in traps, larval numbers and damage in large-plot trials. The median longevity of male and female C. deauratella was 6 d in the laboratory where males emerged in larger numbers earlier than females (protandry). Male response to pheromone peaked at sunrise; thus, puffers were programmed to dispense pheromone throughout this time period. Small-plot (0.25 ha) mating disruption trials indicated that pheromone released from puffers could reduce male C. deauratella orientation to traps by 60.7 ± 18.6% compared with that in untreated control plots. Reduction of male orientation to traps in large-plot (5 ha) trials over the course of the season was also successful (93.7 ± 1.6%). However, there was no corresponding decrease in larval numbers or increase in seed yield in pheromone-treated plots. Challenges of mating disruption of C. deauratella appear to be immigration of mated females combined with high population densities.

  9. Determination of isoflavone content in soy, red clover, and kudzu dietary supplement materials by liquid chromatography-particle beam/electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burdette, Carolyn Q; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Increased consumption of dietary supplements brings about important requirements of analytical methods to allow accurate and precise measurements of the chemical composition of these botanical materials. Presented here is the isoflavone content in proposed National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials (SRMs) determined by LC-particle beam/electron ionization MS. Botanical materials (soy, red clover, and kudzu) are characterized for the content of a suite of five isoflavones (puerarin, daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and biochanin A). These compounds are of interest due to correlations with certain health benefits. An RP chromatographic separation was first optimized using UV-Vis spectrophotometric detection. The LC output was then introduced to an electron ionization source using a particle beam interface on an Extrel Benchmark MS system. The separation was carried out using a commercial C18 column and a linear gradient using water and methanol (both containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid as mobile phases A and B, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min over 40 min. LOD values for the isoflavones were determined to be at the ng level. Quantitation was performed using an internal standard (IS) approach with 7-hydroxy-4-chromone as the IS compound. The levels of isoflavones in the botanical products were determined for the proposed SRMs.

  10. Retardation of Senescence in Red Clover Leaf Discs by a New Antiozonant, N-[2-(2-Oxo-1-imidazolidinyl)ethyl]-N′-phenylurea 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward H.; Bennett, Jesse H.; Heggestad, Howard E.

    1981-01-01

    Dark-induced senescence in leaf discs from O3-sensitive red clover trifoliates (Trifolium pratense L. cv. `Pennscott') was markedly retarded by treatment with N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolidinyl)ethyl-N′-phenylurea (EDU). EDU also protects against acute and chronic foliar O3 injury when sprayed on intact leaves or supplied to the plants through soil application. Senescence retardation was measured by time-dependent analyses of chlorophyll, protein, and RNA in discs floated on aqueous EDU solutions ranging from 0 to 500 micrograms per milliliter EDU. Chlorophyll degradation, total protein, and nucleic acids were followed over 10-day test periods. EDU at 500 micrograms per milliliter (50 milligrams per pot), a concentration known to provide optimal protection to intact leaves against O3 injury, was most effective in preventing chlorosis and in maintaining high concentrations of protein and RNA in the discs. In discs treated with 500 micrograms per milliliter EDU 90% of the chlorophyll was retained after 10 days in the dark. In contrast, lower concentrations (0, 125, and 250 micrograms per milliliter) showed the complete loss of chlorophyll or an intermediate retardation. The intermediate concentrations were similarly less effective in maintaining protein and RNA levels in the dark stressed leaf discs. It is suggested that EDU retards senescence and mitigates O3 injury through the induction of specific free radical scavenging enzymes and in sustaining RNA and protein synthesis. Images PMID:16661672

  11. Isoflavone content and estrogenic activity of different batches of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) extracts: an in vitro study in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Paola; Rasini, Emanuela; Luini, Alessandra; Legnaro, Massimiliano; Luzzani, Marcello; Casareto, Enrico; Carreri, Massimiliano; Paracchini, Silvano; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2014-04-01

    The estrogenicity of different batches of red clover (Trifolium pratense L., Fabaceae; RCL) extracts and its relationship with the isoflavone content were assessed by measuring MCF-7 cell proliferation by flow cytometry and propidium iodide staining. RCL extracts were compared to estradiol (E2) and to the main RCL isoflavones biochanin A, daidzein, genistein and formononetin. Isoflavone content in the extracts was assayed by HPLC. E2 and isoflavones increased MCF-7 proliferation in a concentration-dependent fashion, with the following potency order: E2>genistein>biochanin A=daidzein>formononetin. Extracts increased MCF-7 proliferation with different potencies, which in four out of five extracts correlated with the ratios 5,7-dihydroxyisoflavones/7-hydroxyisoflavones. The efficacy of all extracts increased with decreasing genistein contents. A solution containing the main isoflavones at the average concentration of RCL extracts increased MCF-7 proliferation with higher potency and steeper concentration-response curve. The effects of E2, of RCL extracts and of the isoflavone solution were inhibited by the estrogen receptor antagonist 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Flow cytometric analysis of MCF-7 proliferation is a suitable bioassay for the estrogenicity of RCL extracts, thus expanding the characterization of individual batches beyond assessment of chemical composition and contributing to improved standardization of quality and activity.

  12. Isolation and characterization of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Nicotiana clevelandii plants infected with red clover necrotic mosaic dianthovirus.

    PubMed

    Bates, H J; Farjah, M; Osman, T A; Buck, K W

    1995-06-01

    A template-bound RNA polymerase was isolated from Nicotiana clevelandii plants infected with red clover necrotic mosaic dianthovirus (RCNMV) by differential centrifugation, solubilization with dodecyl beta-D-maltopyranoside, and chromatography on columns of Sephacryl S-400 and Q-Sepharose. Analysis of the purified polymerase by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, followed by silver staining or immunoblotting, showed that it contained virus-encoded proteins of molecular masses 27 kDa and 88 kDa together with several minor proteins possibly of host origin. After removal of endogenous RNA with micrococcal nuclease, the polymerase became template-dependent. It was also template-specific, being able to utilize as templates RNA of two strains of RCNMV, but not RNAs of three viruses in different taxonomic groups, namely cucumber mosaic cucumovirus, tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus and tomato mosaic tobamovirus. The products of RNA polymerase reactions were double-stranded RNAs corresponding to RCNMV RNAs 1 and 2. The ability of the template-dependent RNA polymerase to synthesize RNA was completely inhibited by antibodies to a peptide containing the GDD motif, whereas the activity of the template-bound enzyme was unaffected by these antibodies.

  13. Effect of replacing grass silage with red clover silage on ruminal lipid metabolism in lactating cows fed diets containing a 60:40 forage-to-concentrate ratio.

    PubMed

    Halmemies-Beauchet-Filleau, A; Vanhatalo, A; Toivonen, V; Heikkilä, T; Lee, M R F; Shingfield, K J

    2013-09-01

    Diets based on red clover silage (RCS) typically increase the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in ruminant milk and meat compared with grass silages (GS), an effect that has been attributed to higher activity of polyphenol oxidase in red clover, promoting ruminal escape of dietary lipid. Four multiparous Finnish Ayrshire cows in mid lactation fitted with rumen cannulas were used in a 4×4 Latin Square design with 21-d experimental periods to evaluate the effects of incremental replacement of GS with RCS on ruminal lipid metabolism, using the omasal sampling technique in combination with Cr-EDTA, Yb acetate, and indigestible neutral detergent fiber as markers. Treatments comprised total mixed rations offered ad libitum containing 600 g of forage/kg of diet dry matter, with RCS replacing GS in a ratio of 0:100, 33:67, 67:33, and 100:0 on a dry matter basis. Silages contained a high proportion of lipid as nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), with no difference between forage species (75 and 73% for GS and RCS, respectively). Substitution of GS with RCS had no influence on the intakes of NEFA, polar lipid, triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, monoacylglycerol, or total fatty acids (FA), but altered the ingestion of specific FA. Replacing GS with RCS decreased linearly 18:3n-3 and increased linearly 18:2n-6 intakes. Changes in the proportion of RCS in the diet had no effect on the amounts or on the relative proportions of different lipid fractions at the omasum. On average, NEFA, polar lipid, triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and monoacylglycerol accounted for 80, 12, 4.4, 2.4, and 0.8% of total FA in omasal digesta, respectively. Replacement of GS with RCS increased linearly the amount of esterified and nonesterified 18:3n-3 at the omasum. Flows of cis-9 18:1 and 18:2n-6 were also increased linearly in response to RCS in the diet, whereas 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-16:0 at the omasum was decreased. Replacing GS with RCS in the diet decreased linearly the

  14. Subcutaneous Adipose Fatty Acid Profiles and Related Rumen Bacterial Populations of Steers Fed Red Clover or Grass Hay Diets Containing Flax or Sunflower-Seed

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Mike E. R.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2014-01-01

    Steers were fed 70∶30 forage∶concentrate diets for 205 days, with either grass hay (GH) or red clover silage (RC), and either sunflower-seed (SS) or flaxseed (FS), providing 5.4% oil in the diets. Compared to diets containing SS, FS diets had elevated (P<0.05) subcutaneous trans (t)-18:1 isomers, conjugated linoleic acids and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Forage and oilseed type influenced total n-3 PUFA, especially α-linolenic acid (ALA) and total non-conjugated diene biohydrogenation (BH) in subcutaneous fat with proportions being greater (P<0.05) for FS or GH as compared to SS or RC. Of the 25 bacterial genera impacted by diet, 19 correlated with fatty acids (FA) profile. Clostridium were most abundant when levels of conjugated linolenic acids, and n-3 PUFA's were found to be the lowest in subcutaneous fat, suggestive of their role in BH. Anerophaga, Fibrobacter, Guggenheimella, Paludibacter and Pseudozobellia were more abundant in the rumen when the levels of VA in subcutaneous fat were low. This study clearly shows the impact of oilseeds and forage source on the deposition of subcutaneous FA in beef cattle. Significant correlations between rumen bacterial genera and the levels of specific FA in subcutaneous fat maybe indicative of their role in determining the FA profile of adipose tissue. However, despite numerous correlations, the dynamics of rumen bacteria in the BH of unsaturated fatty acid and synthesis of PUFA and FA tissue profiles require further experimentation to determine if these correlations are consistent over a range of diets of differing composition. Present results demonstrate that in order to achieve targeted FA profiles in beef, a multifactorial approach will be required that takes into consideration not only the PUFA profile of the diet, but also the non-oil fraction of the diet, type and level of feed processing, and the role of rumen microbes in the BH of unsaturated fatty acid. PMID:25093808

  15. Evolution of Quantitative Measures in NMR: Quantum Mechanical qHNMR Advances Chemical Standardization of a Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) Extract.

    PubMed

    Phansalkar, Rasika S; Simmler, Charlotte; Bisson, Jonathan; Chen, Shao-Nong; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Niemitz, Matthias; Pauli, Guido F

    2017-01-09

    Chemical standardization, along with morphological and DNA analysis ensures the authenticity and advances the integrity evaluation of botanical preparations. Achievement of a more comprehensive, metabolomic standardization requires simultaneous quantitation of multiple marker compounds. Employing quantitative (1)H NMR (qHNMR), this study determined the total isoflavone content (TIfCo; 34.5-36.5% w/w) via multimarker standardization and assessed the stability of a 10-year-old isoflavone-enriched red clover extract (RCE). Eleven markers (nine isoflavones, two flavonols) were targeted simultaneously, and outcomes were compared with LC-based standardization. Two advanced quantitative measures in qHNMR were applied to derive quantities from complex and/or overlapping resonances: a quantum mechanical (QM) method (QM-qHNMR) that employs (1)H iterative full spin analysis, and a non-QM method that uses linear peak fitting algorithms (PF-qHNMR). A 10 min UHPLC-UV method provided auxiliary orthogonal quantitation. This is the first systematic evaluation of QM and non-QM deconvolution as qHNMR quantitation measures. It demonstrates that QM-qHNMR can account successfully for the complexity of (1)H NMR spectra of individual analytes and how QM-qHNMR can be built for mixtures such as botanical extracts. The contents of the main bioactive markers were in good agreement with earlier HPLC-UV results, demonstrating the chemical stability of the RCE. QM-qHNMR advances chemical standardization by its inherent QM accuracy and the use of universal calibrants, avoiding the impractical need for identical reference materials.

  16. Evolution of Quantitative Measures in NMR: Quantum Mechanical qHNMR Advances Chemical Standardization of a Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) Extract

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chemical standardization, along with morphological and DNA analysis ensures the authenticity and advances the integrity evaluation of botanical preparations. Achievement of a more comprehensive, metabolomic standardization requires simultaneous quantitation of multiple marker compounds. Employing quantitative 1H NMR (qHNMR), this study determined the total isoflavone content (TIfCo; 34.5–36.5% w/w) via multimarker standardization and assessed the stability of a 10-year-old isoflavone-enriched red clover extract (RCE). Eleven markers (nine isoflavones, two flavonols) were targeted simultaneously, and outcomes were compared with LC-based standardization. Two advanced quantitative measures in qHNMR were applied to derive quantities from complex and/or overlapping resonances: a quantum mechanical (QM) method (QM-qHNMR) that employs 1H iterative full spin analysis, and a non-QM method that uses linear peak fitting algorithms (PF-qHNMR). A 10 min UHPLC-UV method provided auxiliary orthogonal quantitation. This is the first systematic evaluation of QM and non-QM deconvolution as qHNMR quantitation measures. It demonstrates that QM-qHNMR can account successfully for the complexity of 1H NMR spectra of individual analytes and how QM-qHNMR can be built for mixtures such as botanical extracts. The contents of the main bioactive markers were in good agreement with earlier HPLC-UV results, demonstrating the chemical stability of the RCE. QM-qHNMR advances chemical standardization by its inherent QM accuracy and the use of universal calibrants, avoiding the impractical need for identical reference materials. PMID:28067513

  17. Inclusion of sunflower seed and wheat dried distillers' grains with solubles in a red clover silage-based diet enhances steers performance, meat quality and fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Mapiye, C; Aalhus, J L; Turner, T D; Vahmani, P; Baron, V S; McAllister, T A; Block, H C; Uttaro, B; Dugan, M E R

    2014-12-01

    The current study compared beef production, quality and fatty acid (FA) profiles of yearling steers fed a control diet containing 70 : 30 red clover silage (RCS) : barley-based concentrate, a diet containing 11% sunflower seed (SS) substituted for barley, and diets containing SS with 15% or 30% wheat dried distillers' grain with solubles (DDGS). Additions of DDGS were balanced by reductions in RCS and SS to maintain crude fat levels in diets. A total of two pens of eight animals were fed per diet for an average period of 208 days. Relative to the control diet, feeding the SS diet increased (P<0.05) average daily gain, final live weight and proportions of total n-6 FA, non-conjugated 18:2 biohydrogenation products (i.e. atypical dienes) with the first double bond at carbon 8 or 9 from the carboxyl end, conjugated linoleic acid isomers with the first double bond from carbon 7 to 10 from the carboxyl end, t-18:1 isomers, and reduced (P<0.05) the proportions of total n-3 FA, conjugated linolenic acids, branched-chain FA, odd-chain FA and 16:0. Feeding DDGS-15 and DDGS-30 diets v. the SS diet further increased (P<0.05) average daily gains, final live weight, carcass weight, hot dressing percentage, fat thickness, rib-eye muscle area, and improved instrumental and sensory panel meat tenderness. However, in general feeding DGGS-15 or DDGS-30 diets did not change FA proportions relative to feeding the SS diet. Overall, adding SS to a RCS-based diet enhanced muscle proportions of 18:2n-6 biohydrogenation products, and further substitutions of DDGS in the diet improved beef production, and quality while maintaining proportions of potentially functional bioactive FA including vaccenic and rumenic acids.

  18. Development of a natural treatment system consisting of red ball earth and alfalfa for the post-treatment of anaerobically digested livestock wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochen; Fukushi, Kensuke

    2014-01-01

    With the objective of developing a post-treatment process for anaerobically digested livestock wastewater, an innovative natural treatment system composed of two units is proposed. The first trickling filter unit further reduced biochemical oxygen demand and achieved a certain degree of nitrification. The second soil-plant unit was targeted at the removal and recovery of nutrients N, P and K. For the feasibility study, a bench-scale soil column test was carried out, in which red ball earth and alfalfa were utilized for treating synthetic nutrient-enriched wastewater. Through long-term operation, the nitrification function was well established in the top layers, especially the top 20 cm, although a supplementary denitrification process was still required before discharge. P and K were retained by the soil through different mechanisms, and their plant-available forms that remained in the soil were considered suitable for indirect nutrient reuse. As for alfalfa, with wastewater application it fixed more N from the atmosphere, and directly recovered 6% of P and 4% of K input from wastewater. More importantly, alfalfa was verified to have an indispensable role in stimulating the soil nitrifying microorganisms by sustaining their abundance during substrate (NH3) and oxygen scarcity, and enhancing cell-specific nitrification potential during substrate (NH3) and oxygen sufficiency. The proposed system is expected to be further improved, and adopted as a sound countermeasure for livestock wastewater pollution.

  19. A comparison between red clover silage and grass silage feeding on fatty acid composition, meat stability and sensory quality of the M. Longissimus muscle of dairy cull cows.

    PubMed

    Lee, M R F; Evans, P R; Nute, G R; Richardson, R I; Scollan, N D

    2009-04-01

    Sixteen Holstein-Friesian dairy cull cows were offered either ad libitum grass (G) or red clover (RC) silage for 12 weeks. Dry matter (DM), total nitrogen, and pH was higher for the RC than the G silage and organic matter, water-soluble carbohydrate, fibre, DM digestibility, ammonia-N, vitamin E and acetic acid higher for the G silage (P<0.05). Fatty acid compositions were different (P<0.05) with G silage having higher levels of C12:0, C14:0, C16:1cis-9, C18:3n-3 and total fatty acids whereas RC had higher levels of C18:0, C18:2n-6 and C20:0. Daily liveweight gain was high and not different between groups (average 1.22 kg/d). Body condition score and back fat thickness at slaughter along with conformation, fat grade and slaughter weight were not different between groups. Animals offered the G silage produced larger M. longissimus length (P<0.01) and a trend (P<0.1) for width. RC fed animals had higher proportions of C18:3n-3 (P<0.001), total n-3 fatty acids (P<0.01) and total PUFA compared to animals offered the G silage despite greater intakes of these fatty acids on G (P<0.001). Vitamin E concentration and stability of aged meat during simulated retail display, were lower (P<0.05) from animals offered RC than animals offered G. Shear force and ultimate pH, however were not different in steaks and sensory attributes were similar; the only difference being a higher score (P<0.01) for fishy in the RC steaks. The results suggest that feeding high DMD silage to dairy cull cows can result in a high standard of finish and liveweight gain. Furthermore RC silage as opposed to G silage can increase the beneficial fatty acid profile of the resultant meat.

  20. Sweet clover poisoning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet clover poisoning occurs when spoiled sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis and M. alva) hay or silage that contain dicumarol are consumed by livestock. This updated chapter is a succinct review of the clinical disease and pathologic lesions of poisoning. It also reviews current strategies and ...

  1. Polyphenol oxidase activity in annual forage clovers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO)-mediated phenol reactions in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) bind forage protein and reduce proteolysis, producing beneficial effects on forage protein degradability, silage fermentation, and soil-N cycling. We evaluated PPO activity in seven previously untested annual c...

  2. Interactions between p27 and p88 replicase proteins of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus play an essential role in viral RNA replication and suppression of RNA silencing via the 480-kDa viral replicase complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Mine, Akira; Hyodo, Kiwamu; Takeda, Atsushi; Kaido, Masanori; Mise, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2010-11-25

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV), a positive-sense RNA virus with a bipartite genome, encodes p27 and p88 replicase proteins that are required for viral RNA replication and suppression of RNA silencing. In this study, we identified domains in p27 and p88 responsible for their protein-protein interactions using in vitro pull-down assays with the purified recombinant proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis in combination with blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using mutated p27 proteins showed that both p27-p27 and p27-p88 interactions are essential for the formation of the 480-kDa complex, which has RCNMV-specific RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity. Furthermore, we found a good correlation between the accumulated levels of the 480-kDa complex and replication levels and the suppression of RNA silencing activity. Our results indicate that interactions between RCNMV replicase proteins play an essential role in viral RNA replication and in suppressing RNA silencing via the 480-kDa replicase complex assembly.

  3. Effects of pH, sample size, and solvent partitioning on recovery of soluble phenolic acids and isoflavonoids in leaves and stems of red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Kenland).

    PubMed

    Kagan, Isabelle A

    2011-11-01

    Several extraction parameters were tested to determine optimal conditions for extracting phenolics from leaves and stems of red clover (Trifolium pratense L. cv. Kenland), with the goal of using extracts in bioassays and in assessment of phenolic profiles. HPLC-UV profiles were compared before and after partitioning a methanolic extract of soluble phenolics with ethyl acetate-ethyl ether (1:1, v/v). The effect of extract pH on the partitioning of phenolics into the ethyl acetate-ethyl ether (EtOAc-Et2O) phase was evaluated, and several tissue weights were extracted to determine a minimum amount that could be extracted without loss of information. HPLC profiles of soluble phenolics were similar in the methanolic extracts and the partitioned EtOAc-Et2O extracts. However, recoveries in unpartitioned extracts were 2- to 4-fold greater than in the acidified, partitioned extracts. Also, recovery was considerably affected by the pH to which extracts were adjusted prior to partitioning. In extracts acidified to pH 2, recoveries were 2- to 7-fold higher than in extracts partitioned at pH 6. In extracts prepared from 250, 120, or 60 mg of tissue, peak areas of methanolic extracts were directly proportional to the amount of tissue extracted.

  4. Yield, Nutritive Value and Silage Fermentation of Kura Clover-Reed Canarygrass and Lucerne Herbages in Northern USA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The combination of excellent winter hardiness, persistence, and nutritive value of both kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bieb.) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) suggest that intercropping these two crops could represent a good replacement for alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) silage where...

  5. Linseed oil supplementation to dairy cows fed diets based on red clover silage or corn silage: Effects on methane production, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, N balance, and milk production.

    PubMed

    Benchaar, C; Hassanat, F; Martineau, R; Gervais, R

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of linseed oil (LO) supplementation to red clover silage (RCS)- or corn silage (CS)-based diets on enteric CH4 emissions, ruminal fermentation characteristics, nutrient digestibility, N balance, and milk production. Twelve rumen-cannulated lactating cows were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design (35-d periods) with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Cows were fed (ad libitum) RCS- or CS-based diets [forage:concentrate ratio 60:40; dry matter (DM) basis] without or with LO (4% of DM). Supplementation of LO to the RCS-based diet reduced enteric CH4 production (-9%) and CH4 energy losses (-11%) with no adverse effects on DM intake, digestion, ruminal fermentation characteristics, protozoa numbers, or milk production. The addition of LO to the CS-based diet caused a greater decrease in CH4 production (-26%) and CH4 energy losses (-23%) but was associated with a reduction in DM intake, total-tract fiber digestibility, protozoa numbers, acetate:propionate ratio, and energy-corrected milk yield. Urinary N excretion (g/d) decreased with LO supplementation to RCS- and CS-based diets, suggesting reduced potential of N2O emissions. Results from this study show that the depressive effect of LO supplementation on enteric CH4 production is more pronounced with the CS- than with the RCS-based diet. However, because of reduced digestibility with the CS-based diet, the reduction in enteric CH4 production may be offset by higher CH4 emissions from manure storage. Thus, the type of forage of the basal diet should be taken into consideration when using fat supplementation as a dietary strategy to reduce enteric CH4 production from dairy cows.

  6. Draft genome sequence of subterranean clover, a reference for genus Trifolium

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Kaur, Parwinder; Shirasawa, Kenta; Nichols, Phillip; Nagano, Soichiro; Appels, Rudi; Erskine, William; Isobe, Sachiko N.

    2016-01-01

    Clovers (genus Trifolium) are widely cultivated across the world as forage legumes and make a large contribution to livestock feed production and soil improvement. Subterranean clover (T. subterraneum L.) is well suited for genomic and genetic studies as a reference species in the Trifolium genus, because it is an annual with a simple genome structure (autogamous and diploid), unlike the other economically important perennial forage clovers, red clover (T. pratense) and white clover (T. repens). This report represents the first draft genome sequence of subterranean clover. The 471.8 Mb assembled sequence covers 85.4% of the subterranean clover genome and contains 42,706 genes. Eight pseudomolecules of 401.1 Mb in length were constructed, based on a linkage map consisting of 35,341 SNPs. The comparative genomic analysis revealed that different clover chromosomes showed different degrees of conservation with other Papilionoideae species. These results provide a reference for genetic and genomic analyses in the genus Trifolium and new insights into evolutionary divergence in Papilionoideae species. PMID:27545089

  7. Alfalfa: bioenergy and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has the potential to be a significant contributor to America's renewable energy future. In an alfalfa biomass energy production system, alfalfa forage would be separated into stem and leave fractions. The stems would be processed to produce energy, and the leaves would be s...

  8. Isoflavones in several clover species and in milk from goats fed clovers.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Viala, Didier; Ollier, Alain; Combeau, André; Besle, Jean-Michel

    2004-01-01

    Isoflavones that exist in forages such as clover can move in milk, and may have beneficial effects on human health. We measured the isoflavones in subterranean (cv Yarloop, Geraldton, Dinninup and Dwalganup) and red (cv Merviot and Hamua) clovers, grown in a mountain environment, and in the milk of two goats fed a fresh mixture of the four subterranean clovers gathered at flowering stage. Isoflavone glycosides were hydrolysed with an improved beta glycosidase method. Free aglycones (FA) and the hydrolysed glycosides + free aglycones fraction (HF) were analysed by HPLC. In milk, the methanol extracted compounds were deconjugated and similarly analysed. Total HF was highest in Yarloop (19 g kg(-1) dry matter) and was three times lower in Merviot. Formononetin was the major compound (46-64% of total HF). FA varied from 30 to 73% of HF. Milk contained formononetin (50 microg L(-1)), similar amounts of equol and p ethylphenol (about 250 microg L(-1)), and equol like compounds (1120 microg L(-1)). Equol, which has estrogenic activity, and p ethylphenol were produced by biotransformation of formononetin, and biochanin A or genistein, respectively. The modulation of isoflavone amounts in milk and the estimation of their interests for human health warrant further investigation.

  9. Effect of replacing grass silage with red clover silage on nutrient digestion, nitrogen metabolism, and milk fat composition in lactating cows fed diets containing a 60:40 forage-to-concentrate ratio.

    PubMed

    Halmemies-Beauchet-Filleau, A; Vanhatalo, A; Toivonen, V; Heikkilä, T; Lee, M R F; Shingfield, K J

    2014-01-01

    Diets based on red clover silage (RCS) typically increase the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in ruminant meat and milk and lower the efficiency of N utilization compared with grass silages (GS). Four multiparous Finnish Ayrshire cows (108 d postpartum) fitted with rumen cannulas were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods to evaluate the effect of incremental replacement of GS with RCS on milk production, nutrient digestion, whole-body N metabolism, and milk fatty acid composition. Treatments comprised total mixed rations offered ad libitum, containing 600 g of forage/kg of diet dry matter (DM), with RCS replacing GS in ratios of 0:100, 33:67, 67:33, and 100:0 on a DM basis. Intake of DM and milk yield tended to be higher when RCS and GS were offered as a mixture than when fed alone. Forage species had no influence on the concentration or secretion of total milk fat, whereas replacing GS with RCS tended to decrease milk protein concentration and yield. Substitution of GS with RCS decreased linearly whole-tract apparent organic matter, fiber, and N digestion. Forage species had no effect on total nonammonia N at the omasum, whereas the flow of most AA at the omasum was higher for diets based on a mixture of forages. Replacing GS with RCS progressively lowered protein degradation in the rumen, increased linearly ruminal escape of dietary protein, and decreased linearly microbial protein synthesis. Incremental inclusion of RCS in the diet tended to lower whole-body N balance, increased linearly the proportion of dietary N excreted in feces and urine, and decreased linearly the utilization of dietary N for milk protein synthesis. Furthermore, replacing GS with RCS decreased linearly milk fat 4:0 to 8:0, 14:0, and 16:0 concentrations and increased linearly 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3 concentrations, in the absence of changes in cis-9 18:1, cis-9, trans-11 18:2, or total trans fatty acid concentration. Inclusion of RCS in the diet

  10. Manure use on alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure application to alfalfa is often necessary because of limited application windows during the year and limited land-to-livestock ratios to meet Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan requirements. Manure applied before alfalfa planting or during production can improve yield and performance of t...

  11. Plant bugs on alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper treats the most important plant bugs, or Miridae, found on alfalfa in North America. It is estimated that more than 10 species of plant bugs have the potential to develop on this important forage legume. Of these, the alfalfa plant bug (Adelphocoris lineolatus), pale legume bug (Lygus e...

  12. ALFALFA: BIOFUEL AND FEED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa hay is a major crop that supports Idaho's dairy industry. Several cellulosic feedstocks will be needed to meet current ethanol production goals. Alfalfa has considerable potential as a feedstock for production of ethanol and other industrial materials because of its high biomasss production...

  13. Alfalfa witches'-broom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa witches'-broom was first reported in 1969 in Australia and later in South Africa, Canada, and Saudi Arabia. More recently, specific phytoplasmas associated with alfalfa witches'-broom have been identified from symptomatic plants in the United States (Wisconsin), Italy, Lithuania, Oman, Ira...

  14. Manure on alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many managers of crop-livestock operations could, or need to, utilize alfalfa fields in their manure management plans. The advantages to manure application on alfalfa need to be considered in the context of some potential concerns – plant damage from manure or wheel traffic, pathogen transmission in...

  15. Alfalfa non-feed uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-feed uses for alfalfa such as biomass energy and phytoremediation could increase alfalfa acreage and improve farm profitability. The new bio-energy alfalfa and production system increased forage yield and ethanol production. New alfalfas with enhanced nitrogen cycling capacities would protect wa...

  16. Relationship of crop radiance to alfalfa agronomic values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1980-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral data of alfalfa were collected at the time of the third and fourth cuttings using a hand-held radiometer for the earlier alfalfa cutting. Significant linear and non-linear correlation coefficients were found between the spectral variables and plant height, biomass, forage water content, and estimated canopy cover. For the alfalfa of the later cutting, which had experienced a period of severe drought stress which limited growth, the spectral variables were found to be highly correlated with the estimated drought scores.

  17. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Fu, Chunxiang; Hernandez, Timothy; Zhou, Chuanen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a high-quality forage crop widely grown throughout the world. This chapter describes an efficient protocol that allows for the generation of large number of transgenic alfalfa plants by sonication-assisted Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Binary vectors carrying different selectable marker genes that confer resistance to phosphinothricin (bar), kanamycin (npt II), or hygromycin (hph) were used to generate transgenic alfalfa plants. Intact trifoliates collected from clonally propagated plants in the greenhouse were sterilized with bleach and then inoculated with Agrobacterium strain EHA105. More than 80 % of infected leaf pieces could produce rooted transgenic plants in 4-5 months after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

  18. Persistence of biological nitrogen fixation in high latitude grass-clover grasslands under different management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakakis, Vasileios; Sturite, Ievina; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) can substantially contribute to N supply in permanent grasslands, improving N yield and forage quality, while reducing inorganic N inputs. Among the factors critical to the performance of BNF in grass-legume mixtures are selected grass and legume species, proportion of legumes, the soil-climatic conditions, in particular winter conditions, and management practices (e.g. fertilization and compaction). In high latitude grasslands, low temperatures can reduce the performance of BNF by hampering the legumés growth and by suppressing N2 fixation. Estimation of BNF in field experiments is not straightforward. Different methods have been developed providing different results. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of BNF, in a newly established field experiment in North Norway over four years. The grassland consisted of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) sawn in three proportions (0, 15 and 30% in total) together with timothy (Pheum pretense L.) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis L.). Three levels of compaction were applied each year (no tractor, light tractor, heavy tractor) together with two different N rates (110 kg N/ha as cattle slurry or 170 kg N/ha as cattle slurry and inorganic N fertilizer). We applied two different methods, the 15N natural abundance and the difference method, to estimate BNF in the first harvest of each year. Overall, the difference method overestimated BNF relative to the 15N natural abundance method. BNF in the first harvest was compared to winter survival of red and white clover plants, which decreased with increasing age of the grassland. However, winter conditions did not seem to affect the grassland's ability to fix N in spring. The fraction of N derived from the atmosphere (NdfA) in white and red clover was close to 100% in each spring, indicating no suppression of BNF. BNF increased the total N yield of the grasslands by up to 75%, mainly due to high

  19. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Higdon, S.; Balonek, T. J.; Haynes, M. P.; Giovanelli, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team is a consortium of 16 institutions engaged in an NSF-sponsored program to promote undergraduate research within the extragalactic ALFALFA HI blind survey project. In the first two years of the program, more than three dozen undergraduate students have been closely involved in ALFALFA science, observing, and data analysis. A total of 34 students have attended the annual undergraduate workshops at Arecibo Observatory, interacting with faculty, their peers, ALFALFA experts, and Arecibo staff in lectures, group activities, tours, and observing runs. Team faculty have supervised 26 summer research projects and 14 academic year (e.g., senior thesis) projects. Students and faculty have traveled to Arecibo Observatory for observing runs and to national meetings to present their results. Eight Team schools have joined to work collaboratively to analyze HI properties of galaxy groups within the ALFALFA volume. (See O'Brien et al., O'Malley et al., and Odekon et al. posters, this meeting.) Students involved in this program are learning how science is accomplished in a large collaboration while contributing to the scientific goals of a major legacy survey. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918, AST-0725267, and AST-0725380.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the alfalfa weevil complex (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in North America.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Jorge A Achata; Bundy, C Scott; Oesterle, Naomi; Hanson, Stephen F

    2013-02-01

    The Eastern, Western, and Egyptian strains of alfalfa weevil are pests introduced to North America on three separate occasions, now they share partially overlapping geographic ranges, covering most of the continental United States. Behavior, susceptibility to parasites, and subtle morphological differences separate the strains. The difficulty in differentiating among these strains morphologically has led to the application of molecular phylogeny approaches including restriction fragment-length polymorphism characterization and sequencing of mitochondrial genes. While valuable for strain identification, this approach cannot identify interstrain hybrids because mitochondrial markers are maternally inherited. The work reported here extends previous findings by comparing over 7 Kb of sequence from two mitochondrial and four nuclear loci to increase the resolution of molecular phylogeny for these weevils. The related clover leaf weevil, also an occasional pest of alfalfa, was included in the analysis because the molecular phylogeny of this weevil has not been examined to date. Analysis of nuclear loci indicate that the clover weevil is a distinct species. Furthermore, while the three alfalfa weevil strains are separable based on mitochondrial sequence data they cannot be separated using nuclearloci suggesting that they are all recently diverged members of the same species. These data refine the relationships among these strains and may find application in design of better control strategies.

  1. Clover: Compiler directed lightweight soft error resilience

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qingrui; Lee, Dongyoon; Jung, Changhee; Tiwari, Devesh

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents Clover, a compiler directed soft error detection and recovery scheme for lightweight soft error resilience. The compiler carefully generates soft error tolerant code based on idem-potent processing without explicit checkpoint. During program execution, Clover relies on a small number of acoustic wave detectors deployed in the processor to identify soft errors by sensing the wave made by a particle strike. To cope with DUE (detected unrecoverable errors) caused by the sensing latency of error detection, Clover leverages a novel selective instruction duplication technique called tail-DMR (dual modular redundancy). Once a soft error is detected by either the sensor or the tail-DMR, Clover takes care of the error as in the case of exception handling. To recover from the error, Clover simply redirects program control to the beginning of the code region where the error is detected. Lastly, the experiment results demonstrate that the average runtime overhead is only 26%, which is a 75% reduction compared to that of the state-of-the-art soft error resilience technique.

  2. Clover: Compiler directed lightweight soft error resilience

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Qingrui; Lee, Dongyoon; Jung, Changhee; ...

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents Clover, a compiler directed soft error detection and recovery scheme for lightweight soft error resilience. The compiler carefully generates soft error tolerant code based on idem-potent processing without explicit checkpoint. During program execution, Clover relies on a small number of acoustic wave detectors deployed in the processor to identify soft errors by sensing the wave made by a particle strike. To cope with DUE (detected unrecoverable errors) caused by the sensing latency of error detection, Clover leverages a novel selective instruction duplication technique called tail-DMR (dual modular redundancy). Once a soft error is detected by either themore » sensor or the tail-DMR, Clover takes care of the error as in the case of exception handling. To recover from the error, Clover simply redirects program control to the beginning of the code region where the error is detected. Lastly, the experiment results demonstrate that the average runtime overhead is only 26%, which is a 75% reduction compared to that of the state-of-the-art soft error resilience technique.« less

  3. Infection and nodulation of clover by nonmotile Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Napoli, C.; Albersheim, P.

    1980-02-01

    Nonmotile mutants of Rhizobium trifolii were isolated to determine whether bacterial motility is required for the infection and nodulation of clover. The nonmotile mutants were screened for their ability to infect and nodulate clover seedlings in Fahraeus glass slide assemblies, plastic growth pouches, and vermiculite-sand-filled clay pots. In each system, the nonmotile mutants were able to infect and nodulate clover.

  4. Blackpatch of clover, cause of slobbers syndrome: A review of the disease and the pathogen, Rhizoctonia leguminicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia leguminicola Gough and E.S. Elliott is a widely used name for the causal agent of blackpatch disease of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), which infects other legumes as well. This fungal pathogen produces alkaloids (slaframine and swainsonine) that affect grazing mammals. Slaframine ca...

  5. Establishing alfalfa in corn silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to recent agricultural statistics, alfalfa was planted on 0.44 million acres and harvested from 2.2 million acres, and corn silage was planted and harvested from 1.0 million acres per year in Wisconsin. Because both crops are often grown in rotation, alfalfa could be interseeded at corn pl...

  6. Establishing alfalfa in silage corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to recent agricultural statistics, alfalfa was planted on 0.44 million acres and harvested from 2.2 million acres and silage corn was planted and harvested from 1.0 million acres per year in Wisconsin. Because both crops are often grown in rotation, alfalfa could be interseeded at corn pla...

  7. Host Range and Distribution of the Clover Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne trifoliophila

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, E. C.; Jennings, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Meloidogyne trifoliophila to gall 230 species and cultivars of plants was determined in a greenhouse. All clovers (Trifolium spp.) were severely galled regardless of species or cultivar. Most soybean cultivars were moderately to severely galled. Among other legumes, broad bean, garden pea, Korean lespedeza, sweetclover, and common vetch were good hosts, but alfalfa, bird's-foot trefoil, peanut, and pole bean were poor or nonhosts. Among other plant families, most Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) and Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) were galled, but Cucurbitaceae, Iridaceae, Malvaceae, Poaceae, and Solanaceae were rarely or never galled. Results for Amaryllidaceae, Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, and Liliaceae were variable. This nematode was not found in a survey of pasture and soybean fields in southwestern Tennessee. PMID:19274266

  8. Cogeneration for existing alfalfa processing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This study is designed to look at the application of gas-turbine generator cogeneration to a typical Nebraska alfalfa processing mill. The practicality is examined of installing a combustion turbine generator at a plant site and modifying existing facilities for generating electricity, utilizing the electricity generated, selling excess electricity to the power company and incorporating the turbine exhaust flow as a drying medium for the alfalfa. The results of this study are not conclusive but the findings are summarized.

  9. Genetically engineered alfalfa and feral alfalfa plants: What should growers know?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L) is the world’s most important forage crop. The western United States is the most important production area for both alfalfa forage and alfalfa seed. Alfalfa was the first major perennial genetically-engineered (GE)crop and a GE trait for resistance to glypho...

  10. Ensiling Characteristics of Alfalfa Leaves and Stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The separate harvesting of alfalfa leaves and stems would provide farmers more flexibility in the harvesting and utilization of alfalfa, but a key issue is storage. In three trials, unwilted alfalfa leaves were ensiled alone or with cell wall degrading enzymes, formic acid or lactic acid bacterial i...

  11. Managing the rotation from alfalfa to corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa provides many benefits to cropping systems. These benefits occur both during alfalfa production and during the subsequent crops that follow. Some of the common benefits during alfalfa production are increased soil organic matter, decreased soil erosion, and decreased soil nitrate leaching lo...

  12. Molecular characterization of five betacryptoviruses infecting four clover species and dill.

    PubMed

    Lesker, Till; Rabenstein, Frank; Maiss, Edgar

    2013-09-01

    The family Partitiviridae includes plant (Alphacryptovirus and Betacryptovirus), fungal (Partitivirus) and protozoan (Cryspovirus) viruses with bisegmented dsRNA genomes and isometric virions. Cryptic viruses commonly occur in different plant species without causing any symptoms. So far, numerous sequences have been determined for viruses of the genus Alphacryptovirus, but no sequence is available for any assigned member of the genus Betacryptovirus. Following extraction, cloning and sequence analysis of double-stranded RNA in this study, we report the molecular properties of three assigned members of the genus Betacryptovirus, white clover cryptic virus 2, red clover cryptic virus 2 and hop trefoil cryptic virus 2, and two new putative betacryptoviruses found in crimson clover and dill. Betacryptoviruses share sequence motifs with members of the genus Partitivirus. In phylogenetic analyses, members of the genus Betacryptovirus formed a new sub-cluster within the clusters containing members of the genus Partitivirus. Our results provide evidence for a distinct evolutionary lineage of dsRNA viruses of plants and fungi.

  13. Clover development during spaceflight: a model system.

    PubMed

    Guikema, J A; DeBell, L; Paulsen, A; Spooner, B S; Wong, P P

    1994-01-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed.

  14. Clover development during spaceflight: A model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guikema, James A.; Debell, Lynnette; Paulsen, Avelina; Spooner, Brian S.; Wong, Peter P.

    1994-08-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed.

  15. Clover development during spaceflight: A model system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guikema, James A.; Debell, Lynnette; Paulsen, Avelina; Spooner, Brian S.; Wong, Peter P.

    1994-01-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed.

  16. Engineering alfalfa to accumulate useful caffeic acid derivatives and characterization of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA transferases from legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some forages crops, such as red clover, accumulate high levels of caffeic acid derivatives. Oxidation of these o-diphenols to quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) and the subsequent reactions of these quinones (probably with endogenous plant proteases) result in a significant reduction ...

  17. Scaling analysis of fat-link irrelevant clover fermion actions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamleh, Waseem; Lasscock, Ben; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2008-01-01

    The fat-link irrelevant clover fermion action is a variant of the O(a)-improved Wilson action where the irrelevant operators are constructed using smeared links. While the use of such smearing allows for the use of highly improved definitions of the field strength tensor F{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}, we show that the standard 1-loop clover term with a mean field improved coefficient c{sub sw} is sufficient to remove the O(a) errors, avoiding the need for nonperturbative tuning. This result enables efficient dynamical simulations in QCD with the fat-link irrelevant clover fermion action.

  18. Cytoskeleton-amyloplast interactions in sweet clover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guikema, J. A.; Hilaire, E.; Odom, W. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of organelles within columella cells of sweet clover was examined by transmission electron microscopy following growth under static or clinorotating conditions. A developmentally conditioned polarity was observed, with a proximal location of the nucleus and a distal accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum. This polarity was insensitive to clinorotation. In contrast, clinorotation altered the location of amyloplasts. Application of cytoskeletal poisons (colchicine, cytochalasin D, taxol, and phalloidin), especially during clinorotation, had interesting effects on the maintenance of columella cell polarity, with a profound effect on the extent, location, and structure of the endoplasmic reticulum. The site of cytoskeletal interactions with sedimenting amyloplasts is thought to be the amyloplast envelope. An envelope fraction, having over 17 polypeptides, was isolated using immobilized antibody technology, and will provide a means of assessing the role of specific peptides in cytoskeleton/amyloplast interactions.

  19. Alfalfa hay induced primary photosensitization in horses.

    PubMed

    Puschner, B; Chen, X; Read, D; Affolter, V K

    2016-05-01

    Photosensitization, also known as photodermatitis, occurs when phototoxic or photoactive substances accumulate in the skin and interact with sunlight to result in an often severe, crusting, itching or painful dermatitis in unpigmented and/or lightly haired areas of the skin. Primary photosensitization, caused by direct ingestion of photosensitizing agents, has been reported anecdotally in horses after ingestion of alfalfa hay. Between 2004 and 2014, several large outbreaks of primary photosensitization in horses fed primarily alfalfa hay were investigated in California. Alfalfa hay samples were collected and carefully examined for the presence of known photosensitizing plants and pesticide residues but none were identified. Select hay samples were evaluated for unusual fungal infestation and for phototoxicity assay using a specific Candida albicans assay; results were negative. In the 2004 outbreak, a feeding study was conducted with three horses exclusively fed alfalfa hay that was suspected to have caused the outbreak. Two weeks after ingestion of alfalfa hay, two horses developed several lesions in non-pigmented skin characterized as chronic ulcerative and necrotizing dermatitis with superficial vasculitis, which was consistent with photosensitization. In the 2014 outbreak, seven different implicated alfalfa hay samples were analyzed for chlorophyll a and b, and pheophorbide a. These compounds had been suspected to play a role in alfalfa-induced primary photosensitization. The chlorophyll contents ranged from 0.90 to 2.30 mg/g in the alfalfa hay samples, compared to 1.37 and 2.94 mg/g in locally grown alfalfa and orchard grass hay. The pheophorbide a levels ranged from 3.36 to 89.87 µg/g in alfalfa samples compared to 81.39 and 42.33 µg/g in control alfalfa and orchard grass hay samples. These findings eliminate chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and pheophorbide a as possible causes for alfalfa-hay induced primary photosensitization.

  20. Cortical microtubules in sweet clover columella cells developed in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Electron micrographs of columella cells from sweet clover seedlings grown and fixed in microgravity revealed longitudinal and cross sectioned cortical microtubules. This is the first report demonstrating the presence and stability of this network in plants in microgravity.

  1. Using Water Clover to Demonstrate Sexual Reproduction in Ferns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Settle, Wilbur J.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures are described for preparing spores from the fern, water clover, for an educational demonstration of germination and sexual reproduction. The demonstration is recommended for biology instructors who want to illustrate the alternation of phases in plants. (SA)

  2. Genetic Engineering of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Khurshid, Muhammad; Sun, Zhan Min; Tang, Yi Xiong; Zhou, Mei Liang; Wu, Yan Min

    2016-01-01

    Alfalfa is excellent perennial legume forage for its extensive ecological adaptability, high nutrition value, palatability and biological nitrogen fixation. It plays a very important role in the agriculture, animal husbandry and ecological construction. It is cultivated in all continents. With the development of modern plant breeding and genetic engineering techniques, a large amount of work has been carried out on alfalfa. Here we summarize the recent research advances in genetic engineering of alfalfa breeding, including transformation, quality improvement, stress resistance and as a bioreactor. The review article can enables us to understand the research method, direction and achievements of genetic engineering technology of Alfalfa.

  3. Redesigning alfalfa to reduce protein losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa is often referred to as the “Queen of Forages” due to its relatively good digestibility, high protein, and ability to readily fix nitrogen. But there’s a big drawback to alfalfa – much of its protein is lost during the harvest and ensiling process, and more is lost in the rumen of livestock....

  4. Growth of bermudagrass with white clover or nitrogen fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White clover (Trifolium repens) var ‘Durana’ was oversown into established bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) in 2009. Soil analysis indicated potassium (K) was low and potash at 112 and 336 kg/ha was added as main plots. Nitrogen as ammonium nitrate or an ammonium sulfate/urea blend was added as 0, 34...

  5. Plant Guide: Western Prairie Clover [Dalea Ornata (Douglas) Eaton & Wright

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western prairie clover [Dalea ornata (Douglas) Eaton & Wright] is a perennial North American legume that is non-toxic to livestock and wildlife. It can be found in Idaho, Nevada, Washington, Oregon, and California. Western prairie is tap-rooted and reaches a height of 30 to 61 cm. A cluster of st...

  6. Health status of alfalfa leafcutting bee larvae (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) in commercial United States alfalfa seed fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a geographically large survey to quantify production losses in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata, Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), a solitary pollinator used extensively in alfalfa seed production. Healthy prepupae were found in only 47.1% of the nest cells collected at the en...

  7. Prohexadione-calcium responsive alfalfa varieties ensure success of corn-interseeded alfalfa production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent USDA-NASS data indicate alfalfa and corn were planted on about 0.8 and 1.9 million hectares per year, respectively, in the Northeast, Great Lakes, Upper Midwest, and Northern Mountain regions the USA. Because both crops are often grown in rotation, alfalfa could be interseeded at corn plantin...

  8. Effect of seed scarification and seeding depth on greenhouse seedling emergence in western prairie clover, Searls prairie clover, and Basalt milkvetch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Only a few North American legumes are commercially available for rangeland revegetation in the western U.S. Basalt milkvetch (Astragalus filipes, Asfi)), western prairie clover (Dalea ornata, Daor) and Searls' prairie clover (D. searlsiae, Dase) are three North American legumes that hold promise for...

  9. Alfalfa -- a sustainable crop for biomass energy production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has the potential to be a significant contributor to America's renewable energy future. In an alfalfa biomass energy production system, alfalfa forage would be separated into stem and leave fractions. The stems would be processed to produce energy, and the leaves would be s...

  10. Cash in on N credits when corn follows alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When alfalfa is killed, some of the accumulated N in the soil and in alfalfa leaves, stems, and roots becomes available to subsequent crops. This increased N supply is known as the “alfalfa N credit,” which is the amount of fertilizer or available manure N a grower can save, resulting in higher net ...

  11. Comparative drought response in eleven diverse alfalfa accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) production is often negatively affected by drought stress. This is particularly true for alfalfa that is cultivated on rangeland. Thus, the development of drought-tolerant alfalfa cultivars is of great significance. A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate 11 alfa...

  12. Stress Responses in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gowri, Ganesan; Bugos, Robert C.; Campbell, Wilbur H.; Maxwell, Carl A.; Dixon, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    S-Adenosyl-l-methionine:caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT, EC 2.1.1.6) catalyzes the conversion of caffeic acid to ferulic acid, a key step in the biosynthesis of lignin monomers. We have isolated a functionally active cDNA clone (pCOMT1) encoding alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) COMT by immunoscreening a λZAPII cDNA expression library with anti-(aspen COMT) antibodies. The derived amino acid sequence of pCOMT1 is 86% identical to that of COMT from aspen. Southern blot analysis indicates that COMT in alfalfa is encoded by at least two genes. Addition of an elicitor preparation from bakers' yeast to alfalfa cell suspension cultures resulted in a rapid accumulation of COMT transcripts, which reached a maximum level around 19 hours postelicitation. Northern blot analysis of total RNA from different organs of alfalfa plants at various developmental stages showed that COMT transcripts are most abundant in roots and stems. Transcripts encoding ATP: i-methionine-S-adenosyl transferase (AdoMet synthetase, EC 2.5.1.6), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of the methyl donor for the COMT reaction, were coinduced with COMT transcripts in elicitor-treated cells and exhibited a similar pattern of expression to that of COMT in different organs of alfalfa plants at various stages of development. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:16668418

  13. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Collaborative Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, John M.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) has allowed faculty and students from a wide range of public and private colleges and especially those with small astronomy programs to learn how science is accomplished in a large collaboration while contributing to the scientific goals of a legacy radio astronomy survey. The UAT has achieved this through close collaboration with ALFALFA PIs to identify research areas accessible to undergraduates. In this talk we will summarize the main research efforts of the UAT, including multiwavelength followup observations of ALFALFA sources, the UAT Collaborative Groups Project, the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD), and the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, and AST-1211005.

  14. Glyphosate-tolerant alfalfa is compositionally equivalent to conventional alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    McCann, Melinda C; Rogan, Glennon J; Fitzpatrick, Sharie; Trujillo, William A; Sorbet, Roy; Hartnell, Gary F; Riodan, Susan G; Nemeth, Margaret A

    2006-09-20

    Glyphosate-tolerant alfalfa (GTA) was developed to withstand over-the-top applications of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. As a part of the safety assessment, GTA (designated J101 x J163) was grown under controlled field conditions at geographically diverse locations within the United States during the 2001 and 2003 field seasons along with control and other conventional alfalfa varieties for compositional assessment. Field trials were conducted using a randomized complete block design with four replication blocks at each site. Alfalfa forage was harvested at the late bud to early bloom stage from each plot at five field sites in 2001 (establishment year) and from four field sites in 2003 (third year of stand). The concentration of proximate constituents, fibers, amino acids, coumestrol, and minerals in the forage was measured. The results showed that the forage from GTA J101 x J163 is compositionally equivalent to forage from the control and conventional alfalfa varieties.

  15. Rapid phenotyping of alfalfa root system architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root system architecture (RSA) influences the capacity of an alfalfa plant for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, nutrient uptake and water use efficiency, resistance to frost heaving, winterhardiness, and some pest and pathogen resistance. However, we currently lack a basic understanding of root system d...

  16. Sativa by falcata alfalfa hybrid variety trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research has demonstrated that alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) subsp. sativa by subsp. falcata hybrids showed heterosis. Limited work has been done examining these hybrids in a sward situation. The objective of this study was to produce sativa by falcata hybrids using Dairyland Seed Company’...

  17. Effects of silo type on ensiling alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various silo types are used on dairy farms, but there is uncertainty as to how silo type affects losses and silage quality. The objective of this study was to compare three silo types, filled with alfalfa from the same fields and emptied simultaneously, relative to filling rates, dry matter (DM) los...

  18. Evaluation of physical structure value in spring-harvested grass/clover silage and hay fed to heifers.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A K S; Nørgaard, P; Byskov, M V; Weisbjerg, M R

    2015-02-01

    The physical structure value of conserved grass/clover forages of spring harvest was evaluated by assessing effects of harvest time, conservation method, iNDF/NDF ratio and NDF intake (NDFI) per kg BW on chewing activity and fecal particle size in dairy heifers. A mixed sward consisting of ryegrass (Lolium perenne), red clover (Trifolium pratense) and white clover (Trifolium repens) was harvested in 2009 on May 9 (early) and 25 (late), and both cuts were conserved as silage and hay. The early silage, early hay, late silage and late hay contained dry matter (DM) of 454, 842, 250 and 828 g/kg, and NDF of 315, 436, 414 and 503 g/kg DM, respectively. Forages were fed as sole feed to four Jersey heifers of 435±30 kg BW in a 4×4 Latin square experiment. Feeding level was 90% of individual ad libitum intake, divided equally across two daily meals offered at 0800 and 1530 h. Chewing activity was estimated from recorded jaw movements (JM) oscillations continuously logged for 96 h and summarized per 24 h as mean effective rumination time and eating time. Eating behavior was further observed during four 20-min test meals. Weight proportion of large feces particles (>1.0 mm) and geometric mean fecal particle size (GPS) were calculated. Potentially indigestible NDF (iNDF) was estimated by incubation for 288 h in situ. The daily DM intake (DMI) decreased with progressing maturity at harvest (P<0.001) while daily NDFI was unaffected by harvest time (P>0.05). Earlier harvest led to less rumination per kg NDFI (P<0.01), similar eating time per kg NDFI (P>0.05) and similar proportion of large particles (P>0.01) compared with later harvest. Rumination time per kg NDFI decreased with higher NDFI per kg BW (P<0.001) and with lower iNDF/NDF ratio (P<0.01). Content and potential digestibility of NDF was greater in hay than in silage from the same harvest probably due to field loss and therefore confounded effects of conservation method. This study of high digestibility grass/clover

  19. Notice of release of: 1)Majestic germplasm and 2) Spectrum germplasm western prairie clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two natural-track selected germplasms of western prairie clover [Dalea ornata (Douglas ex Hook.) Eaton & J. Wright] [Fabaceae] have been released for use in revegetation of semiarid rangelands in the western USA. Western prairie clover is a perennial leguminous forb that occurs naturally in Idaho, ...

  20. Harvest frequency effects on white clover forage biomass, quality, and theoretical ethanol yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White clover (Trifolium repens L.), an introduced, cool-season, perennial legume, is used throughout the southeastern United States, however there is a need to understand the production of white clover under different management regimes and soil and climatic conditions. The objectives of this study...

  1. A New NPGS Special Collection: Norman L. Taylor University of Kentucky Clover Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Norman L. Taylor was a world renowned Professor and clover breeder in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences at the University of Kentucky for 48 years. Following retirement in 2001, he continued working on clovers up until his death in 2010. Dr. Taylor’s entire career was devoted to enhancin...

  2. Soil Moisture Dynamics under Corn, Soybean, and Perennial Kura Clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, T.; Venterea, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Rising global food and energy consumption call for increased agricultural production, whereas rising concerns for environmental quality call for farming systems with more favorable environmental impacts. Improved understanding and management of plant-soil water interactions are central to meeting these twin challenges. The objective of this research was to compare the temporal dynamics of soil moisture under contrasting cropping systems suited for the Midwestern region of the United States. Precipitation, infiltration, drainage, evapotranspiration, soil water storage, and freeze/thaw processes were measured hourly for three years in field plots of continuous corn (Zea mays L.), corn/soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation, and perennial kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bieb.) in southeastern Minnesota. The evapotranspiration from the perennial clover most closely followed the temporal dynamics of precipitation, resulting in deep drainage which was reduced up to 50% relative to the annual crops. Soil moisture utilization also continued later into the fall under the clover than under the annual crops. In the annual cropping systems, crop sequence influenced the soil moisture dynamics. Soybean following corn and continuous corn exhibited evapotranspiration which was 80 mm less than and deep drainage which was 80 mm greater than that of corn following soybean. These differences occurred primarily during the spring and were associated with differences in early season plant growth between the systems. In the summer, soil moisture depletion was up to 30 mm greater under corn than soybean. Crop residue also played an important role in the soil moisture dynamics. Higher amounts of residue were associated with reduced soil freezing. This presentation will highlight key aspects of the soil moisture dynamics for these contrasting cropping systems across temporal scales ranging from hours to years. The links between soil moisture dynamics, crop yields, and nutrient leaching

  3. [Soil dryness characteristics of alfalfa cropland and optimal growth years of alfalfa on the Loess Plateau of central Gansu, China].

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhu-zhu; Li, Ling-ling; Niu, Yi-ning; Cai, Li-qun; Zhang, Ren-zhi; Xie, Jun-hong

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated soil moisture in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cropland with different growth years (1, 3, 8, 12 and 14 years) and discussed the optimum growth years of alfalfa on the Loess Plateau of central Gansu. The results showed that the soil moisture along 0-300 cm soil profile of alfalfa croplands with different growth years was obviously lower than that of the local soil stable moisture. The soil water contents in croplands with alfalfa that had grown for 12 and 14 years were only 9.2% and 7.1% of local soil stable moisture, respectively, which were even lower than the lower limit of alfalfa growth. The average soil dryness indexes along 0-300 cm soil profile in 1, 3, 8, 12 and 14 years alfalfa croplands were 125.4%, 30.5%, 18.4%, -34.2% and -83.3% respectively. The results indicated that soil dryness occurred to varying degrees with different growth years except croplands with alfalfa grown for 1 year. With the increase of growth years of alfalfa, the soil dryness intensity increased and the soil dryness rate decreased. According to the soil moisture and alfalfa productivity results in this study, it could be concluded that the optimum growth years of alfalfa are 8-10 years in semiarid areas of the Loess Plateau.

  4. Health status of alfalfa leafcutting bee larvae (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) in United States alfalfa seed fields.

    PubMed

    James, R R; Pitts-Singer, T L

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a broad geographic survey in the northwestern United States to quantify production losses in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata (F.), Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), a solitary pollinator used extensively in alfalfa seed production. Viable larvae were found in only 47.1% of the nest cells collected at the end of the season. Most of the rest of the cells contained pollen balls (typified by a provision but no larva; 16.7%), unknown causes of mortality (15.5%), or larvae killed by chalkbrood (8.0%). Prevalence of pollen balls was correlated positively with bee release rates and negatively with alfalfa stand age. The unknown mortality was correlated with the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Plant Hardiness Zone, and thus, some of the mortality may be caused by high temperature extremes, although the nesting season degree-days were not correlated with this mortality. Chalkbrood prevalence was correlated with possible nesting-resource or crowding-related factors, such as the number of bees released per hectare and the number of shelters used, but not with nesting board disinfection practices. Vapona is used to control parasitoids when the parent bees are incubated before release, and use of this fumigant was associated with an increase in both chalkbrood and diapausing offspring, although any reason for these correlations are unknown. This survey quantifies the variation in the quality of alfalfa leafcutting bee cocoons produced across much of the U.S. alfalfa seed production area.

  5. Seeding rate effects in oat-berseem clover intercrops

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; O'Donovan, John T.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.

    2003-10-01

    The sustainability of cereal cropping systems may be improved by the addition of legumes. The effects of seeding rate were studied for intercrops of berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.). Bigbee berseem clover, an annual forage legume, was intercropped with oats on a Black Chernozemic soil at Edmonton, Alberta, in 1996 and 1997. Berseem dry matter (DM) yields were greatly reduced by increasing oat plant density. There was a linear decline in berseem DM with increasing oat DM or oat tiller density. The relationship between oat plant density and berseem DM was nonlinear and varied between years and harvests. Berseem yield reductions varied from 44 to 82% with target densities of 100 oat plants m-2. Effects of berseem seeding rate (BSR) on oats varied between years. Increasing BSR from 6 to 24 kg ha-1 decreased oat tillering, oat DM and oat plant DM by 22-51, 0-57 and 8-51%, respectively, and increased oat tiller DM by 0-18%, with oats at 10 to 20 plants m 2. Differences between years were likely due to environmental factors and relative emergence times. After a silage-stage harvest, oat regrowth was negligible but berseem regrowth averaged 3.1 Mg ha-1 DM.

  6. Maintaining viability of white clover under very high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihira, N.; Iwasaki, T.; Shinpou, R.; Hara, A.; Ono, F.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Saigusa, M.; Matsushima, Y.; Saini, N. L.; Yamashita, M.

    2012-06-01

    The high pressure technique developed in physics may give a new possibility if it is applied to a biological study. We have been studying the tolerance of small living samples such as planktons and mosses, and found that all of them were alive after exposed to extremely high hydrostatic pressure of 7.5 GPa. This technique has been extended to a higher plant Trifolium lepens L. (white clover). A few seeds of white clover were exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 days. After the pressure was released, they were seeded on agar, or directly on sowing soil. Seventeen out of the total 22 seeds exposed to the high pressure were found to be alive. Those exposed for up to 1 day and seeded on agar germinated roots. Those exposed for up to 1 h and seeded on soil germinated stems and leaves. The present technique has the possibility of being applied to improve breed of plants and to discover a very strong species that stands against very severe environmental conditions.

  7. 7 CFR 201.5 - Origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Records for Agricultural and Vegetable Seeds § 201.5 Origin. (a) The complete record for any lot of seed of alfalfa, red clover, white clover, or field corn, except hybrid seed corn, shall include...

  8. 7 CFR 201.14 - Origin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.14 Origin. (a) Alfalfa, red clover, white clover, and field corn (except hybrid seed corn) shall be labeled to show: (1) The origin, if known; or (2) if the origin is not...

  9. Stress responses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Kessmann, H.; Edwards, R.; Dixon, R.A. ); Geno, P.W. )

    1990-09-01

    The isoflavonoid conjugates medicarpin-3-O-glucoside-6{double prime}-O-malonate (MGM), afrormosin-7-O-glucoside (AG), and afrormosin-7-O-glucoside-6{double prime}-O-malonate (AGM) were isolated and characterized from cell suspension cultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), where they were the major constitutive secondary metabolites. They were also found in alfalfa roots but not in other parts of the plant. The phytoalexin medicarpin accumulated rapidly in suspension cultured cells treated with elicitor from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and this was subsequently accompanied by an increase in the levels of MGM. In contrast, net accumulation of afrormosin conjugates was not affected by elicitor treatment. Labeling studies with ({sup 14}C)phenylalanine indicated that afrormosin conjugates were the major de novo synthesized isoflavonoid products in unelicited cells. During elicitation, ({sup 14}C)phenylalanine was incorporated predominantly into medicarpin, although a significant proportion of the newly synthesized medicarpin was also conjugated. Treatment of {sup 14}C-labeled, elicited cells with L-{alpha}-aminooxy-{beta}-phenylpropionic acid, a potent inhibitor of PAL activity in vivo, resulted in the initial appearance of labeled medicarpin of very low specific activity, suggesting that the phytoalexin could be released from a preformed conjugate under these conditions. Our data draw attention to the involvement of isoflavone hydroxylases during the constitutive and elicitor-induced accumulation of isoflavonoids and their conjugates in alfalfa cell cultures.

  10. Increase in plasma cortisol concentrations in ewes fed oestrogenic subterranean clover.

    PubMed

    Tang, B Y; Adams, N R; Sawyer, G J

    1979-11-01

    Pen-feeding oestrogenic clover to ewes increased their plasma cortisol concentration by the third day. This was not due to any change in the variation of cortisol concentration with time of day. Ovulation rate was not affected during the experiment as judged by the levels of plasma progesterone and laparoscopy. The plasma cortisol concentration of ewes also rose within three days of their being placed on oestrogenic clover pasture. During the next 21 days, their mean plasma cortisol was increased by 58 per cent. A previous history of clover disease did not affect this response.

  11. Does White Clover (Trifolium repens) Abundance in Temperate Pastures Determine Sitona obsoletus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Populations?

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Mark R.; van Koten, Chikako; Cave, Vanessa M.; Chapman, David; Hodgson, Hamish

    2016-01-01

    To determine if host plant abundance determined the size of clover root weevil (CRW) Sitona obsoletus larval populations, a study was conducted over 4 years in plots sown in ryegrass (Lolium perenne) (cv. Nui) sown at either 6 or 30 kg/ha and white clover (Trifolium repens) sown at a uniform rate of 8 kg/ha. This provided a range of % white clover content to investigate CRW population establishment and impacts on white clover survival. Larval sampling was carried out in spring (October) when larval densities are near their spring peak at Lincoln (Canterbury, New Zealand) with % clover measured in autumn (April) and spring (September) of each year. Overall, mean larval densities measured in spring 2012–2015 were 310, 38, 59, and 31 larvae m-2, respectively. There was a significant decline in larval populations between 2012 and 2013, but spring populations were relatively uniform thereafter. The mean % white clover measured in autumns of 2012 to 2015 was 17, 10, 3, and 11%, respectively. In comparison, mean spring % white clover from 2012 to 2015, averaged c. 5% each year. Analysis relating spring (October) larval populations to % white clover measured in each plot in autumn (April) found the 2012 larval population to be statistically significantly larger in the ryegrass 6 kg/ha plots than 30 kg/ha plots. Thereafter, sowing rate had no significant effect on larval populations. From 2013 to 2015, spring larval populations had a negative relationship with the previous autumn % white clover with the relationship highly significant for the 2014 data. When CRW larval populations in spring 2013 to 2015 were predicted from the 2013 to 2015 autumn % white clover, respectively, based on their positive relationship in 2012, the predicted densities were substantially larger than those observed. Conversely, when 2015 spring larval data and % clover was regressed against 2012–2014 larval populations, observed densities tended to be higher than predicted, but the numbers came

  12. Does White Clover (Trifolium repens) Abundance in Temperate Pastures Determine Sitona obsoletus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Populations?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Mark R; van Koten, Chikako; Cave, Vanessa M; Chapman, David; Hodgson, Hamish

    2016-01-01

    To determine if host plant abundance determined the size of clover root weevil (CRW) Sitona obsoletus larval populations, a study was conducted over 4 years in plots sown in ryegrass (Lolium perenne) (cv. Nui) sown at either 6 or 30 kg/ha and white clover (Trifolium repens) sown at a uniform rate of 8 kg/ha. This provided a range of % white clover content to investigate CRW population establishment and impacts on white clover survival. Larval sampling was carried out in spring (October) when larval densities are near their spring peak at Lincoln (Canterbury, New Zealand) with % clover measured in autumn (April) and spring (September) of each year. Overall, mean larval densities measured in spring 2012-2015 were 310, 38, 59, and 31 larvae m(-2), respectively. There was a significant decline in larval populations between 2012 and 2013, but spring populations were relatively uniform thereafter. The mean % white clover measured in autumns of 2012 to 2015 was 17, 10, 3, and 11%, respectively. In comparison, mean spring % white clover from 2012 to 2015, averaged c. 5% each year. Analysis relating spring (October) larval populations to % white clover measured in each plot in autumn (April) found the 2012 larval population to be statistically significantly larger in the ryegrass 6 kg/ha plots than 30 kg/ha plots. Thereafter, sowing rate had no significant effect on larval populations. From 2013 to 2015, spring larval populations had a negative relationship with the previous autumn % white clover with the relationship highly significant for the 2014 data. When CRW larval populations in spring 2013 to 2015 were predicted from the 2013 to 2015 autumn % white clover, respectively, based on their positive relationship in 2012, the predicted densities were substantially larger than those observed. Conversely, when 2015 spring larval data and % clover was regressed against 2012-2014 larval populations, observed densities tended to be higher than predicted, but the numbers came

  13. Alfalfa suppression of weeds is affected by preceding crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers are seeking alternative tactics for weed control so that they can reduce their need for tillage. In this study, we examined the impact of the preceding crop on alfalfa suppression of weeds. Alfalfa was most competitive with weeds following soybean. When following spring wheat, v...

  14. 'Don' a Diploid Falcata Alfalfa for Western US Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Don' (Reg. No. CV-______, PI _______) a diploid falcata alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp falcata L.) developed by the Forage and Range Research Laboratory in Logan, Utah, in cooperation with the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station, Utah State University. Recent interest in falcata alfalfa has been ...

  15. Allelopathic effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) on bladygrass (Imperata cylindrica).

    PubMed

    Abdul-Rahman, A A; Habib, S A

    1989-09-01

    Greenhouse and laboratory experiments were conducted at the Agricultural and Water Resources Research Center Station, Baghdad, in 1985 and 1986 to investigate the possible allelopathic potential of alfalfa (Medicago saliva L.) and its decomposed residues on bladygrass (Imperata cylin-drica L. Beauv.), a noxious weed in Iraq, and to isolate, characterize, and quantify possible allelopathic agents in alfalfa residues and root exudates. Results indicated that decomposed alfalfa roots and their associated soil produced a 51-56% reduction in bladygrass seed germination. Root and shoot length of bladygrass seedlings were reduced by an average of 88%. Decayed and undecayed mixtures of alfalfa roots and soil at 0.015∶1 (w/w) inhibited bladygrass seedlings reproduced from rhizomes by 30 and 42%. It was found that root exudates of alfalfa seedlings caused significant reduction in shoot and root dry weights of bladygrass seedlings when alfalfa and bladygrass were grown together in nutrient culture. Caffeic, chlorogenic, isochloro-genic,p-coumaric,p-OH-benzoic, and ferulic acids were detected in alfalfa root exudates and residues. The highest amount (126 fig phenolic acids/g soil) of these compounds was found in alfalfa root residues after six months of decomposition in soil.

  16. Storage characteristics of large round alfalfa bales: dry hay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Losses of forage dry matter (DM) and quality in large round bales of alfalfa stored outdoors can be substantial. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of wrap type and storage method on the preservation of dry alfalfa bales stored outdoors. Several methods to wrap large round ...

  17. Persistence and diversity of rhizobial bacteria nodulating alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most alfalfa seed is treated with an inoculant consisting of several strains of the nitrogen fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti to enhance nodulation of seedlings. One strategy for increasing alfalfa forage yields, particularly in less fertile sites, is selection and use of highly competitive a...

  18. Does Alfalfa-Hay NDFD Matter in a Dairy TMR?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three feeding trials were conducted to study the effect of alfalfa-hay in vitro neutral detergent fiber digestibility (IVNDFD, 48-hour laboratory incubation in rumen fluid) on Holstein dairy cow performance. Treatments (Lh, Ll, Hh, and Hl) included four alfalfa hays selected for relatively low-(L) o...

  19. Alfalfa: Potential For New Feed and Biofuel - USDFRC Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa hay is a major crop supporting U.S ruminant livestock industry, particularly dairy. Several cellulosic feedstocks will be needed to meet current ethanol production goals. Alfalfa has considerable potential as a feedstock for production of ethanol and other industrial materials because of i...

  20. Alfalfa forage and seed crop tolerance to flumioxazin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control is an important component of producing high quality and high yielding alfalfa seed and forage. Flumioxazin was evaluated for weed control in alfalfa forage and seed production in 2007 and 2008 in Washington State. Flumioxazin applied at 0.14 and 0.28 kg ai/ha plus paraquat in February t...

  1. Broadening the U.S. alfalfa germplasm base

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 4000 alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plant introductions (PIs) exist in the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS). NAAIC has discussed/proposed pre-breeding efforts to utilize this germplasm for creating pre-commercial alfalfa germplasm. Funding constraints have been one impediment to th...

  2. Satellite images reveal patterns in crop rotations with alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crops that follow alfalfa in rotation usually benefit from: i) reduced nitrogen (N) requirement from fertilizer or manure; ii) increased yield potential than when following other crops; and iii) reduced weed, insect, and disease pressure. Although benefits of alfalfa in crop rotations often depend o...

  3. Predicting fertilizer nitrogen response in corn following alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Correct prediction and application of alfalfa nitrogen (N) credits to first-year corn can reduce fertilizer N costs for growers, reduce over-application of N, and reduce the potential for water contamination. For decades, researchers have found that first-year corn following alfalfa often requires n...

  4. Complete genome sequence of the alfalfa latent virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa latent virus (ALV) is a member of the carlavirus group and occurs symptomlessly in alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In the US it is prevalent in Nebraska and Wisconsin. The virus is recognized as a strain of Pea streak virus (PeSV) So far, no complete genomic sequence of PSV or ALV is availab...

  5. The effect of target postgrazing height on sward clover content, herbage yield, and dairy production from grass-white clover pasture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, P; Casey, I A; Humphreys, J

    2013-03-01

    White clover (Trifolium repens) is an important legume for grazed grassland that can increase the profitability and environmental sustainability of milk production. Previous experiments on mown grass-clover plots suggest that low postgrazing heights (PGH) can increase sward clover content and herbage production. However, this has not been tested in actual strip or rotational grazing systems with dairy cows. Furthermore, lowering PGH in grass-only swards (typically perennial ryegrass without white clover) has previously been associated with reduced milk yields per cow. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effect of PGH by dairy cows on clover content, herbage production, and milk production from strip-grazed grass-white clover swards in Ireland. Three target PGH treatments of 4, 5, and 6 cm were in place for entire grazing seasons (February to November) for 3 consecutive years (2007 to 2009). Each treatment had a mean of 21 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows that strip-grazed a mean annual area of 10.2 ha. Postgrazing height was measured twice a day with a rising plate meter, and cows were moved to the next strip once the target PGH was reached. Annual fertilizer nitrogen input was 90 kg of N/ha for each treatment. The PGH treatment did not significantly affect annual milk yield (6,202 kg/cow), solids-corrected milk yield (6,148 kg/cow), fat, protein, or lactose yields (265, 222, and 289 kg/cow, respectively), cow liveweight (592 kg) or body condition score (3.01). The PGH treatment also had no significant effect on sward white clover content (196 g/kg). However, herbage production of both grass and clover were significantly higher with the 4-cm PGH treatment compared with the 6-cm treatment. Mean annual herbage yields were 11.1, 10.2, and 9.1 t of organic matter (OM)/ha for the 4-, 5-, and 6-cm PGH treatments, respectively. The lower herbage production in the 6-cm PGH treatment resulted in lower annual silage production, greater housing requirements

  6. Alfalfa leafcutting bee population dynamics, flower availability, and pollination rates in two Oregon alfalfa fields.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Jordi; Kemp, William P

    2005-08-01

    Since the 1970s, it has become increasingly difficult for U.S. alfalfa seed producers to maintain Megachile rotundata (F.) populations used for alfalfa, Medicago sativa L., pollination. In 1998, we monitored M. rotundata population dynamics and foraging behavior, as well as alfalfa bloom and pollination rates in two fields in eastern Oregon. Despite marked differences in bee management, establishment was very similar in the two fields (approximately 0.5 females per nesting cavity) and lagged peak bloom by approximately 2 wk. Pollination rates increased from 0-10% in the first 3 wk to 80-90% in week 4-5. By then, M. rotundata females had difficulty finding untripped (nonpollinated) flowers and visited large numbers of already tripped or not fully matured flowers. M. rotundata progeny mortality was very high (54-78%). Estimated seed yields were similar in both fields. We contend similar seed yields, and improved bee production, could be accomplished with smaller bee populations, better timed with alfalfa bloom.

  7. Opportunities exist to improve alfalfa and manure nitrogen crediting in corn following alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey of Minnesota growers was conducted to determine adoption of extension N rate guidelines for fertilizer and manure for first- and second-year corn (Zea mays L.) following alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) (AC and ACC, respectively) during 2009 to 2011. There were 421 and 273 valid responses for A...

  8. Opportunities exist to improve alfalfa and manure nitrogen crediting in corn following alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey was conducted in 2012 to evaluate the acceptance of fertilizer and manure N extension N rate guidelines for corn (Zea mays L.) grown as the first (AC) and second (ACC) crop following alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) during 2009 to 2011 in Minnesota. There were 421 valid responses for AC and 273...

  9. Characteristics of GRIFFIN high-purity germanium clover detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, U.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Dunlop, R.; Hackman, G.; Rand, E. T.; Smith, J. K.; Starosta, K.; Svensson, C. E.; Voss, P.; Williams, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei, GRIFFIN, is a new experimental facility for radioactive decay studies at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory. The performance of the 16 high-purity germanium (HPGe) clover detectors that will make up the GRIFFIN spectrometer is reported. The energy resolution, efficiency, timing resolution, crosstalk and preamplifier properties of each crystal were measured using a combination of analog and digital data acquisition techniques. The absolute efficiency and add-back factors are determined for the energy range of 80-3450 keV. The detectors show excellent performance with an average over all 64 crystals of a FWHM energy resolution of 1.89(6) keV and relative efficiency with respect to a 3 in . × 3 in . NaI detector of 41(1)% at 1.3 MeV.

  10. Excited nucleon spectrum using non-perturbative improved clover action

    SciTech Connect

    D. G. Richards; M. Gockeler; R. Horsley; D. Pleiter; P. E. L. Rakow; G. Schierholz; C. M. Maynard

    2001-07-01

    We discuss the extraction of negative-parity baryon masses from lattice QCD calculations. The mass of the lowest-lying negative-parity J = 1/2- state is computed in quenched lattice QCD using an O(a)-improved clover fermion action, and a splitting found with the nucleon mass. The calculation is performed on two lattice volumes, and three lattice spacings enabling a study of both finite-volume and finite-lattice-spacing uncertainties. A measurement of the first excited radial excitation of the nucleon finds a mass comparable, or even somewhat larger than that of the negative-parity ground state, in accord with other lattice determinations but in disagreement with experiment. Results are also presented for the lightest negative-parity I=3/2 state.

  11. Water-clover ferns, Marsilea, in the Southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacono, Colette C.; Johnson, David M.

    2006-01-01

    A surge in the collection of exotic Marsilea, M. mutica, M. minuta and M. hirsuta in the southeastern United States has prompted the need for updated identification aids. This study provides an annotated key to all water-clover ferns occurring in the region. It describes and illustrates recently documented exotic species and a previously misidentified western introduction. It details the rediscovery of M. ancylopoda, presumed extinct, and confirms its identification as the western species M. oligospora. Finally it clarifies the status and distribution of two additional western North American species introduced to the southeast, M. vestita and M. macropoda.

  12. Alfalfa variety development. Minnesota Agripower Project, Task II research report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.F.S.; Samac, D.A.; Sheaffer, C.C.

    1997-10-30

    This report briefly summarizes preliminary results from crossbreeding alfalfa to develop desirable characteristics for a dedicated biomass feed stock. The varieties development is part of a larger project which includes preparation and gasification of the alfalfa stems for energy production, and use of the co-product alfalfa leaves in livestock feed. The desired alfalfa traits include winter hardiness, resistance to major pathogens, resistance to foliar disease complexes, many thick, tall, solid, non-lodging stems with high lignin content, delayed flowering, and high quality leaves retained through harvest. Currently no alfalfa varieties meet these criteria. Three crosses were made using old European varieties, with thick stems, and modern resistant varieties. The crossbreeds showed some resistance to diseases, but increased resistance is needed to maximize leaf and steam yield. 1 tab.

  13. Effects of diets containing alfalfa hay or barley flour mixed alfalfa silage on feeding behavior, productivity, rumen fermentation and blood metabolites in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Khadem, Ali-Akbar; Sharifi, Majid; Afzalzadeh, Ahmad; Rezaeian, Mohammad

    2009-08-01

    The effects of barley flour on the fermentation parameters of alfalfa silage and on the productivity of dairy cows were investigated. Alfalfa forage was ensiled either with or without barley flour. Barley flour was soaked in water for 24 h before being mixed with alfalfa (12 kg: 100 kg dry matter bases) at ensiling. Eighteen multi-parous cows were assigned to three equal treatment groups using a completely randomized design. Three isocaloric and isonitrogenous total mixed rations containing alfalfa hay, ordinary alfalfa silage or barley flour mixed alfalfa silage were then prepared. The concentrations of ammonia nitrogen, acetic acid and butyric acid were lower in barley flour mixed alfalfa silage compared to that in ordinary alfalfa silage but the concentration of lactic acid was lower in the ordinary alfalfa silage. Feeding behavior, milk yield and composition, ruminal fermentation and blood metabolites were measured. Although dry matter intake and milk production were not affected, the effect of preparation of alfalfa influenced feeding behavior and rumen fermentation parameters. Cows on alfalfa silage diets spent longer ruminating compared to those fed alfalfa hay. The ruminal ammonia nitrogen and blood urea were affected by ensiling (alfalfa hay versus alfalfa silages) while both parameters were lower in cows fed on barley flour mixed alfalfa silage than those fed on ordinary silage. Although similar blood glucose was recorded for cows fed on alfalfa silages, it was higher in cows fed on alfalfa hay. It is concluded that the addition of barely flour when making alfalfa silage may improve both the fermentation process during ensilage and the ruminal ammonia nitrogen utilization with no significant effects on productivity.

  14. Challenges and opportunities for improved N management in corn following alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With some exceptions, the alfalfa nitrogen (N) credit usually eliminates the need for manure N and/or fertilizer N to economically optimize yield of the first corn crop following alfalfa. Alfalfa also can provide nearly one-half or more of the N requirement for the second corn crop following alfalfa...

  15. Intended release and actual retention of alfalfa leafcutting bees (hymenoptera: megachilidae) for pollination in commercial alfalfa seed fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low, medium, and high stocking densities of Megachile rotundata, the alfalfa leafcutting bee, were released over four years in three research plots of Utah alfalfa planted at seed-production rates. A low number of bees (46-79% of released) survived the incubation and field emergence processes, and ...

  16. Occurrence of transgenic feral alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) in alfalfa seed production areas in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetically-engineered glyphosate-resistant alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa) was commercialized in 2011. The potential risk of transgene dispersal into the environment is not clearly understood for alfalfa, a perennial crop that is cross-pollinated by insects. We gathered data on feral and tr...

  17. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting

    PubMed Central

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Lam, Amy J.; Kim, Bongjae B.; Jacobs, Conor L.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude. PMID:26879144

  18. Stress Responses in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jorrin, Jesus; Dixon, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    l-Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase has been purified from elicitor-treated alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) cell suspension cultures using two protocols based on different sequences of chromatofocusing and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Three distinct forms of the intact enzyme were separated on the basis of affinity for Octyl-Sepharose, with isoelectric points in the range pH 5.1 to 5.4. The native enzyme was a tetramer of Mr 311,000; the intact subunit Mr was about 79,000, although polypeptides of Mr 71,000, 67,000 and 56,000, probably arising from degradation of the intact subunit, were observed in all preparations. Two-dimensional gel analysis revealed the presence of several subunit isoforms of differing isoelectric points. The purified isoforms of the native enzyme had different Km values for l-phenylalanine in the range 40 to 110 micromolar, although mixtures of the forms in crude preparations exhibited apparent negative rate cooperativity. The enzyme activity was induced approximately 16-fold within 6 hours of exposure of alfalfa cells to a fungal elicitor or yeast extract. Analysis by hydrophobic interaction chromatography revealed different proportions of the different active enzyme isoforms, depending upon either time after elicitation or the elicitor used. The elicitor-induced increase in enzyme activity was associated with increased translatable phenylalanine ammonia-lyase mRNA activity in the polysomal fraction. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:16667296

  19. Comparison of grass and legume silages for milk production. 2. In vivo and in sacco evaluations of rumen function.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, R J; Evans, R T; Scollan, N D; Moorby, J M; Merry, R J; Wilkins, R J

    2003-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the basis for higher voluntary intakes and increased alpha-linolenic acid content in milk from cows offered clover silages. Six cows with rumen and duodenal cannulae were used in a four-period changeover-design experiment. Cows received 8 kg/d of dairy concentrate and had ad libitum access to one of six silage treatments: grass, red clover, white clover, alfalfa, and 50/50 (dry matter basis) mixtures of grass with red clover or white clover. The rumen fermentability of grass, red clover, white clover, and grass/red clover silages was also evaluated in a nylon bag study. Legume silages led to increased dry matter intake and milk production in comparison with grass silage. There was no significant effect of legume silages on rumen pH and volatile fatty acid concentrations, but a significant increase in rumen ammonia concentration with the legume silages, reflecting their higher protein content. The inclusion of white clover or alfalfa silage, but not red clover silage, in diets led to an increase in molar proportions of isobutyric, iso-valeric, and n-valeric acids in comparison with diets based on grass silage. Rumen fill was significantly lower, and rumen passage rates were significantly higher for cows offered alfalfa or white clover silages. However, the markedly different particle size distribution of rumen contents with these feeds suggests very different mechanisms for the high intake characteristics: high rates of particle breakdown and passage with alfalfa, and high rates of fermentation and passage with white clover. Microbial energetic efficiency (grams microbial N per kilogram organic matter apparently digested in the rumen) was highest for cows offered alfalfa silage, intermediate for clover silage, and lowest for cows offered grass silage. These differences reflect the higher rumen outflow rates for legume silages in comparison with grass silage. However, the effect of these differences on N-use efficiency

  20. Risks and benefits of compost-like materials prepared by the thermal treatment of raw scallop hepatopancreas for supplying cadmium and the growth of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Ushijima, Kensuke; Fukushima, Masami; Kanno, Shinya; Kanno, Itoko; Ohnishi, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Scallop hepatopancreas, fishery waste, contains relatively high levels of Cd and organic nitrogen compounds, the latter of which represent a fertilizer. In this study, raw scallop hepatopancreas tissue was thermally treated with sawdust and red loam in the presence of an iron catalyst to produce compost-like materials (CLMs). Two CLM samples were prepared by varying the content of raw scallop hepatopancreas tissue: 46 wt.% for CLM-1 and 18 wt.% for CLM-2. Mixtures of control soil (CTL) and CLMs (CLM content: 10 and 25 wt.%) were examined for the growth of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) to evaluate the risks and benefits of using this material for fertilization. The Cd content in shoots and roots of alfalfa, that were grown in the presence of CLMs, was significantly higher than those for the plants grown in the CTL, indicating that Cd had accumulated in the plants from CLMs. The accumulation of Cd in the alfalfa roots was quite high in the case of the 25% CLM-1 sample. However, alfalfa growth was significantly promoted in the presence of 10% CLM-1. This can be attributed to the higher levels of nitrogen and humic substances, which serve as fertilizer components. Although the fertilization effect in case of CLM-1showed a potential benefit, the accumulation of Cd in alfalfa was clearly increased in the presence of both CLMs. In conclusion, the use of CLMs produced from raw scallop hepatopancreas tissue can be considered to have a desirable benefit from standpoint of its use as fertilizer, but is accompanied by a risk of the accumulation of Cd in alfalfa plants.

  1. Removal of phenanthrene in contaminated soil by combination of alfalfa, white-rot fungus, and earthworms.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shuguang; Zeng, Defang

    2017-01-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of phenanthrene by combination of alfalfa, white-rot fungus, and earthworms in soil. A 60-day experiment was conducted. Inoculation with earthworms and/or white-rot fungus increased alfalfa biomass and phenanthrene accumulation in alfalfa. However, inoculations of alfalfa and white-rot fungus can significantly decrease the accumulation of phenanthrene in earthworms. The removal rates for phenanthrene in soil were 33, 48, 66, 74, 85, and 93% under treatments control, only earthworms, only alfalfa, earthworms + alfalfa, alfalfa + white-rot fungus, and alfalfa + earthworms + white-rot fungus, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the combination of alfalfa, earthworms, and white-rot fungus is an effective way to remove phenanthrene in the soil. The removal is mainly via stimulating both microbial development and soil enzyme activity.

  2. Cantharidin decreases in vitro digestion of alfalfa and smooth bromegrass.

    PubMed

    Lenssen, A W; Blodgett, S L; Higgins, R A; Nagaraja, T G; Posler, G L; Broce, A B

    1990-10-01

    Blister beetles (Coleoptera:Meloidae) containing the toxin cantharidin can be incorporated with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L) during forage conservation. Cantharidin inadvertently ingested with animal feed may cause illness or death. Little information is available on the effects of cantharidin on ruminant microbial digestion. The objective of our study was to determine cantharidin effects on digestibility of alfalfa and smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss) by measuring in vitro digestible dry matter (IVDDM) and cell wall digestion (CWD). Alfalfa dry matter digestibility, measured after IVDDM at 48 and 96 h fermentation periods, decreased as cantharidin concentration increased. Increasing cantharidin concentration also significantly reduced IVDDM of smooth bromegrass at 24 and 96 h digestion time. The CWD of alfalfa and smooth bromegrass decreased as cantharidin concentration increased. These results indicate that ingestion of cantharidin by ruminants may decrease microbial digestion of fibrous feeds and therefore may decrease the efficiency of feed utilization by ruminants.

  3. The alfalfa research program in USDA-ARS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa research is currently conducted by scientists employed by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in nine laboratories located in Minnesota (Saint Paul), Wisconsin (Madison, Prairie du Sac, Marshfield), Maryland (Beltsville), Utah (Logan), Washington (Prosser, Pullman), and Iowa (Ames)....

  4. AmeriFlux US-Tw3 Twitchell Alfalfa

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Tw3 Twitchell Alfalfa. Site Description - The Twitchell Alfalfa site is an alfalfa field owned by the state of California and leased to third parties for farming. The tower was installed on May 24, 2013. This site and the surrounding region are part of the San Joaquin - Sacramento River Delta drained beginning in the 1850's and subsequently used for agriculture. The field has been alfalfa for X years…., Crop rotation occurs every 5-6 years. The site is harvested by mowing and bailing several times per year. The field is fallow typically between November and February. The site is irrigated by periodically-flooded ditches surrounding the field. The site is irrigated by raising, and subsequently lowering the water table??

  5. Antimicrobial activity of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) extract on caprine hyper ammonia-producing bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the inefficiencies in rumen fermentation is the catabolism of feed amino acids and peptides by hyper-ammonia-producing bacteria (HAB). The HAB can be controlled through selective inhibition with antimicrobials. In vitro ammonia production by uncultivated goat rumen bacteria was inhibited by ...

  6. Suppression of downy brome by red clover as a cover crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weeds are one of the primary obstacles to successful organic farming. Organic producers till to control weeds, but soil health is being damaged by the extensive tillage. Therefore, organic producers are interested in reducing the amount of tillage in their production systems. This study examined t...

  7. Finishing meat goats on birdsfoot trefoil, chicory, or red clover pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of gastrointestinal (GI) parasites in goats is a major challenge for producers. Some forages may contain natural compounds that can help in GI parasite control. This experiment was conducted to evaluate forage production patterns, animal performance, and health when meat goat kids were fin...

  8. Five cycles of selection for 2,4-D resistance in red clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2,4-D and other auxin-like mode of action herbicides are used to control broadleaf weeds in pastures. Unfortunately such herbicides also kill beneficial forage legumes in pastures. Although transgene-conferred herbicide-resistance is utilized in some crops, it is unlikely that transgenic breeding ap...

  9. Does the white clover response to sulphur availability correspond to phenotypic or ontogenetic plasticity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varin, Sébastien; Leveel, Benjamen; Lemauviel-Lavenant, Servane; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard

    2009-05-01

    White clover ( Trifolium repens L.) is a key species in grasslands. Its performance in grassland communities is strongly linked to nitrogen (N) availability. A decrease in soil sulphur (S) content has appeared in the last few decades in grasslands in Northern Europe and this could change the behaviour of white clover. S is essential for plants and particularly for legumes through its effect upon nitrogen fixation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of S deficiency on white clover fitness, analysing its plasticity in a time course of growth. Three concentrations of SO 42-, "Low S" (0.009 mM), "Medium S" (0.384 mM) and "High S" (1.509 mM), were used to grow plants in a hydroponic system. S availability modified biomasses significantly only at the end of the experiment (11 weeks). Medium S appeared optimal while Low S induced a lower aboveground dry mass. An appropriate S availability (Medium S) not only increased S content but also increased N content by stimulating N 2 fixation. Plant growth analysis using growth fitted curves and the calculation of RGR revealed that S effects on biomass corresponded to the production of different phenotypes and not to a growth delay. This work shows that the acceleration growth phase (49-56 days) is a key period for the nutritional needs of white clover and should be the best period for a sulphur fertilisation regime that aims to enhance white clover fitness.

  10. Enhancement of clover growth by inoculation of P-solubilizing fungi and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Souchie, Edson L; Azcón, Rosario; Barea, Jose M; Silva, Eliane M R; Saggin-Júnior, Orivaldo J

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the synergism between several P-solubilizing fungi isolates and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to improve clover ( Trifolium pratense) growth in the presence of Araxá apatite. Clover was sown directly in plastic pots with 300g of sterilized washed sand, vermiculite and sepiolite 1:1:1 (v:v:v) as substrate, and grown in a controlled environment chamber. The substrate was fertilized with 3 g L(-1) of Araxá apatite. A completely randomized design, in 8×2 factorial scheme (eight P-solubilizing fungi treatments with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi)and four replicates were used. The P-solubilizing fungi treatments consisted of five Brazilian P-solubilizing fungi isolates (PSF 7, 9, 20, 21 and 22), two Spanish isolates ( Aspergillus niger and the yeast Yarowia lipolytica) and control (non-inoculated treatment). The greatest clover growth rate was recorded when Aspergillus niger and PSF 21 were co-inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Aspergillus niger, PSF 7 and PSF 21 were the most effective isolates on increasing clover growth in the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Greater mycorrhizal colonization resulted in greater clover growth rate in most PSF treatments. PSF 7 was the best isolate to improve the establishment of mycorrhizal and rhizobia symbiosis.

  11. Notice of release of Fanny Germplasm, Carmel Germplasm, and Bonneville Germplasm Searls' prairie clover: Selected class of natural germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three natural-track selected germplasms of Searls' prairie clover (Dalea searlsiae [A. Gray] Barneby [Fabaceae]) have been released for use in revegetation/restoration of semi-arid rangelands in the western US. Searls' prairie clover is a perennial leguminous forb that is native to Utah, Nevada, Ar...

  12. The Case Study: I'm Looking over a White-Striped Clover--A Case of Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krufka, Alison; Evarts, Susan; Wilson, Chester

    2007-01-01

    The case presented in this article is an exploration of the process of natural selection using white clover ("Trifolium repens") as an example. In general, two forms of white clover can be found around the world in various habitats. One type has plain green leaves and the other type produces cyanide as a defense against herbivores and…

  13. Genome sequence of the South American clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod isolated from a root nodule of the annual clover Trifolium pallidum L. growing at Glencoe Research Station near Tacuarembó, Uruguay. This strain is generally ineffective for nitrogen (N2) fixation with clovers of Mediterranean, North American and African origin, but is effective on the South American perennial clover T. polymorphum Poir. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,634,384 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 2 scaffolds of 53 contigs, contains 7,394 protein-coding genes and 87 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976883

  14. Genome sequence of the South American clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod isolated from a root nodule of the annual clover Trifolium pallidum L. growing at Glencoe Research Station near Tacuarembó, Uruguay. This strain is generally ineffective for nitrogen (N2) fixation with clovers of Mediterranean, North American and African origin, but is effective on the South American perennial clover T. polymorphum Poir. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,634,384 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 2 scaffolds of 53 contigs, contains 7,394 protein-coding genes and 87 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  15. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host.

  16. Impact of alfalfa on soil and water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, P.; Moncrief, J.; Gupta, S.

    1997-10-30

    Dominance of row crop agriculture in rolling landscapes of western and Southwestern Minnesota is identified as a primary, non-point source of sediments and associated pollutants reaching the Minnesota River. Currently as a biomass energy project, alfalfa is being promoted in western Minnesota to harvest the leaves for animal feed and stems to generate electricity. As a perennial, leguminous crop grown with minimum inputs, introduction of alfalfa in row cropped lands has potential to improve both in-situ soil productivity and downstream water quality. A field study was initiated in 1996 to compare the volume of runoff and pollutants coming from alfalfa an com-soybean fields in western Minnesota. Two pair of alfalfa and corn-soybean watersheds were instrumented at Morris in the Fall of 1996 to measure rainfall, runoff, and sample water for sediment load, phosphorus, nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. Simulated rainfall-runoff experiments were conducted on an existing crop rotation - input management study plots at Lamberton to evaluate soil quality effects of the inclusion of alfalfa in a corn-soybean rotation under manure and fertilization management schemes. Alfalfa soil water use as a function of frequency of harvest was also monitored at Morris to evaluate the effect of cutting schedule on soil water use. During the growing season of 1997, alfalfa under a two-cut management scheme used about 25-mm (an inch) more soil water than under a three-cut schedule. The mean differences between the treatments were not significant. The conclusions drawn in this report come from analysis of data collected during one winter-summer hydrologic and crop management cycle. Continued observations through a period of at least 3-5 years is recommended to improve the instrumentation robustness and discern the variability due to climate, soil, and crop management factors.

  17. Degree-day requirements for alfalfa weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) development in eastern Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Stilwell, A R; Wright, R J; Hunt, T E; Blankenship, E E

    2010-02-01

    The alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica (Gyllenhal), is a serious, yet sporadic defoliator of alfalfa, Medicago sativa L., in Nebraska. A 2-yr study was conducted in 2005 and 2006 to test for variation in degree-day requirements by location in eastern Nebraska. Sampling took place along a latitudinal gradient in three regions of eastern Nebraska. Three fields were sampled in each region during the 2 yr of the study. Alfalfa weevil larval degree-day requirements were found to vary by latitude in eastern Nebraska. Alfalfa weevil larvae were discovered in southern regions after fewer developmental degree-days had accumulated than in fields in the northern regions. Alfalfa weevils may be more damaging to alfalfa in southern regions than in northern regions of eastern Nebraska because they emerge earlier relative to alfalfa growth. Management implications of this shift in alfalfa weevil phenology are discussed.

  18. 75 FR 8299 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101 and J163 as regulated... determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines...

  19. 75 FR 1585 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated... Monsanto/Forage Genetics International (FGI) alfalfa events J101 and J163 were no longer...

  20. Pythium species causing damping-off of alfalfa in Minnesota: Identification, pathogenicity and fungicide sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Damping-off and seed rot is an important disease of alfalfa, severely affecting stand establishment when conditions favor the disease. Globally, 15 Pythium species are reported to cause damping-off and seed rot of alfalfa, although surveys of species causing disease on alfalfa in Minnesota are lacki...

  1. Enhancing pollination by attracting & retaining leaf cutting bees (Megachile rotundata) in alfalfa seed production fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata (F.), has become an important managed pollinator of alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. One problem when using alfalfa leafcutting bees as managed pollinator, is the dispersal of many females upon release, even when adequate nesting sites are present. While d...

  2. Genomic Analysis of Verticillium Wilt Resistance and Drought Tolerance in Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the fourth largest crop in the United States. Changing trends to multipurpose uses increases demand for alfalfa. However, the production of alfalfa is challenged by endemic and emerging diseases and adverse environmental factors. Identification of genes/loci controlli...

  3. Alfalfa production with subsurface drip irrigation in the Central Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigated alfalfa production is gaining interest because of the growing number of dairies in the semi-arid U.S. Central Great Plains and its longstanding superior profitability compared to other alternative crops grown in the region. Irrigation requirements for alfalfa are great because of alfalfa's...

  4. Do glyphosate resistant feral plants and hay fields spread the transgene to conventional alfalfa seed fields?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to meeting domestic needs, large amounts of alfalfa seed and hay produced in the US are being exported overseas. Because alfalfa is an insect pollinated crop, gene flow is a concern. Adding to this alfalfa readily naturalizes along roadsides, irrigation ditches, and unmanaged habitats; a...

  5. Pollen and seed mediated gene flow in commercial alfalfa seed production fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for gene flow has been widely recognized since alfalfa is pollinated by bees. The Western US is a major exporter of alfalfa seed and hay and the organic dairy industry is one of the fastest growing agricultural sectors. Because of this, many alfalfa producers are impacted by market sen...

  6. Transgene movement in commercial alfalfa seed production: Implications for seed purity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States is a major exporter of alfalfa seed and hay and the organic dairy industry is one of the fastest growing agricultural sectors. With the advent of genetically-engineered (GE) alfalfa concerns have risen regarding the coexistence of GE and non GE alfalfa since the crop is largely ou...

  7. Combining cropland data layers to identify alfalfa-annual crop rotation patterns and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) can provide many economic and environmental benefits to crop rotations. Our objectives were to quantify alfalfa stand lengths, identify the two crops following alfalfa, and determine the soil and temporal factors affecting them. The USDA-NASS cropland data layers for 200...

  8. Stand age affects fertilizer nitrogen response in first-year corn following alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of N that alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) provides to subsequent first-year corn (Zea mays L.) depends, in part, on the age of alfalfa at termination. Our objective was to determine how alfalfa stand age affects N availability and fertilizer N requirements for first-year corn. Fertilizer N w...

  9. Alfalfa nitrogen credit to first-year corn: potassium, regrowth, and tillage timing effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compared to corn (Zea mays L.) following corn, N guidelines for corn following alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in the U.S. Corn Belt suggest that N rates for first-year corn after alfalfa be reduced by about 168 kg N/ha when 43 to 53 alfalfa plants per square meter are present at termination; however, ...

  10. Soil N to corn after alfalfa through tillage and regrowth management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Planting corn after alfalfa can eliminate or greatly reduce the nitrogen (N) fertilizer requirement for first-year corn while increasing corn yield potential due to the rotation effect. Current University of Minnesota guidelines regarding alfalfa N credits to corn are based on alfalfa stand density ...

  11. Modeling feral alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) occurrence using topographical and environmental variables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because alfalfa is a perennial species cross pollinated by bees and can establish along roadsides and ruderal areas, there is concern that feral plants can serve as reservoirs and conduits for transgenic genes. The objective of this study was to survey feral alfalfa in alfalfa seed production areas ...

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes in alfalfa and wheat: toxicology and uptake.

    PubMed

    Miralles, Pola; Johnson, Errin; Church, Tamara L; Harris, Andrew T

    2012-12-07

    Data on the bioavailability and toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the environment, and, in particular, on their interactions with vascular plants, are limited. We investigated the effects of industrial-grade multiwalled CNTs (75 wt% CNTs) and their impurities on alfalfa and wheat. Phytotoxicity assays were performed during both seed germination and seedling growth. The germinations of both species were tolerant of up to 2560 mg l(-1) CNTs, and root elongation was enhanced in alfalfa and wheat seedlings exposed to CNTs. Remarkably, catalyst impurities also enhanced root elongation in alfalfa seedlings as well as wheat germination. Thus the impurities, not solely the CNTs, impacted the plants. CNT internalization by plants was investigated using electron microscopy and two-dimensional Raman mapping. The latter showed that CNTs were adsorbed onto the root surfaces of alfalfa and wheat without significant uptake or translocation. Electron microscopy investigations of internalization were inconclusive owing to poor contrast, so Fe(3)O(4)-functionalized CNTs were prepared and studied using energy-filter mapping of Fe(3)O(4). CNTs bearing Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were detected in the epidermis of one wheat root tip only, suggesting that internalization was possible but unusual. Thus, alfalfa and wheat tolerated high concentrations of industrial-grade multiwalled CNTs, which adsorbed onto their roots but were rarely taken up.

  13. Blackpatch of Clover, Cause of Slobbers Syndrome: A Review of the Disease and the Pathogen, Rhizoctonia leguminicola

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Isabelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia leguminicola Gough and Elliott is a widely used name for the causal agent of blackpatch disease of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). This fungal pathogen produces alkaloids (slaframine and swainsonine) that affect grazing mammals. Slaframine causes livestock to salivate profusely, and swainsonine causes neurological problems. Although the blackpatch fungus was classified as a Rhizoctonia species (phylum Basidiomycota), morphological studies have indicated that it is in the phylum Ascomycota, and sequencing data have indicated that it may be a new genus of ascomycete. The effects of the alkaloids on grazing mammals and their biosynthetic pathways have been extensively studied. In contrast, few studies have been done on management of the disease, which requires a greater understanding of the pathogen. Methods of disease management have included seed treatments and fungicides, but these have not been investigated since the 1950s. Searches for resistant cultivars have been limited. This review summarizes the biological effects and biosynthetic precursors of slaframine and swainsonine. Emphasis is placed on current knowledge about the epidemiology of blackpatch disease and the ecology and taxonomy of the pathogen. Possibilities for future research and disease management efforts are suggested. PMID:26858953

  14. Water Balance and Nitrate Leaching for Corn in Kura Clover Living Mulch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cropping systems with improved environmental performance are needed in the Midwestern United States. Corn (Zea mays L.) grown in kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bieb.) living mulch is a relatively new cropping system which may have potential to meet that need. Our objectives were to determine the...

  15. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of western prairie clover collections from the western USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few North American legumes are available for rangeland revegetation in the semi-arid western USA. Western prairie clover (Dalea ornata [Douglas] Eaton & Wright) is a perennial legume with desirable characteristics and is distributed in the Great Basin, Snake River Basin, and southern Columbia Plate...

  16. Corn performance under managed drought stress and in a kura clover living mulch intercropping system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A corn (Zea mays L.) and kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bieb.) intercropping system provides ecological services but competition for water between the grain crop and the living mulch crop leads to reduced corn yields. Our objectives in this study were to determine (i) if drought-tolerant corn ca...

  17. Soil erosion and nutrient runoff in corn silage with kura clover living mulch and winter rye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays L.) silage is a productive and popular forage crop that can exacerbate soil loss, surface water runoff, and nonpoint source nutrient pollution from agricultural fields. The objective of this research was to compare the effects of using kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bieb.) living ...

  18. Systemic colonization of clover (Trifolium repens) by Clostridium botulinum strain 2301.

    PubMed

    Zeiller, Matthias; Rothballer, Michael; Iwobi, Azuka N; Böhnel, Helge; Gessler, Frank; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cases of botulism in cattle and other farm animals and also in farmers increased dramatically. It was proposed, that these cases could be affiliated with the spreading of compost or other organic manures contaminated with Clostridium botulinum spores on farm land. Thus, soils and fodder plants and finally farm animals could be contaminated. Therefore, the colonization behavior and interaction of the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT D) producing C. botulinum strain 2301 and the non-toxin producing Clostridium sporogenes strain 1739 were investigated on clover (Trifolium repens) in a field experiment as well as in phytochamber experiments applying axenic and additionally soil based systems under controlled conditions. Plants were harvested and divided into root and shoot parts for further DNA isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays; subsamples were fixed for fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, we observed significant differences in the growth behavior of clover plants when inoculated with clostridial spores, indicating a plant growth promoting effect. Inoculated plants showed an increased growth index (shoot size, wet and dry weight) and an enlarged root system induced by the systemic colonization of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301. To target C. botulinum and C. sporogenes, 16S rDNA directed primers were used and to specifically detect C. botulinum, BoNT D toxin genes targeted primers, using a multiplex PCR approach, were applied. Our results demonstrate an effective colonization of roots and shoots of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301 and C. sporogenes strain 1739. Detailed analysis of colonization behavior showed that C. botulinum can occur as individual cells, in cell clusters and in microcolonies within the rhizosphere, lateral roots and within the roots tissue of clover.

  19. Nitrous oxide emissions from crop sequences of grass-clover and wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuß, Roland; Blank, Britta; Christen, Olaf; Munch, Jean Charles; Neuhoff, Daniel; Schmid, Harald; Freibauer, Annette

    2013-04-01

    Organic farming is based on the principle of farm internal nitrogen cycling. Soil N input is managed by fertilization with manure if there is animal stock at the farm. Stockless farms use so called Green Manure, i.e., leguminous crops integrated in a crop sequence of cash crops. A mix of grass and clover is commonly used for this. The crop is either harvested and residues incorporated or whole plants are mulched and incorporated. In order to estimate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from organic farming and derive management recommendations, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission data from cultivation of leguminous crops is needed. Currently there is a deficit of published data, in particular for Germany. Hence, N2O fluxes from grass-clover and subsequent wheat cultivation were studied over two years at four sites, which are distributed evenly over Germany. Treatments were (i) harvest of grass-clover and incorporation of residues in fall followed by cultivation of winter wheat, (ii) incorporation of residues in spring followed by summer wheat, (iii) mulching of grass-clover and incorporation in fall followed by winter wheat, (iv) conventional winter wheat with mineral fertilizer. Treatment effects on N2O emissions were marginal compared to site effects such as soil and climate. Overall, direct emissions from the organic treatments were remarkably similar to those from conventional winter wheat with best practice application of mineral fertilizer. Incorporation in spring resulted in higher emissions than incorporation in fall, but there was no consistent difference between incorporation of residues and mulching. Based on the present study regional emission factors for crop sequences of grass-clover and wheat in Germany can be derived.

  20. Systemic colonization of clover (Trifolium repens) by Clostridium botulinum strain 2301

    PubMed Central

    Zeiller, Matthias; Rothballer, Michael; Iwobi, Azuka N.; Böhnel, Helge; Gessler, Frank; Hartmann, Anton; Schmid, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cases of botulism in cattle and other farm animals and also in farmers increased dramatically. It was proposed, that these cases could be affiliated with the spreading of compost or other organic manures contaminated with Clostridium botulinum spores on farm land. Thus, soils and fodder plants and finally farm animals could be contaminated. Therefore, the colonization behavior and interaction of the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT D) producing C. botulinum strain 2301 and the non-toxin producing Clostridium sporogenes strain 1739 were investigated on clover (Trifolium repens) in a field experiment as well as in phytochamber experiments applying axenic and additionally soil based systems under controlled conditions. Plants were harvested and divided into root and shoot parts for further DNA isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays; subsamples were fixed for fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, we observed significant differences in the growth behavior of clover plants when inoculated with clostridial spores, indicating a plant growth promoting effect. Inoculated plants showed an increased growth index (shoot size, wet and dry weight) and an enlarged root system induced by the systemic colonization of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301. To target C. botulinum and C. sporogenes, 16S rDNA directed primers were used and to specifically detect C. botulinum, BoNT D toxin genes targeted primers, using a multiplex PCR approach, were applied. Our results demonstrate an effective colonization of roots and shoots of clover by C. botulinum strain 2301 and C. sporogenes strain 1739. Detailed analysis of colonization behavior showed that C. botulinum can occur as individual cells, in cell clusters and in microcolonies within the rhizosphere, lateral roots and within the roots tissue of clover. PMID:26583010

  1. The Use of Gene Modification and Advanced Molecular Structure Analyses towards Improving Alfalfa Forage

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yaogeng; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Alfalfa is one of the most important legume forage crops in the world. In spite of its agronomic and nutritive advantages, alfalfa has some limitations in the usage of pasture forage and hay supplement. High rapid degradation of protein in alfalfa poses a risk of rumen bloat to ruminants which could cause huge economic losses for farmers. Coupled with the relatively high lignin content, which impedes the degradation of carbohydrate in rumen, alfalfa has unbalanced and asynchronous degradation ratio of nitrogen to carbohydrate (N/CHO) in rumen. Genetic engineering approaches have been used to manipulate the expression of genes involved in important metabolic pathways for the purpose of improving the nutritive value, forage yield, and the ability to resist abiotic stress. Such gene modification could bring molecular structural changes in alfalfa that are detectable by advanced structural analytical techniques. These structural analyses have been employed in assessing alfalfa forage characteristics, allowing for rapid, convenient and cost-effective analysis of alfalfa forage quality. In this article, we review two major obstacles facing alfalfa utilization, namely poor protein utilization and relatively high lignin content, and highlight genetic studies that were performed to overcome these drawbacks, as well as to introduce other improvements to alfalfa quality. We also review the use of advanced molecular structural analysis in the assessment of alfalfa forage for its potential usage in quality selection in alfalfa breeding. PMID:28146083

  2. Occurrence of Transgenic Feral Alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) in Alfalfa Seed Production Areas in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Stephanie L.; Kesoju, Sandya R.; Martin, Ruth C.; Kramer, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The potential environmental risks of transgene exposure are not clear for alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa), a perennial crop that is cross-pollinated by insects. We gathered data on feral alfalfa in major alfalfa seed-production areas in the western United States to (1) evaluate evidence that feral transgenic plants spread transgenes and (2) determine environmental and agricultural production factors influencing the location of feral alfalfa, especially transgenic plants. Road verges in Fresno, California; Canyon, Idaho; and Walla Walla, Washington were surveyed in 2011 and 2012 for feral plants, and samples were tested for the CP4 EPSPS protein that conveys resistance to glyphosate. Of 4580 sites surveyed, feral plants were observed at 404 sites. Twenty-seven percent of these sites had transgenic plants. The frequency of sites having transgenic feral plants varied among our study areas. Transgenic plants were found in 32.7%, 21.4.7% and 8.3% of feral plant sites in Fresno, Canyon and Walla Walla, respectively. Spatial analysis suggested that feral populations started independently and tended to cluster in seed and hay production areas, places where seed tended to drop. Significant but low spatial auto correlation suggested that in some instances, plants colonized nearby locations. Neighboring feral plants were frequently within pollinator foraging range; however, further research is needed to confirm transgene flow. Locations of feral plant clusters were not well predicted by environmental and production variables. However, the likelihood of seed spillage during production and transport had predictive value in explaining the occurrence of transgenic feral populations. Our study confirms that genetically engineered alfalfa has dispersed into the environment, and suggests that minimizing seed spillage and eradicating feral alfalfa along road sides would be effective strategies to minimize transgene dispersal. PMID:26699337

  3. Occurrence of Transgenic Feral Alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) in Alfalfa Seed Production Areas in the United States.

    PubMed

    Greene, Stephanie L; Kesoju, Sandya R; Martin, Ruth C; Kramer, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The potential environmental risks of transgene exposure are not clear for alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa), a perennial crop that is cross-pollinated by insects. We gathered data on feral alfalfa in major alfalfa seed-production areas in the western United States to (1) evaluate evidence that feral transgenic plants spread transgenes and (2) determine environmental and agricultural production factors influencing the location of feral alfalfa, especially transgenic plants. Road verges in Fresno, California; Canyon, Idaho; and Walla Walla, Washington were surveyed in 2011 and 2012 for feral plants, and samples were tested for the CP4 EPSPS protein that conveys resistance to glyphosate. Of 4580 sites surveyed, feral plants were observed at 404 sites. Twenty-seven percent of these sites had transgenic plants. The frequency of sites having transgenic feral plants varied among our study areas. Transgenic plants were found in 32.7%, 21.4.7% and 8.3% of feral plant sites in Fresno, Canyon and Walla Walla, respectively. Spatial analysis suggested that feral populations started independently and tended to cluster in seed and hay production areas, places where seed tended to drop. Significant but low spatial auto correlation suggested that in some instances, plants colonized nearby locations. Neighboring feral plants were frequently within pollinator foraging range; however, further research is needed to confirm transgene flow. Locations of feral plant clusters were not well predicted by environmental and production variables. However, the likelihood of seed spillage during production and transport had predictive value in explaining the occurrence of transgenic feral populations. Our study confirms that genetically engineered alfalfa has dispersed into the environment, and suggests that minimizing seed spillage and eradicating feral alfalfa along road sides would be effective strategies to minimize transgene dispersal.

  4. Rapid analysis of hay attributes using NIRS. Final report, Task II alfalfa supply system

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-24

    This final report provides technical information on the development of a near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) system for the analysis of alfalfa hay. The purpose of the system is to provide consistent quality for processing alfalfa stems for fuel and alfalfa leaf meal products for livestock feed. Project tasks were to: (1) develop an NIRS driven analytical system for analysis of alfalfa hay and processed alfalfa products; (2) assist in hiring a qualified NIRS technician and recommend changes in testing equipment necessary to provide accurate analysis; (3) calibrate the NIRS instrument for accurate analyses; and (4) develop prototype equipment and sampling procedures as a first step towards development of a totally automated sampling system that would rapidly sample and record incoming feedstock and outbound product. An accurate hay testing program was developed, along with calibration equations for analyzing alfalfa hay and sun-cured alfalfa pellets. A preliminary leaf steam calibration protocol was also developed. 7 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Statistical analysis of ALFALFA galaxies: Insights in galaxy formation & near-field cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papastergis, Emmanouil

    2013-03-01

    Sky Survey (SDSS), to measure the number density of galaxies as a function of their "baryonic" mass (stars + atomic gas). In the context of a ΛCDM cosmological model, the measured distribution reveals that low-mass halos are heavily "baryon depleted", i.e. their baryonic-to-dark mass ratio is much lower than the cosmological value. These baryon deficits are usually attributed to stellar feedback (e.g. supernova-driven gas outflows), but the efficiency implied by our measurement is extremely high. Whether such efficient feedback can be accommodated in a consistent picture of galaxy formation is an open question, and remains one of the principle scientific drivers for hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation. Lastly, we measure the clustering properties of HI-selected samples, through the two-point correlation function of ALFALFA galaxies. We find no compelling evidence for a dependence of clustering on HI mass, suggesting that the relationship between galactic gas mass and host halo mass is not tight. We furthermore find that HI galaxies cluster more weakly than optically selected ones, when no color selection is applied. However, SDSS galaxies with blue colors have very similar clustering characteristics with ALFALFA galaxies, both in real as well as in redshift space. On the other hand, HI galaxies cluster much more weakly than optical galaxies with red colors, and in fact "avoid" being located within ≈3 Mpc from the latter. By considering the clustering properties of ΛCDM halos, we confirm our previous intuition for an MHI-Mh relation with large scatter, and find that spin parameter may be a key halo property related to the gas content of present-day galaxies.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Alfalfa latent virus

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jonathan; Postnikova, Olga A.

    2015-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of the Alfalfa latent carlavirus (ALV) was obtained by primer walking and Illumina RNA sequencing. The virus differs substantially from the Czech ALV isolate and the Pea streak virus isolate from Wisconsin. The absence of a clear nucleic acid-binding protein indicates ALV divergence from other carlaviruses. PMID:25883281

  7. Alfalfa response to irrigation from limited water supplies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A five-year field study (2007-2011) of irrigated alfalfa production with a limited water supply was conducted in southwest Kansas with two years of above-average precipitation, one year of average precipitation, and two years of below-average precipitation. The irrigation treatments were designed to...

  8. Validating potassium fertilizer guidelines in alfalfa-corn rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From 2008 to 2010, on-farm research was conducted on 10 fields with medium soil test K (STK) to validate Minnesota K fertilizer guidelines by determining the effect of K fertilizer applications on alfalfa yield and quality in its last production year and estimating the carryover of excess fertilizer...

  9. Paternity testing in an autotetraploid alfalfa breeding polycross

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining unknown parentage in autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) (2n = 4x = 32) can improve breeding gains. Exclusion analysis based paternity testing SAS code is presented, amenable to genotyping errors, for autotetraploid species utilizing co-dominant molecular markers with ambiguous d...

  10. The alfalfa yield gap: A review of the evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of feasibly attainable crop yields is needed for many purposes, from field-scale management to national policy decisions. For alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), the most widely used estimates of yield in the US are whole-farm reports from the National Agriculture Statistics Service, which are b...

  11. Lignin modification leads to increased nodule numbers in alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Bhattarai, Kishor; Pislariu, Catalina I; Nakashima, Jin; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Udvardi, Michael K; Monteros, Maria J; Dixon, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of lignin levels in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa) by down-regulation of the monolignol biosynthetic enzyme hydroxycinnamoyl coenzyme A:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) results in strongly increased digestibility and processing ability of lignocellulose. However, these modifications are often also associated with dwarfing and other changes in plant growth. Given the importance of nitrogen fixation for legume growth, we evaluated the impact of constitutively targeted lignin modification on the belowground organs (roots and nodules) of alfalfa plants. HCT down-regulated alfalfa plants exhibit a striking reduction in root growth accompanied by an unexpected increase in nodule numbers when grown in the greenhouse or in the field. This phenotype is associated with increased levels of gibberellins and certain flavonoid compounds in roots. Although HCT down-regulation reduced biomass yields in both the greenhouse and field experiments, the impact on the allocation of nitrogen to shoots or roots was minimal. It is unlikely, therefore, that the altered growth phenotype of reduced-lignin alfalfa is a direct result of changes in nodulation or nitrogen fixation efficiency. Furthermore, HCT down-regulation has no measurable effect on carbon allocation to roots in either greenhouse or 3-year field trials.

  12. Characterization of alfalfa populations contrasting for root system architecture (RSA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root system architecture affects the capacity for nutrient and water uptake thus impacting biomass yield production and may contribute to the persistence of perennial plants. The objectives of this study were to phenotype the roots of three alfalfa populations and identify differences between di...

  13. Impacts on potential ethanol and crude protein yield in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) biomass energy production system would produce two products. Leaves would be separated from stems to produce a high protein feed for livestock while stems would be processed to produce ethanol. Therefore, maximum yields of both leaves and stems are essential for profi...

  14. Impact of preceding crop on alfalfa competitiveness with weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers would like to include no-till practices in their farming systems. We are seeking to develop a continuous no-till system for organic farming, based on a complex rotation that includes a 3-year sequence of alfalfa. In this study, we evaluated impact of preceding crop on weed infest...

  15. Evaluation of alfalfa-tall fescue mixtures across multiple environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Binary grass-legume mixtures can benefit forage production systems in different ways helping growers cope both with increasing input costs (e.g., N fertilizer, herbicides) and potentially more variable weather. The main objective of this study was to evaluate alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and tall f...

  16. Improved predictability of fertilizer nitrogen need for corn following alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accounting for alfalfa nitrogen (N) credits to first-year corn reduces fertilizer N costs, over-application of N, and the risk of nitrate loss to ground water. It is equally important, however, to avoid inadequate N supply for corn. We analyzed nearly all previous research on fertilizer N response i...

  17. Effect of anionic salts in prepartum diets based on alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Joyce, P W; Sanchez, W K; Goff, J P

    1997-11-01

    This study compared prepartum diets based on grass, alfalfa, or alfalfa and anionic salts to investigate their effect on Ca metabolism, acid-base status, endocrine response, disease incidence, and lactational performance of periparturient dairy cows. Forty-five nonlactating Holstein cows in their last 3 wk of gestation were fed a control diet based on grass hay with a dietary cation-anion difference [expressed as milli-equivalents of ((Na + K) - (Cl + S))/100 g of dietary dry matter] of +30 or diets based on alfalfa with a dietary cation-anion difference of either +35 or -7. Cows fed the diet with the dietary cation-anion difference of -7 had the lowest urine pH prepartum and had the highest concentrations of ionized Ca in blood and total Ca in serum at parturition. Increases in 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D per unit decrease in total Ca in serum were greatest for cows fed the diet with a dietary cation-anion difference of -7. Also, cows fed this same diet consumed the most dry matter postpartum. Incidences of health disorders were 13% (10 of 75), 12% (9 of 75), and 5% (4 of 75) for cows fed the diets with dietary cation-anion differences of +30, +35, and -7, respectively. Results indicate that alfalfa, when supplemented with anionic salts, is a viable forage for prepartum dairy cows.

  18. Diversity of field isolates of sinorhizobium meliloti nodulating alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most alfalfa seed is treated with a rhizobial inoculant consisting of one or more strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti before planting to enhance nodulation of seedlings. However, little is known about the persistence of inoculated strains later in the season. There is also a paucity of information on ...

  19. Strategies for managing foliar and root rot diseases of alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseases can be a major source of yield loss and stand decline in alfalfa. Surveys were conducted to determine the distribution of pathogens for which there is limited resistance in commercial varieties and tests were done with new crop chemicals to determine their effectiveness in controlling sever...

  20. Soil particulate organic matter response to incorporation of alfalfa regrowth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations and the potential effects of climate change have driven a need to understand the potential of agricultural soils to store carbon (C). In Midwestern cropping systems, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has received attention from researchers because including it in crop r...

  1. Oxidative burst in alfalfa-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiotic interaction.

    PubMed

    Santos, R; Hérouart, D; Sigaud, S; Touati, D; Puppo, A

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are produced as an early event in plant defense response against avirulent pathogens. We show here that alfalfa responds to infection with Sinorhizobium meliloti by production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. This similarity in the early response to infection by pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria addresses the question of which mechanism rhizobia use to counteract the plant defense response.

  2. Accounting for alfalfa N credits increases returns to corn production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines are relatively consistent across the Upper Midwest regarding the N benefit of alfalfa to the following grain crops. With higher corn yields and prices, however, some growers have questioned these guidelines and whether more N fertilizer is needed for first-year corn following a good stand...

  3. Managing puncturevine in alfalfa hay and along field edges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puncturevine (Tribulus terrestris) is a nuisance and difficult to control weed in alfalfa hay field edges and borders. Puncturevine contaminated hay can contain high levels of nitrates and burs can injure mouths of livestock, lowering the value and quality of the hay. Puncturevine is a summer annual...

  4. On-Farm Validation of Alfalfa N Credits to Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rotating alfalfa with corn is useful for reducing soil erosion, enhancing soil tilth and carbon storage, reducing weed seedbanks, disrupting the life cycles of disease and insect pests of corn, and supplying nitrogen (N) to the subsequent corn crop. To adjust N fertilizer rates for corn following al...

  5. How reliable are N credits from alfalfa to corn?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first Century farmer and writer, Columella, wrote that alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) 'dungs the land,' and it is likely that most of the benefit he saw was derived from improved nitrogen (N) supply. Today, there is widespread skepticism among growers and farm advisors about how much fertilizer N ...

  6. Management of seedling damping-off of alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vigorous and productive alfalfa stand starts with strong and uniform seedling establishment. Seed rot and seedling damping-off are a significant cause of poor stand establishment in wet soils. A number of organisms cause seed rot and seedling damping-off including several species of Pythium. As a ...

  7. Thermoperiodism synchronizes emergence in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa seed production in the northwestern United States and western Canada is heavily dependent upon the pollinating services of M. rotundata (F.) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). Megachile rotundata females nest in cavities either naturally occurring or in artificial nesting blocks. Because of the ph...

  8. Quality Evaluation of Biscuits Supplemented with Alfalfa Seed Flour

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Fahim; Ahmad, Sajjad; Wahab, Said; Zeb, Alam; Khan Khattak, Mansoor; Khan, Saleem; Kang, Min

    2016-01-01

    The effect of alfalfa seed flour supplementation on the quality characteristics of refined wheat flour-based biscuits was studied. The proximate composition of refined wheat flour and alfalfa seed flour was determined. Refined wheat flour contained 12.43% moisture, 11.52% crude protein, 1.61% crude fat, 0.71% crude fiber, 1.43% ash and 70.83% nitrogen free extract, while alfalfa seed flour contained 5.79%, 29.49%, 12.71%, 5.53%, 4.80% and 41.73% moisture, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, ash and nitrogen free extract correspondingly. Alfalfa seed flour at 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% supplementation levels was incorporated in refined wheat flour to produce composite flour. The biscuits prepared were subjected to quality evaluation. Physical analysis of biscuits disclosed that supplementation of alfalfa seed flour decreased the width from 47.25 to 42 mm and the spread factor from 62.7 to 53.12, while it increased the thickness from 7.53 to 8.10 mm. Supplementation of refined wheat flour–based biscuits with alfalfa seed flour at different inclusion levels significantly (p < 0.05) increased the crude protein content from 10.19% to 15.30%, the crude fiber content from 0.73% to 1.62%, the crude fat content from 17.46% to 21.59% and the ash content from 1.37% to 1.92%, whereas it decreased the moisture content from 3.57% to 3.26% and the nitrogen free extract from 66.90% to 59.32%. The effect of supplementation on the mineral contents of biscuits was also significant (p < 0.05). Potassium, magnesium, calcium, iron and zinc contents increased from 105.30, 14.65, 43.91, 3.74 and 0.94 to 145.00, 26.64, 79.60, 7.93 and 1.60 mg/100 g, respectively. Sensory evaluation revealed that the quality score of biscuits in terms of color, taste, texture and overall acceptability decreased with increased supplementation. The present research work confirmed that a maximum of 10% alfalfa seed flour supplementation in refined wheat flour could produce acceptable biscuits with an

  9. Assessing disease stress and modeling yield losses in alfalfa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jie

    Alfalfa is the most important forage crop in the U.S. and worldwide. Fungal foliar diseases are believed to cause significant yield losses in alfalfa, yet, little quantitative information exists regarding the amount of crop loss. Different fungicides and application frequencies were used as tools to generate a range of foliar disease intensities in Ames and Nashua, IA. Visual disease assessments (disease incidence, disease severity, and percentage defoliation) were obtained weekly for each alfalfa growth cycle (two to three growing cycles per season). Remote sensing assessments were performed using a hand-held, multispectral radiometer to measure the amount and quality of sunlight reflected from alfalfa canopies. Factors such as incident radiation, sun angle, sensor height, and leaf wetness were all found to significantly affect the percentage reflectance of sunlight reflected from alfalfa canopies. The precision of visual and remote sensing assessment methods was quantified. Precision was defined as the intra-rater repeatability and inter-rater reliability of assessment methods. F-tests, slopes, intercepts, and coefficients of determination (R2) were used to compare assessment methods for precision. Results showed that among the three visual disease assessment methods (disease incidence, disease severity, and percentage defoliation), percentage defoliation had the highest intra-rater repeatability and inter-rater reliability. Remote sensing assessment method had better precision than the percentage defoliation assessment method based upon higher intra-rater repeatability and inter-rater reliability. Significant linear relationships between canopy reflectance (810 nm), percentage defoliation and yield were detected using linear regression and percentage reflectance (810 nm) assessments were found to have a stronger relationship with yield than percentage defoliation assessments. There were also significant linear relationships between percentage defoliation, dry

  10. An integrated genetic linkage map for white clover (Trifolium repens L.) with alignment to Medicago

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a temperate forage legume with an allotetraploid genome (2n=4×=32) estimated at 1093 Mb. Several linkage maps of various sizes, marker sources and completeness are available, however, no integrated map and marker set has explored consistency of linkage analysis among unrelated mapping populations. Such integrative analysis requires tools for homoeologue matching among populations. Development of these tools provides for a consistent framework map of the white clover genome, and facilitates in silico alignment with the model forage legume, Medicago truncatula. Results This is the first report of integration of independent linkage maps in white clover, and adds to the literature on methyl filtered GeneThresher®-derived microsatellite (simple sequence repeat; SSR) markers for linkage mapping. Gene-targeted SSR markers were discovered in a GeneThresher® (TrGT) methyl-filtered database of 364,539 sequences, which yielded 15,647 SSR arrays. Primers were designed for 4,038 arrays and of these, 465 TrGT-SSR markers were used for parental consensus genetic linkage analysis in an F1 mapping population (MP2). This was merged with an EST-SSR consensus genetic map of an independent population (MP1), using markers to match homoeologues and develop a multi-population integrated map of the white clover genome. This integrated map (IM) includes 1109 loci based on 804 SSRs over 1274 cM, covering 97% of the genome at a moderate density of one locus per 1.2 cM. Eighteen candidate genes and one morphological marker were also placed on the IM. Despite being derived from disparate populations and marker sources, the component maps and the derived IM had consistent representations of the white clover genome for marker order and genetic length. In silico analysis at an E-value threshold of 1e-20 revealed substantial co-linearity with the Medicago truncatula genome, and indicates a translocation between T. repens groups 2 and 6 relative to

  11. GAS, STARS, AND STAR FORMATION IN ALFALFA DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G. E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jarle@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: susan.g.neff@nasa.gov

    2012-06-15

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and H I components of 229 low H I mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H I masses <10{sup 7.7} M{sub Sun} and H I line widths <80 km s{sup -1}. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M{sub *} obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper H I mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M{sub *} than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H I depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that H I disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  12. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses <10(sup 7.7) solar mass and Hi line widths <80 kilometers per second. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  13. Transcriptome Analyses Reveal Candidate Genes Potentially Involved in Al Stress Response in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenxian; Xiong, Conghui; Yan, Longfeng; Zhang, Zhengshe; Ma, Lichao; Wang, Yanrong; Liu, Yajie; Liu, Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Alfalfa is the most extensively cultivated forage legume, yet most alfalfa cultivars are not aluminum tolerant, and the molecular mechanisms underlying alfalfa responses to Al stress are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to understand how alfalfa responds to Al stress by identifying and analyzing Al-stress-responsive genes in alfalfa roots at the whole-genome scale. The transcriptome changes in alfalfa roots under Al stress for 4, 8, or 24 h were analyzed using Illumina high-throughput sequencing platforms. A total of 2464 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, and most were up-regulated at early (4 h) and/or late (24 h) Al exposure time points rather than at the middle exposure time point (8 h). Metabolic pathway enrichment analysis demonstrated that the DEGs involved in ribosome, protein biosynthesis, and process, the citrate cycle, membrane transport, and hormonal regulation were preferentially enriched and regulated. Biosynthesis inhibition and signal transduction downstream of auxin- and ethylene-mediated signals occur during alfalfa responses to root growth inhibition. The internal Al detoxification mechanisms play important roles in alfalfa roots under Al stress. These findings provide valuable information for identifying and characterizing important components in the Al signaling network in alfalfa and enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying alfalfa responses to Al stress. PMID:28217130

  14. A conceptual design of shock-eliminating clover combustor for large scale scramjet engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Zhao, Yu-xin; Zhao, Guo-yan; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    A new concept of shock-eliminating clover combustor is proposed for large scale scramjet engine to fulfill the requirements of fuel penetration, total pressure recovery and cooling. To generate the circular-to-clover transition shape of the combustor, the streamline tracing technique is used based on an axisymmetric expansion parent flowfield calculated using the method of characteristics. The combustor is examined using inviscid and viscous numerical simulations and a pure circular shape is calculated for comparison. The results showed that the combustor avoids the shock wave generation and produces low total pressure losses in a wide range of flight condition with various Mach number. The flameholding device for this combustor is briefly discussed.

  15. Genome sequence of the clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Melino, Vanessa; Terpolilli, Jason; Ardley, Julie; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ronald; O'Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that is an effective nitrogen fixing microsymbiont on the perennial clovers originating from Europe and the Mediterranean basin. TA1 however is ineffective with many annual and perennial clovers originating from Africa and America. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,618,824 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in a 6 scaffold of 32 contigs, contains 8,493 protein-coding genes and 83 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  16. Genome sequence of the clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Melino, Vanessa; Terpolilli, Jason; Ardley, Julie; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that is an effective nitrogen fixing microsymbiont on the perennial clovers originating from Europe and the Mediterranean basin. TA1 however is ineffective with many annual and perennial clovers originating from Africa and America. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,618,824 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in a 6 scaffold of 32 contigs, contains 8,493 protein-coding genes and 83 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976881

  17. An Exploratory Study of BK from NF = 2 Dynamical Clover-Improved Wilson Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J. M.; Mescia, F.; Tariq, A. S. B.

    2005-04-01

    We report calculations of BK using two flavours of dynamical clover-improved Wilson lattice fermions and look for dependence on the dynamical quark mass at fixed lattice spacing. We see some evidence for dynamical quark effects. In particular BK decreases as the sea quark masses are reduced towards the up/down quark mass. Our meson masses are quite heavy and a firm prediction of the BK value is a task for future simulations.

  18. Tradeoff between Biomass and Flavonoid Accumulation in White Clover Reflects Contrasting Plant Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Rainer W.; Jahufer, M. Z. Zulfiqhar

    2011-01-01

    An outdoor study was conducted to examine relationships between plant productivity and stress-protective phenolic plant metabolites. Twenty-two populations of the pasture legume white clover were grown for 4½ months during spring and summer in Palmerston North, New Zealand. The major phenolic compounds identified and quantified by HPLC analysis were glycosides of the flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol. Multivariate analysis revealed a trade-off between flavonoid accumulation and plant productivity attributes. White clover populations with high biomass production, large leaves and thick tap roots showed low levels of quercetin glycoside accumulation and low quercetin:kaempferol ratios, while the opposite was true for less productive populations. The latter included stress-resistant ecotypes from Turkey and China, and the analysis also identified highly significant positive relationships of quercetin glycoside accumulation with plant morphology (root:shoot ratio). Importantly, a high degree of genetic variation was detected for most of the measured traits. These findings suggest merit for considering flavonoids such as quercetin as potential selection criteria in the genetic improvement of white clover and other crops. PMID:21526153

  19. Effects of stress ethylene inhibitors on sweet clover (Melilotus Alba L.) seedling growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, Gregory L.; Peterson, Barbara V.; Brown, Christopher S.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Previous experiments from our lab have shown that seeds of sweet clover, when germinated and grown within the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA) on a slow rotating clinostat produce significantly greater levels of the volatile stress hormone, ethylene, when compared to seeds treated the same but without clinorotation. In both conditions, carbon dioxide levels reached high levels and seedling growth was inhibited. However, clinorotation inhibited growth to a greater extent. To help determine to what extent microgravity influences stress ethylene production and to what extent ethylene inhibits seedling growth, we have extended the above experiments by growing sweet clover in the presence of aminooxyacetic acid (AOA) and silver nitrate (AgNO3), inhibitors of stress ethylene biosynthesis and action, respectively. Seeds of sweet clover were germinated and grown for five days in the FPA under two gravity conditions: under stationary conditions on Earth and in microgravity onboard the space shuttle, Discovery (STS-63), which launched Feb. 3, 1995. Upon recovery, gas samples were aspirated from the growth chambers and carbon dioxide and ethylene concentrations were measured using a gas chromatograph. Then the tissue was weighed, photographed and fixed, and is current undergoing further morphological and microscopic characterization.

  20. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral injection; Conjunctival injection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies. Others are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Many are nothing to worry about. Eye ...

  1. Identification of Alfalfa Leaf Diseases Using Image Recognition Technology

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng; Liu, Dongxia; Sun, Bingda; Ruan, Liu; Ma, Zhanhong; Wang, Haiguang

    2016-01-01

    Common leaf spot (caused by Pseudopeziza medicaginis), rust (caused by Uromyces striatus), Leptosphaerulina leaf spot (caused by Leptosphaerulina briosiana) and Cercospora leaf spot (caused by Cercospora medicaginis) are the four common types of alfalfa leaf diseases. Timely and accurate diagnoses of these diseases are critical for disease management, alfalfa quality control and the healthy development of the alfalfa industry. In this study, the identification and diagnosis of the four types of alfalfa leaf diseases were investigated using pattern recognition algorithms based on image-processing technology. A sub-image with one or multiple typical lesions was obtained by artificial cutting from each acquired digital disease image. Then the sub-images were segmented using twelve lesion segmentation methods integrated with clustering algorithms (including K_means clustering, fuzzy C-means clustering and K_median clustering) and supervised classification algorithms (including logistic regression analysis, Naive Bayes algorithm, classification and regression tree, and linear discriminant analysis). After a comprehensive comparison, the segmentation method integrating the K_median clustering algorithm and linear discriminant analysis was chosen to obtain lesion images. After the lesion segmentation using this method, a total of 129 texture, color and shape features were extracted from the lesion images. Based on the features selected using three methods (ReliefF, 1R and correlation-based feature selection), disease recognition models were built using three supervised learning methods, including the random forest, support vector machine (SVM) and K-nearest neighbor methods. A comparison of the recognition results of the models was conducted. The results showed that when the ReliefF method was used for feature selection, the SVM model built with the most important 45 features (selected from a total of 129 features) was the optimal model. For this SVM model, the

  2. Revisiting the Economic Injury Level and Economic Threshold Model for Potato Leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in Alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Chasen, Elissa M; Undersander, Dan J; Cullen, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    The economic injury level for potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris), in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was developed over 30 yr ago. In response to increasing market value of alfalfa, farmers and consultants are interested in reducing the economic threshold for potato leafhopper in alfalfa. To address this question, caged field trials were established on two consecutive potato leafhopper susceptible crops in 2013. Field cages were infested with a range of potato leafhopper densities to create a linear regression of alfalfa yield response. The slopes, or yield loss per insect, for the linear regressions of both trials were used to calculate an economic injury level for a range of current alfalfa market values and control costs. This yield-loss relationship is the first quantification that could be used to help assess whether the economic threshold should be lowered, given the increased market value of alfalfa.

  3. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of ... 2000 - The Red Sea between the East Africa coast and Saudi Arabian peninsula. project:  MISR category:  ...

  4. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Permit Application by United States Steel Corp., Proposed Lake Front Steel Mill, Conneaut, Ohio. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    blackberries and dewnFFTis (Rubus spp.), sheep sorrFe(fumex acetosella), goldenroas (Solidago spp. , and various grasses ( Danthonia ii cata, Panicum spp...used for pasture. Major pasture and hay plants here are alfalfa, Ladino, clover, red clover, timothy, birdsfoot trefoil, orchard grass , and...cattails, marsh grasses , and other water-tolerant plants predominate. (2-214) Conneaut Creek, upstream from the proposed project site runs through hardwood

  5. Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Austin-Phillips, Sandra; Koegel, Richard G.; Straub, Richard J.; Cook, Mark

    1999-01-01

    A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

  6. Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Austin-Phillips, Sandra; Koegel, Richard G.; Straub, Richard J.; Cook, Mark

    2001-01-01

    A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

  7. Proteomics Analysis of Alfalfa Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wei, Zhenwu; Qiao, Zhihong; Wu, Zinian; Cheng, Lixiang; Wang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin) seedlings were exposed to 25°C (control) and 40°C (heat stress) in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa. PMID:24324825

  8. Star Formation in Undergraduate ALFALFA Team Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Haynes, Martha P.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Troischt, Parker; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) Groups project is a coordinated study of gas and star formation properties of galaxies in and around 36 nearby (z<0.03) groups and clusters of varied richness, morphological type mix, and X-ray luminosity. By studying a large range of environments and considering the spatial distributions of star formation, we probe mechanisms of gas depletion and morphological transformation. The project uses ALFALFA HI observations, optical observations, and digital databases like SDSS, and incorporates work undertaken by faculty and students at different institutions within the UAT. Here we present results from our wide area Hα and broadband R imaging project carried out with the WIYN 0.9m+MOSAIC/HDI at KPNO, including an analysis of radial star formation rates and extents of galaxies in the NGC 5846, Abell 779, NRGb331, and HCG 69 groups/clusters. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  9. Developing PYTHON Codes for the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troischt, Parker; Ryan, Nicholas; Alfalfa Team

    2016-03-01

    We describe here progress toward developing a number of new PYTHON routines to be used by members of the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team. The codes are designed to analyze HI spectra and assist in identifying and categorizing some of the intriguing sources found in the initial blind ALFALFA survey. Numerical integration is performed on extragalactic sources using 21cm line spectra produced with the L-Band Wide receiver at the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center. Prior to the integration, polynomial fits are employed to obtain an appropriate baseline for each source. The codes developed here are part of a larger team effort to use new PYTHON routines in order to replace, upgrade, or supplement a wealth of existing IDL codes within the collaboration. This work has been supported by NSF Grant AST-1211005.

  10. Imazamox Absorption, Translocation and Metabolism in Red Lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.) and Dry Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imazamox is an imidazolinone herbicide used to control many grasses and broadleaf weeds in leguminous crops such as soybeans, alfalfa and dry beans; however, imazamox cannot be used on red lentils because of unacceptable injury. Studies were conducted to compare imazamox absorption, translocation a...

  11. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  12. Distribution of Hydrogen-Metabolizing Bacteria in Alfalfa Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Scott D.; Kapulnik, Yoram; Phillips, Donald A.

    1986-01-01

    H2 evolved by alfalfa root nodules during the process of N2 fixation may be an important factor influencing the distribution of soil bacteria. To test this hypothesis under field conditions, over 700 bacterial isolates were obtained from fallow soil or from the 3-mm layer of soil surrounding alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) root nodules, alfalfa roots, or bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L.) roots. Bacteria were isolated under either aerobic or microaerophilic conditions and were tested for their capacity to metabolize H2. Isolates showing net H2 uptake and 3H2 incorporation activity under laboratory conditions were assigned a Hup+ phenotype, whereas organisms with significant H2 output capacity were designated as a Hout+ phenotype. Under aerobic isolation conditions two Hup+ isolates were obtained, whereas under microaerophilic conditions five Hup+ and two Hout+ isolates were found. The nine isolates differed on the basis of 24 standard bacteriological characteristics or fatty acid composition. Five of the nine organisms were isolated from soil around root nodules, whereas the other four were found distributed among the other three soil environments. On the basis of the microaerophilic isolations, 4.8% of the total procaryotic isolates from soil around root nodules were capable of oxidizing H2, and 1.2% could produce H2. Two of the Hup+ isolates were identified as Rhizobium meliloti by root nodulation tests, but the fact that none of the isolates reduced C2H2 under the assay conditions suggested that the H2 metabolism traits were associated with various hydrogenase systems rather than with nitrogenase activity. Results from this study support the concept that H2 evolution by alfalfa root nodules has a significant effect on the surrounding microenvironment and influences the number and diversity of bacteria occupying that region. PMID:16347207

  13. Inoculant effects on alfalfa silage: fermentation products and nutritive value.

    PubMed

    Filya, I; Muck, R E; Contreras-Govea, F E

    2007-11-01

    The effect of 14 microbial inoculants on the fermentation and nutritive value of alfalfa silages was studied under laboratory conditions. The first cut (477 g of dry matter/kg) and second cut (393 g of dry matter/kg) of a second-year alfalfa stand were ensiled in 2 trials. In both trials alfalfa was harvested with standard field equipment. All inoculants were applied at 1.0 x 10(6) cfu/g of crop. Uninoculated silages served as controls. After inoculants were added, the chopped forages were ensiled in 1.0- and 0.5-L anaerobic glass jars, respectively, at a density of 500 g/L. Each trial had 15 treatments (uninoculated control and 14 inoculants), with 4 silos per treatment. Silos were stored for a minimum of 30 d at room temperature (approximately 22 degrees C). In first-cut silage, all inoculants but one reduced pH relative to the uninoculated control, and all but 2 of the homofermentative strains shifted fermentation toward lactic acid. In second-cut silage, the epiphytic lactic acid bacterial population was 2.7 x 10(7) cfu/g, and only commercial inoculants produced significant shifts in fermentation. Overall, microbial inoculants generally had a positive effect on alfalfa silage characteristics in terms of lower pH and shifting fermentation toward lactic acid with homofermentative lactic acid bacteria or toward acetic acid with heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus buchneri. These effects were stronger in the commercial products tested. In spite of the positive effects on silage fermentation, 48-h in vitro true DM digestibility was not improved by inoculation with lactic acid bacteria.

  14. Alfalfa Leaf Curl Virus: an Aphid-Transmitted Geminivirus.

    PubMed

    Roumagnac, Philippe; Granier, Martine; Bernardo, Pauline; Deshoux, Maëlle; Ferdinand, Romain; Galzi, Serge; Fernandez, Emmanuel; Julian, Charlotte; Abt, Isabelle; Filloux, Denis; Mesléard, François; Varsani, Arvind; Blanc, Stéphane; Martin, Darren P; Peterschmitt, Michel

    2015-09-01

    The family Geminiviridae comprises seven genera differentiated by genome organization, sequence similarity, and insect vector. Capulavirus, an eighth genus, has been proposed to accommodate two newly discovered highly divergent geminiviruses that presently have no known vector. Alfalfa leaf curl virus, identified here as a third capulavirus, is shown to be transmitted by Aphis craccivora. This is the first report of an aphid-transmitted geminivirus.

  15. Alfalfa Leaf Curl Virus: an Aphid-Transmitted Geminivirus

    PubMed Central

    Roumagnac, Philippe; Granier, Martine; Bernardo, Pauline; Deshoux, Maëlle; Ferdinand, Romain; Galzi, Serge; Fernandez, Emmanuel; Julian, Charlotte; Abt, Isabelle; Filloux, Denis; Mesléard, François; Varsani, Arvind; Blanc, Stéphane; Martin, Darren P.

    2015-01-01

    The family Geminiviridae comprises seven genera differentiated by genome organization, sequence similarity, and insect vector. Capulavirus, an eighth genus, has been proposed to accommodate two newly discovered highly divergent geminiviruses that presently have no known vector. Alfalfa leaf curl virus, identified here as a third capulavirus, is shown to be transmitted by Aphis craccivora. This is the first report of an aphid-transmitted geminivirus. PMID:26109720

  16. Evaluation of two supplements for the prevention of alfalfa bloat.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J W; Walker, I; Majak, W

    1994-01-01

    Poloxalene and a mineral mixture feed supplement patented for the treatment of emphysema, polyarthritis, and other pectin related diseases were tested in two trials for their ability to prevent bloat in cattle fed fresh alfalfa. Each trial had a crossover design using three Jersey steers with rumen fistulas per group. Each trial period continued until the total number of cases of bloat reached > or = 24. Treatments were given at 0800 each day. The mineral mixture was given at 100 g/d and 190 mg/kg body weight per day in the first and second trials, respectively. Poloxalene, which was tested only in the second trial, was given at 23 mg/kg body weight per day. Each group of steers was then fed 200 kg of freshly harvested alfalfa in the vegetative to early bloom stages of growth at 0830. In the first trial, only 69% as many cases of bloat occurred on the mineral mixture as on the control treatment, but no significant difference was detected in the second trial. The potency of the alfalfa may have been higher in the second trial, when forage dry matter was lower, magnesium and soluble nitrogen were higher, and bloat occasionally occurred twice a day. Bloat did not occur when the steers were treated with poloxalene. In these trials, poloxalene was completely effective in preventing bloat, but the mineral mixture was only partially so. PMID:7866960

  17. Host density drives spatial variation in parasitism of the alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica, across dryland and irrigated alfalfa cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Rand, Tatyana A

    2013-02-01

    Classical biological control against the alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica (Gyllenhal), a destructive pest of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), has resulted in the establishment of nine parasitoid species in the United States. Despite widespread redistribution of a number of species, there remains little postrelease data on their establishment and potential effectiveness in many regions. I surveyed parasitoids associated with alfalfa weevil larvae across 30 or more sites in eastern Montana and western North Dakota over 2 yr. Replicate sites were sampled in two habitat types that differ in their physical characteristics, flood-irrigated and dryland alfalfa fields. Irrigated systems are more productive but also more intensively disturbed habitats because of increased harvest frequency and repeated flooding. Given evidence that both habitat disturbance and herbivore density, which often increases with productivity, can influence parasitoid dynamics, I predicted that parasitism levels, the relative importance of different species, or both, would differ across these two system types. Of four larval parasitoid species released previously or recovered in the region, two were found in this study, Bathyplectes curculionis (Thomson) and Oomyzus incertus (Ratzenberg), with average levels of parasitism across habitat types and years of 37.2 and 3.5%, respectively. Parasitism levels differed between habitat types, but the effect was driven by concomitant differences in host densities that were higher in irrigated than dryland fields. Parasitoid responses to host density varied across years and species. B. curculionis exhibited positive density dependence in parasitism across sites in 2009 and negative density dependence in 2010 when host densities were higher regionally. In contrast, O. incertus exhibited positive density dependence in 2010. Our results suggest that these species may be differentially effective at different host densities. Thus, variation in host density could

  18. Identifying OH Imposters in the ALFALFA HI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Katherine; Darling, Jeremiah K.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    OH megamasers (OHMs) are rare, luminous molecular masers that are typically observed in (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies and serve as markers of major galaxy mergers. In blind emission line surveys such as the ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-Band Feed Array) survey for neutral hydrogen (HI) in the local universe, OHMs at z~0.2 can mimic z~0.05 HI lines. We present the results of optical spectroscopy of ambiguous HI detections in the ALFALFA 40% data release [1] detected by WISE but with uncertain optical counterparts. The optical redshifts, obtained from observations at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m telescope, identified 127 HI optical counterparts and discovered five new OHMs. Fifty-six candidates remain ambiguous. The new OHMs are the first detected in a blind spectral line survey.The number of OHMs in ALFALFA matches predictions based on the OH luminosity function [2]. Additionally, the OHMs found in a blind survey do not seem to differ from those found in previous targeted surveys. This provides validation of the methods used in previous IR-selected OHM surveys and indicates there is no previously unknown OHM-producing population at z~0.2. We also provide a method for future surveys to separate OH and HI lines without expensive spectral observations. This method utilizes infrared colors and magnitudes, such as WISE mid-IR data. Since the fraction of OHMs found in flux-limited HI surveys is expected to increase with the redshift of the survey [3], this analysis can be applied to future flux-limited high-redshift hydrogen surveys.We thank the ALFALFA team for observing and producing the survey dataset. The ALFALFA team at Cornell is supported by NSF AST-1107390 and the Brinson Foundation.[1] Haynes, M. P., R. Giovanelli, A. M. Martin, K. M. Hess, A. Saintonge, et al. 2011, Astron J, 142, 142[2] Darling, J. & R. Giovanelli 2002, Astrophys J, 572, 810[3] Briggs, F. H. 1998, A&A, 336, 815

  19. Effects of alfalfa meal on the intestinal microbial diversity and immunity of growing ducks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J F; Song, X M; Wu, J L; Jiang, Y Q

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of alfalfa meal diets on the intestinal microbial diversity and immunity of growing egg-type ducks. A total of 128 healthy 7-week-old female egg-type Shaoxing ducks were selected and randomly assigned into four dietary treatments: 0%, 3%, 6% and 9% alfalfa meal for 8 weeks. Each treatment consisted of four replicates of eight ducks each. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to characterize the microbiota. The results showed that the DGGE fingerprints of the V6-V8 fragments of the 16S rRNA from the caeca and faeces of ducks fed 3%, 6% and 9% alfalfa meal had significantly higher microbiota species richness than those fed 0% alfalfa meal (p < 0.05). The Shannon-Weiner index of the microbiota from the caeca and faeces of ducks fed 3%, 6% and 9% alfalfa meal was significantly higher than those fed 0% alfalfa meal (p < 0.05). Molecular analysis of the caecal and faecal DNA extracts showed that the alfalfa meal diet promotes the intestinal microbial diversity, as indicated by their higher species richness and Shannon-Weiner index. However, the groups did not significantly differ in terms of average daily gain, feed intake and gain-to-feed ratio (p > 0.05), and the 3-9% alfalfa meal did not affect the growth performance of the growing egg-type ducks. The proliferation of T and B lymphocytes was significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the groups supplemented with 3%, 6% and 9% of alfalfa meal than the unsupplemented control group, and alfalfa meal promoted the lymphocytes proliferation of the growing egg-type ducks. Dietary alfalfa meal supplementation increases intestinal microbial community diversity and improves of the immune response growing egg-type ducks.

  20. Variation in alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, reproductive success according to location of nests in U.S. commercial domiciles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata F., is used extensively to pollinate alfalfa for seed production in western North America. However, it usually is not possible to sustain bee populations in the United States. Variable microenvironments are experienced by developing alfalfa leafcutt...

  1. Identification of molecular markers associated with verticillium wilt resistance in alfalfa (medicago sativa l.) using high-resolution melting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt (VW), caused by the soilborne fungus, Verticillium alfalfae, is one of the most serious diseases of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) worldwide. To identify loci associated with resistance to VW, an association study was conducted using autotetraploid alfalfa populations composed of 352...

  2. Greenhouse gas fluxes induced by tillage and fertilisation in an organic grass-clover-wheat sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Maike; Ruser, Reiner; Hansen, Sissel; Mäder, Paul; Gattinger, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Reduced tillage is technically a challenging task in organic arable farming due to the weed competition but also concerning the destruction of grass-clover leys. Regarding its climate impact, there are hardly any data existing. Soil-derived greenhouse gas fluxes were therefore monitored in a long-term field trial in Frick/CH. The trial is arranged in a strip-split-plot design on a heavy clay soil and compares since 2002 conventional tillage (up to 15 cm deep mouldboard ploughing) with reduced tillage (skim plough 5 cm deep and occasional chisel ploughing). In addition, cattle slurry only (SL) is compared with a slurry/manure compost treatment (MC) at a rate of 90 kg N/year. MC plots received one manure compost and two slurry batches, the latter applied with SL the same day but with half the amount. The overall management is in compliance with the EU organic farming regulation. Nitrous oxide and methane fluxes were monitored in a two-year period including a grass-clover ley, its destruction and a subsequent winter wheat crop. We adjusted the closed chamber sampling method developed by Flessa et al. (1995) with eight replicates for each treatment. Gas and soil sampling took place weekly with additional measurements after fertiliser and tillage management. Soil samples were analysed for mineralised nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon and water filled pore space. Flux calculation included linear and non-linear regression calculated with the HMR-Model after Pedersen et al. (2010) and Fuss et al. (unpublished). N2O fluxes calculated with the non-linear model were 10% higher than calculated with the linear model only. First results for the grass-clover period show no significant differences in N2O fluxes neither between reduced tillage and ploughing nor between slurry and manure compost/slurry application. However, ley destruction induced high N2O emissions which will be discussed with the subsequent wheat period.

  3. Salinity-mediated cyanogenesis in white clover (Trifolium repens) affects trophic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ballhorn, Daniel J.; Elias, Jacob D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Increasing soil salinity poses a major plant stress in agro-ecosystems worldwide. Surprisingly little is known about the quantitative effect of elevated salinity on secondary metabolism in many agricultural crops. Such salt-mediated changes in defence-associated compounds may significantly alter the quality of food and forage plants as well as their resistance against pests. In the present study, the effects of soil salinity on cyanogenesis in white clover (Trifolium repens), a forage crop of international importance, are analysed. Methods Experimental clonal plants were exposed to five levels of soil salinity, and cyanogenic potential (HCNp, total amount of accumulated cyanide in a given plant tissue), β-glucosidase activity, soluble protein concentration and biomass production were quantified. The attractiveness of plant material grown under the different salt treatments was tested using cafeteria-style feeding trials with a generalist (grey garden slug, Deroceras reticulatum) and a specialist (clover leaf weevil, Hypera punctata) herbivore. Key Results Salt treatment resulted in an upregulation of HCNp, whereas β-glucosidase activity and soluble protein concentration showed no significant variation among treatments. Leaf area consumption of both herbivore species was negatively correlated with HCNp, indicating bottom-up effects of salinity-mediated changes in HCNp on plant consumers. Conclusions The results suggest that soil salinity leads to an upregulation of cyanogenesis in white clover, which results in enhanced resistance against two different natural herbivores. The potential implications for such salinity-mediated changes in plant defence for livestock grazing remain to be tested. PMID:25006176

  4. Is white clover able to switch to atmospheric sulphur sources when sulphate availability decreases?

    PubMed

    Varin, Sébastien; Lemauviel-Lavenant, Servane; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard

    2013-05-01

    Sulphur (S) is one of the very few nutrients that plants can absorb either through roots as sulphate or via leaves in a gas form such as SO2 or H2S. This study was realized in a non-S-enriched atmosphere and its purpose was to test whether clover plants can increase their ability to use atmospheric S when sulphate availability decreases. A novel methodology measuring the dilution of (34)S provided from a nutrient solution by atmospheric (32)S was developed to measure S acquisition by Trifolium repens L. Clones of white clover were grown for 140 d in a hydroponic system with three levels of sulphate concentrations. S concentration in plants decreased with S deficiency and plant age. In the experimental conditions used here, S derived from atmospheric deposition (Sdad) constituted from 36% to 100% of the total S. The allocation of S coming from atmospheric and pedospheric sources depends on organs and compounds. Nodules appeared as major sinks for sulphate. A greater proportion of atmospheric S was observed in buffer-soluble proteins than in the insoluble S fraction. Decreasing the S concentration in the nutrient solution resulted in an increase in the Sdad:leaf area ratio and in an increase in the leaf:stolon and root:shoot mass ratios, suggesting that a plasticity in the partitioning of resources to organs may allow a higher gain of S by both roots and leaves. This study shows that clover can increase its ability to use atmospheric S even at low concentration when pedospheric S availability decreases.

  5. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops (Castagnone-Sereno et al. 2013) and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields...

  6. Alfalfa interseeded into silage corn can serve as a cover crop and subsequent forage crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and corn (Zea mays) silage are commonly grown in rotation in dairy forage production systems throughout the northern regions of the USA. Alfalfa interseeded into silage corn could potentially serve two purposes: as a cover crop during the silage corn production year, and as...

  7. Mycoleptodiscus Crown and Root Rot of Alfalfa: An Emerging Problem in Minnesota and Wisconsin?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoleptodiscus crown and root rot was observed on alfalfa plants from southeastern MN and southwestern WI during the summer of 2009. The disease was observed in new plantings and established stands. Although the disease has been known since the 1950's, it has not caused severe problems in alfalfa p...

  8. Storage characteristics of large round and square alfalfa bales: low-moisture wrapped bales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substantial dry matter (DM) and quality losses have been reported for partially dried alfalfa that has been rained on before moisture reduction to levels acceptable for dry hay storage. The objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of preserving alfalfa baled at less than 45% mois...

  9. Extraction, composition, and functional properties of dried alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) leaf protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa, traditionally used for animal feed, has attracted attention as a potential feedstock for biofuels and the viability of the process would be enhanced by co-products with value-added uses. This study describes extraction of protein from dried alfalfa leaves and the functional properties of th...

  10. Effects of dairy slurry on the nutritive value and fermentation characteristics of alfalfa silages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy producers frequently ask questions about the risks associated with applying dairy slurry onto growing alfalfa. Our objectives were to determine the effects of dairy-slurry application on the subsequent nutritive value and fermentation characteristics of alfalfa silages. Dairy slurry was applie...

  11. Effects of dairy slurry on silage fermentation characteristics and nutritive value of alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy producers frequently ask questions about the risks associated with applying dairy slurry to growing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Our objectives were to determine the effects of applying dairy slurry on the subsequent nutritive value and fermentation characteristics of alfalfa balage. Dairy sl...

  12. Ensuring coexistence of GE and non-GE alfalfa: status of current research efforts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa routinely places among the top five crops in the nation in terms of both farmgate value and total acreage. In 2011 USDA APHIS announced the complete deregulation of glyphosate-resistant alfalfa in 2011. Since then grower demand for RRA seed has surged. Recognizing the need to support all fac...

  13. Wisconsin and Minnesota - a preliminary update on 2013 evaluation of Headline fungidice use on alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa producers need information on methods to increase yields while minimizing expenses. For three years, experiments to determine the effect of Headline fungicide on alfalfa diseases, yield, and forage quality were conducted in Wisconsin and Minnesota. Experiments were done both in commercial p...

  14. Alfalfa transgene dispersal and adventitious presence: understanding grower perception of risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recognizing the importance of coexistence, the alfalfa industry has developed a set of Best Management Practices (BMP) to maintain separation of GE and conventional production. But the success of BMP depends upon the degree that growers comply. Therefore we surveyed 530 alfalfa hay and seed producer...

  15. A mineral seed coating for control of seedling diseases of alfalfa suitable for organic production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most alfalfa seed is treated with the systemic fungicide mefenoxam (Apron XL) for control of soilborne seedling diseases. However, Apron XL does not have activity against Aphanomyces euteiches, the causal agent of Aphanomyces root rot (ARR), which is an important component of the alfalfa root rot co...

  16. Interaction of bale size and preservative rate for large-round bales of alfalfa hay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, two studies conducted at the US Dairy Forage Research Center have reported inconsistent storage responses following the application of propionic-acid-based preservatives to alfalfa or alfalfa-orchardgrass hays. One of these studies utilized 5-foot-diameter round bales, and produced disappo...

  17. Seasonal and Maturity Effects on Forage Quality of Alfalfa and Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relationships among maturity, yield, and quality have been widely documented in alfalfa and temperate grasses. Studies conducted at multiple locations determined the rate of change for different harvest periods and for different grass species. Alfalfa was harvested in the spring, early summer, lat...

  18. Fungicide Tests on Adult Alfalfa Leafcutting Bees Megachile rotundata (F.) (Hymenoptera:Megachilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chalkbrood is a fungal disease of bee larvae caused by Ascosphaera aggregata. It causes significant mortality in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata), a bee that is used extensively for alfalfa seed pollination in the U.S. Using laboratory bioassays, we previously demonstrated that fung...

  19. First report of race 2 of Colletotrichum trifolii causing anthracnose on alfalfa (Medicago sativa) in Wisconsin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthracnose of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), caused by Colletotrichum trifolii, is widespread in the United States. Three physiological races have been described. Race 1 is reported to be the dominant race that is present wherever alfalfa is grown, while race 2 was reported in a limited area in the Mid...

  20. Roadside alfalfa: Innocent bystanders or conveyers of genetically-engineered traits?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clumps of alfalfa are a common sight along roads and vacant lots in areas that grow alfalfa for hay or seed. So what role do feral roadside plants play in dispersing transgenes? Is there a risk that transgenic feral plants serve as reservoirs or conduits that might facilitate the movement of transg...

  1. Economics of growth regulator treatment of alfalfa seed for interseeding into silage corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have focused on interseeding of alfalfa into corn for use as a temporary cover crop rather than as a means of jump-starting alfalfa production after corn. In ongoing field studies, we are evaluating whether plant growth regulators (PGR) may be used to aid the establishment of inters...

  2. Field-specific N recommendations for second-year corn after alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is terminated, N from soil organic matter and decomposing alfalfa shoots, crowns, and roots becomes available for at least two years of subsequent corn (Zea mays L.) crops. Current state recommendations reflect the fact that fertilizer N requirements of second-year ...

  3. A system for identification of candidate genes controlling cell wall synthesis in alfalfa stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Usefulness of alfalfa for livestock feeding and production of lignocellulose-derived ethanol would be improved by genetic alteration of stem cell wall concentration and composition. This could be accomplished through selective breeding and transgenic technologies. However, development of alfalfa cel...

  4. Selfing rate in an alfalfa seed production field pollinated with leafcutter bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Self-pollination or “selfing” in autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) (2n = 4x = 32) leads to severe inbreeding depression. Investigating selfing in alfalfa seed production may allow mitigation strategy development against potential negative impacts of selfing on varietal performance. Using m...

  5. Mapping fall dormancy and winter injury in tetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa is a widely planted perennial forage crop. Dormancy in autumn (fall dormancy) is generally negatively correlated with winter injury in alfalfa. To understand the genetic basis of the two traits, we identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling autumn growth and winter injury using a...

  6. Prohexadione-calcium improves stand density and yield of alfalfa interseeded into silage corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interseeded alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) could serve as a dual-purpose crop to provide groundcover for silage corn (Zea mays L.) and forage during subsequent years of production, but interspecific competition often leads to poor stands of alfalfa and unsatisfactory yields of corn. Four experiments e...

  7. Mechanisms of qualitative and quantitative resistance to Aphanomyces root rot in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aphanomyces root rot (ARR), caused by Aphanomyces euteiches, is one of the most important diseases of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) in the United States. Two races of the pathogen are currently recognized. Most modern alfalfa cultivars have high levels of resistance to race 1 but few cultivars have resi...

  8. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed. The strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling, and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with su...

  9. Negative ion mass spectrometry and the detection of carbonyls and HCN from clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas G.; Kato, Shuji; Fall, Ray; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2000-12-01

    We have demonstrated that negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) can be used to distinguish several isomeric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted from wounded plants. Reaction chemistry with HO-, hydrogen/deuterium exchange patterns, and collision-induced dissociation spectra allow identification of the isomers. Laboratory studies of emissions from wounded clover using NI-CIMS show several previously detected VOCs, but also clearly demonstrate the emission of HCN. This compound is presumably formed by the decomposition of cyanogenic glycosides which also form aldehyde and ketone byproducts. These results suggest that NI-CIMS may be a valuable tool for investigating VOCs and HCN release from vegetation.

  10. Developing the Late Quaternary Record of Pluvial Lake Clover, Northern Great Basin, U.S.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, B. J.; Munroe, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Clover was one of numerous closed-basin pluvial lakes that formed in the northern Great Basin during the Pleistocene. The geomorphic record of the lake includes continuous shoreline ridges and spits at altitudes of as much as 25 m above the modern playa surface. The history of Lake Clover is poorly known compared to those of the larger lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, but can provide a useful framework for understanding regional-scale environmental changes during the latest Pleistocene. Shoreline ridges of Lake Clover are preserved at altitudes of ca. 1729, 1725, 1719, and 1715 m asl, which correspond to intervals when the lake attained a surface area of 788, 726, 618, and 524 km2, respectively. Although the chronology of highstands at these altitudes is still being developed (through radiocarbon and luminescence-dating methods), the morphology and orientations of prominent shoreline features provide clues to regional air-circulation patterns during highstands. The highest shoreline is represented by a gravel ridge that can be traced nearly continuously around the perimeter of the lake basin. The ridge is uniformly developed along shorelines of differing aspect, suggesting that the wind field during the ice-free season was not dominated by a single direction. Along the eastern and western shores of the basin, the lower shorelines are manifested by a similar gravel ridge. However, in other sectors of the basin, features associated with progressively lower shorelines reveal an increasing dominance of northward longshore drift. The most dramatic features correspond with the 1719 m shoreline and include 1) a pronounced V-shaped, northward projecting spit at the southern end of the basin, 2) a 3-km long spit projecting to the north-northwest along the northeastern shoreline, and 3) a tombolo connecting a former island to the northern shore. Together these features suggest that dominant wind directions became more southerly during the ice-free season when the lake

  11. Comparison of homoeolocus organisation in paired BAC clones from white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and microcolinearity with model legume species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is an outbreeding allotetraploid species and an important forage legume in temperate grassland agriculture. Comparison of sub-genome architecture and study of nucleotide sequence diversity within allopolyploids provides insight into evolutionary divergence mechanisms, and is also necessary for the development of whole-genome sequencing strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the degree of divergence between the O and P' sub-genomes of white clover through sequencing of BAC clones containing paired homoeoloci. The microsyntenic relationships between the genomes of white clover and the model legumes Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula as well as Arabidopsis thaliana were also characterised. Results A total of four paired homoeologous BACs were selected and sequenced to generate 173 kb of overlapping sequence between the O and P' sub-genomes. Equivalent gene content was generally observed, apart from small-scale deletions, in contrast to conservation of intergenic sequences, which varied between the four selected regions. Measurement of the number of synonymous substitutions between homoeologous genes led to estimation of a 4.2 million year divergence time between the two sub-genomes. Microsynteny was observed between the genomes of white clover and L. japonicus for all four targeted regions, but corresponding M. truncatula genomic regions were only identified for two BAC pairs. Conclusions This study describes the first analysis of sub-genome structural conservation across selected genomic regions in white clover. Although the high levels of sequence conservation between the O and P' sub-genomes would complicate efforts for whole genome sequence assembly, the conserved microsynteny with model legume genomes, especially that of L. japonicus, will be highly valuable for the future of white clover genomics and molecular breeding. PMID:20492736

  12. Sustainable bioethanol production combining biorefinery principles using combined raw materials from wheat undersown with clover-grass.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Haugaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2008-05-01

    To obtain the best possible net energy balance of the bioethanol production the biomass raw materials used need to be produced with limited use of non-renewable fossil fuels. Intercropping strategies are known to maximize growth and productivity by including more than one species in the crop stand, very often with legumes as one of the components. In the present study clover-grass is undersown in a traditional wheat crop. Thereby, it is possible to increase input of symbiotic fixation of atmospheric nitrogen into the cropping systems and reduce the need for fertilizer applications. Furthermore, when using such wheat and clover-grass mixtures as raw material, addition of urea and other fermentation nutrients produced from fossil fuels can be reduced in the whole ethanol manufacturing chain. Using second generation ethanol technology mixtures of relative proportions of wheat straw and clover-grass (15:85, 50:50, and 85:15) were pretreated by wet oxidation. The results showed that supplementing wheat straw with clover-grass had a positive effect on the ethanol yield in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation experiments, and the effect was more pronounced in inhibitory substrates. The highest ethanol yield (80% of theoretical) was obtained in the experiment with high fraction (85%) of clover-grass. In order to improve the sugar recovery of clover-grass, it should be separated into a green juice (containing free sugars, fructan, amino acids, vitamins and soluble minerals) for direct fermentation and a fibre pulp for pretreatment together with wheat straw. Based on the obtained results a decentralized biorefinery concept for production of biofuel is suggested emphasizing sustainability, localness, and recycling principles.

  13. A hybrid next generation transcript sequencing-based approach to identify allelic and homeolog-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in allotetraploid white clover

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is an allotetraploid species possessing two highly collinear ancestral sub-genomes. The apparent existence of highly similar homeolog copies for the majority of genes in white clover is problematic for the development of genome-based resources in the species. This is especially true for the development of genetic markers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), since it is difficult to distinguish between homeolog-specific and allelic variants. Robust methods for categorising single nucleotide variants as allelic or homeolog-specific in large transcript datasets are required. We illustrate one potential approach in this study. Results We used 454-pyrosequencing sequencing to generate ~760,000 transcript sequences from an 8th generation white clover inbred line. These were assembled and partially annotated to yield a reference transcript set comprising 71,545 sequences. We subsequently performed Illumina sequencing on three further white clover samples, generating 14 million transcript reads from a mixed sample comprising 24 divergent white clover genotypes, and 50 million reads on two further eighth generation white clover inbred lines. Mapping these reads to the reference transcript set allowed us to develop a significant SNP resource for white clover, and to partition the SNPs from the inbred lines into categories reflecting allelic or homeolog-specific variation. The potential for using haplotype reconstruction and progenitor genome comparison to assign haplotypes to specific ancestral sub-genomes of white clover is demonstrated for sequences corresponding to genes encoding dehydration responsive element binding protein and acyl-coA oxidase. Conclusions In total, 208,854 independent SNPs in 31,715 reference sequences were discovered, approximately three quarters of which were categorised as representing allelic or homeolog-specific variation using two inbred lines. This represents a significant resource for

  14. Effects of alfalfa meal on growth performance and gastrointestinal tract development of growing ducks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J F; Song, X M; Huang, X; Zhou, W D; Wu, J L; Zhu, Z G; Zheng, H C; Jiang, Y Q

    2012-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate effects of alfalfa meal on growth performance and gastrointestinal tract development of growing layer ducks to provide evidence for application of alfalfa meal in the duck industry. Two hundred and fifty-six healthy Shaoxing 7-wk old growing layer ducks were selected and randomly allocated to 1 of 4 dietary treatments based on corn and soybean meal and containing 0, 3, 6, and 9% of alfalfa meal for 8 wks. Each treatment consisted of 4 replicates of 16 ducks each. Briefly, birds were raised in separate compartments, and each compartment consisted of three parts: indoor floor house, adjacent open area and a connecting water area. The results showed: i) Growing ducks fed alfalfa meal diet were not significantly different in average daily gain, feed intake and gain-to-feed ratio from those fed no alfalfa diet (p>0.05). ii) Alfalfa meal increased the ratio crop, gizzard to live weight, caecum to live weight, the caecum index of growing ducks (p<0.05). iii) Villus height in duodenum and jejunum of growing ducks increased significantly with the increase of alfalfa meal levels (p<0.05). Crypt depth in duodenum and jejunum of growing ducks decreased significantly with the increase of alfalfa meal levels (p<0.05). This experiment showed that feeding of alfalfa meal to growing layer ducks could improve gastrointestinal tract growth and small intestinal morphology without effect on performance. This experiment provides evidence that alfalfa meal is a very valuable feedstuff for growing layer ducks.

  15. Selenium and sulfur relationships in alfalfa and soil under field conditions, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between total Se and S or soluble SeO4 and SO4 in soils and tissue concentrations in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), under field conditions in the San Joaquin Valley of California, suggest that the rate of accumulation of Se in alfalfa may be reduced in areas where high Se and S concentrations in soils were measured. These data suggest that the balance between carbonate and sulfate minerals in soil may have a greater influence on uptake of Se by alfalfa than does the balance of SeO4 and SO4 in soil solution. Soil and alfalfa were sampled from areas representing a wide range in soil Se and S concentrations. Specific sampling locations were selected based on a previous study of Se, S, and other elements where 721 soil samples were collected to map landscape variability and distribution of elements. Six multiple-linear regression equations were developed between total and/or soluble soil chemical constituents and tissue concentrations of Se in alfalfa. We chose a regression model that accounted for 72% of the variability in alfalfa Se concentrations based on an association of elements in soil (total C, S, Se, and Sr) determined by factor analysis. To prepare a map showing the spatial distribution of estimated alfalfa Se concentrations, the model was applied to the data from the previously collected 721 soil samples. Estimated alfalfa Se concentrations in most of the study area were within a range that is predicted to produce alfalfa with neither Se deficiency nor toxicity when consumed by livestock. A few small areas are predicted to produce alfalfa that potentially would not meet minimum dietary needs of livestock.

  16. Efficacy of various naturally occurring caffeic acid derivatives in preventing post-harvest protein losses in forages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In red clover, oxidation of endogenous o-diphenols by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) inhibits post-harvest proteolyis. This system is transferable to alfalfa by providing PPO (via a transgene) and o-diphenol PPO substrates (via exogenous application). To exploit the PPO system for protein protection, it w...

  17. In-situ Ruminal Protein, Fiber, and Dry Matter Degradability of Legume Silages and Hays as Influenced by Protein-binding Polyphenols and Conditioning Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conditioning and conservation methods may alter polyphenol binding in forage legumes and the degradability of crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and dry matter (DM) in the rumen. In this study, alfalfa, birdsfoot trefoil with 6 or 15 g/kg condensed tannins (CT), and red clover with ~1...

  18. Use of legume manures as nitrogen sources for corn production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent volatility in supplies and prices of natural gas and synthetic N fertilizer suggests a need to develop and refine alternative strategies for supplying N to corn. In this study, conducted in northeastern Iowa, we examined the use of red clover and alfalfa green manures as means of supplying N ...

  19. [Population dynamics of ground carabid beetles and spiders in a wheat field along the wheat-alfalfa interface and their response to alfalfa mowing].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Hui; Hu, Yi-Jun; Hu, Wen-Chao; Hong, Bo; Guan, Xiao-Qing; Ma, Shi-Yu; He, Da-Han

    2014-09-01

    Taking the wheat-alfalfa and wheat-wheat interfaces as model systems, sampling points were set by the method of pitfall trapping in the wheat field at the distances of 3 m, 6 m, 9 m, 12 m, 15 m, 18 m, 21 m, 24 m, and 27 m from the interface. The species composition and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders captured in pitfalls were investigated. The results showed that, to some extent there was an edge effect on species diversity and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders along the two interfaces. A marked edge effect was observed between 15 m and 18 m along the alfalfa-wheat interface, while no edge effect was found at a distance over 20 m. The edge effect along the wheat-wheat interface was weaker in comparison to the alfalfa-wheat interface. Alfalfa mowing resulted in the migration of a large number of ground carabid beetles and spiders to the adjacent wheat filed. During ten days since mowing, both species and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders increased in wheat filed within the distance of 20 m along the alfalfa-wheat interface. The spatial distribution of species diversity of ground beetles and spiders, together with the population abundance of the dominant Chlaenius pallipes and Pardosa astrigera, were depicted, which could directly indicate the migrating process of natural enemy from alfalfa to wheat field.

  20. Identifying OH Imposters in the ALFALFA Neutral Hydrogen Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Katherine A.; Darling, Jeremy; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2016-06-01

    OH megamasers (OHMs) are rare, luminous molecular masers that are typically observed in (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies and serve as markers of major galaxy mergers. In blind emission line surveys such as the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFALFA) survey for neutral hydrogen (H I), OHMs at z ˜ 0.2 can mimic z ˜ 0.05 H I lines. We present the results of optical spectroscopy of ambiguous H I detections in the ALFALFA 40 per cent data release detected by the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) but with uncertain optical counterparts. The optical redshifts, obtained from observations at the Apache Point Observatory, revealed five new OHMs and identified 129 H I optical counterparts. 60 candidates remain ambiguous. The new OHMs are the first detected in a blind spectral line survey. The number of OHMs in ALFALFA is consistent with predictions from the OH luminosity function. Additionally, the mid-infrared magnitudes and colours of the OHM host galaxies found in a blind survey do not seem to differ from those found in previous targeted surveys. This validates the methods used in previous IR-selected OHM surveys and indicates there is no previously unknown OHM-producing population at z ˜ 0.2. We also provide a method for future surveys to separate OH megamasers from 99 per cent of H I line emitters without optical spectroscopy by using WISE infrared colours and magnitudes. Since the fraction of OHMs found in flux-limited H I surveys is expected to increase with the survey's redshift, this selection method can be applied to future flux-limited high-redshift hydrogen surveys.

  1. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  2. The influence of phosphorus deficiency on growth and nitrogen fixation of white clover plants.

    PubMed

    Høgh-Jensen, Henning; Schjoerring, JanK; Soussana, Jean-Francois

    2002-12-01

    The effects of P deficiency on growth, N(2)-fixation and photosynthesis in white clover (Trifolium repens L.) plants were investigated using three contrasting relative addition rates of P, or following abrupt withdrawal of the P supply. Responses to a constant below-optimum P supply rate consisted of a decline in N(2)-fixation per unit root weight and a small reduction in the efficiency with which electrons were allocated to the reduction of N(2) in nodules. Abrupt removal of P arrested nodule growth and caused a substantial decline in nitrogenase activity per unit root weight, but not per unit nodule mass. Similarly, the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf area was unaffected by abrupt P removal, whereas CO(2) acquisition for the plant as a whole decreased due to a decline in total leaf area, leaf area per unit leaf weight and utilization of incoming radiation. These changes followed the decline in tissue P concentrations. The ratio between CO(2)-fixation and N(2)-fixation was maintained under short-term P deprivation but increased under long-term low P supply, indicating a regulatory inhibition of nodule activity following morphological and growth adjustments. It is concluded that N(2)-fixation did not limit the growth of clover plants experiencing P deficiency. A low P status induced changes in the relative growth of roots, nodules and shoots rather than changes in N and/or C uptake rates per unit mass or area of these organs.

  3. Cross-Section Measurements via the Activation Technique at the Cologne Clover Counting Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Felix; Mayer, Jan; Netterdon, Lars; Scholz, Philipp; Zilges, Andreas

    The activation technique is a widely used method for the determination of cross-section values for charged-particle induced reactions at astrophysically relevant energies. Since network calculations of nucleosynthesis processes often depend on reaction rates calculated in the scope of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model, these cross-sections can be used to improve the nuclear-physics input-parameters like optical-model potentials (OMP), γ-ray strength functions, and nuclear level densities. In order to extend the available experimental database, the 108Cd(α, n)111Sn reaction cross section was investigated at ten energies between 10.2 and 13.5 MeV. As this reaction at these energies is almost only sensitive on the α-decay width, the results were compared to statistical model calculations using different models for the α-OMP. The irradiation as well as the consecutive γ-ray counting were performed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of the University of Cologne using the 10 MV FN-Tandem accelerator and the Cologne Clover Counting Setup. This setup consists of two clover- type high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in a close face-to-face geometry to cover a solid angle of almost 4π.

  4. Effect of microgravity on stress ethylene and carbon dioxide production in sweet clover (Melilotus alba L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, Gregory L.; Odom, William R.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The study of higher plant growth and development in the microgravity (micro-g) environment continues to be a challenge. This is in part a result of the available flight qualified hardware with restrictive closed gas environments. This point is underscored by considering that gas exchange of seedlings grown in microgravity may be further limited owing to a thicker layer of water wicked onto the roots and to the absence of convective mixing. We hypothesized that seedlings grown under such conditions will experience greater hypoxia in microgravity than at Earth gravity, and thus produce greater stress ethylene. We compared flight and ground samples of sweet clover seedlings grown in the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA) during STS-57 and found them to contain extremely high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and stress ethylene. There were time dependent increases for both gases, and seedling growth was greatly inhibited. We repeated these experiments aboard STS-60 using modified chambers which increased, by fifty fold, the air available to the developing seedlings. Sweet clover seed germination and subsequent seedling growth to eight days within the FPA modified with a gas permeable membrane is not compromised by the microgravity environment.

  5. Red Hill

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), an enforceable agreement of the Hawaii Department of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Navy -- Defense Logistics Agency.

  6. The Impact of Kura Clover Living Mulch on Nitrous Oxide Emissions in a Corn/Soybean System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone depleting substance. Produced primarily in agricultural soils, efforts to reduce N2O emissions are underway, but mitigation results thus far have been inconsistent. The leguminous perennial kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bie...

  7. Soil erosion and nutrient runoff in corn silage production with kura clover living mulch and winter rye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn (Zea mays L.) harvested for silage is a productive forage crop, but one that can exacerbate soil loss, surface water runoff, and nonpoint source nutrient pollution from agricultural fields. The objective of this research was to compare the effects of using Kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum M. Bie...

  8. Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizae on Biomass Production and Nitrogen Fixation of Berseem Clover Plants Subjected to Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Sergio; Amato, Gaetano; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore; Giambalvo, Dario; Ruisi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several studies, performed mainly in pots, have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of water stress on plant growth. No information is available about the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on berseem clover growth and nitrogen (N) fixation under conditions of water shortage. A field experiment was conducted in a hilly area of inner Sicily, Italy, to determine whether symbiosis with AM fungi can mitigate the detrimental effects of drought stress (which in the Mediterranean often occurs during the late period of the growing season) on forage yield and symbiotic N2 fixation of berseem clover. Soil was either left under water stress (i.e., rain-fed conditions) or the crop was well-watered. Mycorrhization treatments consisted of inoculation of berseem clover seeds with arbuscular mycorrhizal spores or suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by means of fungicide treatments. Nitrogen biological fixation was assessed using the 15N-isotope dilution technique. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was able to mitigate the negative effect of water stress on berseem clover grown in a typical semiarid Mediterranean environment. In fact, under water stress conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis resulted in increases in total biomass, N content, and N fixation, whereas no effect of crop mycorrhization was observed in the well-watered treatment. PMID:24595111

  9. Phytoplasma infecting cherry and lilac represent two distinct lineages having close evolutionary affinities with clover phyllody phytoplasma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoplasmas infecting cherry and lilac in Lithuania were found to represent two lineages related to clover phyllody phytoplasma (CPh), a subgroup 16SrI-C strain exhibiting rRNA interoperon sequence heterogeneity. 16S rDNAs amplified from the cherry bunchy leaf (ChBL) and lilac little leaf (LcLL) p...

  10. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on biomass production and nitrogen fixation of berseem clover plants subjected to water stress.

    PubMed

    Saia, Sergio; Amato, Gaetano; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore; Giambalvo, Dario; Ruisi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several studies, performed mainly in pots, have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of water stress on plant growth. No information is available about the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on berseem clover growth and nitrogen (N) fixation under conditions of water shortage. A field experiment was conducted in a hilly area of inner Sicily, Italy, to determine whether symbiosis with AM fungi can mitigate the detrimental effects of drought stress (which in the Mediterranean often occurs during the late period of the growing season) on forage yield and symbiotic N2 fixation of berseem clover. Soil was either left under water stress (i.e., rain-fed conditions) or the crop was well-watered. Mycorrhization treatments consisted of inoculation of berseem clover seeds with arbuscular mycorrhizal spores or suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by means of fungicide treatments. Nitrogen biological fixation was assessed using the 15N-isotope dilution technique. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was able to mitigate the negative effect of water stress on berseem clover grown in a typical semiarid Mediterranean environment. In fact, under water stress conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis resulted in increases in total biomass, N content, and N fixation, whereas no effect of crop mycorrhization was observed in the well-watered treatment.

  11. Performance and carcass parameters when meat goats were finished on chicory, birdsfoot trefoil, or red clover pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The meat goat industry is growing rapidly in the eastern U.S., particularly on small farms, to supply ethnic market demands. Body weight (BW), average daily gain (ADG), and carcass parameters were determined when meat goat kids were finished on pastures of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.; CHIC), bird...

  12. Performance, blood parameters, and fecal egg count when meat goats were finished on red clover, birdsfoot trefoil, or chicory pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most farms use forage-based systems for goat production, but control of gastrointestinal (GI) parasites in small ruminants is a major challenge for producers. Some forages may have natural anthelmintic compounds that can help in GI parasite control. This experiment was conducted to evaluate forage...

  13. Toxicity of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds to red clover (Trifolium pratense), ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and mustard (Sinapsis alba).

    PubMed

    Sverdrup, Line E; Krogh, Paul Henning; Nielsen, Torben; Kjaer, Christian; Stenersen, Jørgen

    2003-12-01

    The effect of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) on the seed emergence and early life-stage growth of three terrestrial plants (Sinapsis alba, Trifolium pratense and Lolium perenne) were studied in a greenhouse, using a Danish agricultural soil with an organic carbon content of 1.6%. After three weeks of exposure, seed emergence and seedling weight (fresh weight and dry weight) were determined. Exposure concentrations were verified with chemical analysis. The substances tested were four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (fluoranthene, pyrene, phenanthrene and fluorene), the N-, S-, and O-substituted analogues of fluorene (carbazole, dibenzothiophene and dibenzofuran, respectively), and the quinoline representative acridine. Seedling growth was a far more sensitive endpoint than seed emergence for all substances. Concentrations estimated to give a 20% reduction of seedling fresh weight (EC20-values) ranged from 36 to 290 mgkg(-1) for carbazole, 43 to 93 mgkg(-1) for dibenzofuran, 37 to 110 mgkg(-1) for dibenzothiophene, 140 to 650 mgkg(-1) for fluoranthene, 55 to 380 mgkg(-1) for fluorene, 37 to 300 mgkg(-1) for phenanthrene, and 49 to 1300 mgkg(-1) for pyrene. For acridine, no toxicity was observed within the concentration range tested (1-1000 mgkg(-1)). As illustrated by the EC20-values, there was a rather large difference in sensitivity between the species, and T. pratense was the most sensitive of the species tested.

  14. Alfalfa living mulch advances biological control of soybean aphid.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Nicholas P; O'neal, Matthew E; Singer, Jeremy W

    2007-04-01

    Despite evidence for biological control in North America, outbreaks of the invasive soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), continue to occur on soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.). Our objectives were to determine whether natural enemies delay aphid establishment and limit subsequent population growth and whether biological control can be improved by altering the within-field habitat. We hypothesized that a living mulch would increase the abundance of the aphidophagous community in soybean and suppress A. glycines establishment and population growth. We measured natural enemy and A. glycines abundance in soybean grown with and without an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) living mulch. Soybean grown with an alfalfa living mulch had 45% more natural enemies and experienced a delay in A. glycines establishment that resulted in lower peak populations. From our experiments, we concluded that the current natural enemy community in Iowa can delay A. glycines establishment, and an increase in aphidophagous predator abundance lowered the rate of A. glycines population growth preventing economic populations (i.e., below the current economic threshold) from occurring. Incorporation of a living mulch had an unexpected impact on A. glycines population growth, lowering the aphids' intrinsic rate of growth, thus providing a bottom-up suppression of A. glycines. We suggest future studies of living mulches or cover crops for A. glycines management should address both potential sources of suppression. Furthermore, our experience suggests that more consistent biological control of A. glycines may be possible with even partial resistance that slows but does not prevent reproduction.

  15. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Outcomes for Over 250 Undergraduate Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troischt, Parker; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) is a consortium of 19 institutions founded to promote undergraduate research and faculty development within the extragalactic ALFALFA HI blind survey project and follow-up programs. In this talk we present outcomes for the more than 250 undergraduate students who have who have participated in the program during the 8 years of funding. 40% of these students have been women and members of underrepresented groups. To date 148 undergraduate students have attended annual workshops at Arecibo Observatory, interacting with faculty, graduate students, their peers, and Arecibo staff in lectures, group activities, tours, and observing runs. Team faculty have supervised 159 summer research projects and 120 academic year (e.g., senior thesis) projects. 68 students have traveled to Arecibo Observatory for observing runs and 55 have presented their results at national meetings such as the AAS. Through participation in the UAT, students are made aware of career paths they may not have previously considered. More than 90% of alumni are attending graduate school and/or pursuing a career in STEM. 42% of those pursuing graduate degrees in Physics or Astronomy are women. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, and AST-1211005

  16. Cumulative impact of a clover cover crop on the persistence and efficacy of Beauveria bassiana in suppressing the pecan weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Gardner, Wayne A; Wells, Lenny; Wood, Bruce W

    2012-04-01

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn), is a key pest of pecan. Endemic levels of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin can occur in pecan orchards and contribute to natural control of C. caryae. Commercial formulations of the fungus can also be applied for suppression of C. caryae. We hypothesized that a clover cover crop enhances B. bassiana efficacy and persistence (e.g., by protecting the fungus against abiotic environmental stresses). The hypothesis was tested by conducting field trials in a pecan orchard in Byron, GA, in 2009 and 2010. The study included four treatments arranged in a factorial with two levels of fungus (endemic fungus only, and application of a commercial B. bassiana product), and two levels of clover (white clover, Trifolium repens L., and no clover). Fungal persistence was measured by determining the number of CFUs per gram of soil over time (during 42 d postapplication of B. bassiana in 2009 and 29 d in 2010). Efficacy was measured by capturing naturally emerging C. caryae and subsequently determining mortality and mycosis (over 24 d in 2009 and 17 d in 2010). In 2009, greater prevalence of B. bassiana conidia was detected in plots receiving fungal applications compared with no fungus applications, and no clear effect of clover was observed in plots receiving B. bassiana applications in either year. In 2010, B. bassiana prevalence in the endemic fungus plus clover treatment was higher than fungus without clover, and was similar to plots receiving additional B. bassiana applications. Given that we observed enhanced persistence of endemic B. bassiana in 2010 but not 2009, the impact of clover appears to be a cumulative effect. Mortality of C. caryae (averaged over the sampling periods) ranged between 68-74% in plots receiving B. bassiana applications and 51-56% in plots with endemic fungus only. C. caryae mortality and mycosis data also provided evidence that endemic B. bassiana efficacy was enhanced by clover

  17. Ozone and carbon dioxide effects on spider mites in white clover and peanut

    SciTech Connect

    Heagle, A.S.; Brandenburg, R.L.; Burns, J.C.; Miller, J.E.

    1994-11-01

    Effects of O{sub 3} and/or elevated CO{sub 2} on two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch) grown on an O{sub 3}-sensitive and an O{sub 3}-resistant clone of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) were measured in greenhouse and field experiments. Peanut (Arachis hypogeae L.) {open_quote}NC-9{close_quote} was used in one greenhouse study with O{sub 3}. In field studies, O{sub 3} treatments were charcoal filtered air (CF), nonfiltered air (NF), and two NF treatments with O{sub 3} added for 12 h d{sup {minus}1} at proportions of {approx} 1.25 and 1.50 times the ambient O{sub 3} concentration. In greenhouse studies, constant amounts of O{sub 3} were added to CF for 6 h d{sup {minus}1} to achieve mean concentrations ranging from 5 to 100 nL L{sup {minus}1}. For the greenhouse O{sub 3} x CO{sub 2} experiment, CO{sub 2} concentrations were ambient and approximately twice-ambient for 24 h d{sup {minus}1}. Plants were exposed to O{sub 3} and/or CO{sub 2} for {approx} 7 d before infestation with mites; daily exposures continued for 14 to 28 d to allow reproduction for at least two generations. Leaves were sampled to count eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults. Ozone caused more chlorosis and necrosis on the O{sub 3}-sensitive clover clone (NC-S) than on the O{sub 3}-resistant clone (NC-R). Carbon dioxide enrichment increased shoot growth of both clones by {approx}33%. Statistical analyses indicated significant O{sub 3} effects in some experiments and nonsignificant O{sub 3} effects in others. A trend toward increased mite populations with increased O{sub 3} occurred, however, on NC-S in all trials. No consistent trends occurred with NC-R. With peanut, a significant linear increase in mite population occurred with increased O{sub 3}. Carbon dioxide enrichment increased the rate of population increase on both clover clones, but more so on NC-R. 47 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. 21 CFR 520.1840 - Poloxalene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... section. (c) (d) Conditions of use. (1) For treatment of legume (alfalfa, clover) bloat in cattle... pounds of body weight. (2) For control of legume (alfalfa, clover) bloat in cattle. Administer, in...) per 100 lbs. of body weight per day. (3) For prevention of legume (alfalfa, clover) and wheat...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1840 - Poloxalene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section. (c) (d) Conditions of use. (1) For treatment of legume (alfalfa, clover) bloat in cattle... pounds of body weight. (2) For control of legume (alfalfa, clover) bloat in cattle. Administer, in...) per 100 lbs. of body weight per day. (3) For prevention of legume (alfalfa, clover) and wheat...

  20. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) shoot saponins: identification and bio-activity by the assessment of aphid feeding.

    PubMed

    Mazahery-Laghab, H; Yazdi-Samadi, B; Bagheri, M; Bagheri, A R

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical components in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), such as saponins, can act as protecting factors against bio-stresses. Saponins are also antifeedants and show oral toxicity towards higher and lower animals. Changes in saponins, such as variation in the carbon skeleton, or hydrolysis of saponin glycosides and other conjugates, may change their biological effects. The aims of this research were to study saponin variation in different growth stages of alfalfa and to investigate the biological role of saponins in the spotted alfalfa aphid, Therioaphis maculata. Saponins from alfalfa shoots in different growth stages were extracted, chemically purified and analysed by TLC. Specific saponins such as soyasaponin1 from root and shoot and two bisdesmosides of medicagenic acid, one from shoot and another from root tissues, were identified using reference compounds allowing changes in saponin composition during plant development in different shoot tissues of alfalfa to be assessed. The response of the alfalfa aphid to feeding on alfalfa in different growth stages was studied. No significant difference in the survival of aphids, from neonate to adult, was observed, but due to the antibiotic effects of saponins, two differences were found in the onset of nymph production and cumulative nymph production. The results show that the saponin composition in alfalfa changes with plant development and this, in turn, can often negatively affect the development of specific insect pests such as the spotted alfalfa aphid, suggesting a possible biological role of alfalfa saponins.

  1. Alfalfa microsymbionts from different ITS and nodC lineages of Ensifer meliloti and Ensifer medicae symbiovar meliloti establish efficient symbiosis with alfalfa in Spanish acid soils.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Vargas, Margarita; Martín, María; Tejedor, Carmen; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Álvaro

    2015-06-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is an important crop worldwide whose cropping in acid soils is hampered by the poor nodulation and yield commonly attributed to the sensitivity of its endosymbionts to acid pH. In this work, we isolated several acid-tolerant strains from alfalfa nodules in three acid soils in northwestern Spain. After grouping by RAPD fingerprinting, most strains were identified as Ensifer meliloti and only two strains as Ensifer medicae according to their 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences that allowed the differentiation of two groups within each one of these species. The two ITS groups of E. meliloti and the ITS group I of E. medicae have been previously found in Medicago nodules; however, the group II of E. medicae has been only found to date in Prosopis alba nodules. The analysis of the nodC gene showed that all strains isolated in this study belong to the symbiovar meliloti, grouping with the type strains of E. meliloti or E. medicae, but some harboured nodC gene alleles different from those found to date in alfalfa nodules. The strains of E. medicae belong to the symbiovar meliloti which should be also recognised in this species, although they harboured a nodC allele phylogenetically divergent to those from E. meliloti strains. Microcosm experiments showed that inoculation of alfalfa with selected acid-tolerant strains significantly increased yields in acid soils representing a suitable agricultural practice for alfalfa cropping in these soils.

  2. Magnetic Moments of Delta and Omega- baryons with dynamical clover fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, Christopher; Orginos, Konstantinos; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic dipole moment of the Delta(1232) and Omega- baryons with 2+1-flavors of clover fermions on anisotropic lattices using a background magnetic field. This is the first dynamical calculation of these magnetic moments using a background field technique. The calculation for Omega- is done at the physical strange quark mass, with the result in units of the physical nuclear magneton µ_(Omega-) = -1.93(8)(12) (where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic) compared to the experimental number: -2.02(5). The Delta has been studied at three unphysical quark masses, corresponding to pion mass 366, 438, and 548 MeV. The pion-mass dependence is compared with the behavior obtained from chiral effective-field theory.

  3. Nanowire Terahertz detectors with a resonant four-leaf-clover-shaped antenna.

    PubMed

    Viti, Leonardo; Coquillat, Dominique; Ercolani, Daniele; Sorba, Lucia; Knap, Wojciech; Vitiello, Miriam S

    2014-04-21

    We report on the development of an innovative class of nanowire-based Terahertz (THz) detectors in which the metamaterial properties of an antenna have been imported in the detection scheme of an overdamped plasma-wave field-effect transistor making its response resonant to THz radiation. Responsivities of ~105 V/W at 0.3 THz, with noise equivalent power levels ≈ 10(-10) W/√Hz, detectivities ~2 · 10(8) cm√Hz/W and quantum efficiencies ~1.2 · 10(-5) are reached at room-temperature. The resonant nature of the detection scheme provided by the four-leaf-clover-shaped geometry and the possibility to extend this technology to large multi-pixel arrays opens the path to demanding applications for ultra-sensitive metrology, spectroscopy and biomedicine.

  4. Characterization of new transposable element sub-families from white clover (Trifolium repens) using PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kailey E; Thomas, Mary C; Martini, Samer; Shuipys, Tautvydas; Didorchuk, Volodymyr; Shanker, Rachyl M; Laten, Howard M

    2016-10-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) dominate the landscapes of most plant and animal genomes. Once considered junk DNA and genetic parasites, these interspersed, repetitive DNA elements are now known to play major roles in both genetic and epigenetic processes that sponsor genome variation and regulate gene expression. Knowledge of TE consensus sequences from elements in species whose genomes have not been sequenced is limited, and the individual TEs that are encountered in clones or short-reads rarely represent potentially canonical, let alone, functional representatives. In this study, we queried the Repbase database with eight BAC clones from white clover (Trifolium repens), identified a large number of candidate TEs, and used polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing to create consensus sequences for three new TE families. The results show that TE family consensus sequences can be obtained experimentally in species for which just a single, full-length member of a TE family has been sequenced.

  5. How does sulphur availability modify N acquisition of white clover (Trifolium repens L.)?

    PubMed Central

    Varin, Sébastien; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Personeni, Emmanuelle; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Lemauviel-Lavenant, Servane

    2010-01-01

    The role of S in legume growth, N uptake, and N2 fixation was investigated using white clover (Trifolium repens L.) as a model species. We examined whether the effect of sulphate addition on N fixation resulted from a stimulation of host plant growth, a specific effect of S on nodulation, or a specific effect of S on nodule metabolism. Clones of white clover, inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum, were grown for 140 d in a hydroponic system with three levels of sulphate concentration (0 mM, 0.095 mM, and 0.380 mM). Nodule morphological and biochemical traits, such as root length, nodule biomass and volume, nodule protein contents (nitrogenase and leghaemoglobin obtained by an immunological approach), and root amino acid concentrations, were used to analyse the effect of sulphate availability on N2 fixation. The application of sulphate increased whole plant dry mass, root length, and nodule biomass, expressed on a root-length basis. N uptake proved less sensitive than N2 fixation to the effects of S-deficiency, and decreased as a consequence of the lower root length observed in S-deficient plants. N2 fixation was drastically reduced in S-deficient plants as a consequence of a low nodule development, but also due to low nitrogenase and leghaemoglobin production. This effect is likely to be due to down-regulation by a N-feedback mechanism, as, under severe S-deficiency, the high concentration of whole plant N and the accumulation of N-rich amino acids (such as asparagine) indicated that the assimilation of N exceeded the amount required for plant growth. PMID:19933318

  6. How does sulphur availability modify N acquisition of white clover (Trifolium repens L.)?

    PubMed

    Varin, Sébastien; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Personeni, Emmanuelle; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Lemauviel-Lavenant, Servane

    2010-01-01

    The role of S in legume growth, N uptake, and N2 fixation was investigated using white clover (Trifolium repens L.) as a model species. We examined whether the effect of sulphate addition on N fixation resulted from a stimulation of host plant growth, a specific effect of S on nodulation, or a specific effect of S on nodule metabolism. Clones of white clover, inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum, were grown for 140 d in a hydroponic system with three levels of sulphate concentration (0 mM, 0.095 mM, and 0.380 mM). Nodule morphological and biochemical traits, such as root length, nodule biomass and volume, nodule protein contents (nitrogenase and leghaemoglobin obtained by an immunological approach), and root amino acid concentrations, were used to analyse the effect of sulphate availability on N2 fixation. The application of sulphate increased whole plant dry mass, root length, and nodule biomass, expressed on a root-length basis. N uptake proved less sensitive than N2 fixation to the effects of S-deficiency, and decreased as a consequence of the lower root length observed in S-deficient plants. N2 fixation was drastically reduced in S-deficient plants as a consequence of a low nodule development, but also due to low nitrogenase and leghaemoglobin production. This effect is likely to be due to down-regulation by a N-feedback mechanism, as, under severe S-deficiency, the high concentration of whole plant N and the accumulation of N-rich amino acids (such as asparagine) indicated that the assimilation of N exceeded the amount required for plant growth.

  7. Effect of additive on alfalfa silage fermentation characteristics and feedlot performance of steers.

    PubMed

    Mader, T L; Britton, R A; Krause, V E; Pankaskie, D E

    1985-07-01

    In each of two trials four large plastic bags were filled with approximately 72 mt of first cutting, early bloom alfalfa (35% dry matter). Fresh alfalfa in two bags was treated with .5 kg/metric ton of a commercial silage additive (Silo-Best). Two bags were left untreated. When compared with steers fed untreated alfalfa silage, weight gains, intakes, and feed efficiencies were not significantly (P greater than .05) altered for steers fed treated silage. However, laboratory analysis showed silage treatment increased in vitro dry matter digestibility (57.0 versus 60.6%) and decreased silage pH (4.98 versus 4.83). Concentrations of propionic and butyric acid were decreased by the additive. Data suggest that anaerobic fermentation was enhanced with the additive. Slight but significant improvements of silage in vitro dry matter digestibility, obtained by treating alfalfa silage with the inoculant-type preservative, did not result in improved performance in feeding trials.

  8. Improving ethanol production from alfalfa stems via ambient-temperature acid pretreatment and washing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengfei; Weimer, Paul J; Hatfield, Ronald D; Runge, Troy M; Digman, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The concept of co-production of liquid fuel (ethanol) along with animal feed on farm was proposed, and the strategy of using ambient-temperature acid pretreatment, ensiling and washing to improve ethanol production from alfalfa stems was investigated. Alfalfa stems were separated and pretreated with sulfuric acid at ambient-temperature after harvest, and following ensiling, after which the ensiled stems were subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for ethanol production. Ethanol yield was improved by ambient-temperature sulfuric acid pretreatment before ensiling, and by washing before SSF. It was theorized that the acid pretreatment at ambient temperature partially degraded hemicellulose, and altered cell wall structure, resulted in improved cellulose accessibility, whereas washing removed soluble ash in substrates which could inhibit the SSF. The pH of stored alfalfa stems can be used to predict the ethanol yield, with a correlation coefficient of +0.83 for washed alfalfa stems.

  9. Selenium retention in tissues of swine fed carcasses of pigs grown on diets containing sodium selenite or high selenium white sweet clover grown on fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mandisodza, K.T.; Pond, W.G.; Lisk, D.J.; Gutenmann, W.H.; Hogue, D.E.

    1980-04-01

    Growing pigs were fed diets containing 5 or 10% white sweet clover, and 0, 3.5 or 7.0 ppM selenium (Se) supplied as sodium selenite (Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/) or occurring naturally in white sweet clover harvested from a coal fly ash dump. Ground carcasses of these pigs were included in corn meal diets at 23% and fed back to pigs. Compared to the pigs fed the high Se, fly ash-grown clover diets, the pigs fed Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ diets had higher blood Se levels but lower Se concentrations in kidney, liver and skeletal muscle. Tissues of the pigs which were fed carcasses of the high Se clover-fed pigs had higher Se concentrations than those of the pigs fed carcasses of the Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ - fed pigs.

  10. HI Gas in Early Type Galaxies as Measured by ALFALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Wendy; Morrison, Ryan; Green, Jarred; Raskin, Mark; Crawford, Connor; Bomer-Lawson, August; Hannan, Joshua; Crone-Odekon, Mary; ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    We present the HI content of 1580 early type galaxies (ETGs) in a total sample of 7747 galaxies that have HI measurements or upper limits from the ALFALFA survey. We find a significant correlation between HI content and local density, with HI detections almost exclusively in low-density environments. Using optical line ratios, we split the population into galaxies with spectral lines dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and dominated by star forming regions. Compared with HI-rich star forming ETGs, HI-rich ETGs with AGN tend to be brighter and redder and to exhibit a stronger correlation between stellar mass and HI mass. This work is supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  11. Proteomic Identification of Differentially Expressed Proteins during Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Flower Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingling; Chen, Quanzhu; Zhu, Yanqiao; Hou, Longyu; Mao, Peisheng

    2016-01-01

    Flower development, pollination, and fertilization are important stages in the sexual reproduction process of plants; they are also critical steps in the control of seed formation and development. During alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seed production, some distinct phenomena such as a low seed setting ratio, serious flower falling, and seed abortion commonly occur. However, the causes of these phenomena are complicated and largely unknown. An understanding of the mechanisms that regulate alfalfa flowering is important in order to increase seed yield. Hence, proteomic technology was used to analyze changes in protein expression during the stages of alfalfa flower development. Flower samples were collected at pre-pollination (S1), pollination (S2), and the post-pollination senescence period (S3). Twenty-four differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified, including 17 down-regulated in pollinated flowers, one up-regulated in pollinated and senesced flowers, and six up-regulated in senesced flowers. The largest proportions of the identified proteins were involved in metabolism, signal transduction, defense response, oxidation reduction, cell death, and programmed cell death (PCD). Their expression profiles demonstrated that energy metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and amino acid metabolism provided the nutrient foundation for pollination in alfalfa. Furthermore, there were three proteins involved in multiple metabolic pathways: dual specificity kinase splA-like protein (kinase splALs), carbonic anhydrase, and NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase-like protein. Expression patterns of these proteins indicated that MAPK cascades regulated multiple processes, such as signal transduction, stress response, and cell death. PCD also played an important role in the alfalfa flower developmental process, and regulated both pollination and flower senescence. The current study sheds some light on protein expression profiles during alfalfa flower development and

  12. Role of Silicon Counteracting Cadmium Toxicity in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Ahmad H.; Hossain, Mohammad M.; Khatun, Most A.; Mandal, Abul; Haider, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most phytotoxic elements causing an agricultural problem and human health hazards. This work investigates whether and how silicon (Si) ameliorates Cd toxicity in Alfalfa. The addition of Si in Cd-stressed plants caused significant improvement in morpho-physiological features as well as total protein and membrane stability, indicating that Si does have critical roles in Cd detoxification in Alfalfa. Furthermore, Si supplementation in Cd-stressed plants showed a significant decrease in Cd and Fe concentrations in both roots and shoots compared with Cd-stressed plants, revealing that Si-mediated tolerance to Cd stress is associated with Cd inhibition in Alfalfa. Results also showed no significant changes in the expression of two metal chelators [MsPCS1 (phytochelatin synthase) and MsMT2 (metallothionein)] and PC (phytochelatin) accumulation, indicating that there may be no metal sequestration or change in metal sequestration following Si application under Cd stress in Alfalfa. We further performed a targeted study on the effect of Si on Fe uptake mechanisms. We observed the consistent reduction in Fe reductase activity, expression of Fe-related genes [MsIRT1 (Fe transporter), MsNramp1 (metal transporter) and OsFRO1 (ferric chelate reductase] and Fe chelators (citrate and malate) by Si application to Cd stress in roots of Alfalfa. These results support that limiting Fe uptake through the down-regulation of Fe acquisition mechanisms confers Si-mediated alleviation of Cd toxicity in Alfalfa. Finally, an increase of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities along with elevated methionine and proline subjected to Si application might play roles, at least in part, to reduce H2O2 and to provide antioxidant defense against Cd stress in Alfalfa. The study shows evidence of the effect of Si on alleviating Cd toxicity in Alfalfa and can be further extended for phytoremediation of Cd toxicity in plants. PMID:27512401

  13. Role of Silicon Counteracting Cadmium Toxicity in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Kabir, Ahmad H; Hossain, Mohammad M; Khatun, Most A; Mandal, Abul; Haider, Syed A

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most phytotoxic elements causing an agricultural problem and human health hazards. This work investigates whether and how silicon (Si) ameliorates Cd toxicity in Alfalfa. The addition of Si in Cd-stressed plants caused significant improvement in morpho-physiological features as well as total protein and membrane stability, indicating that Si does have critical roles in Cd detoxification in Alfalfa. Furthermore, Si supplementation in Cd-stressed plants showed a significant decrease in Cd and Fe concentrations in both roots and shoots compared with Cd-stressed plants, revealing that Si-mediated tolerance to Cd stress is associated with Cd inhibition in Alfalfa. Results also showed no significant changes in the expression of two metal chelators [MsPCS1 (phytochelatin synthase) and MsMT2 (metallothionein)] and PC (phytochelatin) accumulation, indicating that there may be no metal sequestration or change in metal sequestration following Si application under Cd stress in Alfalfa. We further performed a targeted study on the effect of Si on Fe uptake mechanisms. We observed the consistent reduction in Fe reductase activity, expression of Fe-related genes [MsIRT1 (Fe transporter), MsNramp1 (metal transporter) and OsFRO1 (ferric chelate reductase] and Fe chelators (citrate and malate) by Si application to Cd stress in roots of Alfalfa. These results support that limiting Fe uptake through the down-regulation of Fe acquisition mechanisms confers Si-mediated alleviation of Cd toxicity in Alfalfa. Finally, an increase of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities along with elevated methionine and proline subjected to Si application might play roles, at least in part, to reduce H2O2 and to provide antioxidant defense against Cd stress in Alfalfa. The study shows evidence of the effect of Si on alleviating Cd toxicity in Alfalfa and can be further extended for phytoremediation of Cd toxicity in plants.

  14. Proteomic Identification of Differentially Expressed Proteins during Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Flower Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingling; Chen, Quanzhu; Zhu, Yanqiao; Hou, Longyu; Mao, Peisheng

    2016-01-01

    Flower development, pollination, and fertilization are important stages in the sexual reproduction process of plants; they are also critical steps in the control of seed formation and development. During alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seed production, some distinct phenomena such as a low seed setting ratio, serious flower falling, and seed abortion commonly occur. However, the causes of these phenomena are complicated and largely unknown. An understanding of the mechanisms that regulate alfalfa flowering is important in order to increase seed yield. Hence, proteomic technology was used to analyze changes in protein expression during the stages of alfalfa flower development. Flower samples were collected at pre-pollination (S1), pollination (S2), and the post-pollination senescence period (S3). Twenty-four differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified, including 17 down-regulated in pollinated flowers, one up-regulated in pollinated and senesced flowers, and six up-regulated in senesced flowers. The largest proportions of the identified proteins were involved in metabolism, signal transduction, defense response, oxidation reduction, cell death, and programmed cell death (PCD). Their expression profiles demonstrated that energy metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and amino acid metabolism provided the nutrient foundation for pollination in alfalfa. Furthermore, there were three proteins involved in multiple metabolic pathways: dual specificity kinase splA-like protein (kinase splALs), carbonic anhydrase, and NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase-like protein. Expression patterns of these proteins indicated that MAPK cascades regulated multiple processes, such as signal transduction, stress response, and cell death. PCD also played an important role in the alfalfa flower developmental process, and regulated both pollination and flower senescence. The current study sheds some light on protein expression profiles during alfalfa flower development and

  15. Salt stress alters DNA methylation levels in alfalfa (Medicago spp).

    PubMed

    Al-Lawati, A; Al-Bahry, S; Victor, R; Al-Lawati, A H; Yaish, M W

    2016-02-26

    Modification of DNA methylation status is one of the mechanisms used by plants to adjust gene expression at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels when plants are exposed to suboptimal conditions. Under abiotic stress, different cultivars often show heritable phenotypic variation accompanied by epigenetic polymorphisms at the DNA methylation level. This variation may provide the raw materials for plant breeding programs that aim to enhance abiotic stress tolerance, including salt tolerance. In this study, methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis was used to assess cytosine methylation levels in alfalfa (Medicago spp) roots exposed to increasing NaCl concentrations (0.0, 8.0, 12.0, and 20.0 dS/m). Eleven indigenous landraces were analyzed, in addition to a salt-tolerant cultivar that was used as a control. There was a slight increase in DNA methylation upon exposure to high levels of soil salinity. Phylogenetic analysis using MSAP showed epigenetic variation within and between the alfalfa landraces when exposed to saline conditions. Based on MSAP and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results, we found that salinity increased global DNA methylation status, particularly in plants exposed to the highest level of salinity (20 dS/m). Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that this might be mediated by the overexpression of methyltransferase homolog genes after exposure to saline conditions. DNA demethylation using 5-azacytidine reduced seedling lengths and dry and fresh weights, indicating a possible decrease in salinity tolerance. These results suggest that salinity affects DNA methylation flexibility.

  16. The HI Content of Groups as Measured by ALFALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; Haynes, Martha P.; Finn, Rose; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    We present the HI content of galaxies in nearby groups and clusters as measured by the 70% complete Arecibo Legacy Fast-ALFA (ALFALFA) survey, including constraints from ALFALFA detection limits. Our sample includes 22 groups at distances between 70-160 Mpc over the mass range 12.5 < log M/M⊙ < 15.0, for a total of 1986 late-type galaxies out to a projected group-centric distance of 4.0 Mpc. We find that late-type galaxies in the centers of groups lack HI at fixed stellar mass relative to the regions surrounding them. Larger groups show evidence of a stronger gradient in HI properties, despite a similar gradient in stellar mass, and in color at fixed stellar mass, over the same range in r/R200. We compare several environment variables to determine which is the best predictor of galaxy properties; group-centric distance r and r/R200 are similarly effective predictors, while local density is slightly more effective and group size and halo mass are slightly less effective. Finally, we see evidence that HI is deficient for blue cloud galaxies in denser environments even when both stellar mass and color are fixed. This is consistent with a picture where HI is removed or destroyed, followed by reddening within the blue cloud. Overall, our results support the existence of pre-processing in isolated groups, along with an additional rapid mechanism for gas removal within larger groups and clusters, perhaps by ram-pressure stripping. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, and AST-1211005.

  17. ALFALFA Hα Reveals How Galaxies Use Their Hi Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne; Oey, Sally; Salzer, John; van Sistine, Angie; Bell, Eric; Haynes, Martha

    Atomic hydrogen traces the raw material from which molecular clouds and stars form. With 565 galaxies from the ALFALFA Hα survey, a statistically complete subset of the ALFALFA survey, we examine the processes that affect galaxies' abilities to access and consume their Hi gas. On galaxy-wide scales, Hi gas fractions correlate only weakly with instantaneous specific star formation rates (sSFRs) but tightly with galaxy color. We show that a connection between dust and Hi content, arising from the fundamental mass-metallicity-Hi relation, leads to this tight color correlation. We find that disk galaxies follow a relation between stellar surface density and Hi depletion time, consistent with a scenario in which higher mid-plane pressure leads to more efficient molecular cloud formation from Hi. In contrast, spheroids show no such trend. Starbursts, identified by Hα equivalent width, do not show enhanced Hi gas fractions relative to similar mass non-starburst galaxies. The starbursts' shorter Hi depletion times indicate more efficient consumption of Hi, and galaxy interactions drive this enhanced star formation efficiency in several starbursts. Interestingly, the most disturbed starbursts show greater enhancements in Hi gas fraction, which may indicate an excess of Hi at early merger stages. At low galaxy stellar masses, the triggering mechanism for starbursts is less clear; the high scatter in efficiency and sSFR among low-mass galaxies may result from periodic bursts. We find no evidence for depleted Hi reservoirs in starbursts, which suggests that galaxies may maintain sufficient Hi to fuel multiple starburst episodes.

  18. Effects of nematicides and plant resistance on white clover performance and seasonal populations of nematodes parasitizing white clover in grazed pasture.

    PubMed

    Mercer, C F; Watson, R N

    2007-12-01

    Root-infecting nematodes are a major cause of white clover, Trifolium repens, not reaching its potential in New Zealand pastures. Resistance and/or tolerance are the preferred control options. Greenhouse-based, recurrent selection programs have developed resistance to Meloidogyne trifoliophila and Heterodera trifolii, and a field-based program has developed tolerance. Lines from these programs were compared with commercial cultivars as controls in a series of field trials at four sites over 4 years. Resistant lines from the CCN program performed better than susceptible lines and as well as most cultivars, reflecting the high level of resistance developed in this greenhouse-based program. In stained root from Cambridge, numbers of CCN were lower in resistant lines than in cultivars; numbers in susceptible lines were intermediate. CCN resistance was also reflected to a lesser extent in the number of cysts counted in soil under resistant lines in Palmerston North. The root-knot nematode-resistant material performed better than the susceptible and as well as most cultivars. In one trial of CRKN-resistant lines, resistant and susceptible lines had similar numbers of CRKN which were both lower than the numbers in the cultivars; in the second trial, there were fewer CRKN in resistant than in susceptible lines or cultivars. The tolerant selections, developed under field conditions, performed as well as or better than the cultivars. The selections from the breeding programmes have exhibited strong agronomic potential across locations and years, and the best material has been crossed; progeny are being assessed in current field trials.

  19. An Insight into microRNA156 Role in Salinity Stress Responses of Alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Muhammad; Gruber, Margaret Y; Wall, Ken; Hannoufa, Abdelali

    2017-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting alfalfa productivity. Developing salinity tolerant alfalfa genotypes could contribute to sustainable crop production. The functions of microRNA156 (miR156) have been investigated in several plant species, but so far, no studies have been published that explore the role of miR156 in alfalfa response to salinity stress. In this work, we studied the role of miR156 in modulating commercially important traits of alfalfa under salinity stress. Our results revealed that overexpression of miR156 increased biomass, number of branches and time to complete growth stages, while it reduced plant height under control and salinity stress conditions. We observed a miR156-related reduction in neutral detergent fiber under non-stress, and acid detergent fiber under mild salinity stress conditions. In addition, enhanced total Kjeldahl nitrogen content was recorded in miR156 overexpressing genotypes under severe salinity stress. Furthermore, alfalfa genotypes overexpressing miR156 exhibited an altered ion homeostasis under salinity conditions. Under severe salinity stress, miR156 downregulated SPL transcription factor family genes, modified expression of other important transcription factors, and downstream salt stress responsive genes. Taken together, our results reveal that miR156 plays a role in mediating physiological and transcriptional responses of alfalfa to salinity stress.

  20. An Insight into microRNA156 Role in Salinity Stress Responses of Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Muhammad; Gruber, Margaret Y.; Wall, Ken; Hannoufa, Abdelali

    2017-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting alfalfa productivity. Developing salinity tolerant alfalfa genotypes could contribute to sustainable crop production. The functions of microRNA156 (miR156) have been investigated in several plant species, but so far, no studies have been published that explore the role of miR156 in alfalfa response to salinity stress. In this work, we studied the role of miR156 in modulating commercially important traits of alfalfa under salinity stress. Our results revealed that overexpression of miR156 increased biomass, number of branches and time to complete growth stages, while it reduced plant height under control and salinity stress conditions. We observed a miR156-related reduction in neutral detergent fiber under non-stress, and acid detergent fiber under mild salinity stress conditions. In addition, enhanced total Kjeldahl nitrogen content was recorded in miR156 overexpressing genotypes under severe salinity stress. Furthermore, alfalfa genotypes overexpressing miR156 exhibited an altered ion homeostasis under salinity conditions. Under severe salinity stress, miR156 downregulated SPL transcription factor family genes, modified expression of other important transcription factors, and downstream salt stress responsive genes. Taken together, our results reveal that miR156 plays a role in mediating physiological and transcriptional responses of alfalfa to salinity stress. PMID:28352280

  1. Alfalfa varieties for biomass production. Task IId. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Sheaffer, C.; Martin, N.; Lamb, J.

    1997-10-30

    The use of alfalfa for biomass production may require harvest schedules and alfalfa varieties with different traits than currently marketed varieties. A late flower (2-cut) system may have several advantages compared to more frequent cutting systems because it can result in high stem yield, result in less trips over the field, allow more schedule flexibility, provide greater wildlife habitat, and allow greater alfalfa persistence. However, modem alfalfa varieties have been developed for a frequent harvest system with 3-4 cuttings per season. The objectives of this study were to determine the total biomass yield; leaf and stem biomass yield; and leaf and stem composition of alfalfa varieties subject to diverse harvest regimes. Alfalfa varieties included those currently marketed in the biomass region as well as experimental entries developed for lodging resistance and leaf retention. Harvest regimes included conventional strategies based on harvests at bud or first flower and a non-conventional strategy with harvests at late flower. Harvest regime had the most consistent and greatest effect on the variables studied. Forage yields were greater for the early flower regime. Harvests at earlier maturity frequently result in leafier, higher quality forage than harvest at late flower. 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. [Determination of Hard Rate of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Seeds with Near Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-xun; Chen, Ling-ling; Zhang, Yun-wei; Mao, Pei-sheng

    2016-03-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the most commonly grown forage crop due to its better quality characteristics and high adaptability in China. However, there was 20%-80% hard seeds in alfalfa which could not be identified easily from non hard seeds which would cause the loss of seed utilization value and plant production. This experiment was designed for 121 samples of alfalfa. Seeds were collected according to different regions, harvested year and varieties. 31 samples were artificial matched as hard rates ranging from 20% to 80% to establish a model for hard seed rate by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with Partial Least Square (PLS). The objective of this study was to establish a model and to estimate the efficiency of NIRS for determining hard rate of alfalfa seeds. The results showed that the correlation coefficient (R2(cal)) of calibration model was 0.981 6, root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) was 5.32, and the ratio of prediction to deviation (RPD) was 3.58. The forecast model in this experiment presented the satisfied precision. The proposed method using NIRS technology is feasible for identification and classification of hard seed in alfalfa. A new method, as nondestructive testing of hard seed rate, was provided to theoretical basis for fast nondestructive detection of hard seed rates in alfalfa.

  3. Effects of engineered Sinorhizobium meliloti on cytokinin synthesis and tolerance of alfalfa to extreme drought stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Li, Xiao-Lin; Luo, Li

    2012-11-01

    Cytokinin is required for the initiation of leguminous nitrogen fixation nodules elicited by rhizobia and the delay of the leaf senescence induced by drought stress. A few free-living rhizobia have been found to produce cytokinin. However, the effects of engineered rhizobia capable of synthesizing cytokinin on host tolerance to abiotic stresses have not yet been described. In this study, two engineered Sinorhizobium strains overproducing cytokinin were constructed. The tolerance of inoculated alfalfa plants to severe drought stress was assessed. The engineered strains, which expressed the Agrobacterium ipt gene under the control of different promoters, synthesized more zeatins than the control strain under free-living conditions, but their own growth was not affected. After a 4-week inoculation period, the effects of engineered strains on alfalfa growth and nitrogen fixation were similar to those of the control strain under nondrought conditions. After being subjected to severe drought stress, most of the alfalfa plants inoculated with engineered strains survived, and the nitrogenase activity in their root nodules showed no apparent change. A small elevation in zeatin concentration was observed in the leaves of these plants. The expression of antioxidant enzymes increased, and the level of reactive oxygen species decreased correspondingly. Although the ipt gene was transcribed in the bacteroids of engineered strains, the level of cytokinin in alfalfa nodules was identical to that of the control. These findings suggest that engineered Sinorhizobium strains synthesizing more cytokinin could improve the tolerance of alfalfa to severe drought stress without affecting alfalfa nodulation or nitrogen fixation.

  4. Influence of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash on alfalfa growth and nutrient uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Concern has been expressed that large amounts of volcanic ash from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens may have created potential nutritional problems associated with forage production in northern Idaho and eastern Washington to the extent that adjustments need to be made in soil test correlation data. The objectives of this greenhouse study were to : (1) determine the effect of varying amounts of volcanic ash mixed into soils of northern Idaho on total alfalfa biomass production, and (2) to determine the effect of various soil/ash mixtures on the nutrient concentrations of P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Mn and Zn in alfalfa. Alfalfa was grown in eight different northern Idaho soils amended with differing levels of volcanic ash (0, 20, 35, 50 and 75%) in the greenhouse. The alfalfa seeds were inoculated and fertilizer P and S were added to all treatments. Total plant biomass and P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Mn and Zn plant concentrations were measured. The eight were pooled for analysis and it was found that increasing amounts of volcanic ash increased alfalfa biomass production. Plant P, S, Ca, Mg and Zn concentrations also increased with increasing levels of ash. Conversely, increasing levels of ash resulted in lower alfalfa tissue K and Mn concentrations. 13 references, 7 figures.

  5. Intended release and actual retention of alfalfa leafcutting bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) for pollination in commercial alfalfa seed fields.

    PubMed

    Pitts-Singer, Theresa L

    2013-04-01

    Low, medium, and high stocking densities (15,000; 30,000; and 45,000-50,000 bees per acre, respectively) of Megachile rotundata (F.) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), the alfalfa leafcutting bee, were released over 4 yr in three research plots of Utah alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. (Fabaceae), planted at seed-production rates. A low percentage of bees (46-79% of released) survived the incubation and field-emergence processes; of those bees, the number of females that established at the nesting sites was 25-100%. Of the three field sites, one site consistently retained more females and produced more completed nests than the other sites, all of which usually had poor female establishment and progeny production. In addition, floral resources were depleted over time, but many flowers remained unvisited over the season. Nest production decreased over time, as numbers of flowers and female bees declined. Significant positive relationships were found between the intended stocking densities and 1) the number of females that actually survived incubation and field emergence and 2) the number of females that established nests. The number of females that established nests was positively affected by the number of females that survived to emerge in the field. The percentage of females that established was not significantly affected by the intended number of released bees, countering a prediction that the release of fewer bees would allow more females to establish nests and achieve high reproductive success. For growers, it may be more frugal to use modest numbers of M. rotundata for pollination, because many of the bees at medium and high stocking densities do not nest in grower-provided bee boards.

  6. An investigation of meson spectroscopy on isotropic clover lattices at the SU(3) flavor-symmetric point

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, David G.; Orginos, Konstantinos

    2014-06-23

    We present an investigation of the excited meson spectrum at the N_f= 3 point obtained on isotropic clover lattices with a plaquette Wilson gauge action, and a NP-improved clover fermion action, at a lattice spacing of a \\simeq 0.08 fm, and compare with corresponding calculations on an anisotropic lattice at fine temporal lattice spacing but a spatial lattice spacing of a_s \\simeq 0.125 fm. The methodology adopted follows that employed in the calculation of the spectrum on anisotropic lattices, and we test the efficacy of that approach for isotropic lattices. In particular, we explore the extent to which rotational symmetry for predominantly single-hadron states is realized. By comparison of the energy levels with that obtained using the anisotropic lattice, we obtain an indication of discretization uncertainties in the single-hadron spectrum.

  7. Clover root exudate produces male-biased sex ratios and accelerates male metamorphic timing in wood frogs

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Max R.

    2015-01-01

    In amphibians, abnormal metamorph sex ratios and sexual development have almost exclusively been considered in response to synthetic compounds like pesticides or pharmaceuticals. However, endocrine-active plant chemicals (i.e. phytoestrogens) are commonly found in agricultural and urban waterways hosting frog populations with deviant sexual development. Yet the effects of these compounds on amphibian development remain predominantly unexplored. Legumes, like clover, are common in agricultural fields and urban yards and exude phytoestrogen mixtures from their roots. These root exudates serve important ecological functions and may also be a source of phytoestrogens in waterways. I show that clover root exudate produces male-biased sex ratios and accelerates male metamorphosis relative to females in low and intermediate doses of root exudate. My results indicate that root exudates are a potential source of contaminants impacting vertebrate development and that humans may be cultivating sexual abnormalities in wildlife by actively managing certain plant species. PMID:27019728

  8. Genome-wide identification of microsatellites in white clover (Trifolium repens L.) using FIASCO and phpSSRMiner

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; He, Ji; Zhao, Patrick X; Bouton, Joseph H; Monteros, Maria J

    2008-01-01

    Background Allotetraploid white clover (Trifolium repens L.) is an important forage legume widely cultivated in most temperate regions. Only a small number of microsatellite markers are publicly available and can be utilized in white clover breeding programs. The objectives of this study were to develop an integrated approach for microsatellite development and to evaluate the approach for the development of new SSR markers for white clover. Results Genomic libraries containing simple sequence repeat (SSR) sequences were constructed using a modified Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences COntaining repeats (FIASCO) procedure and phpSSRMiner was used to develop the microsatellite markers. SSR motifs were isolated using two biotin-labeled probes, (CA)17 and (ATG)12. The sequences of 6,816 clones were assembled into 1,698 contigs, 32% of which represented novel sequences based on BLASTN searches. Approximately 32%, 28%, and 16% of these SSRs contained hexa-, tri-, and di-nucleotide repeats, respectively. The most frequent motifs were the CA and ATG complementary repeats and the associated compound sequences. Primer pairs were designed for 859 SSR loci based on sequences from these genomic libraries and from GenBank white clover nucleotide sequences. A total of 191 SSR primers developed from the two libraries were tested for polymorphism in individual clones from the parental genotypes GA43 ('Durana'), 'SRVR' and six F1 progeny from a mapping population. Ninety two percent produced amplicons and 66% of these were polymorphic. Conclusion The combined approach of identifying SSR-enriched fragments by FIASCO coupled with the primer design and in silico amplification using phpSSRMiner represents an efficient and low cost pipeline for the large-scale development of microsatellite markers in plants. The approach described here could be readily adapted and utilized in other non-related species with none or limited genomic resources. PMID:18631390

  9. American Red Cross

    MedlinePlus

    ... Espanol Local Red Cross ( ) Change Chapter Edit Zip Code Edit Zip Code Shop the Red Cross Store Toggle Navigation Menu ... Espanol Local Red Cross ( ) Change Chapter Edit Zip Code Edit Zip Code Shop the Red Cross Store ...

  10. Characterization of vegetative storage protein (VSP) and low molecular proteins induced by water deficit in stolon of white clover.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bok-Rye; Lee, Dong-Gi; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2014-01-03

    In stolon of white clover (Trifolium repens L.), the 17.3 kDa protein has been newly identified as a vegetative storage protein (VSP) which has preponderant roles in N accumulation and mobilization to sustain growth when capacity of N uptake is strongly reduced. To characterize the water deficit effect on this protein, the kinetic pattern of soluble protein, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and proteomic analysis was studied in the stolon of white clover during 28 days of water-deficit. Water deficit led to decrease protein concentration. SDS-PAGE revealed that two major proteins of 17.3 and 16 kDa were accumulated to high level in response to water stress. These proteins cross-reacted positively with antibodies raised against the 17.3 kDa VSP, a protein which shared biochemical features with stress proteins implied in dehydration tolerance. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gel and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis, it was demonstrated that 19.5 and 17.3 kDa protein spots were up-regulated by water stress, and both spots were identical to nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), respectively. These results suggest that low molecular proteins induced by water-deficit in the stolon of white clover act as an alternative N reserves or play significant roles in plant protection against water-deficit stress.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM1325, an effective microsymbiont of annual Mediterranean clovers.

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; O’Hara, Graham; Chain, Patrick; Ardley, Julie; Bräu, Lambert; Nandesena, Kemanthi; Tiwari, Ravi; Copeland, Alex; Nolan, Matt; Han, Cliff; Brettin, Thomas; Land, Miriam; Ovchinikova, Galina; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Melino, Vanessa; Denton, Matthew; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John

    2010-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv trifolii is a soil-inhabiting bacterium that has the capacity to be an effective nitrogen fixing microsymbiont of a diverse range of annual Trifolium (clover) species. Strain WSM1325 is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod isolated from root nodules collected in 1993 from the Greek Island of Serifos. WSM1325 is produced commercially in Australia as an inoculant for a broad range of annual clovers of Mediterranean origin due to its superior attributes of saprophytic competence, nitrogen fixation and acid-tolerance. Here we describe the basic features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence for a microsymbiont of annual clovers. We reveal that its genome size is 7,418,122 bp encoding 7,232 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. This multipartite genome contains 6 distinct replicons; a chromosome of size 4,767,043 bp and 5 plasmids of size 828,924 bp, 660,973 bp, 516,088 bp, 350,312 bp and 294,782 bp. PMID:21304718

  12. Rumen development and growth of Balouchi lambs offered alfalfa hay pre- and post-weaning.

    PubMed

    Norouzian, Mohammad Ali; Valizadeh, Reza; Vahmani, Payam

    2011-08-01

    The consumption of solid feed is essential for successful transition from a pre-ruminant to a functional digestive tract. Lambs fed starter rations containing highly fermentable carbohydrates often experience dramatic changes in concentrations of rumen and blood metabolites. The optimal amount of roughage required in the diet of pre-ruminant animals is still unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of feeding alfalfa hay on performance and rumen development in young Balouchi lambs. In a completely randomized design, 30 lambs were fed one of three experimental diets consisting of a control, without alfalfa hay (C), a diet containing 7.5% alfalfa hay (A1), and a diet containing 15% alfalfa hay (A2). Lambs fed A1 and A2 diets had lower dry matter intake during the pre-weaning period (P < 0.01) and overall (P = 0.02), but feed conversion ratio and average daily gain were not affected by feeding alfalfa hay. Concentration of beta-hydroxybutyric acid was higher in C compared with the A1 and A2 groups (P < 0.01). Concentrations of glucose and non-esterified fatty acids did not differ among the groups of animals. Feeding alfalfa hay reduced thickness of the rumen epithelial keratinized layer (P = 0.04) and increased thickness of muscular layer (P = 0.05). We concluded that including 15% alfalfa hay in the starter diet could reduce thickness of the keratinization layer and increase muscularity of rumen wall without adverse effects on growth and performance of newborn lambs.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Postnikova, Olga A; Hult, Maria; Shao, Jonathan; Skantar, Andrea; Nemchinov, Lev G

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields. As of today, no studies have been published on global gene expression profiling in alfalfa infected with RKN or any other plant parasitic nematode. Very little information is available about molecular mechanisms that contribute to pathogenesis and defense responses in alfalfa against these pests and specifically against RKN. In this work, we performed root transcriptome analysis of resistant (cv. Moapa 69) and susceptible (cv. Lahontan) alfalfa cultivars infected with RKN Meloidogyne incognita, widespread root-knot nematode species and a major pest worldwide. A total of 1,701,622,580 pair-end reads were generated on an Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 platform from the roots of both cultivars and assembled into 45,595 and 47,590 transcripts in cvs Moapa 69 and Lahontan, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of common and unique genes that were differentially expressed in susceptible and resistant lines as a result of nematode infection. Although the susceptible cultivar showed a more pronounced defense response to the infection, feeding sites were successfully established in its roots. Characteristically, basal gene expression levels under normal conditions differed between the two cultivars as well, which may confer advantage to one of the genotypes toward resistance to nematodes. Differentially expressed genes were subsequently assigned to known Gene Ontology categories to predict their functional roles and associated biological processes. Real-time PCR validated expression changes in genes arbitrarily selected for experimental confirmation. Candidate genes that contribute to protection against M. incognita in alfalfa were proposed and alfalfa-nematode interactions with respect to resistance

  14. Analysis of the alfalfa root transcriptome in response to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Postnikova, Olga A; Shao, Jonathan; Nemchinov, Lev G

    2013-07-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic factors affecting alfalfa productivity. Identifying genes that control this complex trait will provide critical insights for alfalfa breeding programs. To date, no studies have been published on a deep sequencing-based profiling of the alfalfa transcriptome in response to salinity stress. Observations gathered through research on reference genomes may not always be applicable to alfalfa. In this work, Illumina RNA-sequencing was performed in two alfalfa genotypes contrasting in salt tolerance, in order to estimate a broad spectrum of genes affected by salt stress. A total of 367,619,586 short reads were generated from cDNA libraries originated from roots of both lines. More than 60,000 tentative consensus sequences (TCs) were obtained and, among them, 74.5% had a significant similarity to proteins in the NCBI database. Mining of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from all TCs revealed 6,496 SSRs belonging to 3,183 annotated unigenes. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the expression of 1,165 genes, including 86 transcription factors (TFs), was significantly altered under salt stress. About 40% of differentially expressed genes were assigned to known gene ontology (GO) categories using Arabidopsis GO. A random check of differentially expressed genes by quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the bioinformatic analysis of the RNA-seq data. A number of salt-responsive genes in both tested genotypes were identified and assigned to functional classes, and gene candidates with roles in the adaptation to salinity were proposed. Alfalfa-specific data on salt-responsive genes obtained in this work will be useful in understanding the molecular mechanisms of salinity tolerance in alfalfa.

  15. Effects of dietary alfalfa inclusion on Salmonella typhimurium populations in growing layer chicks.

    PubMed

    Escarcha, Jacquelyn F; Callaway, Todd R; Byrd, J Allen; Miller, Dan N; Edrington, Tom S; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2012-10-01

    Reducing Salmonella in poultry has been a paramount goal of the poultry industry in order to improve food safety. Inclusion of high-fiber fermentable feedstuffs in chicken diets has been shown to reduce the incidence of Salmonella colonization in laying hens, but no work has been performed in growing birds. Therefore, the present study was designed to quantify differences in artificially inoculated cecal Salmonella Typhimurium populations in growing layer chicks (n = 60 in each of two replications) fed 0%, 25%, and 50% of their diet (w/w) replaced with alfalfa meal from day (d) 7 to d14 after hatch. Alfalfa supplementation reduced cecal populations of Salmonella by 0.95 and 1.25 log10 colony-forming unit per gram in the 25% and 50% alfalfa groups compared to controls. Alfalfa feeding reduced (p < 0.05) the number of cecal- and crop-positive birds compared to controls. Increasing levels of alfalfa increased (p < 0.05) total volatile fatty acids (VFA) and the proportion of acetate in the cecum. Surprisingly, alfalfa inclusion did not negatively impact average daily gain (ADG) in birds over the 7-d feeding period. Alfalfa inclusion at 50% of the diet increased (p < 0.05) the number of bacterial genera detected in the cecum compared to controls, and also altered proportions of the microbial population by reducing Ruminococcus and increasing Clostridia populations. Results support the idea that providing a fermentable substrate can increase gastrointestinal VFA production and bacterial diversity which in turn can reduce colonization by Salmonella via natural competitive barriers. However, further studies are obviously needed to more fully understand the impact of changes made in diet or management procedures on poultry production.

  16. Contribution of exopeptidases to formation of nonprotein nitrogen during ensiling of alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Zhou, H; Guo, X S; Long, R J; Zhu, Y; Cheng, W

    2011-08-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the exopeptidase classes in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) leaves, and to determine their contribution to the formation of nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) components during ensiling. Six classes of inhibitors that included bestatin (aminopeptidase inhibitor), potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI, carboxypeptidase inhibitor), 1,10-phenanthroline (dipeptidase inhibitor), diprotin A (dipeptidyl-peptidase inhibitor), butabindide (tripeptidyl-peptidase inhibitor), and dipeptide Phe-Arg (peptidyl-dipeptidase inhibitor) were used. To determine the contribution of each exopeptidase to the formation of NPN products, aqueous extracts of fresh alfalfa were fermented to imitate the proteolytic process of ensiled alfalfa and to ensure that each class of exopeptidase inhibitor would have immediate contact with the proteases in the alfalfa extract. Five classes of exopeptidases; namely, aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, dipeptidase, dipeptidyl-peptidase, and tripeptidyl-peptidase, were shown to be present in alfalfa leaves, each playing a different role in alfalfa protein degradation. Aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, and dipeptidase were the main exopeptidases contributing to the formation of NH(3)-N. Among the 5 exopeptidases, tripeptidyl-peptidase appeared to be the principal exopeptidase in hydrolyzing forage protein into peptides, whereas carboxypeptidase and dipeptidase appeared to be more important in contributing to the formation of amino acid-N. Dipeptidyl-peptidase and tripeptidyl-peptidase did not play a role in the formation of NH(3)-N or amino acid-N. Dipeptidase, carboxypeptidase, and tripeptidyl-peptidase were the principal exopeptidases for hydrolyzing forage protein into NPN during ensilage, and treatment with a mixture of the 5 inhibitors reduced the total NPN concentration in the fermented alfalfa extract to about 45% of that in the control after 21 d of fermentation.

  17. Effect of quantity, quality, and length of alfalfa hay on selective consumption by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, C; Armentano, L E

    2003-02-01

    Twenty-four lactating Holstein cows were used in a replicated 6 x 6 Latin square design. Experimental periods were 6 or 7 d. Cows were housed in tie-stalls, and diets were fed ad libitum twice daily at 1100 and 1600 h. Diets contained 60% concentrate and either 40% alfalfa hay or 20% alfalfa hay and 20% alfalfa silage (dry matter basis). The effect of quantity, quality, and length of hay on sorting behavior was determined. Treatments consisted of 20% lower or higher quality long alfalfa hay, 20% lower or higher quality chopped alfalfa hay, and 40% lower or higher quality chopped alfalfa hay. Variation of sorting among cows was also determined. Particle size distribution of samples of as-fed total mixed rations and orts were determined using the Wisconsin particle size separator. Screens have square holes with diagonals of 26.9, 18, 8.98, 5.61, and 1.65 mm (screens Y1 to Y5, respectively). Sorting was calculated as the actual intake of each fraction expressed as a percentage ofthe predicted intake. Increasing the proportion of dry hay increased sorting. Quality of alfalfa hays that were offered did not affect sorting activity. Feeding long alfalfa hay increased selective consumption of fine particles. However, feeding long alfalfa hay also increased intake of longer particles because a higher percentage of long particles was offered. Across treatments, animals consistently sorted against longer particles in favor of finer particles. In particular, intake of Y1 as a percentage of the predicted intake was the most variable. Average Y1 intake, across the six treatments for each cow, was between 60 and 70% of predicted intake for four cows, 71 to 80% for 11 cows, 81 to 90% for five cows, 91 to 100% for two cows, and 101 to 110% for two cows. On one diet a cow failed to consume any of the Y1 portion of the total mixed ration. This variation among animals in sorting of very long feed particles may have practical significance.

  18. Microgravity and clinorotation cause redistribution of free calcium in sweet clover columella cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    In higher plants, calcium redistribution is believed to be crucial for the root to respond to a change in the direction of the gravity vector. To test the effects of clinorotation and microgravity on calcium localization in higher plant roots, sweet clover (Melilotus alba L.) seedlings were germinated and grown for two days on a slow rotating clinostat or in microgravity on the US Space Shuttle flight STS-60. Subsequently, the tissue was treated with a fixative containing antimonate (a calcium precipitating agent) during clinorotation or in microgravity and processed for electron microscopy. In root columella cells of clinorotated plants, antimonate precipitates were localized adjacent to the cell wall in a unilateral manner. Columella cells exposed to microgravity were characterized by precipitates mostly located adjacent to the proximal and lateral cell wall. In all treatments some punctate precipitates were associated with vacuoles, amyloplasts, mitochondria, and euchromatin of the nucleus. A quantitative study revealed a decreased number of precipitates associated with the nucleus and the amyloplasts in columella cells exposed to microgravity as compared to ground controls. These data suggest that roots perceive a change in the gravitational field, as produced by clinorotation or space flights, and respond respectively differently by a redistribution of free calcium.

  19. Impact of Kura Clover Living Mulch on Nitrous Oxide Emissions in a Corn-Soybean System.

    PubMed

    Turner, Peter A; Baker, John M; Griffis, Timothy J; Venterea, Rodney T

    2016-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (NO), produced primarily in agricultural soils, is a potent greenhouse gas and is the dominant ozone-depleting substance. Efforts to reduce NO emissions are underway, but mitigation results have been inconsistent. The leguminous perennial kura clover ( M. Bieb.) (KC) can grow side-by-side with cash crops in rotational corn ( L.)-soybean ( L.) systems. With biological nitrogen fixation, KC provides land managers an opportunity to reduce external fertilizer inputs, which may diminish problematic NO emissions. To investigate the effect of a KC living mulch on NO emissions, automated soil chambers coupled to a NO analyzer were used to measure hourly fluxes from April through October in a 2-yr corn-soybean (CS) rotation. Emissions from the KC treatment were significantly greater than those from the conventional CS treatment despite the fact that the KC treatment received substantially less inorganic nitrogen fertilizer. A seasonal tradeoff was observed with the KC treatment wherein emissions before strip-tillage were reduced but were surpassed by high losses after strip-tillage and postanthesis. These results represent the first reported measurements of NO emissions from a KC-based living mulch. The findings cast doubt on the efficacy of KC for mitigating NO loss in CS systems. However, if KC reduces nitrate leaching losses, as has been reported elsewhere, it may result in lower indirect (offsite) NO emissions.

  20. Effects of clinorotation and microgravity on sweet clover columella cells treated with cytochalasin D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of columella cells is believed to be involved in maintaining the developmental polarity of cells observed as a reproducible positioning of cellular organelles. It is also implicated in the transduction of gravitropic signals. Roots of sweet clover (Melilotus alba L.) seedlings were treated with a microfilament disrupter, cytochalasin D, on a slowly rotating horizontal clinostat (2 rpm). Electron micrographs of treated columella cells revealed several ultrastructural effects including repositioning of the nucleus and the amyloplasts and the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) whorls. However, experiments performed during fast clinorotation (55 rpm) showed an accumulation (but no whorling) of a disorganized ER network at the proximal and distal pole and a random distribution of the amyloplasts. Therefore, formation of whorls depends upon the speed of clinorotation, and the overall impact of cytochalasin D suggests the necessity of microfilaments in organelle positioning. Interestingly, a similar drug treatment performed in microgravity aboard the US Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-54, January 1993) caused a displacement of ER membranes and amyloplasts away from the distal plasma membrane. In the present study, we discuss the role of microfilaments in maintaining columella cell polarity and the utility of clinostats to simulate microgravity.

  1. Meloidogyne trifoliophila n. sp. (Nemata: Meloidogynidae), a Parasite of Clover from Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, E. C.; Eisenback, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    Meloidogyne trifoliophila n. sp. is described from white clover collected at Ames Plantation, Fayette County, Tennessee. The perineal pattern is rounded, with long, smooth striae and rounded arch, and without distinct lateral lines or perivulval striae. The female stylet is 12.6-15.5 μm long, the excretory pore is level with or up to one stylet length posterior to the stylet knobs, and the vulva is subterminal. The posterior terminus is weakly protuberant. The male lateral field is composed of approximately eight repeatedly broken or forked incisures. The male stylet is 17.0-18.9 μm long, the stylet knobs are rounded and sloping, gradually merging with the shaft, and the head region consists of one large annule. Second-stage juveniles are 357-400 μm long, with a stylet length of 11.9-13.6 μm and one head annule. The tail tapers to a slender tip. This new species is similar to M. graminicola and M. triticoryzae but differs from them in perineal pattern and lateral field morphology, and numerous morphometric characters. PMID:19274133

  2. Genotypic Variation in a Breeding Population of Yellow Sweet Clover (Melilotus officinalis)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Kai; Jahufer, M. Z. Z.; Wu, Fan; Di, Hongyan; Zhang, Daiyu; Meng, Xuanchen; Zhang, Jiyu; Wang, Yanrong

    2016-01-01

    Yellow sweet clover is a widely spread legume species that has potential to be used as a forage crop in Western China. However, limited information is available on the genetic variation for herbage yield, key morphological traits, and coumarin content. In this study, 40 half sib (HS) families of M. officinalis were evaluated for genotypic variation and phenotypic and genotypic correlation for the traits: LS (leaf to stem ratio), SV (spring vigor), LA (leaf area), PH (plant height), DW (herbage dry weight), SD (stem diameter), SN (stem number), Cou (coumarin content), SY (seed yield), across two locations, Yuzhong and Linze, in Western China. There was significant (P < 0.05) genotypic variation among the HS families for all traits. There was also significant (P < 0.05) genotype-by-environment interaction for the traits DW, PH, SD, SN, and SV. The estimates of HS family mean repeatability across two locations ranged from 0.32 for SN to 0.89 for LA. Pattern analysis generated four HS family groups where group 3 consisted of families with above average expression for DW and below average expression for Cou. The breeding population developed by polycrossing the selected HS families within group 3 will provide a significant breeding pool for M. officinalis cultivar development in China. PMID:27462321

  3. The carbon footprint of pasture-based milk production: can white clover make a difference?

    PubMed

    Yan, M-J; Humphreys, J; Holden, N M

    2013-02-01

    Carbon footprint (CF) calculated by life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to compare greenhouse gas emissions from pasture-based milk production relying mainly on (1) fertilizer N (FN), or (2) white clover (WC). Data were sourced from studies conducted at Solohead Research Farm in Ireland between 2001 and 2006. Ten FN pastures stocked between 2.0 and 2.5 livestock units (LU)/ha with fertilizer N input between 180 and 353 kg/ha were compared with 6 WC pastures stocked between 1.75 and 2.2 LU/ha with fertilizer N input between 80 and 99 kg/ha. The WC-based system had 11 to 23% lower CF compared with FN (average CF was 0.86 to 0.87 and 0.97 to 1.13 kg of CO(2)-eq/kg of energy-corrected milk, respectively, 91% economic allocation). Emissions of both N(2)O and CO(2) were lower in WC, whereas emissions of CH(4) (per kg of energy-corrected milk) were similar in both systems. Ratio sensitivity analysis indicated that the difference was not caused by error due to modeling assumptions. Replacing fertilizer N by biological nitrogen fixation could lower the CF of pasture-based milk production.

  4. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stem vascular tissue suggests a role for invertase in cell wall cellulose synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants were transformed with two constructs: (1) a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase promoter isolated from alfalfa nodules (PEPC-4) fused to GUS; and (2) PEPC-4 fused with sucrose synthase (SUS) isolated from alfalfa nodules. Histochemical staining for GUS in st...

  5. Implications of season and management protocol on the landscape of gene regulation during diapause development in the Alfalfa Leaf Cutting Bee

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : The alfalfa leaf cutting bee, Megachile rotundata, is the world’s most intensively managed solitary bee for commercial pollination. It is the primary pollinator of seed alfalfa, a valuable crop for dairy cow feed. Overwintering bees emerge in the spring during alfalfa bloom to mate an...

  6. Occurrence of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) populations along roadsides in southern Manitoba, Canada and their potential role in intraspecific gene flow.

    PubMed

    Bagavathiannan, Muthukumar V; Gulden, Robert H; Van Acker, Rene C

    2011-04-01

    Alfalfa is a highly outcrossing perennial species that can be noticed in roadsides as feral populations. There remains little information available on the extent of feral alfalfa populations in western Canadian prairies and their role in gene flow. The main objectives of this study were (a) to document the occurrence of feral alfalfa populations, and (b) to estimate the levels of outcrossing facilitated by feral populations. A roadside survey confirmed widespread occurrence of feral alfalfa populations, particularly in alfalfa growing regions. The feral populations were dynamic and their frequency ranged from 0.2 to 1.7 populations km(-1). In many cases, the nearest feral alfalfa population from alfalfa production field was located within a distance sufficient for outcrossing in alfalfa. The gene flow study confirmed that genes can move back and forth between feral and cultivated alfalfa populations. In this study, the estimated outcrossing levels were 62% (seed fields to feral), 78% (feral to seed fields), 82% (hay fields to feral) and 85% (feral to feral). Overall, the results show that feral alfalfa plants are prevalent in alfalfa producing regions in western Canada and they can serve as bridges for gene flow at landscape level. Management of feral populations should be considered, if gene flow is a concern. Emphasis on preventing seed spill/escapes and intentional roadside planting of alfalfa cultivars will be particularly helpful. Further, realistic and pragmatic threshold levels should be established for markets sensitive to the presence of GE traits.

  7. The Role of Proanthocyanidins Complex in Structure and Nutrition Interaction in Alfalfa Forage

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Arjan; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the main forages grown in the world. Alfalfa is a winter hardy, drought tolerant, N-fixing legume with a good longevity, high yield, high nutrient levels, high digestibility, unique structural to non-structural components ratio, high dry matter intake, and high animal productivity per hectare. However, its main limitation is its excessively rapid initial rate of protein degradation in the rumen, which results in pasture bloat and inefficient use of protein with consequent excessive excretions of nitrogen into the environment. Proanthocyanidins are secondary plant metabolites that can bind with protein and thereby reduce the rate and extent of ruminal protein degradation. However, these secondary metabolites do not accumulate in alfalfa. This review aims to firstly describe the events involved in the rapid release of protein from alfalfa and its effect on ruminant nutrition, environmental pollution, and pasture bloat; secondly, to describe occurrence, structure, functions and benefits of moderate amounts of proanthocyanidin; and finally, to describe the development of alfalfa which accumulates moderate amounts of proanthocyanidins. The emphasis of this review focuses on the role of proanthocyanidins compounds in structure and nutrition interaction in ruminant livestock systems. PMID:27223279

  8. Transgenic Alfalfa Plants Expressing the Sweetpotato Orange Gene Exhibit Enhanced Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Myoung Duck; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Park, Woo Sung; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Li, Hongbing; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xiping; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr) is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants), three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8) selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands. PMID:25946429

  9. The Role of Proanthocyanidins Complex in Structure and Nutrition Interaction in Alfalfa Forage.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Arjan; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-05-23

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the main forages grown in the world. Alfalfa is a winter hardy, drought tolerant, N-fixing legume with a good longevity, high yield, high nutrient levels, high digestibility, unique structural to non-structural components ratio, high dry matter intake, and high animal productivity per hectare. However, its main limitation is its excessively rapid initial rate of protein degradation in the rumen, which results in pasture bloat and inefficient use of protein with consequent excessive excretions of nitrogen into the environment. Proanthocyanidins are secondary plant metabolites that can bind with protein and thereby reduce the rate and extent of ruminal protein degradation. However, these secondary metabolites do not accumulate in alfalfa. This review aims to firstly describe the events involved in the rapid release of protein from alfalfa and its effect on ruminant nutrition, environmental pollution, and pasture bloat; secondly, to describe occurrence, structure, functions and benefits of moderate amounts of proanthocyanidin; and finally, to describe the development of alfalfa which accumulates moderate amounts of proanthocyanidins. The emphasis of this review focuses on the role of proanthocyanidins compounds in structure and nutrition interaction in ruminant livestock systems.

  10. Accumulation and residue of napropamide in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and soil involved in toxic response.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li E; Yang, Hong

    2011-06-15

    Napropamide belongs to the amide herbicide family and widely used to control weeds in farmland. Intensive use of the herbicide has resulted in widespread contamination to ecosystems. The present study demonstrated an analysis on accumulation of the toxic pesticide napropamide in six genotypes of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), along with biological parameters and its residues in soils. Soil was treated with napropamide at 3 mg kg(-1) dry soil and alfalfa plants were cultured for 10 or 30 d, respectively. The maximum value for napropamide accumulation is 0.426 mg kg(-1) in shoots and 2.444 mg kg(-1) in roots. The napropamide-contaminated soil with alfalfa cultivation had much lower napropamide concentrations than the control (soil without alfalfa cultivation). Also, the content of napropamide residue in the rhizosphere was significantly lower than that in the non-rhizosphere soil. M. sativa exposed to 3 mg kg(-1) napropamide showed inhibited growth. Further analysis revealed that plants treated with napropamide accumulated more reactive oxygen species (O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2)) and less amounts of chlorophyll. However, not all cultivars showed oxidative injury, suggesting that the alfalfa cultivars display different tolerance to napropamide.

  11. Effects of dairy slurry application and bale moisture concentration on voluntary intake and digestibility of alfalfa silage by sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy slurry is used commonly as a fertilizer in agriculture. However, residual effects of slurry application on intake and digestibility of alfalfa silage from subsequent harvests are not well known. The objective of this study was to determine if moisture concentration of alfalfa silage and timing...

  12. Effects of extended prepupal storage duration on adult flight physiology of the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata (F.), is a solitary, cavity-nesting bee and is the primary pollinator for alfalfa seed production. Bee management practices include cold storage during the prepupal stage. Fluctuating thermal regimes (FTR) during cold storage increases survival of c...

  13. Variation in alfalfa leafcutting bee (hymenoptera: megachilidae) reproductive success according to location of nests in United States commercial domiciles.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low, medium, and high stocking densities of Megachile rotundata, the alfalfa leafcutting bee, were released over four years in three research plots of Utah alfalfa planted at seed-production rates. A low number of bees (46-79% of released) survived the incubation and field emergence processes, and ...

  14. The genetic components of extended life expectancy in chilled, post-diapause quiescent Alfalfa Leafcutting Bees, Megachile rotundata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, a solitary bee native to Eurasia, is the world’s most intensively managed solitary bee and has become the primary pollinator for alfalfa seed production. These bees, when commercially managed, are overwintered as diapausing prepupae under static ther...

  15. Assessment of the importance of alfalfa to the epidemiology of xylellae diseases in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of alfalfa in the epidemiology of xylellae diseases in the San Joaquin Valley of California was assessed. Alfalfa was investigated as it is a known host of Xylella fastidiosa and often harbors large populations of a native vector, Draeculacephala minerva. Laboratory inoculation of fourtee...

  16. In vitro ruminal fermentation of treated alfalfa silage using ruminal inocula from high and low feed-efficient lactating cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to assess the effect of two additives on alfalfa silage and on in vitro ruminal fermentation when using ruminal inocula prepared from high feed-efficient (HE) and low feed-efficient (LE) lactating cows. Second and third cut alfalfa was harvested at 40% bloom stage, treated with con...

  17. Chalkbrood Transmission in the Alfalfa Leafcutting Bee: The Impact of Disinfecting Bee Cocoons in Loose Cell Management Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A good understanding of pathogen transmission in a host population should illuminate methods for disease prevention and control. A case in point for this is the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata), a solitary bee which is used extensively for pollination of alfalfa grown for seed. Propaga...

  18. Laboratory Bioassays to Evaluate Fungicides for Chalkbrood Control in Larvae of the Alfalfa Leafcutting Bee, Megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chalkbrood, a fungal disease caused by Ascosphaera aggregata, is a major mortality factor in populations of the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata) used in commercial alfalfa seed production. Four formulated fungicides, Benlate®, Captan®, Orbit™, and Rovral®, were tested in the laboratory...

  19. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa stem vascular tissue by a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: sucrose synthase construct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important role of sucrose synthase (SUS, EC 2.4.1.13) in plants is to provide UDP-glucose needed for cellulose synthesis in cell walls. We examined if over-expressing SUS in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) would increase cellulose content of stem cell walls. Alfalfa plants were transformed with two ...

  20. Effect of synthetic auxin herbicides on seed development and viability in genetically-engineered glyphosate-resistant alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feral populations of cultivated crops have the potential to function as bridges and reservoirs that contribute to the unwanted movement of novel genetically engineered (GE) traits. Recognizing that feral alfalfa has the potential to lower genetic purity in alfalfa seed production fields when it is g...

  1. Alfalfa varieties differ markedly in seedling survival when interseeded into corn and treated with prohexadione-calcium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interseeded alfalfa could serve as a dual purpose crop for providing groundcover during silage corn production and forage during subsequent years of production, but this system has been unworkable because competition between the co-planted crops often leads to stand failure of interseeded alfalfa. R...

  2. Effect of dietary alfalfa on the fatty acid composition and indexes of lipid metabolism of rabbit meat.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, A; Mugnai, C; Roscini, V; Mattioli, S; Ruggeri, S; Castellini, C

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse and increase the quality of rabbit meat by increasing the levels of natural bioactive compounds through providing fresh alfalfa to rabbits as complementary feed. At 50 days of age, forty rabbits were divided into two homogeneous groups and fed pelleted feed (control group) or pelleted feed plus fresh alfalfa (alfalfa group). The lipid content of meat was significantly higher in the control group likely due to the higher feed consumption observed in this group. The same trend was observed in the contents of myristic, palmitoleic, oleic and linoleic acid. On the contrary, the supplementation of fresh alfalfa increased the stearic, linolenic, eicosatrienoic, eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and total polyunsaturated fatty acid contents; also the total monounsaturated fatty acids and the α- and γ-tocopherol content was significantly lower. Moreover, alfalfa ingestion decreased the n-6 content, n-6/n-3 ratio and thrombogenicity index.

  3. Host Suitability of Twelve Leguminosae Species to Populations of Meloidogyne hapla and M. chitwoodi

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, G. D.; Rumbaugh, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Legumes of the genera Astragalus (milkvetch), Coronilla (crownvetch), Lathyrus (pea vine), Lotus (birdsfoot trefoil), Medicago (alfalfa), Melilotus (clover), Trifolium (clover), and Vicia (common vetch) were inoculated with a population of Melaidogyne chitwoodi from Utah or with one of three M. hapla populations from California, Utah, and Wyoming.Thirty-nine percent to 86% of alfalfa (M. scutellata) and 10% to 55% of red clover (T. pratense) plants survived inoculation with the nematode populations at a greenhouse temperature of 24 ± 3°C. All plants of the other legume species survived all nematode populations, except 4% of the white clover (T. repens) plants inoculated with the California M. hapla population. Entries were usually more susceptible to the M. hapla populations than to M. chitwoodi. Galling of host roots differed between nematode populations and species. Root-galling indices (1 = none, 6 = severely galled) ranged from 1 on pea vine inoculated with the California population of M. hapla to 6 on yellow sweet clover inoculated with the Wyoming population of M. hapla. The nematode reproductive factor (Rf = final nematode population/initial nematode population) ranged from 0 for all nematode populations on pea vine to 35 for the Wyoming population of M. hapla on alfalfa (M. sativa). PMID:19277158

  4. Host Suitability of Twelve Leguminosae Species to Populations of Meloidogyne hapla and M. chitwoodi.

    PubMed

    Griffin, G D; Rumbaugh, M D

    1996-09-01

    Legumes of the genera Astragalus (milkvetch), Coronilla (crownvetch), Lathyrus (pea vine), Lotus (birdsfoot trefoil), Medicago (alfalfa), Melilotus (clover), Trifolium (clover), and Vicia (common vetch) were inoculated with a population of Melaidogyne chitwoodi from Utah or with one of three M. hapla populations from California, Utah, and Wyoming.Thirty-nine percent to 86% of alfalfa (M. scutellata) and 10% to 55% of red clover (T. pratense) plants survived inoculation with the nematode populations at a greenhouse temperature of 24 +/- 3 degrees C. All plants of the other legume species survived all nematode populations, except 4% of the white clover (T. repens) plants inoculated with the California M. hapla population. Entries were usually more susceptible to the M. hapla populations than to M. chitwoodi. Galling of host roots differed between nematode populations and species. Root-galling indices (1 = none, 6 = severely galled) ranged from 1 on pea vine inoculated with the California population of M. hapla to 6 on yellow sweet clover inoculated with the Wyoming population of M. hapla. The nematode reproductive factor (Rf = final nematode population/initial nematode population) ranged from 0 for all nematode populations on pea vine to 35 for the Wyoming population of M. hapla on alfalfa (M. sativa).

  5. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: A Model for Involving Undergraduates in Large Astronomy Collaborations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David W.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) has allowed faculty and students from a wide range of public and private colleges and especially those with small astronomy programs to learn how science is accomplished in a large collaboration while contributing to the scientific goals of a legacy radio astronomy survey. This effort has been made possible through the collaboration of the ALFALFA PIs and graduate students, Arecibo Observatory staff, and the faculty at 19 undergraduate-focussed institutions. In this talk, we will discuss how the UAT model works for the ALFALFA project and lessons learned from our efforts over the 8 years of grant funding. We will provide suggestions on how the model could be applied to other legacy projects, particularly in such areas as online collaboration and software usage by undergraduates. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, and AST-1211005.

  6. Effect of year and cutting on equations for estimating net energy of alfalfa forage.

    PubMed

    Belyea, R; Restrepo, R; Martz, F; Ellersieck, M

    1999-09-01

    The net energy of lactation (NEL) concentration of forages is important for formulating diets. The equations presently used to estimate NEL of alfalfa are based on limited data. Our objective was to determine whether a larger database would provide more relevant equations. One hundred eighty samples of alfalfa were taken over four cuttings and 2 yr, combined into 45 composites and analyzed for neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber (ADF), and in vitro true digestibility. Finally, NEL values were estimated using neutral detergent fiber and in vitro true digestibility. Prediction equations were obtained by regressing NEL upon ADF concentration. Changes in NEL with age of alfalfa at harvest differed with year and cutting. Estimation of NEL would be more accurate with equations specific for cutting and year, but such an approach would be difficult to use in practice. When data were pooled across years, four cutting-specific equations were obtained; these had different intercepts and slopes and gave different NEL values for a given ADF content. Differences among estimates of NEL increased as ADF increased. Data were combined across years and cuttings to give an overall equation that was similar to published prediction equations. Compared with NEL values from the cutting-specific equations, the overall equation underestimated NEL for first cutting alfalfa and overestimated NEL of second cutting alfalfa. A lack of precision in estimating NEL could equate to 1.5 to 2.5 kg of milk/d. Cutting specific equations should be used to estimate the NEL of first- and second-cutting alfalfa; NEL of the third and fourth cuttings could be estimated using an overall equation.

  7. Physiological response of glandular-haired alfalfa to potato leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) injury.

    PubMed

    Lamp, W O; Alexander, L C; Nguyen, M

    2007-02-01

    Plant tolerance to herbivory is a key approach for managing pests. In alfalfa, Medicago sativa, the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae, is a major pest as a result of the cascade of plant responses to piercing-sucking injury. To identify tolerance to its injury based on alfalfa physiology, experiments were conducted in the field and greenhouse. In our comparison of the response of field-grown alfalfa cultivars to standardized leafhopper densities, net photosynthesis and transpiration rates of 'Geneva' leaves were reduced by 18 and 21%, respectively, by leafhopper presence compared with a rate change of <1% of resistant 'EverGreen' leaves. Under greenhouse conditions, alfalfa clones varied in their level of gas exchange (net photosynthesis and transpiration) and stem elongation responses to leafhopper injury. For example, in the comparison of seven clones, net photosynthesis declined an average of 40.7% with leafhopper injury, although individual clones varied from 26.6 to 74.3% reduction. Internode elongation after 2 d was 60.3% less on injured stems compared with healthy stems, but again, the individual clones varied from 17.3 to 91.9%. In a time-course study of selected clones, clones varied in their level of injury just after and 3 d after insect removal. Gas exchange responses of all clones recovered by 7 d after cessation of injury. In a choice test, leafhoppers spent similar amounts of time on the susceptible clone and the most tolerant clone; however, their precise feeding behaviors were not measured. Thus, the variable response of clones to injury may be either true physiological tolerance or antixenosis from a change in feeding behavior. This study showed putative tolerance to leafhopper injury among alfalfa genotypes, suggesting that tolerance could be the basis for crop protection in alfalfa from potato leafhopper injury.

  8. Assessing the Spatial Variability of Alfalfa Yield Using Satellite Imagery and Ground-Based Data.

    PubMed

    Kayad, Ahmed G; Al-Gaadi, Khalid A; Tola, ElKamil; Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Zeyada, Ahmed M; Kalaitzidis, Chariton

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variability in a crop yield is viewed as one of the key steps in the implementation of precision agriculture practices. Therefore, a study on a center pivot irrigated 23.5 ha field in Saudi Arabia was conducted to assess the variability in alfalfa yield using Landsat-8 imagery and a hay yield monitor data. In addition, the study was designed to also explore the potential of predicting the alfalfa yield using vegetation indices. A calibrated yield monitor mounted on a large rectangular hay baler was used to measure the actual alfalfa yield for four alfalfa harvests performed in the period from October 2013 to May 2014. A total of 18 Landsat-8 images, representing different crop growth stages, were used to derive different vegetation indices (VIs). Data from the yield monitor was used to generate yield maps, which illustrated a definite spatial variation in alfalfa yield across the experimental field for the four studied harvests as indicated by the high spatial correlation values (0.75 to 0.97) and the low P-values (4.7E-103 to 8.9E-27). The yield monitor-measured alfalfa actual yield was compared to the predicted yield form the Vis. Results of the study showed that there was a correlation between actual and predicted yield. The highest correlations were observed between actual yield and the predicted using NIR reflectance, SAVI and NDVI with maximum correlation coefficients of 0.69, 0.68 and 0.63, respectively.

  9. Assessing the Spatial Variability of Alfalfa Yield Using Satellite Imagery and Ground-Based Data

    PubMed Central

    Kayad, Ahmed G.; Al-Gaadi, Khalid A.; Tola, ElKamil; Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Zeyada, Ahmed M.; Kalaitzidis, Chariton

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variability in a crop yield is viewed as one of the key steps in the implementation of precision agriculture practices. Therefore, a study on a center pivot irrigated 23.5 ha field in Saudi Arabia was conducted to assess the variability in alfalfa yield using Landsat-8 imagery and a hay yield monitor data. In addition, the study was designed to also explore the potential of predicting the alfalfa yield using vegetation indices. A calibrated yield monitor mounted on a large rectangular hay baler was used to measure the actual alfalfa yield for four alfalfa harvests performed in the period from October 2013 to May 2014. A total of 18 Landsat-8 images, representing different crop growth stages, were used to derive different vegetation indices (VIs). Data from the yield monitor was used to generate yield maps, which illustrated a definite spatial variation in alfalfa yield across the experimental field for the four studied harvests as indicated by the high spatial correlation values (0.75 to 0.97) and the low P-values (4.7E-103 to 8.9E-27). The yield monitor-measured alfalfa actual yield was compared to the predicted yield form the Vis. Results of the study showed that there was a correlation between actual and predicted yield. The highest correlations were observed between actual yield and the predicted using NIR reflectance, SAVI and NDVI with maximum correlation coefficients of 0.69, 0.68 and 0.63, respectively. PMID:27281189

  10. Effects of plant enzyme inactivation or sterilization on lipolysis and proteolysis in alfalfa silage.

    PubMed

    Ding, W R; Long, R J; Guo, X S

    2013-04-01

    This experiment studied the contribution of plant enzymes and microbial activity on lipolysis and proteolysis in ensiled alfalfa. Before ensiling, the wilted alfalfa was treated with plant enzyme inactivation by autoclaving or with sterilization by γ-ray irradiation. The treated alfalfa was then inoculated with commercial lactic acid bacteria inoculants and ensiled for 40 d. Alfalfa without treatment was ensiled as the control. The content of total fatty acid (FA) after ensiling decreased 43% in the control silage and 28% in the γ-ray-treated silage, but did not change in the autoclave-treated silage. Among the major FA (C16:0, C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3), a considerable increase was observed in proportion of C16:0 in the control silage as compared with fresh alfalfa; conversely, decreases in proportions of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 occurred during ensilage. Silage treated with γ-ray radiation at ensiling had a smaller proportion of C16:0 and greater proportions of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 than control silage. Autoclave treatment further decreased proportions of C16:0 and most of the other FA, and increased C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 proportions in comparison with γ-ray treatment. Proportions of C16:0, C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3 and other detected FA (except for the proportion of C15:0) did not differ between fresh forage and autoclave-treated silage. Remarkably, smaller nonprotein nitrogen content was observed in the autoclave-treated silage compared with the γ ray-treated silage or the control silage. These results indicated that an extensive lipolysis occurred during ensiling of alfalfa, and plant enzymes played a major role in lipolysis and proteolysis.

  11. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This New Horizons image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io was taken at 13:05 Universal Time during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby on February 28, 2007. It shows the reddish color of the deposits from the giant volcanic eruption at the volcano Tvashtar, near the top of the sunlit crescent, as well as the bluish plume itself and the orange glow of the hot lava at its source. The relatively unprocessed image on the left provides the best view of the volcanic glow and the plume deposits, while the version on the right has been brightened to show the much fainter plume, and the Jupiter-lit night side of Io.

    New Horizons' color imaging of Io's sunlit side was generally overexposed because the spacecraft's color camera, the super-sensitive Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), was designed for the much dimmer illumination at Pluto. However, two of MVIC's four color filters, the blue and 'methane' filter (a special filter designed to map methane frost on the surface of Pluto at an infrared wavelength of 0.89 microns), are less sensitive than the others, and thus obtained some well-exposed views of the surface when illumination conditions were favorable. Because only two color filters are used, rather than the usual three, and because one filter uses infrared light, the color is only a rough approximation to what the human eye would see.

    The red color of the Tvashtar plume fallout is typical of Io's largest volcanic plumes, including the previous eruption of Tvashtar seen by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft in 2000, and the long-lived Pele plume on the opposite side of Io. The color likely results from the creation of reddish three-atom and four-atom sulfur molecules (S3 and S4) from plume gases rich in two-atom sulfur molecules (S2 After a few months or years, the S3 and S4 molecules recombine into the more stable and familiar yellowish form of sulfur consisting of eight-atom molecules (S8), so these red deposits are only seen around recently-active Io

  12. Calcium Nutrition and Resistance of Alfalfa to Ditylenchus dipsaci

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, R. T.; Huisingh, D.

    1970-01-01

    Stem nematode-susceptible 'Atlantic' and resistant 'Lahontan' alfalfa seedlings, grown in sand and watered with complete nutrient solutions containing 0.75, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, or 12.0 mM Ca⁺⁺/liter, were inoculated with Ditylenchus dipsaci (the stem nematode) 5-6 days after emergence. Approximately equal numbers of nematodes entered the tissues of each variety/Ca⁺⁺ concentration within 2 days. Penetration was reduced at 12 mM Ca⁺⁺/liter. Reproduction during 21 days following inoculation yielded 3-fold, or greater, nematode increases in 'Atlantic' buds at all Ca⁺⁺ concentrations, in 'Atlantic' cotyledons at the four lower concentrations, in 'Lahontan' buds at the lowest concentration and in 'Lahontan' cotyledons at the two lowest concentrations. Reproduction was lower at the higher Ca⁺⁺ concentrations. Increased nutrient Ca⁺⁺ concentrations resulted in increased Ca⁺⁺ content, decreased Na⁺ and K⁺ content, and unchanged Mg⁺⁺ content of buds and cotyledons. Accordingly, increased nutrient Ca⁺⁺ resulted in increased divalent/monovalent cation ratios (Ca⁺⁺ + Mg⁺⁺/Na⁺ + K⁺ ). Resistance to reproduction was correlated more closely with the divalent/monovalent cation ratio than with Ca⁺⁺ content of tissue, At the four higher nutrient Ca⁺⁺ concentrations, 'Lahontan' buds had higher ratios than 'Atlantic,' and infected buds had higher ratios than noninfected buds. Although cation balance modifies disease expression, the basic resistance mechanism remains unknown. PMID:19322318

  13. Thermoperiodism Synchronizes Emergence in the Alfalfa Leafcutting Bee (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).

    PubMed

    Yocum, George D; Rinehart, Joseph P; Yocum, Ian S; Kemp, William P; Greenlee, Kendra J

    2016-02-01

    Alfalfa seed production in the northwestern United States and western Canada is heavily dependent upon the pollinating services of Megachile rotundata (F.) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). M. rotundata females nest in cavities either naturally occurring or in artificial nesting blocks. Because of the physical nature of the nest, M. rotundata brood may have limited to no exposure to photoperiodic cues in order to regulate important circadian functions. Therefore, various thermoperiod regimes were used to characterize the possible role of thermoperiodism in synchronizing M. rotundata adult emergence. Adult emergence was monitored using a microprocessor-controlled event logger. Incubating bees under constant 29°C and darkness resulted in an arhythmic adult emergence pattern. Exposing developing M. rotundata to a thermoperiod synchronized emergence to the beginning of the thermophase and decreased the total number of days required for all adults to emerge. The amplitude of the thermoperiod regulated the timing of peak emergence in relationship to the increase in temperature. A thermoperiod amplitude of only 2°C was sufficient to synchronize peak adult emergence to take place during the rise in temperature. Increasing the amplitude of the thermoperiod to 4 or 8°C caused a positively correlated shift in peak emergence to later in the thermophase. Brood stored under constant 29°C and darkness for different durations (May or June early in the growing season or July or August late in the growing season) or under a fluctuating thermal regime (base temperature of 6°C and daily 1-h pulse of 20°C until September or November) maintained their capacity for entraining emergence timing by thermoperiodism.

  14. Expression of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase during Leaf Ontogeny in White Clover1

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Donald A.; Yoo, Sang Dong; Butcher, Stephen M.; McManus, Michael T.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the expression of three distinct 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase genes during leaf ontogeny in white clover (Trifolium repens). Significant production of ethylene occurs at the apex, in newly initiated leaves, and in senescent leaf tissue. We used a combination of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and 3′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends to identify three distinct DNA sequences designated TRACO1, TRACO2, and TRACO3, each with homology to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase. Southern analysis confirmed that these sequences represent three distinct genes. Northern analysis revealed that TRACO1 is expressed specifically in the apex and TRACO2 is expressed in the apex and in developing and mature green leaves, with maximum expression in developing leaf tissue. The third gene, TRACO3, is expressed in senescent leaf tissue. Antibodies were raised to each gene product expressed in Escherichia coli, and western analysis showed that the TRACO1 antibody recognizes a protein of approximately 205 kD (as determined by gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis) that is expressed preferentially in apical tissue. The TRACO2 antibody recognizes a protein of approximately 36.4 kD (as determined by gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis) that is expressed in the apex and in developing and mature green leaves, with maximum expression in mature green tissue. No protein recognition by the TRACO3 antibody could be detected in senescent tissue or at any other stage of leaf development. PMID:10318691

  15. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (I) Single Hadron Correlation Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold,Konstantinos Orginos,Silas R. Beane,Will Detmold,William Detmold,Thomas C. Luu,Konstantinos Orginos,Assumpta Parreno,Martin J. Savage,Aaron Torok,Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of high-statistics calculations of correlation functions generated with single-baryon interpolating operators on an ensemble of dynamical anisotropic gauge-field configurations generated by the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using a tadpole-improved clover fermion action and Symanzik-improved gauge action. A total of 292,500 sets of measurements are made using 1194 gauge configurations of size 20^3 x 128 with an anisotropy parameter \\xi= b_s/b_t = 3.5, a spatial lattice spacing of b_s=0.1227\\pm 0.0008 fm, and pion mass of m_\\pi ~ 390 MeV. Ground state baryon masses are extracted with fully quantified uncertainties that are at or below the ~0.2%-level in lattice units. The lowest-lying negative-parity states are also extracted albeit with a somewhat lower level of precision. In the case of the nucleon, this negative-parity state is above the N\\pi threshold and, therefore, the isospin-1/2 \\pi N s-wave scattering phase-shift can be extracted using Luescher's method. The disconnected contributions to this process are included indirectly in the gauge-field configurations and do not require additional calculations. The signal-to-noise ratio in the various correlation functions is explored and is found to degrade exponentially faster than naive expectations on many time-slices. This is due to backward propagating states arising from the anti-periodic boundary conditions imposed on the quark-propagators in the time-direction. We explore how best to distribute computational resources between configuration generation and propagator measurements in order to optimize the extraction of single baryon observables.

  16. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (IV) The Volume Dependence of the Light Hadron Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S R; Detmold, W; Lin, H W; Luu, T C; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M J; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2011-07-01

    The volume dependence of the octet baryon masses and relations among them are explored with Lattice QCD. Calculations are performed with nf = 2 + 1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ? 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 4.0 fm, with an anisotropic lattice spacing of b_s ? 0.123 fm in the spatial direction, and b_t = b_s/3.5 in the time direction, and at a pion mass of m_\\pi ? 390 MeV. The typical precision of the ground-state baryon mass determination is

  17. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (III) Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Detmold, William; Lin, Huey-Wen; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin; Torok, Aaron M.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L^3 ~ (2.5 fm)^3, and a spatial lattice spacing of b ~ 0.123 fm. Luscher’s method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The N-Sigma interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the ^3 S _1 channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N-Lambda interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is Lambda-Lambda, indicating that the Lambda-Lambda interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of the NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting

  18. High statistics analysis using anisotropic clover lattices: (III) Baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Lin, H; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2010-01-19

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L{sup 3} {approx} (2.5 fm){sup 3}, and a spatial lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.123 fm. Luescher's method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The isospin-3/2 N{Sigma} interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the {sup 3}S{sub 1} channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N{Lambda} interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is {Lambda}{Lambda}, indicating that the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting is explored. In particular, focus is placed on the window of time slices for which the signal-to-noise ratio does not degrade exponentially, as this provides the opportunity to extract quantitative information about multi-baryon systems.

  19. Vapor-phase toxicity of butylbenzyl phthalate to three plant species: white mustard, chinese cabbage, and white clover.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, J W; Staples, C A; Brown, D; Enste-Diefenbach, R

    2008-08-01

    During the manufacture of products containing butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), low emissions to the air may occur. Due to potential exposure of terrestrial communities to BBP vapors, phytotoxicity tests were conducted using Chinese cabbage, white mustard, and white clover. No significant effects on shoot growth were observed at the higher BBP vapor-phase concentration tested, which measured 5.7 microg/m(3). The overall practicality of vapor-phase testing of chemicals with very low vapor pressures is reviewed. These study results suggest that environmental risk from exposure to BBP vapor is negligible for plants.

  20. Hydrographs Showing Groundwater Level Changes for Selected Wells in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed and Vicinity, Pierce County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justin, G.B.; Julich, R.; Payne, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Selected groundwater level hydrographs for the Chambers-Clover Creek watershed (CCCW) and vicinity, Washington, are presented in an interactive web-based map to illustrate changes in groundwater levels in and near the CCCW on a monthly and seasonal basis. Hydrographs are linked to points corresponding to the well location on an interactive map of the study area. Groundwater level data and well information from Federal, State, and local agencies were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS), Groundwater Site Inventory (GWSI) System.

  1. Identification and analysis of a genomic strain cluster of mycoplasmalike organisms associated with Canadian peach (eastern) X disease, western X disease, and clover yellow edge.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I M; Gundersen, D E; Davis, R E; Chiykowski, L N

    1992-01-01

    Genetic interrelatedness among 13 strains of mycoplasmalike organisms (MLOs) from various sources was evaluated by dot hybridization and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses using cloned DNA probes derived from Canadian peach X (CX) and western X (WX) MLOs. Dot hybridization analysis indicated that CX, WX, and clover yellow edge MLOs are closely related and form a distinct strain cluster that is only distantly related to the 10 other MLOs. Similarity coefficients derived from restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that CX, WX, and clover yellow edge MLOs represent three distinct genomic types. Images PMID:1356968

  2. Increase phosphorus availability from the use of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L) green manure in rice (Oryza sativa L.) agroecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoye; Shi, Dongyan; Lv, Aimin; Wang, Shengyin; Yuan, Shili; Zhou, Peng; An, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Alfalfa is a good green manure source, but its effect on rice growth has not been fully elucidated. Two green manure species, alfalfa and broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and two N fertilizer levels, alone or combination, were applied to a rice field. The results indicated that alfalfa had more pronounced effects on increasing soil labile phosphorus (P) fractions (including NaHCO3-Pi, NaOH-Pi), P uptake and soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, urease, acid phosphatase and β-glucosidase) than broad bean and N fertilizer. The transformation of NaHCO3-Po to labile P regulated by alfalfa played a significant direct and indirect effect on grain yield. Although a much lower N input from alfalfa addition, a similar grain yield with N fertilizer treatment was achieved, and the integration of alfalfa with N fertilizer produced the highest grain yield and P availability, which was associated with the highest urease, acid phosphatase and β-glucosidase activity in soil. These results indicate that alfalfa green manure had a great ability of increasing grain yield through enhancing P availability in rice paddy, which could give us a way to reduce N fertilizer application by enhancing P availability. PMID:27833163

  3. Increase phosphorus availability from the use of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L) green manure in rice (Oryza sativa L.) agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoye; Shi, Dongyan; Lv, Aimin; Wang, Shengyin; Yuan, Shili; Zhou, Peng; An, Yuan

    2016-11-11

    Alfalfa is a good green manure source, but its effect on rice growth has not been fully elucidated. Two green manure species, alfalfa and broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and two N fertilizer levels, alone or combination, were applied to a rice field. The results indicated that alfalfa had more pronounced effects on increasing soil labile phosphorus (P) fractions (including NaHCO3-Pi, NaOH-Pi), P uptake and soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenase, urease, acid phosphatase and β-glucosidase) than broad bean and N fertilizer. The transformation of NaHCO3-Po to labile P regulated by alfalfa played a significant direct and indirect effect on grain yield. Although a much lower N input from alfalfa addition, a similar grain yield with N fertilizer treatment was achieved, and the integration of alfalfa with N fertilizer produced the highest grain yield and P availability, which was associated with the highest urease, acid phosphatase and β-glucosidase activity in soil. These results indicate that alfalfa green manure had a great ability of increasing grain yield through enhancing P availability in rice paddy, which could give us a way to reduce N fertilizer application by enhancing P availability.

  4. Fixed-Precision Sequential Sampling Plans for Estimating Alfalfa Caterpillar, Colias lesbia, Egg Density in Alfalfa, Medicago sativa, Fields in Córdoba, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Gerardo V.; Porta, Norma C. La; Avalos, Susana; Mazzuferi, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    The alfalfa caterpillar, Colias lesbia (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), is a major pest of alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), crops in Argentina. Its management is based mainly on chemical control of larvae whenever the larvae exceed the action threshold. To develop and validate fixed-precision sequential sampling plans, an intensive sampling programme for C. lesbia eggs was carried out in two alfalfa plots located in the Province of Córdoba, Argentina, from 1999 to 2002. Using Resampling for Validation of Sampling Plans software, 12 additional independent data sets were used to validate the sequential sampling plan with precision levels of 0.10 and 0.25 (SE/mean), respectively. For a range of mean densities of 0.10 to 8.35 eggs/sample, an average sample size of only 27 and 26 sample units was required to achieve a desired precision level of 0.25 for the sampling plans of Green and Kuno, respectively. As the precision level was increased to 0.10, average sample size increased to 161 and 157 sample units for the sampling plans of Green and Kuno, respectively. We recommend using Green's sequential sampling plan because it is less sensitive to changes in egg density. These sampling plans are a valuable tool for researchers to study population dynamics and to evaluate integrated pest management strategies. PMID:23909840

  5. Yield and forage quality of glandular-haired alfalfa under alfalfa weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and potato leafhopper (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) pest pressure in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, Theresa A; Youngman, Roger R; Laub, Curt A; Brewster, Carlyle C; Kuhar, Thomas P

    2006-08-01

    Cultivars of glandular-haired alfalfa, Medicago sativa L., such as '54H69', are currently available and marketed as being resistant to potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). 54H69 and a standard, nonglandular-haired alfalfa 'Choice' were evaluated at two locations in Virginia over a 3-yr period. Dry matter yields and concentrations of crude protein and acid detergent fiber were compared at the first, second, and third harvests. Overall, the two cultivars produced similar dry matter yields of comparable forage quality in the absence of insecticides at both locations in each year. Untreated 54H69 did not produce greater dry matter yields than untreated Choice under either light or heavier potato leafhopper pest pressure. Concentrations of crude protein did not vary between the two cultivars at any harvest. Some differences in concentrations of acid detergent fiber were detected between cultivars, but these differences were not consistent among years, harvests, or between locations. Further comparisons between untreated 54H69 and treated Choice were made, but few significant differences were detected in dry matter yields or forage quality. An economic analysis for the study indicated that a grower planting 54H69 would realize less net revenue than a grower planting Choice, largely because of the seed premium for the glandular-haired cultivar and the evident need to treat 54H69 with insecticide for control of alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and potato leafhopper.

  6. Fixed-precision sequential sampling plans for estimating alfalfa caterpillar, Colias lesbia, egg density in alfalfa, Medicago sativa, fields in Córdoba, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Serra, Gerardo V; Porta, Norma C La; Avalos, Susana; Mazzuferi, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    The alfalfa caterpillar, Colias lesbia (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), is a major pest of alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), crops in Argentina. Its management is based mainly on chemical control of larvae whenever the larvae exceed the action threshold. To develop and validate fixed-precision sequential sampling plans, an intensive sampling programme for C. lesbia eggs was carried out in two alfalfa plots located in the Province of Córdoba, Argentina, from 1999 to 2002. Using Resampling for Validation of Sampling Plans software, 12 additional independent data sets were used to validate the sequential sampling plan with precision levels of 0.10 and 0.25 (SE/mean), respectively. For a range of mean densities of 0.10 to 8.35 eggs/sample, an average sample size of only 27 and 26 sample units was required to achieve a desired precision level of 0.25 for the sampling plans of Green and Kuno, respectively. As the precision level was increased to 0.10, average sample size increased to 161 and 157 sample units for the sampling plans of Green and Kuno, respectively. We recommend using Green's sequential sampling plan because it is less sensitive to changes in egg density. These sampling plans are a valuable tool for researchers to study population dynamics and to evaluate integrated pest management strategies.

  7. Correlation of fermentation characteristics with intake and digestibility of alfalfa silage in gestating ewes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baled silage production provides benefits to farmers because it reduces leaf losses, and requires a shorter wilting time, thereby limiting risks of exposure to rain compared with making hay. Our objective was to investigate the correlation of alfalfa silage fermentation parameters with intake and di...

  8. Effects of wrapping time delays on the nutritive value of baled alfalfa silages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baled silages are an attractive forage conservation option, especially for small and mid-sized beef and dairy producers. Our objectives were to test the effects of delayed wrapping on the nutritive value of baled alfalfa silages on a pre- and post-storage basis. A secondary objective was to evaluate...

  9. Growth, Intake, Diet Digestibility, and Nitrogen Use in Three Hair Sheep Breeds Fed Alfalfa Hay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pen feeding and metabolism trials were conducted to determine intake, diet digestibility and nitrogen (N) use in three hair sheep breeds with differing growth potential offered an alfalfa hay diet. For pen feeding, 24 6-mo-old wether lambs, equally representing the Barbados Blackbelly, Katahdin, an...

  10. (Almost) Dark Galaxies in the ALFALFA Survey: HI-bearing Ultra-Diffuse Galaxies, and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; ALFALFA Almost Darks Team

    2017-01-01

    Scaling relations between HI and stars in galaxies suggest strong ties between their atomic gas content and star formation laws. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) blind extragalactic HI survey is well positioned to locate very low surface brightness sources that lie off these relations, the most extreme of which may fall below optical detection limits. Thus, the ALFALFA (Almost) Darks Project has been investigating extreme outliers from these relations by studying the ~1% of ALFALFA sources without apparent stellar counterparts in major optical surveys. We have obtained deep HI and optical imaging of 25 of these candidate "dark" sources. We find that most "dark" sources are not extreme "(almost) dark" galaxies. A few are rare OH Megamasers, redshifted into the ALFALFA bandpass, and many are part of large galactic plumes, stretching as far as 600 kpc from their host galaxy. However, a small handful of sources appear to be galaxies with extreme stellar systems. We find multiple systems with HI mass to stellar mass ratios an order of magnitude larger than typical gas rich dwarfs. Further, we find an isolated population of HI-bearing "ultra diffuse" galaxies (UDGs), with stellar masses of dwarfs, but HI and optical radii of L* galaxies. We suggest that these sources may be related to recently reported gas poor, quiescent UDGs.

  11. Effect of chemical inhibitors of photorespiration on nitrogenase activity in nodulated alfalfa plants.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Olivares, J

    1980-12-01

    Nitrogen fixation (measured as acetylene reduction) by whole nodulated alfalfa plants was stimulated when the plants were treated with isonicotinic acid hydracide (INH) and glyoxylate, both inhibitors of the glycolate pathway of carbohydrate metabolism, at concentrations of 300 and 100 mM, respectively. Reducing energetic loses caused by photorespiration results in an increase in the symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

  12. Flavonoids Released Naturally from Alfalfa Seeds Enhance Growth Rate of Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) releases different flavonoids from seeds and roots. Imbibing seeds discharge 3′,4′,5,7-substituted flavonoids; roots exude 5-deoxy molecules. Many, but not all, of these flavonoids induce nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The dominant flavonoid released from alfalfa seeds is identified here as quercetin-3-O-galactoside, a molecule that does not induce nod genes. Low concentrations (1-10 micromolar) of this compound, as well as luteolin-7-O-glucoside, another major flavonoid released from germinating seeds, and the aglycones, quercetin and luteolin, increase growth rate of R. meliloti in a defined minimal medium. Tests show that the 5,7-dihydroxyl substitution pattern on those molecules was primarily responsible for the growth effect, thus explaining how 5-deoxy flavonoids in root exudates fail to enhance growth of R. meliloti. Luteolin increases growth by a mechanism separate from its capacity to induce rhizobial nod genes, because it still enhanced growth rate of R. meliloti lacking functional copies of the three known nodD genes. Quercetin and luteolin also increased growth rate of Pseudomonas putida. They had no effect on growth rate of Bacillus subtilis or Agrobacterium tumefaciens, but they slowed growth of two fungal pathogens of alfalfa. These results suggest that alfalfa can create ecochemical zones for controlling soil microbes by releasing structurally different flavonoids from seeds and roots. PMID:16668056

  13. Variable salinity responses of 12 alfalfa genotypes and comparative expression analyses of salt-response genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve alfalfa genotypes that were selected for biomass under salinity, differences in Na and Cl concentrations in shoots and K/Na ratio were evaluated in this long-term salinity experiment. The selected plants were cloned to reduce genetic variability within each genotype. Salt tolerance (ST) index...

  14. Impacts of Contrasting Alfalfa Production Systems on the Drivers of Carabid Beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Community Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goosey, H B; McKenzie, S C; Rolston, M G; O'Neill, K M; Menalled, F D

    2015-08-01

    Growing concerns about the environmental consequences of chemically based pest control strategies have precipitated a call for the development of integrated, ecologically based pest management programs. Carabid or ground beetles (Coleoptera:Carabidae) are an important group of natural enemies of common agricultural pests such as aphids, slugs, and other beetles. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most common forage crop species in the semi-arid western United States. In 2011, Montana alone produced 4.0 × 10(6 )Mg of alfalfa on 8.1 × 10(5 )ha for gross revenue in excess of US$4.3 × 10(8), making it the third largest crop by revenue. We conducted our study over the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons. Each year, our study consisted of three sites each with adjacent systems of monoculture alfalfa, alfalfa nurse cropped with hay barley, and an uncultivated refuge consisting of a variety of forbs and grasses. Carabid community structure differed and strong temporal shifts were detected during both 2012 and 2013. Multivariate fuzzy set ordination suggests that variation in canopy height among the three vegetation systems was primarily responsible for the differences observed in carabid community structure. Land managers may be able to enhance carabid species richness and total abundance by creating a heterogeneous vegetation structure, and nurse cropping in particular may be effective strategy to achieve this goal.

  15. Gene flow in commercial alfalfa fields and implications to isolation and seed certification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a perennial species with an out-crossing rate of between 67 and 77 percent. Pollen is primarily vectored by bees. An accurate understanding of the frequency with which foreign pollen results in viable seed set is critical to establishing appropriate mechanisms for i...

  16. Gene Expression Analysis of Alfalfa Seedlings Response to Acid-Aluminum

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Aimin; Wang, Shengyin; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Acid-Aluminum (Al) is toxic to plants and greatly affects crop production worldwide. To understand the responses of plants to acid soils and Aluminum toxicity, we examined global gene expression using microarray data in alfalfa seedlings with the treatment of acid-Aluminum. 3,926 genes that were identified significantly up- or downregulated in response to Al3+ ions with pH 4.5 treatment, 66.33% of which were found in roots. Their functional categories were mainly involved with phytohormone regulation, reactive oxygen species, and transporters. Both gene ontology (GO) enrichment and KEGG analysis indicated that phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, and flavonoid biosynthesis played a critical role on defense to Aluminum stress in alfalfa. In addition, we found that transcription factors such as the MYB and WRKY family proteins may be also involved in the regulation of reactive oxygen species reactions and flavonoid biosynthesis. Thus, the finding of global gene expression profile provided insights into the mechanisms of plant defense to acid-Al stress in alfalfa. Understanding the key regulatory genes and pathways would be advantageous for improving crop production not only in alfalfa but also in other crops under acid-Aluminum stress. PMID:28074175

  17. Emergence, forage production, and ion relations of alfalfa in response to saline waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L) is an important crop utilized in regions under irrigation commonly impacted by salinity. In this study we evaluate the effect of salinity, as a continual process, from emergence to mature plant growth in successive harvests. We studied emergence, biomass production, salt ...

  18. Evaluation of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) populations' response to salinity stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa is a moderately salt tolerant crop with high economic return, therefore more suitable for production with lower quality water than most high value crops. This study was conducted to examine the effects of the irrigation water salt type (ST=Cl- or SO4 2-) and five salinity levels (ECiw= 0.85,...

  19. Milk production response to feeding alfalfa silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mini-silo trials, silages treated with a Lactobacillus plantarum silage inoculant (Ecosyl, Yorkshire, UK) had increased in vitro rumen microbial biomass production compared to untreated. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage treated with this inoculant could produce a milk production r...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 Isolated from Alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Harrison, James; Dornbusch, Melinda R; Samac, Deborah; Studholme, David J

    2016-02-11

    We report here the annotated draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming. A comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathogen and alfalfa.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 Isolated from Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, James; Dornbusch, Melinda R.; Samac, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    We report here the annotated draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming. A comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathogen and alfalfa. PMID:26868403

  2. Population Dynamics of Empoasca fabae (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) in Central Iowa Alfalfa Fields.

    PubMed

    Weiser Erlandson, L A; Obrycki, J J

    2015-01-01

    Adults and nymphs of Empoasca fabae Harris (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) and adults of predatory species in the families Coccinellidae, Anthocoridae, Nabidae, Chrysopidae, and Hemerobiidae were sampled in Iowa alfalfa fields from June to September in 1999 and 2000. The relationship between each predatory taxa and E. fabae was examined using regression analysis. In 2000, all predators were found to be positively correlated with the presence of E. fabae during all periods sampled and most likely contributed to mortality. Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemiptera: Anthoridae) was the most numerous insect predatory species; population numbers ranged from 0 to 1 and 0.1 to 3.7 adults per 0.25 m(2) in 1999 and 2000, respectively. Partial life tables were constructed for E. fabae nymphs for two alfalfa-growing periods. Nymphs were grouped into three age intervals: first and second, third and fourth, and fifth instars. For the first alfalfa growing period examined, E. fabae nymphal mortality was 70% in 1999 and 49% in 2000. During the last growing period of each season (August-September), total nymphal mortality was relatively low (<25%). Adult E. fabae density ranged from 5.4 to 25.6 and 1.4-9.2 per 0.25 m(2) in 1999 and 2000, respectively. E. fabae population peaks were similar for each age interval in all growing periods. This study provides further information on the population dynamics of E. fabae and its relationship with select predatory species in Iowa alfalfa fields.

  3. Alfalfa stand length and subsequent crop patterns in the upper Midwestern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain perspective on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), annual crop rotations in the upper midwestern United States, USDA-National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) cropland data layers (CDLs) and USDA-NRCS soil survey layers were combined for six states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Minn...

  4. Reducing water inputs with subsurface drip irrigation may improve alfalfa nutritive value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigated alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is an important forage crop for western Kansas dairy producers. Concerns over decreasing groundwater supplies have prompted the need to develop more efficient methods of irrigation. We investigated the effects of a subsurface drip irrigation system at three lev...

  5. Molybdate in Rhizobial Seed-Coat Formulations Improves the Production and Nodulation of Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiqiong; Deng, Bo; Zhang, Yingjun; Cobb, Adam B.; Zhang, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Rhizobia-legume symbiosis is the most well researched biological nitrogen fixation system. Coating legume seeds with rhizobia is now a recognized practical measure for improving the production of legume corp. However, the efficacy of some commercial rhizobia inoculants cannot be guaranteed in China due to the low rate of live rhizobia in these products. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to assess the effects of different rhizobial inoculant formulations on alfalfa productivity and nitrogen fixation. Two rhizobia strains, (ACCC17631 and ACCC17676), that are effective partners with alfalfa variety Zhongmu No. 1 were assessed with different concentrations of ammonium molybdate in seed-coat formulations with two different coating adhesives. Our study showed that the growth, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation ability of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17631 rhizobial strain were greatest when the ammonium molybdate application was0.2% of the formulation. An ammonium molybdate concentration of 0.1% was most beneficial to the growth of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17676 rhizobial strain. The sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate, used as coating adhesives, did not have a significant effect on alfalfa biomass and nitrogen fixation. However, the addition of skimmed milk to the adhesive improved nitrogenase activity. These results demonstrate that a new rhizobial seed-coat formulation benefitted alfalfa nodulation and yield. PMID:28099471

  6. Overexpressing Arabidopsis ABF3 increases tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses and reduces leaf size in alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Su, Guoxia; Li, Min; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Soo Young; Li, Hongbing; Huang, Jin; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xi-Ping; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR 3 (ABF3), a bZIP transcription factor, plays an important role in regulating multiple stress responses in plants. Overexpressing AtABF3 increases tolerance to various stresses in several plant species. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), one of the most important perennial forage crops worldwide, has high yields, high nutritional value, and good palatability and is widely distributed in irrigated and semi-arid regions throughout the world. However, drought and salt stress pose major constraints to alfalfa production. In this study, we developed transgenic alfalfa plants (cv. Xinjiang Daye) expressing AtABF3 under the control of the sweetpotato oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SAF plants) via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. After drought stress treatment, we selected two transgenic lines with high expression of AtABF3, SAF5 and SAF6, for further characterization. Under normal conditions, SAF plants showed smaller leaf size compared to non-transgenic (NT) plants, while no other morphological changes were observed. Moreover, SAF plants exhibited enhanced drought stress tolerance and better growth under drought stress treatment, which was accompanied by a reduced transpiration rate and lower reactive oxygen species contents. In addition, SAF plants showed an increased tolerance to salt and oxidative stress. Therefore, these transgenic AtABF3 alfalfa plants might be useful for breeding forage crops with enhanced tolerance to environmental stress for use in sustainable agriculture on marginal lands.

  7. Divergent alfalfa root system architecture is maintained across environment and nutrient supply

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant root system architecture can alter and be altered by soil fertility and other environmental conditions. In soils with suboptimal fertility, plant root length often is correlated with P and K uptake because these nutrients are supplied by diffusion. We developed alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) pop...

  8. Managing foliar and root rot diseases of alfalfa for improving yield and persistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to the six most common diseases across the United States is available in modern alfalfa cultivars. However, several diseases are becoming increasing problems in many parts of the country. Recognizing these problems is the first step in using crop management strategies to minimize diseases...

  9. First report of Alfalfa mosaic virus infecting basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) in California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) plants collected from a field in Imperial County, CA in May, 2011 were found to exhibit yellowing, chlorotic sectors and spots on leaves, resulting in plants being unmarketable. Total nucleic acid was extracted from plants and tested by RT-PCR for the presence of Alfalfa...

  10. Crop mergers: Management of soil contamination and leaf loss in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maximizing the capacity and subsequent efficiency of the forage harvester necessitates consolidation (raking or merging) of alfalfa cuttings. Although rotary rakes are in wide use, the use of continuous pickup belt mergers is increasing in the Midwestern U.S. Previous work on crop consolidation is l...

  11. Extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya, and spearmint: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, M J; Glaze, L E

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported for a collaborative study to extend AOAC method 44.A06-44.A08 to extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya, and spearmint. A 5 g (spearmint) or 10 g (alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya) test portion is defatted with isopropanol in a simple reflux apparatus. Rat hairs, insect fragments, and whole insects are isolated by wet sieving on a No. 230 sieve, a deaerating boil in 40% isopropanol, and flotation with mineral oil-heptane (85 + 15) from Tween 80-Na4EDTA (1 + 1) and 40% isopropanol in a Wildman trap flask. Each product was spiked at a different level. For rat hairs, recoveries averaged 82.2% from alfalfa, 88.9% from lemon balm, 80.6% from papaya, and 79.6% from spearmint. Recoveries of whole or equivalent insects from these products averaged 66.1, 218.8, 69.4, and 85.4%, respectively; recoveries of insect fragments from these products averaged 89.6, 94.4, 94.1, and 88.1%, respectively. The method has been adopted official first action for extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, papaya, and spearmint. The extension of the method to lemon balm was not recommended because of interferences by intrinsic whole insects, which were the same species as the spike material.

  12. Growth environment, harvest management and germplasm impacts on potential ethanol and crude protein yield in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alfalfa (Medicago sativa L) biomass energy production system would produce two products. Leaves would be separated from stems to produce a high protein feed for livestock and stems would be processed to produce ethanol. Therefore, maximum yields of both leaves and stems are essential for profitab...

  13. Flight metabolic rate as an expression of quality in temperature stressed alfalfa leafcutting bees, Megachile rotundata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee,Megachile rotundata F.(Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)is a solitary species that develops inside a maternally constructed brood cell. Pre-pupal M. rotundata diapause over winter and resume development as ambient temperatures increase. Environmental cues are known to initiate b...

  14. Critical PO2 of developing Megachile rotundata, the alfalfa leaf-cutting bee

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leaf-cutting bee, Megachile rotundata, is a solitary, cavity-nesting bee. Juvenile bees develop inside brood cells constructed out of leaf pieces. During development inside the brood cell, pre-pupae may experience hypoxic conditions from both the cavity nesting behavior and brood cell ...

  15. Evaluating Headline fungicide on alfalfa production and sensitivity of pathogens to pyraclostrobin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Headline fungicide was recently registered for management of foliar diseases on alfalfa. The effect of disease control on yield, forage quality, and potential return on investment for fungicide application was determined for field experiments conducted at five locations in 2012, three in Wisconsin a...

  16. Comparison of stem morphology and anatomy of two alfalfa clonal lines exhibiting divergent cell wall composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous research, two alfalfa clonal lines (252, 1283) were identified that exhibited environmentally stable differences in stem cell walls. Compared to stems of 1283, stems of 252 have a higher cell wall concentration and greater amounts of lignin and cellulose but reduced levels of pectic suga...

  17. Quantifying the area-wide dispersal patterns of honeybees in commercial alfalfa fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to examine the foraging range of honey bees in an agroecosystem dominated by a glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready® (RR) alfalfa seed production field and several non-RR fields. Honey bee self-marking devices were attached to colonies originating from nine different apiary locat...

  18. Environmental variability and/or stability of stem fiber content and digestibility in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration and low digestibility of stem fiber constituents in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L, herbage can limit dry matter intake and energy availability in dairy and beef production systems. Stem neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), and stem neutral detergent fiber digest...

  19. Canopy visible and near-infrared reflectance data to estimate alfalfa nutritive attributes before harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proximal sensing could help improve profit margins by timing the cutting or harvesting of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), in rapid assessment of nutritive values, such as total nitrogen (N), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) as well as nutritive quality indicators such as r...

  20. Pythium and Fusarium species causing seed rot and damping-off of alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed rot and damping-off is an important disease of alfalfa, severely affecting stand establishment when conditions favor the disease. This disease may have been overlooked as a cause of poor stand establishment and reduced vigor of adult plants. Globally, 15 Pythium species have been found to cause...