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Sample records for alfred wegener medal

  1. Greenland Expeditions by Alfred Wegener - A photographic window to past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, M.; Tschürtz, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Kranzelbinder, H.; Prügger, B.; Krause, R. A.; Kalliokoski, M.; Thórhallsdóttir, E.

    2012-04-01

    On several expeditions to Greenland, Alfred Wegener (1880-1930) took pictures on glass plates from landscapes and glaciers, the expedition equipment, the people and animals taking part on the expeditions as well as physical phenomena as dust storm, clouds or spherical light phenomena. Chronologically the plates show the Danmark Expedition 1906-1908, the crossing of Greenland expedition with stop in Iceland 1912-1913, and the German Greenland Expedition 1929-1930. Until the tragic end of the expedition in 1930, Wegener was professor at the University of Graz, and such a stock of about 300 glass plates stayed there. The aim of our work is to digitize all plates for further studies. We present a first selection of Wegener's Greenland expedition pictures. For those made at Iceland in 1912 we will present a comparison of the past with pictures from the same viewing point made in 2011.

  2. Tracing the origin of Geodynamics: The Alfred Wegener Memorial Expedition 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    2012 marked the 100st anniversary of the seminal publications on Continental Drift Theory by Alfred Wegener. These publications (and Wegener's book "On the origin of the continents", published three years later) are widely accepted to be the fundamental breakthrough that opened the path to the Theory of Plate Tectoncis and ultimately the path to modern Geodynamics some 50 years later. In the same historic year of the 1912 publications, Alfred Wegener set off for what was to become the most dramatic of his three Greenland expeditions. On this expedition Wegener and Koch crossed the entire northern icecap of Greenland. In honour of the hundreds anniversary of Wegener's publications, the Austrian Academy of Sciences funded an expedition to trace the footsteps of the 1912 expedition in the spirit of Alfred Wegener, while also conducting modern Earth Science. This expedition that was conducted in summer 2014. For the expedition, a 1952 Cessna180 was acquired in Alaska, adapted with bush wheels, wing extensions and extra tanks and was flown by the author and one of the worlds most renown bush pilots from Alaska in a 10 day effort to Greenland. There, the entire NE Greenland Caledonides were covered and photographed. Field work for a masters projects was conducted and samples were collected from a series of some of the most remote locations in the Caledonides ever visited. Most spectacularly, the original sled of Wegeners 1912 expedition was found some 30 kilometers from its expected location in the Dove Bugt Region of northeastern Greenland.

  3. Why turbulence dominates the atmosphere and hydrosphere? (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    It is widely recognised that in very stable stratifications, at Richardson numbers (Ri) exceeding the critical value Ric ~ 0.25, turbulence inevitably decays and the flow becomes laminar. This is so, indeed, in the low-Reynolds-number (Re) flows, e.g., in some laboratory experiments; but this is by no means always the case. Air flows in the free atmosphere and water currents in deep ocean are almost always turbulent in spite of the strongly supercritical stratifications, with typical values of Ri varying in the interval 10 < Ri < 102. Until recently, this paradox has remained unexplained. We demonstrate that the key mechanism of the seemingly paradoxical self-preservation of the very-high-Re geophysical turbulence as a loop including (i) conversion of the turbulent kinetic unto potential energy and (ii) self-control of the negative (down-gradient) turbulent heat flux through efficient generation of the positive (counter-gradient) heat transfer by the turbulent potential energy (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008, 2009, 2013). Thanks to this loop, turbulence is maintained in supercritical stratifications and, moreover, at Ri > Ric the familiar 'strong-mixing turbulence' regime, typical of boundary-layer flows and characterised by the practically invariable turbulent Prandtl number PrT ~ 1 (the so-called 'Reynolds analogy'), gives way to a previously unknown 'wave-like turbulence' regime, wherein PrT sharply increases with increasing Ri (rather than to the laminar regime as is often the case in lab experiments). It is precisely the wave-like turbulence that dominates the free flows in the atmosphere and ocean. Modellers have long been aware that the turbulent heat transfer in the free atmosphere/ocean is much weaker than the momentum transfer. Our theory gives authentic formulation for this heuristic rule and provides physically grounded method for modelling geophysical turbulence up to very stable startifications.

  4. The three lost millennia of the last deglaciation (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Edouard

    2013-04-01

    Looking back more than thirty years, climate history over the last period of deglaciation was seen to portray a smooth transition between the last glacial maximum (LGM) centered around 18,000 years ago (based on radiocarbon), and the beginning of the Holocene at about 10,000 years before present. At that time, the renowned CLIMAP group used the stratigraphy available to reconstruct the glacial world by averaging paleothermometric data over a wide time window, ranging between at least 14,000 and 24,000 yr BP, over which period climate was assumed to be rather stable. Even if northern European pollen records showed several phases of vegetation shift, the exact duration and spatial coverage of these shifts was unknown and their climatic significance was not well-enough understood to be separated from other biological effects, such as plant migration following ice-sheet demise. Significant progress came from mass spectrometry developments applied to isotope geochronology in the mid- and late- 1980s. This allowed the precise analysis of radiocarbon on small samples such as foraminifera in marine sediments and enabled the measurement of U-Th ages for accurate dating of corals and speleothems. These technological improvements permitted meaningful comparisons between proxy records from the various archives originating from all latitudes and longitudes. Today, it is clear that the old LGM time window corresponds to a period of more than ten millennia during which there was significant climate variability, including a prominent cooling event at the beginning of the deglaciation. This cooling event is known as the 'Oldest Dryas' by palynologists, as 'Heinrich Event #1' (H1) by paleoceanographers, and has even been dubbed the 'Mystery Interval' by prominent authors as they puzzled while attempting to synthesize and interpret its records. The H1 drastic cooling, attributed to a pulse-like injection of ice and meltwater into the North Atlantic, was first evidenced in 1987 in sediments from the Iberian Margin. Three years later, significant improvements of the radiocarbon calibration demonstrated that about three millennia were missing from the deglaciation record. Accordingly, the LGM mean age was pushed from 18,000 to 21,000 yr BP, the midpoint of H1 was shifted from 13,500 to 16,000 yr BP, and the beginning of the Holocene was repositioned at about 11,500 yr BP. This new climate chronology was subsequently confirmed by counting 'cryovarves' within the GRIP and GISP2 Greenland ice cores. These studies have since been complemented by many other records from polar ice, marine and lacustrine sediments and cave speleothems. In addition to extending the chronology by three additional millennia, improvement also arose from the quality of the new geological archives. These archives have allowed studies at much higher resolution than was previously achieved in the framework of CLIMAP, which included many records based on deep-sea cores characterized by low sedimentation rate, and thus very susceptible to smoothing processes such as bioturbation. In addition, analytical geochemistry has only recently provided techniques adapted to the production of high-resolution time series of various proxies based on elemental ratios, on organic compounds or on stable and radiogenic isotopes. More than a dozen years after the H1 discovery, the same Iberian Margin sediments were used to show that H1 comprised at least two phases, H1a and H1b, based on ice rafted debris (IRD) and other proxies. It is now recognized that the entire H1 event (H1 sensu lato) is a three millennia-long period (ca. 17,500 to 14,500 yr BP). To illustrate the progress in this research field, I will review the key records that can be used to document the complex nature of this episode. The H1 (s.l.) included several phases of intense cooling, of precipitation changes - notably at low latitudes and in the Asian monsoon area, of retreat and decay of glacial ice-sheets - as evidenced in sediments collected in river mouths, and of sea-level rise as recorded in corals from Tahiti and Barbados. Various isotopic proxies of deep-sea ventilation have been used to identify variations during the H1 sub-phases of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC), indicating that ocean heat transport was involved in the observed climate fluctuations. The various records documenting different climate parameters at many locations over the Earth can also be used in meaningful comparison with numerical model simulations performed in a transient mode. Collectively, these works allow to estimate the phase relationships between the causes (insolation and the greenhouse effect) and the often abrupt responses of the various components of the climate system, such as the atmosphere, oceans and ice sheets. Although these studies concern a naturally-occurring global warming that took place over a long time period, useful parallels will be drawn with the evolution of modern climate. In fact, the phase relationships between forcings (such as greenhouse gases and solar input) and changes in regional and global temperatures are also at the heart of modern global climate change. As for early deglaciation, the ocean can modulate warming regionally, thereby delaying, or even temporarily masking, long-term changes. Climate changes over the last century have been smaller in magnitude than those of the last deglaciation. Fortunately for us, there has been no recent collapse of gigantic ice masses such as the Laurentian and Fennoscandian ice sheets. However, most climate models show a 20 to 40% reduction of the MOC during the 21st century. Even if this change exerts only a minor influence on the projected magnitude of global warming, such a slowdown in ocean circulation change is generally sufficient to reduce the simulated warming over the North Atlantic with a resulting impact on adjacent continents, including Europe.

  5. The Complex Physics of Climate Change and Climate Sensitivity: A Grand Unification (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghil, M.

    2012-04-01

    Recent estimates of climate evolution over the coming century still differ by several degrees. This uncertainty motivates in part the work presented in this lecture. The complex physics of climate change arises from the large number of components of the climate system, as well as from the wealth of processes occurring in each of the components and across them. This complexity has given rise to countless attempts to model each component and process, as well as to two overarching approaches to apprehend the complexity as a whole: deterministically nonlinear and stochastically linear. Call them the Ed Lorenz and the Klaus Hasselmann approach, respectively, for short. We propose a "grand unification" of these two approaches that relies on the theory of random dynamical systems (RDS). In particular, we apply this theory to the problem of climate sensitivity, and study the random attractors of nonlinear, stochastically perturbed systems, as well as the time-dependent probability densities associated with these attractors. The random attractors so obtained are visually spectacular objects that generalize the strange attractors of the Lorenz approach. Results are presented for several simple climate models, from the classical Lorenz convection model to El Nino-Southern Oscillation models. Their attractors carry probability densities with nice physical properties. Implications of these properties for climate predictability on interannual and decadal time scales are discussed. The RDS setting allows one to examine the interaction of internal climate variability with the forcing, whether natural or anthropogenic, and to provide a definition of climate sensitivity that takes into account the climate system's non-equilibrium behavior. Such a definition is of the essence in studying systematically the sensitivity of global climate models (GCMs) to the uncertainties in tens of semi-empirical parameters; it is given here in terms of the response of the appropriate probability densities to changes in the parameters and compared with numerical results for a somewhat simplified GCM. This lecture is the result of recent collaborations with M. D. Chekroun, D. Kondrashov, J. C. McWilliams, J. D. Neelin, E. Simonnet, S. Wang, and I. Zaliapin; more broadly, it represents the fruition of all I learned from tens of Ph. D. students, post-docs and other colleagues over the years.

  6. [Wegener and Wegener's disease].

    PubMed

    Knuistingh Neven, Arie

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the history and significance of the eponym 'Wegener'. After the American College of Chest Physicians awarded Wegener with the Master Clinician Award, discussion about his Nazi past arose. Should the eponym 'Wegener' be maintained?

  7. The Challenges of Developing a Framework for Global Water Cycle Monitoring and Prediction (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Eric F.

    2014-05-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Water Strategy ("From Observations to Decisions") recognizes that "water is essential for ensuring food and energy security, for facilitating poverty reduction and health security, and for the maintenance of ecosystems and biodiversity", and that water cycle data and observations are critical for improved water management and water security - especially in less developed regions. The GEOSS Water Strategy has articulated a number of goals for improved water management, including flood and drought preparedness, that include: (i) facilitating the use of Earth Observations for water cycle observations; (ii) facilitating the acquisition, processing, and distribution of data products needed for effective management; (iii) providing expertise, information systems, and datasets to the global, regional, and national water communities. There are several challenges that must be met to advance our capability to provide near real-time water cycle monitoring, early warning of hydrological hazards (floods and droughts) and risk assessment under climate change, regionally and globally. Current approaches to monitoring and predicting hydrological hazards are limited in many parts of the world, and especially in developing countries where national capacity is limited and monitoring networks are inadequate. This presentation describes the developments at Princeton University towards a seamless monitoring and prediction framework at all time scales that allows for consistent assessment of water variability from historic to current conditions, and from seasonal and decadal predictions to climate change projections. At the center of the framework is an experimental, global water cycle monitoring and seasonal forecast system that has evolved out of regional and continental systems for the US and Africa. The system is based on land surface hydrological modeling that is driven by satellite remote sensing precipitation to predict current hydrological conditions, flood potential and the state of drought. Seasonal climate model forecasts are downscaled and bias-corrected to drive the land surface model to provide hydrological forecasts and drought products out 6-9 months. The system relies on historic reconstructions of water variability over the 20th century, which forms the background climatology to which current conditions can be assessed. Future changes in water availability and drought risk are quantified based on bias-corrected and downscaled climate model projections that are used to drive the land surface models. For regions with lack of on-the-ground data we are field-testing low-cost environmental sensors and along with new satellite products for terrestrial hydrology and vegetation, integrating these into the system for improved monitoring and prediction. At every step there are scientific challenges whose solutions are only partially being solved. In addition there are challenges in delivering such systems as "climate services", especially to societies with low technical capacity such as rural agriculturalists in sub-Saharan Africa, but whose needs for such information are great. We provide an overview of the system and some examples of real-world applications to flood and drought events, with a focus on Africa.

  8. Wegener, Alfred Lothar (1880-1930)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    German climatologist and geophysicist who suggested the phenomena of continental drift and plate tectonics. His idea was that a super-continent he called Pangaea had broken up, the pieces drifting to their present positions. His evidence was the fit of South America and Africa, and similarities in climate, fossil record and geology across the join. His path had been prepared by ALEXANDER VON HUMB...

  9. Alfred Gilman.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, K

    2001-08-01

    At the age of 10, Alfred Gilman wanted to go to the moon; on a visit to New York's Hayden Planetarium with his parents, he signed up to be an astronaut. Fifty years later, Gilman is preparing to take on a different, yet equally astronomical task. Instead of traveling to outer space, he is heading up a research program to detail the workings of cellular space.

  10. Indolent Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, D G; Bourne, J T; Dieppe, P A; Easty, D L

    1983-01-01

    Classical Wegener's granulomatosis is a relentlessly progressive and rapidly fatal disease. A pulmonary 'limited form' is associated with a much better prognosis. We report 3 cases of Wegener's granulomatosis which ran a prolonged indolent course despite major manifestations outside the lower respiratory tract and review the literature on survival. Images PMID:6882035

  11. The Wegener Memorial Expedition to the Greenland Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt; Piller, Werner

    2014-05-01

    2012 marked the 100 anniversary of the publication of Alfred Wegeners book: 'Die Entstehung der Kontinente' - which is often hailed as the discovery of continental drift theory in the advent of plate tectonics. Wegener was later appointed as professor for geophysics at the University of Graz in Austria - in part for this discovery. He held this position until his death in Greenland in 1930. In honor of the hundredth anniversary of the 1912 milestone publication, the University of Graz in Austria stages an expedition to Greenland in the spirit of Alfred Wegener, supported by the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The expedition aims predominantly to unravel secrets of the Caledonides of Northeastern Greenland using an extensive sampling program to some of the least explored corners of the orogenic belt. Particular emphasis will be placed on the Hager Bjerg allochthon and its relationship to the hanging wall and footwall units. The expedition will use the unparalleled flexibility of small aircraft that will be piloted by experienced Alaskan bush pilots and brought to Greenland from Alaska for this purpose.

  12. Seismological medals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, P.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic events are environmental events, so it is not surprising that mankind, in coming to terms with earthquakes, has tried to express his feelings about them in an artistic manner too. By understanding the topical importance of medals in seismological affairs, we can appreciate the hertiage of the past. 

  13. ENT manifestations of Wegeners granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arpit; Deshmukh, Shraddha; Dabholkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Wegeners granulomatosis is a necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis with multisystemic involvement. We present two cases of Wegener's presenting with otological manifestations as the first symptom. These symptoms are subtle and diagnosis may be easily overlooked. Hence a high index of suspicion is required. Early diagnosis and treatment goes a long way in improving the outcomes and in preventing further complications.

  14. President Reagan Presents Medals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    President Ronald Reagan presents astronaut John Young with the Congressional Space Medal of Honor as well as NASA's Distinguished Service Medal. Astronaut Robert C. Crippen also received the Distinguished Service Medal and Dr. Alan Lovelace was presented with the President's Citizens Medal. From left to right: President Ronald Reagan Astronaut, John Young Astronaut, Robert Crippen Dr. Alan Lovelace Vice President George Bush

  15. The Canonical Alfred Hitchcock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Alfred Hitchcock is a major figure of popular culture. He was one of the founding fathers of the cinematic art and, together with Eisenstein and Murnau, helped define its visual language. So fruitful was he that a single film could spawn an entire genre, as "Psycho" helped create the modern horror film and "North by Northwest" the style and tone…

  16. The Other Alfred Binet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the major contributions of Alfred Binet. Explains why the fame of the Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale was so long lasting whereas that of his other contributions was so fleeting. Discusses implications of his contributions for current efforts to formulate unified theories of cognition and cognitive development. (Author/GLR)

  17. [Neurological involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis].

    PubMed

    Asakura, Kunihiko; Muto, Tatsuro

    2013-11-01

    Abstract Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare autoimmune disease associated with granulomatous inflammation and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small vessel vasculitis. Following the discovery of ANCA, ANCA-associated vasculitis is established as a disease entity of Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. Clinical and experimental studies have provided evidences that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3), which are major antigenic targets for ANCA in neutrophils, are not only disease markers but also involved in the pathogenesis. In addition, recent studies have revealed another potential antigen for ANCA, lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2). Though nervous system manifestations of Wegener's granulomatosis are less frequent than classical manifestations in the lungs and kidneys, 20-50% of patients demonstrate neurological involvements. Peripheral nervous system involvement (in generalized Wegener's granulomatosis) is more frequent than central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Multiple mononeuropathy and multiple cranial neuropathy are the most prevalent symptoms. CNS manifestations include cerebrovascular events, pachymeningitis, seizures, and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Here we discuss the pathogenic mechanism of ANCA and review the literature regarding neurological involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis.

  18. Wegener granulomatosis presenting as epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Miller, D Chris; Koss, Michael N

    2009-06-01

    Isolated epididymitis is a very rare presentation of Wegener granulomatosis (WG). Only 1 such case has been previously reported. We report a case of epididymitis in which WG was not suspected clinically or pathologically at orchiectomy, and the patient subsequently developed pulmonary involvement with WG. WG was ultimately diagnosed and treated after lung biopsy several months after the orchiectomy. The retrospective pathologic review of the orchiectomy specimen confirmed the presence of WG in the epididymis; the testicular tissue was not involved.

  19. Anders receives Hess Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Anders, Edward

    Edward Anders was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony on May 31 in Baltimore. The Hess Medal recognizes outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets. The award citation and Anders' response are given here.

  20. Hanson receives Macelwane Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.; Hanson, David R.

    At the 1996 Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, David R. Hanson received the 1996 James B. Macelwane Medal, which recognizes significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability. The medal citation and Hanson's response are given here.

  1. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Newbery Medal acceptance speech of Russell Freedman, writer of children's nonfiction. Discusses the place of nonfiction in the world of children's literature, the evolution of children's biographies, and the author's work on "Lincoln." (ARH)

  2. Fulminant Wegener's granulomatosis presenting as epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Ankur; George, Ajith; Pfleiderer, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 63‐year‐old woman who presented to the emergency department with epistaxis and haemodynamic instability is reported. Subsequent investigation showed renal failure and multiple pulmonary nodules. A positive proteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody test supported the diagnosis of fulminant Wegener's granulomatosis, requiring urgent dialysis, plasma exchange and immunosuppression. This is the first report in the emergency literature of Wegener's granulomatosis presenting as acute epistaxis. Emergency physicians should consider Wegener's granulomatosis in patients with atypical epistaxis. In patients presenting with clinically severe, active disease early proteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody testing is recommended. PMID:17351208

  3. Wegener Granulomatosis: Otologic Manifestation as First Symptom.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carla Fabiane da; Polanski, Jose Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Introduction Wegener granulomatosis is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized vessels of the upper and lower respiratory tract and kidneys. Objective To describe a case of Wegener disease with atypical manifestation. Resumed Report We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman with chronic otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss as the primary symptoms, without other manifestations. Conclusion In cases of acute ear manifestations with or without hearing loss and with poor response to usual treatments, Wegener granulomatosis should be included among the possible etiologies. After adequate diagnoses and treatment of this rare disease, there was favorable evolution.

  4. ATS Presents Two Silver Medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambleton, Robert

    At the ATS convention at Bath, England, two medals were awarded. The Hans Lippershey medal was awarded to Dr. Henry C. King for The History of the Telescope. The Issac Newton medal was awarded to Robert Hambleton for his dedication to publishing the ATS Journal.

  5. National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    The nation's highest honor for American scientists and engineers, the National Medal of Science is awarded annually by the president of the United States to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to or for the total impact of their work on the current state of chemical, physical, biological, social or behavioral sciences; mathematics; or engineering. Anyone can submit a nomination. Submit a short description of the nominee's contribution and three letters of support to http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/medal.jsp by 1 May 2014.

  6. Tracheal Stenosis Because of Wegener Granulomatosis Misdiagnosed as Asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Hear, Kelley E; Ingrande, Jerry; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M; Sung, Chih-Kwang

    2016-05-15

    We describe a patient with Wegener granulomatosis whose complaint of wheezing was incorrectly attributed to asthma. Anesthesiologists must recognize that tracheal stenosis is extremely common in Wegener granulomatosis and can mimic other causes of wheezing.

  7. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, S N; Shah, V; Dillon, M J

    1998-09-01

    The prevalence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) was studied in 12 children with Wegener's granulomatosis. The serum samples were taken in the active phase of disease and were screened for ANCA by indirect immunofluorescence with normal neutrophils and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using crude neutrophil extract, proteinase 3, myeloperoxidase, cathepsin G, lactoferrin, and elastase as antigens. Of these 12 patients, 10 wre positive for ANCA in the active phase of their illness, and they showed a predominantly cytoplasmic ANCA staining pattern on indirect immunofluorescence. There were high titres of ANCA directed against crude neutrophil extract, proteinase 3, myeloperoxidase, and cathepsin G. IgM isotypes occurred as commonly as IgG isotypes. Therefore, screening for ANCA is usually but not invariably positive in children with Wegener's granulomatosis. Specific diagnosis still relies on clinical and pathological features, and the value of ANCA in the diagnosis of paediatric Wegener's granulomatosis requires further study.

  8. Wegener's granulomatosis: current and upcoming therapies

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Carol A

    2003-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a complex multisystem disease that can be associated with morbidity and mortality. The introduction of cyclophosphamide and glucocorticoids brought about the potential for long-term survival and provided the opportunity and impetus to explore treatment options that can reduce the toxicity of therapy and lessen the likelihood of relapse. With the growth of knowledge regarding disease pathophysiology and the increasing ability to selectively target the immune system, the potential options for therapeutic investigation have continued to expand. Careful study of new agents through rigorously designed trials is essential to answering questions of safety and efficacy in Wegener's granulomatosis. PMID:12823849

  9. Langley Medal awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Robert Thomas Jones, senior scientist at the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif., was awarded the distinguished Langley Medal by the Smithsonian Institution for his ‘extensive contributions in theoretical aerodynamics, particularly with regard to development of the swept wing, supersonic area rule and, more recently, the oblique wing.’ Jones is an internationally acclaimed expert on aerodynamics, optics, and biomechanics as well as an applied mathematician, astronomer, inventor, author, and violin maker.The Langley award has been given to just 16 recipients since it was established 73 years ago. Past recipients include Wilbur and Orville Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Richard Byrd. Named for Samuel Pierpont Langley, aeronautical pioneer and third secretary of the Smithsonian, the medal honors ‘especially meritorious investigations in the field of aerospace science.’

  10. Stevenson receives Hess Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaula, William M.; Stevenson, David J.

    David J. Stevenson was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on May 27, 1998, in Boston, Massachusetts. The Harry H. Hess Medal recognizes outstanding achievements in the research of the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets.A meaningful understanding of the Earth and planets requires explaining their differences. This explanation of planetary processes is difficult partly because it entails a wide range of scales—from microscale, operating at the atomic level, to macroscale, determined by boundaries thousands of kilometers apart. David Stevenson's graduate study was mainly in theoretical condensedmatter physics, but he is remarkable in his grasp of large-scale planetary processes such as mantle convection and the dynamos. He is also remarkable in his ‘instinct to attack the jugular,’ that is to go for the most important problems and for the versatility of his approaches thereto.

  11. 58. Photographic copy of historic medal, The Yellow Fever Medal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. Photographic copy of historic medal, The Yellow Fever Medal, presented to the Portsmouth Naval Hospital by the Town Council of Portsmouth, 1856. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Hospital Building, Rixey Place, bounded by Williamson Drive, Holcomb Road, & The Circle, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  12. Wegener's granulomatosis and autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, D R; Maxwell, A P; Watt, L

    1988-01-01

    We report five cases of Wegener's granulomatosis all of whom had clinical and histological evidence of disease activity at presentation and in whom autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens were detected. This test may prove useful for the diagnosis of this serious condition and help to monitor disease activity during treatment. PMID:3068870

  13. Wegener's granulomatosis of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Govett, G S; Amedee, R G

    1990-05-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is an uncommon systemic vasculitis with granuloma formation that has many manifestations in the head and neck. The otolaryngologist may be the first physician called upon to examine such a patient. Although this disease was previously fatal, treatment with cyclophosphamide and steroids has produced response rates of 93%.

  14. Walcott receives 1999 Whitten Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan P.; Walcott, Richard I.

    Richard I. Walcott was awarded the 1999 Charles A. Whitten Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremomy, which was held on December 15, 1999, in San Francisco, California. The medal recognizes outstanding achievement in research on the form and dynamics of the Earth and planets.

  15. Alfred Binet and higher education.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge; Ferrand, Ludovic

    2002-08-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, Alfred Binet sought teaching positions at the Collége de France and the Sorbonne. Binet wanted to develop experimental psychology in France, but the strong psychopathological orientation of French psychology blocked his ambition. The 1st part of this article relates the history of the introduction of psychology, via Théodule Ribot, to the Sorbonne and the Collège de France. Ribot's premature retirement from the Collège de France in 1901 triggered a battle that led to Binet's repeated failure to gain access to these institutions of highter education and the success in 1902 of Ribot's students: Pierre Janet at the Collège de France and George Dumas at the Sorbonne.

  16. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  17. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  18. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  19. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  20. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  1. Paranasal sinus obliteration in Wegener granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Roberts, R.L.; Fauci, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The authors report 14 cases of Wegener granulomatosis in which one or more paranasal sinuses were obliterated by bone. The maxillary antra were involved in all cases, with the other sinuses being affected less frequently. These changes are thought to result from chronic bacterial sinusitis superimposed on the granulomatous vasculitic process. Computed tomography dramatically demonstrated the bone changes, consisting of a combination of sinus wall thickening and trabeculated new bone formation within the sinuses.

  2. Alfred Russel Wallace deserves better.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David; Wimpenny, Julian; Venables, Alfred

    2010-09-01

    During 2009, while we were celebrating Charles Darwin and his The origin of species, sadly, little was said about the critical contribution of Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) to the development of the theory of evolution. Like Darwin, he was a truly remarkable nineteenth century intellect and polymath and, according to a recent book by Roy Davies (The Darwin conspiracy: origins of a scientific crime), he has a stronger claim to the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection than has Darwin. Here we present a critical comparison between the contributions of the two scientists. Sometimes referred to as 'The other beetle-hunter' and largely neglected for many decades, Wallace had a far greater experience of collecting and investigating animals and plants from their native habitats than had Darwin. He was furthermore much more than a pioneer biogeographer and evolutionary theorist, and also made contributions to anthropology, ethnography, geology, land reform and social issues. However, being a more modest, self-deprecating man than Darwin, and lacking the latter's establishment connections, Wallace's contribution to the theory of evolution was not given the recognition it deserved and he was undoubtedly shabbily treated at the time. It is time that Wallace's relationship with Darwin is reconsidered in preparation for 2013, the centenary of Wallace's death, and he should be recognized as at least an equal in the Wallace-Darwin theory of evolution.

  3. Gupta Receives 2008 Robert E. Horton Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Enda; Gupta, Vijay K.

    2009-02-01

    Vijay K. Gupta was awarded the 2008 Robert E. Horton Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held 17 December 2008 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for ``outstanding contributions to hydrology.''

  4. Gurnis, McComas receive Macelwane Medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Richard; Gurnis, Michael; Burch, James L.; McComas, David J.

    Michael Gurnis and David J. McComas were honored as recipients of James B. Macelwane Medals at the AGU 1993 Spring Meeting in Baltimore last May. The medal recognizes significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability. Richard O'Connell presented Gurnis' medal, and James L. Burch presented McComas' medal. Citations and responses are presented below.

  5. [Wegener's granulomatosis presenting with ischaemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Wieteska, Maria; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Wiatr, Elzbieta; Chabowski, Mariusz; Bestry, Iwona; Kurzyna, Marcin; Torbicki, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic disease of unknown origin characterized by necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis that involves primarily the upper and the lower respiratory tracts and the kidneys. A 44-year-old woman presenting with unusual neurological manifestation is reported. The patient with multiple pulmonary round shadows and hilar lymphadenopathy on the chest X-ray pictures, suffered from sudden hemiparesis episode. Computed tomography revealed ischemic stroke focus. A diagnosis of WG was confirmed by histological examination of specimen obtained during open lung biopsy. During the combination chemotherapy with prednisolone and cyclophosphamide, neurological symptoms decreased and clinical condition significantly improved.

  6. Indian Peace Medals in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prucha, Francis Paul

    Silver medals played an important role in American Indian policy for more than a century. Following a practice of the French, Spanish, and British in the New World, the United States government presented Indian peace medals to important chiefs and warriors as symbols of attachment to the new nation. In addition, the medals were marks of rank…

  7. Alfred North Whitehead: Plato's Lost Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Joseph Gerard

    1978-01-01

    The author reminisces about a course, Philosophy 3b at Harvard, taught by Alfred North Whitehead in 1934, where Whitehead moved from meditations on Plato, Epicurus, and Descartes to his own metaphysical speculations. He also discusses other philosophers at Harvard, calling the 1930s the Silver Age of the Harvard Philosophy Department. (KC)

  8. Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshner, Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    Draws an interesting and instructive parallel between the work of film director Alfred Hitchcock, a master craftsman and technician, and the process of academic research. Briefly identifies shared qualities of specific concepts clearly communicated: all of the parts serve the whole, and respect for the audience. (MJP)

  9. Humor in the Films of Alfred Hitchcock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Glenn D.

    Although usually considered the "master of suspense," Alfred Hitchcock relished working humor into his films, frequently juxtaposing it against scenes of utter gruesomeness. This placement of comic elements--comic relief--in an otherwise serious murder mystery or suspense thriller became a Hitchcock trademark early in his career.…

  10. The Contributions of Dr. Alfred Gysi.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Rodney D; Engelmeier, Robert L

    2016-11-24

    This article is a historical overview of Dr. Alfred Gysi's contributions to the profession in the areas of denture tooth and articulator design. His understanding of occlusion and mandibular movement resulted in denture tooth designs and occlusal concepts still in widespread use.

  11. Marathon of eponyms: 23 Wegener granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Langdon, J; Evans, J

    2012-03-01

    The use of eponyms has long been contentious, but many remain in common use, as discussed elsewhere (Editorial: Oral Diseases. 2009: 15; 185). The use of eponyms in diseases of the head and neck is found mainly in specialties dealing with medically compromised individuals (paediatric dentistry, special care dentistry, oral and maxillofacial medicine, oral and maxillofacial pathology and oral, oral and maxillofacial radiology and maxillofacial surgery) and particularly by hospital-centred practitioners. This series has selected some of the more recognized relevant eponymous conditions and presents them alphabetically. The information is based largely on data available from MEDLINE and a number of internet websites as noted below: the authors would welcome any corrections. This document summarizes data about Wegener granulomatosis.

  12. [Wegener's granulomatosis with pronounced kidney involvement].

    PubMed

    Heinicke, H J; Hensel, J

    1981-06-01

    It is reported on the course of histologically ascertained Wegeners' granulomatosis in 4 patients. After initial affection of the upper respiratory tract in form of necrotizing and granulomatous inflammations in all cases a generalisation of the disease with above all early and severe participation of the kidneys developed. Maximum acceleration of sedimentation, C-reactive protein, anaemia, leucocytosis, eosinophilia, thrombocytosis, enlargement of the number of alpha 2-globulins, increase of creatinine, proteinuria, erythrocyturia and leucocyturia are the most frequent pathological laboratory findings, whereas LE-cells, ANF, rheumatoid factor and decrease of the complement never could be proved. By reason of a pathogenic immunoreaction a combined glucocorticoid therapy and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and cyclophosphamide may favourably influence the course of the disease which is otherwise prognostically infaust.

  13. Colitis: an unusual presentation of Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sinnott, Joseph Dalby; Matthews, Paul; Fletcher, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) also known as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive (ANCA) vasculitis which most commonly affects the upper respiratory tract, lungs and kidneys. It is uncommon for colitis to be the primary reason for the first hospital admission related to WG. This case represents one of the few in the literature where colitis is associated with WG and in particular, where colonic involvement was the presenting symptom. The patient presented to hospital with a 3-day history of bloody diarrhoea and was treated for colitis. The disease progressed and during the second admission renal and pulmonary involvement was found. A renal biopsy showed a crescentic change and a CT-confirmed inflammatory changes in the caecum and ascending colon. A diagnosis of WG was made and appropriate treatment initiated. The patient is now in remission. PMID:23436885

  14. William Alfred Fowler (1911-1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1996-01-01

    The scientific career of W. A. Fowler enduringly enriched astronomy by providing us with a systematic treatment of nuclear reaction rates in stars. I clarify how and why this achievement earned him both the 1979 Bruce Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and the 1983 Nobel Prize in physics (jointly with S. Chandrasekhar). I attempt to share my understanding and experience of this great man, what he was like personally, and the larger context of his life. (SECTION: Obituary)

  15. [Jean Alfred Fournier: to 180th anniversary].

    PubMed

    Betekhin, M S

    2012-01-01

    Jean Alfred Fournier was professor in dermatology in Université de Paris and the director of the world-wide known venereology hospital of Saint Louisio. He is the author of many publications about clinical and social aspects of syphilidology. Fournier introduced the concept of "parasyphilis" (tabes dorsalis and general paralysis) and he was the first one who specified the relationship between these diseases and syphilis. He pointed out the significance of congenital syphilisio. In 1901 Fournier founded the French Society of sanitary and moral prevention. His ideas concerning syphilis control were implemented on the territories of many European countries.

  16. Fung receives 2004 Roger Revelle Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Elisabeth A.; Doney, Scott A.; Fung, Inez

    Inez Fung received the Revelle Medal at the 2004 Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony on 15 December, in San Francisco, California. The medal is given for outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system.

  17. Bender Receives 2008 Roger Revelle Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, Jorge; Bender, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Michael L. Bender was awarded the 2008 AGU Roger Revelle Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held 17 December 2008 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for ``outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system.''

  18. Toon receives 2011 Roger Revelle Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, Darin

    2012-01-01

    Owen Brian Toon was awarded the 2011 Roger Revelle Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system.”

  19. Alley Receives 2007 Roger Revelle Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Alley, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    Richard B. Alley was awarded the 2007 Roger Revelle Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 12 December 2007 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for ``outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system.''

  20. Toon receives 2011 Roger Revelle Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, Owen Brian

    2012-01-01

    Owen Brian Toon was awarded the 2011 Roger Revelle Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system.”

  1. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    James Alfred Van Allen, world-renowned space scientist, died 9 August 2006 at the age of ninety-one. He succumbed to heart failure after a ten-week period of declining health. Van Allen served for his entire sixty-seven-year professional career as an amazingly productive researcher, space science spokesman, inspired teacher, and valued colleague. The realization by him and his associates that charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field began a whole new field of research, magnetospheric physics. Following that initial discovery, he and his associates quickly extended their observations, first to the inner planets, and then to the rest of the planets and beyond. During his tenure at Iowa, he and his group flew instruments on more than sixty successful Earth satellites and planetary spacecraft, including the first missions to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Van Allen's lifetime publication list numbers more than 275, of which many are widely-cited, seminal papers. He was the sole author of more than 125 of those papers. Beyond the research laboratory, Van Allen worked energetically throughout his career in establishing space research as a new branch of human inquiry. He was among the most sought-after as a committee member and adviser, working at the highest levels of government, including the White House and Congress, and at all levels of the national and international research establishments. Many presentations in the non-scientific arena helped to bring the exciting discoveries and challenges of space research to the attention of the general public. James Van Allen (Van to his many friends and colleagues) was born on 7 September 1914 on a small farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, the second of four sons of Alfred Morris Van Allen and Alma Olney Van Allen. After high school in Mount Pleasant, he entered Iowa Wesleyan College, majoring in physics and graduating summa cum laude. While there, he was introduced to geophysics

  2. [Wegener granulomatosis - otologic, nasal, tracheobronchial and pulmonary involvement].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Sandra; Leal, Laurentino Mendes; Morais, António; Magalhães, Adriana; Oliveira, Teresa; Hespanhol, Venceslau; Dias, Carlos; Fernandes, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    Wegener granulomatosis is a rare systemic idiopathic disease characterized by involvement of small vessels - medium and small arteries, venules, arterioles and ocasionally large arteries. This disease has predilection for the upper and lower respiratory tract and the kidney, with granulomatous inflamation and necrosis. Clinical manifestations and organ involvement of the disease vary widely. Early diagnosis and treatment may lead to a full recovery. Without treatment, Wegener's granulomatosis can be fatal. The authors present a case of a 33 year-old female, with severe disease, but with good outcome, after adequate diagnosis and treatment.

  3. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  4. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  5. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  6. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  7. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  8. Cecil Green receives Smith Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Frank; Green, Cecil

    The Waldo E. Smith Medal, which is awarded for extraordinary service to geophysics, was presented to Cecil H. Green at the 1994 AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony on December 7, 1994 in San Francisco. The award citation and Green's response are given here.“It would take a book to do justice to Cecil Green's extraordinary contributions to the geophysics and electronics industries, to the training of scientists, physicians, and engineers, and to strengthening education and research institutions. In fact, such a book has been written about Cecil's multiple lives as engineer, geophysicist, cofounder of Texas Instruments, and partner with his wife, Ida, in international philanthropy.

  9. Centennial Presidential Perspective: Dr. Alfred Blalock

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Claude A.; George, Timothy J.; Conte, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Great men are not a common occurrence. Indeed, they are a rare find. Though respected and lauded in their time, it is only in retrospect that their true contributions can be adequately measured as a surgeon, an educator and a scientist. Such is the case of Dr. Alfred Blalock. Many have considered him the father of modern cardiac surgery. All consider his “blue baby” operation to be one of the landmarks of cardiac surgery and, as the chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins, he trained many who would become the leaders of our discipline. His continual reach for excellence helped him to not only affect, but revolutionize the paradigm of surgical research, an understanding of the physiology of shock and the surgical management of pulmonic stenosis/atresia. Dr. Blalock was the 30th president of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery and his presidential address was given in 1951. PMID:22248679

  10. Extensive gastrointestinal tract and thyroid involvement with Wegeners granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raja Shekhar; Biyyani, Sappati; Pauskar, Privi; Fahmy, Nabil M; King, James F

    2007-01-01

    Wegeners granulomatosis (WG) is a pauci-immune systemic vasculitis involving small to medium sized blood vessels of the respiratory tract and renal vasculature. We report a 34-year-old lady with extensive gastrointestinal tract, pancreas and thyroid involvement. Literature review revealed only two prior reports of esophageal involvement, two reports of pancreatic involvement and few cases of thyroid involvement.

  11. National Medal of Science nominations sought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) is accepting nominations for the 2013 National Medal of Science until 1 April 2013. Congress established the medal in 1959 as a presidential award for individuals "deserving of special recognition by reason of their outstanding contributions to knowledge in the physical, biological, mathematical, or engineering sciences." Later, Congress expanded the recognition to include the social and behavioral sciences. NSF notes, "We are especially interested in identifying women, members of minority groups, and persons with disabilities for consideration." More information is available at http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/medal.jsp and http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/nsf_2013nationalmedalofscience_callfornominations.pdf. For more details, contact the Medal of Science program manager at nms@nsf.gov or 703-292-8040.

  12. 75 FR 14257 - Pricing for Bronze Medals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ...; and three-inch bronze medals will be priced at $42.00 each. Detailed information about product designs and availability can be found on the United States Mint Web site at http://www.usmint.gov ....

  13. Fred Spilhaus Receives 2010 Waldo E. Smith Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher; Burch, James; Spilhaus, Fred

    2011-02-01

    Fred Spilhaus was awarded the 2010 Waldo E. Smith Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “extraordinary service to geophysics.”

  14. David Simpson Receives 2012 Waldo E. Smith Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner-Lam, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    David Simpson was awarded the 2012 Waldo E. Smith Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "extraordinary service to geophysics".

  15. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy in Wegener's granulomatosis involving the spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Morayati, S.J.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1986-12-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 44-yr-old man to exclude an occult abscess. Four- and twenty-four-hour images of the abdomen revealed splenic photopenia except for a rim of activity medially. A subsequent computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated necrosis or hemorrhage of the spleen except for a medial rim. Exploratory laparotomy demonstrated necrotizing vasculitis with granuloma formation consistent with Wegener's granulomatosis and a rim of viable splenic tissue corresponding to the radionuclide and CT studies.

  16. [Wegener's granulomatosis. Three cases with different clinical courses].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Sawionek, I; Filipecki, S

    1996-01-01

    Three cases of Wegener's granulomatosis are presented. In every case the different clinical picture was observed. In the first case dominated the pulmonary changes and fingers necrosis. In that case the excellent therapeutic effect of etoposide was observed. In the second case the most important clinical sings illustrated severe renal insufficiency. The third case demonstrated pericardial and skin changes. The significance of early diagnosis and early institution of proper therapy was discussed.

  17. Diabetes insipidus as a complication of Wegener's granulomatosis and its treatment with biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Cunnington, Joanna Rosalind; Jois, Ramesh; Zammit, Ivan; Scott, David; Isaacs, John

    2009-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis of the pituitary gland resulting in diabetes insipidus is a rare complication of the disease. Standard treatment for Wegener's granulomatosis involves a combination of prednisolone and cylophosphamide, however biologic agents are now being used in refractory cases. We report three cases of patients with diabetes insipidus as a complication of Wegener's granulomatosis who were treated with biologic agents. All three cases showed clinical response to treatment with biologic agents including rituximab and alemtuzumab and two cases demonstrated improvement in pituitary gland abnormalities by MRI. Clinicians should be aware that diabetes insipidus can present as a complication of Wegener's granulomatosis and that biologic therapies may be effective in refractory cases.

  18. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  19. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  20. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  1. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  2. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  3. ASLO Hutchinson Medal to Piatt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penhale, Polly

    The winner of the 1988 Hutchinson Medal of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanogrphy is Trevor Piatt, Chief of the Biological Oceanography Division at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography (BIO), Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. The award was presented by outgoing president Richard Barber at the ASLO 51st Annual Meeting in Boulder, Colo.After Trevor Piatt received his M.A. in physics from the University of Toronto , he was hired in 1965 by what was then the Fisheries Research Board of Canada to work on optical oceanography at the Bedford Institute. His previous research on focusing and steering electron beams for a linear accelerator notwithstanding, he soon put his knowledge of the measurement of radioactivity and of optics to work as the leader of a project on phytoplankton photosynthesis in a group which later became known as the Marine Ecology Laboratory. Out of this experience and the influence of Lloyd Dickie came an awareness of the need to determine the representativeness of individual field samples, and there followed a Ph.D. thesis (Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia) on the scales of variability in phytoplankton biomass and productivity. The themes of variability and optics have continued through his present research on the spatial field of chlorophyll to make estimates of primary production over large space scales.

  4. Gilbert receives 1999 William Bowie Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turekian, Karl K.; Gilbert, J. Freeman

    J. Freeman Gilbert was awarded the William Bowie Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on June 2, 1999, in Boston, Massachusetts. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research.Freeman Gilbert was a geophysical pioneer, even as a student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he used the Whirlwind computer to apply computational methods to seismic problems. Later at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP),at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he began his professional university career, he wrote a series of papers on the computation of synthetic seismograms in simple media.

  5. An unusual orbital localization of wegener granulomatosis detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bertagna, Francesco; Treglia, Giorgio; Rossini, Pierluigi; Giubbini, Raffaele

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old male patient affected by Wegener granulomatosis and left exophthalmos who underwent F-FDG PET/CT during follow-up for rectal cancer. The study was negative for secondary lesions but revealed high uptake at the left orbital mass consistent with Wegener granulomatosis.

  6. [Wegener's granulomatosis with anti-MPO c-ANCA revealed by uveitis].

    PubMed

    Mbéthé, G L Gaundong; Diéval, C; Lafitte, A; Roger-Schmeltz, J; Longy-Boursier, M; Mercié, P

    2010-10-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a rare systemic necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis affecting small- to medium-sized vessels, associated with antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA), mainly anti-proteinase 3. Rarely, ANCA may be directed against myeloperoxidase. We report a 58-year-old woman who developed an uveitis as the presenting manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis who highlight the usefulness of internist and ophthalmologist collaboration.

  7. An unusual case of multiple cranial nerve palsies in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Daderian, A. D.; Chayasirisobhon, S.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of Wegener's granulomatosis, which initially caused fulminant palsies affecting cranial nerves II, V, VI, VII, and VIII during a brief episode of the disease. The patient was successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Wegener's granulomatosis should be suspected when multiple cranial nerves are initially affected. PMID:11052460

  8. Kaposi's sarcoma following immune suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Deschênes, Isabelle; Dion, Louise; Beauchesne, Claude; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur

    2003-03-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma and infection with human herpesvirus 8 is now well recognized. Immunologic impairment is associated with 2 forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, epidemic [associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection] and iatrogenic (associated with immunosuppressive treatment); both forms have become more common during the last decade. We describe an HIV negative 54-year-old man who developed Kaposi's sarcoma 2 months after the beginning of immuno-suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). With tapering of medication, complete remission of Kaposi's sarcoma was achieved in one year. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of iatrogenic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with WG.

  9. [Guild medals from the Surgeons' Guild of Amsterdam].

    PubMed

    IJpma, Frank F A; Teulings, Chris; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Between around 1620 and the end of the eighteenth century, every surgeon working in Amsterdam was presented with a guild medal on passing their surgeon's exams. These medals actually represented membership of the Surgeon's Guild of Amsterdam and could be used as proof of attendance at meetings of the Guild. From 1864 onwards surgeons also received the Hortus medal, which allowed them entry to the Hortus Medicus. Less common medals include medals for ensuring the surgeon's apprentices attended lectures, funeral medals for ensuring correct procedures regarding casket bearing duties were followed at a funeral, and medals of honour recognising services to the Guild. The collection of 17th and 18th century Amsterdam Surgeon's Guild medals numbers some 230 examples, and is the largest and most varied collection of its kind in the world. A few of the medals that have been preserved actually belonged to surgeons depicted in the famous series of group portraits. We examined who these surgeons were and what the purpose of these medals was.

  10. Psychology and the National Medal of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Robert P.; Benjamin, Ludy T., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    When Congress created the National Medal of Science in 1959 to be awarded by the president of the United States, psychology was not among the eligible sciences. A concerted lobbying effort in the late 1970s changed that situation, adding social and behavioral sciences to the listing of eligible disciplines. This article describes how the award…

  11. Emeritus trio scoops the 2013 Dirac Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2013-09-01

    The 2013 Dirac Medal has been awarded to three scientists whose wide-ranging work has brought profound advances in cosmology, astrophysics and fundamental physics. Thomas Kibble, James Peebles and Martin Rees all receive the honour, which is bestowed annually by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy.

  12. Alfred of Wessex at a Cross-Roads in the History of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper first situates King Alfred in Winchester, in Wessex, in Anglo-Saxon England, and in the Christendom of the ninth century. Attention is drawn to Alfred's education, which included experience of court life in Wessex, Rome and Francia. The paper argues that Alfred prioritised vernacular literacy as a means of educating elites in a shared…

  13. 78 FR 19009 - Gary Alfred Shearer, M.D.; Decision And Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Enforcement Administration Gary Alfred Shearer, M.D.; Decision And Order On February 4, 2013, Administrative... Certificate of Registration AS6213172, issued to Gary Alfred Shearer, M.D., be, and it hereby is, revoked. I further order that any pending application of Gary Alfred Shearer, M.D., to renew or modify...

  14. Prince Alfred College 1993 Study Tour to China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Marten; Lake, Simon

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a trip to China by students of Mandarin Chinese at Prince Alfred College, Australia, in order to learn about the language and culture of the host country. Some continuing features of the stay were shopping, food, and attitudes of the local populace toward the foreigners. (Author/CK)

  15. Professor Alfred Jost: the builder of modern sex differentiation.

    PubMed

    Josso, N

    2008-01-01

    Professor Alfred Jost (1916-1991) is famous for his discovery of the Mullerian inhibitor, now called anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) or Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS). Alfred Jost resolved the controversy surrounding the mechanism of somatic sex differentiation by proving that male characteristics must be imposed on the fetus by the testicular hormones testosterone and AMH, respectively responsible for the virilization of the Wolffian ducts, urogenital sinus and external genitalia and for the regression of Mullerian ducts. In the absence or inactivity of these hormones, the fetus becomes phenotypically female. Alfred Jost was also a pioneer through his work on testicular differentiation, in collaboration with Solange Magre. He was the first to show that testicular organization is heralded by the development of pre-Sertoli cells, which progressively surround germ cells to form seminiferous tubules. Alfred Jost did not rely only on his brilliant mind. He distrusted theories built on suboptimal experimental data and believed that intelligence was powerless without technical skill. His search for elegant, effective techniques led him to apply surgical methods to fetal endocrinology. He was also a fascinating teacher, particularly for pre-doctoral students. He died aged 75, having retired from the Collège de France, but still active as the Secrétaire Perpétuel of the French Science Academy.

  16. Apostle of Freedom: Alfred Adler and His British Disciples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Pam

    2005-01-01

    The psychology of Alfred Adler is traditionally considered to be one of the three so-called in-depth or psychoanalytic therapies, the other two being the theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Gustav Jung. This article demonstrates that Adler's Individual Psychology was especially influential on teachers in Vienna between the two world wars. There…

  17. Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes. Fact Sheets on Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedish Inst., Stockholm.

    The life and personality of Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes established by his will are discussed. Nobel was a 19th century Swedish industrialist who was fluent in six languages. He invented dynamite. At his death in 1896, his estate amounted to $9,200,000. His will stipulated that the income from his estate should be divided annually into five…

  18. Aortic aneurysm and orchitis due to Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Minnee, R C; van den Berk, G E L; Groeneveld, J O; van Dijk, J; Turkcan, K; Visser, M J; Vahl, A C

    2009-01-01

    We present a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) with involvement of the abdominal aorta, testis, peripheral nerve system, and skin. A 51-year-old man presented at our outpatient clinic with lower back pain. He had a history of smoking, hypertension, and an embryonal carcinoma of the left testis, treated 13 years ago with orchidectomy and chemotherapy. One month earlier, he underwent a partial orchidectomy of the right testis due to testicular swelling. Abdominal computed tomography showed a 3.8 cm wide aneurysm of the distal part of the aorta with inflammation. One week later he was admitted to the hospital with numbness of his hands and feet. Physical examination showed signs of peripheral microemboli. Serological laboratory tests revealed elevated antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody titers with positive reactions against proteinase-3, indicating Wegener's disease. The chest X-ray was normal. Pathological examination of the right testis showed necrotizing vasculitis of a small artery. He was treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. WG with extrapulmonary involvement occurs infrequently, and reports of manifestations of WG in aorta, testis, the peripheral nerve system, and skin are even more uncommon. Small- and medium-vessel vasculitis can precede large-vessel vasculitis or occur in the absence of small-vessel involvement. Therefore, WG should be included in the work-up of large-vessel vasculitis, which can give rise to periaortic inflammation.

  19. Alpha 1-antitrypsin activity is markedly decreased in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Mota, Ali; Sahebghadam Lotfi, Abbas; Jamshidi, Ahmad-Reza; Najavand, Saeed

    2014-04-01

    Alpha 1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the most abundant proteinase inhibitor in plasma and the main inhibitor of Proteinase 3, the target antigen of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) that predominant in Wegeners' granulomatosis. Α1AT deficiency correlated with ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study explores the trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC), specific activity, and phenotypic deficiency of Α1AT in Wegener's granulomatosis. Twenty-seven WG patients were studied. ANCA was tested by IIF and ELISA. Serum a1-anti-trypsin levels were quantified in WG patients and healthy controls by immunoturbidimetric assay. Serum TIC was assessed by the enzymatic colorimetric assay. Phenotypes of A1AT were detected by Isoelectric Focusing. A1AT concentration was equivalent in patients and controls; however, serum TIC (P = 0.001) and specific activity of A1AT (P = 0.001) were dramatically lower in WG patients. Five patients had deficient phenotypes of A1AT: MZ (n = 3), MS (n = 1) and SS (n = 1). This was correlated with an increase in the prevalence of deficient phenotypes of A1AT in WG (P = 0.01). Trypsin inhibitory capacity and specific activity of A1AT were decreased in WG patients and may be involve in disease pathogenesis and can worsen the clinical manifestations. This A1AT deficiency probably resulted from oxidative inactivation and/or enzymatic degradation of A1AT. This could result in localized deficiency of A1AT in vessel wall interfaces and lead to severe disease.

  20. A typical Wegeners granulomatosis -- but not pauci-immune!

    PubMed

    Joerg, L; Kerstin, A; Niko, B; Dominik, A; Martin, K; Latus, J; Amann, K; Braun, N; Alscher, M D; Kimmel, M

    2012-06-01

    We present a the case of 58-year old man who was admitted to hospital with typical clinical features (bloody nasal discharge, arthralgia, acute kidney injury with a nephritic syndrome) consisting with Wegeners granulomatosis (WG). CT-scan showed pulmonary nodules and antineutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (ANCA) were elevated. A kidney biopsy showed a crescentic glomerulonephritis, but not pauci-immune-immune with a histopathological staining of a mesangioproliferative IgA-glomerulonephritis. The patient was put on prednisolone and i.v. cyclophosphamid (CYCLOPS-protocol (1). The anti-proteinase-3 antibody titer decreased and the CT-scan showed decreased activity of Wegener's granulomatosis (BVAS 26 dropped to 2) and the patient`s serum creatinine level was stable. The exact nosological relation of mesangial IgA-nephropathy to WG is still unclear. This case underlines that knowledge of renal histology is essential in the management of patients with renal disease, especially in patients with hematuria and/or proeinuria with positive ANCA.

  1. Morel Receives 2005 Maurice Ewing Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Morel, François M. M.

    2006-02-01

    François M. M. Morel received the Ewing Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December 2005, in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is given for significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation; and for outstanding service to marine sciences. François Morel has led the search to understand the role of metals in the ocean, starting with a focus on inorganic processes and aquatic chemistry, and leading to a blend of geochemistry, microbiology, biochemistry, and genetics. His influence comes from his research and from the way he has educated an entire community of scientists with his textbooks, with his teaching, and through his former students and postdocs who hold faculty positions at universities throughout the world.

  2. Tumor of the heart in a young woman; a rare manifestation of Wegener granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Remmi; Rosen, Seymour

    2012-02-01

    Wegener granulomatosis may rarely present with tumor masses that are in areas not typically involved by the disease. Although some cases have an associated positive anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies, other cases do not, especially those of the limited form. To prevent misdiagnosis and ensure prompt treatment, it is extremely important to consider Wegener granulomatosis even in cases without the classic clinical findings. We report a case of a 19-year-old woman with no prior significant medical history who presented with persistent ventricular tachycardia and a papillary muscle mass in her left ventricle which upon excision and tissue evaluation demonstrated histologic changes of Wegener granulomatosis.

  3. Wegener's granulomatosis: parotid involvement and associated pancreatitis with C.T. findings.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, S L; Smart, P J

    1992-11-01

    Parotid enlargement is an uncommon physical sign and even less commonly the reason for referral for computerised tomography (CT) as the aetiology is usually self-evident. In cases referred for CT examination Wegener's granulomatosis should be considered, particularly if the pathology appears bilateral. This diagnosis may be confirmed by biopsy and/or supported by Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody (ANCA) assay. A case of Wegener's granulomatosis with parotid gland involvement and temporally related pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is reported. This is the second reported case of possible pancreatic involvement in Wegeners granulomatosis and approximately the tenth reported case of salivary gland involvement.

  4. Wegener's thinking about the mechanism: Greenland and Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Wegener's early Arctic expeditions to Greenland (1906-08 and 1912-13 with a stop in Iceland) suggest a significant affect on his thinking about the mechanism of continental drift till his death in 1930. Beside his specialized work in meteorology and the Arctic, he had a broad general interest in science especially of the earth system as a whole. The drift idea occurred to him in 1910 on the basis of new data on geomorphology (Atlantic seafloor), supported by geophysics, geology and palaeontology. In his 1912 initial public talk and ensuing paper he mentioned something akin to seafloor spreading and refuted the continental relict hypothesis from break-up for the mid-Atlantic ridge. But 1912 he bypassed the tension fractures in Iceland and in Greenland (1912-13) he experienced the rheology of ice, brittle and viscous, when thinking about the drift of SIAL continents through the SIMA mantle (as documented in his diaries). When in 1915 rewriting his 1012 paper as the book "Die Entstehung der Kontinente und Ozeane" he had given up the early idea for that of floating continental rafts. It is tempting to speculate why. Rheology of rocks was clearly described. But some misconceptions distracted him from the correct relationships: (1) Data of the time suggested that sialic rock is more solid than mafic rock which would soften at lower temperature (contrary to present knowledge) and (2) convection in the atmosphere, well known to him, seemed to be no model for convection in the mantle, although rafting continents implied mantle flow. Did the rheologies appear too different to him? Not before the mid twenties (as documented in the 4th edition of his book, 1929) did Wegener admit that mantle convection might be the answer. A great spirit was misled but clearly saw that the phenomenon of drift, based on observations, is not refuted by the lack of an explanation.

  5. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-30 Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Silver Lifesaving Medal...

  6. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-30 Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Silver Lifesaving Medal...

  7. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-30 Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Silver Lifesaving Medal...

  8. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-30 Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Silver Lifesaving Medal...

  9. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-30 Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Silver Lifesaving Medal...

  10. 2009 National Medal for Museum and Library Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper features the winners of this year's National Medals for Museum and Library Service, the nation's highest honor for libraries and museums. The award celebrates libraries and museums that make a difference for individuals, families, and communities. Medal winners are selected from nationwide nominations for institutions that demonstrate…

  11. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.1 Manufacture of medals. With the approval of the Director of the Mint, dies for medals of a national character designated by Congress may be executed at the Philadelphia Mint, and struck in such field office of the...

  12. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.1 Manufacture of medals. With the approval of the Director of the Mint, dies for medals of a national character designated by Congress may be executed at the Philadelphia Mint, and struck in such field office of the...

  13. David E. Smith Receives 2012 Charles A. Whitten Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    David E. Smith was awarded the 2012 Charles A. Whitten Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding achievement in research on the form and dynamics of the Earth and planets."

  14. Steven C. Wofsy Receives 2012 Roger Revelle Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Steven C. Wofsy was awarded the 2012 Roger Revelle Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system."

  15. Pieter P. Tans Receives 2010 Roger Revelle Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, James W. C.; Tans, Pieter P.

    2011-01-01

    Pieter P. Tans was awarded the 2010 Roger Revelle Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system.”

  16. Jorge L. Sarmiento Receives 2009 Roger Revelle Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Nicolas; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2010-01-01

    Jorge L. Sarmiento was awarded the 2009 Roger Revelle Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 16 December 2009 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system.”

  17. The Readability of the Newbery Medal Books (1974-1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Paul J.

    Noting that research indicating Newbery Medal books are not popular with elementary students in spite of their unquestioned superiority in plot, characterization, and style, a study examined the readability level of Newbery Medal winners from 1974 to 1986. Three readability formulas were used to assess readability: Gunning's Fog Index, Fry…

  18. Lobell, Rickaby, and Vrugt Receive 2010 James B. Macelwane Medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, Steven M.; Lobell, David B.; Elderfield, Harry; Rickaby, Rosalind; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2011-03-01

    David B. Lobell, Rosalind E. Rickaby, and Jasper A. Vrugt were awarded the 2010 James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by an outstanding young scientist.”

  19. Dick receives 2011 Harry H. Hess Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yaoling

    2012-01-01

    Henry J. B. Dick was awarded the 2011 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding achievements in research on the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets."

  20. Dick receives 2011 Harry H. Hess Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Henry J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Henry J. B. Dick was awarded the 2011 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding achievements in research on the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets."

  1. Williams and Doney receive 2000 James B. Macelwane medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Thome; Williams, Quentin C.

    Quentin C. Williams and Scott C. Doney were awarded the James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on December 17, 2000 in San Francisco, California. The medal recognizes significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability.

  2. McNutt Receives 2007 Maurice Ewing Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Anthony B.; Mcnutt, Marcia K.

    2008-01-01

    Marcia Kemper McNutt was awarded the 2007 Maurice Ewing Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 12 December 2007 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is ``for significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering technology, and instrumentation; or outstanding service to marine science.''

  3. W. R. Peltier Receives 2010 Charles A. Whitten Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Jean O'Brien; Peltier, W. R.

    2011-01-01

    W. Richard Peltier was awarded the 2010 Charles A. Whitten Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding achievement in research on the form and dynamics of the Earth and planets.”

  4. [Wegener's granulomatosis with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies against anti-cathepsin G antigen].

    PubMed

    Ocaña Pérez, E; Peña Casas, A M; del Campo Muñoz, T; Avila Casas, A; Luque Barona, R

    2013-12-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis belongs to the group of small vessel vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies characterized by granulomatous inflammation and necrotising vasculitis in various organs with particular involvement of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and kidneys. Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare disorder in childhood and early diagnosis of this disease is critical to the long-term prognosis of the disease. The presence of positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody staining or a high titre of proteinase 3 antibodies were added as new criteria of vasculitis in childhood. This article presents a case of Wegener's granulomatosis, with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies with cytoplasmic pattern with absence of anti-proteinase 3 antibodies and presence of high levels of anti-cathepsin G antibodies, rarely described in Wegener's granulomatosis.

  5. A Case of Wegener's Granulomatosis Presenting with Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ujjawal, Roy; Koushik, Pan; Ajay, Panwar; Subrata, Chakrabarti

    2016-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis or granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a necrotizing vasculitis affecting both arterioles and venules. The disease is characterized by the classical triad involving acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts with renal involvement. However, the disease pathology can affect any organ system. This case presents Wegener's granulomatosis presenting with facial nerve palsy as the first manifestation of the disease, which is rarely reported in medical literature. PMID:27110249

  6. 77 FR 14600 - Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal Set and the Birth Set AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing 2012 pricing for Kennedy Half-Dollar bags and rolls,...

  7. Proteinase 3, Wegener's autoantigen: from gene to antigen.

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Y M; Limburg, P C; Kallenberg, C G

    2001-02-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is one of four serine protease homologues in the azurophilic granules of neutrophils and granules of monocytes. It is of importance that anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) are mainly directed against PR3 only. Furthermore, PR3 is overexpressed in a variety of acute and chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for a PR3-derived peptide have been shown to specifically lyse leukemia cells that overexpress PR3. This review will focus on PR3 and the characteristics of PR3 that might implicate this particular antigen in the pathogenesis of WG and as target for immunotherapy in myeloid leukemias. We will discuss the genetic localization and gene regulation of PR3, the processing, storage, and expression of the PR3 protein, and the physiological functions of PR3, and compare this with the three other neutrophil-derived serine proteases: human leukocyte elastase, cathepsin G, and azurocidin. Three main differences are described between PR3 and the other serine proteases. This makes PR3 a very intriguing protein with a large array of physiological functions, some of which may play a role in ANCA-associated vasculitidis and myeloid leukemia.

  8. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-01-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG. PMID:1458677

  9. Alfred Lee Loomis - last great amateur of science

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarex, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Alfred Loomis may well be remembered as the last of the great amateurs of science. He had distinguished careers as a lawyer, as an Army officer and as an investment banker before he turned his full energies to the pursuit of scientific knowledge, first in the field of physics and later as a biologist. By any measure that can be employed, he was one of the most influential physical scientists of this century: he was elected to the National Academy when he was 53 years old; he received many honorary degrees from prestigious universities; and he played a crucial role as director of all NDRC-OSRD radar research in World War II.

  10. Alfred Russel Wallace and the Antivaccination Movement in Victorian England

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace, eminent naturalist and codiscoverer of the principle of natural selection, was a major participant in the antivaccination campaigns in late 19th-century England. Wallace combined social reformism and quantitative arguments to undermine the claims of provaccinationists and had a major impact on the debate. A brief account of Wallace’s background, his role in the campaign, and a summary of his quantitative arguments leads to the conclusion that it is unwarranted to portray Victorian antivaccination campaigners in general as irrational and antiscience. Public health policy can benefit from history, but the proper context of the evidence used should always be kept in mind. PMID:20350381

  11. [Science and the scientist: opposing vues on Alfred Granadidier's explorations].

    PubMed

    Monnier, Jehanne-Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    This article embraces the different ways a scientist traveller and his fieldworks can be perceived through the case of Alfred Grandidier in South America, in India and in Madagascar (1857-1870). Our aim is to deal with various aspects of historical scientific exploration and to draw a picture of the erudite traveller by crossing various and complementary points of view. Scientific works can be received very differently, depending on the place and the nature of the addresses, whether they are authorities wishing to take advantage of it, native people fearing for their safety or disciples glorifying their idol. The concept of science itself and the status of the scientist raise the question of mutual understanding between the explorer and his contemporaries, in Paris or in a remote place. Alfred Grandidier's example is particularly relevant to reveal different visions of scientist traveller as promoted in the 19th century, as well as the various perceptions that a scientific work can have depending on the public it impacts.

  12. ALFRED: A Practical Method for Alignment-Free Distance Computation.

    PubMed

    Thankachan, Sharma V; Chockalingam, Sriram P; Liu, Yongchao; Apostolico, Alberto; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-06-01

    Alignment-free approaches are gaining persistent interest in many sequence analysis applications such as phylogenetic inference and metagenomic classification/clustering, especially for large-scale sequence datasets. Besides the widely used k-mer methods, the average common substring (ACS) approach has emerged to be one of the well-known alignment-free approaches. Two recent works further generalize this ACS approach by allowing a bounded number k of mismatches in the common substrings, relying on approximation (linear time) and exact computation, respectively. Albeit having a good worst-case time complexity [Formula: see text], the exact approach is complex and unlikely to be efficient in practice. Herein, we present ALFRED, an alignment-free distance computation method, which solves the generalized common substring search problem via exact computation. Compared to the theoretical approach, our algorithm is easier to implement and more practical to use, while still providing highly competitive theoretical performances with an expected run-time of [Formula: see text]. By applying our program to phylogenetic inference as a case study, we find that our program facilitates to exactly reconstruct the topology of the reference phylogenetic tree for a set of 27 primate mitochondrial genomes, at reasonably acceptable speed. ALFRED is implemented in C++ programming language and the source code is freely available online.

  13. The Alfred Nobel rocket camera. An early aerial photography attempt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingemar Skoog, A.

    2010-02-01

    Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), mainly known for his invention of dynamite and the creation of the Nobel Prices, was an engineer and inventor active in many fields of science and engineering, e.g. chemistry, medicine, mechanics, metallurgy, optics, armoury and rocketry. Amongst his inventions in rocketry was the smokeless solid propellant ballistite (i.e. cordite) patented for the first time in 1887. As a very wealthy person he actively supported many Swedish inventors in their work. One of them was W.T. Unge, who was devoted to the development of rockets and their applications. Nobel and Unge had several rocket patents together and also jointly worked on various rocket applications. In mid-1896 Nobel applied for patents in England and France for "An Improved Mode of Obtaining Photographic Maps and Earth or Ground Measurements" using a photographic camera carried by a "…balloon, rocket or missile…". During the remaining of 1896 the mechanical design of the camera mechanism was pursued and cameras manufactured. In April 1897 (after the death of Alfred Nobel) the first aerial photos were taken by these cameras. These photos might be the first documented aerial photos taken by a rocket borne camera. Cameras and photos from 1897 have been preserved. Nobel did not only develop the rocket borne camera but also proposed methods on how to use the photographs taken for ground measurements and preparing maps.

  14. Caldecott Medal Books and Readability Levels: Not Just "Picture" Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Julia; Leal, Dorothy

    1999-01-01

    Determines readability levels for each of the Caldecott Medal books, and presents the full list. Finds that the overall grade-level readability average was 4.75. Offers some suggestions for using the books in elementary classrooms. (SR)

  15. Dunlop receives European Geophysical Society's Néel Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, Lisa

    David J. Dunlop of the Physics Department and Erindale College at the University of Toronto has been awarded the 1999 Louis Néel Medal of the European Geophysical Society (EGS) for “authoritative contributions to rock magnetism, setting the standards for future decades.” The medal will be presented to Dunlop in April in a special ceremony at the Nederlands Congresbebouw in The Hague, The Netherlands, during the 24th General Assembly of the EGS.The Néel Medal is awarded by the Solid Earth Geophysics section of EGS in recognition of the scientific achievements of Louis Néel, who shared the 1970 Nobel Prize in Physics for his fundamental discoveries in magnetism.The medal is awarded “for outstanding achievements in the fertilization of the Earth Sciences by the transfer and application of fundamental theory and/or experimental techniques of solid state physics, defined in its broadest sense.”

  16. Interview With the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, David Wiesner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses David Wiesner, the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, and includes excerpts of an interview with him. Notes that Wiesner's books appeal to the imagination and often use art elements such as scale. Details the winning book, "The Three Pigs." (PM)

  17. In Brief: National Medal of Science nomination deadline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-03-01

    The deadline for nominations for the 2010 U.S. National Medal of Science is 31 March 2010. The Medal of Science, which is presented annually by the president of the United States to distinguished scientists and engineers, is the nation's highest honor for American scientists and engineers. For more information, visit http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/nominations.jsp or contact Mayra Montrose at the U.S. National Science Foundation, mmontros@nsf.gov.

  18. Kuo-Nan Liou Receives 2013 Roger Revelle Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kuo-Nan

    2014-01-01

    I was surprised and thrilled to receive AGU's 2013 Roger Revelle Medal. Indeed, it is a great pleasure and distinct honor to be on the roster of previous outstanding awardees. I would like to thank Wilfried Brutsaert for his generous remarks and unwavering support and encouragement in my pursuit of academic and research excellence and to extend my appreciation to the Revelle Medal Selection Committee for recognizing my contributions to radiative transfer and related climate and remote sensing fields.

  19. Anny Cazenave Receives 2012 William Bowie Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazenave, Anny

    2013-01-01

    It is a great pleasure, a privilege, and an immense honor to receive the AGU Bowie Medal. When I look at the list of previous recipients, with so many prestigious well-known names, I can hardly realize that I have also been awarded this prestigious medal. I feel very humble, following on from these highly distinguished scientists. Thanks very much, Dick, for your kind citation and thanks to the colleagues who have supported my nomination.

  20. Strawberry gingivitis as the first presenting sign of wegener's granulomatosis: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare multi-system disease characterized by the classic triad of necrotizing granulomas affecting the upper and lower respiratory tracts, disseminated vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. Oral lesions as a presenting feature are only encountered in 2% of these cases. Hyperplastic gingival lesions or strawberry gingivitis, is a characteristic sign of Wegener's granulomatosis. The latter consists of reddish-purple exophytic gingival swellings with petechial haemorrhages thus resembling strawberries. Recognition of this feature is of utmost importance for timely diagnosis and definitive management of this potentially fatal disease. A case of strawberry gingivitis as the first presenting sign of Wegener's granulomatosis affecting a 50-year-old Malay male is reported here. The differential diagnosis of red lesions that may present in the gingiva is discussed. PMID:21813375

  1. [Subglottic stenosis as the initial manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis in a teenager. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Rodríguez, Verónica; Doormann, Flavia; Pringe, Alejandra; Bellia Munzón, Patricio; Bellia Munzón, Gastón; Ortega, Carlos; Álvarez, Rubén

    2017-04-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis of autoimmune origin that primarily affects the upper and lower airways and kidneys. It is very rare in children and adolescents. When started at a young age it is often associated with subglottic stenosis. Subglottic stenosis is a potentially fatal manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis. Its diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion since it might develop in the absence of other signs of activity. Occasionally, subglottic stenosis may present as the initial manifestation of the disease. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic visualization of the lesion. The treatment is complex, and it often requires repeated interventions due to restenosis. We present a 13-year-old patient with subglottic stenosis secondary to Wegener's granulomatosis. We describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of this rare cause of respiratory distress in the pediatric population.

  2. Kaposi's sarcoma in an elderly man with Wegener's granulomatosis treated with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Erban, S B; Sokas, R K

    1988-05-01

    The association of Kaposi's sarcoma with malignant lymphoreticular diseases and immunosuppressive therapy is well documented. This report describes an elderly man who presented with fulminant Wegener's granulomatosis that responded to treatment with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids. Rapidly progressing cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma developed ten weeks after the start of immunosuppressive therapy yet regressed on discontinuation of the corticosteroid therapy, despite continuation of cyclophosphamide therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Kaposi's sarcoma occurring in association with Wegener's granulomatosis. The literature on Kaposi's sarcoma in immunosuppressed patients is reviewed.

  3. 75 FR 69631 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ...] National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Meeting AGENCY: United States... Technology and Innovation (NMTI) Nomination Evaluation Committee will meet in closed session on Tuesday..., Program Manager, National Medal of Technology and Innovation Program, United States Patent and...

  4. Alfred P. Dachnowski and the scientific study of peats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Cohen, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Botanist Alfred Paul Dachnowski (1875–1949) was a major contributor to efforts at mapping organic soils in the United States during the early 20th century. He began his career at The Ohio State University, and spent most of his professional life at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, DC. His work spanned a diversity of topics, including bog ecology and the ecosystem services provided by wetlands, the mapping and chemical characterization of peat, and the commercial applications of peat. We present a biography and overview of his work. Dachnowski is best known today for the peat sampler that bears his name. The details of its operation are described here, and its place in modern peat studies is discussed.

  5. Stroke, music, and creative output: Alfred Schnittke and other composers.

    PubMed

    Zagvazdin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998), a celebrated Russian composer of the twentieth century, suffered from several strokes which affected his left cerebral hemisphere. The disease, however, did not diminish his musical talent. Moreover, he stated that his illness in a way facilitated his work. The composer showed amazingly high productivity after his first and second injuries of the central nervous system. The main topic of this chapter is the effect of strokes on Schnittke's output, creativity, and style of music. A brief biography of the composer with the chronology of his brain hemorrhages is included. In addition, the influence of cerebrovascular lesions on creative potential of other prominent composers such as Benjamin Britten, Jean Langlais, Vissarion Shebalin, Igor Stravinsky, and Ira Randall Thompson is discussed.

  6. Reporting hospital adverse events using the Alfred Hospital's morbidity data.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Rhonda; McLean, Jenny; Walsh, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Hospital morbidity data were analysed to determine their usefulness for reporting adverse events. The entire ICD-10-AM classification system was reviewed in conjunction with the Australian Coding Standards to identify external cause codes and code prefixes associated with adverse events. For the 50,712 separations registered at The Alfred from July 2000-June 2001, 4,740 external cause codes were associated with adverse events. Place of occurrence code CY92.22 was considered the best indicator of the number of separations associated with adverse events. Approximately 4% of all separations were associated with adverse events occurring during an episode of care. Results suggest that hospital morbidity data are useful for monitoring adverse events at hospital level. Reliable reporting across the health care industry requires consistent reporting requirements at state and national levels and the adoption of standard code prefixes nationally.

  7. [Alfred Kirstein (1863-1922)--pioneer in direct laryngoscopy].

    PubMed

    Reinhard, M; Eberhardt, E

    1995-06-01

    On April 23rd 1895, in Berlin, Alfred Kirstein performed the first direct examination of the interior of the larynx. 23 days after his first view of larynx, he gave a comprehensive demonstration of autoscopy to the Berlin Medical Association. Until then laryngologists had been content with the technique of indirect laryngoscopy using mirrors, a method popularised by Garcia, Türck and Czermak. Kirstein named the combination of the electroscope and the oesophagoscope "The autoscope" and direct examination of the larynx he termed "autoscopy". Despite the infancy of autoscopy and the autoscope, Kirstein already recognised the potential of his new discovery. He reported that the removal of foreign bodies from the trachea must be easier through an autoscope then by means of a tracheostomy; furthermore, catheterisation of the bronchi should now present no great difficulties. The similarity between the blades he used and those described in the 1940s by Macintosh and Miller is remarkable.

  8. Alfred O.C. Nier (1911”1994)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldich, Samuel S.

    Alfred O.C. Nier was a friendly, helpful person who got along remarkably well with people from all walks of life. For the scientific community, his work opened new possibilities for discovery in many fields. His skill in designing and operating mass spectrometers and in interpreting the data brought him worldwide recognition.Nier was born in St. Paul, Minnesota on May 28, 1911, and lived most of his life in the state. He earned three degrees from the University of Minnesota: a Bachelor of Engineering, 1931; an M.S. in electrical engineering, 1933; and a Ph.D. in physics, 1936. For his doctoral research, Nier measured the relative abundance of the isotopes of Ar, K, Zn, Rb, Cd [Nier, 1936].

  9. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale of âlistâ medals. 92.2 Section... OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale of “list” medals. Medals on the regular Mint list... mailing cost when mailed. Copies of the list of medals available for sale and their selling prices may...

  10. 75 FR 30859 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote on the... . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those...

  11. 33 CFR 13.01-25 - Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal. 13.01-25 Section 13.01-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals,...

  12. 33 CFR 13.01-25 - Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal. 13.01-25 Section 13.01-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals,...

  13. 75 FR 8043 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination... requesting nominations of individuals to serve on the National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination..., National Medal of Technology and Innovation Program, United States Patent and Trademark Office, P.O....

  14. 76 FR 76388 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Application ACTION....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The National Medal of Technology and Innovation is the highest honor for... innovation, and development of the Nation's technological manpower. The purpose of the National Medal...

  15. 75 FR 3203 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2010 Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2010... nominations for its National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since establishment by Congress in 1980, the President of the United States has awarded the National Medal of Technology and...

  16. 78 FR 35604 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination... closed meeting. SUMMARY: The National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI) Nomination Evaluation..., National Medal of Technology and Innovation Program, United States Patent and Trademark Office, P.O....

  17. 76 FR 80901 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination... requesting nominations of individuals to serve on the National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination...: Nominations must be submitted to: Program Manager, National Medal of Technology and Innovation Program,...

  18. On ``Carrington, Schwabe, and the Gold Medal''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    2006-06-01

    I note with interest the article by Cliver [2005] about the early solar investigations of Heinrich Schwabe and Richard Carrington and offer some further insights into Schwabe's work and its reception at the time. Schwabe commenced his observations in 1826 with a small telescope he had bought some years earlier. For more than 40 years, he observed the Sun and made meteorological notes. In his 1843 essay, he noted a sunspot cycle of about 10 years, but his result aroused little interest with contemporary astronomers. Research at the time was focused on the physics of the planets, the Moon, and other topics. Schwabe had published data in the well-known Astronomische Nachrichten, but not until Alexander von Humboldt republished it in his Kosmos, volume 3 (1851), did the data begin to be recognized and accepted by Schwabe's fellow scientists. Humboldt's Kosmos was a publication of considerable prestige, and it had a wide circulation among scientists and the educated public. Scwabe's work became familiar to other scientists including Carrington, Angelo Secchi, and Gustav Spörer and, as noted by Cliver, earned him the gold medal of the Royal Astronomical Society.

  19. In Brief: Rita Colwell receives National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-07-01

    Rita Colwell, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation from 1998 to 2004, was awarded a U.S. National Medal of Science in a White House ceremony on 27 July 2007. Colwell, currently a professor of microbiology and biotechnology at the University of Maryland at College Park and a professor at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, received the award for her research on global infectious diseases and marine microbes, specifically the bacterium that causes pandemic cholera. The National Medal of Science is the United States' highest honor for scientific achievement. Colwell currently serves on AGU's development board.

  20. Alfred binet and the concept of heterogeneous orders.

    PubMed

    Michell, Joel

    2012-01-01

    In a comment, hitherto unremarked upon, Alfred Binet, well known for constructing the first intelligence scale, claimed that his scale did not measure intelligence, but only enabled classification with respect to a hierarchy of intellectual qualities. Attempting to understand the reasoning behind this comment leads to an historical excursion, beginning with the ancient mathematician, Euclid and ending with the modern French philosopher, Henri Bergson. As Euclid explained (Heath, 1908), magnitudes constituting a given quantitative attribute are all of the same kind (i.e., homogeneous), but his criterion covered only extensive magnitudes. Duns Scotus (Cross, 1998) included intensive magnitudes by considering differences, which raised the possibility (later considered by Sutherland, 2004) of ordered attributes with heterogeneous differences between degrees ("heterogeneous orders"). Of necessity, such attributes are non-measurable. Subsequently, this became a basis for the "quantity objection" to psychological measurement, as developed first by Tannery (1875a,b) and then by Bergson (1889). It follows that for attributes investigated in science, there are three structural possibilities: (1) classificatory attributes (with heterogeneous differences between categories); (2) heterogeneous orders (with heterogeneous differences between degrees); and (3) quantitative attributes (with thoroughly homogeneous differences between magnitudes). Measurement is possible only with attributes of kind (3) and, as far as we know, psychological attributes are exclusively of kinds (1) or (2). However, contrary to the known facts, psychometricians, for their own special reasons insist that test scores provide measurements.

  1. Alfred Binet and the Concept of Heterogeneous Orders†

    PubMed Central

    Michell, Joel

    2012-01-01

    In a comment, hitherto unremarked upon, Alfred Binet, well known for constructing the first intelligence scale, claimed that his scale did not measure intelligence, but only enabled classification with respect to a hierarchy of intellectual qualities. Attempting to understand the reasoning behind this comment leads to an historical excursion, beginning with the ancient mathematician, Euclid and ending with the modern French philosopher, Henri Bergson. As Euclid explained (Heath, 1908), magnitudes constituting a given quantitative attribute are all of the same kind (i.e., homogeneous), but his criterion covered only extensive magnitudes. Duns Scotus (Cross, 1998) included intensive magnitudes by considering differences, which raised the possibility (later considered by Sutherland, 2004) of ordered attributes with heterogeneous differences between degrees (“heterogeneous orders”). Of necessity, such attributes are non-measurable. Subsequently, this became a basis for the “quantity objection” to psychological measurement, as developed first by Tannery (1875a,b) and then by Bergson (1889). It follows that for attributes investigated in science, there are three structural possibilities: (1) classificatory attributes (with heterogeneous differences between categories); (2) heterogeneous orders (with heterogeneous differences between degrees); and (3) quantitative attributes (with thoroughly homogeneous differences between magnitudes). Measurement is possible only with attributes of kind (3) and, as far as we know, psychological attributes are exclusively of kinds (1) or (2). However, contrary to the known facts, psychometricians, for their own special reasons insist that test scores provide measurements. PMID:22912619

  2. Alfred Binet and experimental psychology at the Sorbonne laboratory.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge; Sanitioso, Rasyid Bo

    2012-11-01

    Between 1892 and 1904, Alfred Binet (1857-1911) produced, in the psychology laboratory of the Sorbonne, a whole set of original works that still remains little known today. He integrated the laboratory, directed by the psychophysiologist Henry Beaunis (1830-1921), in 1891. We describe the circumstances that led Binet to take the direction of this laboratory in 1895 and present scientific investigations that were conducted there by Binet and his collaborators. For Binet, the laboratory was not narrowly limited to a set of rooms where experiments were conducted by means of sophisticated devices (experimental psychology), it was also a working area, regularly organized, where all the psychological documents were classified, whatever their origin (descriptive psychology). We show that Binet was a pioneer who is still little recognized in various areas of experimental psychology. Binet suffered, at the time, from the indifference of his contemporaries, but he especially regretted not being able to attract students to his laboratory due to the absence of diploma-offering programs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Autoantibodies against neutrophils and monocytes: tool for diagnosis and marker of disease activity in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, F J; Rasmussen, N; Lobatto, S; Wiik, A; Permin, H; van Es, L A; van der Giessen, M; van der Hem, G K; The, T H

    1985-02-23

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies against extranuclear components of polymorphonuclear granulocytes were detected in 25 of 27 serum samples from patients with active Wegener's granulomatosis and in only 4 of 32 samples from patients without signs of disease activity. In a prospective study of 19 patients these antibodies proved to be better markers of disease activity than several other laboratory measurements used previously. The autoantibodies were disease specific and the titres were related to the results of an in-vitro granulocyte phagocytosis test, in which 7S IgG antibodies were internalised after specific binding to the cell, resulting in gradual formation of ring-like cytoplasmic structures. This autoantibody may have a pathogenetic role in Wegener's granulomatosis. The detection of this antibody is valuable for diagnosis and estimation of disease activity.

  4. U.S. Students Win Medals in International Chemistry Olympiad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1985-01-01

    The four members of the American team in the International Chemistry Olympiad won medals in this international competition (which involved written/laboratory examinations in organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry, and biochemistry). Selection of the team involved a nationwide examination and participation in a two-week chemistry camp. (DH)

  5. 28 CFR 50.22 - Young American Medals Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Service will be presented personally by the President of the United States to the candidates selected. These medals will be presented in the name of the President and the Congress of the United States... bear the signature of the President of the United States and the Attorney General of the United...

  6. DPyC Medal Award in Honor of Matias Moreno

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Manuel

    2009-04-20

    The 2008 DPyC Medal Award has been granted jointly to Matias Moreno and Miguel Angel Perez Angon. It is an honor for me to give here a brief account of Matias' achievements in the field of high energy physics.

  7. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 92.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance UNITED STATES MINT... Director of the Mint, dies for medals of a national character designated by Congress may be executed at the Philadelphia Mint, and struck in such field office of the Mints and Assay Offices as the Director...

  8. 38 CFR 3.802 - Medal of Honor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medal of Honor. 3.802 Section 3.802 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension... Secretary of the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, the Department of the Air Force, or...

  9. 38 CFR 3.802 - Medal of Honor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medal of Honor. 3.802 Section 3.802 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension... Secretary of the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, the Department of the Air Force, or...

  10. 38 CFR 3.802 - Medal of Honor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medal of Honor. 3.802 Section 3.802 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension... Secretary of the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, the Department of the Air Force, or...

  11. 38 CFR 3.802 - Medal of Honor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medal of Honor. 3.802 Section 3.802 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension... Secretary of the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, the Department of the Air Force, or...

  12. 38 CFR 3.802 - Medal of Honor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medal of Honor. 3.802 Section 3.802 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension... Secretary of the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, the Department of the Air Force, or...

  13. 2000 Newbery Medal Winner: A Conversation with Christopher Paul Curtis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nancy J.; Giorgis, Cyndi

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with 2000 Newbery Medal winner Christopher Paul Curtis. Reveals the author's journey as a reader and a writer, offers glimpses into the humor and upbeat attitude of Bud (the main character in Curtis' s award-winning book "Bud, Not Buddy"), and gives a peek into what readers can expect next from this award-winning…

  14. Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher 2012 Wilder Silver Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher, Oregon State University, was awarded the 2012 Wilder Medal by the American Pomological Society for his contributions to hazelnut genetics and cultivar development. Dr. Mehlenbacher took over the leadership of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program in 1986 aft...

  15. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manufacture of medals. 92.1 Section 92.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations §...

  16. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manufacture of medals. 92.1 Section 92.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations §...

  17. [Alfred Lacroix (Macon, 1863 - Paris, 1948), Chemist, Mineralogist, Volcanologist].

    PubMed

    Chaigneau, M

    1998-01-01

    His grandfather and his father were chemists in Macon. It was then natural for him to adopt such profession. After his studies at the Superior School of Chemistry of Paris (Ecole superieure de pharmacie de Paris), he passed as a first class chemist on december the seventh 1887. His passion for mineralogy, displayed since his youngest years, leads him to frequent scientists specialized in the earth's science, amongst who is Ferdinand Fouque, from the College of France (College de France), whom he used to accompany in his travels through the world between 1888 - the year when he parted from his pharmacy - and 1902. This very year, the eight of may, the terrifying eruption of the montagne Pelee on the isle of la Martinique annihilated in few minutes the town and the port of Saint-Pierre, leaving only two survivors, He sejourned there a second time, in august 1902 after the second eruption. A. Lacroix explained, for the first time, phenomena he designated as nuees ardentes. His knowledge in volcanology and mineralogy made him an expert who has been solicitated to observe various volcanos through out the world. Amongst his principal writings are the treaty of mineralogy (5 vol.), the 2 volumes of his conclusions about his observations of the montagne Pelee and one about the Piton de la Fournaise, to which must be added more than 650 notes and communications. Great officer of the Legion d'Honneur, the chemist Alfred Lacroix, professor at the Museum of natural history since the first of april 1893, carried on the function of perpetual secretary of the Academy of Sciences during 34 years.

  18. Management Scheme for Cerebral Wegener Granulomatosis: An Unusual Pseudotumoral Skull Base Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Anne Laure; Lefevre, Etienne; Sène, Damien; Herman, Philippe; Biassette, Homa Adle; Froelich, Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener disease) is a rare antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis that seldom involves brain and meninges. We present a case of a 35-year-old woman with granulomatosis with polyangiitis involving the brain and the meninges. The histologic diagnosis required a complete resection of the lesion. Despite the possibility of postoperative wound infection, surgery was mandatory to ascertain the diagnostic and to treat locally.

  19. Cytoplasmic-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies targeting myeloperoxidase in Wegener's granulomatosis: a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Bhavana M; Joshi, Sangeeta; Adhikary, Ranjeeta

    2014-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) patients can rarely have antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) directed against myeloperoxidase (MPO), producing a cytoplasmic pattern on indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). This has important implications in the diagnosis and pathophysiology of the disease. We present to you a report of three cases of WG, demonstrating a cytoplasmic-ANCA pattern on indirect IIF, but directed against MPO. It is necessary to diagnose a patient taking into account both the autoimmune test results and the clinical features.

  20. Successful Management of Refractory Dialysis Independent Wegener's Granulomatosis with Combination of Therapeutic Plasma Exchange and Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sheetal; Dhawan, Hari Krishan; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Marwaha, Neelam; Sharma, Aman

    2016-06-01

    Wegeners granulomatosis (WG) is an autoimmune, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody mediated necrotizing vasculitis involving renal, and upper and lower respiratory systems. Treatment relies on a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and tapering regimen of glucocorticoids. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) has been recognized as a second line treatment. We report the successful use of TPE in combination with rituximab in achieving remission in a patient with WG (dialysis independent) not responding to conventional therapy.

  1. Progressive renal disease despite immunosuppressive therapy in a patient with Wegener s granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Klein, I; Vervoort, G; Steenbergen, E; Wetzels, J

    2008-03-01

    We present a patient with Morbus Wegener and crescentic glomerulonephritis. Treatment with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone resulted in the disappearance of signs and symptoms of systemic inflammation. However, renal function deteriorated. Renal biopsy showed evidence of continuing capillary necrosis. Renal function improved with added plasmapheresis treatment. This case report illustrates that in patients with vasculitis necrotizing glomerulonephritis may remain active despite immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of extrarenal disease activity.

  2. Our Magnetic Planet (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    It is a great honour to receive the Arthur Holmes Medal, certainly the highest scientific award of my life. My first thoughts and deep gratitude are with the people who have contributed to me being here today, from my PhD mentors, Pierre Berge and Pierre Pério, later Jacques Labeyrie, my colleagues and students and last, but not least, the members of the Committee on Education of EGU, with whom I have shared over 10 years of a wonderful educational activity. In this presentation, among the various scientific arguments in which I have been involved, I will recall only those mentioned in my letter of nomination to the Holmes Medal, trying to replace them in what was known at the time. After a PhD in Solid State Physics, working in a laboratory of the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, I obtained a post doctoral research position for the the study of liquid binary critical fluids, and worked on this topics for 5 years. I then joined the Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, a CNRS-CEA Institute dedicated to the study of geological-environmental phenomena. My first task there has been to develop a paleomagnetic laboratory, dedicated to the study of Earth Sciences, through the study of the magnetic properties of sediments and igneous rocks. From there on, my entire scientific activity has been devoted to the study of our "Magnetic Planet". My first project in Geophysics dealt with the geodynamical evolution of the Aegean Arc. At the time, only a few paleomagnetic studies existed in the Mediterranean realm, and none in the Aegean region. Moreover all of them dealt with rather old geological formations, so that almost nothing was known about the recent post-cretaceous evolution. The originality of our study was to start from the most recent to the older formations, in order to precisely describe "retro-tectonically" the different phases of rotational deformation. This intensive study (over 700 sampling sites, over 10,000 samples spread over continental Greece, the Aegean

  3. Confessions of a serial entrepreneur: a conversation with Alfred E. Mann. Interview by Molly Joel Coye.

    PubMed

    Mann, Alfred E

    2006-01-01

    In this wide-ranging interview, Alfred Mann describes the activities of several medical technology enterprises with which he is engaged. Several of them are companies that he formed; one is a nonprofit foundation, the Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Biomedical Engineering, founded to establish research-oriented institutes on a dozen university campuses and support their work in developing marketable innovations. Mann discusses the need to consider the cost implications of technology, in the context of U.S. health system reform, and describes several important innovations that have emerged from his companies over the years.

  4. 76 FR 44912 - Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site; Lake Alfred, Polk County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    .... Submit your comments by Site name Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site by one of the following...] Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site; Lake Alfred, Polk County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... concerning the Callaway and son Drum Service Superfund Site located in Lake Alfred, Polk County, Florida...

  5. John Tyndall and the Royal Medal that was never struck

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Just once in its long history has a Royal Medal been awarded but not presented. John Tyndall FRS (1820–93) was the chosen recipient in 1853 for his early work on diamagnetism but declined to accept it. The story of why Tyndall felt compelled to turn down this considerable honour sheds light on the scientific politics and personal relationships of the time, on the importance given to the study of magnetism, and on Tyndall's own character and career. PMID:24921107

  6. [The social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz and its contribution for the nursing].

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Capalbo, Creusa; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Oliveira, Deise Moura; Tocantins, Florence Romijn; Rodrigues, Benedita Maria Rêgo Deusdará; Ciuffo, Lia Leão

    2013-06-01

    Nursing care can be considered a social action that is set in the everyday world, where intersubjective relations are established and must be valued by the nurse in the different contexts in which it acts. It is a theoretical study which aimed to highlight the main concepts of the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz's and its contribution to Nursing as a knowledge and professional practice field. The following questions guided this study: what is the understanding of caring in Nursing from the perspective of the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz's? How to apply Alfred Schütz's theoretical concepts in the action of caring in Nursing? The theoretical concepts of the social phenomenology and their interface with Nursing were delimited. By incorporating the concepts of the t theory of social action developed by Alfred Schütz into Nursing, this study allows nurses to value and apply the aspects highlighted by this theoretical framework within healthcare, education and scientific research.

  7. Why Community Works: The Use of Alfred Adler's Individual Psychology as a Foundational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Robert K.; Keith, Edwin M.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler should be used as a foundational theory for student affairs work. The success of community building programs is explained and the concepts of Individual Psychology are summarized. Also asserts that the current drive to develop programs to develop community on college campuses is firmly rooted…

  8. 76 FR 17672 - Alfred E. Boyce, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ....100(b) and 0.104, I order that DEA Certificate of Registration, FB0003943, issued to Alfred E. Boyce..., M.D., to renew or modify his registration, be, and it hereby is, denied. This Order is effective... May 13, 2010, proposing to revoke the DEA Certificate of Registration (COR), Number FB0003943,...

  9. Frank Buchman's Moral Re-Armament and Alfred Korzybski's General Semantics: A Comparison and Contrast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, H. L.

    This paper hypothesizes that Frank Buchman and Alfred Korzybski were aware of each other and made some comments--written or orally--about each other's work. Support for this hypothesis was developed by concentrating on correspondence, documents, and interviews relative to the two men. The paper also provides documentation about Buchman and…

  10. Wegener's granulomatosis complicated by central diabetes insipidus and peripheral neutrophy with normal pituitary in a patient.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Wang, Huiying; Wu, Huaxiang; Jin, Qiaofei

    2009-08-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a necrotizing systemic vasculitis that any organ system can be involved in. We report a patient who was hospitalized with recurrent nodules in pulmonary computed tomograph and symptoms such as intermitted fever, polydipsia, insensibility and pain on extremities. Laboratory investigation showed positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody in a cytoplastic pattern. The histopathologic result of the lung nodule revealed multiloci necrosis of lung tissue accompanied with large amount of neutrophils. She was diagnosed as WG with multi-systemic involvements and almost recovered on 6 months' prednisone and cyclophosphamide treatment.

  11. [Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole++ in the treatment of a case of localized Wegener's granulomatosis].

    PubMed

    Villegas Fernández, F R; Callol Sánchez, L; Moreno Muro, M; Cuevas Ibáñez, A; Gómez de Terreros, F J

    1991-04-01

    A 50 year old man, affected by a Wegener's granulomatosis limited to lung, is presented. The indirect immunofluorescence test for "Anticytoplasmic Antibodies" (ACPA) was negative and we got the definitive diagnostic by the histological study from thoracotomy and biopsy samples. We started treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and a good evolution with an adequate clinical control, x-ray study and blood test was obtained. Some aspects of the value of the ACPA as diagnostic and activity markers of the disease and also the use of an antimicrobial agent on the treatment of this nosological entity are discussed.

  12. A Guide to Newbery Medal Winners and Honor Books, 1977-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinman, Judith R.; Henderson, Darwin L.

    Intended for use by teachers, librarians, and parents, this guide analyzes Newbery Award Medal and honor winning books (1977 through 1984) for sexism. Following a statement of criteria, established by the American Library Association concerning the type of book that should receive the medal and honor citations, and the guidelines used to determine…

  13. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale of “list” medals. Medals on the regular Mint list, when available, are sold to the public at a charge... available for sale and their selling prices may be obtained from the Director of the Mint, Washington, DC....

  14. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale of “list” medals. Medals on the regular Mint list, when available, are sold to the public at a charge... available for sale and their selling prices may be obtained from the Director of the Mint, Washington, DC....

  15. 77 FR 70483 - President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in meeting of the President' Committee on the National Medal of Science. Originally the meeting...

  16. Bowen, Dufek, and Shelly Receive 2012 James B. Macelwane Medals: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachos, James

    2013-01-01

    Gabriel J. Bowen, Josef Dufek, and David Richard Shelly were awarded the 2012 James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by an outstanding young scientist".

  17. Gold medal award for life achievement in the practice of psychology.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2010 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Judith Worell.

  18. Gold medal award for life achievement in psychology in the public interest.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2010 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Patricia Gurin.

  19. 77 FR 26790 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board (``Board'') to vote on the position of Board Chairperson, review issues relevant to the nomination review process, discuss pending ceremonies and...

  20. 77 FR 51826 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Bureau.... SUMMARY: This is an announcement of a meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to... to the nomination review process, discuss pending ceremonies and upcoming activities and...

  1. 76 FR 56226 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote of the position of Board Chairperson, review issues relevant to the nomination review process, discuss...

  2. 76 FR 37375 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office...: This is an announcement of a meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor... review process, discuss pending ceremonies and upcoming activities and other relevant Board...

  3. 75 FR 54915 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting/conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote on... process and upcoming activities and other relevant Board issues related thereto. The...

  4. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is Richard M. Lerner.

  5. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Gilbert O. Sanders.

  6. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Thomas J. Bouchard Jr.

  7. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Bonnie R. Strickland.

  8. 78 FR 78838 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2014 Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2014... nominations for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since establishment by Congress in the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980, the President of the United States has awarded...

  9. Character Traits Depicted in Newbery Medal Books from the 1920s through the 2000s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Kimberly; Parker, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Readers readily identify with characters in literature; therefore, educators must be acutely aware of the overt and underlying messages conveyed in Newbery Medal books. In this quantitative content analysis with a qualitative component, the researchers employed nonparametric measurements to examine Newbery Medal books from the 1920s to the 2000s…

  10. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Bernice Lott

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in…

  11. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Marcia K. Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  12. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Charles Silverstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  13. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: Walter C. Borman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  14. Diversity of PR3-ANCA epitope specificity in Wegener's granulomatosis. Analysis using the biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Rarok, Agnieszka A; van der Geld, Ymke M; Stegeman, Coen A; Limburg, Pieter C; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2003-11-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a systemic disease characterized by the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies specific for proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA). The functional characteristics of PR3-ANCA differ between quiescent and active disease, suggesting changes in the properties of the autoantibodies in time. Using biosensor technology, we found that PR3-ANCA of different patients (n = 8) recognize a limited number of overlapping regions on PR3 at the time of diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis. This area might cover an immunodominant epitope, common for PR3-ANCA from all patients, irrespective of the size of the total area recognized by an individual autoantibody. Experiments with sera (n = 4) collected at the moment of diagnosis and at the time of relapse showed that the individual epitope specificities of PR3-ANCA change during the course of the disease. These changes in epitope specificity of PR3-ANCA may be responsible for the differences in functional properties of these autoantibodies between various stages of the disease.

  15. Anti-endothelial cell antibodies in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis and micropolyarteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, G; Meroni, P L; Tincani, A; Sinico, A; Barcellini, W; Radice, A; Gregorini, G; Froldi, M; Borghi, M O; Balestrieri, G

    1990-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) have been detected by cell surface radioimmunoassay in nine out of 15 patients with micropolyarteritis (MPA) and in two out of five patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. AECA mostly belonged to the IgG isotype and were present in the active phase of the diseases. These antibodies were not detectable in 10 sera from patients with essential mixed cryoglobulinaemia, suggesting that they were not a mere epiphenomenon consequent to the inflammatory vascular injury. The binding activity was not related to ABH antigens or to HLA class I antigens displayed by resting human endothelial cells in culture and was not influenced by removing immune complexes. Absorption of the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), present in MPA and Wegener's granulomatosis sera, did not affect the endothelial binding. AECA-positive sera did not display lytic activity against endothelial cells, neither alone nor after addition of fresh complement or normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although AECA are not cytolytic for endothelial cell monolayers in vitro, the reactivity against intact endothelial cells suggests their possible involvement in in vivo pathological processes affecting vascular structures in small vessel primary vasculitides. PMID:2302834

  16. Acceptance of the 2016 Alfred E. Treibs Award by Patrick G. Hatcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2017-03-01

    It is with great humility that I accept the 2016 Treibs Medal awarded by the Organic Geochemistry Division of The Geochemical Society. I am honored and thank Tom Bianchi and others who nominated me as well as the members of the selection committee. I also thank all my associates over the more than 30 years of continuous research who are part of this award. Without the collaboration of these associates, my career would not have developed to the stage it is now.

  17. Wegener's Granulomatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammation behind the eye is known as an “orbital pseudotumor”. An orbital pseudotumor such as those caused by Wegener’s Granulomatosis ... the eyes in a patient with a retro–orbital mass (a mass behind the eye) in a ...

  18. Steven C. Wofsy Receives 2012 Roger Revelle Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofsy, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Modern views of the Earth's climate, oceans and atmosphere, and appreciation of human impacts on these systems, are relatively new. Less than a decade before I started my professional career, a small nucleus of pioneering scientists, including many previous recipients of the Revelle Medal, began to discern unexpected changes in atmospheric composition and to assess the implications for the global environment. They initially did not imagine that global environmental changes would be observed in their lifetimes: The Earth system was thought to be too massive compared with human endeavors.

  19. Treatment of refractory retrobulbar granuloma with rituximab in a patient with ANCA-negative Wegener's granulomatosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Seido; Maeda, Akihiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Omata, Masami; Yamada, Hidehiro; Ozaki, Shoichi

    2009-01-01

    Retrobulbar granuloma is one of the serious complications in Wegener's granulomatosis and often shows resistance to conventional therapy during long-term treatment. The outcome of this complication includes visual loss, orbital and facial deformity, fistula formation, as well as infection. There has been increasing evidence that shows the efficacy of rituximab, a chimeric anti-B cell mAb, for the treatment of autoimmune diseases including Wegener's granulomatosis. We present a 22-year-old Japanese woman who was diagnosed with Wegener's granulomatosis complicated by refractory retrobulbar granuloma. She was admitted to our hospital with pain of the right eye and right proptosis during treatment with monthly IVCY for Wegener's granulomatosis. We diagnosed refractory retrobulbar granuloma by computed tomography (CT) scan and biopsy. She showed a refractory growth of retrobulbar granuloma in spite of negative ANCA. She was also complicated with pulmonary granulomatous lesions in bilateral apices. After approval by an institutional ethical committee and informed consent of this patient, rituximab 375 mg/m2 was intravenously administered weekly four times. Concomitant prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg was also administered for 2 weeks and gradually tapered. Treatment of rituximab resulted in prompt relief of symptoms in this case and the reduction of the granuloma. BVAS score also improved from 6 to 0 at 3 months and was kept in remission for 12 months. Circulating CD19-positive cells were kept less than 0.1% during the follow-up. There were no serious adverse events. This case suggests that rituximab is effective for refractory retrobulbar granuloma complicated in Wegener's granulomatosis even when ANCA titers are negative.

  20. Alfred Kastler et le développement du Groupement Ampère

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béné, G. J.

    We show, in this paper, the decisive contributions of A. Kastler at the time of the foundation of the Ampere Group by René Freymann in the years 1950-51. Alfred Kastler contributes also to give, during the main steps of its development at the european level in the year 1956-57, to the meetings their particular physionomy : encounter of men for cooperation and mutual help. Nous montrons dans cette communication les contributions décisives de Alfred Kastler, soit au moment de la création, par René Freymann, du Groupement Ampère en 1950-51, soit lors de son développement au niveau européen dès 1956-57. A. Kastler a toujours voulu faire des colloques Ampère des rencontres d'hommes ayant le souci de coopérer et de s'entraider.

  1. Citation for presentation of the 2016 Alfred E. Treibs Award to Patrick G. Hatcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Thomas S.

    2017-03-01

    I am privileged and honored to introduce Patrick G. Hatcher as the recipient of the 2016 Alfred E. Treibs Award. I have known Pat for almost twenty years, over which time we have shared an interest in biomacromolecules, biodegradation, and the development of analytical methods. Pat is a true chemist at heart and we have all benefited greatly from his insights on the examination of complex macromolecular materials through state-of-the art spectroscopic analyses.

  2. Video Q&A: Allergies and allergen immunotherapy - an interview with Alfred William Frankland

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this video Q&A, we talk to Dr Alfred William Frankland about the highlights of his career, including working alongside Sir Alexander Fleming, co-founding the British Allergy Society, and introducing pollen counts to UK weather forecasts. We also discuss his opinions on why misconceptions about allergies and allergen immunotherapy still exist. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/255. PMID:24447813

  3. Alfred Bentz - Erdölgeologe in schwieriger Zeit, 1938-1947

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, E.; Seibold, I.

    2002-12-01

    Alfred Bentz was the leading oil geologist in Germany during the Third Reich, the World War II and thereafter. His relevant activities are treated here mainly on the base of documents in the Geologenarchiv Freiburg. In spite of his prominent position during the Nazi Regime he can obviously not be blamed for personal guilt. As a loyal civil servant he was embedded in the tragic German fate in these years.

  4. Wegener's granulomatosis presenting as an abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Aortic aneurysm is not common in young patient. When a young patient presents with abdominal aortic aneurysm, there may be an underlying cause. Case presentation Here, we describe a case of a 33-year-old gentleman who presented with flu like illness, chest and abdominal pains following a tooth extraction. A chest X-ray and subsequent computerised tomogram of the chest and abdomen demonstrated lung nodules and an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm was repaired and his serology was positive for Wegener's granulomatosis. A nasal mucosal biopsy confirmed WG. He was treated with oral steroids and cyclophosphamide. His graft leaked and had to be replaced with a synthetic graft. Two months after his re-operation, he remains well. Conclusion Whenever a young patient presents with an abdominal aortic aneurysm, an underlying connective disease should be excluded because early steroid/immunosuppressive treatment may prevent the development of further aneurysms. PMID:20066062

  5. Combined CNS and pituitary involvement as a primary manifestation of Wegener granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Spísek, Radek; Kolouchová, Elena; Jensovský, Jirí; Rusina, Robert; Fendrych, Pavel; Plas, Jaroslav; Bartůnková, Jirina

    2006-09-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic vasculitis of small and medium vessels. It predominantly affects the upper and/or lower respiratory airway and kidneys. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. WG relatively frequently affects the nervous system (in 30-50% according to the different studies). Most frequently, it manifests as necrotizing vasculitis that leads to the peripheral neuropathies or to the cranial nerves palsy. Impairment of the central nervous system (CNS) is less frequent and occurs in 2-8% of patients. Three major pathogenetic mechanisms were described: CNS vasculitis, spreading of granulomas from the adjacent anatomical areas (paranasal cavities, orbit etc.), and new formation of granulomas in brain tissue. This case report describes patients in whom WG manifested in the form of localized skin involvement and combined CNS involvement that included pituitary gland. Atypical presentation of WG impedes and slows down the process of diagnosis and emphasizes the need for collaboration between medical specialists.

  6. Airway Surgery in Tracheostomised Patients with Wegener Granulomatosis Leading to Subglottic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Altun, Demet; Sivrikoz, Nükhet; Çamcı, Emre

    2015-10-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystemic disorder characterised by granulomatous inflammation of the respiratory system. The growing of proliferative tissue towards the larynx and trachea may cause airway obstruction on account of subglottic stenosis. In this situation, the surgical goal is to eliminate the airway obstruction by providing natural airway anatomy. While mild lesions do not require surgical intervention, in fixed lesions, surgical intervention is required, such as tracheostomy, laser resection and dilatation. In tracheostomised patients, granuloma formation surrounding the tracheostomy cannula may occur in the trachea. Inflammation and newly formed granulation tissue result in severe stenosis in the airways. During surgical treatment of such patients, airway management is important. In this case report, we will discuss gas exchange and airway management with jet ventilation (JV) during excision of the granulation tissue with endolaryngeal laser surgery, leading to subglottic stenosis in tracheostomised patients in WG.

  7. Limited-Form Wegener Granulomatosis Case: Anaesthetic Approach and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sarıtaş, Tuba Berra; Şahin, Osman; Borazan, Hale; Otelcioğlu, Şeref

    2014-12-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a kind of vasculitis that affects small and medium-sized arteries. Necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and necrotizing glomerulonephritis of the kidneys are present. WG affects mainly Caucasian individuals between 15-75 years old, with a mean age of onset of 41 years. It affects both males and females equally. Kidney involvement is not present in the limited form of WG. Peripheral nerve blocks are good alternatives when general anaesthesia is risky. Popliteal block is blockade of the sciatic nerve at the popliteal region. Popliteal block is a kind of peripheral block for surgeries below the knee level. In this article, we report on the anaesthesia management of a 61-year-old limited-form WG patient for whom general anaesthesia was risky because of lung involvement.

  8. ANCA-negative Wegener's granulomatosis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Park, Jin; Bae, Jung Ho; Cho, Min-Sun; Park, Kee Duk; Jeong, Jee Hyang

    2013-11-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized vessels with granulomatous formation. Though it is known for respiratory tract and kidney involvement, neurologic manifestation has been also reported. Herein we report a patient who suffered pansinusitis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies but reached remission by immunosuppressant after the diagnosis of WG. A 54-yr-old female visited with headache, hearing difficulty, and progressive bulbar symptoms. She experienced endoscopic sinus surgeries due to refractory sinusitis. Neurologic examination revealed multiple lower cranial nerve palsies. Vasculitic markers showed no abnormality. Nasal biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis involving small vessels. Given cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, her symptoms were prominently improved. WG should be considered in the patient with multiple cranial nerve palsies, especially those with paranasal sinus disease. Because WG can be lethal if delayed in treatment, prompt immunosuppressant is warranted after the diagnostic tissue biopsy.

  9. Spiro K. Antiochos Receives 2013 John Adam Fleming Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    Thank you, Jim Klimchuk, for this far too generous citation, and thank you very much, my AGU colleagues, for honoring me with the Fleming Medal. When I consider the list of excellent scientists who have been awarded the Fleming Medal, I am humbled that you have included me in their company. I am especially proud that this award is from AGU because only later in my career did I change my science focus and join AGU. This was the best professional decision I have ever made. As a result, I have met many wonderful colleagues. I've always loved doing research, but my colleagues in AGU have made it so much more enjoyable. Also, moving to AGU gave me the opportunity to participate in truly exciting science. My present position is that of senior scientist for space weather at NASA Goddard. It is interesting to note that the field of space weather science did not even exist when I started my career. I was very fortunate to be part of the beginning of a new field and, as a result, to be able to participate in the explosive advances of space weather science over the past 2 decades.

  10. 1983 William Bowie Medal to Syun-iti Akimoto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert C.; Akimoto, Syun-iti

    The 45th William Bowie Medal is awarded to Syun-iti Akimoto for his pioneering work in the application of high-pressure, high-temperature research to geophysical problems. It is a great honor and personal pleasure for me to present to you this warm and generous man, whom I have admired and respected for many years, to receive AGU's most prestigious award. Akimoto joins the ranks of other distinguished scientists in the field of mineral physics who have received the William Bowie Medal: Leason Adams in 1950, Francis Birch in 1960, and A. E. Ringwood in 1974.High-pressure geophysics research was virtually nonexistent in Japan before 1960. In the 22 years since he joined the faculty of the Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP) of the University of Tokyo, Akimoto has played the leading role in building Japanese high-pressure research as applied to the earth's mantle up to the level where, according to Ted Ringwood, Japan leads the world. Ringwood further attests that, “Akimoto has accomplished this by the example of scientific excellence which he has set in all his research and by his generous encouragement of younger workers.”

  11. National Medal of Technology Awarded to NCI Drs. Lowy and Schiller

    Cancer.gov

    President Obama announced that two NCI scientists would be recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honor for technological achievement. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO)

  12. Three EPA Employees Selected as Finalists for 2015 Service to America Medals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON- Today the Partnership for Public Service honored three U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) employees that have been selected as finalists for the 2015 Service to America Medals, which highlight America's dedicated federal workers

  13. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article announces the 2007 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Irving I. Gottesman. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Gottesman's work, is provided.

  14. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Announces the 2007 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Patricia M. Bricklin. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Bricklin's work, is provided.

  15. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Announces the 2007 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: McCay Vernon. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Vernon's work, is provided.

  16. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in the application of psychology.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2013 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is Frank L. Schmidt. This article presents Schmidt's award citation, a brief biography, and a selected bibliography.

  17. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in the practice of psychology.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2013 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Patrick H. DeLeon. This article presents DeLeon's award citation, a brief biography, and a selected bibliography.

  18. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in the science of psychology.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2013 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Elizabeth F. Loftus. This article presents Loftus' award citation, a brief biography, and a selected bibliography.

  19. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in psychology in the public interest.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2013 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Jacquelynne S. Eccles. This article presents Eccles' award citation, a brief biography, and a selected bibliography.

  20. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  1. Manual of Military Decorations and Awards: DoD Service Awards - Campaign, Expeditionary, and Service Medals. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-23

    procedures and guidance regarding creation, activation, and award of DoD service awards – campaign, expeditionary, and service (CE& S ) medals. (2...Provides the basis and eligibility requirements for award of DoD CE& S medals. (3) Incorporates and cancels References (d) through (y). 2...Service Awards - Campaign, Expeditionary, and Service Medals 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT

  2. Militares medici in nummis repraesentati: the heritage of military medicine in coins and medals.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2002-01-01

    Coins and commemorative medals constitute one special repository of the history of military medicine. The numismatic record has proven to be the most enduring, albeit one of the most selective, records of the progress of history. Matters of health, and especially of military medicine, have been central to the endeavors and indeed the survival of many cultures and societies. Many such themes in the national and international history of military medicine are preserved in the medallic record. Coins and medallions thus constitute one record of the chronology of this profession, one parallel to that of the more traditional history to be found in oral and written records. This account presents a four-part classification of medical coins and medals of military interest. These examples include (1) medals that portray military surgeons and physicians; (2) medals that commemorate special events of military medicine: (3) coins that portray the themes of the discipline of military medicine and health; and (4) a miscellaneous group that includes such examples as disease "touch pieces" and the militarily worn medals of such bodies as the International Red Cross and the Order of St. John, the latter of which are awarded inter alia for contributions to prehospital care in the field. A representative photo archive of such exemplars is included in this account.

  3. [Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic anti body (ANCA)-negative limited form of Wegener's granulomatosis; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Sato, Nobuyuki; Tsubochi, H; Kishimoto, K; Imai, T; Kaimori, M

    2007-07-01

    A 54-year-old man, who was suspected to suffer from multi-drug resistant lung abcess, was admitted to our hospital. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed large cavitary mass in right S6 and nodules in left S1+2 and S10. No abnormal findings were detected without raised immunoglobulin E (IgE) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) was repeatedly negative. We couldn't make a diagnosis by percutaneous biopsy. Finally we performed open lung biopsy of left lung, and Wegener's granulomatosis was diagnosed at last He improved immediately after treatment with prednisolone, cyclophosphamide and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. ANCA-negative Wegener's granulomatosis should be considered when we diagnose multiple pulmonary nodules.

  4. [A case of Wegener's granulomatosis with seronegative for PR-3 ANCA and seropositive for MPO-ANCA].

    PubMed

    Narita, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Kensuke; Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Zaima, Mika; Kohno, Chiyoko; Yamada, Yoshihito; Murota, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Tamiko

    2009-07-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with low fever, dry cough and occult hematuria with abnormality on her chest X-ray film showing patchy shadows in the apices of both lungs. The patient was seronegative for PR-3 ANCA and seropositive for MPO-ANCA and transbronchial lung biopsy showed inflammatory granulation tissue. We performed an open lung biopsy to achieve a definitive diagnosis. The lung specimen showed the typical findings of Wegener's granulomatosis. Renal biopsy revealed necrotizing glomerulonephiritis. A systemic form of Wegener's granulomatosis was diagnosed. Initilal treatment combined oral prednisolone at 30 mg daily with oral cyclophosphamide at 50 mg daily improved not only the clinical course, but also the radiographic findings. Finally, she became seronegative for MPO-ANCA.

  5. Diagenetic history and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Permian carbonate buildups, Wegener Halvoe area, Jameson Land basin, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. ); Stemmerik, L. )

    1991-04-01

    The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two carbonate sequences, the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The Karstryggen Formation contains hypersaline carbonates and localized evaporites that were heavily weathered and dissected prior to deposition of the overlying strata. The overlying Wegener Halvoe Formation represents an abrupt and extensive marine inundation over the underlying karstified Karstryggen surface. Bryozoan-brachiopod-algal-cement buildups of the Wegener Halvoe Formation are localized on karstic highs, and show up to 150 m of depositional relief. The diagenetic histories of the core and flank facies are very different. Core facies porosity was initially obliterated by marine cements, but repeated meteoric exposure altered unstable core facies constituents. This alteration produced extensive secondary porosity through grain and cement leaching with local collapse brecciation. Flank strata, however, underwent little sea-floor diagenesis, and low permeability and mineralogically stable grain composition protected these strata from meteoric alteration. Subsequent fracturing and hydrothermal fluid flow, however, flushed hydrocarbons and filled pores with ferroan calcite, barite, fluorite, galena, and baroque dolomite. This heating and flushing is thought to have been especially intense in the Wegener Halvoe region; thus, more basinal areas may still have reservoirs containing significant oil in equivalent Upper Permian limestones. If, as is likely, the sea level changes affecting the Greenland Permian were eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin and the Arctic basin of the Barent Sea. This study also provides some important connections to the probably time-equivalent Guadalupian carbonate reservoir rocks of west Texas-New Mexico and Wyoming.

  6. Nominations sought for U.S. National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    Nominations are now being accepted for the 2012 U.S. National Medal of Science, which is the nation's highest honor for American scientists and engineers, presented annually by the president. The award is given to individuals “deserving of special recognition by reason of their outstanding cumulative contributions to knowledge” in the physical, biological, chemical, mathematical, engineering, or behavioral or social sciences, in combination with exemplary service to the nation, according to the program, which is administered by the National Science Foundation (NSF) on behalf of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. A note in NSF's call for nominations states, “We are especially interested in identifying women, members of minority groups, and persons with disabilities for consideration.”

  7. Bernard J. Wood Receives 2013 Harry H. Hess Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bernard J.

    2014-01-01

    President Finn, friends, and colleagues, I am truly delighted to accept the Hess Medal for 2013. It is difficult to express one's feelings adequately on receipt of such a prestigious award, but a mixture of pride, humility, and thankfulness for a long and lucky career all occur. It did not start propitiously as my high school grades would only ensure undergraduate entry into the Northern Polytechnic, a second-tier institution in London. Nevertheless, I was enthused by several great teachers, including John Charalambous (inorganic chemistry) and Stephen Morel, a field geologist who had worked for many years in Malawi. They pushed me into trying for graduate school, and I was fortunate to find the eclectic Roger Strens my supervisor at Newcastle.

  8. Kuo-Nan Liou Receives 2013 Roger Revelle Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried H.

    2014-01-01

    The Revelle Medal is awarded for "outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system." It also celebrates the man Roger Revelle, who through his broad interests, his awareness of global change, and his national and international service, was a true statesman of science. Dr. Kuo-Nan Liou's accomplishments in research and leadership service are the perfect embodiment of this ideal. He made trailblazing contributions in radiation, the prime driver in the Earth's energy budget, and in cloud physics; both are fundamental to our understanding of climate dynamics and atmosphere-surface interactions. Moreover, his leadership successively as chair of two departments and as director of two separate Institutes and his outreach initiatives in spearheading hydrologic-atmospheric experimentation and in founding the Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering at UCLA reveal him to be a true leader in the image of Roger Revelle.

  9. Nicholson Medal for Human Outreach Talk: Physics Outreach: Social Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benczer-Koller, Noemie

    2011-04-01

    Physics constitutes a scientific endeavour that has benefited particularly from the globalization of our planet and the international character of its practitioners. The Medal Award was created by friends of Dwight Nicholson to highlight achievements in humanitarian service, special mentorship of students and junior colleagues while motivating interest in physics in the general public, outreach to the larger community of scientists and nonscientists, and work towards achieving gender and minority equity in the work force. While these are broad goals, they uniquely match the interests of practicing physicists as they weave seamlessly with their scientific work. Examples of the variety of such engagement in the physics community in the present time as well as in the past will be presented.

  10. Nuclear Planetology: Constraining the Driving Force in Wegener's Continental Drift Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, G.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear planetology [1] is a new research field, which aims at deciphering the nuclear physics processes responsible for the evolution of ultra-substellar objects and the driving force in Wegener's continental drift theory by means of Re-Os nuclear geochronometry [2]. Terrestrial Re/Os ratios observed within diamond sulphide inclusions [3], compatible with lunar r-process production ratios of Th/U≈1≈Au/Ir [4], drop from ≈0.8 to 0.2-0.05 for nucleogeochronometric ages between 2.3 Ga and 1.4 Ga [5]. It has therefore been argued [5,6] that the Re/Os fractionation is related to a change in oxygen fugacity due to the physics/chemistry of Earth's core after a possibly Fermi-pressure controlled core collapse [4]. Here, Pd/Ru, Pd/Pt, Pd/Ir, Pd/Os, Ru/Ir, Ru/Os, Pt/Ir or Pt/Os ratios from 24 published H chondrite components [7] are connected to their respective nucleogeochronometric ages to constrain an extended fossil fractionation record over 800 Ma. The following ranges are obtained: 0.06-1.04 (Pd/Ru), 0.06-0.79 (Pd/Pt), 0.06-1.76 (Pd/Os), 0.07-1.94 (Pd/Ir), 1.08-1.99 (Ru/Ir), 0.83-2.41 (Pt/Os), 0.82-2.64 (Pt/Ir). Comparing the Re/Os fractionation pattern of the diamond sulphide inclusions with these results and considering that Re is readily oxidized even at ultra-low oxygen fugacity, it may be concluded that (i) extremely reducing conditions within Earth's core basically preserve any unfractionated r-process element ratio until today; and (ii) nuclear/quantum physics processes leading to the observed ratios and fractionation pattern are ultimately the driving force in Wegener's continental drift theory. [1] Roller (2015), Abstract T34B-0407, AGU Spring Meeting. [2] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-17. [3] Smit et al. (2010), GCA 74, 3292. [4] Roller (2015), Abstract #5041, 78th Ann. Met. Soc. Meeting. [5] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-2399. [6] Roller (2015), Abstract PG34A-0283, AGU Spring Meeting. [7] Horan et al. (2009), GCA 73

  11. [Doctor and poet as rivals. Sigmund Freud, Alfred von Berger and the narrative of female homosexuality].

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Starting from a passage in the Dora case history where Freud suggests some differences between a literary and a clinical narrative of female homosexuality, this paper presents examples which he might have had in mind. Besides Balzac's "La fille aux yeux d'or" (1834/35) it is in particular Alfred v. Berger's novella "Die Italienerin [The Italian woman]" (1904) which may have served as a model and counterpoint to the literary strategies used in Freud's case history. Freud had a relationship of long standing with Berger. This newly discovered source may provide a clue for the date at which Freud finalized the Dora manscript which he had held back for years.

  12. Alfred Werner's role in the mid-20th century flourishing of American inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Labinger, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    The development of organic and physical chemistry as specialist fields, during the middle and end of the 19th century respectively, left inorganic behind as a decidedly less highly regarded subfield of chemistry. Despite Alfred Werner's groundbreaking studies of coordination chemistry in the early 20th century, that inferior status remained in place - particularly in the US - until the 1950s, when the beginnings of a resurgence that eventually restored its parity with the other subfields can be clearly observed. This paper explores the extent to which Werner's heritage - both direct, in the form of academic descendants, and indirect - contributed to those advances.

  13. Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL): Introducing novel concepts in allergy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Anto, Josep M; Bousquet, Jean; Akdis, Mubeccel; Auffray, Charles; Keil, Thomas; Momas, Isabelle; Postma, Dirkje S; Valenta, Rudolf; Wickman, Magnus; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Haahtela, Tari; Lambrecht, Bart N; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sunyer, Jordi; Zuberbier, Torsten; Annesi-Maesano, Isabelle; Arno, Albert; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Forastiere, Francesco; Heinrich, Joachim; Kowalski, Marek L; Maier, Dieter; Melén, Erik; Smit, Henriette A; Standl, Marie; Wright, John; Asarnoj, Anna; Benet, Marta; Ballardini, Natalia; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gehring, Ulrike; Guerra, Stefano; Hohmann, Cynthia; Kull, Inger; Lupinek, Christian; Pinart, Mariona; Skrindo, Ingebjorg; Westman, Marit; Smagghe, Delphine; Akdis, Cezmi; Andersson, Niklas; Bachert, Claus; Ballereau, Stephane; Ballester, Ferran; Basagana, Xavier; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergstrom, Anna; von Berg, Andrea; Brunekreef, Bert; Burte, Emilie; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Chatzi, Leda; Coquet, Jonathan M; Curin, Mirela; Demoly, Pascal; Eller, Esben; Fantini, Maria Pia; von Hertzen, Leena; Hovland, Vergard; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Just, Jocelyne; Keller, Theresa; Kiss, Renata; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lau, Susanne; Lehmann, Irina; Lemonnier, Nicolas; Mäkelä, Mika; Mestres, Jordi; Mowinckel, Peter; Nadif, Rachel; Nawijn, Martijn C; Pellet, Johan; Pin, Isabelle; Porta, Daniela; Rancière, Fanny; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Saeys, Yvan; Schuijs, Martijn J; Siroux, Valerie; Tischer, Christina G; Torrent, Mathies; Varraso, Raphaelle; Wenzel, Kalus; Xu, Cheng-Jian

    2017-02-01

    Asthma, rhinitis, and eczema are complex diseases with multiple genetic and environmental factors interlinked through IgE-associated and non-IgE-associated mechanisms. Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy (MeDALL; EU FP7-CP-IP; project no: 261357; 2010-2015) studied the complex links of allergic diseases at the clinical and mechanistic levels by linking epidemiologic, clinical, and mechanistic research, including in vivo and in vitro models. MeDALL integrated 14 European birth cohorts, including 44,010 participants and 160 cohort follow-ups between pregnancy and age 20 years. Thirteen thousand children were prospectively followed after puberty by using a newly standardized MeDALL Core Questionnaire. A microarray developed for allergen molecules with increased IgE sensitivity was obtained for 3,292 children. Estimates of air pollution exposure from previous studies were available for 10,000 children. Omics data included those from historical genome-wide association studies (23,000 children) and DNA methylation (2,173), targeted multiplex biomarker (1,427), and transcriptomic (723) studies. Using classical epidemiology and machine-learning methods in 16,147 children aged 4 years and 11,080 children aged 8 years, MeDALL showed the multimorbidity of eczema, rhinitis, and asthma and estimated that only 38% of multimorbidity was attributable to IgE sensitization. MeDALL has proposed a new vision of multimorbidity independent of IgE sensitization, and has shown that monosensitization and polysensitization represent 2 distinct phenotypes. The translational component of MeDALL is shown by the identification of a novel allergic phenotype characterized by polysensitization and multimorbidity, which is associated with the frequency, persistence, and severity of allergic symptoms. The results of MeDALL will help integrate personalized, predictive, preventative, and participatory approaches in allergic diseases.

  14. Erosive rhinitis resembling granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) in an Anatolian shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Marlies; Basson, Sandra

    2015-04-21

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) is one of the idiopathicimmune-mediated small-vessel vasculitides described in humans which are characterised by the presence of circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. It most commonly involves capillaries, venules and arterioles of the ear, nose and throat, lungs and glomeruli. A case of destructive haemopurulent rhinitis associated with relapsing periods of pyrexia, lethargy and stiffness as well as generalised pulmonary infiltrates in a young Anatolian shepherd dog is presented that closely resembles granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) as reported in humans. Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) were detected in the dog's serum. Signs resolved promptly and completely once immunosuppressive doses of prednisone were administered, and have not recurred. This is the first report onthe use of pANCA to investigate rhinitis in dogs. It is also, to the authors' knowledge, the first description of a relapsing haemopurulent lytic rhinitis in this species. The concurrent manifestations of erosive haemopurulent rhinitis, ground-glass opacities on pulmonary computed tomography, pyrexia and listlessness resemble GPA as described in humans.

  15. A case of exorbitism in association with Wegener's granulomatosis with renal involvement.

    PubMed

    Beji, S; Fatma, L Ben; Chebbi, A; Rais, L; Krid, M; Smaoui, W; Maiz, H Ben; Zouaghi, K; Moussa, F Ben

    2012-03-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis involving the nose, paranasal sinuses, lungs, and kidneys. Ocular involvement can occur in about 50% of cases. There are very few reports of WG with orbital inflammation and exorbitism. We report a case of a female patient who presented with exorbitism related to orbital inflammation secondary to WG, with renal involvement. A 29-year-old woman with a previous history of recurrent pan-sinusitis presented with bilateral exophthalmos and renal failure with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Computed tomography showed extensive bilateral soft tissue in the retro-orbital area. Immunologic tests showed the presence of type-C anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and renal biopsy revealed pauci immune crescentic glomerulonephritis. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and pulses of cyclophosphamide followed by azathioprine and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. After a follow-up of 10 months, the renal outcome was favorable with improvement of renal function but there was persistence of exorbitism and loss of visual function. Our case suggests that WG should be considered in the differential diagnosis of persistent bilateral exophthalmos. Prompt recognition of this early manifestation is important for the institution of early treatment.

  16. Cocaine-induced midline destruction lesions with positive ANCA test mimicking Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Stahelin, Letícia; Fialho, Sonia Cristina de Magalhães Souza; Neves, Fabrício Souza; Junckes, Larissa; Werner de Castro, Gláucio Ricardo; Pereira, Ivânio Alves

    2012-01-01

    Chronic use of cocaine by inhalation may induce midline destructive lesions (CIMDL), which can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from the ear, nose and throat lesions of Wegener's Granulomatosis (WG). We describe the case of a 43-year-old female patient admitted with a two-year history of nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea. She had been diagnosed with WG for five months, being on prednisone and cyclophosphamide. On her physical examination, perforation of her nasal septum and palate was observed. Laboratory tests showed elevated acute phase proteins and a positive p-ANCA test. ELISA assays anti-proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase were negative. The paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) showed destruction of the nasal septum and palate, in addition to bilateral maxillary sinusitis. Chest CT was normal. Nasal mucosal biopsy revealed an inflammatory infiltrate, with neither granuloma nor vasculitis. When questioned, she admitted being a cocaine user for five years. Medical therapy and cocaine use were withdrawn. She has been followed up for six months and no other lesion or other organ symptoms occurred. Differential diagnosis in patients with midline destructive lesions can be very challenging. Evaluation should include enquiry about intranasal use of cocaine. Although ANCA testing does not clearly differentiate the ANCA found in some patients with CIMDL from those found in WG patients, the localized involvement and the biopsy findings non-characteristic of small vessel granulomatous vasculitis should be recognized as features for cocaine-induced lesions.

  17. c-ANCA-induced neutrophil-mediated lung injury: a model of acute Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Hattar, K; Oppermann, S; Ankele, C; Weissmann, N; Schermuly, R T; Bohle, R M; Moritz, R; Krögel, B; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Sibelius, U; Grandel, U

    2010-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA) targeting proteinase 3 (PR3) are implicated in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). Fulminant disease can present as acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, a model of ALI in WG was developed using isolated rat lungs. Isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were primed with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) to induce surface expression of PR3. Co-perfusion of TNF-primed neutrophils and monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies induced a massive weight gain in isolated lungs. This effect was not observed when control immunoglobulin G was co-perfused with TNF-primed PMNs. The c-ANCA-induced oedema formation was paralleled by an increase in the capillary filtration coefficient as a marker of increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. In contrast, pulmonary artery pressure was not affected. In the presence of the oxygen radical scavenger superoxide dismutase and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, c-ANCA-induced lung oedema could be prevented. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase was equally effective in preventing c-ANCA-induced lung injury. In conclusion, anti-PR3 antibodies induced neutrophil mediated, elastase- and oxygen radical-dependent ALI in the isolated lung. This experimental model supports the hypothesis of a pathogenic role for c-ANCA in WG and offers the possibility of the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of lung injury in fulminant WG.

  18. Sir Alfred Keogh--the years of reform 1899-1910.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sydney V

    2008-12-01

    History inevitably requires individuals to influence and change circumstances; men and women of principles, courage or power who influence events to such an extent they produce change, even to the extent of changing the course of history. Alfred Keogh was such a man. He possessed strong principles and the courage to convert a nineteenth-century attitude to the health of an army into the modern vision of Army Health we have today. Keogh was plucked from obscurity in India and plunged into a war, the outcome of which was never certain. The reputation of the Army had been tarnished by a government who had done next to nothing to prepare it for modern war or ameliorate the condition of the common soldier and the Boer War exposed the extent of that neglect to a shocked public. Ultimately the humiliation of the Army prompted radical reforms which converted a metaphorically red-coated army into a fighting force fit for the twentieth-century. During this time Keogh led the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) through a very painful rebirth. His meteoric rise from Major to Lt. General in a little less than five years was matched only by his vision of the future and the dynamic effect he had in effecting change. This essay looks at the influence Alfred Keogh had in the reform of the RAMC that occurred in Edwardian Britain.

  19. 75 FR 28782 - Extension of Period for Nominations to the National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee AGENCY: United States Patent and Trademark Office... of individuals to serve on the National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation... Medal of Technology and Innovation Program, United States Patent and Trademark Office, P.O. Box...

  20. "Remember to Hand out Medals": Peer Rating and Expertise in a Question-and-Answer Study Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponti, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study of giving medals as part of a peer rating system in a question-and-answer (Q&A) study group on Python, a programming language. There are no professional teachers tutoring learners. The study aimed to understand whether and how medals, awarded to responses in a peer-based learning environment, can…

  1. Expression of recombinant proteinase 3, the autoantigen in Wegener's granulomatosis, in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Van der Geld, Y M; Smook, M L F; Huitema, M G; Harmsen, M C; Limburg, P C; Kallenberg, C G M

    2002-06-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is the major autoantigen for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. Little is known about the major antigenic sites on PR3. To facilitate epitope mapping, PR3 was cloned in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. Four different sequences of the PR3 cDNA were amplified by PCR: two clones containing the pro-peptide of PR3 with or without a His-tag (rproPR3-his and rproPR3, respectively) and two clones without the pro-peptide and with or without a His-tag (rPR3-his and rPR3, respectively). The PR3 sequences were cloned behind the polyhedrin promoter and the honeybee melittin signal peptide enabling secretion of rPR3. Plasmids were transposed into the genome of baculovirus, and wild types as well as PR3-containing virus genomes were transfected into Sf21 insect cells. All four rPR3 variants were secreted into the medium and were recognized by anti-neutrophil PR3 rabbit serum and by at least two anti-PR3 monoclonal antibodies. Mature forms of PR3 were recognized by almost all patient sera, whereas the pro-forms of PR3 were recognized by 14 of 18 PR3-ANCA sera tested. On SDS-PAGE, the four rPR3 forms migrated at approximately 32 kDa. RPR3-his and rproPR3-his could be purified by means of this His-tag. In conclusion, especially the mature rPR3s are well recognized by PR3-ANCA sera. The presence of a C-terminal His-tag facilitated purification of His-tagged rPR3. Thus, rPR3 expressed in insect cells can be used as a tool for diagnostic tests as well as for epitope mapping studies.

  2. Using inpatient data to estimate the prevalence of Wegener's granulomatosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Cui, Yazhou; Li, Yan; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Heng; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Summary China lacks a registry for most rare diseases, so specific epidemiological data on those diseases are lacking. A strategy involving the DISMOD II model was recently formulated to estimate the epidemiological parameters of rare diseases, and this strategy has been used to study several rare diseases. The current study used this strategy to estimate the prevalence of one such rare disease, Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), in China based on its incidence, mortality, and rate of remission according to the software tool DISMOD II. The incidence of WG was calculated based on inpatient data from 100 hospitals throughout China. The cause-specific mortality from WG was estimated based on data from the National Vital Statistics System of the United States and adjusted for the Chinese population. The rate of disease remission was based on the results of previous study. The current results indicated that the prevalence of WG in China is 1.94/100,000, which is slightly lower than that in Europe and the United States. The mean age at onset of WG in China was calculated to be 38.9 years for males and 39.3 years for females and the duration of disease was 28 years for both male and female patients. These figures are similar to published data from other countries. In conclusion, the DISMOD II model was used to estimate the prevalence of WG in China, providing a basis to evaluate the potential disease burden and orphan drug use by patients with WG. The DISMOD II model could be used to estimate the prevalence of other rare diseases. PMID:26989646

  3. The New Liberal Arts. An Exchange of Views. An Occasional Paper from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koerner, James D., Ed.; And Others

    The position taken by Stephen White, of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (New York, New York), in the title article of this collection, states that the programs of many liberal arts colleges are moving toward incorporating applied mathematics and technological literacy into the curriculum. White also states that colleges should be adjusting their…

  4. 75 FR 30427 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Idaho, Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Laboratory of Anthropology, Moscow, ID AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is..., Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, Moscow, ID, that meet the definitions of ``unassociated... Laboratory of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the five cultural...

  5. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: David W. Johnson.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is David W. Johnson. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Beatrice A. Wright.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in 4 areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Beatrice A. Wright. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are: Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Gold Medal Award for life achievement in the science of psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2012 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Philip G. Zimbardo. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 120th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 3, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2012 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; Charles L. Brewer, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; Brian N. Baird; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Connie Chan; William Howell; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Aurelio Prifitera; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  8. 50 years of space science (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Roger-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    The launch of Sputnik-1 triggered my fascination for space at the age of 20. The past 50 years have allowed me to study the Sun with sounding rockets and satellites, revealing the complexity of our star, contributing to the understanding of its physics, and offering surprising manifestations of its behavior and of its effects on Earth. Building instruments for space astronomy, managing teams of space scientists and engineers, led me to become the science director of the European space agency between 1983 and 2001 where I formulated and managed the Horizon 2000 program, which led Europe to occupy the front row of world space science. The Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture offers me an opportunity, to describe the most spectacular achievements of this long-term plan and to outline some basic principles for reaching success, including the essential role of international cooperation with shared partnership. The Lecture also identifies key problems and controversial issues that space astronomy and exploration will face in the 21st century.

  9. Cohort profile: the Welsh Geriatric Registrar-Led Research Network (WeGeN): rationale, design and description

    PubMed Central

    Long, Sara; Butler, John

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Medical trainees are required to undertake audit and quality improvement projects. They must also have an understanding of the principles of research and are encouraged to participate in research projects. However, the constraints of time, a lack of formal training and rotation between different training posts create barriers to audit cycle completion and pursuing research. This leads to trainees being reluctant to undertake research, facilitates poor quality research and risks incomplete audit. Participants The Welsh Geriatricians Network (WeGeN) has been created with the aims of facilitating collaborative, trainee-led research within Geriatric Medicine in Wales, promoting research engagement and improving the research evidence base for older patients. By coordinating collaborative research projects across different sites within Wales, trainees continue existing projects at new sites, allowing completion of projects and establishing the long-term infrastructure and experienced personnel needed for high-quality research data to be gathered. Findings WeGeN has facilitated 4 national audits, all of which are intended for peer review publication. The first project considers the service provision for the older person in the emergency department, the second Parkinson's disease, the third reviews delirium management and the fourth project considers epidemiology of surgical disease in older people. Future plans The objective of this project is to further establish and develop WeGeN as a group which facilitates high-quality research and provides the opportunity for geriatric trainees to engage in research activity. It is anticipated that the establishment of this research platform will provide a blueprint for the development of other such networks in the UK and beyond. PMID:28196947

  10. [A patient with both cocaine-induced nasal septum destruction and antibodies against anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA); potential confusion with Wegener's disease].

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, R J; van Buren, M; Koopman, J P

    2007-10-27

    A 37-year-old male cocaine user presented with continual, sanguinolent nasal obstruction and persistant pain following a nasal operation one year ago. Examination showed crustae, granulations and exposed septal cartilage in the right nasal passage in addition to a considerable septal deviation to the left. No other physical abnormalities were found. A biopsy of the nasal mucosa showed acute necrotic inflammation. The serological examination revealed markedly elevated anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) titres with positive reactions against proteinase-3, indicating Wegener's disease. Additional testing also showed a positive ANCA reaction for human neutrophil elastase, which made cocaine use a more plausible cause for the nasal abnormalities than Wegener's disease. Treatment consisted of nasal flushing with saline and, for a short period, a nasal tampon with hydrocortisone-oxytetracycline-polymyxin B ointment. However, the patient did, ultimately, develop a septal perforation. Cocaine-induced nasal abnormalities can imitate symptoms that may fit Wegener's disease, including relevant serological ANCA findings.

  11. Before New Big Science: Alfred O. C. Nier and the Resurrection of Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The mass spectrometer found its first success as a means to determine the isotopic masses and constitutions of chemical elements. As the last known elements were analyzed, its future in physics and chemistry laboratories was in doubt. From the 1940s to the 1960s, however, the mass spectrometer transformed from an instrument built for a specific purpose into a flexible analytical tool that brought together researchers from disciplines across the natural sciences. This talk examines that transition through the career of Alfred Otto Carl Nier, the University of Minnesota mass spectroscopist who was instrumental in both finding new realms where his favored tool could be applied and in building an interdisciplinary community around it. It argues that the reinvention of the mass spectrometer that Nier helped effect prefigured a similar transition in accelerator laboratories, which Catherine Westfall and Robert P. Crease have called ``New Big Science,'' some decades later.

  12. The Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein Signaling Then and Now: A Tribute to Alfred G. Gilman.

    PubMed

    Sunahara, Roger K; Insel, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    The recent, unfortunate death of Alfred G. ("Al") Gilman, M.D., Ph.D., represents a sad signpost for an era spanning over 40 years in molecular pharmacology. Gilman's discoveries, influence, and persona were dominant forces in research and training in pharmacology. Here, we review the progression of ideas and knowledge that spawned early work by Gilman and collaborators (among them, one of the authors) and later efforts (including those of the other author) that have recently yielded a comprehensive and precise structural understanding of fundamental topics in pharmacology: the binding of ligands to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and the interaction of GPCRs with heterotrimeric G proteins and effector molecules. Those data provide new and important insights into the molecular basis that underlies affinity and efficacy, two of the most important features of drug action, which represent the latest chapter in the saga that Al Gilman's work helped launch.

  13. Capturing the will: Imposture, delusion, and exposure in Alfred Russel Wallace's defence of spirit photography.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Benjamin David

    2014-06-01

    The co-discoverer of natural selection, Alfred Russel Wallace, found himself deeply embroiled in a range of controversies surrounding the relationship between science and spiritualism. At the heart of these controversies lay a crisis of evidence in cases of delusion or imposture. He had the chance to observe the many epistemic impasses brought about by this crisis while participating in the trial of the American medium Henry Slade, and through his exchanges with the physiologist William Benjamin Carpenter and the psychical researcher Frederic Myers. These contexts help to explain the increasing value that Wallace placed on the evidence of spirit photography. He hoped that it could simultaneously break these impasses, while answering once and for all the interconnected questions of the unity of the psyche and the reliability of human observation.

  14. Alfred Russel Wallace's medical libertarianism: state medicine, human progress, and evolutionary purpose.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), naturalist and explorer of South America and the Malay Archipelago, secured his place in history by independently discovering the theory of natural selection. His letter outlining the theory was sent from Ternate in eastern Indonesia and received at Down House, according to Charles Darwin (1809-82), on June 18, 1858, prompting the now-famed evolutionist to rush his languishing manuscript to press. Wallace's contributions to evolutionary biology, biogeography, and anthropology are well known, but his medical views have received far less attention. Within the context of a strident populist antivaccination movement and an ominous elitist eugenics campaign, Wallace took his stand, which revealed itself in a libertarianism that defended traditional socialist constituencies (the working poor, the lumpenproletariat, and feminist reformers) against state-mandated medical interventions. Rather than viewing Wallace as a heterodox contrarian, this article argues that his positions were logical outgrowths of his medical libertarianism and evolutionary and social theories.

  15. Archival note: an inquiry into the relationshp between Alfred Binet and Cyril Burt.

    PubMed

    Faber, Diana

    2003-01-01

    Two recent archival items offer material for analysis of Alfred Binet's (1857-1911) and Cyril Burt's (1883-1971) relationship in the early twentieth century. Burt's letter to Binet's biographer Theta Wolf was an answer to her request for information about his contact with Binet. An analysis of Burt's account prompts more questions than it answers. His statements in the letter are compared with previous ones and are put into the context of the activities of the two men, but these do not enlighten us about his actual relations with Binet. The problem arises because of Burt's desciptive vagueness and lack of supporting evidence. Despite attacks against Burt's integrity made from 1976 onward, we found no conclusive evidence of false claims. The negative outcome of this analysis probably results from Burt's faulty memory, and herein lies the caveat that personal memories make unreliable material for historical accounts.

  16. Medal of Honor Award Process Review: U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officer Nominee (Redacted)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-04

    surrounding the recommendation to award the Medal ofHonor (MOH) to a U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officer for his valorous actions in combat while deployed...authority for awards below the Medal ofHonor. We found no evidence that the Secretary of the Army relied on the CID investigation in his decision to...award the nominee the Silver Star. We determined Secretary McHugh acted within his authority when he decided to award the SS. We found no evidence

  17. Alfred P. Southwick, MDS, DDS: dental practitioner, educator and originator of electrical executions.

    PubMed

    Christen, A G; Christen, J A

    2000-11-01

    The search for a modern, humane method of criminal execution was triggered by a freak accident which occurred in Buffalo, New York in 1881. Dr. Alfred P. Southwick (a former steam-boat engineer, noted dentist and dental educator) happened to witness an intoxicated man die after he inadvertently touched a live generator terminal. Southwick's initial reaction was shock. Later, as he pondered this tragic event, he concluded that electrocution was, at least, a quick and seemingly painless way to depart from this earth. As his thoughts turned to common methods of capital punishment, Alfred concluded that death by electrocution could become a more humane alternative, as compared with the more grisly methods (e.g., hanging, beheading by guillotine, garroting, suffocation and flaying). Working through the governor of New York and the state legislature, Southwick originated and successfully promoted the passage of laws which mandated electrical executions in New York and in approximately 20 other states. During 1888-1889, Southwick served on the state's three-person Electrical Death Commission, a group who reported that electrical execution was superior to all other methods. On January 1, 1889, the world's first electrical execution law went into effect. On August 6, 1890, William Francis Kemmler, who had murdered his mistress, was the first person to die in the electric chair. However, this public event became an amateurish spectacle: the initial surge of current did not cause Kemmler's immediate death and a second jolt was needed. Those who witnessed this bungled execution were stunned. Graphic and detailed criticism from both the press and the general public ran high. However, Dr. Southwick vigorously continued to support and finally achieve his goal--to humanize capital punishment through the legal use of electrical execution.

  18. 1988 Horton Medal presented to Peter S. Eagleson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Eagleson, Peter S.

    It is indeed a great honor for me, and also a great pleasure, to present to you the 1988 recipient of the Robert E. Horton Medal, Peter S. Eagleson. Shortly after it became public that Pete was the winner of this year's medal, I commented to my wife that, although I had never given a citation for an AGU medalist, this was one I would really love to give. The reason is simple: there is no one in the world who better represents the standards of excellence that a hydrologist hopes to achieve and that hydrologists hope our discipline will attain than Peter Eagleson.Pete did not start his research career in hydrology. In fact, his Ph.D. thesis in 1956 and his research up to 1965 were mainly in the field of sediment sorting and transport by waves on beaches. During this period he also investigated problems related to flow-induced vibrations of plates. His research in these areas was extremely successful, producing three chapters in books and about 20 journal papers in addition to many technical reports and journal discussions. Indeed, Pete had made his mark in wave theory and sediment transport, but it was good fortune for our field that starting about 1964 his interest in hydrology overcame all his past experience and assured a reputation in the waves and sediment field, and thus he embarked on a new adventure—bringing into hydrology the scientific rigor that existed in more academically established disciplines. With his strong fluid mechanics background—he still teaches that subject to undergraduates at MIT—Pete was ideally suited to lead the field toward new problems and also toward new approaches to old problems . . . and this he did indeed! Just in 1967 he and his students published six papers, most of them in Water Resources Research, which had a strong, an almost immediate impact on the field of hydrology. Here was somebody who was tackling the modeling of overland flow with the scientific standards of fluid mechanics. At the same time, finally somebody had

  19. Riccardo Giacconi to Receive National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    Riccardo Giacconi, very recently retired President of Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), will be awarded the National Medal of Science by President George W. Bush on March 14, according to the White House. Giacconi, who received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2002, will be honored for his pioneering research in X-ray astronomy and for his visionary leadership of major astronomy facilities. Established by Congress in 1959, the National Medal of Science is the Nation's highest honor for American scientists and is awarded annually by the President of the United States to individuals "deserving of special recognition for their outstanding contributions to knowledge." "We are extremely proud that Riccardo Giacconi has been selected to receive the nation's highest award for scientific achievement," said current AUI President Ethan J. Schreier, a long-term colleague of Dr. Giacconi. "It is another fitting recognition for an outstanding scientific career that has enhanced our basic understanding of the universe," Schreier added. Giacconi, known as the father of X-ray astronomy, used X-ray detectors launched on rockets to discover the first cosmic X-ray source in 1962. Because X-ray radiation is absorbed in Earth's atmosphere, space-based instruments are necessary to study it. Giacconi outlined a methodical program to investigate this new X-ray universe and, working with his research group at American Science and Engineering, Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts, developed the first space satellite dedicated to the new field of X-ray astronomy. Named Uhuru, this X-ray satellite observatory was launched in 1970 and subsequently discovered hundreds of X-ray sources. The ground-breaking work of Giacconi and his group led to the discovery of black holes, which to that point had been hypothesized but never seen. Giacconi was also the first to prove that the universe contains background radiation of X-ray light. Riccardo Giacconi has played a key role in many other landmark

  20. Persistent expansion of CD4+ effector memory T cells in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Abdulahad, W H; van der Geld, Y M; Stegeman, C A; Kallenberg, C G M

    2006-09-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is associated with an ongoing immune effector response, even in remission, we examined the distribution of peripheral naive and memory T-lymphocytes in this disease, and analyzed the function-related phenotypes of the memory T-cell population. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were freshly isolated from WG-patients in remission (R-WG, n=40), active WG-patients (A-WG, n=17), and age-matched healthy controls (HCs, n=21). Expression of CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CCR7, interleukin (IL)-18Ralpha, ST2L, and FoxP3 were determined by four-color flow cytometric analysis. CD45RO and CCR7 were used for distinction between naive and memory T cells, IL-18Ralpha, ST2L, and FoxP3 for the assessment of Type1, Type2, and regulatory T-cells, respectively. In R-WG, the CD4+CD45RO+CCR7- effector memory T-cell subpopulation (TEM) was relatively increased, whereas the CD4+CD45RO-CCR7+ naive T-cell population (TNaive) was decreased as compared to HC. The distribution of naive and memory CD8+T cells did not differ between R-WG, A-WG, and HC, nor did CD4+CD45RO+CCR7+ central memory T cells (TCM). In contrast to HC, the percentage of CD4+TNaive cells in R-WG correlated negatively with age, whereas CD4+TEM cells showed a positive correlation. In R-WG, a skewing towards Type2 T cells was observed in CD4+TEM cells. No differences were detected in FoxP3+CD4+TEM cells between R-WG and A-WG, whereas the FoxP3-CD4+TEM cells were increased in R-WG and decreased in A-WG as compared to HC. Collectively, peripheral blood homeostasis of CD4+T cells is disturbed in R-WG with the persistent expansion of non-regulatory CD4+TEM cells. These cells might be involved in relapse and may constitute a target for therapy.

  1. The Dead Sea Transform as exemplary pattern for the quest of the Wegener Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, A.; Damm, V.; Piepjohn, K.; Tessensohn, F.; Neben, S.

    2006-12-01

    The northern Baffin Bay (BB) forms a tectonic system around a triple point which is similar to the northern Red Sea (RS) triple junction. The oceanic BB is supposed to have formed by sea floor spreading, although no marine magnetic anomalies have been found north of Davis Strait, so far. The spreading history is derived from the Labrador Sea, south of the BB. The supposed triple junction is located between Baffin and Ellesmere Islands, where the left-lateral Wegener Fault (WF) branches off, as well as the failed rift arm Lancaster Sound and/or Jones Sound. The area forms a key region in order to understand the late break-up development of Laurasia. There is an ongoing debate about the amount of left lateral displacement that was compensated along the WF between Greenland and Ellesmere Island. Evidence for left lateral motion is found in most parts of the Nares Strait (NS). But, in the south, towards the triple junction (Smith Sound), evidence for the fault is lacking. A similar tectonic system is located in the northern Red Sea (RS) area. The Dead Sea Transform (DST)/Gulf of Aqaba (GoA) joins the RS-rift south of the Sinai Peninsula. The other arm of the triple junction extends into the Gulf of Suez. The RS-rift is active since the Middle Oligocene and the left lateral displacement of 105 km along the DST began about 18 Ma ago. The comparison between the BB/NS region and the northern RS/GoA could shed light onto the unknown processes of tectonic development of both systems. The DST and its accompanying structures are well known. Similar tectonic features and geophysical evidence are found along the WF. On the other hand, the actual stage of development of the northern RS is still unknown. The investigation of the transition from continental rifting to seafloor spreading in the southern BB could provide evidence for the actual status quo in the northern RS. A compilation of recent marine seismic and bathymetric data of the NS (BGR 01) and the GoA and northern RS

  2. How Earth works 100 years after Wegener's continental drift theory and IGCP 648

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. X.; Evans, D. A.; Zhong, S.; Eglington, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    It took half a century for Wegener's continental drift theory to be accepted as a fundamental element of the plate tectonic theory. Another half a century on, we are still unsure of the driving mechanism for plate tectonics: is it dominated by thermal convection, gravitational forces, or by a combination of mechanisms? Nonetheless, breakthroughs in the past decades put us in a position to make a major stride in answering this question. These include: (1) widely accepted cyclic occurrences of supercontinent assembly and break-up (whereas random occurrence of supercontinents was an equal possibility in the 1990s); (2) the discovery of two equatorial and antipodal large low seismic velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that dominate the lower mantle and appear to have been the base for almost all mantle plumes since at the Mesozoic, and of subduction of oceanic slabs all the way to the core-mantle boundary, which together suggesting whole-mantle convection; (3) the recognition of true polar wander (TPW) as an important process in Earth history, likely reflecting Earth's major internal mass redistribution events; and (4) rapidly enhancing computer modelling power enabling us to simulate all aspect of Earth's dynamic inner working. Many new yet often controversial ideas have been proposed, such a possible coupling in time (with an offset) and space between supercontinent cycle and superplume (LLSVP) events which oppose to the idea of static and long-lived LLSVPs, and the orthoversion v.s. introversion or extroversion models for supercontinent transition. To fully utilise these advances as well as the rapidly expanding global geoscience databases to address the question of how Earth works, an UNESCO-IUGS sponsored IGCP project No. 648 was formed to coordinate a global cross-disciplinary effort. We aim to achieve a better understanding of the supercontinent cycle, and examine the relationship between supercontinent cycle and global plume events. We will establish a series of global

  3. [A case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis in the course of Wegener's granulomatosis].

    PubMed

    Idasiak-Piechocka, I; Oko, A; Łochyńska, K; Woźniak, A; Czekalski, S

    2000-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is characterized by granulomatous vasculitis of the respiratory tract and glomerulonephritis (GN). Prognosis of this disease is poor and about 20% of untreated patients die after one year from the onset. WG was recognized in 45-year-old patient on the basis of: 1) clinical symptoms (joint pain and swollen, purpura on the skin which appeared one week after respiratory tract infection, ulceration of the tonsils and lingula), 2) results of additional testing (X-chest-ray-infiltrates of both lungs), positive results of the cANCA (titre 1:640) and rapidly progressive renal failure [the increase of serum creatinine level (Pcr) from 123.7 to 707 mumol/l (1.4 to 8.0 mg/dl) during one week]. Renal biopsy revealed extracapillary GN (cellular crescents in 7 out of 8 glomeruli and scattered foci of fibrinoid necrosis of capillary walls in all). At the beginning of the treatment Pcr raised to 884 mumol/l (10 mg/dl) and the patient required hemodialysis. He was treated with methylprednisolone (M) at flash doses of 1000 mg/24 h by three days followed by 125 mg/24 h i.v.--because of peptic ulcer, with cyclophosphamide (C-150 mg/24 h p.p.), with trimetoprim/sulphametoxazole, with pentoxifylline and omeprazol. After six weeks of the treatment in the control kidney biopsy sclerotic changes in 10 out of 13 glomeruli and diffuse interstitial fibrosis were found. However, during the same time, we observed clinical remission of the disease and the decrease of Pcr to 176.8 mumol/l (2 mg/dl). The M dosis was reduced by 5 mg every weeks and the C dosis--to 50 mg (because of the increase of aminotransferase levels) After six months of the treatment Pcr was 132.6 mumol/l (1.5 mg/dl) and CANCA titer was 1:16. In this case of RPGN, despite off the progression of the morphological changes in the kidney, we obtained the clinical remission of the disease and significant decrease of Pcr level. These results suggest that aggressive treatment of WG is justified even in

  4. Effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen Process to Black Carbon Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ling; Li, Qinbin; He, Cenlin; Wang, Xin; Huang, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    We systematically investigated the effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process to black carbon (BC) simulation by a global 3D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem constrained by measurements of BC scavenging efficiencies, concentration in air, deposition fluxes, concentration in snow and washout ratios. Including effect of WBF process reduces the annual mean BC scavenging efficiencies (the ratio of BC in cloud droplets to total BC) at all altitudes by 43-76% in the Arctic. For mid latitude BC scavenging efficiencies decrease by 8-22%, 23-39%, and 41-50% in lower (0-2 km), middle (2-5 km) and upper troposphere (5-10 km), respectively. Simulated BC in air in the Arctic and at mid altitude (˜4 km) in mid latitude increases by ˜40%, and the discrepancy reduces from -65% to -30%. Simulated median BC in snow decreases from 25.7 to 22.4 ng g-1, by 15% in mid latitude and increases from 8.7 to 11.0 ng g-1, by 26% in the Arctic and the comparison with observations improves. The model overestimates washout ratios (ratio of BC in fresh snow/rain to BC in surface air) at most of the sites by up to a factor of 165. With effect of WBF process included, the discrepancy decreases to a factor of 72. The simulated BC burden increases from 0.22 to 0.35 mg m-2 yr-1 when effect of WBF process is included, partly explains the scaled up of BC burden in Bond et al., 2013. Moreover, burden above 5 km increases from 22% to 27% when WBF process is included, indicating a higher forcing efficiency. We also found that BC simulation is insensitive to the temperature criteria between mixed phase clouds and ice clouds. The simulated BC burden is the same when the temperature is set as -15° C and -25° C. This study also suggests that more observations are needed to better distinguish riming dominated and WBF dominated conditions and better parameterize BC scavenging efficiency under the two conditions.

  5. Localization of α-adrenoceptors: JR Vane Medal Lecture

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, John C

    2015-01-01

    This review is based on the JR Vane Medal Lecture presented at the BPS Winter Meeting in December 2011 by J.C. McGrath. A recording of the lecture is included as supporting information. It covers his laboratory's work from 1990 to 2010 on the localization of vascular α1-adrenoceptors in native tissues, mainly arteries. Main points: (i) α1-adrenoceptors are present on several cell types in arteries, not only on medial smooth muscle, but also on adventitial, endothelial and nerve cells; (ii) all three receptor subtypes (α1A, α1B, α1D) are capable of binding ligands at the cell surface, strongly indicating that they are capable of function and not merely expressed. (iii) all of these cell types can take up an antagonist ligand into the intracellular compartments to which endocytosing receptors move; (iv) each individual subtype can exist at the cell surface and intracellularly in the absence of the other subtypes. As functional pharmacological experiments show variations in the involvement of the different subtypes in contractions of different arteries, it is concluded that the presence and disposition of α1-adrenoceptors in arteries is not a simple guide to their involvement in function. Similar locations of the subtypes, even in different cell types, suggest that differences between the distribution of subtypes in model systems do not directly correlate with those in native tissues. This review includes a historical summary of the alternative terms used for adrenoceptors (adrenergic receptors, adrenoreceptors) and the author's views on the use of colours to illustrate different items, given his partial colour-blindness. PMID:25377869

  6. The William Houston Gold Medal of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh 2009.

    PubMed

    Flint, Helen E

    2010-12-01

    As part of the Membership in Orthodontics examination, candidates are required to present five treated cases. Two of the cases treated by one of the winners of the William Houston Gold Medal from the MOrth diet of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 2009 are described.

  7. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Arthur L. Kovacs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is awarded to Arthur L. Kovacs. He is recognized for making outstanding contributions to achieving statutory recognition and securing insurance reimbursement, and as a pioneer in the professional school movement, having trained several generations of practitioners.

  8. Benjamin Franklin's Commemorative Medal "Libertas Americana": A Study in Rhetorical Iconology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lester C.

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the underlying rhetorical functions of how Benjamin Franklin used the medal to praise the national characters of France and the United States in those two countries, while he also used it to influence government policy in Malta and to vindicate himself from criticism in England. (KEH)

  9. 76 FR 36176 - Pricing for National September 11 Memorial & Museum Commemorative Medal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... United States Mint Pricing for National September 11 Memorial & Museum Commemorative Medal ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum..., Associate Director for Sales and Marketing; United States Mint; 801 9th Street, NW.; Washington, DC...

  10. 78 FR 48724 - President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces...

  11. Kroll, Murakami, and Seneviratne Receive 2013 James B. Macelwane Medals: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Motohiko

    2014-01-01

    Thank you very much, Jay, for your generous citation and for all of your support. It is a great honor for me to receive this medal. First, I sincerely thank AGU for this recognition and my nominators for their support and time.

  12. The William Houston Gold Medal of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh 2014, orthodontic cases.

    PubMed

    Almuzian, Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    The William Houston Medal is awarded to the individual achieving the highest mark at, the Membership in Orthodontics (MOrth) examination at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. As part of the examination the candidate must submit five clinical cases. Details of two cases treated by the winning candidate are presented in this paper.

  13. Discourse following award of Kepler Gold Medal. [Kepler Laws, planetary astronomy and physics, and Jupiter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    Kuiper briefly reviews Kepler's contributions to the field of planetary astronomy and physics, along with references to his own background in the study of stars, planets, and the solar system. He mentions his participation in NASA programs related to planetary astronomy. He concludes his remarks with thanks for being honored by the award of the Kepler Gold Medal.

  14. 14 CFR § 1221.201 - Basis for award of the medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be awarded to any person who is or has been designated to travel in space and who has distinguished... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Basis for award of the medal. § 1221.201 Section § 1221.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL...

  15. 14 CFR 1221.201 - Basis for award of the medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be awarded to any person who is or has been designated to travel in space and who has distinguished... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Basis for award of the medal. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL...

  16. An Examination of Newbery Medal Books from the 1920s through the 2000s: Biblical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Content analysis was conducted to determine the frequency of the presence of positive Biblical virtues and paired opposite traits across 18 Newbery Medal books from the 1920s through the 2000s because the Newbery Award is a prestigious honor bestowed upon children's literature, and the criteria for selection among books specifically precludes…

  17. 76 FR 68167 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ...-2011-0069] National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Meeting AGENCY... of Technology and Innovation (NMTI) Nomination Evaluation Committee will meet in closed session on... Innovation Program, United States Patent and Trademark Office, 600 Dulany Street, Alexandria, VA...

  18. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sale of âlistâ medals. 92.2 Section 92.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale...

  19. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sale of âlistâ medals. 92.2 Section 92.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale...

  20. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: Edwin A. Fleishman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology was awarded to Edwin A. Fleishman, for his significant contributions to the science and applications of psychology, which he has sustained over his remarkable career. He is cited for his research, which has had a profound influence on our understanding of human…

  1. 14 CFR 1221.201 - Basis for award of the medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be awarded to any person who is or has been designated to travel in space and who has distinguished... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis for award of the medal. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL...

  2. "We all go a little mad sometimes": Alfred Hitchcock, American psychoanalysis, and the construction of the Cold War psychopath.

    PubMed

    Genter, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the image of the psychopath in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 film Psycho. The famed director’s portrayal of a psychologically damaged young man connected with a much larger discussion over political and sexual deviance in the early Cold War, a discussion that cantered on the image of the psychopath as the dominant threat to national security and that played upon normative assumptions about adolescent development and mother-son relations.

  3. Eminent Victorian dentistry. 1. John Ruskin and the patient experience of Victorian dentistry. Ruskin's dentist, Alfred James Woodhouse.

    PubMed

    Bishop, M G H

    2011-02-26

    This paper describes the relationship between John Ruskin [1819-1900] the Victorian artist, writer, and critic, and Alfred James Woodhouse [1824-1906], the dentist who cared for him from 1866 to 1883. Although Ruskin was perhaps not quite as eccentric as a recent television series has portrayed him, he was certainly not conventional, and the relationship with his dentist was also not entirely conventional.

  4. The prominent absence of Alfred Russel Wallace at the Darwin anniversaries in Germany in 1909, 1959 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that the contribution of Alfred Russell Wallace (1823-1913) to the development of the "Darwinian" principle of natural selection has often been neglected. Here we focus on how the three anniversaries to celebrate the origin of the Darwin-Wallace theory in Germany in 1909, in 1959 in the divided country, as well as in 2009, have represented Charles Robert Darwin's and Alfred Russell Wallace's contributions. We have analyzed books and proceedings volumes related to these anniversaries, and the main result is that Wallace was almost always ignored, or only mentioned in passing. In 1909, Ernst Haeckel gave a talk in Jena, later published under the title The worldview of Darwin and Lamarck (Das Weltbild von Darwin und Lamarck), but not as the Darwin-Wallace concept. Haeckel mentions Wallace only once. In two important proceedings volumes from the 1959 anniversaries, Wallace was ignored. The only fair treatment of Wallace is given in another book, a collection of documents edited by Gerhard Heberer, for which the author selected nine key documents and reprinted excerpts (1959). Three of them were articles by Wallace, including the Sarawak- and Ternate-papers of 1855 and 1858, respectively. An analysis of the dominant themes during the celebrations of 2009 shows that none of the six topics had much to do with Wallace and his work. Thus, the tendency to exclude Alfred Russell Wallace is an international phenomenon, and largely attributable to the "Darwin industry".

  5. From evaporating pans to transpiring plants (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, Michael

    2013-04-01

    observations that win. That is the basis of science. In this Dalton Medal lecture we first examine pan evaporation observations and show why pan evaporation has declined. Armed with that knowledge we then investigate the consequences for plant water use and how this is directly coupled to the catchment water balance.

  6. Deciphering the evolution of birdwing butterflies 150 years after Alfred Russel Wallace.

    PubMed

    Condamine, Fabien L; Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Genson, Gwenaelle; Sperling, Felix A H; Kergoat, Gael J

    2015-07-02

    One hundred and fifty years after Alfred Wallace studied the geographical variation and species diversity of butterflies in the Indomalayan-Australasian Archipelago, the processes responsible for their biogeographical pattern remain equivocal. We analysed the macroevolutionary mechanisms accounting for the temporal and geographical diversification of the charismatic birdwing butterflies (Papilionidae), a major focus of Wallace's pioneering work. Bayesian phylogenetics and dating analyses of the birdwings were conducted using mitochondrial and nuclear genes. The combination of maximum likelihood analyses to estimate biogeographical history and diversification rates reveals that diversity-dependence processes drove the radiation of birdwings, and that speciation was often associated with founder-events colonizing new islands, especially in Wallacea. Palaeo-environment diversification models also suggest that high extinction rates occurred during periods of elevated sea level and global warming. We demonstrated a pattern of spatio-temporal habitat dynamics that continuously created or erased habitats suitable for birdwing biodiversity. Since birdwings were extinction-prone during the Miocene (warmer temperatures and elevated sea levels), the cooling period after the mid-Miocene climatic optimum fostered birdwing diversification due to the release of extinction. This also suggests that current global changes may represent a serious conservation threat to this flagship group.

  7. Alfred Walter Campbell and the visual functions of the occipital cortex.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Malcolm

    2014-07-01

    In his pioneering cytoarchitectonic studies of the human brain, Alfred Walter Campbell identified two structurally different areas in the occipital lobes and assigned two different kinds of visual functions to them. The first area, the visuosensory, was essentially on the mesial surface of the calcarine fissure. It was the terminus of nervous impulses generated in the retina and was where simple visual sensations arose. The second area, the visuopsychic, which surrounded or invested the first, was where sensations were interpreted and elaborated into visual perceptions. I argue that Campbell's distinction between the two areas was the starting point for the eventual differentiation of areas V1-V5. After a brief outline of Campbell's early life and education in Australia and of his Scottish medical education and early work as a pathologist at the Lancashire County Lunatic Asylum at Rainhill near Liverpool, I summarise his work on the human brain. In describing the structures he identified in the occipital lobes, I analyse the similarities and differences between them and the related structures identified by Joseph Shaw Bolton. I conclude by proposing some reasons for how that work came to be overshadowed by the later studies of Brodmann and for the more general lack of recognition given Campbell and his work. Those reasons include the effect of the controversies precipitated by Campbell's alliance with Charles Sherrington over the functions of the sensory and motor cortices.

  8. The ornithologist Alfred Russel Wallace and the controversy surrounding the dinosaurian origin of birds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nizar; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2013-12-01

    Over many years of his life, the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) explored the tropical forests of Malaysia, collecting numerous specimens, including hundreds of birds, many of them new to science. Subsequently, Wallace published a series of papers on systematic ornithology, and discovered a new species on top of a volcano on Ternate, where he wrote, in 1858, his famous essay on natural selection. Based on this hands-on experience, and an analysis of an Archaeopteryx fossil, Wallace suggested that birds may have descended from dinosaurian ancestors. Here, we describe the "dinosaur-bird hypothesis" that originated with the work of Thomas H. Huxley (1825-1895). We present the strong evidence linking theropod dinosaurs to birds, and briefly outline the long and ongoing controversy around this concept. Dinosaurs preserving plumage, nesting sites and trace fossils provide overwhelming evidence for the dinosaurian origin of birds. Based on these recent findings of paleontological research, we conclude that extant birds indeed descended, with some modifications, from small, Mesozoic theropod dinosaurs. In the light of Wallace's view of bird origins, we critically evaluate recent opposing views to this idea, including Ernst Mayr's (1904-2005) arguments against the "dinosaur-bird hypothesis", and document that this famous ornithologist was not correct in his assessment of this important aspect of vertebrate evolution.

  9. Stereochemistry of coordination compounds. From alfred werner to the 21st century.

    PubMed

    von Zelewsky, Alex

    2014-01-01

    As a contribution to the scientific symposium, November 22nd, 2013, commemorating the Nobel Prize awarded to Alfred Werner in 1913, a presentation of the development of stereochemistry of coordination compounds during the past 120 years was given. Stereochemistry was fundamental to Werner's theory of coordination compounds. After Werner's death in 1919, stereochemistry in this field did not progress much further for almost 20 years, but then developed continuously. It was realized that stereochemical features of elements showing coordination numbers larger than four are responsible for an almost unlimited number of stereochemical possibilities, thus opening a molecular world of new structures. In the beginning of the 21st century, interest in the field rose again considerably, mainly due to the potential of stereoselective catalysis, and the self-assembly of supramolecular structures. An end of these developments is not in sight. Here an abbreviated version of the lecture is given. A PowerPoint(®) file, or a video of the presentation, can be downloaded.

  10. Deciphering the evolution of birdwing butterflies 150 years after Alfred Russel Wallace

    PubMed Central

    Condamine, Fabien L.; Toussaint, Emmanuel F. A.; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Genson, Gwenaelle; Sperling, Felix A. H.; Kergoat, Gael J.

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and fifty years after Alfred Wallace studied the geographical variation and species diversity of butterflies in the Indomalayan-Australasian Archipelago, the processes responsible for their biogeographical pattern remain equivocal. We analysed the macroevolutionary mechanisms accounting for the temporal and geographical diversification of the charismatic birdwing butterflies (Papilionidae), a major focus of Wallace’s pioneering work. Bayesian phylogenetics and dating analyses of the birdwings were conducted using mitochondrial and nuclear genes. The combination of maximum likelihood analyses to estimate biogeographical history and diversification rates reveals that diversity-dependence processes drove the radiation of birdwings, and that speciation was often associated with founder-events colonizing new islands, especially in Wallacea. Palaeo-environment diversification models also suggest that high extinction rates occurred during periods of elevated sea level and global warming. We demonstrated a pattern of spatio-temporal habitat dynamics that continuously created or erased habitats suitable for birdwing biodiversity. Since birdwings were extinction-prone during the Miocene (warmer temperatures and elevated sea levels), the cooling period after the mid-Miocene climatic optimum fostered birdwing diversification due to the release of extinction. This also suggests that current global changes may represent a serious conservation threat to this flagship group. PMID:26133078

  11. Alfred Russel Wallace and the destruction of island life: the Iguana tragedy.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Kleinhans, Simon

    2013-12-01

    The Galápagos Islands (Ecuador) are usually associated with the explorations and theoretical deductions of Charles Robert Darwin (1809-1882), but Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) also investigated these islands and published several reports on the living world of this unique archipelago. In contrast to Darwin, Wallace described the destruction of natural ecosystems by humans and foresaw the resulting extinction of species. Here, we outline two case studies pertinent to Wallace's prediction. First, we summarize the behavior of the predator-naive marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on the Galápagos Islands, which are threatened by feral dogs and cats imported by humans. We also describe the unique life cycle of the spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura bakeri) from the island of Utila (Honduras), a rare species whose populations are declining because of habitat destructions. In contrast to these threatened, endemic island species, the Green iguana (Iguana iguana) is still widely distributed, although, as a result of de-forestation, in some areas of South America local populations have disappeared. We conclude that Wallace was correct in his prediction that, because of human activities, numerous species of animals and plants will be driven to extinction, notably on islands.

  12. [Alfred Binet and the first 'measures' of intelligence (1905-1908)].

    PubMed

    Cicciola, Elisabetta

    2008-01-01

    Alfred Binet (1857-1911) is considered the most representative exponent of the second generation of French experimental psychologists. His scientific work was inspired both by the experimentalism that Théodule Ribot and Hippolyte Taine introduced in France at the end of the 1870s, and by that of Wundt. Drawing from numerous sources, Binet was able to elaborate a psychology that focused on experiments and a controlled observation of pathological phenomena, with the objective of differentiating them from normal phenomena. His scientific production was moreover characterized by the emphasis placed upon the experimental study of "superior" psychic phenomena and, in particular, on their measurement. The aim of this paper is to describe the stages and sources of the "psychological" study of intelligence, which constituted precisely the fil rouge that had indispensably to be followed in order to fully understand the originality of all of Binet's research, whose most mature product was undoubtedly represented by the development of the Echelle métrique de l'intelligence, the first intelligence test in the history of psychology.

  13. Politics and naturalism in the 20th century psychology of Alfred Binet.

    PubMed

    Foschi, Renato; Cicciola, Elisabetta

    2006-11-01

    Alfred Binet is internationally recognized as the "father" of the first intelligence test as well as the most faithful French representative of laboratory experimentalism. A historical analysis of his work is therefore necessary to get to a thorough comprehension of 20th century psychology. The present article, starting from Binet's intellectual path and from the suggestions of the previous historical literature, aims at providing fresh insights into Binet's work by trying to capture the intersections between Binet, his naturalistic culture and the political context in which he worked in the early 20th century, when he actively tried to apply experimental psychology to the pedagogical area. In fact, it is possible to underline, with reference to those years, an evident turn towards applications in Binet's psychological production. The article reconstructs the political and institutional background of Binet's research and shows how the naturalism and experimentalism he promoted were complementary to the solidarist conceptions that were particularly prevalent among those who supported his work during the Third Republic.

  14. Real-Time Measurements of Sediment Modification by Large Macrofauna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    to organism behaviors. Nils Volkenborn ( Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research) and Lubos Polerecky (Microsensors Group, Max Planck...at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research. We combined geochemistry, physics, and behavior studies of Arenicola marina using...infauna have been excluded so that the biogenic hydraulic head causing advection can be measured. Nils Volkenborn and Karsten Reise ( Alfred

  15. Recombinant proteinase 3 (Wegener's antigen) expressed in Pichia pastoris is functionally active and is recognized by patient sera.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, M C; Heeringa, P; van der Geld, Y M; Huitema, M G; Klimp, A; Tiran, A; Kallenberg, C G

    1997-11-01

    The open reading frame of human proteinase 3 (PR3) without the prepro-peptide was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli (rcPR3) and in Pichia pastoris (rpPR3). The 6-histidine tagged rpPR3 was efficiently secreted into culture supernatant from which it could be purified by immobilized metal chelate chromatography. Purified rpPR3 migrated as a single 32-kD band on SDS-PAGE and harboured protease activity that could be inhibited with inhibitors specific for serine-proteases. By indirect antigen-capture ELISA using rpPR3, 60% of sera from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis bound to the recombinant product, although it was not recognized in ELISA with directly coated rpPR3.

  16. Hémothorax spontané révélant une vascularite de Wegener chez une femme enceinte

    PubMed Central

    Serhane, Hind; Yassine, Msougar; Amro, Lamyae

    2016-01-01

    L’hémothorax spontané demeure une pathologie rare. Ses étiologies sont multiples mais restent parfois inconnues. Chez certains patients, la thoracotomie peut être le seul recours pour déterminer son origine. Les vascularites n’ont pas été rapporté comme cause habituelle des hémothorax spontanés. La grossesse ne semble pas avoir d’effet causal, ni aggravant des hémothorax spontanés, ni des vascularites. Nous rapportons une observation assez particulière d’une jeune patiente, présentant au cours de sa grossesse un hémothorax spontané secondaire à une vasularite de type Wegener, diagnostiquée par la biopsie pleurale faite au cours d’une thoracotomie exploratrice et confirmée par le dosage des ANCA. PMID:28154726

  17. Pathways to ANCA production: from differentiation of dendritic cells by proteinase 3 to B lymphocyte maturation in Wegener's granuloma.

    PubMed

    Csernok, Elena; Moosig, Frank; Gross, Wolgang L

    2008-06-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome are idiopathic systemic vasculitides in which circulating anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) or myeloperoxidase (MPO) are commonly found. Within the last 25 years, these antibodies were subject of intensive studies, and a growing body of evidence arose for a distinct role of ANCA in the pathogenesis of the ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV). Yet, the evidence derived from clinical observations and in vitro studies remains circumstantial. The various animal models have provided substantial support for a pathogenic role of MPO-ANCA in vivo, but the debate if ANCA play a primary role in the pathogenesis of these diseases is still open. The aim of this review was to update current basic and clinical research on ANCA in the pathophysiology of AAV and to point out and discuss limitations and inconsistencies of the clinical and experimental evidence.

  18. C-ANCA-positive IgG fraction from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis induces lung vasculitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    WEIDEBACH, W; VIANA, V S T; LEON, E P; BUENO, C; LEME, A S; ARANTES-COSTA, F M; MARTINS, M A; SALDIVA, P H N; BONFA, E

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse in rats the ability of C-ANCA-positive IgG fraction in triggering inflammatory response on pulmonary tissue. Wistar rats (n = 18) were injected via the the internal jugular vein with 20 mg of total C-ANCA-positive IgG fraction isolated from serum of three different Wegener's granulomatosis patients obtained before therapy. Similarly, control rats were treated with IgG fraction from two rheumatoid arthritis patients (n = 7), IgG from six normal human sera (n = 15) or saline (n = 18), respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24h of injection for histological analysis of the lungs. Vasculitis and inflammatory infiltrate were consistently absent in rats injected with rheumatoid arthritis IgG or saline and in 14/15 of normal IgG treated animals. In contrast, marked vasculitis was observed in all 18 animals injected with C-ANCA-positive IgG fraction. The histological features were characterized by the presence of a perivascular pleomorphic cellular sheath, particularly around small vessels, endothelial adherence and diapedesis of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and presence of granuloma-like lesions. A dose–response relationship was observed between protein concentration of C-ANCA IgG sample and the intensity of the inflammatory response in the animals. In addition, IgG fraction with undetectable C-ANCA, obtained from one patient in remission after treatment, was not able to reproduce the pulmonary tissue alterations induced by its paired IgG that was positive for C-ANCA taken before therapy. The experimental model described herein may be useful to characterize more effectively the pathogenic mechanism of C-ANCA in Wegener's disease. PMID:12100022

  19. Generation of high-resolution wind fields from the dense meteorological station network WegenerNet in South-Eastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Christoph; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Fuchsberger, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    To investigate weather and climate on a local scale as well as for evaluating regional climate models (RCMs) the Wegener Center at the University of Graz established the long-term field experiment WegenerNet Feldbach region, a dense grid of 153 meteorological stations. The observations of these stations are managed by an automatic WegenerNet Processing system. This system includes a quality check of collected observations and a Data Product Generator (DPG), among other subsystems. Products already implemented in the DPG are gridded weather and climate products, generated from the main parameters temperature, precipitation and relative humidity (Kirchengast et. al., Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 95, 227-242, 2014). Missing elements are gridded wind fields from wind observations. Wind is considered as one of the most difficult meteorological variables to model and depends on many different parameters such as topography and surface roughness. Therefore a simple interpolation can only be performed in case of uniform characteristics of landscape. The presentation introduces our method of generation of wind fields from near real-time observations of the WegenerNet. Purpose of this work is to provide a database with 3D wind fields in a high spatial and time resolution as addition to the existing products, for evaluating convection permitting climate models as well as investigating weather and climate on a local scale. Core of the application is the diagnostic California Meteorological Model (CALMET). This model computes 3D wind fields based on meteorological observational data, a digital elevation model and land use categories. The application generates the required input files from meteorological stations of the WegenerNet Feldbach region and triggers the start of the CALMET model with these input files. In a next step the modeled wind fields are stored automatically every 30 minutes with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 m in the WegenerNet database. To verify the

  20. From Abrupt Change to the Future (Hans Oeschger Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, T.

    2009-04-01

    The award of the Oeschger Medal 2009 is a particular honor and pleasure for me as I was given the chance to take over from Hans Oeschger the lead of a wonderful Institute at the University of Bern in 1993. Very apprehensive first, in front of the huge expectations and challenges, I quickly found dear colleagues, close collaborators and extremely supportive staff who all dedicated their time and creativity to work for the common goal of better understanding the Earth System, its variations in the past and its sensitivity to perturbations that man is inflicting on it today. Although met with innate skepticism first by the experimental physicists, our efforts in modelling, particularly the approach of using climate models of reduced complexity, quickly paid off and provided added value to the hard won data and measurements from polar ice cores. It is clear that modelling in such a diverse environment is so much more stimulating and enriching than working on a sophisticated parameterisation in a big modelling centre. Simple models have suggested that the Earth System may have limited stability and that rather fundamental changes could be triggered by the increase of greenhouse gases. However, it is the unique results from polar ice cores, particularly from Greenland that showed that, indeed, the Earth System has limited stability and can react in extremely abrupt ways to changes in forcing. Likewise, the Antarctic ice cores have provided one of the corner stones of our knowledge about climate change: Concentrations of CO2 are today 29% higher than ever during the last 800,000 years. These two fundamental insights from the paleoclimatic archive call for accelerated research into the sensitivity of the climate system and its components to perturbations, as well as the investigation of feedback mechanisms in the biogeochemical cycles that are disturbed by the input of CO2 into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels and land use change. Our research has only scratched the

  1. [The Roots of Idiographic Paleontology: Karl Alfred von Zittel's Methodology and Conception of the Fossil Record].

    PubMed

    Tamborini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines Karl Alfred von Zittel’s practice in order to uncover the roots of so-called idiographic paleontology.The great American paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) defined the discipline of idiographic paleontology as illustration and description of the morphological features of extinct species. However, this approach does not investigate macroevolutionary patterns and processes. On the contrary, the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s implemented an epistemic methodology that illustrates macrovelutionary patterns and laws by combining idiographic data with a nomothetic form of explanation. This article elucidates the features of the idiographic data as well as the acquired knowledge coupled with this approach. First of all, Heinrich G. Bronn’s (1800–1862) statistical method is analyzed. Zittel’s practice arose as a reaction against the approximate conclusions reached by Bronn’s quantitative approach. Second, the details of Zittel’s methodology are described in order to bring out its peculiarities.The microscope played a pivotal role in creating and forming Zittel’s morphological data. This analysis sheds new light on the reasons behind the so-called ideographic paleontology, thus revising Gould’s historical reconstruction, as well as on the notion of paleontological data. However, even though Zittel aimed at reaching precise and stable conclusions,his data cannot be used for elucidating evolutionary mechanisms: they are scientific in a purely descriptive sense, but completely useless for biological investigations. Finally, this paper examines how Zittel’s methodology affects the contemporary paleobiological enterprise and thereby reflects upon the notion of natural history.

  2. Acceptance of the 2009 Henry Baldwin Ward Medal: The accidental parasitologist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Society, President Conn, colleagues, friends, and particularly students, the Ward Medal recipient, from Clarke Read onward, traditionally recounts how their career was shaped. A decade ago, in a crumbling Kona hotel, the ASP's own tattooed lady, Janine Caira, opened her Ward Medal address with: “To all future Ward Medalists, many of whom I trust are sitting in the audience out there today, I say: savor the moment! You have no idea how much easier it is to be sitting out there where you are than standing up here where I am” (Caira 1998). I certainly didn't imagine that Janine was delivering her advice to me and it is presumptuous to imagine my story is a template for shaping a career. As the title of my talk indicates, it was an accident.

  3. Kroll, Murakami, and Seneviratne Receive 2013 James B. Macelwane Medals: Citation for Motohiko Murakami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The James B. Macelwane Medal of AGU is presented to Motohiko Murakami for his discovery of the postperovskite phase of MgSiO3, for a new class of sound velocity measurements under lower mantle pressure-temperature conditions that have changed our view of whole-Earth chemistry, and for other fundamental contributions that have furthered our understanding of the Earth's deep interior.

  4. Bowen, Dufek, and Shelly Receive 2012 James B. Macelwane Medals: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardbeck, Jeanne; Hill, David

    2013-01-01

    David R. Shelly is awarded the 2012 Macelwane Medal for his revolutionary advances in understanding the nature of tectonic tremor and its role in the earthquake preparation process. His innovations in the study of this subtle "noise" from deep within the Earth has opened a new window into the processes governing the earthquake cycle on major plate boundary faults and the magmatic systems beneath active volcanoes.

  5. The color of complexes and UV-vis spectroscopy as an analytical tool of Alfred Werner's group at the University of Zurich.

    PubMed

    Fox, Thomas; Berke, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Two PhD theses (Alexander Gordienko, 1912; Johannes Angerstein, 1914) and a dissertation in partial fulfillment of a PhD thesis (H. S. French, Zurich, 1914) are reviewed that deal with hitherto unpublished UV-vis spectroscopy work of coordination compounds in the group of Alfred Werner. The method of measurement of UV-vis spectra at Alfred Werner's time is described in detail. Examples of spectra of complexes are given, which were partly interpreted in terms of structure (cis ↔ trans configuration, counting number of bands for structural relationships, and shift of general spectral features by consecutive replacement of ligands). A more complete interpretation of spectra was hampered at Alfred Werner's time by the lack of a light absorption theory and a correct theory of electron excitation, and the lack of a ligand field theory for coordination compounds. The experimentally difficult data acquisitions and the difficult spectral interpretations might have been reasons why this method did not experience a breakthrough in Alfred Werner's group to play a more prominent role as an important analytical method. Nevertheless the application of UV-vis spectroscopy on coordination compounds was unique and novel, and witnesses Alfred Werner's great aptitude and keenness to always try and go beyond conventional practice.

  6. Alfred Donné and Léon Foucault: the first applications of electricity and photography to medical illustration.

    PubMed

    Tobin, William

    2006-03-01

    The first electric projecting microscope and the first published photomicrographs harnessed recent technological developments to provide improved methods of medical illustration for educational purposes. Both projects were the work of two Frenchmen. The impetus came from the microscopist Dr Alfred Donné (1801-78), discoverer of trichomonas vaginalis and leukaemia. Implementation was primarily by his medical-student assistant, Léon Foucault (1819-68), who later gained fame as a physicist, especially with his pendulum demonstration of the Earth's rotation.

  7. Real-Time Measurements of Sediment Modification by Large Macrofauna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    pressure pulses due to organism behaviors. 2 Nils Volkenborn (formerly of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research and now a...Volkenborn and Karsten Reise ( Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research) allowed us to use their long term exclusion experiments (20 m by 20 m...Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology and Nils Volkenborn at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research we have now confirmed that

  8. Real-Time Measurements of Sediment Modification by Large Macrofauna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    pressure pulses due to organism behaviors. Nils Volkenborn ( Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research) and Lubos Polerecky (Microsensors...Reise ( Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research) have allowed us to use their long term exclusion experiments (20 m by 20 m) involving...and Nils Volkenborn at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research. We combined geochemistry, physics, and behavior studies of

  9. Identity of African American Characters in Newbery Medal and Newbery Honor Award Winning Books: A Critical Content Analysis of Books from 1991 to 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Tami Butler

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a critical content analysis of the African American characters found in Newbery Medal award winning books recognized between the years of 1991 and 2011. The John Newbery Medal is a highly regarded award in the United States for children's literature and esteemed worldwide. Children's and adolescents' books…

  10. Population Muscle Strength Predicts Olympic Medal Tallies: Evidence from 20 Countries in the PURE Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Darryl P.; McKee, Martin; Yusuf, Salim

    2017-01-01

    Background National sporting achievement at the Olympic Games is important for national pride and prestige, and to promote participation in sport. Summer Olympic Games medal tallies have been associated with national wealth, and also social development and healthcare expenditure. It is uncertain however, how these socioeconomic factors translate into Olympic success. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the relationship between population muscle strength and Olympic medal tallies. Methods and Results This study of handgrip strength represents a cross-sectional analysis of the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study, which is an ongoing population cohort study of individuals from high-, middle-, and low-income countries. Within participating countries, households from both urban and rural communities were invited to participate using a sampling strategy intended to yield a sample that was representative of the community. Households were eligible if at least one member was aged 35–70 years and if they intended living at the same address for a further four years. A total of 152,610 participants from these households, located in 21 countries, were included in this analysis. Handgrip strength was measured using a Jamar dynanometer. Olympic medal tallies were made over the five most recent Summer Games. There was a significant positive association between national population grip strength (GS) and medal tally that persisted after adjustment for sex, age, height, average daily caloric intake and GDP (total and per capita). For every 1kg increase in population GS, the medal tally increased by 36% (95% CI 13–65%, p = 0.001) after adjustment. Among countries that won at least one medal over the four most recent Summer Olympic Games, there was a close linear relationship between adjusted GS and the natural logarithm of the per capita medal tally (adjusted r = 0.74, p = 0.002). Conclusions Population muscle strength may be an important determinant

  11. Alfred Pischinger (1899-1983): An Austrian career in anatomy continuing through National Socialism to postwar leadership.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Sabine; Czarnowski, Gabriele

    2017-02-20

    Despite intensified research efforts on the history of anatomy during National Socialism (NS), many aspects of this story still need further investigation. This study explores the life, work and politics of Alfred Pischinger, Chairman of the Institute for Embryology and Histology in Graz from 1936 to 1945, and in Vienna from 1958 to 1970, and is an addition to previous reports on careers in anatomy continuing through the Third Reich to the postwar period. Pischinger was an illegal NSDAP member in Austria, joined the SA in 1938, served as expert in racial hygiene, and as judge on the Genetic Health High Court of Graz. His research focus was histochemistry, but he became part of a scientific network at the University of Graz, which from 1939 on experimented on the bodies of pregnant women and their fetuses under the leadership of gynecologist Karl Ehrhardt. The researchers were among the many who took actively part in the complete exploitation and physical destruction of those considered to be "the enemy" by the NS regime. After the war, Pischinger received publicity for his work on the "scientific basis" of alternative and holistic approaches of medicine. His NS past and fetal experiments seem to have vanished from public knowledge. As systematic studies of the influence of the NS period on postwar medical education and the science of anatomy itself are still missing, this critical investigation of Alfred Pischinger's life within the relevant historic background aims to contribute to this body of knowledge.

  12. B-lymphocyte activating factor levels are increased in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis and inversely correlated with ANCA titer.

    PubMed

    Bader, Lucius; Koldingsnes, Wenche; Nossent, Johannes

    2010-09-01

    Circulating autoantibodies against neutrophils (ANCA) are a distinctive finding in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). B-lymphocyte activating factor (BAFF) promotes autoantibody production by increasing B cell survival and proliferation. We investigated serum BAFF levels (s-BAFF) in a WG patient cohort in relation to ANCA titers and disease activity. Baseline data were obtained in twenty-two WG patients (55% female, age 44 years, disease duration 1 year). S-BAFF was determined by capture ELISA and associations between s-BAFF, clinical (Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI) and Disease Extent Index (DEI)) and biochemical (C-reactive protein (CRP), IgG and ANCA) disease measures were analysed in a cross sectional as well as longitudinal analysis. S-BAFF was increased in WG patients compared to healthy controls (1.8 vs. 0.55 ng/ml, p < 0.01). S-BAFF was higher in ANCA negative than ANCA-positive WG sera (2.16 vs. 1.29 ng/ml, p < 0.01), correlated independently and inversely with ANCA levels (Rs -0.48, p < 0.01) but did not correlate with CRP, BVAS, DEI or VDI scores. Individual s-BAFF profiles were stable over time in 68% of patients. The finding of a negative correlation between ANCA levels and s-BAFF that is independent of steroid treatment indicates that BAFF does not directly drive ANCA production in WG.

  13. The SEAD global efficiency medal competition: accelerating market transformation for efficient televisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, Kavita; Bennich, Peter; Cockburn, John; Doi, Naoko; Garg, Sandeep; Garnaik, S.P.; Holt, Shane; Walker, Mike; Westbrook-Trenholm, Elizabeth; Lising, Anna; Pantano, Steve; Khare, Amit; Park, Won Young

    2013-10-15

    The Global Efficiency Medal competition, a cornerstone activity of the Super-efficient Equipment and Appliance Deployment (SEAD) Initiative, is an awards program that encourages the production and sale of super-efficient products. SEAD is a voluntary multinational government collaboration of the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM). This winner-takes-all competition recognizes products with the best energy efficiency, guides early adopter purchasers towards the most efficient product choices and demonstrates the levels of energy efficiency achievable by commercially available and emerging technologies. The first Global Efficiency Medals were awarded to the most energy-efficient flat panel televisions; an iconic consumer purchase. SEAD Global Efficiency Medals were awarded to televisions that have proven to be substantially more energy efficient than comparable models available at the time of the competition (applications closed in the end of May 2012). The award-winning TVs consume between 33 to 44 percent less energy per 2 unit of screen area than comparable LED-backlit LCD televisions sold in each regional market and 50 to 60 percent less energy than CCFL-backlit LCD TVs. Prior to the launch of this competition, SEAD conducted an unprecedented international round-robin test (RRT) to qualify TV test laboratories to support verification testing for SEAD awards. The RRT resulted in increased test laboratory capacity and expertise around the world and ensured that the test results from participating regional test laboratories could be compared in a fair and transparent fashion. This paper highlights a range of benefits resulting from this first SEAD awards competition and encourages further investigation of the awards concept as a means to promote energy efficiency in other equipment types.

  14. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots. Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes. Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  15. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots.Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes.Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  16. Rhythm Analyses Of Melodies Used To Obtain Women Marathon Gold Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacano, Munecazu; Yokokura, Saburo; Kajiwara, Yoko; Pavelka, Jan; Tanuma, Nobuhisa; Uemura, Tatsuhisa; Hashiguchi, Sumihisa; Sikula, Josef

    2005-11-01

    In Athena Olympics in 2004 a Japanese girl got the gold medal in Women Marathon games. Just before the beginning, she was listening to some domestic melodies in order to concentrate on the race. The rhythm or power of that music is found to have the typical 1/f noise characteristics. The 1/f music is found effective to concentrate as well as to relax themselves for a fairly long time range, while some short time trial runner uses a kind of white noise like music.

  17. Historical Snapshot: Dr. Mary E. Walker, Civil War Surgeon, Medal of Honor Recipient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    R E F E R E N C E S 1. Bellafaire J, Graf MH. Women Doctors in War: Texas A&M University Press; 2009. 2. Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center...Medal of Honor Recipient 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center,11800 Tech Road, Suite 220,(MCAF-CS

  18. Examining the Extent and Nature of Online Learning in American K-12 Education: The Research Initiatives of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picciano, Anthony G.; Seaman, Jeff; Shea, Peter; Swan, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In 1992, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation began its "Anytime, Anyplace Learning Program", the purpose of which was to explore educational alternatives for people who wanted to pursue an education via Internet technology. Part of this grant activity was a research award to the Babson College Survey Research Group to examine online learning in…

  19. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies target sequential functional proteinase 3 epitopes in the sera of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, B F; Vista, E S; Wynn, D M; Harley, J B; James, J A

    2010-01-01

    Many patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Aside from being a diagnostic marker, these autoantibodies may play roles in disease pathogenesis. Proteinase 3 (PR3) is the primary target of c-ANCA in WG patient sera. Of 60 c-ANCA-positive patients, 10 patients were selected for detailed humoral epitope analysis, contingent upon serum availability, using samples with positive levels of anti-PR3 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sequential epitope specificities of anti-PR3 antibodies detected by screening the maximally overlapping solid-phase octapeptides of PR3 showed seven major common antigenic targets bound by WG patient sera. These include novel and previously identified sequential PR3 epitopes bound by c-ANCA. B cell epitope prediction algorithms identified all or part of the seven defined epitopes. Several epitopes share sequence and structural proximity with functional sites, including the catalytic triad and proposed binding sites of other potential proteins [PR3 complementary peptide and soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR)]. Epitope 4 (VVLGAHNVRTQ) had the highest binding prevalence (90%) and epitope 2 (AQPHSRPYMAS) has the highest average reactivity of the antigenic regions. Epitope 4 includes the interaction site between sEPCR and PR3 which may serve as an important interaction to down-regulate inflammation. Epitopes 3, 5 and 7 are in direct proximity to amino acids that form the catalytic triad of the protein. c-ANCA targets both unique and previously known sequential PR3 peptides. This information may prove useful in understanding anti-PR3-mediated disease pathogenesis in systemic vasculitides. PMID:21077276

  20. Image analysis: a novel approach for the quantification of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody levels in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Maarten M; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; Stegeman, Coen A; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Patnaik, Meeta; Peter, James B; Tervaert, Jan W Cohen

    2003-03-01

    Rises in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) have predictive potential for a relapse of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). To assess the value of image analysis for monitoring ANCA levels, we measured PR3-ANCA in a cohort of PR3-ANCA positive patients with WG that were prospectively followed in our clinic and compared findings with other techniques. ANCA levels were measured serially by quantitative image analysis, titration in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), two different directly coated antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and a capture ELISA using a PR3-specific monoclonal antibody in 16 consecutive WG patients prior to a renal relapse, and in 16 age- and sex-matched patients with inactive WG. The positive predictive value (PPV) of an increase in ANCA titers by image analysis for relapse was 69% (11 of 16). The PPV of an increase in ANCA was 61% (11 of 18) by IIF, 71% (12 of 17) by a commercial direct ELISA, 63% (12 of 19) by in-house direct ELISA, and 75% (12 of 16) by capture ELISA. The negative predictive value (NPV) of the absence of an increase in ANCA titers by image analysis for relapse was 69% (11 of 16). The NPV of the absence of an increase in ANCA was 64% (9 of 14) by IIF, 73% (11 of 15) by a commercial direct ELISA, 63% (9 of 13) by in-house direct ELISA, and 75% (12 of 16) by capture ELISA. In conclusions, quantitative image analysis is a novel technique based on the principle of IIF to quantify ANCA levels in a single dilution in a patient sample. No major differences were observed between image analysis and the other techniques in their capacity to predict relapses of disease activity.

  1. Infectious serologies and autoantibodies in Wegener's granulomatosis and other vasculitides: novel associations disclosed using the Rad BioPlex 2200.

    PubMed

    Lidar, Merav; Lipschitz, Noga; Langevitz, Pnina; Barzilai, Ori; Ram, Maya; Porat-Katz, Bat-Sheba; Pagnoux, Christian; Guilpain, Philippe; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Radice, Antonella; Bizzaro, Nicola; Damoiseaux, Jan; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Martin, Javier; Guillevin, Loïc; Bombardieri, Stefano; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-09-01

    In this study we assess the presence of antibodies against infectious agents as well as for a variety of autoantibodies in an attempt to establish associations between various vasculitides and infections in order to shed light on the etiopathogenesis of these diseases and perhaps implicate a potential cure. Sera from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), polyarteritis nodosa, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg Strauss, and giant cell arteritis were compared to healthy control sera. Serum samples were assessed, using the Bio-Rad BioPlex 2200, for the presence of Toxoplama gondii, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Treponema pallidum, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies were assessed by ELISA. In addition, sera were tested for a panel of antibodies associated with thrombophilia as well as various autoantibodies. The prevalence of antibodies toward HCV and H. pylori was significantly higher among patients with WG. IgG antibodies toward T. gondii and IgM antibodies toward CMV were significantly more common among WG patients than among controls. WG patients exhibited more antibodies toward EBV viral capsid antigen IgG and EBV early antigen IgG compared to sera from healthy controls. In WG, positive associations were disclosed between CMV IgG antibodies and the presence of gastrointestinal manifestations and renal involvement, and there was a higher Birmingham vasculitis activity score in association with elevated titers of EBV viral capsid antigen IgG antibodies. Otorhinolaryngeal manifestations were more common in those with positive IgG antibodies for EBV early antigen. Our results unveil novel associations between WG and various infectious agents, including HCV, H. pylori, T. gondii, CMV, and EBV. In addition to putative roles in initiation and exacerbation of the vasculitic process, it seems that these infectious agents also modulate the clinical phenotype of the

  2. PSYCHOLOGY IN FRENCH ACADEMIC PUBLISHING IN THE LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY: ALFRED BINET, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR AT THE SCHLEICHER PUBLISHING HOUSE.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge

    2015-01-01

    To date, historians of psychology have largely ignored the role of academic publishing and the editorial policies of the late nineteenth century. This paper analyzes the role played by academic publishing in the history of psychology in the specific case of France, a country that provides a very interesting and unique model. Up until the middle of the 1890s, there was no collection specifically dedicated to psychology. Alfred Binet was the first to found, in 1897, a collection of works specifically dedicated to scientific psychology. He chose to work with Reinwald-Schleicher. However, Binet was soon confronted with (1) competition from other French publishing houses, and (2) Schleicher's management and editorial problems that were to sound the death knell for Binet's emerging editorial ambitions. The intention of this paper is to encourage the efforts of the pioneers of modern psychology to have their work published and disseminated.

  3. WegenerNet climate station network region Feldbach/Austria: From local measurements to weather and climate data products at 1 km-scale resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabas, T.; Leuprecht, A.; Bichler, C.; Kirchengast, G.

    2010-12-01

    South-eastern Austria is characteristic for experiencing a rich variety of weather and climate patterns. For this reason, the county of Feldbach was selected by the Wegener Center as a focus area for a pioneering observation experiment at very high resolution: The WegenerNet climate station network (in brief WegenerNet) comprises 151 meteorological stations within an area of about 20 km × 15 km (~ 1.4 km × 1.4 km station grid). All stations measure the main parameters temperature, humidity and precipitation with 5 minute sampling. Selected further stations include measurements of wind speed and direction completed by soil parameters as well as air pressure and net radiation. The collected data is integrated in an automatic processing system including data transfer, quality control, product generation, and visualization. Each station is equipped with an internet-attached data logger and the measurements are transferred as binary files via GPRS to the WegenerNet server in 1 hour intervals. The incoming raw data files of measured parameters as well as several operating values of the data logger are stored in a relational database (PostgreSQL). Next, the raw data pass the Quality Control System (QCS) in which the data are checked for its technical and physical plausibility (e.g., sensor specifications, temporal and spatial variability). In consideration of the data quality (quality flag), the Data Product Generator (DPG) results in weather and climate data products on various temporal scales (from 5 min to annual) for single stations and regular grids. Gridded data are derived by vertical scaling and squared inverse distance interpolation (1 km × 1 km and 0.01° × 0.01° grids). Both subsystems (QCS and DPG) are realized by the programming language Python. For application purposes the resulting data products are available via the bi-lingual (dt, en) WegenerNet data portal (www.wegenernet.org). At this time, the main interface is still online in a system in which

  4. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  5. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  6. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  7. DPyC-SMF Medal Award in Honor of José Luis Lucio Martínez

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napsuciale, M.

    2011-09-01

    The DPyC Medal award 2009 has been granted to José Luis Lucio for his contributions to the field of particle physics and to the development of the Mexican high energy physics community. In this contribution I briefly discuss these topics.

  8. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  9. [Webometrics – on the occasion of the awarding of the Derek John de Solla Price Medal, 2015].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2015-09-06

    The most significant recognition in scientometrics, the Derek John de Solla Price Medal was awarded in 2015 to Mike Thelwall. Thelwall is a dominant personality in webometrics studying the internet presence of scientific research with quantitative methods. In this paper the emergence, standing and directions of webometrics are briefly reviewed.

  10. Learning Strategies in Play during Basic Training for Medal of Honor and Call of Duty Video Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziaeehezarjeribi, Yadi

    2010-01-01

    This study, based on experiential play methodology was used to explore student engagement while playing "Medal of Honor (2002)" and "Call of Duty (2003)". It identifies some of the key issues related to the use of video games and simulations during the training phase of game play. Research into the effects of gaming in education has been extremely…

  11. EPA Employee Selected as Winner of 2015 Service to America Medal/Cookstoves initiative improving lives of millions by reducing indoor smoke exposure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today, the Partnership for Public Service selected Jacob Moss as winner of one of the most prestigious 2015 Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals (Sammies), which highlight America's dedicated federal workers who have made significa

  12. Discrimination and variable impact of ANCA binding to different surface epitopes on proteinase 3, the Wegener's autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M; Jenne, Dieter E; Specks, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are highly specific for the autoimmune small vessel vasculitis, Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). PR3-ANCA have proven diagnostic value but their pathogenic potential and utility as a biomarker for disease activity remain unclear. PR3-ANCA recognize conformational epitopes, and epitope-specific PR3-ANCA subsets with variable impact on biological functions of PR3 have been postulated. The aims of this study were to identify specific PR3 surface epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) and to determine whether the findings can be used to measure the functional impact of epitope-specific PR3-ANCA and their potential relationship to disease activity. We used a novel flow cytometry assay based on TALON-beads coated with recombinant human (H) and murine (M) PR3 and 10 custom-designed chimeric human/mouse rPR3-variants (Hm1-5/Mh1-5) identifying 5 separate non-conserved PR3 surface epitopes. Anti-PR3 moAbs recognize 4 major surface epitopes, and we identified the specific surface location of 3 of these with the chimeric rPR3-variants. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3 was measured indirectly using a capture-ELISA system based on the different epitopes recognized by capturing moAbs. Epitope-specific PR3-ANCA capture-ELISA results obtained from patient plasma (n=27) correlated with the inhibition of enzymatic activity of PR3 by paired IgG preparations (r=0.7, P<0.01). The capture-ELISA results also seem to reflect disease activity. In conclusion, insights about epitopes recognized by anti-PR3 moAbs can be applied to separate PR3-ANCA subsets with predictable functional qualities. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3, a property linked to disease activity, can now be gauged using a simple epitope-based capture-ELISA system.

  13. One More Step Toward a Warmer Arctic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-09

    Seattle, WA 98105, USA. A. Beszczynska, E. Fahrbach, R. Gerdes, M. Karcher, F. Kauker, and References U, Schauer, Alfred - Wegener Institut fur Polar...speed of -25 cm/s, with a sampling2Alfred- Wegener Institut fur Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerha- period of 0.5s. The MMP measures temperature

  14. Innovation and hard work: The 2015 George E. Palade Medal Award Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The George E Palade Medal is the highest honor awarded by the International Association of Pancreatology and is given to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the understanding of the pancreas and pancreatic diseases. Professor David C Whitcomb, University of Pittsburgh, is the 2015 recipient. The Palade Lecture, presented in Shanghai, China on August 28, 2015, included 5 personal stories that provide perspective from a life-time of achievement: “My life in a nutshell”; “Two old ladies”; “7777”; “I helped put a man on the moon”; and “Rugby”. Together, the stories provide encouragement to a younger generation, struggling to find their way as physicians and scientists who are working on pancreatic or other diseases in a challenging world. PMID:26481054

  15. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Wegener's)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient and Caregiver ... Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient and Caregiver ...

  16. Biochar and Glomus caledonium Influence Cd Accumulation of Upland Kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) Intercropped with Alfred Stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-04-01

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (-62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks.

  17. Biochar and Glomus caledonium influence Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance).

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-04-14

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (-62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks.

  18. Biochar and Glomus caledonium Influence Cd Accumulation of Upland Kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) Intercropped with Alfred Stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-01-01

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (−62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks. PMID:24728157

  19. Engaging with Lyell: Alfred Russel Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers as reactions to Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology.

    PubMed

    Costa, J T

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) and Charles Darwin (1809-1882) are honored as the founders of modern evolutionary biology. Accordingly, much attention has focused on their relationship, from their independent development of the principle of natural selection to the receipt by Darwin of Wallace's essay from Ternate in the spring of 1858, and the subsequent reading of the Wallace and Darwin papers at the Linnean Society on 1 July 1858. In the events of 1858 Wallace and Darwin are typically seen as central players, with Darwin's friends Charles Lyell (1797-1875) and Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) playing supporting roles. This narrative has resulted in an under-appreciation of a more central role for Charles Lyell as both Wallace's inspiration and foil. The extensive anti-transmutation arguments in Lyell's landmark Principles of Geology were taken as the definitive statement on the subject. Wallace, in his quest to solve the mystery of species origins, engaged with Lyell's arguments in his private field notebooks in a way that is concordant with his engagement with Lyell in the 1855 and 1858 papers. I show that Lyell was the object of Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers through a consideration of the circumstances that led Wallace to send his Ternate paper to Darwin, together with an analysis of the material that Wallace drew upon from the Principles. In this view Darwin was, ironically, intended for a supporting role in mediating Wallace's attempted dialog with Lyell.

  20. Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913): the forgotten co-founder of the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Hossfeld, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    The British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), who had to leave school aged 14 and never attended university, did extensive fieldwork, first in the Amazon River basin (1848-1852) and then in Southeast Asia (1854-1862). Based on this experience, and after reading the corresponding scientific literature, Wallace postulated that species were not created, but are modified descendants of pre-existing varieties (Sarawak Law paper, 1855). Evolution is brought about by a struggle for existence via natural selection, which results in the adaptation of those individuals in variable populations who survive and reproduce (Ternate essay, 1858). In his monograph Darwinism (1889), and in subsequent publications, Wallace extended the contents of Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) into the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution, with reference to the work of August Weismann (1834-1914). Wallace also became the (co)-founder of biogeography, biodiversity research, astrobiology and evolutionary anthropology. Moreover, he envisioned what was later called the anthropocene (i.e., the age of human environmental destructiveness). However, since Wallace believed in atheistic spiritualism and mixed up scientific facts and supernatural speculations in some of his writings, he remains a controversial figure in the history of biology.

  1. THE IMPORTANCE OF INSTRUMENT MAKERS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: THE CASE OF ALFRED BINET AT THE SORBONNE LABORATORY.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge

    2016-07-01

    The importance of instrument firms in the development of psychology, and science in general, should not be underestimated since it would not have been possible for various leading psychologists at the turn of the twentieth century to conduct certain experiments without the assistance of instrument makers, as is often the case today. To illustrate the historical perspective introduced here, the example of Alfred Binet is taken, as he is an interesting case of a psychologist working in close collaboration with various French instrument designers of the time. The objective of this article is twofold: (1) to show the considerable activity carried out by early psychologists to finalize new laboratory instruments in order to develop their research projects; (2) to reassess the work of a major figure in French psychology through his activity as a designer of precision instruments. The development of these new instruments would certainly have been difficult without the presence in Paris of numerous precision instrument manufacturers such as Charles Verdin, Otto Lund, Henri Collin, and Lucien Korsten, on whom Binet successively called in order to develop his projects in the field of experimental psychology.

  2. Keeping the fire burning: Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Richer, Charles Féré and Alfred Binet.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was the one of the world's leading physicians during the final third of the 19th century. Rewarded in 1882 with the creation of the first chair in the diseases of the nervous system, he was extremely successful at recruiting loyal and talented students. Charcot himself never produced a general treatise on hysteria, but instead encouraged his pupils to write their own books. Here, we describe how the work on hysteria of Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Richer, Charles Féré and Alfred Binet was closely associated with Charcot, and how they remained faithful to their mentor. We will highlight the unusual personality of G. Gilles de la Tourette and the tragic end to his life, the exceptional artistic talent of P. Richer (writer and painter of his magnificently illustrated thesis), the prolific writing capacity of C. Féré (bearing witness to his broad fields of interest) and A. Binet (blessed with an extraordinary capacity for work, and author of The Psychology of Reasoning, before presenting his metric scale of intelligence).

  3. Advances in allergen-microarray technology for diagnosis and monitoring of allergy: the MeDALL allergen-chip.

    PubMed

    Lupinek, Christian; Wollmann, Eva; Baar, Alexandra; Banerjee, Srinita; Breiteneder, Heimo; Broecker, Barbara M; Bublin, Merima; Curin, Mirela; Flicker, Sabine; Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Mittermann, Irene; Pahr, Sandra; Resch, Yvonne; Roux, Kenneth H; Srinivasan, Bharani; Stentzel, Sebastian; Vrtala, Susanne; Willison, Leanna N; Wickman, Magnus; Lødrup-Carlsen, Karin C; Antó, Josep Maria; Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Ebner, Daniel; Schlederer, Thomas; Harwanegg, Christian; Valenta, Rudolf

    2014-03-01

    Allergy diagnosis based on purified allergen molecules provides detailed information regarding the individual sensitization profile of allergic patients, allows monitoring of the development of allergic disease and of the effect of therapies on the immune response to individual allergen molecules. Allergen microarrays contain a large variety of allergen molecules and thus allow the simultaneous detection of allergic patients' antibody reactivity profiles towards each of the allergen molecules with only minute amounts of serum. In this article we summarize recent progress in the field of allergen microarray technology and introduce the MeDALL allergen-chip which has been developed for the specific and sensitive monitoring of IgE and IgG reactivity profiles towards more than 170 allergen molecules in sera collected in European birth cohorts. MeDALL is a European research program in which allergen microarray technology is used for the monitoring of the development of allergic disease in childhood, to draw a geographic map of the recognition of clinically relevant allergens in different populations and to establish reactivity profiles which are associated with and predict certain disease manifestations. We describe technical advances of the MeDALL allergen-chip regarding specificity, sensitivity and its ability to deliver test results which are close to in vivo reactivity. In addition, the usefulness and numerous advantages of allergen microarrays for allergy research, refined allergy diagnosis, monitoring of disease, of the effects of therapies, for improving the prescription of specific immunotherapy and for prevention are discussed.

  4. Un mode de révélation rare de la maladie de Wegener: une myocardite associée a une endocardite fibroblastique

    PubMed Central

    Arous, Salim; Bensahi, Ilham; Noureddine, Malika; Habbal, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    Nous rapportons à travers cette observation le cas rare d'une maladie de Wegener révélée par une myocardite associée à une endocardite fibroblastique. Le patient a été admis initialement dans un tableau d'insuffisance cardiaque globale, avec un trouble du rythme type flutter auriculaire à l'ECG. A l’échocardiographie le ventricule gauche était non dilaté, siège d'une dysfonction sévère, avec un dosage des troponines positif. Une insuffisance rénale sévère a été découverte fortuitement nécessitant une hémodialyse, associée à une anémie inflammatoire confirmée par la férritinémie et le myélogramme. Le dosage des c-ANCA était fortement positif confirmant le diagnostic. La TDM thoracique avait objectivé une pneumopathie basale droite. Après avoir démarré un traitement adapté comprenant une corticothérapie et un traitement immunosuppresseur, l’évolution a été favorable avec normalisation de la fonction systolique du ventricule gauche. Bien que les manifestations cardiaques cliniques évidentes soient rares, l'atteinte cardiaque au cours de la maladie de Wegener est décrite, nécessitant une orientation diagnostic rapide et une connaissance rigoureuse de cette maladie grave. PMID:27279960

  5. On the importance of debate in (geo-)scientific research (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, V.

    2012-04-01

    It is of course a great honor to receive the Holmes medal from EGU. As past (founding) treasurer and later president of EUG, the medal carries special significance for me. It may be a good time to look back on the scientific path I have followed, pursuing research in the geosciences, with outstanding support from a number of family members (foremost my wife Michèle), mentors, colleagues and students. Chance, not planning, led me to attend a French school that trained mining engineers, then a US University that made me fall in love with geophysics and plate tectonics at a time when this scientific revolution was still going on, and finally the marvelous Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), where I have spent the rest of my career to this day. To pursue on this path, I selected the rather separate fields of paleomagnetism (then linked to geology) and geomagnetism (then linked to physics). I have devoted much of my time to make sure that the two specialties would closely interact, including in the structure of our groups at IPGP. Geo- and paleo-magnetism have turned out (in a way reminiscent of geochemistry) to be powerful tools to explore a broad range of exciting scientific questions. Equipped with them, I have had the pleasure and good fortune to navigate from the discovery of geomagnetic secular variation impulses (with Jean-Louis Le Mouël), now inelegantly called "geomagnetic jerks", to that of propagating rifting of continents in the Afar depression, to fascinating work on the India-Asia collision in the Tibetan plateau and the Cenozoic paleogeography of the Indian ocean bordering continents, to the reconstruction of synthetic apparent polar wander paths for major continental masses (with Jean Besse) that have been widely used, to the understanding of the significance of the volume, age and short duration of massive flood basalt volcanism in the Deccan traps of India and their potential link to the biological mass extinction at the Cretaceous

  6. Mourning Dr. Alfred G. Knudson: the two-hit hypothesis, tumor suppressor genes, and the tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Hino, Okio; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    On July 10, 2016, Alfred G. Knudson, Jr., MD, PhD, a leader in cancer research, died at the age of 93 years. We deeply mourn his loss. Knudson's two-hit hypothesis, published in 1971, has been fundamental for understanding tumor suppressor genes and familial tumor-predisposing syndromes. To understand the molecular mechanism of two-hit-initiated tumorigenesis, Knudson used an animal model of a dominantly inherited tumor, the Eker rat. From the molecular identification of Tsc2 germline mutations, the Eker rat became a model for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a familial tumor-predisposing syndrome. Animal models, including the fly, have greatly contributed to TSC research. Because the product of the TSC2/Tsc2 gene (tuberin) together with hamartin, the product of another TSC gene (TSC1/Tsc1), suppresses mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), rapalogs have been used as therapeutic drugs for TSC. Although significant activity of these drugs has been reported, there are still problems such as recurrence of residual tumors and adverse effects. Recent studies indicate that there are mTORC1-independent signaling pathways downstream of hamartin/tuberin, which may represent new therapeutic targets. The establishment of cellular models, such as pluripotent stem cells with TSC2/Tsc2 gene mutations, will facilitate the understanding of new aspects of TSC pathogenesis and the development of novel treatment options. In this review, we look back at the history of Knudson and animal models of TSC and introduce recent progress in TSC research.

  7. Melba Newell Phillips Medal Lecture 2013: Discipline-Based Education Research—A View From Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie McDermott, Lillian

    2014-08-01

    Preface: In thanking AAPT for the Melba Newell Phillips Medal, I want to emphasize that the accomplishments that have been recognized by this award have resulted from many contributions over many years by past and present members of the UW Physics Education Group. Support by the National Science Foundation has been critical. On a more personal level, I am also very much honored to have my name associated with Melba Newell Phillips through this award. I remember her warm welcome at my first AAPT meeting many years ago. Although we had not met before, she did not seem too busy to express interest in my work and to offer encouragement. I was impressed then (and still am) by her accomplishments in research and teaching, her political courage, and her service to the physics academic community. Abstract: This article presents an overview of research in physics education (PER) as it has been conducted by the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington. Examples from introductory physics illustrate the nature of our investigations and the application of our findings in the development of research-based and research-validated curriculum for university students and K-12 teachers. The results from our research provide strong evidence of the ongoing need for research on the learning and teaching of physics that is strongly discipline-based.

  8. Universality, limits and predictability of gold-medal performances at the olympic games.

    PubMed

    Radicchi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the Games held in ancient Greece, modern Olympics represent the world's largest pageant of athletic skill and competitive spirit. Performances of athletes at the Olympic Games mirror, since 1896, human potentialities in sports, and thus provide an optimal source of information for studying the evolution of sport achievements and predicting the limits that athletes can reach. Unfortunately, the models introduced so far for the description of athlete performances at the Olympics are either sophisticated or unrealistic, and more importantly, do not provide a unified theory for sport performances. Here, we address this issue by showing that relative performance improvements of medal winners at the Olympics are normally distributed, implying that the evolution of performance values can be described in good approximation as an exponential approach to an a priori unknown limiting performance value. This law holds for all specialties in athletics-including running, jumping, and throwing-and swimming. We present a self-consistent method, based on normality hypothesis testing, able to predict limiting performance values in all specialties. We further quantify the most likely years in which athletes will breach challenging performance walls in running, jumping, throwing, and swimming events, as well as the probability that new world records will be established at the next edition of the Olympic Games.

  9. A case of simultaneous, biopsy-proven, classic, ANCA-positive Wegener's granulomatosis and anti-GBM disease, but without detectable circulating anti-GBM antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gmurczyk, Aleksandra; Ahya, Shubhada N; Goldschmidt, Robert; Kim, George; Ho, L Tammy; Nash, Kevin

    2010-06-15

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic, necrotizing, granulomatous vasculitis of unknown etiology. Approximately 75% of cases present as classic WG with both pulmonary and renal involvement, while the remaining 25% of patients present with a limited form with either predominantly upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms. Ninety percent of WG patients have circulating anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), and approximately 10% have both circulating ANCA antibodies and concomitant anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease on renal biopsy. Virtually all of these patients also have circulating anti-GBM antibodies. While it has been reported that some patients with ANCA vasculitis have circulating anti-GBM antibodies, and patients with anti-GBM disease may have positive ANCA, review of the literature does not demonstrate other cases of biopsy-proven, simultaneous, ANCA-associated vasculitis and anti-GBM disease. We report a case of simultaneous, biopsy-proven, classic, ANCA-positive WG and anti-GBM disease, but without detectible circulating anti-GBM antibodies. We present findings characteristic of both WG and linear IgG deposition along the GBM suggesting concurrent anti-GBM disease, in the absence of detectable circulating anti-GBM antibodies. Possible theories to explain the absence of these antibodies are discussed.

  10. Proteinase-3 as the major autoantigen of c-ANCA is strongly expressed in lung tissue of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Brockmann, Holger; Schwarting, Andreas; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Petrow, Peter; Gaumann, Andreas; Müller, Klaus-Michael; Galle, Peter Robert; Mayet, Werner

    2002-01-01

    Proteinase-3 (PR-3) is a neutral serine proteinase present in azurophil granules of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and serves as the major target antigen of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies with a cytoplasmic staining pattern (c-ANCA) in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The WG disease appears as severe vasculitis in different organs (e.g. kidney, nose and lung). Little is known about the expression and distribution of PR-3 in the lung. We found that PR-3 is expressed in normal lung tissue and is upregulated in lung tissue of patients with WG. Interestingly, the parenchymal cells (pneumocytes type I and II) and macrophages, and not the neutrophils, express PR-3 most strongly and may contribute to lung damage in patients with WG via direct interaction with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antobodies (ANCA). These findings suggest that the PR-3 expression in parenchymal cells of lung tissue could be at least one missing link in the etiopathogenesis of pulmonary pathology in ANCA-associated disease. PMID:12010574

  11. "Is This a Boy or a Girl?": Rethinking Sex-Role Representation in Caldecott Medal-Winning Picturebooks, 1938-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Thomas; Hiller, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    A number of previous studies have addressed gender role-stereotyping in Caldecott Award-winning picturebooks. Building upon the extensive scholarship examining representations of females in Caldecott books, this current study offers a critical investigation of how gender is represented in Caldecott Medal-winning literature from 1938 to 2011 by…

  12. Birth cohorts in asthma and allergic diseases: Report of a NIAID, NHLBI, MeDALL joint workshop

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, J; Gern, JE; Martinez, FD; Anto, JM; Johnson, CC; Holt, PG; Lemanske, RF; Le Souef, PN; Tepper, R; von Mutius, ERM; Arshad, SH; Bacharier, LB; Becker, A; Belanger, K; Bergstrom, A; Bernstein, D; Cabana, MD; Carroll, KN; Castro, M; Cooper, PJ; Gillman, MW; Gold, DR; Henderson, J; Heinrich, J; S-J, Hong; Jackson, DJ; Keil, T; Kozyrskyj, AL; Lodrup-Carlsen, K; Miller, RL; Momas, I; Morgan, WJ; Noel, P; Ownby, DR; Pinart, M; Ryan, P; Schwaninger, JM; Sears, MR; Simpson, A; Smit, HA; Stern, D; Subbarao, P; Valenta, R; Wang, X; Weiss, ST; Wood, R; Wright, AL; Wright, RJ; Togias, A; Gergen, PJ

    2014-01-01

    Population-based birth cohorts on asthma and allergies increasingly provide new insights into the development and natural history of the diseases. Over 130 birth cohorts focusing on asthma and allergy have been initiated in the last 30 years. A NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases), NHLBI (National Heart Lung and Blood Institute), MeDALL (Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy, Framework Programme 7 of the European Commission) joint workshop was held in Bethesda, MD, USA September 11–12, 2012 with 3 objectives (1) documenting the knowledge that asthma/allergy birth cohorts have provided, (2) identifying the knowledge gaps and inconsistencies and (3) developing strategies for moving forward, including potential new study designs and the harmonization of existing asthma birth cohort data. The meeting was organized around the presentations of 5 distinct workgroups: (1) clinical phenotypes, (2) risk factors, (3) immune development of asthma and allergy, (4) pulmonary development and (5) harmonization of existing birth cohorts. This manuscript presents the workgroup reports and provides web links (AsthmaBirthCohorts.niaid.nih.gov or www.medall-fp7.eu) where the reader will find tables describing the characteristics of the birth cohorts included in this report, type of data collected at differing ages, and a selected bibliography provided by the participating birth cohorts. PMID:24636091

  13. Alfred E. Bergeat (1866-1924): a distinguished volcanologist and ore deposit researching scientist at the mining academies of Freiberg (Saxony) and Clausthal (Harz mountains) in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffl, Fritz A.

    2010-06-01

    Alfred E. Bergeat, originated from a family, who produced gold-glance in a factory (porcelain painting), studied mineralogy and geology at the University of Munich from 1886 to 1892. Due to the results of his habilitation work on the volcanism of island arcs, especially of the Stromboli volcanic island in the Tyrrhenian Sea, he became a recognized volcanologist and specialist in volcanic petrography. He further became an explorer of syngenetic, epigenetic and deuterogenic ore deposits at the mining academies (Bergakademien) of Freiberg (Saxony) and Clausthal (Harz mountains). He described these ore deposits in a two-volume manual (1904-1906) which was summarized again in 1913. After his early death in 1924, the two manuals “Die Vulkane” (1925) and “Vulkankunde” (1927) were posthumously published by his colleague and friend Karl Sapper (1866-1945).

  14. Interference of PR3-ANCA with the enzymatic activity of PR3: differences in patients during active disease or remission of Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Y M; Tool, A T J; Videler, J; de Haas, M; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Stegeman, C A; Limburg, P C; Kallenberg, C G M; Roos, D

    2002-09-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) against proteinase 3 (PR3) are strongly associated with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and are thought to be involved in its pathogenesis. Levels of PR3-ANCA do not always correspond to clinical disease activity. To investigate the relationship between functional effects of PR3-ANCA and disease activity, we tested the effect of IgG samples from sera of 43 WG patients, taken during active disease or remission, for their capacity to interfere with the proteolytic activity of PR3. Furthermore, longitudinal sera of seven WG patients were included. The enzymatic activity of PR3 was determined (1) with casein or with a small synthetic substrate and (2) by complexation of PR3 with alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT). With a fixed concentration (100 microg/ml) of IgG, PR3-ANCA from patients during an active phase of WG had a higher inhibitory capacity towards the proteolytic activity of PR3 and complexation of PR3 with alpha1-AT than did PR3-ANCA from WG patients during remission. However, the number of PR3-ANCA units that gave 50% inhibition of the PR3 enzymatic activity and its complexation with alpha1-AT was lower for patients during remission than for patients during an active phase of WG, indicating a stronger inhibitory capacity at a molar base. In conclusion, PR3-ANCA from patients during remission had a relatively higher inhibitory capacity towards the enzymatic activity of PR3 than PR3-ANCA from patients during an active phase. This may indicate that during active disease the ANCA titre is increased, but the number of active ANCA molecules that recognize the enzyme-inhibiting epitopes is not increased.

  15. Relevance of classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (C-ANCA)-mediated inhibition of proteinase 3-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexation to disease activity in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, K M; Stegeman, C A; van de Wiel, B A; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Kallenberg, C G; Goldschmeding, R

    1993-01-01

    In the sera of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), C-ANCA can be detected that are directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). We have previously observed that C-ANCA interfere with PR3 proteolytic activity and with complexation of PR3 with its major physiologic inhibitor, alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). In the present study we investigated whether this inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation correlates with clinical activity of WG. Serial serum samples of eight consecutive patients with histologically proven relapses of WG were tested. At the moment of relapse all sera revealed inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation (median 22%, range 10-59%). Disease activity score (r = 0.87, P < 0.02) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (r = 0.66, P < 0.1) correlated with C-ANCA inhibition of PR3-alpha 1AT complexation, while they did not correlate with the C-ANCA titre detected by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) nor with IgG anti-PR3 antibody level measured by ELISA. The inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation had risen significantly at the moment of relapse compared with values 3 months (P < 0.05) and 6 months (P < 0.01) before relapse. Eight patients with established WG and positive for C-ANCA but without clinical evidence of relapse served as controls. In this group no inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation was observed in 7/8 patients sera. Sera of one control patient contained moderate C-ANCA inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation, which remained at a constant level during the 6 months period of observation. Thus, disease activity in WG appears to be more closely related to C-ANCA inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation. PMID:8370167

  16. Representation of Arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiwen; Ghan, Steven; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Liu, Xiaohong; Rasch, Philip J.; Korolev, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Two types of Arctic mixed-phase clouds observed during the ISDAC and M-PACE field campaigns are simulated using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with size-resolved cloud microphysics. The modeled cloud properties agree reasonably well with aircraft measurements and surface-based retrievals. Cloud properties such as the probability density function (PDF) of vertical velocity (w), cloud liquid and ice, regimes of cloud particle growth, including the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process, and the relationships among properties/processes in mixed-phase clouds are examined to gain insights for improving their representation in General Circulation Models (GCMs). The PDF of the simulated w is well represented by a Gaussian function, validating, at least for arctic clouds, the subgrid treatment used in GCMs. The PDFs of liquid and ice water contents can be approximated by Gamma functions, and a Gaussian function can describe the total water distribution, but a fixed variance assumption should be avoided in both cases. The CRM results support the assumption frequently used in GCMs that mixed phase clouds maintain water vapor near liquid saturation. Thus, ice continues to grow throughout the stratiform cloud but the WBF process occurs in about 50% of cloud volume where liquid and ice co-exist, predominantly in downdrafts. In updrafts, liquid and ice particles grow simultaneously. The relationship between the ice depositional growth rate and cloud ice strongly depends on the capacitance of ice particles. The simplified size-independent capacitance of ice particles used in GCMs could lead to large deviations in ice depositional growth.

  17. Representation of Arctic Mixed-Phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen Process in Climate Models: Perspectives from a Cloud-Resolving Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Ghan, Steven J.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Liu, Xiaohong; Rasch, Philip J.; Korolev, Alexei

    2011-09-20

    Two types of Arctic mixed-phase clouds observed during the ISDAC and M-PACE field campaigns are simulated using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with size-resolved cloud microphysics. The modeled cloud properties agree reasonably well with aircraft measurements and surface-based retrievals. Cloud properties such as the probability density function (PDF) of vertical velocity (w), cloud liquid and ice, the regime of ice growth at the expense of liquid water (i.e., Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process), and the inherent relationships among cloud properties/processes in the mixed-phase layers are examined to gain insights for improving the representation of the mixed-phase processes in General Circulation Models (GCMs). We find that, the WBF process only occurs in about 50% of the mixed-phase regime with the vast majority occurring in the downdrafts. In updrafts both liquid and ice grow simultaneously. But in GCMs, it is not necessary to treat the WBF process at the subgrid scale. Our CRM results produce a w distribution well represented by a Gaussian normal function, validating, at least for arctic clouds, the subgrid treatment used in GCMs. Our CRM results also support the assumption frequently used in GCMs that mixed phase clouds maintain water vapor very near liquid saturation. A Gamma function with a fixed variance does not accurately represent the subgrid variability of cloud liquid. The PDFs of cloud liquid and cloud ice can be fitted with Gamma functions, and a normal function can be used for total water, but the variance should not be fixed. The relationship between the ice depositional growth rate and cloud ice strongly depends on the capacitance of ice particles. The assumption for the capacitance of ice particles (e.g., 1.0 for spheres) used in GCMs could lead to a large deviation in ice depositional growth. At large sales, the maximum overlap assumption looks appropriate.

  18. Accelerating progress on the road to safer sports: based on remarks of NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in the Neurosurgical Society of America (NSA) medal lecture.

    PubMed

    Goodell, Roger; Batjer, H Hunt; Ellenbogen, Richard G

    2014-10-01

    Roger Goodell was invited by the Neurosurgical Society of America (NSA) to give the keynote speech as the NSA Medalist 2013. As President of the NSA, and Co-Chairs of the National Football league's Head Neck and Spine Committee, we provided the introduction for Goodell. He was cited for his tireless advocacy on behalf of professional and student athletes. We noted that the National Football League has been a world leader in funding traumatic brain injury research and a catalyst for safety in youth and professional sports. Mr Goodell's national leadership in thinking and acting boldly on the subject of traumatic brain injury prevention and treatment was the primary motivation for awarding him the NSA medal. What follows is a transcript of his NSA Medal Lecture to the Neurosurgical Society of America.

  19. The excluded philosophy of evo-devo? Revisiting C.H. Waddington's failed attempt to embed Alfred North Whitehead's "organicism" in evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Erik L

    2011-01-01

    Though a prominent British developmental biologist in his day, a close friend of Theodosius Dobzhansky, and a frequent correspondent with Ernst Mayr, C.H. Waddington did not enter the ranks of "architect" of the Modern Synthesis. By the end of his career, in fact, he recognized that other biologists reacted to his work "as though they feel obscurely uneasy"; and that the best that some philosophers of biology could say of his work was that he was not "wholly orthodox" (Waddington 1975c, 11). In this essay, I take Waddington's self-assessments at face value and explore three potential reasons why his work did not have more of a direct impact: Waddington's explicit support for the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead; a lack of institutional support; and Waddington's occasional marginalization from the core network of American neo-Darwinians. Though excluded from the Modern Synthesis in the mid-20th century, it now appears that Waddington's work does undergird the emerging evo-devo synthesis. Whether this indicates concomitant, if implicit, support for Whiteheadian philosophy is an interesting question not explored here.

  20. Using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques to Detect Changes to the Prince Alfred Hamlet Conservation Area in the Western Cape, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, P.; Lewarne, M.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and identifying the spatial-temporal changes in the natural environment is crucial for monitoring and evaluating conservation efforts, as well as understanding the impact of human activities on natural resources, informing responsible land management, and promoting better decision-making. Conservation areas are often under pressure from expanding farming and related industry, invasive alien vegetation, and an ever-increasing human settlement footprint. This study focuses on detecting changes to the Prince Alfred Hamlet commonage, near Ceres in the Cape Floral Kingdom. It was chosen for its high conservation value and significance as a critical water source area. The study area includes a fast-growing human settlement footprint in a highly productive farming landscape. There are conflicting development needs as well as risks to agricultural production, and both of these threaten the integrity of the ecosystems which supply underlying services to both demands on the land. Using a multi-disciplinary approach and high-resolution satellite imagery, land use and land cover changes can be detected and classified, and the results used to support the conservation of biodiversity and wildlife, and protect our natural resources. The aim of this research is to study the efficacy of using remote sensing and GIS techniques to detect changes to critical conservation areas where disturbances can be understood, and therefore better managed and mitigated before these areas are degraded beyond repair.

  1. Resister's logic: the anti-vaccination arguments of Alfred Russel Wallace and their role in the debates over compulsory vaccination in England, 1870-1907.

    PubMed

    Fichman, Martin; Keelan, Jennifer E

    2007-09-01

    In the 1880s, Alfred Russel Wallace, the celebrated co-discoverer of natural selection, launched himself into the centre of a politicised and polarised debate over the unpopular compulsory vaccination laws in England. Wallace never wavered in his belief that smallpox vaccination was useless and likely dangerous. Six years before his death, the anti-vaccinationists successfully secured a conscience clause that effectively dismantled the compulsory vaccination laws. Several other important Victorian scientists joined Wallace in the fight to repeal compulsory vaccination arguing that widely held views on the effectiveness of vaccination and evidence for immunity were inconclusive in the light of (then) contemporary standards of evidence. This article situates Wallace's anti-vaccination logic within the broader matrix of sociopolitical and cultural reform movements of the late Victorian era. Additionally it provides the first detailed analysis of his critique of vaccination science, in particular the role statistics played in his arguments. In this period, both pro-vaccinationists and anti-vaccinationists invested great efforts in collating and analysing statistical data sets that either supported or refuted the claims of vaccination's effectiveness. While each side presented 'controlled' case studies to support their assertions, without an unambiguous test to measure or demonstrate vaccination's effectiveness, the anti-vaccinationists continued to mount credible statistical critiques of vaccination science.

  2. Paving the way of systems biology and precision medicine in allergic diseases: the MeDALL success story: Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy; EU FP7-CP-IP; Project No: 261357; 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Akdis, M; Auffray, C; Keil, T; Momas, I; Postma, D S; Valenta, R; Wickman, M; Cambon-Thomsen, A; Haahtela, T; Lambrecht, B N; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Koppelman, G H; Sunyer, J; Zuberbier, T; Annesi-Maesano, I; Arno, A; Bindslev-Jensen, C; De Carlo, G; Forastiere, F; Heinrich, J; Kowalski, M L; Maier, D; Melén, E; Palkonen, S; Smit, H A; Standl, M; Wright, J; Asarnoj, A; Benet, M; Ballardini, N; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gehring, U; Guerra, S; Hohman, C; Kull, I; Lupinek, C; Pinart, M; Skrindo, I; Westman, M; Smagghe, D; Akdis, C; Albang, R; Anastasova, V; Anderson, N; Bachert, C; Ballereau, S; Ballester, F; Basagana, X; Bedbrook, A; Bergstrom, A; von Berg, A; Brunekreef, B; Burte, E; Carlsen, K H; Chatzi, L; Coquet, J M; Curin, M; Demoly, P; Eller, E; Fantini, M P; Gerhard, B; Hammad, H; von Hertzen, L; Hovland, V; Jacquemin, B; Just, J; Keller, T; Kerkhof, M; Kiss, R; Kogevinas, M; Koletzko, S; Lau, S; Lehmann, I; Lemonnier, N; McEachan, R; Mäkelä, M; Mestres, J; Minina, E; Mowinckel, P; Nadif, R; Nawijn, M; Oddie, S; Pellet, J; Pin, I; Porta, D; Rancière, F; Rial-Sebbag, A; Saeys, Y; Schuijs, M J; Siroux, V; Tischer, C G; Torrent, M; Varraso, R; De Vocht, J; Wenger, K; Wieser, S; Xu, C

    2016-11-01

    MeDALL (Mechanisms of the Development of ALLergy; EU FP7-CP-IP; Project No: 261357; 2010-2015) has proposed an innovative approach to develop early indicators for the prediction, diagnosis, prevention and targets for therapy. MeDALL has linked epidemiological, clinical and basic research using a stepwise, large-scale and integrative approach: MeDALL data of precisely phenotyped children followed in 14 birth cohorts spread across Europe were combined with systems biology (omics, IgE measurement using microarrays) and environmental data. Multimorbidity in the same child is more common than expected by chance alone, suggesting that these diseases share causal mechanisms irrespective of IgE sensitization. IgE sensitization should be considered differently in monosensitized and polysensitized individuals. Allergic multimorbidities and IgE polysensitization are often associated with the persistence or severity of allergic diseases. Environmental exposures are relevant for the development of allergy-related diseases. To complement the population-based studies in children, MeDALL included mechanistic experimental animal studies and in vitro studies in humans. The integration of multimorbidities and polysensitization has resulted in a new classification framework of allergic diseases that could help to improve the understanding of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of allergy as well as to better manage allergic diseases. Ethics and gender were considered. MeDALL has deployed translational activities within the EU agenda.

  3. Studying Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Processes: A Personal Look Back, ... and Forward (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Genuchten, Martinus Th.

    2010-05-01

    In this presentation, to be given at the occasion of my receipt of the John Dalton Medal from the European Geophysical Union, I provide a personal look back of studying subsurface flow and transport processes. Looking back, it is clear that tremendous advances have been made from the time I first started as a student some 40 years ago. Actually, compared to the thousands of years during which humans tried to manipulate the earth's surface for improved agricultural and engineering practices, it is truly amazing that Darcy's law for saturated flow was first formulated only some 150 years ago, and the Richards equation for unsaturated flow less than 80 years ago. In this presentation I will focus especially on alternative formulations for modeling fluid flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface, including the use of dual-porosity and dual-permeability models for nonequilibrium transport. The various approaches are illustrated by means of a large number of examples, from transport through well-controlled laboratory soil columns to flow and contaminant transport at the larger field scale. Looking forward, I will also give a personal view of what I believe comes next, and the topics I would work on if I could somehow start now all over again.

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi induced differential Cd and P phytoavailability via intercropping of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance): post-harvest study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Li, Jintian; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Ye, Zhihong; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-12-01

    A post-harvest experiment was conducted further to our previous greenhouse pot study on upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) and Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) intercropping system in Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Previously, four treatments were established in the intercropping experiment, including monoculture of kangkong (control), intercropping with stonecrop (IS), and IS plus inoculation with Glomus caledonium (IS+Gc) or Glomus versiforme (IS+Gv). Both kangkong and stonecrop plants were harvested after growing for 8 weeks. Then, the tested soils were reclaimed for growing post-harvest kangkong for 6 weeks. In the post-harvest experiment, there were no significant differences between the IS and control treatments, except for a significantly decreased (p<0.05) soil available P concentration with IS treatment. Compared with IS, both IS+Gc and IS+Gv significantly decreased (p<0.05) soil DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations, but not total Cd, by elevating soil pH, causing significantly lower (p<0.05) Cd concentrations in both the root and shoot of kangkong. In addition, both Gc and Gv significantly increased (p<0.05) soil acid phosphatase activities and available P concentrations and hence resulted in significantly higher (p<0.05) plant P acquisitions. However, only Gv significantly increased (p<0.05) kangkong yield, while Gc only significantly elevated (p<0.05) the shoot P concentration. It suggested that AM fungi have played key roles in Cd stabilization and P mobilization in the intercropping system, and such positive responses seemed to be sustainable and valuable in post-harvest soils.

  5. Conjoint Membership in Orthodontics examination of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and the College of Dental Surgeons of Hong Kong 2007 Gold Medal -- report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wilson; Wong, Ricky; Rabie, Bakr

    2011-06-01

    This article describes the treatment of two orthodontic patients by the recipient of the Gold Medal for the Conjoint Membership in Orthodontics of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and the College of Dental Surgeons of Hong Kong in November 2007.

  6. The sixth presentation of the Maurice Ewing Medal by the American Geophysical Union and the United States Navy to Manik Talwani for leadership in marine geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyeda, Seiya; Talwani, Manik

    Manik Talwani's impact on the geosciences clearly places him among those who deserve to be honored as a Ewing medalist. He has contributed major advances to our understanding of Earth's fundamental characteristics and has provided direction that will help guide geological/geophysical research long into the future.Born in Patiala, India, in 1933, Manik earned bachelor's and master's degrees at Delhi University. In the mid-1950s he moved to the United States and enrolled in Columbia University for his Ph.D. studies. It was the beginning of a long association between Manik and Columbia. When he earned his Ph.D. in 1959, it was already apparent that he was destined to make a significant impact on the geosciences. He has been the recipient of several important awards for his contributions and leadership. These include the first Krishnan Medal in 1965, from his home country, and the Macelwane Award from the American Geophysical Union, in 1967, for his pioneering achievements in the application of marine gravimetry to studies of Earth's crust and upper mantle. Since 1970, Manik has been a professor of geology at Columbia, and for 8 years he served as director of Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. This evening, for his continued contributions and leadership, Manik is being awarded the Maurice Ewing Medal. He is truly qualified for this distinction, based on his many important original contributions to marine geophysics, ocean technology and instrumentation, and also for his outstanding service to marine science.

  7. [The Essen-based steel producer Alfred Krupp (1812-1887) as a reader of the flora and fauna of the Gulf of Naples. A look at the relationship of Anton Dohrn (1840-1909) to the house Krupp].

    PubMed

    Müller, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    A unfavourable notice written by industrial magnate Alfred Krupp (1812-1887) has been discovered on the posterior cover sheet of the first volume of the monumental series Fauna und Flora des Golfes von Neapel, edited by the Zoological Station at Naples (1880) Krupp's handwritten statement affords the opportunity to discuss in more detail the intricate relationship between the founder of the first marine biology station, Anton Dohrn (1840-1909), and the owner of the greatest steel factory in Europe, the Krupp-family at Essen. Although Anton Dohrn did not know about Krupp's disapproving comment he had a fine unerring instinct for the mentality of his negotiating partner, whose way of thinking rather aimed at the practical success and completion of armament factory, preventing thus a the serious rapprochement between the two personalities. Even when the Krupp-heir, Friedrich Alfred Krupp, later devoted to questions about marine biology in his new built house at Capri, and was willing to support the Zoological Station with high sponsoring, Anton Dohrn maintained a reserved attitude towards the Krupp's offer to support the marine research financially. Likewise, he remained unimpressed, when the steel magnate was shook by the smear campaign in Capri that ultimately led to Krupp's death in November 1902.

  8. Precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate: key processes bridging the bio- and geosciences (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    In this Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal lecture, I will focus on the biogeochemical cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) which is arguably one of the best example of a set processes that bridge the bio- and geosciences. The main reactions involved are calcification and dissolution that, respectively, manufacture and destroy calcium carbonate. Biology is intimately involved in these two processes which are key controls of the Earth's climate and leave remains that are of great use to human societies (as building materials) and geoscientists. I will illustrate the bridge between the bio- and geosciences by providing brief examples for each of the following four issues. (1) The marine cycle of CaCO3 and its relationship with climate. The release of CO2 by the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the uptake of CO2 by its dissolution are important controls of atmospheric CO2 and climate. The vertical distribution of Ψ, the ratio of CO2 released/used per CaCO3 precipitated/dissolved in the ocean will be shown to be consistent with the Högbom-Urey reactions. (2) The use of CaCO3 in paleooceanography. The remains of calcium carbonate shells and skeletons are wonderful archives of past environmental changes. Their isotopic composition and the concen-tration of trace elements are invaluable in the reconstruction of past climate. I will address the challenge of calibrating one of the proxies used to reconstruct past ocean pH. (3) The challenge of understanding calcification. Despite having been investigated for decades, many aspects of the physiological and molecular processes involved in calcification by marine organisms remain obscure. Recent breakthroughs, mostly on reef-building corals, will be briefly reviewed. (4) The response of calcification and dissolution to environmental change. The critical importance of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution as climate controls makes it vital to understand their response to global environmental changes such as ocean warming and

  9. A Gold Medal Finish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 1999, Darryl Mitchell of Goddard Space Flight Center's Technology Commercialization Office (TCO) met with the U.S. Olympic Committee at the official training facility in Colorado Springs, Colorado, to offer assistance in transferring NASA technologies applicable to Olympic sports. Following the meeting with the Olympic committee, Mitchell was approached by U.S. Speedskating Long Track Program Director Finn Halvorsen, who eagerly voiced his interest in working with NASA to identify a means of improving performance for his team. According to Halvorsen, 'If (NASA) can put a man on the moon, surely they can help our skaters.' Mitchell and Halvorsen went to work uncovering NASA technologies that could boost the U.S. team's skating capabilities. Mitchell received a crash course in speedskating, and as a result, generated a lengthy list of promising NASA developments that could benefit the sport. From this list, he and his Goddard TCO partner, Joe Famiglietti, deliberated over whether a NASA mirror-polishing technique could possibly be adapted to the athletes speedskates. The polishing technique, developed by Jim Lyons, a 16-year optical engineering veteran of Goddard, was derived from the same principles used to create the optics for NASA's science observatories, such as the Hubble Space Telescope (highly polished optics are required by NASA to obtain sharp, clear images in space).

  10. Integrated Solid Earth Science: the right place and time to discover the unexpected? (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloetingh, Sierd

    2013-04-01

    go. Not only on a national level, such as pursued by the Netherlands Research School of Integrated Solid Earth Science (ISES), but also on a full European scale, such as the TOPO-EUROPE research program. This goes hand in hand with setting the stage for a pan-European research infrastructure for solid earth science by the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). Much of the unexpected remains to be discovered. The Holmes medal awarded by the European Geosciences Union, itself an example of the immense progress European earth scientists have made in joining forces, means a lot to me. I share it with my co-workers in my group, the close to 70 PhD students who worked with us, and other numerous colleagues and friends that all contributed immensely to the unexpected.

  11. Precambrian crustal evolution in relation to geodynamics and supercontinents: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, Tamer S.; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    More than a century ago, Alfred Wegener explored the origin of continents in his work: "Die Entstehung der Kontinente" (Wegener, 1912, 1915) which provided the core idea of plate tectonics. However, significantly before this work, the idea of "continental drift" was hypothesized by Abraham Ortelius in 1596 with the suggestion that the Americas were torn away from Europe and Africa by earthquakes and floods, and that these continents were once united.

  12. Large-Area Flexible 3D Optical Negative Index Metamaterial Formed by Nanotransfer Printing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    metamaterial formed by nanotransfer printing Debashis Chanda1, Kazuki Shigeta1, Sidhartha Gupta1, Tyler Cain1, Andrew Carlson1, Agustin Mihi1, Alfred J. Baca3...2008). 11. Dolling, G., Enkrich, C. & Wegener , M. Low-loss negative-index metamaterial at telecommunication wavelengths. Opt. Lett. 31, 1800–1802 (2006...metamaterials. Phys. Rev. B 75, 024304 (2007). 13. Dolling, G., Wegener , M. & Linden, S. Realization of a three-functional-layer negative-index photonic

  13. Land-Based Air in a National Maritime Strategy: The Need for a Joint Strategic Doctrine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-30

    Scene i Granting the same aggregate of force, It Is never as great in two hands as in one, because it is not perfectly concentrated.1 Alfred Thayer Mahan... Alfred Thayer Mahan, Naval Strategy (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1911). 2. See Peter M. Swartz, "Contemporary U.S. Naval Strategy: A Bibliography...Principles of Maritime Strategy (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1918), p. 21. 4. Corbett, p. 13. 5. See Edward Wegener , "Theory of Naval Strategy in

  14. [Figures of first laureates of the Wiktor Dega medal (XXXVII Jubilee Congress of Polish Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Society, 10-13 September 2008)].

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Andrzej; Rapała, Kazimierz

    2008-01-01

    Figures of two outstanding orthopaedists Professor Stefan Malawski and Professor Jerzy Król rewarded with the medal of the name of Wiktor Degi were described. The medal is being granted by the Chapter of the Medal as regarding for outstanding achievements for the Polish and world orthopaedics and rehabilitation. Profesor Stefan Kazimierz Malawski was born 26. 12. 1920 in the Vilnius area. In Vilnius he stated his medical studies, which he continued in Lwow and graduated in 1946 at the Marie Curie Skłodowska in Lublin. Professor Malawski's main field of interest were related to the problems related to tuberculosis of bones and joints and trauma of the lumbar and cervical spine. In the problems of bone tuberculosis he remains an unquestioned authority in Poland. His deep understanding of these clinical problems can be found in his text-book "Tuberculosis of bones and joints", which was printed in 1976. The information pertaining diagnosis and surgical treatment remain extremely valuable today. Another field of interest of Professor Malawski are pathologies of the spine. Disc disease, neoplasms of the spine, spinal stenosis and infections of the spine, spondylolisthesis are among many of his interests. This very wide field of interest can be dound in his 3 tome publication Spondyloorthopedics. His 166 papars printed in Poland and abroad bear proof of the Professors wide field of interest and deep knowledge. Professor Malawski was the first surgeon in Poland to perform surgery on the front elements of the spine in tuberculotic paraplegia. In 1958 he implemented surgical treatment of spine tumor--both primary and metastatic, by resecting them and stabilizing the spine with grafts. In the early 70's he focused on spinal stenosis. In the years 1982-1986 he was the Chairman of the Board of the Polish Orthopedic and Trauma Society. Professor Malawski introdued a modern set of Rules and Regulations, greatly simplifying the decision making process during General assemblies

  15. Zur Geschichte der Geophysik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobach, Klaus

    1980-07-01

    Alfred Wegener's most important work, the theory of continental drift, has a key position in the history of geophysics and has crucially advanced the discussion of this central problem of geodynamics amongst supporters and adversaries. The aim of this paper is to paint a portrait of Wegener's personality, of his stations of life, and of his interests and research work. The conceptions of the origin of continents and oceans prior to Wegener, and the further development of his ideas after his death on the ice cup of Greenland 50 years ago are discussed.

  16. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  17. Earthquakes and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1977-01-01

    An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics, a concept which has revolutionized thinking in the Earth sciences in the last 10 years. The theory of plate tectonics combines many of the ideas about continental drift (originally proposed in 1912 by Alfred Wegener in Germany) and sea-floor spreading (suggested originally by Harry Hess of Princeton University). 

  18. Frank Bursley Taylor - Forgotten Pioneer of Continental Drift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, George W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Frank B. Taylor was an American geologist who specialized in the glacial geology of the Great Lakes. This article discusses his work on the Continental Drift theory, which preceeded the work of Alfred Wegener by a year and a half. (MA)

  19. Topographic Stress in the Oceans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-20

    tilt witnd stress, Itldeed, ilves ’s, takmla- 0 A AQ 1 1) - rb tions described by D. Olbcrs of the Alfred 6 similar to the zonal momentum budget...issue Wegener Institut. Bremerhaven. Federal Re- ’ r’ , in ACC channel geometry.:.L~:-b- "T qg)"-7 in channel.geometry public of Germany, suggest that

  20. A Review of Mechanics and Injury Trends Among Various Running Styles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    running. Sports Eng. 2005;8(1):47-55. McDougall C. 12. Born to Run. New York: Alfred A. Knopf; 2009. Divert C, Mornieux G, Baur H, Mayer F, Belli A...McClay IS, Hamill J. Arch struc-86. ture and injury patterns in runners. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2001;16(4):341-347. Wegener C, Burns J, Penkala

  1. European SEPG 󈨥 Event Planner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    reaching Level 3. AIf Pilgrim Profile - AIf Pilgrim Digital Dr Alfred Pilgrim is the Engineering Manager responsible for several of Digital’s Office and...http:l/www.software.ibm.com/year2000 Internet for benchmark: http:l/www.europe.ibm.comlsoftwarelbenchmk F14 7 ICT NIEUWE WEGEN IN AUTOMArtSERING With

  2. Space Strategy: A Call to Arms for the Sea Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    environment of operations— including the strategic positions within it—affects means. See Wolfgang Wegener , The Naval Strategy of the World War (Berlin...Strategy (London: Longmans, Green, 1911; reprint, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1988), 91–93. 7 Alfred T. Mahan, The Problem of Asia and Its

  3. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    In the About AGU article "AGU Union Fellows elected for 2014," published in the 29 July 2014 issue of Eos (95(30), 272, doi:10.1022/ 2014EO300008), a joint research group affiliation was inadvertently omitted for one Fellow. Antje Boetius is with the Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany, and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.

  4. Eberhard Fahrbach (1948-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmer, Hartmut; Schauer, Ursula; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Rintoul, Steve

    2013-11-01

    Eberhard Fahrbach, an internationally known oceanographer, died on 21 April 2013 at age 65 after battling a brain tumor. He had retired 1 year earlier from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, where he directed research on observational oceanography.

  5. Lovell, Alfred Charles Bernard [Sir Bernard] (1913-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Physicist and astronomer, born in Oldland Common, Gloucestershire, England. Worked on cosmic rays at Manchester, researched radar in the Second World War, and afterwards with J S HEY procured an ex-army mobile radar unit used to detect V-2 rockets and attempted to detect cosmic ray showers with it. Interference from the electric trams at Manchester displaced the work to the university's botanical...

  6. The Alfred Hospital Lung Transplant Experience.

    PubMed

    Paraskeva, Miranda A; Westall, Glen P; Pilcher, David; McGiffin, David; Levvey, Bronwyn J; Williams, Trevor J; Snell, Gregory I

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients undergoing lung transplantation has continued to evolve, leading to improvements in 90-day and 1-year survival. The significant advancements in donor management and utilization at our center have led to significant increases in lung transplant activity without any compromise in recipient outcomes. Through the use of a patient-centered multidisciplinary model of care involved in all aspects of recipient management, from assessment and waitlisting to pre-, peri- and post-operative care, our lung transplant outcomes represent 2015 world's best lung transplant practice.

  7. Alfred-Adler's Basic Concepts and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundin, Robert W.

    This book presents the basic principles of Adler's psychology. The first chapter looks at Adlerian psychology as it exists today, and examines earlier influences. The second chapter examines feelings of inferiority and compensation for these feelings. The third chapter considers the nature of goals and how they are formulated. The fourth chapter…

  8. Fowler, William Alfred [`Willy'] (1911-95)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    American nuclear physicist, born in Pittsburgh, PA, worked at CalTech. Nobel prizewinner (1983). While at the Kellogg Laboratory studied the nuclear reactions of protons with the isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, the very reactions in the CN cycle identified at that time by HANS BETHE as occurring in the stars. Established the science of nuclear astrophysics. Found that there was a gap in the sequ...

  9. Combat Medals, Streamers, and Campaigns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Service and World War I. He laid the foundation on which I built. Another reservist at the Center, Col. Michael W. LeMorte, USAFR (Retired), began... Schmidt . By March 16 the Marines had crushed the defenders. The next day several B-29s returning from missions over Japan made emergency landings on...United States forces reached Paderbom, a little over 200 miles west of Berlin, and on 11 th they arrived at Magdeburg , only 85 miles west of Berlin

  10. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  11. 'Peony Nebula' Star Settles for Silver Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Movie

    If our galaxy, the Milky Way, were to host its own version of the Olympics, the title for the brightest known star would go to a massive star called Eta Carina. However, a new runner-up now the second-brightest star in our galaxy has been discovered in the galaxy's dusty and frenzied interior. This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the new silver medalist, circled in the inset above, in the central region of our Milky Way.

    Dubbed the 'Peony nebula' star, this blazing ball of gas shines with the equivalent light of 3.2 million suns. The reigning champ, Eta Carina, produces the equivalent of 4.7 million suns worth of light though astronomers say these estimates are uncertain, and it's possible that the Peony nebula star could be even brighter than Eta Carina.

    If the Peony star is so bright, why doesn't it stand out more in this view? The answer is dust. This star is located in a very dusty region jam packed with stars. In fact, there could be other super bright stars still hidden deep in the stellar crowd. Spitzer's infrared eyes allowed it to pierce the dust and assess the Peony nebula star's true brightness. Likewise, infrared data from the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope in Chile were integral in calculating the Peony nebula star's luminosity.

    The Peony nebula, which surrounds the Peony nebular star, is the reddish cloud of dust in and around the white circle.

    The movie begins by showing a stretch of the dusty and frenzied central region of our Milky Way galaxy. It then zooms in to reveal the 'Peony nebula' star the new second-brightest star in the Milky Way, discovered in part by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  12. Planets in Space (Julius Bartels Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Interplanetary space is not void, but filled with photons and energetic particle of solar origin as well as the fast stream solar wind plasma. Planets and other planetary bodies such as comets and asteroids need to interact with this interplanetary medium. Different types of interaction are known, dependent on the properties of the planetary body. The parameter space in which the interaction is described is mainly spanned by the magnetic field of the body, the density of its atmosphere, and the solar wind dynamic pressure. Using the concept of ternary triangles, different possible interaction scenarios will be described. As no active planetary scale experiments are possible only a few points in the interaction space can be visited right now. The discovery of exo-planets will allow exploring the parameter space further. Also, temporal changes of the terrestrial magnetic field strength and the resulting paleo-interaction situations will be discussed as they represent additional points in parameter space. Furthermore, the interaction between a planetary body and the interplanetary medium will not only modify the solar wind streaming past, but the body itself experiences changes. Planetary bodies are thus treated as embedded systems. As an example the impact of an external magnetic field on planetary dynamo action is discussed. Possible connections with the small observed magnetic field of Mercury are mentioned.

  13. Closing the balance (Louis Agassiz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeke, Michiel

    2015-04-01

    The 4000 Gt of ice that has been lost since 2003 by the ice sheets of Greenland and West Antarctica accounts for about 1/3 of recent global mean sea level rise. Especially the Greenland ice sheet is far out of balance: each year, 30% more mass leaves the ice sheet than is gained by snowfall at its surface; in Antarctica, this imbalance is currently less than 10%. To make matters worse, the mass loss is accelerating: each year it increases by about 10%, making it likely that the ice sheets will soon become the main source of global mean sea level rise. Given their huge volumes, they could remain so for centuries to come. Thirty years ago, the concept of rapid melting of the large ice sheets was purely theoretical. But since that time, the evolution of remote sensing techniques (altimetry, gravimetry and interferometry), in situ observations (automatic weather stations, mass balance and ice velocity measurements) and climate models has revealed a surprising diversity of mass loss mechanisms. This ranges from the relatively steady acceleration of large West-Antarctic ice streams to the highly variable (in space and time) flow speed of outlet glaciers in Greenland. Moreover, both ice sheets experience large interannual fluctuations in snowfall and melt, temporarily masking or accentuating the mass loss. In spite of all the technological developments, there is still room for exciting discoveries. In April 2011, a reservoir of liquid water twice the size of the Netherlands was discovered in the firn in southeast Greenland. In July 2012, an extreme melt event affected the entire Greenland ice sheet, with meltwater runoff destroying infrastructure in west Greenland that had been in place since the 1950's. And in 2014, two separate studies concluded that the mass loss in West Antarctica appears to be irreversible. When will it be possible to model and robustly predict the fully coupled system of atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and ice sheets? To start answering that question, we explore possibilities and outstanding challenges in the application of Earth System Models to ice sheet mass balance on one hand, and the use of very-high-resolution regional models to individual glacier basins and fjord systems on the other. These models need observations! We show a newly developed suitcase automatic weather station (iWS) for easy deployment in remote, glaciated regions, without compromising measurement accuracy.

  14. Small Colleges Need "Gold Medal Selfies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Higher education has been a favorite news topic for months. President Obama and the first lady have entered the national conversation, particularly around issues of cost and graduation rates for low-income students--addressing education in the State of the Union, at White House events, and in speeches across the nation. In the midst of these…

  15. Kutzbach Receives 2006 Roger Revelle Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddiman, William; Kutzbach, John E.

    2007-02-01

    John Kutzbach's career contributions to climate science are broad and deep. After a distinguished early career in atmospheric sciences, he shifted into paleoclimate during the 1970s. His subsequent research used general circulation models to explore several problems, including insolation and icesheet forcing of regional climates during the last deglaciation and in the late Holocene, the megamonsoon climates on the supercontinent Pangaea, and the climatic impacts of uplift of Tibet. These and other studies are characterized by an impressive economy of design, clarity of interpretation, and depth of insight into the operation of the climate system. Together, this body of work forms a large part of the framework of our current understanding of past climates.

  16. New Frontier Congressional Gold Medal Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2009-05-01

    09/23/2010 Message received in the Senate: Returned to the Senate pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 1653. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2245, which became Public Law 111-44 on 8/7/2009. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. American Fighter Aces Congressional Gold Medal Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Manchin, Joe, III [D-WV

    2013-12-15

    03/27/2014 Held at the desk. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.685, which became Public Law 113-105 on 5/23/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Turcotte Receives 2003 William Bowie Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, Lawrence M.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2004-01-01

    ``Few have contributed more to fundamental geophysics, or been better at encouraging others to contribute, than Donald L. Turcotte. Don trained as an engineer, receiving a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1958. After a year at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, he joined the Cornell Graduate School of Aeronautical Engineering, rising to full professor. He established expertise on seeded combustion, magnetohydrodynamic and electrical phenomena in turbulent boundary layers, and shock waves and authored a book, Space Propulsion, and co-authored a textbook, Statistical Thermodynamics. ``In 1965 he went on sabbatical to Oxford and returned an Earth scientist. The catalyst was Ron Oxburgh. Plate tectonics was just on the horizon, and Don joined his quantitative abilities and physical intuition with Ron's skills and knowledge of geology to produce over the next decade a remarkable series of 24 papers that explored topics such as the many implications of the Earth's thermal boundary layer, ridge melting, subduction zone volcanism, and intraplate tectonics and magmatism, and established the physical bases for many of the processes operating on our planet. Shifting to the Cornell Department of Geological Sciences in 1973, Don explored virtually every aspect of physical Earth geology and became an expert on planetary remote sensing and geophysical interpretation. He published over 150 papers on thermal subsidence in sedimentary basins, two-phase hydrothermal porous media convection, lithosphere flexure, cyclic sedimentation, and stick-slip earthquakes and the lithospheres and mantles of the other planets. He worked and published with outstanding students and colleagues including Ken Torrance, Gerald Schubert, David Spence, Marc Parmentier, Bill Haxby, John Ockendon, Kevin Burke, Jud Ahern, Steve Emerman, and Charlie Angevine. In 1982 he published Geodynamics with Jerry Schubert, a book that became the primary reference in the field.

  19. Dwight Nicholson Medal Lecture: Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2014-03-01

    I will present some background as to the current ``scientific state'' of our society and some ideas of how we got into the fix we are in. I will then describe The Physics Force a program we developed to popularize physics. It has proven to be a very successful and entertaining outreach program of the College of Science and Engineering in the University of Minnesota developed to make science exciting and fun for students of all ages, from 6 to 106. The Force performed variations of The Physics Circus, our most popular show, at Disney's Epcot Center, parts of it were shown on Newton's Apple and several of us have performed demonstrations on the Knoff-Hoff Show, a very successful German T.V. science program. The goal of The Physics Force is to show students and the public Science is Fun, Science is Interesting, and Science is Understandable. By all measures we have available, we are extremely successful in reaching our goals. In the last three year cycle of our University support about 110,000 residents of Minnesota (or about 2% of the total population) saw a Physics Force performance; over the last decade the total is around 250,000!

  20. Fathoming the hydrosphere (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    As Lord Kelvin observed: "If you can not measure it, you can not improve it." Measurement is the start of all scientific knowledge. Measurement sets science apart from metaphysical speculation. Measurement is not the last word in science but it is the first. In hydrology, progress in measurement methods has not been as rapid as in sister Earth sciences such as meteorology, oceanography, or geodynamics. Of the hundreds of scientific satellites, only one has hydrology as its main mission at the time of this writing (hopefully two at the time of the lecture). The closest we come to a large measurement infrastructure is an experimental watershed. Nothing wrong with an experimental watershed but it does not compare to, say, the Square Kilometer Array with its exabyte per day output. We tend to give up quickly because we will always have to work with effective parameters that can not be measured directly. We will never be able to know all stomata in a tree and how they interact with the turbulent flow through the canopy. We will never be able to know all pores in a soil and how water moves through them. But also effective parameters have to be measured, be it indirectly. No surprise then that my presentation will focus on measurements in hydrology and water management. First, the fun aspects and intellectual challenges of developing new measurement methods will be highlighted. From weighing trees to listening to rain to taking a stream's temperature, we have had many interesting experiences over the years. Second, the balance between model complexity and data availability will be discussed. Although there is a generally recognized need for parsimonious models in hydrology, formal approaches to finding the correct level of complexity are rare. Some complexity control approaches, borrowed from computer science, will be presented together with a hydrological application. As it turns out, these methods seem to predict nicely the onset of equifinality or the statistical illposedness of the inverse problem of finding effective parameters. Finally, an ambitious program will be presented that aims to shed light on Africa's climate and water resources, the TransAfrican HydroMeteorological Observatory or TAHMO. TAHMO's aim is to deploy and operate 20,000 hydroclimatological stations throughout subSaharan Africa. There are many aspects that are novel from the design of the stations, to deployment at schools, and a business model that should fund the system for decades to come. Given the global need for finding the water needed to produce our food by 2050 and the fact that Africa will have to play a major role in this effort, TAHMO addresses a scientific challenge of great societal importance.

  1. Medal of Honor Recipients: 1979-2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-20

    Rank and organization: Lieutenant Colonel U.S. Army Second Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, Ninth Infantry Division. Place and date: Renouf , St...60th Infantry Regiment, Ninth Infantry Division. On 14 June, Captain Urban’s company, attacking at Renouf , France, encountered heavy enemy small arms

  2. Medal of Honor Recipients: 1979-2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-21

    Infantry Division. Place and date: Renouf , St. Lo, France, the Meuse River near Heer, Belgium, 14 June to 3 September 1944. Entered service at: Fort...duty, while assigned to the Second Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, Ninth Infantry Division. On 14 June, Captain Urban’s company, attacking at Renouf

  3. Medal of Honor Recipients: 1979-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-27

    ridge guarding an important road junction , Second Lieutenant Inouye skillfully directed his platoon through a hail of automatic weapon and small CRS...during Indian Wars. Born: Warren County, Tennessee, 2 May 1820. Entered service: Fort Richardson, Texas. Place: Holliday Creek Texas, Little Wichita

  4. Medal of Honor Recipients: 1979-2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-29

    road junction , Second Lieutenant Inouye skillfully directed his platoon through a hail of automatic weapon and small CRS-11 arms fire, in a swift...Entered service: Fort Richardson, Texas. Place: Holliday Creek Texas, Little Wichita River. Action date: 5 October 1870. Issue date: 19 November

  5. Medal of Honor Recipients: 1979-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-12

    heroism in action on 21 April 1945, in the vicinity of San Terenzo, Italy. While attaching a defended ridge guarding an important road junction , Second...County, Tennessee, 2 May 1820. Entered service: Fort Richardson, Texas. Place: Holliday Creek Texas, Little Wichita River. Action date: 5 October

  6. Medal of Honor Recipients: 1979-2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-13

    21 April 1945, in the vicinity of San Terenzo, Italy. While attaching a defended ridge guarding an important road junction , Second Lieutenant Inouye...1820. Entered service: Fort Richardson, Texas. Place: Holliday Creek Texas, Little Wichita River. Action date: 5 October 1870. Issue date: 19

  7. Alfred P. Gage and the Introductory Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2016-03-01

    This article is about a late 19th-century teacher of secondary school physics. I was originally interested in the apparatus that he sold. This led me to the physics books that he wrote, and these took me to his unusual ideas about ways to use laboratory time to introduce students to the phenomena of physics. More than 100 years later educational ideas have now come full circle, and it is time to bring Gage and his texts and ideas to 21st-century physics teachers.

  8. Alfred P. Gage and the Introductory Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This article is about a late 19th-century teacher of secondary school physics. I was originally interested in the apparatus that he sold. This led me to the physics books that he wrote, and these took me to his unusual ideas about ways to use laboratory time to introduce students to the phenomena of physics. More than 100 years later educational…

  9. School Counseling for African American Adolescents: The Alfred Adler Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Marty

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how Adlerian counseling can be used as a form of school counseling for African American adolescents. Moreover, school counseling for African American adolescents is discussed within the context of African American culture. Due to the strength-based nature of Adlerian approach, it can capitalize on African American…

  10. Alfred Thayor Mahan and Space: A Necessary Unity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    point for unmanned space exploration, space colony resupply * .and further manned interplanetary exploration. Mankind’s reach after making the transition ...2050 5. Rapid, reliable transport within the Solar sstem. Median date: 2040 . IQR: 2030-2050 6. Detection of an extrasolar planet. .-.- , Median date...This orbital parameter is the dividing line between CLS and Trans-lunar space. The Van Allen belts contain high energy particles which lie in

  11. Imaging the plate boundary between Greenland and North America within the Kane Basin by means of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Axel; Schnabel, Michael; Damm, Volkmar; Piepjohn, Karsten

    2016-08-01

    The Nares Strait is a waterway separating NW Greenland and North America. The nature of the Nares Strait has been subject of discussion for decades, especially if it represents a transform fault that compensated the opening of the Baffin Bay in the Paleogene as Alfred Wegener supposed in 1912. The Kane Basin in the central part of Nares Strait provides an opportunity to cross the proposed fault. Geophysical data were acquired in 2001 and 2010, including among others multichannel and wide-angle seismic data. The eastern part of the Kane Basin is characterized by a solid platform most likely representing a continuation of the Paleoproterozoic Inglefield-Mobile-Belt (Greenland). In the western part, a sedimentary basin with northwestward tilted and eroded layers of Cretaceous age can be resolved. The transition between those two units shows the plate boundary between Greenland and North America and can be considered as a relic of the Wegener Fault.

  12. Continental drift under the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Buffetaut, Eric

    2003-12-01

    Contrary to what happened in many other countries in the 1930s and 1940s, Alfred Wegener's theory of continental drift was not generally rejected in Nazi Germany, although several leading German geologists of the time did not accept it. It was actually presented as the modern view of Earth history in books and magazine articles aimed at the general public. Although outlandish geological theories such as Hörbiger's Welteislehre were favoured by some Nazi dignitaries, they were not widely accepted in scientific circles. On the other hand, continental drift received official support under the Third Reich, at a time when it was ignored or ridiculed by most earth scientists outside Germany.

  13. The Ny-Alesund aerosol and ozone measurements intercomparison campaign 1997/1998 (NAOMI-1998)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuber, R.; Beyerle, G.; Beninga, I.; VonderGathen, P.; Rairoux, P.; Schrems, O.; Wahl, P.; Gross, M.; McGee, Th.; Iwasaka, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Shibata, T.; Klein, U.; Steinbrecht, W.

    1998-01-01

    An intercomparison campaign for Lidar measurements of stratospheric ozone and aerosol has been conducted at the Primary Station of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) in Ny-Alesund/Spitsbergen during January-February 1998. In addition to local instrumentation, the NDSC mobile ozone lidar from NASA/GSFC and the mobile aerosol lidar from Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) participated. The aim is the validation of stratospheric ozone and aerosol profile measurements according to NDSC guidelines. This paper briefly presents the employed instruments and outlines the campaign. Results of the blind intercomparison of ozone profiles are given in a companion paper and temperature measurements are described in this issue.

  14. A. E. “Ted” Ringwood (1930-1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred E. (“Ted”) Ringwood died on November 12 at age 63. In 1974, he was awarded AGU's William Bowie Medal, given for outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research. In his citation for the Bowie Medal, Francis R. Boyd said that Ringwood's “personal approach in Earth sciences has been to blend petrological, geophysical, geochemical, and cosmological data into detailed models of the mantle, the Earth as a whole, and the Moon.” These models stimulated and organized the thinking of many Earth scientists, Boyd noted. Ringwood was the 1993 Hess Medalist, in recognition of his outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and sister planets.

  15. Surfaces and interfaces of glass and ceramics; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Special Topics in Ceramics, Alfred University, Alfred, N.Y., August 27-29, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frechette, V. D. (Editor); Lacourse, W. C.; Burdick, V. L.

    1974-01-01

    The characterization of surfaces and interfaces is considered along with the infrared spectra of several N-containing compounds absorbed on montmorillonites, applications of surface characterization techniques to glasses, the observation of electronic spectra in glass and ceramic surfaces, a method for determining the preferred orientation of crystallites normal to a surface, and the friction and wear behavior of glasses and ceramics. Attention is given to the wear behavior of cast surface composites, an experimental investigation of the dynamic and thermal characteristics of the ceramic stock removal process, a dynamic elastic model of ceramic stock removal, and the structure and properties of solid surfaces. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  16. School Psychology: Prospective and Retrospective Views of the Field. Proceedings of the Annual Alfred University School Psychology Symposium (20th, Alfred, New York, November 1, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaughan, Edward, Ed.; Faherty, Ellen, Ed.

    Five contributors, viewing the field from divergent phenomenological spaces, provide a variety of viewpoints on the status of the field of school psychology. In "Glimpses of the Future in Current Practice?" Randy W. Kamphaus discusses the changing nature of school psychology, its two identities today, and the need to adapt a core value for…

  17. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's disease): An updated review of ocular disease manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kubaisi, Buraa; Abu Samra, Khawla; Foster, C. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a potentially lethal systemic disorder that is characterized by necrotizing vasculitis of small arteries and veins. The respiratory system is most commonly affected in limited forms of the disease, however upper and lower respiratory system, systemic vasculitis, and necrotizing glomerulonephritis are the characteristic components of the disease triad. The peak incidence is observed at 64–75 years of age, with a prevalence of 8–10 per million depending on geographic location. In this review we focus on the ocular manifestations of the disease which occur in nearly in one third of the patients. In addition we describe the neuro-ophthalmic complications which occur in up to half of cases. We also discuss the current systemic treatment options including corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and the available biologic response modifiers including rituximab. The disease remains difficult to diagnose due to the generalized symptomatic presentation of patients with GPA. As a result, several sets of diagnostic criteria have been developed which include clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to varying extents. Early diagnosis and multi-specialty collaboration among physicians is necessary to adequately manage the disease and the potential complications that may result from drugs used in the treatment of the disease. Despite recent advances, more research is necessary to prevent the high rates of mortality from the disease itself and from therapeutic side effects. PMID:27195187

  18. WEGENER: Solid Body Dynamics Investigation of Venus. Results from Summer School Alpbach 2014.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, A.; Coyle, S.; Czeluschke, A.; Donaldson Hanna, K.; Donohoe, A.; Hu, H.; Koopmans, R.-J.; Lucchetti, A.; Mannel, T.; Nachon, M.; Nilsson, D.; Shelakhaev, N.; Suer, A.; Timoney, R.

    2015-10-01

    The work presented in this paper was performed by the Orange Team during Summer School Alpbach 2014, which mainly concerns about geophysics of terrestrial planets. A mission is designed to investigate the past and current tectonic and volcanic activity on Venus. During the mission, a simultaneous observations from topographic, magnetic and gravitational measurements will be performed and the combination of the information has the potential to provide an improved understanding of the formation and evolution of the planet.

  19. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies should not be used to guide treatment in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Langford, C A

    2004-01-01

    WG can be associated with serious consequences that can occur as a result of active disease or from the side effects of treatment. If the medications used to treat WG were safe, the risk of exposing even a significant proportion of individuals to unwarranted treatment might be a reasonable approach in light of the nature of the disease process. In the setting of toxic medications though, the use of preemptive treatment based on ANCA alone and the potential for unnecessary exposure to side effects cannot be justified in the absence of compelling evidence. Unfortunately, the medical literature does not support that the benefits of preemptive treatment determined by ANCA outweigh the risks. To treat solely on the basis of ANCA potentially exposes an unacceptably high number of patients to the toxicities of treatment that they would not have needed. It is for these reasons that treatment decisions in WG should not be based on ANCA alone in the absence of clinical evidence of disease activity.

  20. Ice - not just H2O (Louis Agassiz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. W.

    2009-04-01

    Many of the important properties and uses of ice that fascinate cryospheric scientists actually depend on impurities that are present: isotopic variants of water molecules, small amounts of soluble and insoluble material derived from the aerosol and gas phase, and the trace constituents of the air bubbles that make up around 10% of the volume of ice at atmospheric pressure. In this lecture, I will first discuss how these impurities, and their location within the ice structure, affect local properties of the ice such as the electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, which scale up to give ice sheets their geophysical properties. I will then consider how the concentrations of different impurities are used to give unique records of palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental properties, extending so far 800,000 years back in time. This will be illustrated particularly with data from the EPICA Dome C ice core. Bringing the presentation full circle (and towards Agassiz!), I will discuss how the data from ice cores and other palaeoclimatic archives are starting to lead us towards understanding of the causes of the most prominent feature of late Quaternary climate: the huge glacial/interglacial swings in temperature, that are accompanied by the waxing and waning, roughly every 100,000 years, of great northern hemisphere ice sheets.

  1. Some Problems of the Lithosphere (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory A.

    2015-04-01

    In 1911 Augustus Love published a monograph: Some Problems of Geodynamics which in part dealt with the problem of isostasy and the support of mountain belts. In doing so he was one of the first authors to use the concept of the lithosphere. Although his analysis used the framework of linear elasticity, he clearly recognised that the evident structural heterogeneity of the Earth's crust could not simply be interpreted in terms of elastic displacement, and he had no simple explanation for what processes had produced the major topographic features of the Earth: continents, oceans and mountain belts. Today we have a far more complete understanding of those processes, but there are still unresolved problems. In this presentation I will focus on two of those problems that are of particular interest in understanding the geological evolution of the continents: the relationship of near-surface faults and ductile deformation in the lithosphere, and the stability of continental lithosphere in actively deforming zones. While the lithosphere certainly manifests elastic strain, most notably in the context of earthquakes and seismic waves, the large strains that have shaped the continents result from diffuse ductile strain at the deeper levels, coupled with movement on fault planes in the upper crust. Although plates in many regions move coherently with little internal deformation, the stresses that act on different parts of a plate may cause broad deformation zones to develop within a plate interior. Plate boundaries that cross continental regions also typically involve broadly distributed deformation. In recent years the distribution of deformation in such regions is measured accurately using GPS, and in general is explained well by a model in which the lithosphere behaves as a thin viscous sheet, albeit with a non-linear temperature-dependent viscosity law. Such models are broadly consistent with laboratory deformation experiments on small rock samples. However, the relationship between faulting and earthquake activity and the continuous deformation field below the seismogenic layer continues to be poorly understood. Prominent surface faults may be a natural consequence of the localization of strain caused by processes within the ductile layer such as shear heating, grain-size reduction, or simply the interaction of non-Newtonian constitutive law and irregular geometry. Where intra-plate convergence occurs the lithosphere must thicken, and the question naturally arises as to whether the thickened lithosphere will remain stable or somehow be removed by convective overturn with underlying asthenophere. Such overturn is expected of a viscous lithospheric layer that is denser than the asthenosphere; it will be denser because it is colder, unless there is some compositional contrast which makes it intrinsically buoyant. A relatively low viscosity is required, however, in order that the instability can grow at a sufficiently fast rate to overcome diffusive stabilisation of the temperature field. The high stresses created by plate convergence may provide the mechanism that activates the viscosity (and explains why the lithosphere elsewhere is generally stable). High-resolution tomographic investigations find convincing evidence of small-scale mantle drips occurring beneath recently active orogenic zones such as the western USA and the SE Carpathians. However, seismic observations of thickened lithosphere remaining beneath Tibet apparently contradict the interpretation of mantle overturn suggested by recent volcanism and uplift. Although the Tibetan mantle lithosphere may be relatively buoyant, the possibility that this layer has overturned internally may allow these conflicting interpretations to be reconciled.

  2. FREDERIC IVES MEDAL PAPER: From classical to quantum noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, Hermann A.

    1995-11-01

    An account is given of noise in electrical circuits and its relation to quantum noise connected with Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. A phase-insensitive amplifier must introduce noise (most commonly the spontaneous emission noise) in order to satisfy the constraint imposed by quantum mechanics on the simultaneous measurement of two observables represented by noncommuting operators. Nonstationary, phase-sensitive amplifiers can employ squeezed radiation and reduce the noise below that of phase-insensitive amplifiers. Experiments on squeezing in optical fibers and the attendant noise reduction are presented. The squeezing apparatus can also be employed as a quantum nondemolition measurement of photon number. A thought experiment of a two-slit interferometer is described, in which the fringes are washed out progressively with the accuracy of the photon number determination in one of its arms. Implications of measurements of this kind for the resolution of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox are discussed. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  3. Water and the city (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Renzo

    2010-05-01

    Total world population is about six billion, half living in cities, one third living in slums. This figure has doubled from 1960, when urban population was less than one billion out of the total figure of 3 billion; no more than one fifth was estimated to live in slums at that time. Demography experts predict that population will be around 9 billion in 2050, two thirds (6 billion) living in urban areas, and no reasonable prediction is available for slums. History shows that water is a key factor of urbanization: springs and rivers played a fundamental role in determining where one could settle, and where we are settled now. Water availability is expected to be a major control of man's life in the next future of planet Earth. The daily municipal water withdrawal ranges from 80 to 150 liters per person in China, India and Brazil cities; can they pretend to get more than 600 liters as a US citizen currently does? The impact of natural disasters such as storms and floods is strongly linked to increasing vulnerability associated with urbanization. Are state-of-the-art mitigation policies effective in reducing this impact in both terms of human casualties and economic damage? These and similar questions are fundamental to address hydrological science and engineering hydrology in next years. This talk will approach some open problems arising from the impact of increasing urbanization on the water cycle and, mostly, the associated feedback on human life. These include the need for an insight of nonstationarity, transients and feedback control of hydrological processes; the merging of the space-time scales of hydrological processes with the spatial scales of the city, and the temporal scale of lifestyles; and the way for water scientist and engineers to be involved in the design of cities and the search for life styles coherent with a sustainable development approach.

  4. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... is lost, destroyed, or rendered unfit for use without fault or neglect on the part of the person to... rendered unfit for use due to the fault or neglect of the person to whom it was awarded, is replaced...

  5. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... is lost, destroyed, or rendered unfit for use without fault or neglect on the part of the person to... rendered unfit for use due to the fault or neglect of the person to whom it was awarded, is replaced...

  6. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... is lost, destroyed, or rendered unfit for use without fault or neglect on the part of the person to... rendered unfit for use due to the fault or neglect of the person to whom it was awarded, is replaced...

  7. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... is lost, destroyed, or rendered unfit for use without fault or neglect on the part of the person to... rendered unfit for use due to the fault or neglect of the person to whom it was awarded, is replaced...

  8. Faults and Earthquakes (Louis Néel Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2015-04-01

    I have been studying fault rocks and fault mechanics for 40 years, trying to understand mechanisms of earthquakes. A basic strategy has been to study fault rocks for understanding deformation and transport processes in fault zones at depths, to reproduce the same processes in laboratory experiments and determine mechanical and transport properties of faults, and to conduct earthquake modeling based on measured properties and compare with natural earthquakes. I will try to give an overview of the progress of fault studies in the last 25 years, emphasizing the importance of such integrated studies. The following four topics will be covered from my own perspectives of fault and earthquake studies. High-velocity frictional properties of faults in relation to earthquake rupture dynamics will be the main focus, but the lecture will cover lithosphere rheology, initiation processes of earthquake-induced landslides, and a basin evolution and pore-pressure development as relevant topics. [1] Friction to flow law A simple friction to flow law merges strength profiles of lithosphere and velocity-dependency models of faults that have been used widely in the last three decades to characterize the thickness and internal structures of the lithosphere and to model earthquake cycles and earthquake rupture propagations, respectively. The law allows analyzing earthquake generations including frictional, transitional and flow properties at shallow to deep faults across a lithosphere. Analyses shows how strength profile evolve during earthquake cycles. The law can be extended to describe brittle to high-temperature flow properties across a lithosphere, and realistic analysis of earthquake generation and interseismic deformation, including postseismic deformation, will be possible. [2] High-velocity weakening of fault and a source of diverse seismic activities Extensive studies in the last two decades demonstrated that faults undergo dramatic weakening at seismic slip rates, through mechanisms such as flash heating/bulk heating of gouge, frictional melting, and thermochemical pressurization. It is likely that earthquake nucleation is controlled by rate and state frictional properties at slow slip rates, whereas high-velocity weakening can affect the growth processes of large earthquakes. Combinations of those slow and high-velocity properties can produce very diverse seismic and aseismic fault motions. I will also discuss technical problems in building friction apparatuses to extend the high-velocity friction studies to wet environments and to higher normal stresses and temperatures. [3] Catastrophic landslides triggered by earthquakes Tsaoling landslide in Taiwan is the largest and well-documented landslide among many landslides triggered by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. The landslide occurred along a very flat bedding surface, and a Newmark analysis using high-velocity frictional properties quantitatively reproduced the initiation and runaway processes of the landslide, elucidating the importance of slip weakening of landslide surface. The method has many applications to earthquake-triggered landslides. [4] Basin evolution and pore pressure development Pore-pressure distribution in the earth is poorly known at present. Analysis of basin evolution, using measured permeability and storage capacity of all formations of a basin, revealed the sedimentation and fluid flow processes in the last 30 Ma that lead to the development of abnormal pore pressure below about 4 km in depths. Modeling based on measured transport properties will be useful to solve many problems such as fluid flow in the earth, effect of water on earthquake generation, waste isolation, and CCS.

  9. A scientist interested in soils (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, F. C.

    2009-04-01

    These are the most important findings of my scientific carrier. Unfrozen water in frozen soils - In continental Antarctica, the intense cold, the paucity of liquid water and low biological activity posed the question on whether the surficial, grayish, sandy, material devoided of plants and humus could be legitimately called soils. This question was raised since 1916 when Antarctic soils were first analyzed. The question was later resolved by waiving the U.S.D.A requirements for the presence of higher plants. Nevertheless, one cannot usher the apparently lifeless, unconsolidated material into the realm of soils just by changing a definition! Proofs are required to show that soil formation in continental Antarctica is a present day process. This confermation was obtained by detecting ionic migration in frozen xeric soils. The experiment showed that radioactive ions, 36Cl- and 22Na+, moved in the unfrozen interfacial films of water at the surface of soil particles. The higly dissociated and corrosive nature of the unfrozen water could explain, also, the observed weathering in situ. Dynamic Pedology and Podzolization - For studying the process of podzolization, I used a different approach to the traditional pedological investigations; I called this approach dynamic Pedology. Dynamic pedology involves the collection, analysis and interpretation of the soil solution obtained in the field through lysimetry. Traditional pedology by analyzing the solid phase averages the sum total of all the processes since the soil initiated its development. Dynamic pedology is suitable for examining current processes. In weathering studies, soil solution composition allows to verify the thermodynamic stability of minerals. Also, the proton donors proposed as responsible for formation of soils can be identified in the soil solution. Contrasting with the drab, colorless Antarctic soils, the podzols are some of the most photogenic and aesthetic soils of the world. Soil solutions was collected from 45 tension lysimeters located in the central Cascades Mountains U.S.A. and analyzed for pH, major cations and anions and DOC. The study lasted 15 years. From the interpretation of these data I was able to produce a new theory for the process of podzolization that explained the presence of imogolite. The theory is based on the presence of two major proton donors that originate two chemical compartments. The upper one included the O, E and Bhs horizons.The lower, the Bs, the C and ground water. In the upper compartment, the organic acids acted as the major proton donors and complexing agents; here, the low pH depresses the dissociation of carbonic acid. In the lower compartment the major proton donor is carbonic acid formed by the high partial pressure of CO2and the rise in pH. These two compartments rule two contrasting reactions: congruent and incongruent dissolution. The mineralas in the E and Bhs are congruently dissolved, although neogenic minerals are seasonally possible .The solution in this compartment is undersaturated with rispect to imogolite equilibrium, hence it is thermodynamically unstable. In the incongruent dissolution compartment, imogolite is present and thermodamic stable. The suspended fraction of the solution shows, in the upper compartment humic particles containig metals, in the lower compartment, only mineral grains were present. This theory appears also valid for Japan and northern Alaska. The Role of Podzolization in the Formation of Peatland - In south eastern Alaska, following a chronosequence of marine terraces, it was discovered that podzolization was related to the formation of bogs, the final stage of plant succession.The formation of peatland was caused by the deterioration of the internal drainage as an iron-cemented pan developed during podzolization. Only extensive windthrow, a common phenomenon in S.E. Alaska, could revert the trend toward paludification by mechanically breaking the pan and creating windthrow mounds on which a new forest can be established.

  10. The Sun, stars and planets (Christiaan Huygens Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2010-05-01

    Using stellar occultations as a tool to probe the planetary atmospheres has resulted in significant contributions to the exploration of our solar system. The technique of solar occultation has been well known for decades, but because of stars being so faint objects with respect to the Sun this technique was not very popular in the 70's. While fostering the idea of stellar occultations, I tried to avoid the unfortunate fate of Giordano Bruno, who was burned to death on February 17, 1600: he had dared to declare that the stars were objects like the sun, only much more remote. This talk will illustrate some results obtained by the star occultation technique by one scientific example on each of the three planets which are equipped with a stellar occultation instrument: GOMOS on ENVISAT (ozone monitoring), SPICAM on board Mars Express (temperature profiles), and SPICAV on Venus Express (SO2). I will also talk about Cristiaan Huygens, the first to discuss (according to the historical review of Pierre Connes) the problem of extra-solar planets in modern scientific terms which are still valid to day. Finally, I will address the threat to the planet Earth posed by Mankind, with some discussions about demography and geo-engineering.

  11. Dr. Chad E. Finn, 2013 Wilder Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Chad Finn took over the leadership of the USDA-ARS small fruit breeding program in Corvallis, Oregon in 1993 after three years working as an extension horticulturist in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since taking over this program he has developed what is...

  12. A random walk on water (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2009-04-01

    Randomness and uncertainty had been well appreciated in hydrology and water resources engineering in their initial steps as scientific disciplines. However, this changed through the years and, following other geosciences, hydrology adopted a naïve view of randomness in natural processes. Such a view separates natural phenomena into two mutually exclusive types, random or stochastic, and deterministic. When a classification of a specific process into one of these two types fails, then a separation of the process into two different, usually additive, parts is typically devised, each of which may be further subdivided into subparts (e.g., deterministic subparts such as periodic and aperiodic or trends). This dichotomous logic is typically combined with a manichean perception, in which the deterministic part supposedly represents cause-effect relationships and thus is physics and science (the "good"), whereas randomness has little relationship with science and no relationship with understanding (the "evil"). Probability theory and statistics, which traditionally provided the tools for dealing with randomness and uncertainty, have been regarded by some as the "necessary evil" but not as an essential part of hydrology and geophysics. Some took a step further to banish them from hydrology, replacing them with deterministic sensitivity analysis and fuzzy-logic representations. Others attempted to demonstrate that irregular fluctuations observed in natural processes are au fond manifestations of underlying chaotic deterministic dynamics with low dimensionality, thus attempting to render probabilistic descriptions unnecessary. Some of the above recent developments are simply flawed because they make erroneous use of probability and statistics (which, remarkably, provide the tools for such analyses), whereas the entire underlying logic is just a false dichotomy. To see this, it suffices to recall that Pierre Simon Laplace, perhaps the most famous proponent of determinism in the history of philosophy of science (cf. Laplace's demon), is, at the same time, one of the founders of probability theory, which he regarded as "nothing but common sense reduced to calculation". This harmonizes with James Clerk Maxwell's view that "the true logic for this world is the calculus of Probabilities" and was more recently and epigrammatically formulated in the title of Edwin Thompson Jaynes's book "Probability Theory: The Logic of Science" (2003). Abandoning dichotomous logic, either on ontological or epistemic grounds, we can identify randomness or stochasticity with unpredictability. Admitting that (a) uncertainty is an intrinsic property of nature; (b) causality implies dependence of natural processes in time and thus suggests predictability; but, (c) even the tiniest uncertainty (e.g., in initial conditions) may result in unpredictability after a certain time horizon, we may shape a stochastic representation of natural processes that is consistent with Karl Popper's indeterministic world view. In this representation, probability quantifies uncertainty according to the Kolmogorov system, in which probability is a normalized measure, i.e., a function that maps sets (areas where the initial conditions or the parameter values lie) to real numbers (in the interval [0, 1]). In such a representation, predictability (suggested by deterministic laws) and unpredictability (randomness) coexist, are not separable or additive components, and it is a matter of specifying the time horizon of prediction to decide which of the two dominates. An elementary numerical example has been devised to illustrate the above ideas and demonstrate that they offer a pragmatic and useful guide for practice, rather than just pertaining to philosophical discussions. A chaotic model, with fully and a priori known deterministic dynamics and deterministic inputs (without any random agent), is assumed to represent the hydrological balance in an area partly covered by vegetation. Experimentation with this toy model demonstrates, inter alia, that: (1) for short time horizons the deterministic dynamics is able to give good predictions; but (2) these predictions become extremely inaccurate and useless for long time horizons; (3) for such horizons a naïve statistical prediction (average of past data) which fully neglects the deterministic dynamics is more skilful; and (4) if this statistical prediction, in addition to past data, is combined with the probability theory (the principle of maximum entropy, in particular), it can provide a more informative prediction. Also, the toy model shows that the trajectories of the system state (and derivative properties thereof) do not resemble a regular (e.g., periodic) deterministic process nor a purely random process, but exhibit patterns indicating anti-persistence and persistence (where the latter statistically complies with a Hurst-Kolmogorov behaviour). If the process is averaged over long time scales, the anti-persistent behaviour improves predictability, whereas the persistent behaviour substantially deteriorates it. A stochastic representation of this deterministic system, which incorporates dynamics, is not only possible, but also powerful as it provides good predictions for both short and long horizons and helps to decide on when the deterministic dynamics should be considered or neglected. Obviously, a natural system is extremely more complex than this simple toy model and hence unpredictability is naturally even more prominent in the former. In addition, in a complex natural system, we can never know the exact dynamics and we must infer it from past data, which implies additional uncertainty and an additional role of stochastics in the process of formulating the system equations and estimating the involved parameters. Data also offer the only solid grounds to test any hypothesis about the dynamics, and failure of performing such testing against evidence from data renders the hypothesised dynamics worthless. If this perception of natural phenomena is adequately plausible, then it may help in studying interesting fundamental questions regarding the current state and the trends of hydrological and water resources research and their promising future paths. For instance: (i) Will it ever be possible to achieve a fully "physically based" modelling of hydrological systems that will not depend on data or stochastic representations? (ii) To what extent can hydrological uncertainty be reduced and what are the effective means for such reduction? (iii) Are current stochastic methods in hydrology consistent with observed natural behaviours? What paths should we explore for their advancement? (iv) Can deterministic methods provide solid scientific grounds for water resources engineering and management? In particular, can there be risk-free hydraulic engineering and water management? (v) Is the current (particularly important) interface between hydrology and climate satisfactory?. In particular, should hydrology rely on climate models that are not properly validated (i.e., for periods and scales not used in calibration)? In effect, is the evolution of climate and its impacts on water resources deterministically predictable?

  13. 2000 Caldecott Medal Winner: A Conversation with Simms Taback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Simms Taback, winner of the 2000 Caldecott Award for his children's book illustrations. Discusses Taback's career as a graphic artist and children's book illustrator. Discusses intricate details and clever nuances in "Joseph Had a Little Overcoat," a warm and humorous tale proving that you can always make…

  14. Macelwane Medal talk: Mars Exploration - A look forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    One of two neighbors in the Sun's habitable zone, Mars offers a unique opportunity for exploration. Over 60% of the surface is >3.5 Gyr, offering a window into the first billion years of the evolution of a terrestrial planet, including processes such as early crust formation, early atmospheric evolution, and the effects of late heavy bombardment. The past decade of exploration by orbiters and rovers has revolutionized our understanding of the planet. Two of the most exciting discoveries are (1) the discovery of over a dozen aqueous, potentially habitable environments - lacustrine, hydrothermal, pedogenic - in the ancient Mars geologic record, delineated by geomorphology and mineralogy and (2) the presence of near-surface mid-latitude surface ice and recurring slope linae that may imply intermittent liquid brines in near-polar environments today. Near-term funded future robotic exploration plans entail a caching rover, an orbiter focused on ice and potential seep modeling, and return of samples from one landing site. Recent findings and changes in the exploration landscape motivate a number of possible new possibilities and opportunties: (a) multiple exploration rovers to sample ancient Mars' diverse, potentially habitable environments scouting to understand the planet's history and for signs of life; (b) the importance of commercial space exploration efforts and private efforts to move beyond Earth.

  15. Mantle convection: concensus and queries (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal convection driven by surface cooling and internal heat production is the cause of endogenic activity of all planets, expressed as tectonic activity and volcanism for solid planets. The sluggish convection of the silicated mantle also controls the activity of the metallic core and the possibility of an active dynamo. A glimpse of the internal structure of Earth's mantle is provided by seismic tomography. However, both the limited resolution of seismic methods and the complexity of the relations between seismic velocities and the thermo-mechanical parameters (mostly temperature and density), leave to the geodynamicist a large degree of interpretation. At first order, a very simple model of mantle heterogeneities, only built from the paleogeographic positions of Cenozoic and Mesozoic slabs, explains the pattern and amplitude of Earth's plate motions and gravity field, while being in agreement with long wavelength tomography. This indicates that the mantle dynamics is mostly controlled by thermal anomalies and by the dynamics of the top boundary layer, the lithosphere. However, the presence of various complexities due to variations in elemental composition and to phase transitions is required by seismology, mineralogy and geochemistry. I will review how these complexities affect the dynamics of the transition zone and of the deep mantle and discuss the hypothesis on their origins, either primordial or as a consequence of plate tectonics. The rheologies that are used in global geodynamic models for the mantle and the lithosphere remain very simplistic. Some aspects of plate tectonics (e.g., the very existence of plates, their evolution, the dynamics of one-sided subductions...) are now reproduced by numerical simulations. However the rheologies implemented and their complexities remain only remotely related to that of solid minerals as observed in laboratories. The connections between the quantities measured at microscopic scale (e.g., mineralogy, grainsize, mechanisms of creeping, anisotropy, preferential shape orientations, water content...), their macroscopic averages, and the retroaction between them, are still unclear. The understanding of these relations would explain why Earth has plate tectonics while the other planets of the solar system, including her sister planet Venus, do not. As plate tectonics can be advocated to be a major ingredient for life to developp, we can speculate that a better understanding of the interaction between rheology and geodynamics would help us to estimate on what extrasolar planets including super earths, life might be expected.

  16. Comets and the Young Solar System (David Bates Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, H.

    2012-04-01

    I will focus my talk around four outstanding problems concerning comets and the early Solar System. How were comet nuclei formed, and what was their initial size distribution? In which way could suchicy planetesimals have delivered volatiles to the planetary embryos in the terrestrial planet region? How large was the Sun's birth cluster, and what implications does this have for the origin of the Oort Cloud? Finally, in the framework of the Nice Model, which consequences are likely to follow from alargely cometary bombardment of the Moon and terrestrial planets during the LHB?

  17. MHD Dynamo phenomenon in our lab (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailitis, Agris

    2016-04-01

    Celestial objects generate magnetic field very like technical dynamo do. Field induces current in a moving electroconductor. The induced current amplifies magnetic field. At large enough product conductivity time's velocity time's size amplification exceeds losses and situation without magnetic field is impossible. Such scenario is obvious for technical dynamo made from insolated wire but not so for uniform conductor as in celestial bodies. Development of the idea took literally the entire 20th century. Discovery of sunspot magnetic fields at the century rise and laboratory verification at the very fall. At thirties Cowling noticed that geometrically simple shaped (axially symmetrical) field can't sustain itself. Process must be more complex, somehow spatially fragmented. At the middle of century Parker and Steenbeck saw such fragmentation in a turbulent structure of hydrodynamic flow. Shortly after his α-effect approach was made ready Steenbeck invited us to think on molten Na experiments for theory verification. The first idea was to push the Na flow through the hand-blown pipe maze. Similar industrial scale experiment after years and regardless of us was realized in Karlsruhe. Seeking for something cheaper we stopped at Ponomarenko idea - axially symmetric helical flow can't generate axi-simmetric field but it can generate azimuthally structured one. The mathematical model was modified to experimental conditions and numerically optimized. The Dynamo stand was built and it works. Even after optimization Dynamo stand exceeds usual size of hydraulic experiments. 2m3 of molten Na circulate there by means of propeller powered from 200kW motor. When circulation exceeds 0.6 m3/s (at 120°C) seemingly from nowhere appears magnetic field. Twisted field pattern slowly (about 1.5Hz) rotates round flow axis. Up to 0.1T field stay as long as stay circulation and temperature. When sodium is heated up or slowed down the field is slowly dying out. Phenomenon is much richer then underlining mathematical model. Followed by dozens of fields sensor it shows lot of anomalies and variations. More details in the lecture.

  18. Sagan Medal Paper: Improving Impact in Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D.

    2004-11-01

    Carl Sagan was masterful at reaching a wide public. He had great native talent as an educator, and he worked hard to hone his ability to promote his image as a television personality. Through TV as well as writing, he reached a far wider audience than would have been possible by classroom teaching or other direct personal contact. While none of us is "another Sagan", we can draw lessons from his use of media to leverage his message. One way to multiply our impact is through contributing to textbooks. I jumped at the opportunity to take on the popular George Abell college astronomy texts when the author unexpectedly died. I hoped that as a planetary scientist involved in NASA missions, I could do a better job than most astronomers to convey the excitement of planetary exploration. One edition of a text can reach tens of thousands of students and may represent the only college science course they will take. In the 1980s it was difficult for educators and writers to obtain high quality NASA images. Voyager and other missions issued press releases of first products, but the later, more carefully processed images were unavailable. By selecting the best planetary images and making them available with captions as slide sets, I could reach another large audience. Later I helped establish the NASA-USGS Planetary Photojournal for web-based images and captions. Developing websites for the public is today one of the best ways to broaden the impact of our work. My impact hazard website is now a decade old and exceeds a million hits a month. I also distribute "NEO News" via e-mail to more than 800 readers. I believe that the public is hungry for reliable, understandable information. We can all look at ways to use modern technology to help provide it.

  19. Earth Evolution and Dynamics (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, Trond H.

    2016-04-01

    While physicists are fantasizing about a unified theory that can explain just about everything from subatomic particles (quantum mechanics) to the origin of the Universe (general relativity), Darwin already in 1858 elegantly unified the biological sciences with one grand vision. In the Earth Sciences, the description of the movement and deformation of the Earth's outer layer has evolved from Continental Drift (1912) into Sea-Floor Spreading (1962) and then to the paradigm of Plate Tectonics in the mid-to-late 1960s. Plate Tectonics has been extremely successful in providing a framework for understanding deformation and volcanism at plate boundaries, allowed us to understand how continent motions through time are a natural result of heat escaping from Earth's deep interior, and has granted us the means to conduct earthquake and volcanic hazard assessments and hydrocarbon exploration, which have proven indispensable for modern society. Plate Tectonics is as fundamentally unifying to the Earth Sciences as Darwin's Theory of Evolution is to the Life Sciences, but it is an incomplete theory that lacks a clear explanation of how plate tectonics, mantle convection and mantle plumes interact. Over the past decade, however, we have provided compelling evidence that plumes rise from explicit plume generation zones at the margins of two equatorial and antipodal large low shear-wave velocity provinces (Tuzo and Jason). These thermochemical provinces on the core-mantle boundary have been stable for at least the last 300 million years, possibly the last 540 million years, and their edges are the dominant sources of the plumes that generate large igneous provinces, hotspots and kimberlites. Linking surface and lithospheric processes to the mantle is extremely challenging and is only now becoming feasible due to breakthroughs in the estimation of ancient longitudes before the Cretaceous, greatly improved seismic tomography, recent advances in mineral physics, and new developments in our understanding of the dynamics of true polar wander. Dramatic improvements in computational capacity and numerical methods that efficiently model mantle flow while incorporating surface tectonics, plumes, and subduction, have emerged to facilitate further study - We are now capitalizing on these recent advances so as to generate a new Earth model that links plate tectonics with shallow and deep mantle convection through time, and which includes elements such as deeply subducted slabs and stable thermochemical piles with plumes that rise from their edges. It is still unclear, though, why lower mantle structures similar to today would have existed since the Early Phanerozoic (540 Ma), and perhaps for much longer time. Could large-scale upwellings act as an anchor for mantle structure that also controls where downward flow and subduction occurs? Or could it be that subduction keeps itself in place? These are open questions, and at the moment we do not even know with certainty whether Tuzo and Jason were spatially stable for much longer than 300 Myr; we can only state that their stability before Pangea formed is consistent with palaeomagnetic and geological data, but is not necessarily required.

  20. Nicholson Medal for Human Outreach Lecture: Inceasing Diversity in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, David

    2012-03-01

    Two initiatives designed to increase diversity in physics, astronomy, and related fields will be described. First, the programs of the National Society of Hispanic Physicists (NSHP), including its partnership with the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans (SACNAS) and with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSHP) as well as others will be presented as well as a summary of the outcome of a recent planning meeting supported by the American Physical Society. The basic ingredients of the Fisk/Vanderbilt Master's to PhD Bridge Program will be presented. The program has made Fisk University the number one producer of Master's degrees in physics to African Americans, and Vanderbilt University the number one producer of PhD degrees in physics, astronomy, and materials science to African American students and soon to become the number one producer of PhD degrees in these areas to Hispanic students. Members are being sought for NSHP and partner institutions for the Bridge program.

  1. Oersted Medal Lecture, January 6, 2015: AAPT, TPT, and Me

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamola, Karl C.

    2016-01-01

    AAPT established The Physics Teacher more than 50 years ago as a magazine for high school teachers. Over the decades, the publication has evolved in a number of important ways, and I was privileged to play a part in that evolution. I will describe some of the important preparation I received for that role and share some of the insights I gained during my 13 years as editor. I'll outline the history of The Physics Teacher, leading to its eventually becoming a peer-reviewed journal serving a very broad audience. I will also discuss TPT's role in the physics teaching community and the important positive influence it has had on the evolution of AAPT. I'll conclude with some observations and conclusions drawn from my more than 40 years of teaching experience.

  2. Mark A. Cane Receives 2013 Maurice Ewing Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    I must first pay tribute to Klaus Wyrtki, a hero of mine who passed away earlier this year. At a time when ideas about El Niño pointed all over the place, he told me that Bjerknes's hypothesis was the way forward. He was right, of course, but Bjerknes stopped short of explaining the oscillatory nature of ENSO, and it took Klaus's tide gauge data to show that ocean dynamics is the answer. His analysis was masterful, but there would have been nothing much to analyze without his incredible effort to deploy those tide gauges in atolls and islands throughout the tropical Pacific. My magnum opus may fairly be described as translating Bjerknes-Wyrtki into a numerical model.

  3. The Voyager spacecraft /James Watt International Gold Medal Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacock, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Voyager Project background is reviewed with emphasis on selected features of the Voyager spacecraft. Investigations by the Thermo-electric Outer Planets Spacecraft Project are discussed, including trajectories, design requirements, and the development of a Self Test and Repair computer, and a Computer Accessed Telemetry System. The design and configuration of the spacecraft are described, including long range communications, attitude control, solar independent power, sequencing and control data handling, and spacecraft propulsion. The development program, maintained by JPL, experienced a variety of problems such as design deficiencies, and process control and manufacturing problems. Finally, the spacecraft encounter with Jupiter is discussed, and expectations for the Saturn encounter are expressed.

  4. Grove Medal Address - investing in the fuel cell business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasul, Firoz

    Successful commercialization of fuel cells will require significant investment. To attract this funding, the objective must be commercially driven and the financing will have to be viewed as an investment in the business of fuel cells rather than just the funding of technology development. With the recent advancements in fuel cells and demonstrations of fuel cell power systems in stationary and transport applications, an industry has begun to emerge and it is attracting the attention of institutional and corporate investors, in addition to the traditional government funding. Although, the strategic importance of fuel cells as a versatile, efficient and cleaner power source of the future as well as an `engine' for economic growth and job creation has now been understood by several governments, major corporations have just begun to recognize the enormous potential of the fuel cell for it to become as ubiquitous for electrical power as the microprocessor has become for computing power. Viewed as a business, fuel cells must meet the commercial requirements of price competitiveness, productivity enhancement, performance and reliability, in addition to environmental friendliness. As fuel cell-based products exhibit commercial advantages over conventional power sources, the potential for higher profits and superior returns will attract the magnitude of investment needed to finance the development of products for the varied applications, the establishment of high volume manufacturing capabilities, and the creation of appropriate fuel and service infrastructures for these new products based on a revolutionary technology. Today, the fuel cell industry is well-positioned to offer the investing public opportunities to reap substantial returns through their participation at this early stage of growth of the industry.

  5. Edward Teller Medal: Laudations and Citations 2005-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George H.

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Max Tabak * Joseph D. Kilkenny * Kunioki Mima * Brian R. Thomas * Ricardo Betti * Edward I. Moses * Christine Garban-Labaune * Bruce A. Remington * James Hammer * Richard Petrasso * Jie Zhang * Hiroshi Azechi

  6. Soroosh Sorooshian Receives 2013 Robert E. Horton Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2014-01-01

    It is a true honor to be named the 2013 Robert E. Horton medalist by AGU. To be considered for such an honor, one must be nominated for consideration. I am grateful to Jasper Vrugt for having led my nomination and to colleagues who wrote supporting letters on my behalf.

  7. Milankovitch theory - hits and misses (Milutin Milankovitch Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, W. H.

    2012-04-01

    Milankovitch Theory has become an important tool in geologic practice and thought, and is sufficiently conspicuous to provide a rewarding target for criticism. The chief problem arising has to do with the prominence of a cycle near 100,000 years, whose origin is not clear. Most practitioners, presumably, would accept a close relationship of that cycle to precession of the equinoxes (that is, cyclic changes in seasonality), along with dynamical properties oft he system that enhance the amplitude of the 100-kyrcycleat the expense of others. In any case, Milankovitch Theory has proved useful, both for age assignments and for stimulating thought about relationships between climate change and sedimentation, as is readily evident from the relevant literature. It would be difficult to replace. Neither does it seem desirable to do so: the chief problem noted in regard of the theory (the 100-kyr problem) is not necessarily a part of the theory, which is concerned with change rather than with condition. The 100-kyr cycle is linked to condition. The problem raised by critics seems to be the time scale of integration of change, a problem not addressed in Milankovitch Theory. A necessity for additional processes and mechanisms not considered in Milankovitch Theory can not be excluded.

  8. Does hydrology have a soul?(Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Upmanu

    2014-05-01

    Water is the distinguishing feature of Earth. Its presence sustains life, business, energy and romance. Hydrology is the science of water. Hence, it is one of the most relevant and exciting of the planetary sciences. But, does hydrology as it is taught and practiced today achieve this potential? Is understanding and predicting the hydrological cycle really in the domain of today's hydrologists? I intend to present a personal view of some puzzles as well as fundamental issues that define hydrology as a fertile ground of scientific inquiry that emerges at the intersection of the planetary and life sciences, and of course human behavior. I plan to outline 5 main questions whose explicit or implicit pursuit characterizes the essence of the hydrological being.

  9. Medal of Honor Commemorative Coin Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Kerry, John F. [D-MA

    2009-04-23

    04/23/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.1209, which became Public Law 111-91 on 11/6/2009. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. National September 11 Memorial & Museum Commemorative Medal Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Schumer, Charles E. [D-NY

    2010-02-24

    02/24/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.4684, which became Public Law 111-221 on 8/6/2010. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Ocean-shelf interaction and exchange (Fridtjof Nansen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthnance, John M.

    2016-04-01

    A brief review will be given of physical processes where shallow shelf seas border the deep ocean, including waves that travel and propagate responses around the ocean boundary. Some implications for ocean-shelf exchange of water and its physical and biochemical contents will be discussed, along with an outline of some studies estimating these exchanges. There will be an emphasis on the north-west European shelf edge. A recent study is the project FASTNEt: "Fluxes across sloping topography of the North East Atlantic". This aims to resolve seasonal, interannual and regional variations. Novel and varied measurements have been made in three contrasting sectors of shelf edge: the Celtic Sea south-west of Britain, the Malin-Hebrides shelf west of Scotland and the West Shetland shelf north of Scotland. Previous studies established the existence of flow along the continental slope in these areas, more persistently poleward in northern sectors. Modelling aims to diagnose and estimate the contribution of various processes to transports and to exchange along and across the slope. Estimates obtained so far will be presented; overall transport from drifters and moored current meters; effective "diffusivity" from drifter dispersion and salinity surveys; other estimates of velocity variance contributing to exchange. In addition to transport by the along-slope flow, possible process contributions which may be estimated include internal waves and their Stokes drift, tidal pumping, eddies and Ekman transports, in a wind-driven surface layer and in a bottom boundary layer. Overall estimates of exchange across the shelf edge here are large by global standards, several m**2/s (Sverdrups per 1000 km). However, the large majority of this exchange is in tides and other motion of comparably short period, and is only effective for water properties or contents that evolve on a time-scale of a day or less.

  12. Newbery and Caldecott Medal Books, 1966-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingman, Lee, Ed.

    The Newbery and Caldecott children's book awards for the years 1966 to 1975 are covered. A resume of the book, an excerpt, the author's acceptance speech, and a biography of the author are provided for each of the ten Newbery award books. Some also have an author's note. For the Caldecott award books there are a book summary, the artist's…

  13. The importance of sea-level research (Plinius Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    200 million people worldwide live in coastal regions less than 5 meters above sea level. By the end of the 21st century, this figure is estimated to increase to 500 million. These low-lying coastal regions are vulnerable to changes in sea level brought about by climate change, storms or earthquakes. But the historic and instrumental record is too short to fully understand the climate relationships and capture the occurrence of the rare, but most destructive events. The coastal sedimentary record provides a long-term and robust paleo perspective on the rates, magnitudes and spatial variability of sea-level rise and the frequency (recurrence interval) and magnitude of destructive events. Reconstructions of paleo sea level are important for identifying the meltwater contributions, constraining parameters in Earth-Ice models, and estimating past and present rates of spatially variable sea-level change associated glacial isostatic adjustment, sediment compaction and tidal range variability. Sea-level reconstructions capture multiple phases of climate and sea-level behavior for model calibration and provide a pre-anthropogenic background against which to compare recent trends. Pre-historic earthquakes (Mw>8.0) are often associated with abrupt and cyclical patterns of vertical land-motion that are manifest in coastal sedimentary archives as abrupt changes in relative sea level. Geologic evidence of paleoearthquakes elucidates characteristic and repeated pattern of land-level movements associated with the earthquake-deformation cycle. Tsunamis and storms leave behind anomalous and characteristic sediment that is incorporated into the coastal sedimentary record often as evidence of a high-energy event affecting a low-energy, depositional environment. Records of tsunamis developed from the sedimentary deposits they leave behind improve understanding of tsunami processes and frequency by expanding the age range of events available for study. Reconstructions of paleo storms may reveal spatial and temporal variability of tropical cyclone activity and provided insight into their relationship with global climatic changes.

  14. The Weiland Medal: Clinical Research in Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical research designed to enhance the quality of healthcare has always received a great deal of national attention. Outcomes studies, clinical trials, and evidence-based research are key components of clinical research that have advanced the field of hand surgery. The purpose of the Weiland Award is to encourage innovations and progress in clinical research in hand surgery for the betterment of patients and to promote hand surgery’s visibility in American medicine. This article will highlight my efforts in clinical research through three specific research themes: (1) outcomes research, (2) economic analysis, and (3) evidence-based research and quality assessment in healthcare. PMID:20117312

  15. 1987 William Bowie Medal to Robert N. Clayton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Julian R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    In my mind's eye I still see Bob Clayton as he was first introduced to me by Sam Epstein, nodding hello from behind an extraction line at Caltech [the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena], where he was a graduate student. After getting his degree in chemistry, Bob went to Penn State [Pennsylvania State University, University Park] for 2 years but was lured to Chicago in 1958 when Harold Urey “retired.” Bob is exceedingly conscientious and more dedicated to excellence in science than anyone I know, and he awed those who may have expected a replacement for Urey by striding along his own new and clearly blazed trails. But Bob does the very best job possible in everything he does; in research, in teaching, in administration, and in service activities, and I'm glad I won't be around to worry about the void he leaves at retirement. Incidentally, I find it awkward in his presence to say anything good about him. He does not engage in small talk and unnecessary speculation and does not express subjective opinions; I fear he will challenge these Clayton-directed judgments as subjective, irrespective of their laudatory nature.

  16. Bradford H. Hager Receives 2013 Inge Lehmann Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    2014-01-01

    Thank you, Jerry, for your very kind words. I am delighted, surprised, and honored. I have been very lucky to be in the right places at the right times and with the right people all my career. I can't think of another person blessed with as many exceptionally talented and passionate students and postdocs as well as fantastic faculty colleagues. I wish that I had the space to do each of you justice here. Thank you all.

  17. A Local Vision on Soil Hydrology (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.

    2012-04-01

    After shortly looking back to some research trails of the past decades, and touching on the role of soils in our environmental machinery, a vision on the future of soil hydrology is offered. It is local in the sense of being based on limited experience as well as in the sense of focussing on local spatial scales, from 1 m to 1 km. Cornerstones of this vision are (i) rapid developments of quantitative observation technology, illustrated with the example of ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and (ii) the availability of ever more powerful compute facilities which allow to simulate increasingly complicated model representations in unprecedented detail. Together, they open a powerful and flexible approach to the quantitative understanding of soil hydrology where two lines are fitted: (i) potentially diverse measurements of the system of interest and their analysis and (ii) a comprehensive model representation, including architecture, material properties, forcings, and potentially unknown aspects, together with the same analysis as for (i). This approach pushes traditional inversion to operate on analyses, not on the underlying state variables, and to become flexible with respect to architecture and unknown aspects. The approach will be demonstrated for simple situations at test sites.

  18. The Era of Computational Seismology (Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, Jeroen

    2013-04-01

    The quality of tomographic images of the Earth's interior and earthquake source models is closely tied to our ability to efficiently and accurately simulate 3D seismic wave propagation. For decades seismologists have used asymptotic, approximate methods to address the forward problem in seismology, namely, given a seismic source and a 3D Earth model, accurately simulate the associated wave motions. In recent years, modern numerical methods and parallel computers have facilitated fully 3D simulations of seismic wave propagation at unprecedented resolution and accuracy, heralding the age of computational seismology. The current focus is on harnessing the power of these sophisticated forward modeling tools to enhance the quality of images of the Earth's interior and the earthquake rupture process, that is, to address the inverse problem. Traditional tomographic methods utilize traveltime and dispersion information obtained by comparing data with simulations, and interpret such measurements based on ray theory or other approximate methods. Because of the limitations of these approximate techniques, only certain parts of seismograms can be used, and initial models are generally restricted to be layered or spherically symmetric. With modern numerical modeling tools we are now going well beyond classical tomography, using fully 3D initial models and utilizing as much information contained in seismograms as possible. The ultimate goal is broad band full waveform inversion utilizing entire seismograms. Surprisingly, one tomographic iteration may be performed based on just two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one calculation for the current model and a second 'adjoint' calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers as simultaneous, fictitious sources. Seismic imaging based on adjoint methods assimilates seismographic information into 3D models of elastic (seismic wavespeeds) and anelastic (quality factors) structure. These methods fully account for the physics of wave excitation, propagation, and interaction by numerically solving the inhomogeneous equations of motion for a heterogeneous anelastic solid. Such methods require the execution of complex workflows, involving extensive pre- and post-processing of observed and simulated seismograms. After successful applications of adjoint tomography in southern California and Europe, we are currently moving toward adjoint tomography of the entire planet. The objective is to image Earth's global interior based on full waveform inversion, thereby facilitating a deeper understanding of its physics and chemistry. To start with, we selected 255 earthquakes and gathered data from global seismographic networks. Our strategy is to invert for crust and mantle structure jointly, thereby avoiding any bias introduced into upper-mantle images due to commonly used 'crustal corrections'. Our ultimate aim is to harness more than 6,000 magnitude 5-7 earthquakes digitally recorded over the past 20 years.

  19. Improving the Geologic Time Scale (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradstein, Felix M.

    2010-05-01

    The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) provides the framework for the physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth. The time scale is the tool "par excellence" of the geological trade, and insight in its construction, strength, and limitations enhances its function and its utility. Earth scientists should understand how time scales are constructed and its myriad of physical and abstract data are calibrated, rather than merely using ages plucked from a convenient chart or card. Calibration to linear time of the succession of events recorded in the rocks on Earth has three components: (1) the standard stratigraphic divisions and their correlation in the global rock record, (2) the means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record, and (3) the methods of effectively joining the two scales, the stratigraphic one and the linear one. Under the auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international stratigraphic divisions and their correlative events are now largely standardized, especially using the GSSP (Global Stratigraphic Section and Point) concept. The means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record are objectives in the EARTH TIME and GTS NEXT projects, that also are educating a new generation of GTS dedicated scientists. The U/Pb, Ar/Ar and orbital tuning methods are intercalibrated, and external error analysis improved. Existing Ar/Ar ages become almost 0.5% older, and U/Pb ages stratigraphically more realistic. The new Os/Re method has potential for directly dating more GSSP's and its correlative events. Such may reduce scaling uncertainty between the sedimentary levels of an age date and that of a stage boundary. Since 1981, six successive Phanerozoic GTS have been published, each new one achieving higher resolution and more users. The next GTS is scheduled for 2011/2012, with over 50 specialists taking part. New chapters include an expanded planetary time scale, sequence stratigraphy, Osmium, Carbon and Oxygen stratigraphy, the Cryogenian period, history of the plants, hominid prehistory, and last but not least the Anthropocene. The Cambrian Period is radically improved with 10 standard stages and detailed trilobite biochronology. Ordovician now has a stable international stages and graptolites scale. The integration of a refined 100 and 400 ka sedimentary cycles scale and a truly high-resolution U/Pb ages scale for the Mississippian is a major step towards the global Carboniferous GTS. The Devonian GTS leaves to be desired with lack of firm definitions for its upper boundary, and the long Emsian stage; it also lacks age dates. Its stages scaling is disputed. The Rhaetian and Norian stages in the Triassic and the Berriasian stage in the Cretaceous urgently require lower boundary definitions, and also boundary age dates. The single ~400 ka eccentricity component is very stable and can extend orbital tuning from the Cenozoic well into the Mesozoic portion of the GTS. Jurassic and Cretaceous now have long orbitally tuned segments. A completely astronomical-tuned Geological Time Scale (AGTS) for the Cenozoic is within reach showing unprecedented accuracy, precision and resolution. Burdigalian in the Miocene, and Lutetian, Bartonian and Priabonian stages in the Eocene still require formal definition. The K/T boundary will become about 0.5 ± 0.1 Ma older. After 25 years of research and authorship in the GTS it behoves me to especially thank my colleagues James Ogg, Frits Agterberg, John McArthur and Roger Cooper for longstanding collaboration. As a final note I urge construction of more regional time scales(like developed ‘down under') calibrated to the standard global GTS, to scale regional rock units.

  20. Citation for presentation of the 2010 Alfred Treibs Award to John Volkman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Jan W.

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decades, Dr. John Volkman has established himself as a world authority on the discovery and application of biomarkers in organic geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, petroleum geochemistry and palaeoclimatology. His work has laid the foundation on which much modern biomarker research is based and his studies of lipids in microalgae, in particular, have had a considerable influence and is widely cited. He has identified many new compounds including sterols, alcohols, diols and hydrocarbons. He has written a large number of review papers which are commonly used by younger organic geochemists to become acquainted with the field and as reference work by many others. John Volkman is truly exceptional in the breadth of expertise, his ability to integrate different sub-disciplines and his openness for young organic geochemists to act as a sparring-partner in scientific discussions. John has achieved this very impressive record even though he has not been employed as a “hard-core” organic geochemist for the last two decades but has nevertheless remained active in organic geochemistry in his “free” time. In addition, John's contributions to more applied fields of research are also numerous.

  1. The Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler: Toward an Adlerian Vocational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, C. Edward, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Presents an Adlerian vocational theory with several hypotheses and corollaries regarding: (a) life style, (b) work as life task, (c) family atmosphere and relationships, and (d) early recollections. Develops predictive vocational statements and offers the resulting framework as a stimulant to generate further study of Adlerian vocational…

  2. "Gulliver's Travels" by Alfred Silver with Music by Stephen Naylor. Cue Sheet for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterfall, Milde; Flynn, Rosalind, Ed.

    Designed to be used before and after attending a musical adaptation of Jonathan's Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" (performed by the Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia), this cue sheet presents information about the performance and suggests activities that can be done with classmates, friends, or family members. Beginning with an illustration of…

  3. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry.

  4. Project Update: Alfred Kiger Savoy Elementary School Modernization and Co-Location Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    21st Century School Fund, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Savoy Elementary School Modernization and Co-Location project is designed to meet a number of important goals for Washington, D.C. Public Schools (DCPS) and the District of Columbia. It will improve the teaching and learning conditions for Savoy Elementary School so that they are in excellent condition, can support a high quality curriculum,…

  5. The Marketing of Education in a Coordinated Decentralised Context: Alfred P. Sloan Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Peter E.

    This paper argues that a useful way of analyzing the current moves to locate education within a decentralized framework of schools competing for educational consumers is to return to the founders of managerialism. In particular, this paper suggests that by returning to the point of production, the "mutilated rationality" (Habermas) of…

  6. Some species tolerate ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels lead to rising ocean acidity, which can harm corals and many other species of ocean life. Acidification causes calcium carbonate, which corals usually need to build skeletons, to dissolve. “Every day, ocean acidification is taking up the weight of 6 million midsize cars' worth of carbon, said Nina Keul, a graduate student at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Germany during a 7 December press conference at the AGU Fall Meeting. Somewhat surprising, though, is that some species are more tolerant of acidic conditions than scientists had expected. For instance, Keul exposed a species of foraminifera, Ammonia tepida, to seawater with varying acidity and varying carbonate ion concentrations. Previous studies had found that foraminifera growth declined with decreasing carbonate levels, but Keul's foraminifera continued to grow in the acidic conditions. She said that the mechanism that allows this species to tolerate the low carbonate conditions is as yet unknown.

  7. Instability Rules: The Ten Most Amazing Ideas of Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, Charles

    2002-03-01

    World-altering discoveries that reveal a universe of uncertainty and constant change Whether probing the farthest reaches of the vast universe or exploring the microscopic world of genetics and the subatomic world of quantum mechanics, Instability Rules is a remarkably informative and engaging look at ten milestone discoveries and their discoverers-a wide range of very human personalities whose insights have dramatically altered our most basic assumptions about human existence during the last century. The stories include Edwin Hubble and the expanding universe, Alfred Wegener and continental drift, Neils Bohr and quantum mechanics, Alan Turing and artificial intelligence, and James Watson and Francis Crick and DNA. Also covering discoveries of the twenty-first century that are already refining these and other ideas, Instability Rules is an exhilarating, sometimes amusing encounter with the defining scientific discoveries of our age.

  8. ESSReS-PEP, an international and interdisciplinary postgraduate education concept on Earth and Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfeld, Klaus; Lohmann, Gerrit; Ladstätter-Weißenmayer, Annette; Burrows, John

    2013-04-01

    Promoting young researchers is a major priority of the German Helmholtz Association. Since more than five years graduate and postgraduate education in the field of Earth System and Environmental Science has been established in Bremen and Bremerhaven, north-western Germany. Using the network and collaboration of experts and specialists on observational and paleoclimate data as well as on statistical data analysis and climate modelling from two Universities and the Helmholtz research institute on Polar and Marine Research, master and PhD students are trained to understand, decipher and cope with the challenges of recent climate change on an highly interdisciplinary and inter-institutional level. The existing research infrastructure at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven (AWI), University of Bremen, and Jacobs University Bremen offers a unique research environment to study past, present and future changes of the climate system, with special focus on high latitudinal processes. It covers all kind of disciplines, climate science, geosciences and biosciences, and provides a consistent framework for education and qualification of a new generation of expertly trained, internationally competitive master and PhD students. On postgraduate level, the Postgraduate Programme Environmental Physics (PEP) at the University of Bremen (www.pep.uni-bremen.de) educates the participants on the complex relationship between atmosphere, hydrosphere (ocean), cryosphere (ice region) and solid earth (land). Here, the learning of experimental methods in environmental physics at the most advanced level, numerical data analysis using supercomputers, and data interpretation via sophisticated methods prepare students for a scientific career. Within cooperation with the Ocean University of China (OUC) students are participating one year in the PEP programme during their master studies since 2006, to get finally a double degree of both universities. At the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar

  9. Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

  10. Geology of California. Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.M.; Webb, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two introductory chapters familiarize readers with basic geologic concepts. The following chapters describe the geology of each of California's 11 geomorphic provinces; the San Andreas fault and offshore geology are discussed in two separate chapters. Four appendices acquaint readers with technical words and terms, common minerals and rocks in California, geologic time, and geologic theories that pertain to California. During the 1960s evidence collected from the east Pacific sea floor off the western coast of North America gave scientists supporting data for Alfred Wegener's 1910 theory of continental drift. In addition to the confirmation of continental drift, since the 1960s scientists have discovered paleomagnetism, sea-floor spreading, exotic and suspect terranes, and polar wandering. These important concepts have had far reaching effects about how we understand the geology of California and how this region has evolved through geologic time. Improved investigative procedures enable earth scientists to comprehend previously puzzling aspects of California's geology.

  11. Operational tsunami modelling with TsunAWI - recent developments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakowsky, N.; Androsov, A.; Fuchs, A.; Harig, S.; Immerz, A.; Danilov, S.; Hiller, W.; Schröter, J.

    2013-06-01

    In this article, the tsunami model TsunAWI (Alfred Wegener Institute) and its application for hindcasts, inundation studies, and the operation of the tsunami scenario repository for the Indonesian tsunami early warning system are presented. TsunAWI was developed in the framework of the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) and simulates all stages of a tsunami from the origin and the propagation in the ocean to the arrival at the coast and the inundation on land. It solves the non-linear shallow water equations on an unstructured finite element grid that allows to change the resolution seamlessly between a coarse grid in the deep ocean and a fine representation of coastal structures. During the GITEWS project and the following maintenance phase, TsunAWI and a framework of pre- and postprocessing routines was developed step by step to provide fast computation of enhanced model physics and to deliver high quality results.

  12. Transport Pathways of Pollution Plumes into the Canadian Arctic during RACEPAC and NETCARE 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoor, P. M.; Bozem, H.; Koellner, F.; Schneider, J.; Schulz, C.; Burkart, J.; Willis, M. D.; Herber, A. B.; Borrmann, S.; Wendisch, M.; Ehrlich, A.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC and NETCARE 2014. The measurements were performed in May and July 2014 out of Inuvik and Resolute Bay with the POLAR 6 DC-3 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) and focused on cloud processes in the Canadian Arctic as well as transport processes of pollution. CO and CO2 measurements indicate that long range transport from various sources affected the arctic lower troposphere during spring /summer 2014. Whereas the high latitudes were relatively unaffected by pollution plumes from lower latitudes, the more southern parts of the arctic regions were strongly perturbed by pollution from various sources. These events are likely connected to biomass burning. We also performed measurements of local emissions from shipping, to investigate their potential to penetrate the arctic boundary layer and affect the arctic free troposphere thereby becoming part of the large scale flow.

  13. On solving the momentum equations of dynamic sea ice models with implicit solvers and the elastic-viscous-plastic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losch, Martin; Danilov, Sergey

    Experiments with idealized geometry are used to compare model solutions of implicit VP- and explicit EVP-solvers in two very different ice-ocean codes: the regular-grid, finite-volume Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) and the Alfred Wegener Institute Finite Element Ocean Model (FEOM). It is demonstrated that for both codes the obtained solutions of implicit VP-and EVP-solvers can differ significantly, because the EVP solutions tend to have smaller ice viscosities ("weaker" ice). EVP solutions tend to converge only slowly to implicit VP solutions for very small sub-cycling time steps. Variable resolution in the unstructured-grid model FEOM also affects the solution as smaller grid cell size leads to smaller viscosity in EVP solutions. Models with implicit VP-solvers can block narrow straits under certain conditions, while EVP-models are found to always allow flow as a consequence of lower viscosities.

  14. Peripheral T cell lymphoma with a high titer of proteinase-3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies that resembled Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Reiko; Tajima, Yumi; Kohata, Katsura; Yamamoto, Joji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Naruhiko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Here, we present a 54-year-old man with proptosis and swelling below the left eyelid. Laboratory findings showed high levels of PR3-ANCA and histological examination of the first biopsy revealed acute inflammation. Together with the findings of MRI, a diagnosis of WG was made. However, the disease progressed rapidly and histological examination of the second biopsy revealed infiltration of neoplastic T lymphocytes with aberrant loss of CD7. A final diagnosis of peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (WHO) was made, and complete remission was achieved by chemotherapy. This is a very rare case of T cell lymphoma with a high titer of PR3-ANCA.

  15. Th17 expansion in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's): the role of disease activity, immune regulation and therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In autoimmune diseases, IL-17 producing T-cells (Th17), a pro-inflammatory subset of T-cells, are pathophysiologically involved. There is little knowledge on the role of Th17 cells in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). In the present study, we investigated Th17 cells, Tregs and subsets of circulating Th17 cells in GPA and related results to disease activity. Methods 42 GPA patients in remission, 18 with active disease and 14 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. Th17 cells, their subsets and regulatory T-cells were determined by intracellular fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS). Data are given as mean percentage ±SD of total T-helper-cells. Results Th17 cells are expanded in active and quiescent GPA as compared to HC (1.7±1.4% vs. 0.7 ±0.3%, P = 0.006 and 1.9 ±1.5% vs. 0.7 ±0.3%, P<0.0001). Th17 expansion is stable over time and does not decline when remission is achieved. However, a negative association of Th17 cells and steroid dosage is observed (r=-0.46, P = 0.002). The Th17 expansion was not balanced by Tregs as indicated by skewed Th17/Treg ratios in active and quiescent GPA. Th17 subsets co-producing IFNγ or IL-10 are significantly increased in GPA. GPA patients in remission not receiving maintenance therapy have significantly more IL-10/IL-17A double positive T-cells than HC (0.0501 ±0.031% vs. 0.0282 ±0.016%, P = 0.007). Conclusions We provide evidence for a persistent, unbalanced expansion of Th17 cells and Th17 subsets which seems to be independent of disease activity. Maintenance therapy reduces -but does not normalize- Th17 expansion. PMID:23079279

  16. 76 FR 417 - 2011 Numismatic Products Pricing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Spouse Medal Set \\TM\\... First Spouse 1-5/16'' Bronze Medals..... 7.95 N/A 2011 First Spouse Bronze Medal Series: 19.95 N/A Four Medal Set 1-1/2'' Bronze Medals 7.95 N/A 3'' Bronze Medals 44.95 N/A 2011...

  17. A resolution commemorating Dr. Norman Borlaug, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Congressional Gold Medal, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and founder of the World Food Prize.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Harkin, Tom [D-IA

    2009-09-16

    09/16/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S9441) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. A resolution commemorating Dr. Norman Borlaug, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Congressional Gold Medal, Presidential Medal of Freedom, and founder of the World Food Prize.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Harkin, Tom [D-IA

    2009-09-17

    09/17/2009 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S9571; text as passed Senate: CR S9571; text of measure as introduced: CR S9567-9568) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. The Eye of the Storm. The Seventh Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Survey of Broadcast Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Marvin; Sklar, Zachary

    This book, the seventh in a series surveying broadcast journalism, provides behind-the-scenes details of news coverage during 1978-79, evaluating the growth and sophistication of the news media. The first section of the book discusses the treatment of major issues and news events, including the "odd couple" of politics and broadcasting,…

  20. New Horizons: Higher Education Academic Link between King Alfred's College, Winchester and the Universities of Dhaka and Khulna, Bangledesh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentki, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Explains the Higher Education Academic link, which promotes Theatre for Development in both the university and non-governmental organization sectors in Bangladesh. Highlights some of the most important and innovative issues which emerged from the link. Describes activities in the university sector which engaged students in practical workshops…