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Sample records for alfred wegener medal

  1. Greenland Expeditions by Alfred Wegener - A photographic window to past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, M.; Tschürtz, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Kranzelbinder, H.; Prügger, B.; Krause, R. A.; Kalliokoski, M.; Thórhallsdóttir, E.

    2012-04-01

    On several expeditions to Greenland, Alfred Wegener (1880-1930) took pictures on glass plates from landscapes and glaciers, the expedition equipment, the people and animals taking part on the expeditions as well as physical phenomena as dust storm, clouds or spherical light phenomena. Chronologically the plates show the Danmark Expedition 1906-1908, the crossing of Greenland expedition with stop in Iceland 1912-1913, and the German Greenland Expedition 1929-1930. Until the tragic end of the expedition in 1930, Wegener was professor at the University of Graz, and such a stock of about 300 glass plates stayed there. The aim of our work is to digitize all plates for further studies. We present a first selection of Wegener's Greenland expedition pictures. For those made at Iceland in 1912 we will present a comparison of the past with pictures from the same viewing point made in 2011.

  2. Tracing the origin of Geodynamics: The Alfred Wegener Memorial Expedition 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    2012 marked the 100st anniversary of the seminal publications on Continental Drift Theory by Alfred Wegener. These publications (and Wegener's book "On the origin of the continents", published three years later) are widely accepted to be the fundamental breakthrough that opened the path to the Theory of Plate Tectoncis and ultimately the path to modern Geodynamics some 50 years later. In the same historic year of the 1912 publications, Alfred Wegener set off for what was to become the most dramatic of his three Greenland expeditions. On this expedition Wegener and Koch crossed the entire northern icecap of Greenland. In honour of the hundreds anniversary of Wegener's publications, the Austrian Academy of Sciences funded an expedition to trace the footsteps of the 1912 expedition in the spirit of Alfred Wegener, while also conducting modern Earth Science. This expedition that was conducted in summer 2014. For the expedition, a 1952 Cessna180 was acquired in Alaska, adapted with bush wheels, wing extensions and extra tanks and was flown by the author and one of the worlds most renown bush pilots from Alaska in a 10 day effort to Greenland. There, the entire NE Greenland Caledonides were covered and photographed. Field work for a masters projects was conducted and samples were collected from a series of some of the most remote locations in the Caledonides ever visited. Most spectacularly, the original sled of Wegeners 1912 expedition was found some 30 kilometers from its expected location in the Dove Bugt Region of northeastern Greenland.

  3. Wetting Front Instability in Porous Media (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, Jean-Yves

    2010-05-01

    Normal porous media, like soils, exhibit liquid flow instabilities that are very different from what is observed in a Hele-Shaw cell. Unfortunately, the latter is often used as the basis of our understanding in the case of soils. In Hele-Shaw cells, the instability is less developed and shows as "fingers" merging into a hand. On the other hand, in a soil, the "fingers" are replaced by "columns" that remain distinct. With fingers, surface tension enters Laplace's equation through the radius of the saturated tip, whereas with columns, it is not the diameter of the column but the much smaller pore radii which are relevant. At present, the phenomenon is fairly well understood: With fingers, the liquid viscosity is often important and hysteresis is not; with columns the opposite usually holds. In nature, columns tend to remain at the same position in the soil. This persistence is responsible for rapid water and solute transport with potential pollution of ground water. As the column enters the soil, its tip consists of a narrow wetting zone followed by drainage. Both the drainage profile and the lateral diffusion of water are well described by Richards' equation. Lateral diffusion eventually stops because of hysteresis, maintaining columns of constant width which do not merge into a hand. The wet zone cannot be described by Richards' equation as the wetting requires understanding of the flow at the pore scale, i.e., solving the Navier-Stokes equations, leading to a Hoffman-Tanner type of flow behavior.

  4. Why turbulence dominates the atmosphere and hydrosphere? (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    It is widely recognised that in very stable stratifications, at Richardson numbers (Ri) exceeding the critical value Ric ~ 0.25, turbulence inevitably decays and the flow becomes laminar. This is so, indeed, in the low-Reynolds-number (Re) flows, e.g., in some laboratory experiments; but this is by no means always the case. Air flows in the free atmosphere and water currents in deep ocean are almost always turbulent in spite of the strongly supercritical stratifications, with typical values of Ri varying in the interval 10 < Ri < 102. Until recently, this paradox has remained unexplained. We demonstrate that the key mechanism of the seemingly paradoxical self-preservation of the very-high-Re geophysical turbulence as a loop including (i) conversion of the turbulent kinetic unto potential energy and (ii) self-control of the negative (down-gradient) turbulent heat flux through efficient generation of the positive (counter-gradient) heat transfer by the turbulent potential energy (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008, 2009, 2013). Thanks to this loop, turbulence is maintained in supercritical stratifications and, moreover, at Ri > Ric the familiar 'strong-mixing turbulence' regime, typical of boundary-layer flows and characterised by the practically invariable turbulent Prandtl number PrT ~ 1 (the so-called 'Reynolds analogy'), gives way to a previously unknown 'wave-like turbulence' regime, wherein PrT sharply increases with increasing Ri (rather than to the laminar regime as is often the case in lab experiments). It is precisely the wave-like turbulence that dominates the free flows in the atmosphere and ocean. Modellers have long been aware that the turbulent heat transfer in the free atmosphere/ocean is much weaker than the momentum transfer. Our theory gives authentic formulation for this heuristic rule and provides physically grounded method for modelling geophysical turbulence up to very stable startifications.

  5. The three lost millennia of the last deglaciation (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Edouard

    2013-04-01

    Looking back more than thirty years, climate history over the last period of deglaciation was seen to portray a smooth transition between the last glacial maximum (LGM) centered around 18,000 years ago (based on radiocarbon), and the beginning of the Holocene at about 10,000 years before present. At that time, the renowned CLIMAP group used the stratigraphy available to reconstruct the glacial world by averaging paleothermometric data over a wide time window, ranging between at least 14,000 and 24,000 yr BP, over which period climate was assumed to be rather stable. Even if northern European pollen records showed several phases of vegetation shift, the exact duration and spatial coverage of these shifts was unknown and their climatic significance was not well-enough understood to be separated from other biological effects, such as plant migration following ice-sheet demise. Significant progress came from mass spectrometry developments applied to isotope geochronology in the mid- and late- 1980s. This allowed the precise analysis of radiocarbon on small samples such as foraminifera in marine sediments and enabled the measurement of U-Th ages for accurate dating of corals and speleothems. These technological improvements permitted meaningful comparisons between proxy records from the various archives originating from all latitudes and longitudes. Today, it is clear that the old LGM time window corresponds to a period of more than ten millennia during which there was significant climate variability, including a prominent cooling event at the beginning of the deglaciation. This cooling event is known as the 'Oldest Dryas' by palynologists, as 'Heinrich Event #1' (H1) by paleoceanographers, and has even been dubbed the 'Mystery Interval' by prominent authors as they puzzled while attempting to synthesize and interpret its records. The H1 drastic cooling, attributed to a pulse-like injection of ice and meltwater into the North Atlantic, was first evidenced in 1987 in sediments from the Iberian Margin. Three years later, significant improvements of the radiocarbon calibration demonstrated that about three millennia were missing from the deglaciation record. Accordingly, the LGM mean age was pushed from 18,000 to 21,000 yr BP, the midpoint of H1 was shifted from 13,500 to 16,000 yr BP, and the beginning of the Holocene was repositioned at about 11,500 yr BP. This new climate chronology was subsequently confirmed by counting 'cryovarves' within the GRIP and GISP2 Greenland ice cores. These studies have since been complemented by many other records from polar ice, marine and lacustrine sediments and cave speleothems. In addition to extending the chronology by three additional millennia, improvement also arose from the quality of the new geological archives. These archives have allowed studies at much higher resolution than was previously achieved in the framework of CLIMAP, which included many records based on deep-sea cores characterized by low sedimentation rate, and thus very susceptible to smoothing processes such as bioturbation. In addition, analytical geochemistry has only recently provided techniques adapted to the production of high-resolution time series of various proxies based on elemental ratios, on organic compounds or on stable and radiogenic isotopes. More than a dozen years after the H1 discovery, the same Iberian Margin sediments were used to show that H1 comprised at least two phases, H1a and H1b, based on ice rafted debris (IRD) and other proxies. It is now recognized that the entire H1 event (H1 sensu lato) is a three millennia-long period (ca. 17,500 to 14,500 yr BP). To illustrate the progress in this research field, I will review the key records that can be used to document the complex nature of this episode. The H1 (s.l.) included several phases of intense cooling, of precipitation changes - notably at low latitudes and in the Asian monsoon area, of retreat and decay of glacial ice-sheets - as evidenced in sediments collected in river mouths, and of sea-level rise as recorded in corals from Tahiti and Barb

  6. The three lost millennia of the last deglaciation (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Edouard

    2013-04-01

    Looking back more than thirty years, climate history over the last period of deglaciation was seen to portray a smooth transition between the last glacial maximum (LGM) centered around 18,000 years ago (based on radiocarbon), and the beginning of the Holocene at about 10,000 years before present. At that time, the renowned CLIMAP group used the stratigraphy available to reconstruct the glacial world by averaging paleothermometric data over a wide time window, ranging between at least 14,000 and 24,000 yr BP, over which period climate was assumed to be rather stable. Even if northern European pollen records showed several phases of vegetation shift, the exact duration and spatial coverage of these shifts was unknown and their climatic significance was not well-enough understood to be separated from other biological effects, such as plant migration following ice-sheet demise. Significant progress came from mass spectrometry developments applied to isotope geochronology in the mid- and late- 1980s. This allowed the precise analysis of radiocarbon on small samples such as foraminifera in marine sediments and enabled the measurement of U-Th ages for accurate dating of corals and speleothems. These technological improvements permitted meaningful comparisons between proxy records from the various archives originating from all latitudes and longitudes. Today, it is clear that the old LGM time window corresponds to a period of more than ten millennia during which there was significant climate variability, including a prominent cooling event at the beginning of the deglaciation. This cooling event is known as the 'Oldest Dryas' by palynologists, as 'Heinrich Event #1' (H1) by paleoceanographers, and has even been dubbed the 'Mystery Interval' by prominent authors as they puzzled while attempting to synthesize and interpret its records. The H1 drastic cooling, attributed to a pulse-like injection of ice and meltwater into the North Atlantic, was first evidenced in 1987 in sediments from the Iberian Margin. Three years later, significant improvements of the radiocarbon calibration demonstrated that about three millennia were missing from the deglaciation record. Accordingly, the LGM mean age was pushed from 18,000 to 21,000 yr BP, the midpoint of H1 was shifted from 13,500 to 16,000 yr BP, and the beginning of the Holocene was repositioned at about 11,500 yr BP. This new climate chronology was subsequently confirmed by counting 'cryovarves' within the GRIP and GISP2 Greenland ice cores. These studies have since been complemented by many other records from polar ice, marine and lacustrine sediments and cave speleothems. In addition to extending the chronology by three additional millennia, improvement also arose from the quality of the new geological archives. These archives have allowed studies at much higher resolution than was previously achieved in the framework of CLIMAP, which included many records based on deep-sea cores characterized by low sedimentation rate, and thus very susceptible to smoothing processes such as bioturbation. In addition, analytical geochemistry has only recently provided techniques adapted to the production of high-resolution time series of various proxies based on elemental ratios, on organic compounds or on stable and radiogenic isotopes. More than a dozen years after the H1 discovery, the same Iberian Margin sediments were used to show that H1 comprised at least two phases, H1a and H1b, based on ice rafted debris (IRD) and other proxies. It is now recognized that the entire H1 event (H1 sensu lato) is a three millennia-long period (ca. 17,500 to 14,500 yr BP). To illustrate the progress in this research field, I will review the key records that can be used to document the complex nature of this episode. The H1 (s.l.) included several phases of intense cooling, of precipitation changes - notably at low latitudes and in the Asian monsoon area, of retreat and decay of glacial ice-sheets - as evidenced in sediments collected in river mouths, and of sea-level rise as recorded in corals from Tahiti and Barbados. Various isotopic proxies of deep-sea ventilation have been used to identify variations during the H1 sub-phases of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC), indicating that ocean heat transport was involved in the observed climate fluctuations. The various records documenting different climate parameters at many locations over the Earth can also be used in meaningful comparison with numerical model simulations performed in a transient mode. Collectively, these works allow to estimate the phase relationships between the causes (insolation and the greenhouse effect) and the often abrupt responses of the various components of the climate system, such as the atmosphere, oceans and ice sheets. Although these studies concern a naturally-occurring global warming that took place over a long time period, useful parallels will be drawn with the evolution of modern climate. In fact, the phase relationships between forcings (such as greenhouse gases and solar input) and changes in regional and global temperatures are also at the heart of modern global climate change. As for early deglaciation, the ocean can modulate warming regionally, thereby delaying, or even temporarily masking, long-term changes. Climate changes over the last century have been smaller in magnitude than those of the last deglaciation. Fortunately for us, there has been no recent collapse of gigantic ice masses such as the Laurentian and Fennoscandian ice sheets. However, most climate models show a 20 to 40% reduction of the MOC during the 21st century. Even if this change exerts only a minor influence on the projected magnitude of global warming, such a slowdown in ocean circulation change is generally sufficient to reduce the simulated warming over the North Atlantic with a resulting impact on adjacent continents, including Europe.

  7. The Complex Physics of Climate Change and Climate Sensitivity: A Grand Unification (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghil, M.

    2012-04-01

    Recent estimates of climate evolution over the coming century still differ by several degrees. This uncertainty motivates in part the work presented in this lecture. The complex physics of climate change arises from the large number of components of the climate system, as well as from the wealth of processes occurring in each of the components and across them. This complexity has given rise to countless attempts to model each component and process, as well as to two overarching approaches to apprehend the complexity as a whole: deterministically nonlinear and stochastically linear. Call them the Ed Lorenz and the Klaus Hasselmann approach, respectively, for short. We propose a "grand unification" of these two approaches that relies on the theory of random dynamical systems (RDS). In particular, we apply this theory to the problem of climate sensitivity, and study the random attractors of nonlinear, stochastically perturbed systems, as well as the time-dependent probability densities associated with these attractors. The random attractors so obtained are visually spectacular objects that generalize the strange attractors of the Lorenz approach. Results are presented for several simple climate models, from the classical Lorenz convection model to El Nino-Southern Oscillation models. Their attractors carry probability densities with nice physical properties. Implications of these properties for climate predictability on interannual and decadal time scales are discussed. The RDS setting allows one to examine the interaction of internal climate variability with the forcing, whether natural or anthropogenic, and to provide a definition of climate sensitivity that takes into account the climate system's non-equilibrium behavior. Such a definition is of the essence in studying systematically the sensitivity of global climate models (GCMs) to the uncertainties in tens of semi-empirical parameters; it is given here in terms of the response of the appropriate probability densities to changes in the parameters and compared with numerical results for a somewhat simplified GCM. This lecture is the result of recent collaborations with M. D. Chekroun, D. Kondrashov, J. C. McWilliams, J. D. Neelin, E. Simonnet, S. Wang, and I. Zaliapin; more broadly, it represents the fruition of all I learned from tens of Ph. D. students, post-docs and other colleagues over the years.

  8. The Challenges of Developing a Framework for Global Water Cycle Monitoring and Prediction (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Eric F.

    2014-05-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Water Strategy ("From Observations to Decisions") recognizes that "water is essential for ensuring food and energy security, for facilitating poverty reduction and health security, and for the maintenance of ecosystems and biodiversity", and that water cycle data and observations are critical for improved water management and water security - especially in less developed regions. The GEOSS Water Strategy has articulated a number of goals for improved water management, including flood and drought preparedness, that include: (i) facilitating the use of Earth Observations for water cycle observations; (ii) facilitating the acquisition, processing, and distribution of data products needed for effective management; (iii) providing expertise, information systems, and datasets to the global, regional, and national water communities. There are several challenges that must be met to advance our capability to provide near real-time water cycle monitoring, early warning of hydrological hazards (floods and droughts) and risk assessment under climate change, regionally and globally. Current approaches to monitoring and predicting hydrological hazards are limited in many parts of the world, and especially in developing countries where national capacity is limited and monitoring networks are inadequate. This presentation describes the developments at Princeton University towards a seamless monitoring and prediction framework at all time scales that allows for consistent assessment of water variability from historic to current conditions, and from seasonal and decadal predictions to climate change projections. At the center of the framework is an experimental, global water cycle monitoring and seasonal forecast system that has evolved out of regional and continental systems for the US and Africa. The system is based on land surface hydrological modeling that is driven by satellite remote sensing precipitation to predict current hydrological conditions, flood potential and the state of drought. Seasonal climate model forecasts are downscaled and bias-corrected to drive the land surface model to provide hydrological forecasts and drought products out 6-9 months. The system relies on historic reconstructions of water variability over the 20th century, which forms the background climatology to which current conditions can be assessed. Future changes in water availability and drought risk are quantified based on bias-corrected and downscaled climate model projections that are used to drive the land surface models. For regions with lack of on-the-ground data we are field-testing low-cost environmental sensors and along with new satellite products for terrestrial hydrology and vegetation, integrating these into the system for improved monitoring and prediction. At every step there are scientific challenges whose solutions are only partially being solved. In addition there are challenges in delivering such systems as "climate services", especially to societies with low technical capacity such as rural agriculturalists in sub-Saharan Africa, but whose needs for such information are great. We provide an overview of the system and some examples of real-world applications to flood and drought events, with a focus on Africa.

  9. Pregnancy complicating Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Soh, May Ching; Hart, Hamish H; Bass, Eileen; Wilkinson, Lucille

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy associated with Wegener's granulomatosis is rare. Therapeutic options are limited. There is a paucity of published literature to guide clinical decision-making in these complex patients. Two cases are presented. Firstly, a 33-year-old woman with generalized Wegener's in remission and off all medications presented with a flare in the third trimester with haemoptysis, raised C-reactive protein and c-anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (c-ANCA) levels. Her care was complicated by florid steroid-induced psychosis. With deteriorating disease control, she was treated with pulsed-intravenous cyclophosphamide with a good response. She delivered a healthy baby at 38 weeks. She had a severe postpartum flare. Secondly, a 37-year-old woman with limited Wegener's in remission for the last two years and off all treatment became pregnant after pre-conception counselling. A normal baby was delivered at term. An exhaustive review of all published literature on Wegener's activity in pregnancy is presented along with therapeutic options and recommendations.

  10. The Wegener Memorial Expedition to the Greenland Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt; Piller, Werner

    2014-05-01

    2012 marked the 100 anniversary of the publication of Alfred Wegeners book: 'Die Entstehung der Kontinente' - which is often hailed as the discovery of continental drift theory in the advent of plate tectonics. Wegener was later appointed as professor for geophysics at the University of Graz in Austria - in part for this discovery. He held this position until his death in Greenland in 1930. In honor of the hundredth anniversary of the 1912 milestone publication, the University of Graz in Austria stages an expedition to Greenland in the spirit of Alfred Wegener, supported by the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The expedition aims predominantly to unravel secrets of the Caledonides of Northeastern Greenland using an extensive sampling program to some of the least explored corners of the orogenic belt. Particular emphasis will be placed on the Hager Bjerg allochthon and its relationship to the hanging wall and footwall units. The expedition will use the unparalleled flexibility of small aircraft that will be piloted by experienced Alaskan bush pilots and brought to Greenland from Alaska for this purpose.

  11. President Reagan Presents Medals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    President Ronald Reagan presents astronaut John Young with the Congressional Space Medal of Honor as well as NASA's Distinguished Service Medal. Astronaut Robert C. Crippen also received the Distinguished Service Medal and Dr. Alan Lovelace was presented with the President's Citizens Medal. From left to right: President Ronald Reagan Astronaut, John Young Astronaut, Robert Crippen Dr. Alan Lovelace Vice President George Bush

  12. The Canonical Alfred Hitchcock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Alfred Hitchcock is a major figure of popular culture. He was one of the founding fathers of the cinematic art and, together with Eisenstein and Murnau, helped define its visual language. So fruitful was he that a single film could spawn an entire genre, as "Psycho" helped create the modern horror film and "North by Northwest" the style and tone…

  13. [Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis].

    PubMed

    Pagnoux, Christian

    2008-03-15

    Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis are among the main systemic necrotizing vasculitides predominantly affecting small vessels. Their prevalences range from 24 to 157 cases per million inhabitants. Mean age at onset is usually 40 to 60 years old. Most common and suggestive features of Wegener's granulomatosis are upper (sinusitis, crusting rhinitis, saddle nose deformity, otitis media) and lower (excavated lung nodules, alveolar hemorrhage) respiratory tract, and kidney involvements. Alveolar hemorrhage and crescentic necrotizing glomerulonephritis are also characteristic manifestations of microscopic polyangiitis. Mononeuritis multiplex and necrotic purpura are frequent symptoms in both diseases. Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) directed against proteinase 3 can be found in the serum of 90% of the patients with diffuse forms of Wegener's granulomatosis, whereas ANCA with anti-myeloperoxidase specificity, whose pathogenic role is now well documented, can be detected in more than 60% of those with microscopic polyangiitis. Histologically, Wegener's granulomatosis can be differentiated from its counterpart when the inflammatory infiltrates have a granulomatous pattern. Therapy relies on the combination of corticosteroids and pulse intravenous cyclophosphamide, which can be switched, as soon as remission is achieved, to azathioprine or methotrexate, for a total duration of treatment of at least 18 months. Ten-year survival rate now exceeds 80%, but relapses are frequent. The precise place of new biologics, such as rituximab, needs to be further defined. PMID:18524109

  14. Cardiac involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Goodfield, N. E.; Bhandari, S.; Plant, W. D.; Morley-Davies, A.; Sutherland, G. R.

    1995-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. The protean clinical presentations depend on the organ(s) involved and the degree of progression from a local to a systemic arteritis. The development of serological tests (antieutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) allows easier diagnosis of a disease whose incidence is increasing. This is particularly helpful where the presentation is not classic--for example "overlap syndromes"--or where the disease presents early in a more localised form. This is true of cardiac involvement, which is traditionally believed to be rare, but may not be as uncommon as has hitherto been thought (< or = 44%). This involvement may be subclinical or the principal source of symptoms either in the form of localised disease or as part of a systemic illness. Pericarditis, arteritis, myocarditis, valvulitis, and arrhythmias are all recognised. Wegener's granulomatosis should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of any non-specific illness with cardiac involvement. This includes culture negative endocarditis, because Wegener's granulomatosis can produce systemic upset with mass lesions and vasculitis. Echocardiography and particularly transoesophageal echocardiography can easily identify and delineate cardiac and proximal aortic involvement and may also be used to assess response to treatment. Images PMID:7696016

  15. Anders receives Hess Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Anders, Edward

    Edward Anders was awarded the Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony on May 31 in Baltimore. The Hess Medal recognizes outstanding achievements in research in the constitution and evolution of Earth and its sister planets. The award citation and Anders' response are given here.

  16. Bruce Medalist Profile - Fowler, Alfred

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    1995-09-01

    Alfred Fowler was to stars what Scotland Yard is to criminals. In his laboratory, spectra became a way to fingerprint stars and deduce their composition. Yet for years Fowler's efforts went unrecognized, because his boss took the credit.

  17. Wegener Granulomatosis: Otologic Manifestation as First Symptom

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Carla Fabiane da; Polanski, Jose Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wegener granulomatosis is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized vessels of the upper and lower respiratory tract and kidneys. Objective To describe a case of Wegener disease with atypical manifestation. Resumed Report We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman with chronic otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss as the primary symptoms, without other manifestations. Conclusion In cases of acute ear manifestations with or without hearing loss and with poor response to usual treatments, Wegener granulomatosis should be included among the possible etiologies. After adequate diagnoses and treatment of this rare disease, there was favorable evolution. PMID:26157503

  18. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Newbery Medal acceptance speech of Russell Freedman, writer of children's nonfiction. Discusses the place of nonfiction in the world of children's literature, the evolution of children's biographies, and the author's work on "Lincoln." (ARH)

  19. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of Ms. Cleary's Newbery medal acceptance speech in which she gives personal history concerning her development as a writer and her response to the letters she receives from children. (CRH)

  20. Caldecott Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provensen, Alice; Provensen, Martin

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of the Provensens' Caldecott medal acceptance speech in which they describe their early interest in libraries and literature, the collaborative aspect of their work, and their current interest in aviation. (CRH)

  1. ATS Presents Two Silver Medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambleton, Robert

    At the ATS convention at Bath, England, two medals were awarded. The Hans Lippershey medal was awarded to Dr. Henry C. King for The History of the Telescope. The Issac Newton medal was awarded to Robert Hambleton for his dedication to publishing the ATS Journal.

  2. National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    The nation's highest honor for American scientists and engineers, the National Medal of Science is awarded annually by the president of the United States to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to or for the total impact of their work on the current state of chemical, physical, biological, social or behavioral sciences; mathematics; or engineering. Anyone can submit a nomination. Submit a short description of the nominee's contribution and three letters of support to http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/medal.jsp by 1 May 2014.

  3. Tracheal Stenosis Because of Wegener Granulomatosis Misdiagnosed as Asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Hear, Kelley E; Ingrande, Jerry; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M; Sung, Chih-Kwang

    2016-05-15

    We describe a patient with Wegener granulomatosis whose complaint of wheezing was incorrectly attributed to asthma. Anesthesiologists must recognize that tracheal stenosis is extremely common in Wegener granulomatosis and can mimic other causes of wheezing. PMID:27075424

  4. National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nineteen scientists and engineers were awarded the nation's highest scientific honor, the National Medal of Science, by President Ronald Reagan in late February in a ceremony held in the East Room of the White House. Among the recipients were two AGU members.

  5. Dalgarno receives Fleming Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Michael B.; Dalgarno, Alexander

    The John Adam Fleming Medal, given for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, and related sciences, was presented to Alexander Dalgarno at the AGU Spring Meeting Honor Ceremony on May 31 in Baltimore. The award citation and Dalgarno's response are given here.

  6. Dessler receives Fleming Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Thomas W.; Dessler, Alex

    Alexander J. Dessler was presented with the John Adam Fleming Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore last May. The award recognizes original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, and related sciences. The citation was delivered by Thomas W. Hill.

  7. Fuselier receives Macelwane Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Edward G.; Fuselier, Stephen A.

    The 1995 James B. Macelwane Medal, given by AGU for significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability, was presented to Stephen A. Fuselier at the AGU Fall Meeting Honor Ceremony on December 13, 1995, in San Francisco. The award citation and Fuselier's response are given here.On behalf of Don Gurnett and the other distinguished members of AGU who supported this nomination, it is a privilege and a pleasure to introduce one of this year's James B. Macelwane Medal recipients, Stephen A. Fuselier of the Lockheed Martin Palo Alto Research Laboratory. Fuselier has established himself as an exceptional young scientist through the broad range of significant contributions that he has already made to space plasma physics.

  8. Langley Medal awarded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Robert Thomas Jones, senior scientist at the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif., was awarded the distinguished Langley Medal by the Smithsonian Institution for his ‘extensive contributions in theoretical aerodynamics, particularly with regard to development of the swept wing, supersonic area rule and, more recently, the oblique wing.’ Jones is an internationally acclaimed expert on aerodynamics, optics, and biomechanics as well as an applied mathematician, astronomer, inventor, author, and violin maker.The Langley award has been given to just 16 recipients since it was established 73 years ago. Past recipients include Wilbur and Orville Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Richard Byrd. Named for Samuel Pierpont Langley, aeronautical pioneer and third secretary of the Smithsonian, the medal honors ‘especially meritorious investigations in the field of aerospace science.’

  9. 58. Photographic copy of historic medal, The Yellow Fever Medal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. Photographic copy of historic medal, The Yellow Fever Medal, presented to the Portsmouth Naval Hospital by the Town Council of Portsmouth, 1856. (Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Museum, Portsmouth, VA) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Hospital Building, Rixey Place, bounded by Williamson Drive, Holcomb Road, & The Circle, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  10. Fukushima to receive Smith Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 1990 Waldo E. Smith Medal for extraordinary service to geophysics will be given to Naoshi Fukushima, who earned an international reputation for his pioneering work in geomagnetic disturbance and ionospheric electric currents. Now retired from the University of Tokyo, Japan, Fukushima is being cited for his public service to international geophysics, and, in particular, his contributions to the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy, of which he was Secretary General from September 1975 to August 1983.The Smith Medal will be presented as part of the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Night festivities, Wednesday, December 5, in San Francisco, Calif. Three James B. Macelwane Medals, the John Adam Fleming Medal, and the Maurice Ewing Medal will also be presented (see Eos, February 20, 1990, p. 294).

  11. Paranasal sinus obliteration in Wegener granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Roberts, R.L.; Fauci, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The authors report 14 cases of Wegener granulomatosis in which one or more paranasal sinuses were obliterated by bone. The maxillary antra were involved in all cases, with the other sinuses being affected less frequently. These changes are thought to result from chronic bacterial sinusitis superimposed on the granulomatous vasculitic process. Computed tomography dramatically demonstrated the bone changes, consisting of a combination of sinus wall thickening and trabeculated new bone formation within the sinuses.

  12. 75 FR 14257 - Pricing for Bronze Medals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    .... ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price of the 1\\5/16\\- inch bronze medals, 1\\1/2\\-inch bronze medals and three-inch bronze medals. Beginning March 25, 2010, the 1\\5/16\\-inch bronze medals will be priced at $5.50 each; 1\\1/2\\-inch bronze medals will be priced at $6.00...

  13. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  14. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  15. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  16. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  17. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  18. Wegener's Granulomatosis: Are We Still Missing It?

    PubMed

    Adiody, Supriya; Gopinathan, V P; George, Edwin J

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old female who was mis-diagnosed as a smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis and advised standard antituberculosis treatment. She later presented with clinio-radiological worsening and thrombosis of superficial veins of the lower extremity. Cytoplasmic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and computed tomography-guided lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis. The rare association of superficial vein thrombosis with lung manifestation is highlighted here as also the need for a high index of clinical suspicion to avoid a missed or delayed diagnosis. PMID:26591976

  19. 1983 Maurice Ewing Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shor, George G., Jr.; Spiess, Fred Noel

    The Maurice Ewing Medal is presented jointly by the U.S. Navy and AGU for significant contributions to one or more of the following areas: the understanding of physical, geophysical, and geological processes in the ocean; significant original contributions to scientific ocean engineering, technology, and instrumentation; and outstanding service to marine sciences. Fred Noel Spiess has done all of these things superlatively.If one is to work successfully in the oceans, it is useful (although not strictly necessary) to enjoy being at sea—Samuel Johnson, Charles Darwin and Lord Nelson notwithstanding. Fred Spiess combines this enjoyment of seagoing with a logical nature that leads him to the physical heart of a problem, an inventiveness that makes it natural to develop the tools that he needs when they don't exist, an ability to work well with others in a wide variety of disciplines, and leadership that persuades others to work on significant problems.

  20. Diagnostic consideration for sinonasal Wegener's granulomatosis clinically mistaken for carcinoma.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Cristina; Emmanuele, Carmela; Tranchina, Maria Grazia; Ippolito, Massimo; Cosentino, Sebastiano; Saita, Vincenzo; Improta, Giuseppina; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Wegener's granulomatosis clinically mistaken for carcinoma in a 21-year-old girl presenting with an ulcerated mass of the nasopharynx associated with enlarged laterocervical nodes. The lesion was clinically suspected as malignant on the basis of clinical and radiological findings (namely, computed tomography scan and positron emission tomography). However, multiple biopsies were not conclusive for malignancy showing histological change suggestive of Wegener's granulomatosis. A serum determination of cANCA supported the diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis. Clinical findings and image studies suggested an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy whereas a definitive diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis was achieved only after repeated biopsies thus leading to a correct therapeutic approach. The Wegener granulomatosis must be added to the list of the differential diagnoses of the masses of the nasopharynx associated with or without enlarged laterocervical nodes. PMID:24106630

  1. Alfred Russel Wallace deserves better.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David; Wimpenny, Julian; Venables, Alfred

    2010-09-01

    During 2009, while we were celebrating Charles Darwin and his The origin of species, sadly, little was said about the critical contribution of Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) to the development of the theory of evolution. Like Darwin, he was a truly remarkable nineteenth century intellect and polymath and, according to a recent book by Roy Davies (The Darwin conspiracy: origins of a scientific crime), he has a stronger claim to the Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection than has Darwin. Here we present a critical comparison between the contributions of the two scientists. Sometimes referred to as 'The other beetle-hunter' and largely neglected for many decades, Wallace had a far greater experience of collecting and investigating animals and plants from their native habitats than had Darwin. He was furthermore much more than a pioneer biogeographer and evolutionary theorist, and also made contributions to anthropology, ethnography, geology, land reform and social issues. However, being a more modest, self-deprecating man than Darwin, and lacking the latter's establishment connections, Wallace's contribution to the theory of evolution was not given the recognition it deserved and he was undoubtedly shabbily treated at the time. It is time that Wallace's relationship with Darwin is reconsidered in preparation for 2013, the centenary of Wallace's death, and he should be recognized as at least an equal in the Wallace-Darwin theory of evolution. PMID:20826943

  2. Knauss Receives 2006 Waldo E. Smith Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrad, Richard W.; Knauss, John A.

    2007-01-01

    John A. Knauss was awarded the Waldo E. Smith Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting honors ceremony, which was held on 13 December 2006 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal recognizes extraordinary service to geophysics.

  3. Indian Peace Medals in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prucha, Francis Paul

    Silver medals played an important role in American Indian policy for more than a century. Following a practice of the French, Spanish, and British in the New World, the United States government presented Indian peace medals to important chiefs and warriors as symbols of attachment to the new nation. In addition, the medals were marks of rank…

  4. RAS Awards and Prizes: RAS Awards 2009; Gold Medal: Prof. David Williams; Gold Medal: Prof. Eric Priest; Price Medal: Prof. Malcolm Sambridge; Eddington Medal: Prof. James Pringle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    Each year the RAS recognizes outstanding achievement in astronomy and geophysics by the award of medals and prizes. Candidates are nominated by Fellows and the awards made by a committee of Fellows, ensuring that these scientists have earned the respect and admiration of their peers in the research community. The Gold Medal for Astronomy is awarded to Prof. David Williams of University College London. The Gold Medal for Geophysics is awarded to Prof. Eric Priest of the University of St Andrews. The Price Medal is awarded to Prof. Malcolm Sambridge of the Australian National University. The Eddington Medal is given to Prof. James Pringle of the University of Cambridge.

  5. Alfred North Whitehead: Plato's Lost Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Joseph Gerard

    1978-01-01

    The author reminisces about a course, Philosophy 3b at Harvard, taught by Alfred North Whitehead in 1934, where Whitehead moved from meditations on Plato, Epicurus, and Descartes to his own metaphysical speculations. He also discusses other philosophers at Harvard, calling the 1930s the Silver Age of the Harvard Philosophy Department. (KC)

  6. [GRANULOMATOSIS WITH POLYANGIITIS (WEGENER'S): CLINICAL CASE].

    PubMed

    Zimba, E; Olkhova, O

    2016-05-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's disease) - systemic vasculitis, initial manifestations, the clinical picture may be present in a wide variety. This leads to difficulties in establishing a timely diagnosis. The prognosis in untreated generalized granulomatosis with polyangiitis is extremely poor. The present case report illustrates a late diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. A 53-year-old woman was diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis only after ten months of onset of disease. Wrong diagnosis of tuberculosis of ear leads to a lot of delay in the treatment this type of vasculitis. At the time of diagnosis she had generalized form of disease presented with involvement of the eyes, upper and lower respiratory tracts, kidneys, and nervous system. Remission was achieved with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide but suffered a relapse shortly afterwards. Further treatment with rituximab achieved a second remission, but the patient continued to suffer from dry conjunctivitis. Symptomatic therapy in this case was ineffective. An effective pathogenic therapy for this condition was instillation of cyclosporine eye drops. PMID:27348166

  7. Tracheobronchial Stenoses in Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's)

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Charlotte; Charles, Pierre; Terrier, Benjamin; Bussonne, Guillaume; Cohen, Pascal; Pagnoux, Christian; Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François; Guillevin, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tracheobronchial stenoses (TBSs) are potentially severe manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA) that usually respond poorly to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents. We describe 26 GPA patients with ≥1 tracheal (mainly subglottic, SGS) and/or bronchial stenosis(ses) (BS(s)). Sixteen patients had solitary SGS and 10 had ≥1 BS(s). The male/female sex ratio was 9:17, and the median age at GPA diagnosis was 32 years (3:13 and 28 years, respectively, for SGS patients). Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies were proteinase 3-positive in 65.5% of the patients (50% of those with SGS). Despite conventional GPA therapy, 62% patients experienced ≥1 stenosis relapse(s) (81% of SGS patients, for a total of 1–8 relapses per patient). None of the several systemic or endoscopic treatments prevented future relapses. Cyclophosphamide induction therapy was effective in 4/6 patients with BS(s) and in 1 patient with SGS among the 7 treated. After many relapses, rituximab achieved remission in 3/4 SGS patients. Endoscopic treatments (dilation, laser, corticosteroid injection, etc.) had only transient efficacy. Other GPA manifestations relapsed independently of TBSs. One SGS patient died of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Our findings confirmed that TBSs are severe GPA manifestations that evolve independently of other organ involvements and do not respond to conventional systemic regimens. As previously described, our population was younger and comprised more females than usual GPA patients, especially those with SGS. The small number of patients and the wide variety of local and systemic treatments prevent us from drawing definitive conclusions about the contribution of each procedure. However, cyclophosphamide seemed to effectively treat BSs, but not SGS, and rituximab may be of interest for SGS management. PMID:26266344

  8. William Alfred Fowler (1911-1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1996-01-01

    The scientific career of W. A. Fowler enduringly enriched astronomy by providing us with a systematic treatment of nuclear reaction rates in stars. I clarify how and why this achievement earned him both the 1979 Bruce Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and the 1983 Nobel Prize in physics (jointly with S. Chandrasekhar). I attempt to share my understanding and experience of this great man, what he was like personally, and the larger context of his life. (SECTION: Obituary)

  9. Two cases of refractory Wegener's granulomatosis successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Naoto; Matsudaira, Ran; Hirashima, Mika; Ikeda, Makoto; Tajima, Michiko; Nawata, Masuyuki; Morimoto, Shinji; Kaneda, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeto; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    2007-01-01

    Conventional therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis, steroid and cyclophosphamide, fails to control disease activity in some refractory patients and has treatment-related toxicity. B cell depletion therapy using rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been shown to be effective for certain autoimmune diseases including antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) -associated systemic vasculitis. We report two refractory cases of Wegener's granulomatosis: one with bronchial and pulmonary involvement and retroorbital granuloma, the other with retroorbital granuloma and hypertrophic pachymeningitis causing severe headache. Rituximab was effective in both cases, with diminished granuloma and reduced ANCA titers, allowing steroids to be tapered. No adverse effects were detected. PMID:17409608

  10. Pulkkinen receives James B. Macelwane Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.

    Tuija I. Pulkkinen was awarded the James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on May 27, 1998, in Boston, Massachusetts. The James B. Macelwane Medal recognizes young scientists of outstanding ability who have made significant contributions to the geophysical sciences.

  11. Sleep receives Walter H. Bucher medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaula, William M.; Sleep, Norman

    Norman H. Sleep was awarded the Walter H. Bucher Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony which was held on December 8, 1998, in San Francisco, California. The medal recognizes original contributions to the basic knowledge of the Earth's crust.

  12. Seeking Nominations for COSPAR Awards and Medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) is seeking candidates to be nominated for COSPAR awards and medals. These awards and medal recognize the outstanding achievements of space scientists throughout the world in a number of areas. It is important to honor the contributions of your colleagues. Therefore, please take a moment to consider nominees for the following:

  13. Purdy Awarded 2006 Maurice Ewing Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, G. Michael; Detrick, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    G. Michael Purdy was awarded the Maurice Ewing Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting honors ceremony, which was held on 13 December 2006 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal recognizes significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering technology and instrumentation; or outstanding service to marine science.

  14. 32. 'WATCHMAN'S SHELTER,' drawn by project architect Alfred Eichler, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 'WATCHMAN'S SHELTER,' drawn by project architect Alfred Eichler, March 28, 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  15. The evolutionary ethics of Alfred C. Kinsey.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Frederick B

    2002-01-01

    It is commonplace to point out that Alfred Kinsey's taxonomic work on gall wasps provided a methodology for his studies of human sexual behavior. It is equally commonplace to point out that, when researching and presenting his sexual studies, Kinsey's professedly neutral scientific data were constrained by a social agenda. What I have done in this paper is to join these two claims and demonstrate, with particular reference to Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, how his zoology helped guide Kinsey to a naturalistic ethics that, despite contrasts to, shared certain parallel logical failures with the traditional ethics of his critics. PMID:15045831

  16. Cecil Green receives Smith Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Frank; Green, Cecil

    The Waldo E. Smith Medal, which is awarded for extraordinary service to geophysics, was presented to Cecil H. Green at the 1994 AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony on December 7, 1994 in San Francisco. The award citation and Green's response are given here.“It would take a book to do justice to Cecil Green's extraordinary contributions to the geophysics and electronics industries, to the training of scientists, physicians, and engineers, and to strengthening education and research institutions. In fact, such a book has been written about Cecil's multiple lives as engineer, geophysicist, cofounder of Texas Instruments, and partner with his wife, Ida, in international philanthropy.

  17. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  18. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  19. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  20. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  1. 33 CFR 13.01-45 - Replacement of medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-45 Replacement of medals and bars. The Gold or Silver Lifesaving Medal or...

  2. Solomon Receives 2005 Harry H. Hess Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, G. Michael; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-02-01

    Sean C. Solomon received the Harry H. Hess Medal at the 2005 Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is given for outstanding achievements in research on the constitution and evolution of the Earth and other planets. It is a privilege to present Sean C. Solomon as the American Geophysical Union's Harry H. Hess Medal recipient. During more than 30 years of accomplished research he has established himself as one of the remarkable leadersin geophysical research today.

  3. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    James Alfred Van Allen, world-renowned space scientist, died 9 August 2006 at the age of ninety-one. He succumbed to heart failure after a ten-week period of declining health. Van Allen served for his entire sixty-seven-year professional career as an amazingly productive researcher, space science spokesman, inspired teacher, and valued colleague. The realization by him and his associates that charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field began a whole new field of research, magnetospheric physics. Following that initial discovery, he and his associates quickly extended their observations, first to the inner planets, and then to the rest of the planets and beyond. During his tenure at Iowa, he and his group flew instruments on more than sixty successful Earth satellites and planetary spacecraft, including the first missions to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Van Allen's lifetime publication list numbers more than 275, of which many are widely-cited, seminal papers. He was the sole author of more than 125 of those papers. Beyond the research laboratory, Van Allen worked energetically throughout his career in establishing space research as a new branch of human inquiry. He was among the most sought-after as a committee member and adviser, working at the highest levels of government, including the White House and Congress, and at all levels of the national and international research establishments. Many presentations in the non-scientific arena helped to bring the exciting discoveries and challenges of space research to the attention of the general public. James Van Allen (Van to his many friends and colleagues) was born on 7 September 1914 on a small farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, the second of four sons of Alfred Morris Van Allen and Alma Olney Van Allen. After high school in Mount Pleasant, he entered Iowa Wesleyan College, majoring in physics and graduating summa cum laude. While there, he was introduced to geophysics

  4. National Medal of Science nominations sought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) is accepting nominations for the 2013 National Medal of Science until 1 April 2013. Congress established the medal in 1959 as a presidential award for individuals "deserving of special recognition by reason of their outstanding contributions to knowledge in the physical, biological, mathematical, or engineering sciences." Later, Congress expanded the recognition to include the social and behavioral sciences. NSF notes, "We are especially interested in identifying women, members of minority groups, and persons with disabilities for consideration." More information is available at http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/medal.jsp and http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/nsf_2013nationalmedalofscience_callfornominations.pdf. For more details, contact the Medal of Science program manager at nms@nsf.gov or 703-292-8040.

  5. Wigner Medal 2010 - Laudatio for Michio Jimbo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielanowski, Piotr

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the Wigner Medal is to recognize outstanding contributions to the understanding of physics through group theory. The Wigner Medal was established in 1977/78 and is administered by the Group Theory and Fundamental Physics Foundation, a publicly supported organization. The 2010 International Selection Committee consisting of J Patera (Canada) - Chairman, M del Olmo (Spain), W Schleich (Germany), J-B Zuber (France) and A Bohm (USA) awarded the 2010 Wigner Medal to Michio JimboUniversity of Tokyo for his introduction of quantum groups and his study of affine Lie algebras in connection with classical and quantum integrable systems. Further information about the Wigner Medal and the Laudatio for Professor Michio Jimbo, presented by Fedor Smirnov, are included in the PDF.

  6. Armstrong Receives Space Medal of Honor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong receives the first Congressional Space Medal of Honor from President Jimmy Carter, assisted by Captain Robert Peterson. Armstrong, one of six astronauts to be presented the medal during ceremonies held in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), was awarded for his performance during the Gemini 8 mission and the Apollo 11 mission when he became the first human to set foot upon the Moon.

  7. Armstrong Awarded Space Medal of Honor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong receives the first Congressional Space Medal of Honor from President Jimmy Carter, assisted by Captain Robert Peterson. Armstrong, one of six astronauts to be presented the medal during ceremonies held in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), was awarded for his performance during the Gemini 8 mission and the Apollo 11 mission when he became the first human to set foot upon the Moon.

  8. Centennial Presidential Perspective: Dr. Alfred Blalock

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Claude A.; George, Timothy J.; Conte, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Great men are not a common occurrence. Indeed, they are a rare find. Though respected and lauded in their time, it is only in retrospect that their true contributions can be adequately measured as a surgeon, an educator and a scientist. Such is the case of Dr. Alfred Blalock. Many have considered him the father of modern cardiac surgery. All consider his “blue baby” operation to be one of the landmarks of cardiac surgery and, as the chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins, he trained many who would become the leaders of our discipline. His continual reach for excellence helped him to not only affect, but revolutionize the paradigm of surgical research, an understanding of the physiology of shock and the surgical management of pulmonic stenosis/atresia. Dr. Blalock was the 30th president of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery and his presidential address was given in 1951. PMID:22248679

  9. Alfred Russel Wallace's world of final causes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Charles H

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) is an important figure in the history of science, but there remain many questions about the nature of his world view, and how it developed. Here, Wallace's appreciation of the role of final causes in evolution is linked to some of its probable origins, with an emphasis on the influence of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859). The question is then asked whether a final causes-based scientific agenda might be possible, and answered by drawing attention to two current efforts in that direction by Adrian Bejan, and by the author. A sketch of the latter approach, adapted from Spinozian thinking, is given, with an empirical example involving drainage basin morphology that suggests structural influences of a final causes sort. PMID:24019011

  10. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy in Wegener's granulomatosis involving the spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Morayati, S.J.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1986-12-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 44-yr-old man to exclude an occult abscess. Four- and twenty-four-hour images of the abdomen revealed splenic photopenia except for a rim of activity medially. A subsequent computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated necrosis or hemorrhage of the spleen except for a medial rim. Exploratory laparotomy demonstrated necrotizing vasculitis with granuloma formation consistent with Wegener's granulomatosis and a rim of viable splenic tissue corresponding to the radionuclide and CT studies.

  11. 38. 'DESIGN NO. 7,' Pencil drawing by project architect Alfred ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. 'DESIGN NO. 7,' Pencil drawing by project architect Alfred Eichler, dated March 2, 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  12. Photocopy of circa 1870 watercolor by Alfred R. Waud. Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of circa 1870 watercolor by Alfred R. Waud. Original owned by Mrs. Hoffman Clinton, 1160 Park Avenue, New York, New York. VIEW FROM THE WEST BEFORE ALTERATIONS - Chateau-sur-Mer, Bellevue Avenue, Newport, Newport County, RI

  13. Photocopy of circa 1870 watercolor by Alfred R. Waud. Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of circa 1870 watercolor by Alfred R. Waud. Original owned by Mrs. Hoffman Clinton, 1160 Park Avenue, New York, New York. LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD PALM HOUSE AND GRAPERY - Chateau-sur-Mer, Bellevue Avenue, Newport, Newport County, RI

  14. 3. Photocopy of Photograph Alfred, Garrett, Photographer, worked in West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of Photograph Alfred, Garrett, Photographer, worked in West Chester, Pennsylvania between 1864 and 1878 NORTHEAST CORNER - Hickman Fountain, 225 North Matlack Street (moved from Chester County Courthouse, High & Market Streets), West Chester, Chester County, PA

  15. 28 CFR 50.22 - Young American Medals Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Young American Medals Program. 50.22 Section 50.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) STATEMENTS OF POLICY § 50.22 Young American Medals Program. (a) Scope. There are hereby established two medals, one to be known as the...

  16. 28 CFR 0.12 - Young American Medals Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Young American Medals Committee. 0.12... Office of the Attorney General § 0.12 Young American Medals Committee. There shall be in the Office of the Attorney General a Young American Medals Committee, which shall be composed of four members,...

  17. 28 CFR 50.22 - Young American Medals Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Young American Medals Program. 50.22 Section 50.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) STATEMENTS OF POLICY § 50.22 Young American Medals Program. (a) Scope. There are hereby established two medals, one to be known as the...

  18. 28 CFR 50.22 - Young American Medals Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Young American Medals Program. 50.22 Section 50.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) STATEMENTS OF POLICY § 50.22 Young American Medals Program. (a) Scope. There are hereby established two medals, one to be known as the...

  19. 28 CFR 50.22 - Young American Medals Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Young American Medals Program. 50.22 Section 50.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) STATEMENTS OF POLICY § 50.22 Young American Medals Program. (a) Scope. There are hereby established two medals, one to be known as the...

  20. 28 CFR 0.12 - Young American Medals Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Young American Medals Committee. 0.12... Office of the Attorney General § 0.12 Young American Medals Committee. There shall be in the Office of the Attorney General a Young American Medals Committee, which shall be composed of four members,...

  1. 28 CFR 0.12 - Young American Medals Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Young American Medals Committee. 0.12... Office of the Attorney General § 0.12 Young American Medals Committee. There shall be in the Office of the Attorney General a Young American Medals Committee, which shall be composed of four members,...

  2. 28 CFR 0.12 - Young American Medals Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Young American Medals Committee. 0.12... Office of the Attorney General § 0.12 Young American Medals Committee. There shall be in the Office of the Attorney General a Young American Medals Committee, which shall be composed of four members,...

  3. 28 CFR 0.12 - Young American Medals Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Young American Medals Committee. 0.12... Office of the Attorney General § 0.12 Young American Medals Committee. There shall be in the Office of the Attorney General a Young American Medals Committee, which shall be composed of four members,...

  4. Can sulfasalazine therapy induce or exacerbate Wegener's granulomatosis?

    PubMed

    Denissen, N H A M; Peters, J G P; Masereeuw, R; Barrera, P

    2008-01-01

    Sulfasalazine (SSZ) can induce serological and clinical autoimmune reactions but the occurrence of SSZ-related Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) has not been reported before. We describe two patients with rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed biopsy-proven WG with serious organ involvement during SSZ therapy. The pathogenetic mechanism that explains the relationship between SSZ and the occurrence of a de novo anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-related vasculitis or a flare is discussed. We propose that WG can be a rare complication of SSZ therapy and that this, like other autoimmune adverse events of this drug, is mediated by SSZ-induced apoptosis. PMID:18189198

  5. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  6. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  7. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  8. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  9. 33 CFR 13.01-5 - Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-5 Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals. Lifesaving Medals may be awarded to any person...

  10. Gilbert receives 1999 William Bowie Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turekian, Karl K.; Gilbert, J. Freeman

    J. Freeman Gilbert was awarded the William Bowie Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on June 2, 1999, in Boston, Massachusetts. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research.Freeman Gilbert was a geophysical pioneer, even as a student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he used the Whirlwind computer to apply computational methods to seismic problems. Later at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP),at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he began his professional university career, he wrote a series of papers on the computation of synthetic seismograms in simple media.

  11. Psychology and the National Medal of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Robert P.; Benjamin, Ludy T., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    When Congress created the National Medal of Science in 1959 to be awarded by the president of the United States, psychology was not among the eligible sciences. A concerted lobbying effort in the late 1970s changed that situation, adding social and behavioral sciences to the listing of eligible disciplines. This article describes how the award…

  12. Emeritus trio scoops the 2013 Dirac Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2013-09-01

    The 2013 Dirac Medal has been awarded to three scientists whose wide-ranging work has brought profound advances in cosmology, astrophysics and fundamental physics. Thomas Kibble, James Peebles and Martin Rees all receive the honour, which is bestowed annually by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy.

  13. 75 FR 69631 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee.... SUMMARY: The National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI) Nomination Evaluation Committee will meet... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Maulsby, Program Manager, National Medal of Technology and...

  14. 76 FR 68167 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination... meeting. SUMMARY: The National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI) Nomination Evaluation Committee... Medal of Technology and Innovation Program, United States Patent and Trademark Office, 600 Dulany...

  15. Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913): evolution and medicine.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Henry P

    2009-11-01

    The theory we now know simply as 'evolution' was first presented to the scientific world one and a half centuries ago, on 1 July 1858, when the work of two men, Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Robert Darwin (1809-82), was jointly read at the Linnean Society. While Charles Darwin has rightly taken his place in history as one of the greatest scientists of all time, Alfred Russel Wallace has been largely forgotten outside of the scientific community. However, Wallace was a prolific researcher and writer with interests in a wide range of topics, from medicine to economics. PMID:20029081

  16. Alfred of Wessex at a Cross-Roads in the History of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper first situates King Alfred in Winchester, in Wessex, in Anglo-Saxon England, and in the Christendom of the ninth century. Attention is drawn to Alfred's education, which included experience of court life in Wessex, Rome and Francia. The paper argues that Alfred prioritised vernacular literacy as a means of educating elites in a…

  17. "Strawberry like" gingivitis being the first sign of Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ruokonen, Hellevi; Helve, Tapani; Arola, Johanna; Hietanen, Jarkko; Lindqvist, Christian; Hagstrom, Jaana

    2009-10-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a rare granulomatous necrotizing vasculitis of small vessels, affecting vascular structures having predilection for upper airways. If untreated WG can be lethal. WG is also known to cause oral mucosal lesions. We report a case of WG that was first diagnosed on oral gingival mucosa. A 51-year old woman was referred to a specialized dentist because of consistent irritative buccal gingival hyperplasia that did not react to conservative and microbial treatment. The lesion was biopsied and the diagnosis was suggestive for WG. Patient was further referred to the Department of Rheumatology and the diagnose of WG was confirmed and treated. The oral lesions cured totally. This case emphasizes the importance to recognize the oral manifestation of WG to get proper medication as soon as possible and avoid serious systemic tissue damage. PMID:19782931

  18. Wegener's thinking about the mechanism: Greenland and Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Wegener's early Arctic expeditions to Greenland (1906-08 and 1912-13 with a stop in Iceland) suggest a significant affect on his thinking about the mechanism of continental drift till his death in 1930. Beside his specialized work in meteorology and the Arctic, he had a broad general interest in science especially of the earth system as a whole. The drift idea occurred to him in 1910 on the basis of new data on geomorphology (Atlantic seafloor), supported by geophysics, geology and palaeontology. In his 1912 initial public talk and ensuing paper he mentioned something akin to seafloor spreading and refuted the continental relict hypothesis from break-up for the mid-Atlantic ridge. But 1912 he bypassed the tension fractures in Iceland and in Greenland (1912-13) he experienced the rheology of ice, brittle and viscous, when thinking about the drift of SIAL continents through the SIMA mantle (as documented in his diaries). When in 1915 rewriting his 1012 paper as the book "Die Entstehung der Kontinente und Ozeane" he had given up the early idea for that of floating continental rafts. It is tempting to speculate why. Rheology of rocks was clearly described. But some misconceptions distracted him from the correct relationships: (1) Data of the time suggested that sialic rock is more solid than mafic rock which would soften at lower temperature (contrary to present knowledge) and (2) convection in the atmosphere, well known to him, seemed to be no model for convection in the mantle, although rafting continents implied mantle flow. Did the rheologies appear too different to him? Not before the mid twenties (as documented in the 4th edition of his book, 1929) did Wegener admit that mantle convection might be the answer. A great spirit was misled but clearly saw that the phenomenon of drift, based on observations, is not refuted by the lack of an explanation.

  19. 9. Photocopy of published photograph (from Hopkins, Alfred, The Fundamentals ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of published photograph (from Hopkins, Alfred, The Fundamentals of Good Banking, New York: The Bankers Publishing Co., 1929, plate 22) Photographer unknown INTERIOR, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING ORIGINAL TELLER WINDOWS AND FURNISHINGS - City National Bank, 49 Court Street, Binghamton, Broome County, NY

  20. 8. Photocopy of published photograph (from Hopkins, Alfred, The Fundamentals ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of published photograph (from Hopkins, Alfred, The Fundamentals of Good Banking, New York: The Bankers Publishing Co., 1929, plate 4) Photographer unknown GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE - City National Bank, 49 Court Street, Binghamton, Broome County, NY

  1. Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes. Fact Sheets on Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedish Inst., Stockholm.

    The life and personality of Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes established by his will are discussed. Nobel was a 19th century Swedish industrialist who was fluent in six languages. He invented dynamite. At his death in 1896, his estate amounted to $9,200,000. His will stipulated that the income from his estate should be divided annually into five…

  2. Apostle of Freedom: Alfred Adler and His British Disciples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Pam

    2005-01-01

    The psychology of Alfred Adler is traditionally considered to be one of the three so-called in-depth or psychoanalytic therapies, the other two being the theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Gustav Jung. This article demonstrates that Adler's Individual Psychology was especially influential on teachers in Vienna between the two world wars. There…

  3. Prince Alfred College 1993 Study Tour to China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Marten; Lake, Simon

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a trip to China by students of Mandarin Chinese at Prince Alfred College, Australia, in order to learn about the language and culture of the host country. Some continuing features of the stay were shopping, food, and attitudes of the local populace toward the foreigners. (Author/CK)

  4. [Early achievements of the Danish pharmaceutical industry--3. Alfred Benzon].

    PubMed

    Grevsen, Jørgen V; Kirkegaard, Hanne; Kruse, Edith; Kruse, Poul R

    2011-01-01

    The article series provides a written and pictorial account of the Danish pharmaceutical industry's products from their introduction until about 1950. Part 3 deals with products from the company founded by Alfred Benzon in 1849. Alfred Nicolai Benzon owned the Swan Pharmacy in Copenhagen. In 1863 he started an independent company manufacturing branded pharmaceuticals, thus combining the pharmacy's activities with the wholesale business. The family owned the company until 1952, when it was converted into a foundation. After several restructuring rounds, the medicine production business continued as Benzon Pharma A/S until 1990, when Nycomed Pharma A/S bought up all the branded pharmaceuticals. As the first pharmaceutical company in Denmark, Alfred Benzon was an industrial frontrunner in the country at the time, supplying not only the domestic market but foreign markets as well. Alfred Benzon was the first Danish company to produce ether for anesthesia, and malt extract, a dietetic preparation. The high quality of both products made them valuable export articles. In the early 1890s, Alfred Benzon became the first Danish company to start the research-based production of extract of thyroid glands from slaughtered cattle. This was the beginning of a long-standing specialization in producing organotherapeutic substances from animal organs originating from Danish animal husbandry. In 1932 the company had 26 preparations of this type in its range, many of them on the market for several years. These medicine substances included iron preparations and effervescent salts followed by sulfonamides, synthetic hormones and a substance to counteract motion sickness. PMID:21879529

  5. Morel Receives 2005 Maurice Ewing Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Morel, François M. M.

    2006-02-01

    François M. M. Morel received the Ewing Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December 2005, in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is given for significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation; and for outstanding service to marine sciences. François Morel has led the search to understand the role of metals in the ocean, starting with a focus on inorganic processes and aquatic chemistry, and leading to a blend of geochemistry, microbiology, biochemistry, and genetics. His influence comes from his research and from the way he has educated an entire community of scientists with his textbooks, with his teaching, and through his former students and postdocs who hold faculty positions at universities throughout the world.

  6. The 2013 Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Hieter, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 32 years. The George W. Beadle Award recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2013 awards. PMID:23633133

  7. A Case of Wegener's Granulomatosis Presenting with Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ujjawal, Roy; Koushik, Pan; Ajay, Panwar; Subrata, Chakrabarti

    2016-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis or granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a necrotizing vasculitis affecting both arterioles and venules. The disease is characterized by the classical triad involving acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts with renal involvement. However, the disease pathology can affect any organ system. This case presents Wegener's granulomatosis presenting with facial nerve palsy as the first manifestation of the disease, which is rarely reported in medical literature. PMID:27110249

  8. 33 CFR 13.01-25 - Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Description of Gold Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-25 Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Gold Lifesaving Medal is...

  9. 33 CFR 13.01-25 - Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Description of Gold Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-25 Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Gold Lifesaving Medal is...

  10. 33 CFR 13.01-25 - Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Description of Gold Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-25 Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Gold Lifesaving Medal is...

  11. 33 CFR 13.01-25 - Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Description of Gold Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-25 Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Gold Lifesaving Medal is...

  12. 33 CFR 13.01-25 - Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Description of Gold Lifesaving... SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-25 Description of Gold Lifesaving Medal. (a) The Gold Lifesaving Medal is...

  13. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.1 Manufacture of medals. With the approval of the Director of the Mint, dies for medals of a national character designated by Congress may be executed at the Philadelphia Mint, and struck in such field office of the...

  14. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.1 Manufacture of medals. With the approval of the Director of the Mint, dies for medals of a national character designated by Congress may be executed at the Philadelphia Mint, and struck in such field office of the...

  15. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manufacture of medals. 92.1 Section 92.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.1 Manufacture of medals. With the approval of...

  16. Lobell, Rickaby, and Vrugt Receive 2010 James B. Macelwane Medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, Steven M.; Lobell, David B.; Elderfield, Harry; Rickaby, Rosalind; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2011-03-01

    David B. Lobell, Rosalind E. Rickaby, and Jasper A. Vrugt were awarded the 2010 James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by an outstanding young scientist.”

  17. John Glenn: Presented with NASA Distinguished Service Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John Glenn tours with his family, meets JFK and is presented with the NASA distinguished Service Medal. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  18. Steven C. Wofsy Receives 2012 Roger Revelle Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Steven C. Wofsy was awarded the 2012 Roger Revelle Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system."

  19. 2009 National Medal for Museum and Library Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper features the winners of this year's National Medals for Museum and Library Service, the nation's highest honor for libraries and museums. The award celebrates libraries and museums that make a difference for individuals, families, and communities. Medal winners are selected from nationwide nominations for institutions that demonstrate…

  20. Williams and Doney receive 2000 James B. Macelwane medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Thome; Williams, Quentin C.

    Quentin C. Williams and Scott C. Doney were awarded the James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on December 17, 2000 in San Francisco, California. The medal recognizes significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability.

  1. The Readability of the Newbery Medal Books (1974-1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Paul J.

    Noting that research indicating Newbery Medal books are not popular with elementary students in spite of their unquestioned superiority in plot, characterization, and style, a study examined the readability level of Newbery Medal winners from 1974 to 1986. Three readability formulas were used to assess readability: Gunning's Fog Index, Fry…

  2. Clement, Hardebeck, and Nimmo Receive 2007 James B. Macelwane Medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, Mark A.; Clement, Amy C.; Michael, Andrew; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.; Stevenson, Dave; Nimmo, Francis

    2008-02-01

    Amy C. Clement, Jeanne L. Hardebeck, and Francis Nimmo were awarded the 2007 James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 12 December 2007 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is ``for significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability.''

  3. 77 FR 14600 - Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Kennedy Half-Dollar Bags and Rolls, Bronze Medals, the First Spouse Bronze Medal Set and the Birth Set AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing 2012 pricing for Kennedy Half-Dollar bags and rolls,...

  4. Alfred Russel Wallace's North American tour: transatlantic evolutionism.

    PubMed

    Fichman, M

    2001-06-01

    Evolutionary theory aroused vigorous debate in the late-19th century, regarding both its scientific status and its sociocultural implications. Alfred Russel Wallace's lecture tour of North America, during 1886-1887, affords a striking insight into his particular interpretation of evolution and reveals the depth of his conviction that science was inseparable from ethical and political realities. Wallace's views on matters scientific and cultural were as controversial and significant in North America as they were in Great Britain and Europe. PMID:11468798

  5. Evaluating the (your country here) olympic medal count.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    An Olympic Games is a measurable test of a nation´s sporting power. Medal counts are the object of intense scrutiny after every Olympiad. Most countries celebrate any medal with national glee, since 60% of competing countries will win none. In 2012, 10% of the competing countries won 75% of all medals. Despite this concentration among a few countries, more countries are winning more medals now than 20 years ago, thanks in part to athlete-support and -development programs arising around the globe. Small strong sporting countries like Norway are typified by fairly large variation in medal results from Olympiad to Olympiad and a high concentration of results in a few sports. These are important factors to consider when evaluating national performance and interpreting the medal count. Medal conversion, podium placements relative to top 8 placements, may provide a measure of the competitiveness of athlete-support programs in this international zero sum game where the cost of winning Olympic gold keeps rising whether measured in dollars or human capital.  PMID:23428493

  6. Warren Receives 2004 Maurice Ewing Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speer, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Bruce A. Warren received the Ewing Medal at the 2004 Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony on 15 December, in San Francisco, California. The medal is given for significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation; and for outstanding service to marine sciences. Citation. Bruce Warren is a physical oceanographer and scientist emeritus at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he has spent his entire career. Few can claim to have personally unearthed so many distinct elements of the World Ocean circulation as Bruce. At the beginning of his career, oceanographers were working out the implications of the still relatively fresh idea that the large-scale circulation tends to concentrate flow at the western boundary of ocean basins in strong western boundary currents like the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio. During his Ph.D. years, Stommel and Arons published their simple but far-reaching dynamical framework for deep circulation in the ocean, and these concepts and extensions were nowhere better tested than in Bruce's field investigations of deep circulation in almost every major ocean basin in the world. Bruce never failed to point out how, for good reason, other explanations were usually less compelling. His application of Occam's Razor to all work, including his own, is fierce and famous.

  7. Dahlen Receives 2003 Inge Lehmann Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolet, Guust; Dahlen, Francis A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    ``I feel honored and pleased to cite my friend and Princeton colleague Tony Dahlen for the Inge Lehmann medal. Given Tony's wide range of important contributions, there is actually a choice of AGU honors one might cite him for; his influence extends well beyond those fields that are primarily associated with the Lehmann Medal. ``Tony started his scientific journey as an undergraduate at Caltech. By the time he moved on to graduate studies with George Backus and Freeman Gilbert at Scripps he was already applying his many talents to geophysics. He soon pioneered a series of papers on normal modes that represent the first substantial step away from Earth's spherical symmetry. In fact, all of the current research on the use of low-frequency seismic data for the determination of the Earth's three-dimensional structure is based on this early work, its extension to an inverse problem, and subsequent research with Martin Smith and John Woodhouse. His interest in the theory of global tomography has survived until this day: Recently he developed a very elegant and efficient theory to include the frequency-dependent effects of diffraction into body wave tomography, a theoretical improvement that was almost immediately rewarded by the imaging of a large number of mantle plumes. These represent the first concrete seismological evidence that many hot spots originate deep in the mantle, confirming Jason Morgan's long-standing hypothesis.

  8. Pulmonary lymphoma of large B-cell type mimicking Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, N; Eda, R; Umemori, Y; Murakami, T; Kunichika, N; Makihata, K; Aoe, K; Murakami, K; Takeyama, H; Harada, M

    2001-08-01

    A 27-year-old man with a primary pulmonary lymphoma of large B-cell type is described. Symptoms involved both the upper and lower respiratory tract. A chest roentgenogram showed a dense mass with cavitation. Transbronchial biopsy specimens revealed no atypical cells, rather they demonstrated granulomatous infiltration and vasculitis consistent with but not conclusively diagnostic of Wegener's granulomatosis. The pulmonary mass became smaller after sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim therapy. These features suggested Wegener's granulomatosis. However, an open biopsy specimen was diagnostic for diffuse lymphoma of large B-cell type. High-grade pulmonary lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with clinical and pathologic features suggesting Wegener's granulomatosis. PMID:11518126

  9. [Coexistence of Crohn disease and Wegener granulomatosis in a 15-year-old patient].

    PubMed

    Sieczkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowski, Piotr; Szumera, Małgorzata; Kamińska, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease is being diagnosed more and more frequently in children and teenagers. Clinical symptoms are mainly related to the gastrointestinal tract, however there are many reports in the literature about the coexistence of Crohn disease with other autoimmunological disorders such as celiac disease, autoimmune hypothyroidism, systemic lupus erythematosus and Wegener granulomatosis. We report a 15-year-old patient with Crohn disease who also developed Wegener granulomatosis. The presented case illustrates the difficulties in establishing the diagnosis when symptoms of the original disease are superimposed on symptoms of a different disorder. PMID:22516704

  10. In Brief: Nominations requested for U.S. science medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-02-01

    Scientists can help recognize the contributions of colleagues by submitting nominations for the National Medal of Science and the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, which are the highest honors the president bestows in science, technology, and innovation. The National Medal of Science, the nation's highest honor for American scientists and engineers, is given to individuals deserving special recognition for outstanding contributions to knowledge, or the total impact of their work, in the chemical, physical, biological, mathematical, engineering, or behavioral sciences. Nominations and three letters of support must be submitted by 31 March. For more information, contact program manager Mayra Montrose at nms@nsf.gov or +1-703-292-8040, or visit http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/medal.jsp.

  11. VIEW OF CARILLON MEMORIAL WITH 5 SERVICE MEDALS IN FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CARILLON MEMORIAL WITH 5 SERVICE MEDALS IN FOREGROUND AND GETTYSBURG ADDRESS TABLET IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Leavenworth National Cemetery, 150 Muncie Road, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  12. Interview With the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, David Wiesner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses David Wiesner, the 2002 Caldecott Medal Winner, and includes excerpts of an interview with him. Notes that Wiesner's books appeal to the imagination and often use art elements such as scale. Details the winning book, "The Three Pigs." (PM)

  13. Alfred Lee Loomis - last great amateur of science

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarex, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Alfred Loomis may well be remembered as the last of the great amateurs of science. He had distinguished careers as a lawyer, as an Army officer and as an investment banker before he turned his full energies to the pursuit of scientific knowledge, first in the field of physics and later as a biologist. By any measure that can be employed, he was one of the most influential physical scientists of this century: he was elected to the National Academy when he was 53 years old; he received many honorary degrees from prestigious universities; and he played a crucial role as director of all NDRC-OSRD radar research in World War II.

  14. The significance of Alfred Adler for the concept of narcissism.

    PubMed

    Ansbacher, H L

    1985-02-01

    Alfred Adler's significance for the concept of narcissism is presented with reference to four aspects: 1) Adler's theory of masculine protest was evidently a factor influencing Freud to turn toward the phenomenon of narcissism. 2) Present-day understanding of narcissism shows remarkable similarity to Adler's views on psychodynamics and neurotic egocentricity. 3) Some contemporary criticisms of Freud's theory of narcissism are very similar to Adler's criticism. 4) Adler's theory of social interest permits subsumption of narcissism under lack of social interest rather than acceptance of it as an expression of innate socially negative tendencies. PMID:3882001

  15. Alfred Russel Wallace and the Antivaccination Movement in Victorian England

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace, eminent naturalist and codiscoverer of the principle of natural selection, was a major participant in the antivaccination campaigns in late 19th-century England. Wallace combined social reformism and quantitative arguments to undermine the claims of provaccinationists and had a major impact on the debate. A brief account of Wallace’s background, his role in the campaign, and a summary of his quantitative arguments leads to the conclusion that it is unwarranted to portray Victorian antivaccination campaigners in general as irrational and antiscience. Public health policy can benefit from history, but the proper context of the evidence used should always be kept in mind. PMID:20350381

  16. Alfred Russel Wallace and the antivaccination movement in Victorian England.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas P

    2010-04-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace, eminent naturalist and codiscoverer of the principle of natural selection, was a major participant in the antivaccination campaigns in late 19th-century England. Wallace combined social reformism and quantitative arguments to undermine the claims of provaccinationists and had a major impact on the debate. A brief account of Wallace's background, his role in the campaign, and a summary of his quantitative arguments leads to the conclusion that it is unwarranted to portray Victorian antivaccination campaigners in general as irrational and antiscience. Public health policy can benefit from history, but the proper context of the evidence used should always be kept in mind. PMID:20350381

  17. In Brief: National Medal of Science nomination deadline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-03-01

    The deadline for nominations for the 2010 U.S. National Medal of Science is 31 March 2010. The Medal of Science, which is presented annually by the president of the United States to distinguished scientists and engineers, is the nation's highest honor for American scientists and engineers. For more information, visit http://www.nsf.gov/od/nms/nominations.jsp or contact Mayra Montrose at the U.S. National Science Foundation, mmontros@nsf.gov.

  18. ALFRED: A Practical Method for Alignment-Free Distance Computation.

    PubMed

    Thankachan, Sharma V; Chockalingam, Sriram P; Liu, Yongchao; Apostolico, Alberto; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-06-01

    Alignment-free approaches are gaining persistent interest in many sequence analysis applications such as phylogenetic inference and metagenomic classification/clustering, especially for large-scale sequence datasets. Besides the widely used k-mer methods, the average common substring (ACS) approach has emerged to be one of the well-known alignment-free approaches. Two recent works further generalize this ACS approach by allowing a bounded number k of mismatches in the common substrings, relying on approximation (linear time) and exact computation, respectively. Albeit having a good worst-case time complexity [Formula: see text], the exact approach is complex and unlikely to be efficient in practice. Herein, we present ALFRED, an alignment-free distance computation method, which solves the generalized common substring search problem via exact computation. Compared to the theoretical approach, our algorithm is easier to implement and more practical to use, while still providing highly competitive theoretical performances with an expected run-time of [Formula: see text]. By applying our program to phylogenetic inference as a case study, we find that our program facilitates to exactly reconstruct the topology of the reference phylogenetic tree for a set of 27 primate mitochondrial genomes, at reasonably acceptable speed. ALFRED is implemented in C++ programming language and the source code is freely available online. PMID:27138275

  19. 32 CFR 901.13 - Children of Medal of Honor recipients category.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements § 901.13 Children of Medal of Honor recipients category. (a) The child of any Medal of Honor... defined as the natural children of a parent and adopted children whose adoption proceedings were...

  20. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis, a new nomenclature for Wegener's Granulomatosis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Alexandre Moretti; Torraca, Pedro de Freitas Silva; da Rocha, Sheila Pereira; Santiago, Carmelia Matos Reis; Ferraz, Fabio Humberto Ribeiro Paes

    2015-01-01

    The granulomatosis with polyangiitis, initially known as Wegener's granulomatosis, is a small and medium vessels vasculitis. It's classic form presents a triad: necrotizing granuloma of respiratory tract, necrotizing cutaneous vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. This vasculitis has cytoplasmic antineutrophil antibodies as signal. This work illustrates a case, of multisystemic rare disease, in which the segment and treatment were considered satisfactory for symptoms remission. PMID:26312687

  1. The involvement of upper airway in Wegener's granulomatosis - about four cases.

    PubMed

    Sarău, Cristian Andrei; Lighezan, Daniel Florin; Doroş, Ion Caius; Ştefănescu, Eugen Horaţiu; Iovănescu, Gheorghe; Balica, Nicolae Constantin; Horhat, Ioana Delia; Poenaru, Marioara

    2015-01-01

    The authors present four cases of Wegener's granulomatosis patients with multiorganic manifestation forms, but with a prevalent involvement in upper-airway. Granulomatosis diseases of the nose include bacterial infections (rhinoscleroma, tuberculosis, syphilis, lupus, and leprosy), fungal infections (rhinosporidiosis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, candidosis, histoplasmosis, and blastomycosis) and diseases with unspecified etiology (Wegener's granulomatosis, mediofacial malignant granuloma, and sarcoidosis). We consider an interesting experience regarding Wegener's granulomatosis due to its rarity, being an autoimmune systemic disease, with continuous evolution and multiorganic involvement. The beginning of the disease is like upper airway affection, a kind of "persistent cold", being difficult to differentiate it from a common cold in the head, with a prolonged evolution. It is important to mention that we establish the diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis starting with Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) clinical exam, followed by other tests and investigations realized in our Clinic and completed with specialty tests (nephrology, internal medicine and dermatology), meaning that we need a close cooperation with these medical specialties. All the patients presented multiorganic involvement. Notably significant for our four cases is the prolonged evolution in a stable condition in one patient. PMID:26193239

  2. Role of WEGENER (World Earthquake GEodesy Network for Environmental Hazard Research) in monitoring natural hazards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Zerbini, S.; Bastos, M. L.; Becker, M. H.; Meghraoui, M.; Reilinger, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    WEGENER was originally the acronym for Working Group of European Geoscientists for the Establishment of Networks for Earth-science Research. It was founded in March 1981 in response to an appeal delivered at the Journées Luxembourgeoises de Geodynamique in December 1980 to respond with a coordinated European proposal to a NASA Announcement of Opportunity inviting participation in the Crustal Dynamics and Earthquake Research Program. WEGENER, during the past 33 years, has always kept a close contact with the Agencies and Institutions responsible for the development and maintenance of the global space geodetic networks with the aim to make them aware of the scientific needs and outcomes of the project which might have an influence on the general science policy trends. WEGENER served as Inter-commission Project 3.2, between Commission 1 and Commission 3, of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) until 2012. Since then, WEGENER project has become the Sub-commission 3.5 of IAG commission 3, namely Tectonics and Earthquake Geodesy. In this presentation, we briefly review the accomplishments of WEGENER as originally conceived and outline and justify the new focus of the WEGENER consortium. The remarkable and rapid evolution of the present state of global geodetic monitoring in regard to the precision of positioning capabilities (and hence deformation) and global coverage, the development of InSAR for monitoring strain with unprecedented spatial resolution, and continuing and planned data from highly precise satellite gravity and altimetry missions, encourage us to shift principal attention from mainly monitoring capabilities by a combination of space and terrestrial geodetic techniques to applying existing observational methodologies to the critical geophysical phenomena that threaten our planet and society. Our new focus includes developing an improved physical basis to mitigate earthquake, tsunami, and volcanic risks, and the effects of natural and

  3. 14 CFR 1221.201 - Basis for award of the medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis for award of the medal. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR The Congressional Space Medal of Honor § 1221.201 Basis for award of the medal. (a)...

  4. 14 CFR 1221.201 - Basis for award of the medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Basis for award of the medal. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR The Congressional Space Medal of Honor § 1221.201 Basis for award of the medal. (a)...

  5. Nomenclature and classification of vasculitis: lessons learned from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis)

    PubMed Central

    Jennette, J C

    2011-01-01

    Names influence how something is perceived. Diagnostic terms (diagnoses) are the names of diseases that are usually derived either from some distinctive characteristic of the disease or include an eponym recognizing someone who elucidated the disease. No matter how logical and appropriate a name may be, if it is not usable and used it is of no lasting value. This brief commentary focuses on the nomenclature of systemic vasculitides, and uses as a prime example Wegener's granulomatosis, which has been renamed recently ‘granulomatosis with polyangiitis’, in part because of concerns about the suitability of Friedrich Wegener as the source of an eponym. The most distinctive pathological feature of Wegener's granulomatosis is multi-focal necrotizing inflammation that has long been called granulomatosis. The systemic variant of Wegener's granulomatosis also is characterized by inflammation in many different vessels or different types, i.e. polyangiitis. Thus, granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a very appropriate alternative term for Wegener's granulomatosis. This term also is in accord with the name for a closely related vasculitis, i.e. microscopic polyangiitis. Terms that indicate aetiology and pathogenesis, when known, are useful to include in names for diseases (diagnoses). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA) or proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) are implicated in the cause of granulomatosis with polyangiitis and thus also should be specified in the diagnosis (e.g. PR3-ANCA-positive granulomatosis with polyangiitis or MPO-ANCA-positive microscopic polyangiitis). As our understanding of the clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and aetiology of vasculitides change over time, the names and approaches for diagnosing these diseases will change accordingly. PMID:21447122

  6. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. 13.01-30 Section 13.01-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals,...

  7. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. 13.01-30 Section 13.01-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals,...

  8. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. 13.01-30 Section 13.01-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals,...

  9. 76 FR 37375 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office...: This is an announcement of a meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor... Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory functions specified in 42 U.S.C. 15202....

  10. 76 FR 56226 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote of the... Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory functions specified in 42...

  11. 75 FR 54915 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting/conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote on recommendations for the 2009-2010 Medal of Valor nominations, review issues relevant to the nomination...

  12. 78 FR 25476 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Bureau... announcement of a meeting (via conference call-in) of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to... Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory functions specified in 42 U.S.C. 15202....

  13. 75 FR 30859 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... meeting via conference call of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to vote on the... . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those...

  14. 77 FR 26790 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office... Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board (``Board'') to vote on the position of Board Chairperson... Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board carries out those advisory functions specified in 42...

  15. 77 FR 51826 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Bureau.... SUMMARY: This is an announcement of a meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to review and vote on recommendations for the 2011-2012 Medal of Valor nominations, consider issues...

  16. 78 FR 43227 - Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board AGENCY: Office.... SUMMARY: This is an announcement of a meeting of the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Review Board to review and vote on recommendations for the 2012-2013 Medal of Valor nominations, consider issues...

  17. 75 FR 8043 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination... requesting nominations of individuals to serve on the National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination..., National Medal of Technology and Innovation Program, United States Patent and Trademark Office, P.O....

  18. 76 FR 76388 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Application ACTION....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The National Medal of Technology and Innovation is the highest honor for... innovation, and development of the Nation's technological manpower. The purpose of the National Medal...

  19. 78 FR 35604 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination... closed meeting. SUMMARY: The National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI) Nomination Evaluation..., National Medal of Technology and Innovation Program, United States Patent and Trademark Office, P.O....

  20. 76 FR 80901 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination... requesting nominations of individuals to serve on the National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination...: Nominations must be submitted to: Program Manager, National Medal of Technology and Innovation Program,...

  1. 75 FR 3203 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2010 Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2010... nominations for its National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since establishment by Congress in 1980, the President of the United States has awarded the National Medal of Technology and...

  2. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. 13.01-30 Section 13.01-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals,...

  3. 33 CFR 13.01-30 - Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Description of Silver Lifesaving Medal. 13.01-30 Section 13.01-30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals,...

  4. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale of âlistâ medals. 92.2 Section 92.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale of “list” medals. Medals on the regular Mint...

  5. 14 CFR § 1221.201 - Basis for award of the medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Basis for award of the medal. § 1221.201 Section § 1221.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR The Congressional Space Medal of Honor...

  6. 14 CFR 1221.201 - Basis for award of the medal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Basis for award of the medal. 1221.201 Section 1221.201 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION THE NASA SEAL AND OTHER DEVICES, AND THE CONGRESSIONAL SPACE MEDAL OF HONOR The Congressional Space Medal of Honor §...

  7. [Alfred Kirstein (1863-1922)--pioneer in direct laryngoscopy].

    PubMed

    Reinhard, M; Eberhardt, E

    1995-06-01

    On April 23rd 1895, in Berlin, Alfred Kirstein performed the first direct examination of the interior of the larynx. 23 days after his first view of larynx, he gave a comprehensive demonstration of autoscopy to the Berlin Medical Association. Until then laryngologists had been content with the technique of indirect laryngoscopy using mirrors, a method popularised by Garcia, Türck and Czermak. Kirstein named the combination of the electroscope and the oesophagoscope "The autoscope" and direct examination of the larynx he termed "autoscopy". Despite the infancy of autoscopy and the autoscope, Kirstein already recognised the potential of his new discovery. He reported that the removal of foreign bodies from the trachea must be easier through an autoscope then by means of a tracheostomy; furthermore, catheterisation of the bronchi should now present no great difficulties. The similarity between the blades he used and those described in the 1940s by Macintosh and Miller is remarkable. PMID:7632859

  8. Stroke, music, and creative output: Alfred Schnittke and other composers.

    PubMed

    Zagvazdin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998), a celebrated Russian composer of the twentieth century, suffered from several strokes which affected his left cerebral hemisphere. The disease, however, did not diminish his musical talent. Moreover, he stated that his illness in a way facilitated his work. The composer showed amazingly high productivity after his first and second injuries of the central nervous system. The main topic of this chapter is the effect of strokes on Schnittke's output, creativity, and style of music. A brief biography of the composer with the chronology of his brain hemorrhages is included. In addition, the influence of cerebrovascular lesions on creative potential of other prominent composers such as Benjamin Britten, Jean Langlais, Vissarion Shebalin, Igor Stravinsky, and Ira Randall Thompson is discussed. PMID:25684289

  9. Alfred C. Kinsey and the politics of sex research.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, John

    2004-01-01

    In view of the recent phase of political opposition to sex research and intense public interest in Alfred C. Kinsey, this paper considers the impact that Kinsey's research has had on the political process in the past 50 years. Initial reactions to Kinsey's research that remain relevant today include "normal" people don't participate in sex surveys, sex surveys are intended to promote homosexuality, and asking people about their sex lives in a nonjudgmental fashion promotes immorality. Episodes of political opposition are documented, and the long-running anti-Kinsey campaign and its impact on the political process are described and discussed. Reasons why people might still oppose sex research are considered, and conclusions are reached about how sex researchers might deal with this problem. PMID:16913278

  10. [Oncological care according Alfred Schütz].

    PubMed

    Popim, Regina Célia; Boemer, Magali Roseira

    2005-01-01

    The study was realized among oncological nurses in their daily work routine and aimed to understand these professionals' subjective action, starting from their relation with patients, adopting a phenomenological reference framework based on the ideas of Alfred Schütz. The question: what does working in oncological care mean to you? Please describe, was used to collect statements, which were analyzed and clarified the typical action of a nurse caregiver in this daily routine. The study revealed that oncological care implies dealing with humans in a fragile situation; requires a relationship of affectivity; is care delivery that entails the genesis of professional burnout. Care delivery in oncology is highly complex, requiring a professional competence that goes beyond the technical-scientific sphere. Nursing professionals need to seek strategies which enable them to face the fatigue they are submitted to in their work. PMID:16308624

  11. Alfred P. Dachnowski and the scientific study of peats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Cohen, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Botanist Alfred Paul Dachnowski (1875–1949) was a major contributor to efforts at mapping organic soils in the United States during the early 20th century. He began his career at The Ohio State University, and spent most of his professional life at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, DC. His work spanned a diversity of topics, including bog ecology and the ecosystem services provided by wetlands, the mapping and chemical characterization of peat, and the commercial applications of peat. We present a biography and overview of his work. Dachnowski is best known today for the peat sampler that bears his name. The details of its operation are described here, and its place in modern peat studies is discussed.

  12. The 2012 Thomas Hunt Morgan medal: Kathryn V. Anderson.

    PubMed

    Wolfner, Mariana F; Schedl, Tim

    2012-06-01

    The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 31 years. The George W. Beadle Medal recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2012 awards. PMID:22701044

  13. In Brief: Rita Colwell receives National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2007-07-01

    Rita Colwell, director of the U.S. National Science Foundation from 1998 to 2004, was awarded a U.S. National Medal of Science in a White House ceremony on 27 July 2007. Colwell, currently a professor of microbiology and biotechnology at the University of Maryland at College Park and a professor at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, received the award for her research on global infectious diseases and marine microbes, specifically the bacterium that causes pandemic cholera. The National Medal of Science is the United States' highest honor for scientific achievement. Colwell currently serves on AGU's development board.

  14. Association of Wegener's granulomatosis with HLA antigens and other genetic markers.

    PubMed Central

    Papiha, S S; Murty, G E; Ad'Hia, A; Mains, B T; Venning, M

    1992-01-01

    The frequencies of the HLA-A, B, C, DR, DQ antigens and of several other genetic markers in biopsy proved and well characterised patients with Wegener's granulomatosis were compared with control frequencies of the region. A highly significant increase in HLA-DR1 was found. The percentage combined frequency of DR1-DQw1 was significantly higher in patients than in the controls. Interestingly, association with the red cell enzyme GLOI and complement locus C4B was also seen. As both of these markers are either linked or within the major histocompatibility complex region (MHC) this is further evidence for the involvement of chromosome 6 in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis. To understand the pathology of the disease fully molecular genetic studies of the MHC region are warranted. PMID:1550412

  15. Successful Management of Refractory Dialysis Independent Wegener's Granulomatosis with Combination of Therapeutic Plasma Exchange and Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sheetal; Dhawan, Hari Krishan; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Marwaha, Neelam; Sharma, Aman

    2016-06-01

    Wegeners granulomatosis (WG) is an autoimmune, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody mediated necrotizing vasculitis involving renal, and upper and lower respiratory systems. Treatment relies on a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and tapering regimen of glucocorticoids. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) has been recognized as a second line treatment. We report the successful use of TPE in combination with rituximab in achieving remission in a patient with WG (dialysis independent) not responding to conventional therapy. PMID:27408429

  16. Alfred Nier and the sector field mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John; Kurz, Mark D

    2006-07-01

    Science and technology are intimately related, and advances in science often become possible with the availability of new instrumentation. This has certainly been the case in mass spectrometry, which is used in so many scientific disciplines. Originally developed as an instrument for research in physics it was used in the discovery of isotopes, their recognition as the fundamental species comprising the elements, and the investigation of elemental isotopic composition. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry is a metrological technique of the highest order, and has been widely used in chemical, biochemical, cosmochemical, environmental, geological, physical, and nuclear research. Mass spectrometry presently plays a key role not only in scientific research, but also in industrial operations. This paper highlights the role that Alfred Otto Carl Nier played in bringing mass spectrometry into the mainstream of science. Nier's career spanned a remarkable period in science, and he made crucial contributions to atomic weights, geochronology, isotope geochemistry, nuclear physics, and space science. He is widely viewed as the 'father of modern mass spectrometry', because of his genius with instrumentation, his innovations, and the generosity with which he shared his ideas and designs. It is timely to remember his fundamental work in mass spectrometry, particularly the development of the sector field mass spectrometer, which is still the instrument of choice for many isotope scientists some 66 years after its first appearance in 1940. PMID:16810642

  17. Alfred binet and the concept of heterogeneous orders.

    PubMed

    Michell, Joel

    2012-01-01

    In a comment, hitherto unremarked upon, Alfred Binet, well known for constructing the first intelligence scale, claimed that his scale did not measure intelligence, but only enabled classification with respect to a hierarchy of intellectual qualities. Attempting to understand the reasoning behind this comment leads to an historical excursion, beginning with the ancient mathematician, Euclid and ending with the modern French philosopher, Henri Bergson. As Euclid explained (Heath, 1908), magnitudes constituting a given quantitative attribute are all of the same kind (i.e., homogeneous), but his criterion covered only extensive magnitudes. Duns Scotus (Cross, 1998) included intensive magnitudes by considering differences, which raised the possibility (later considered by Sutherland, 2004) of ordered attributes with heterogeneous differences between degrees ("heterogeneous orders"). Of necessity, such attributes are non-measurable. Subsequently, this became a basis for the "quantity objection" to psychological measurement, as developed first by Tannery (1875a,b) and then by Bergson (1889). It follows that for attributes investigated in science, there are three structural possibilities: (1) classificatory attributes (with heterogeneous differences between categories); (2) heterogeneous orders (with heterogeneous differences between degrees); and (3) quantitative attributes (with thoroughly homogeneous differences between magnitudes). Measurement is possible only with attributes of kind (3) and, as far as we know, psychological attributes are exclusively of kinds (1) or (2). However, contrary to the known facts, psychometricians, for their own special reasons insist that test scores provide measurements. PMID:22912619

  18. Alfred Binet and the Concept of Heterogeneous Orders†

    PubMed Central

    Michell, Joel

    2012-01-01

    In a comment, hitherto unremarked upon, Alfred Binet, well known for constructing the first intelligence scale, claimed that his scale did not measure intelligence, but only enabled classification with respect to a hierarchy of intellectual qualities. Attempting to understand the reasoning behind this comment leads to an historical excursion, beginning with the ancient mathematician, Euclid and ending with the modern French philosopher, Henri Bergson. As Euclid explained (Heath, 1908), magnitudes constituting a given quantitative attribute are all of the same kind (i.e., homogeneous), but his criterion covered only extensive magnitudes. Duns Scotus (Cross, 1998) included intensive magnitudes by considering differences, which raised the possibility (later considered by Sutherland, 2004) of ordered attributes with heterogeneous differences between degrees (“heterogeneous orders”). Of necessity, such attributes are non-measurable. Subsequently, this became a basis for the “quantity objection” to psychological measurement, as developed first by Tannery (1875a,b) and then by Bergson (1889). It follows that for attributes investigated in science, there are three structural possibilities: (1) classificatory attributes (with heterogeneous differences between categories); (2) heterogeneous orders (with heterogeneous differences between degrees); and (3) quantitative attributes (with thoroughly homogeneous differences between magnitudes). Measurement is possible only with attributes of kind (3) and, as far as we know, psychological attributes are exclusively of kinds (1) or (2). However, contrary to the known facts, psychometricians, for their own special reasons insist that test scores provide measurements. PMID:22912619

  19. Alfred Adler, pioneer in prevention of mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Ansbacher, H L

    1990-09-01

    Alfred Adler (1870-1937) one of the four original members of what was to become the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society, was the first to accept a humanistic-educational model of man in contrast to Freud's medical model of man. This was in line with his deep involvement with prevention; in fact his original interest was in medical prevention. The present paper describes how his work touched on all the points of the contemporary field of psychological prevention. He developed a personality theory most suitable for application in prevention, education and brief psychotherapy. He identified various categories of children at risk. He advocated the right to abortion partly to prevent the birth of a child severely at risk by being unwanted. He considered the then existing dominance of the male sex to be damaging to both sexes. He engaged in practical prevention work by addressing general audiences and especially teachers and by the establishment of and participation in Educational Counseling Centers. He felt that the honest psychologist for reasons of prevention is bound to social advocacy, and that a true psychology of mental health merges into a corresponding world philosophy. These points are fully documented with quotations and references. PMID:24264862

  20. At home among strangers: Alfred Russel Wallace in Russia.

    PubMed

    Levit, Georgy S; Polatayko, Sergey V

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) was an influential figure within Russian pre-Synthetic evolutionary biology, i.e. the time period before the Synthetic Theory of Evolution was established (ca. 1880-1930s). His major works were translated into Russian and his general ideas were read and discussed by both insiders and outsiders of scientific evolutionism. At the same time, Wallace played a controversial role in the growth of Darwinism in Russia, and Charles Robert Darwin (1809-1882) has eclipsed Wallace in his influence on Russian evolutionary thinking. In this paper we briefly outline Wallace’s impact on Russian pre-Synthetic scientific evolutionism and its general intellectual climate. We demonstrate that both Russian pro-Darwinian evolutionists and anti-Darwinians (scientific anti-Darwinians as well as creationists) were fully aware of Wallace’s contributions to the development of evolutionary theory. Yet, Wallace’s radical selectionism, as well as his controversial arguments for “design in nature”, predetermined his special place within the Russian intellectual landscape. PMID:24022180

  1. 28 CFR 50.22 - Young American Medals Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Young American Medals Program. 50.22 Section 50.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) STATEMENTS OF POLICY § 50.22 Young... Administration, Member; (3) Director of the U.S. Marshals Service, Member; and (4) Assistant Attorney...

  2. The Gold Medal Fitness Program: A Model for Teacher Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jan; Konza, Deslea; Hearne, Doug; Okely, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Background: Following the 2000 Sydney Olympics, the NSW Premier, Mr Bob Carr, launched a school-based initiative in NSW government primary schools called the "Gold Medal Fitness Program" to encourage children to be fitter and more active. The Program was introduced into schools through a model of professional development, "Quality Teaching and…

  3. Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher 2012 Wilder Silver Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher, Oregon State University, was awarded the 2012 Wilder Medal by the American Pomological Society for his contributions to hazelnut genetics and cultivar development. Dr. Mehlenbacher took over the leadership of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program in 1986 aft...

  4. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manufacture of medals. 92.1 Section 92.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations §...

  5. 31 CFR 92.1 - Manufacture of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manufacture of medals. 92.1 Section 92.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations §...

  6. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 937; 14 U.S.C. 501, 633; 49 U.S.C. 1655(b)(1); 49 CFR 1.46(b)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Replacement of medals. 1.26-5 Section 1.26-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  7. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 937; 14 U.S.C. 501, 633; 49 U.S.C. 1655(b)(1); 49 CFR 1.46(b)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Replacement of medals. 1.26-5 Section 1.26-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  8. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 937; 14 U.S.C. 501, 633; 49 U.S.C. 1655(b)(1); 49 CFR 1.46(b)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Replacement of medals. 1.26-5 Section 1.26-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  9. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 937; 14 U.S.C. 501, 633; 49 U.S.C. 1655(b)(1); 49 CFR 1.46(b)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Replacement of medals. 1.26-5 Section 1.26-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  10. 33 CFR 1.26-5 - Replacement of medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 937; 14 U.S.C. 501, 633; 49 U.S.C. 1655(b)(1); 49 CFR 1.46(b)) ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Replacement of medals. 1.26-5 Section 1.26-5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  11. [Alfred Lacroix (Macon, 1863 - Paris, 1948), Chemist, Mineralogist, Volcanologist].

    PubMed

    Chaigneau, M

    1998-01-01

    His grandfather and his father were chemists in Macon. It was then natural for him to adopt such profession. After his studies at the Superior School of Chemistry of Paris (Ecole superieure de pharmacie de Paris), he passed as a first class chemist on december the seventh 1887. His passion for mineralogy, displayed since his youngest years, leads him to frequent scientists specialized in the earth's science, amongst who is Ferdinand Fouque, from the College of France (College de France), whom he used to accompany in his travels through the world between 1888 - the year when he parted from his pharmacy - and 1902. This very year, the eight of may, the terrifying eruption of the montagne Pelee on the isle of la Martinique annihilated in few minutes the town and the port of Saint-Pierre, leaving only two survivors, He sejourned there a second time, in august 1902 after the second eruption. A. Lacroix explained, for the first time, phenomena he designated as nuees ardentes. His knowledge in volcanology and mineralogy made him an expert who has been solicitated to observe various volcanos through out the world. Amongst his principal writings are the treaty of mineralogy (5 vol.), the 2 volumes of his conclusions about his observations of the montagne Pelee and one about the Piton de la Fournaise, to which must be added more than 650 notes and communications. Great officer of the Legion d'Honneur, the chemist Alfred Lacroix, professor at the Museum of natural history since the first of april 1893, carried on the function of perpetual secretary of the Academy of Sciences during 34 years. PMID:11625479

  12. Our Magnetic Planet (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    It is a great honour to receive the Arthur Holmes Medal, certainly the highest scientific award of my life. My first thoughts and deep gratitude are with the people who have contributed to me being here today, from my PhD mentors, Pierre Berge and Pierre Pério, later Jacques Labeyrie, my colleagues and students and last, but not least, the members of the Committee on Education of EGU, with whom I have shared over 10 years of a wonderful educational activity. In this presentation, among the various scientific arguments in which I have been involved, I will recall only those mentioned in my letter of nomination to the Holmes Medal, trying to replace them in what was known at the time. After a PhD in Solid State Physics, working in a laboratory of the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, I obtained a post doctoral research position for the the study of liquid binary critical fluids, and worked on this topics for 5 years. I then joined the Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, a CNRS-CEA Institute dedicated to the study of geological-environmental phenomena. My first task there has been to develop a paleomagnetic laboratory, dedicated to the study of Earth Sciences, through the study of the magnetic properties of sediments and igneous rocks. From there on, my entire scientific activity has been devoted to the study of our "Magnetic Planet". My first project in Geophysics dealt with the geodynamical evolution of the Aegean Arc. At the time, only a few paleomagnetic studies existed in the Mediterranean realm, and none in the Aegean region. Moreover all of them dealt with rather old geological formations, so that almost nothing was known about the recent post-cretaceous evolution. The originality of our study was to start from the most recent to the older formations, in order to precisely describe "retro-tectonically" the different phases of rotational deformation. This intensive study (over 700 sampling sites, over 10,000 samples spread over continental Greece, the Aegean

  13. Our Magnetic Planet (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    It is a great honour to receive the Arthur Holmes Medal, certainly the highest scientific award of my life. My first thoughts and deep gratitude are with the people who have contributed to me being here today, from my PhD mentors, Pierre Berge and Pierre Pério, later Jacques Labeyrie, my colleagues and students and last, but not least, the members of the Committee on Education of EGU, with whom I have shared over 10 years of a wonderful educational activity. In this presentation, among the various scientific arguments in which I have been involved, I will recall only those mentioned in my letter of nomination to the Holmes Medal, trying to replace them in what was known at the time. After a PhD in Solid State Physics, working in a laboratory of the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique, I obtained a post doctoral research position for the the study of liquid binary critical fluids, and worked on this topics for 5 years. I then joined the Centre des Faibles Radioactivités, a CNRS-CEA Institute dedicated to the study of geological-environmental phenomena. My first task there has been to develop a paleomagnetic laboratory, dedicated to the study of Earth Sciences, through the study of the magnetic properties of sediments and igneous rocks. From there on, my entire scientific activity has been devoted to the study of our "Magnetic Planet". My first project in Geophysics dealt with the geodynamical evolution of the Aegean Arc. At the time, only a few paleomagnetic studies existed in the Mediterranean realm, and none in the Aegean region. Moreover all of them dealt with rather old geological formations, so that almost nothing was known about the recent post-cretaceous evolution. The originality of our study was to start from the most recent to the older formations, in order to precisely describe "retro-tectonically" the different phases of rotational deformation. This intensive study (over 700 sampling sites, over 10,000 samples spread over continental Greece, the Aegean

  14. 76 FR 44912 - Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site; Lake Alfred, Polk County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... AGENCY Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site; Lake Alfred, Polk County, FL; Notice of Settlement... costs concerning the Callaway and son Drum Service Superfund Site located in Lake Alfred, Polk County.... Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site by one of...

  15. The 2013 Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal: Thomas Douglas Petes.

    PubMed

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Hieter, Philip

    2013-05-01

    The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 32 years. The George W. Beadle Award recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2013 awards. PMID:23633133

  16. Confessions of a serial entrepreneur: a conversation with Alfred E. Mann. Interview by Molly Joel Coye.

    PubMed

    Mann, Alfred E

    2006-01-01

    In this wide-ranging interview, Alfred Mann describes the activities of several medical technology enterprises with which he is engaged. Several of them are companies that he formed; one is a nonprofit foundation, the Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Biomedical Engineering, founded to establish research-oriented institutes on a dozen university campuses and support their work in developing marketable innovations. Mann discusses the need to consider the cost implications of technology, in the context of U.S. health system reform, and describes several important innovations that have emerged from his companies over the years. PMID:16537551

  17. John Tyndall and the Royal Medal that was never struck

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Just once in its long history has a Royal Medal been awarded but not presented. John Tyndall FRS (1820–93) was the chosen recipient in 1853 for his early work on diamagnetism but declined to accept it. The story of why Tyndall felt compelled to turn down this considerable honour sheds light on the scientific politics and personal relationships of the time, on the importance given to the study of magnetism, and on Tyndall's own character and career. PMID:24921107

  18. Darwin Medal presentation: Corals-seeking the big picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, J. E. N.

    2006-03-01

    Recipients of Darwin Medals from the International Society of Reef Studies are requested to write an overview of the work that led to their award. This account is a personal perspective of thirty-five years work on corals. The fields of taxonomy, biogeography, palaeontology, molecular biology, and evolution are presented in an historical context. Emphasis is given to the changing relevance of these fields to today’s world of information technology and the ever-increasing conservation needs.

  19. [A suspected case of Wegener granulomatosis accompanied with pachymeningitis and white matter lesions].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Tomohisa; Abe, Tetsuya; Kurakawa, Eri; Kasuga, Ikuma; Park, Jinho; Akata, Souichi; Aoshima, Masahiro; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2005-03-01

    A 53-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of high fever and abnormal chest radiograph shadows. Chest X-ray on admission showed a nodular shadow in the right upper lung field and a mass shadow with a cavity in the left middle lung field. Laboratory data indicated leukocytosis and elevation of C-reactive protein. Pulmonary suppuration was suspected, panipenem/betamipron was prescribed, but a mass and consolidation developed, and the medication was changed to ciprofloxacin. Convulsive seizures with loss of consciousness appeared after the change to ciprofloxacin. Lumbar puncture revealed pleocytosis with a predominance of mononuclear cells (198/3) and elevated protein(83 mg/dl). Brain CT showed no abnormal image, and acute aseptic meningitis was diagnosed and was treated with cefotaxime, clindamycin, fluconazole, acicrovir and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. However, the treatment did not result in symptomatic improvement, and brain MRI showed intracranial disorders. Serum PR3-ANCA was elevated to 15 U/ml. Taken together with chest X-ray, sinusitis and clinical course, a generalized form of Wegener's granulomatosis was diagnosed. She was given 60 mg/day of prednisolone, 100 mg/day of cyclophosphamide and 9 g/day of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and progressively improved. In this process, enhanced MR images showed thickened dural enhancement of the falx and bilateral anterior regions, which showed improvement on brain MRI at 8 months after starting treatment. We report a rare case of Wegener's granulomatosis accompanied with pachymeningitis and white matter lesions. PMID:15912757

  20. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    James Alfred Van Allen, world-renowned space scientist, died 9 August 2006 at the age of ninety-one. He succumbed to heart failure after a ten-week period of declining health. Van Allen served for his entire sixty-seven-year professional career as an amazingly productive researcher, space science spokesman, inspired teacher, and valued colleague. The realization by him and his associates that charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field began a whole new field of research, magnetospheric physics. Following that initial discovery, he and his associates quickly extended their observations, first to the inner planets, and then to the rest of the planets and beyond. During his tenure at Iowa, he and his group flew instruments on more than sixty successful Earth satellites and planetary spacecraft, including the first missions to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Van Allen's lifetime publication list numbers more than 275, of which many are widely-cited, seminal papers. He was the sole author of more than 125 of those papers. Beyond the research laboratory, Van Allen worked energetically throughout his career in establishing space research as a new branch of human inquiry. He was among the most sought-after as a committee member and adviser, working at the highest levels of government, including the White House and Congress, and at all levels of the national and international research establishments. Many presentations in the non-scientific arena helped to bring the exciting discoveries and challenges of space research to the attention of the general public. James Van Allen (Van to his many friends and colleagues) was born on 7 September 1914 on a small farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, the second of four sons of Alfred Morris Van Allen and Alma Olney Van Allen. After high school in Mount Pleasant, he entered Iowa Wesleyan College, majoring in physics and graduating summa cum laude. While there, he was introduced to geophysics

  1. Bowen, Dufek, and Shelly Receive 2012 James B. Macelwane Medals: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachos, James

    2013-01-01

    Gabriel J. Bowen, Josef Dufek, and David Richard Shelly were awarded the 2012 James B. Macelwane Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by an outstanding young scientist".

  2. 78 FR 78838 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2014 Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Call for 2014... nominations for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation (NMTI). Since establishment by Congress in the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980, the President of the United States has awarded...

  3. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale of “list” medals. Medals on the regular Mint list, when available, are sold to the public at a charge... available for sale and their selling prices may be obtained from the Director of the Mint, Washington, DC....

  4. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale of “list” medals. Medals on the regular Mint list, when available, are sold to the public at a charge... available for sale and their selling prices may be obtained from the Director of the Mint, Washington, DC....

  5. Character Traits Depicted in Newbery Medal Books from the 1920s through the 2000s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Kimberly; Parker, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Readers readily identify with characters in literature; therefore, educators must be acutely aware of the overt and underlying messages conveyed in Newbery Medal books. In this quantitative content analysis with a qualitative component, the researchers employed nonparametric measurements to examine Newbery Medal books from the 1920s to the 2000s…

  6. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: Walter C. Borman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  7. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Marcia K. Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  8. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Bernice Lott

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in…

  9. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Charles Silverstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the…

  10. A Guide to Newbery Medal Winners and Honor Books, 1977-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinman, Judith R.; Henderson, Darwin L.

    Intended for use by teachers, librarians, and parents, this guide analyzes Newbery Award Medal and honor winning books (1977 through 1984) for sexism. Following a statement of criteria, established by the American Library Association concerning the type of book that should receive the medal and honor citations, and the guidelines used to determine…

  11. 77 FR 15997 - National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination... Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee on March 1, 2012. DATES: The Charter for the National Medal of Technology and Innovation Nomination Evaluation Committee was renewed on March 1,...

  12. Wegener's Granulomatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... dots on the lower extremities (known as “palpable purpura”). Inadequate blood flow to fingers and toes can ... vision from retro-orbital pseudotumor, scleritis), skin (ulcers, purpura). or peripheral nerve (mononeuritis multiplex). Wegener’s granulomatosis may ...

  13. Why Community Works: The Use of Alfred Adler's Individual Psychology as a Foundational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Robert K.; Keith, Edwin M.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler should be used as a foundational theory for student affairs work. The success of community building programs is explained and the concepts of Individual Psychology are summarized. Also asserts that the current drive to develop programs to develop community on college campuses is firmly rooted…

  14. [The social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz and its contribution for the nursing].

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Capalbo, Creusa; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Oliveira, Deise Moura; Tocantins, Florence Romijn; Rodrigues, Benedita Maria Rêgo Deusdará; Ciuffo, Lia Leão

    2013-06-01

    Nursing care can be considered a social action that is set in the everyday world, where intersubjective relations are established and must be valued by the nurse in the different contexts in which it acts. It is a theoretical study which aimed to highlight the main concepts of the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz's and its contribution to Nursing as a knowledge and professional practice field. The following questions guided this study: what is the understanding of caring in Nursing from the perspective of the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz's? How to apply Alfred Schütz's theoretical concepts in the action of caring in Nursing? The theoretical concepts of the social phenomenology and their interface with Nursing were delimited. By incorporating the concepts of the t theory of social action developed by Alfred Schütz into Nursing, this study allows nurses to value and apply the aspects highlighted by this theoretical framework within healthcare, education and scientific research. PMID:24601154

  15. Further additions to the bibliography of Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913).

    PubMed

    Smith, C H

    2004-04-01

    Twenty-one previously unrecorded published writings by the English naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) are noticed. The writings vary greatly in date, size and importance, and include items pertaining both to Wallace's natural history as well as social and political interests PMID:15190918

  16. Recent developments in the WegenerNet high-resolution climate station network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchsberger, Jürgen; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Kabas, Thomas; Bichler, Christoph; Galovic, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The Feldbach region in southeast Austria, characteristic for experiencing a rich variety of weather and climate patterns, has been selected as the focus area for a pioneering weather and climate observation network at very high resolution: The WegenerNet comprises 151 meteorological stations measuring temperature, precipitation, and other parameters, in a tightly spaced grid within an area of about 20 km × 15 km centered near the city of Feldbach (46.93°N, 15.90°E). With its stations about every 2 km2, each with 5-min time sampling, the network provides regular measurements since January 2007. Quality-controlled station time series and gridded field data (spacing 200 m × 200 m) are available in near-real time (data latency less than 1-2 h) for visualization and download via a data portal (www.wegenernet.org). Detailed information is available in the recent description by Kirchengast et al. (2014) and via www.wegcenter.at/wegenernet. The network is set to serve as a long-term monitoring and validation facility for weather and climate research and applications. Uses include validation of nonhydrostatic models operated at 1-km-scale resolution and of statistical downscaling techniques (in particular for precipitation), validation of radar and satellite data, study of orography-climate relationships, and many others. The poster gives a brief introduction to the WegenerNet design and setup, its processing system and its data products, with a focus on recent developments. The latter include calibration of weather radar data (by calculating the reflectivity-rain rate transfer function of each single radar image), derivation of soil moisture from matric potential data (for inclusion in the International Soil Moisture Network), and the development of a versatile semi-automatic maintenance system. Also some example results are shown, including extreme weather events and climate variability over the 8-yr period from 2007 to 2014. Reference: Kirchengast, G., T. Kabas, A

  17. Airway Surgery in Tracheostomised Patients with Wegener Granulomatosis Leading to Subglottic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Altun, Demet; Sivrikoz, Nükhet; Çamcı, Emre

    2015-10-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystemic disorder characterised by granulomatous inflammation of the respiratory system. The growing of proliferative tissue towards the larynx and trachea may cause airway obstruction on account of subglottic stenosis. In this situation, the surgical goal is to eliminate the airway obstruction by providing natural airway anatomy. While mild lesions do not require surgical intervention, in fixed lesions, surgical intervention is required, such as tracheostomy, laser resection and dilatation. In tracheostomised patients, granuloma formation surrounding the tracheostomy cannula may occur in the trachea. Inflammation and newly formed granulation tissue result in severe stenosis in the airways. During surgical treatment of such patients, airway management is important. In this case report, we will discuss gas exchange and airway management with jet ventilation (JV) during excision of the granulation tissue with endolaryngeal laser surgery, leading to subglottic stenosis in tracheostomised patients in WG. PMID:27366530

  18. Meningeal involvement in Wegener granulomatosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Soriano, A; Lo Vullo, M; Casale, M; Quattrocchi, C C; Afeltra, A

    2012-01-01

    Wegener Granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder characterized by necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis that most commonly involves the upper respiratory tract, lungs, and kidneys. The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is infrequent and can cause stroke, cranial nerve abnormalities, cerebrovascular events, seizures, and meningeal involvement. Meningeal involvement is rare and may occur due to local vasculitis, directly spread from adjacent disease in the skull base, paranasal or orbital region. We describe the case of a 20-year-old Caucasian man who was diagnosed with sinonasal WG with frontal focal meningeal involvement. A literature review on diagnosis and treatment of meningeal involvement in course of WG was carried out. The importance of an early diagnosis and treatment of localized WG has been emphasized, in order to avoid the progression to a severe form of disease, especially in younger patients and in paucisymptomatic cases. PMID:23298504

  19. Pyoderma gangrenosum and Wegener granulomatosis-like syndrome induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Gallo, D; Albarrán-Planelles, C; Linares-Barrios, M; Rodríguez-Hernández, C; Martínez-Rodríguez, A; García-Moreno, E; Bravo-Monge, R

    2013-12-01

    Cocaine abuse is associated with various skin and rheumatological diseases that mimic primary autoimmune diseases, including retiform purpura with involvement of the ears, cocaine-induced midline destructive lesions (CIMDL), and eruptive pyoderma gangrenosum (PG). Previous reports have suggested the use of perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) with specificity against human neutrophil elastase (HNE) to differentiate these cocaine-induced diseases from primary autoimmune diseases. We describe a case of a 54-year-old woman with a history of cocaine abuse, who had PG lesions on her legs with accompanying CIMDL and lung lesions similar to those seen in Wegener granulomatosis. Detection of HNE-positive pANCA, and improvement or clinical recurrence after cessation or consumption of cocaine, respectively, were key to differentiating this presentation from primary autoimmune disease. PMID:24252079

  20. Bradford H. Hager Receives 2013 Inge Lehmann Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovica, Jerry X.

    2014-01-01

    In the post-plate tectonics world, efforts to map the structure of Earth's interior broadened to include a growing preoccupation with the underlying dynamics. Students of global geophysics recognize the important role that previous recipients of the Inge Lehmann Medal played in this effort, but they would also understand the reasons that Bradford Hager of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology must be included in this honored list. Brad has been a central figure in mantle dynamics for the last 30 years, responsible for many fundamental advances in our understanding of mantle structure and flow and their connection to the geological record.

  1. Steven C. Wofsy Receives 2012 Roger Revelle Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofsy, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Modern views of the Earth's climate, oceans and atmosphere, and appreciation of human impacts on these systems, are relatively new. Less than a decade before I started my professional career, a small nucleus of pioneering scientists, including many previous recipients of the Revelle Medal, began to discern unexpected changes in atmospheric composition and to assess the implications for the global environment. They initially did not imagine that global environmental changes would be observed in their lifetimes: The Earth system was thought to be too massive compared with human endeavors.

  2. Spiro K. Antiochos Receives 2013 John Adam Fleming Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    Thank you, Jim Klimchuk, for this far too generous citation, and thank you very much, my AGU colleagues, for honoring me with the Fleming Medal. When I consider the list of excellent scientists who have been awarded the Fleming Medal, I am humbled that you have included me in their company. I am especially proud that this award is from AGU because only later in my career did I change my science focus and join AGU. This was the best professional decision I have ever made. As a result, I have met many wonderful colleagues. I've always loved doing research, but my colleagues in AGU have made it so much more enjoyable. Also, moving to AGU gave me the opportunity to participate in truly exciting science. My present position is that of senior scientist for space weather at NASA Goddard. It is interesting to note that the field of space weather science did not even exist when I started my career. I was very fortunate to be part of the beginning of a new field and, as a result, to be able to participate in the explosive advances of space weather science over the past 2 decades.

  3. 1983 William Bowie Medal to Syun-iti Akimoto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert C.; Akimoto, Syun-iti

    The 45th William Bowie Medal is awarded to Syun-iti Akimoto for his pioneering work in the application of high-pressure, high-temperature research to geophysical problems. It is a great honor and personal pleasure for me to present to you this warm and generous man, whom I have admired and respected for many years, to receive AGU's most prestigious award. Akimoto joins the ranks of other distinguished scientists in the field of mineral physics who have received the William Bowie Medal: Leason Adams in 1950, Francis Birch in 1960, and A. E. Ringwood in 1974.High-pressure geophysics research was virtually nonexistent in Japan before 1960. In the 22 years since he joined the faculty of the Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP) of the University of Tokyo, Akimoto has played the leading role in building Japanese high-pressure research as applied to the earth's mantle up to the level where, according to Ted Ringwood, Japan leads the world. Ringwood further attests that, “Akimoto has accomplished this by the example of scientific excellence which he has set in all his research and by his generous encouragement of younger workers.”

  4. [Alfred Döblin (1878-1957). Notes on the cover picture].

    PubMed

    von Stuckrad-Barre, S; Schröter, K

    2003-11-01

    Alfred Döblin studied medicine after completing his Abitur (A-levels). In 1905 he earned his doctorate under Alfred Hoche, director of the psychiatric clinic, by presenting a study on "Memory disorders in Korsakoff's psychosis." He subsequently worked as an assistant doctor in various psychiatric clinics until he switched to internal medicine in 1908. He opened a practice as panel doctor in 1911, which he operated until 1930. Although Döblin had already published a few stories, he first became generally known in 1929 with the appearance of his novel entitled "Berlin Alexanderplatz: the story of Franz Biberkopf." After the burning of the Reichstag in February 1933, as a Jewish socialist Döblin was forced to emigrate. He was unable to work as a physician during his exile, but remained active in his literary pursuits. Döblin died on 26 June 1957 in the state hospital in Emmendingen. PMID:14598043

  5. Video Q&A: Allergies and allergen immunotherapy - an interview with Alfred William Frankland

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this video Q&A, we talk to Dr Alfred William Frankland about the highlights of his career, including working alongside Sir Alexander Fleming, co-founding the British Allergy Society, and introducing pollen counts to UK weather forecasts. We also discuss his opinions on why misconceptions about allergies and allergen immunotherapy still exist. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/255. PMID:24447813

  6. Video Q&A: allergies and allergen immunotherapy--an interview with Alfred William Frankland.

    PubMed

    Frankland, A William

    2014-01-01

    In this video Q&A, we talk to Dr Alfred William Frankland about the highlights of his career, including working alongside Sir Alexander Fleming, co-founding the British Allergy Society, and introducing pollen counts to UK weather forecasts. We also discuss his opinions on why misconceptions about allergies and allergen immunotherapy still exist. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/255. PMID:24447813

  7. Preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky by Alfred Adler, MD.

    PubMed

    Ansbacher, H L

    1981-07-01

    This is a previously unpublished work by Alfred Adler that was written in 1936 as a preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky. A theory of schizophrenia is described in which characteristic prepsychotic features, especially lack of social interest and oversensitivity to real and imagined slights, lead to increasing irrationalism and preoccupation with grandiose ideas. The establishment of a cooperative therapeutic relationship and the instilling of hope are presented as central factors for successful treatment. PMID:7018450

  8. [Alfred Adler and the psychology of aesthetic surgery in the United States].

    PubMed

    Gilman, S L

    2002-01-01

    The quest for a psychological theory to explain the effects of aesthetic surgery reached its high point in the 1920s with the adoption of Alfred Adler's theory of the inferiority complex. The basis for this theory was Adler's early work in the psychological response of the body to disease and "degeneration". Aesthetic surgeons sought out the Adlerian model rather than a Freudian one as purely psychological while its roots, and their own theories, were clearly somatic in origin. PMID:11791189

  9. Alfred Bentz - Erdölgeologe in schwieriger Zeit, 1938-1947

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, E.; Seibold, I.

    2002-08-01

    Alfred Bentz was the leading oil geologist in Germany during the Third Reich, the World War II and thereafter. His relevant activities are treated here mainly on the base of documents in the Geologenarchiv Freiburg. In spite of his prominent position during the Nazi Regime he can obviously not be blamed for personal guilt. As a loyal civil servant he was embedded in the tragic German fate in these years.

  10. Diagenetic history and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Permian carbonate buildups, Wegener Halvoe area, Jameson Land basin, east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. ); Stemmerik, L. )

    1991-04-01

    The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two carbonate sequences, the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The Karstryggen Formation contains hypersaline carbonates and localized evaporites that were heavily weathered and dissected prior to deposition of the overlying strata. The overlying Wegener Halvoe Formation represents an abrupt and extensive marine inundation over the underlying karstified Karstryggen surface. Bryozoan-brachiopod-algal-cement buildups of the Wegener Halvoe Formation are localized on karstic highs, and show up to 150 m of depositional relief. The diagenetic histories of the core and flank facies are very different. Core facies porosity was initially obliterated by marine cements, but repeated meteoric exposure altered unstable core facies constituents. This alteration produced extensive secondary porosity through grain and cement leaching with local collapse brecciation. Flank strata, however, underwent little sea-floor diagenesis, and low permeability and mineralogically stable grain composition protected these strata from meteoric alteration. Subsequent fracturing and hydrothermal fluid flow, however, flushed hydrocarbons and filled pores with ferroan calcite, barite, fluorite, galena, and baroque dolomite. This heating and flushing is thought to have been especially intense in the Wegener Halvoe region; thus, more basinal areas may still have reservoirs containing significant oil in equivalent Upper Permian limestones. If, as is likely, the sea level changes affecting the Greenland Permian were eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin and the Arctic basin of the Barent Sea. This study also provides some important connections to the probably time-equivalent Guadalupian carbonate reservoir rocks of west Texas-New Mexico and Wyoming.

  11. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article announces the 2007 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Irving I. Gottesman. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Gottesman's work, is provided.

  12. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Announces the 2007 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: McCay Vernon. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Vernon's work, is provided.

  13. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Announces the 2007 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Patricia M. Bricklin. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Bricklin's work, is provided.

  14. National Medal of Technology Awarded to NCI Drs. Lowy and Schiller

    Cancer.gov

    President Obama announced that two NCI scientists would be recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honor for technological achievement. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO)

  15. NCI’s Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller awarded Sabin Medal

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists whose discovery provided the technology for commercially developed HPV vaccines were honored with the prestigious Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award at a ceremony held at the Sabin Vaccine Institute, May 18, 2011.

  16. Nuclear Planetology: Constraining the Driving Force in Wegener's Continental Drift Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, G.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear planetology [1] is a new research field, which aims at deciphering the nuclear physics processes responsible for the evolution of ultra-substellar objects and the driving force in Wegener's continental drift theory by means of Re-Os nuclear geochronometry [2]. Terrestrial Re/Os ratios observed within diamond sulphide inclusions [3], compatible with lunar r-process production ratios of Th/U≈1≈Au/Ir [4], drop from ≈0.8 to 0.2-0.05 for nucleogeochronometric ages between 2.3 Ga and 1.4 Ga [5]. It has therefore been argued [5,6] that the Re/Os fractionation is related to a change in oxygen fugacity due to the physics/chemistry of Earth's core after a possibly Fermi-pressure controlled core collapse [4]. Here, Pd/Ru, Pd/Pt, Pd/Ir, Pd/Os, Ru/Ir, Ru/Os, Pt/Ir or Pt/Os ratios from 24 published H chondrite components [7] are connected to their respective nucleogeochronometric ages to constrain an extended fossil fractionation record over 800 Ma. The following ranges are obtained: 0.06-1.04 (Pd/Ru), 0.06-0.79 (Pd/Pt), 0.06-1.76 (Pd/Os), 0.07-1.94 (Pd/Ir), 1.08-1.99 (Ru/Ir), 0.83-2.41 (Pt/Os), 0.82-2.64 (Pt/Ir). Comparing the Re/Os fractionation pattern of the diamond sulphide inclusions with these results and considering that Re is readily oxidized even at ultra-low oxygen fugacity, it may be concluded that (i) extremely reducing conditions within Earth's core basically preserve any unfractionated r-process element ratio until today; and (ii) nuclear/quantum physics processes leading to the observed ratios and fractionation pattern are ultimately the driving force in Wegener's continental drift theory. [1] Roller (2015), Abstract T34B-0407, AGU Spring Meeting. [2] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-17. [3] Smit et al. (2010), GCA 74, 3292. [4] Roller (2015), Abstract #5041, 78th Ann. Met. Soc. Meeting. [5] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-2399. [6] Roller (2015), Abstract PG34A-0283, AGU Spring Meeting. [7] Horan et al. (2009), GCA 73

  17. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  18. Patera in Aere. Symbols of the goddess of health on coins and medals.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    2000-06-01

    The numismatic record, coins and medals, portrays many of the symbols of health. The oldest symbol which portrays health, as a positive state of physical well-being, is the patera. First associated with Hygeia, it extended to that of the Roman Goddess of Health, Salus, imparting to the concept of health the additional themes of safety and security. Ancient and modern coins and medals, which portray the patera, are included in this account. PMID:11624589

  19. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APA) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2008 recipient of the American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Florence W. Kaslow. A citation, biography, and selected bibliography for Florence W. Kaslow are provided in this article. PMID:18665668

  20. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APA) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2008 recipient of the American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Raymond D. Fowler. A citation, biography, and selected bibliography for Raymond D. Fowler are provided in this article. PMID:18665669

  1. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APA) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2008 recipient of the American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is Theodore Millon. A citation, biography, and selected bibliography for Theodore Millon are provided in this article. PMID:18665667

  2. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APA) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2008 recipient of the American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Alice H. Eagly. A citation, biography, and selected bibliography for Alice H. Eagly are provided in this article. PMID:18665670

  3. NCI Scientists Awarded National Medal of Technology and Innovation by President Obama | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two NCI scientists received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the nation’s highest honor for technological achievement. The award was announced by President Obama in October. The honorees, John Schiller, Ph.D., Laboratory of Cellular Oncology (LCO), Center for Cancer Research, NCI, and Douglas Lowy, M.D., also from LCO and NCI deputy director, received their medals at a White House ceremony on Nov. 20.

  4. [Delayed diagnosis in a case of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's) with initial predominance of joint involvement].

    PubMed

    Macri, Anca; Ulmeanu, Ruxandra; Mihălţan, Florin; Popa, Gabriela; Stoica, Radu

    2014-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 53-year-old female, initially admitted in a rheumatology department for fever and diffuse arthritis--being diagnosed with sero-positive rheumathoid arthritis. Although the chest X-ray and CT scan of thorax showed several abnormal features (medium lobe atelectasis, pseudo-cyst in the posterior segment of the right upper lobe with satellite milliary nodules, mediastinal lymph node enlargement), the investigations performed in our pneumology department couldn't establish the etiology of radiological abnormalities. With non-steroidal antiinflamatory treatment, the patient got worse, being readmitted in our hospital after 3 months for high fever, diffuse arthralgia with functional impairment, small hemoptysis, loss of hearing and left ear ache and on chest X-ray with bilateral macronodules, some of these with cavitation. The investigations showed a slight alveolar hemorrhagic syndrome, positive cANCA antibodies, negative antiCCP antibodies--the diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis with lung and ENT involvement being established. Puls-therapy with Solumedrol and i.v. Cyclophosphamide was thereafter initiated with a favorable evolution. This case is special because of the initial misdiagnosis due to the atypical pulmonary manifestations and the non-specific paraclinical findings, in the context of diffuse arthritis with positive rheumatoid factor. PMID:24800597

  5. Silent Ischemic Heart Disease in a Patient with Necrotizing Glomerulonephritis due to Wegener's Granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Exaire, Daniel; Ramos-Gordillo, Manolo; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Salazar-Cabrera, Celia Elena; Sanchez-Uribe, Magdalena; Calleja-Romero, Maria Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a necrotizing vasculitis that mainly affects the respiratory tract and kidneys, but can also affect other systems such as the eye, joints, skin, muscles, nerves, and gastrointestinal tract. Cardiac involvement is traditionally believed to be rare. We report a patient with silent myocardial infarction (MI) and review previously reported cases showing this association. Methods A Medline database search of cases published between January 1978 and July 2008 both in English and Spanish, reporting silent MI complicating WG, was conducted. Results We describe a typical patient with WG who had both respiratory and renal involvement and died unexpectedly following a silent MI after a period of clinical improvement induced by treatment with prednisone and cyclophosphamide. We report necropsy findings and the association with 5 additional cases of WG with silent MI reported in the literature. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware of potential cardiac involvement due to WG. Careful evaluation of each patient, with or without cardiac symptoms, using ECG, echocardiogram, and myocardial enzymes is prudent. PMID:22969778

  6. Mike Fuller Receives 2012 John Adam Fleming Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Thank you, Chris and Subir, for nominating me for the Fleming Medal and for your very kind comments on my research. In looking back over the medalists since 1962, it is hard to believe that I could be lucky enough to join such distinguished company. Yet, I have been very lucky through life. First, I was lucky to go to Christ's Hospital and Cambridge University. Second, my Aunt Marjorie married a physicist, Johnnie Clegg, who was an excellent teacher and inspiration for me. Third, to be born in England in the mid-1930s was to be a member of a fortunate generation of scientists. Providing one safely negotiated World War II, one joined the academic world at a time of great excitement, of expansion, and support for science.

  7. Kuo-Nan Liou Receives 2013 Roger Revelle Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried H.

    2014-01-01

    The Revelle Medal is awarded for "outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system." It also celebrates the man Roger Revelle, who through his broad interests, his awareness of global change, and his national and international service, was a true statesman of science. Dr. Kuo-Nan Liou's accomplishments in research and leadership service are the perfect embodiment of this ideal. He made trailblazing contributions in radiation, the prime driver in the Earth's energy budget, and in cloud physics; both are fundamental to our understanding of climate dynamics and atmosphere-surface interactions. Moreover, his leadership successively as chair of two departments and as director of two separate Institutes and his outreach initiatives in spearheading hydrologic-atmospheric experimentation and in founding the Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering at UCLA reveal him to be a true leader in the image of Roger Revelle.

  8. Bernard J. Wood Receives 2013 Harry H. Hess Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bernard J.

    2014-01-01

    President Finn, friends, and colleagues, I am truly delighted to accept the Hess Medal for 2013. It is difficult to express one's feelings adequately on receipt of such a prestigious award, but a mixture of pride, humility, and thankfulness for a long and lucky career all occur. It did not start propitiously as my high school grades would only ensure undergraduate entry into the Northern Polytechnic, a second-tier institution in London. Nevertheless, I was enthused by several great teachers, including John Charalambous (inorganic chemistry) and Stephen Morel, a field geologist who had worked for many years in Malawi. They pushed me into trying for graduate school, and I was fortunate to find the eclectic Roger Strens my supervisor at Newcastle.

  9. Nicholson Medal for Human Outreach Talk: Physics Outreach: Social Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benczer-Koller, Noemie

    2011-04-01

    Physics constitutes a scientific endeavour that has benefited particularly from the globalization of our planet and the international character of its practitioners. The Medal Award was created by friends of Dwight Nicholson to highlight achievements in humanitarian service, special mentorship of students and junior colleagues while motivating interest in physics in the general public, outreach to the larger community of scientists and nonscientists, and work towards achieving gender and minority equity in the work force. While these are broad goals, they uniquely match the interests of practicing physicists as they weave seamlessly with their scientific work. Examples of the variety of such engagement in the physics community in the present time as well as in the past will be presented.

  10. Nominations sought for U.S. National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    Nominations are now being accepted for the 2012 U.S. National Medal of Science, which is the nation's highest honor for American scientists and engineers, presented annually by the president. The award is given to individuals “deserving of special recognition by reason of their outstanding cumulative contributions to knowledge” in the physical, biological, chemical, mathematical, engineering, or behavioral or social sciences, in combination with exemplary service to the nation, according to the program, which is administered by the National Science Foundation (NSF) on behalf of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. A note in NSF's call for nominations states, “We are especially interested in identifying women, members of minority groups, and persons with disabilities for consideration.”

  11. Alfred Werner's role in the mid-20th century flourishing of American inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Labinger, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    The development of organic and physical chemistry as specialist fields, during the middle and end of the 19th century respectively, left inorganic behind as a decidedly less highly regarded subfield of chemistry. Despite Alfred Werner's groundbreaking studies of coordination chemistry in the early 20th century, that inferior status remained in place - particularly in the US - until the 1950s, when the beginnings of a resurgence that eventually restored its parity with the other subfields can be clearly observed. This paper explores the extent to which Werner's heritage - both direct, in the form of academic descendants, and indirect - contributed to those advances. PMID:24983802

  12. Charles Robert Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace: their dispute over the units of selection.

    PubMed

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace independently discovered the mechanism of natural selection for evolutionary change. However, they viewed the working of selection differently. For Darwin, selection was always focused on the benefit for the individual. For Wallace, selection was as much something of benefit for the group as for the individual. This difference is traced to their different background political-economic views, with Darwin in favor of Adam Smith's view of society and Wallace following Robert Owen in being a socialist. PMID:24014173

  13. H Is for Enthalpy, Thanks to Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and Alfred W. Porter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Irmgard K.

    2002-06-01

    During the 19th century the letter H sometimes represented heat, but the designation of enthalpy was placed into the scientific literature in 1909 by J. P. Dalton and credited by him to Heike Kamerlingh Onnes. In 1922 Alfred W. Porter formally proposed that H become the accepted symbol for Kamerlingh Onnes' enthalpy. During the 20th century, however, the genesis of that word became obscured by error, speculation, and use without attribution. This paper resolves current confusion about origins of the word enthalpy and its symbol H by examining their early uses in the literature.

    See Letter re: this article.

  14. Long-term damage to the ENT system in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Martinez Del Pero, Marcos; Walsh, Michael; Luqmani, Raashid; Flossmann, Oliver; Mukhtyar, Chetan; Jani, Piyush; Rasmussen, Niels; Jayne, David

    2011-05-01

    The objectives of the study are to describe long-term ENT damage and assess risk factors in patients with newly diagnosed and treated Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) using the vasculitis damage index (VDI). Data from four randomised controlled trials carried out by the European Vasculitis Study Group was used. Patients newly diagnosed with WG with complete data at 5 years were included. Patients enrolled into the trials without 5-year data were excluded. Total and ENT VDI scores were recorded at 12 months and after at least 5 years. Logistic regression models were constructed to assess risk factors using total ENT and overall VDI score over the follow-up period, the proportion of patients with increased VDI score and the presence or absence of damage as the main outcomes. One hundred and thirty-eight patients were included. Ninety patients (65%) had long-term damage and 81% of these (73/90) developed some damage in the first 12 months. Positive ENT activity score (BVAS) at baseline and relapses were associated with higher ENT VDI scores long-term (OR = 6.90, 95% CI 2.01-23.75; OR = 2.65, 95% CI 1.20-5.82). Increasing BVAS score showed a trend towards lower VDI scores (OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.88-0.99). Only ENT relapses and number of relapses were associated with an increase in VDI over time (OR = 8.38, 95% CI 3.10-22.68; OR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.24-2.58). In conclusion, most of the ENT damage in these patients was accrued within 12 months of diagnosis. We have shown an association between later ENT damage and the presence of ENT disease at baseline; lower initial BVAS and higher rate of disease relapse. PMID:21085976

  15. The interface of inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's): a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hajj-Ali, Rula A; Major, Jennifer; Langford, Carol; Hoffman, Garry S; Clark, Tiffany; Zhang, Li; Sun, Zhiyuan; Silverstein, Roy L

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between inflammatory disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener's) and the development of subclinical atherosclerosis. A total of 46 adult patients with GPA were enrolled. Disease status was measured by Birmingham vasculitis assessment scores as modified for GPA, vasculitis damage index, disease duration, and number of relapses. Classic atherosclerotic risk factors, platelet aggregation responses, and circulating microparticle (MP) levels were recorded. All patients underwent carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement as outcome for subclinical atherosclerosis. In univariate analyses, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, creatinine, and age were significantly associated with higher IMT (ρ values 0.37, 0.38, 0.35, and 0.054, respectively [P < 0.02 for all]). In a multiple regression model, greater number of relapses, older age at the onset of disease, and higher diastolic blood pressure were found to be associated with higher IMT (P values 0.003, <0.001, and 0.031, respectively). MP counts and platelet reactivity correlated well with disease activity in GPA. Furthermore, MPs were found to activate vascular endothelial cells and platelets in vitro. The cumulative burden of systemic inflammation in GPA correlated with the development of subclinical atherosclerosis. The correlation with subclinical atherosclerosis could be because of glucocorticoid use and not the inflammatory process in GPA, giving the inherent bias that exits with the use of glucocorticoid with each relapse. The findings of increased levels of circulating leukocyte-derived MPs and enhanced platelet reactivity during relapse suggest possible roles for MPs and platelets in disease pathogenesis and support a growing literature that links inflammation, atherosclerosis, and platelet activation. This hypothesis is further substantiated by our demonstration that MPs isolated from plasma of GPA patients can activate

  16. Tracheobronchial Stenoses in Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener's): A Report on 26 Cases.

    PubMed

    Girard, Charlotte; Charles, Pierre; Terrier, Benjamin; Bussonne, Guillaume; Cohen, Pascal; Pagnoux, Christian; Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François; Guillevin, Loïc

    2015-08-01

    Tracheobronchial stenoses (TBSs) are potentially severe manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA) that usually respond poorly to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents. We describe 26 GPA patients with ≥1 tracheal (mainly subglottic, SGS) and/or bronchial stenosis(ses) (BS(s)).Sixteen patients had solitary SGS and 10 had ≥1 BS(s). The male/female sex ratio was 9:17, and the median age at GPA diagnosis was 32 years (3:13 and 28 years, respectively, for SGS patients). Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies were proteinase 3-positive in 65.5% of the patients (50% of those with SGS).Despite conventional GPA therapy, 62% patients experienced ≥1 stenosis relapse(s) (81% of SGS patients, for a total of 1-8 relapses per patient). None of the several systemic or endoscopic treatments prevented future relapses. Cyclophosphamide induction therapy was effective in 4/6 patients with BS(s) and in 1 patient with SGS among the 7 treated. After many relapses, rituximab achieved remission in 3/4 SGS patients. Endoscopic treatments (dilation, laser, corticosteroid injection, etc.) had only transient efficacy. Other GPA manifestations relapsed independently of TBSs. One SGS patient died of acute respiratory distress syndrome.Our findings confirmed that TBSs are severe GPA manifestations that evolve independently of other organ involvements and do not respond to conventional systemic regimens. As previously described, our population was younger and comprised more females than usual GPA patients, especially those with SGS.The small number of patients and the wide variety of local and systemic treatments prevent us from drawing definitive conclusions about the contribution of each procedure. However, cyclophosphamide seemed to effectively treat BSs, but not SGS, and rituximab may be of interest for SGS management. PMID:26266344

  17. Increased expression of chemokines in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis – modulating effects of methylprednisolone in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, E A; Yndestad, A; Bjerkeli, V; Halvorsen, B; Aukrust, P; Frøland, S S

    2005-01-01

    Chemokines, a group of cytokines that attracts and activates leucocyte subpopulations in inflamed tissue, have been associated with the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases, and some recent reports have suggested their involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). To elucidate further the possible role of chemokines in WG we examined serum levels of several CC- and CXC-chemokines in WG patients and assessed the ability of corticosteroids to modulate the expression of these mediators in vitro. Our main findings were: (i) WG patients (n = 14) had elevated serum levels of several inflammatory chemokines [i.e. regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-8] compared to healthy controls (n = 9), as assessed by enzyme immunoassays (EIAs); (ii) by using EIAs and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we demonstrated the ability of methylprednisolone (MP) to down-regulate both the spontaneous and the staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-induced release of chemokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro in both WG patients and controls, possibly involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms; and (iii) the ability of MP to attenuate chemokine secretion was less pronounced in WG patients than in controls, particularly with regard to inhibition of spontaneous release. Our findings suggest a role for chemokines in the pathogenesis of WG. The diminished MP-mediated suppression of chemokines in PBMC from WG patients suggests that more specific modulators of chemokine levels should be investigated in this disorder. PMID:15807865

  18. Using inpatient data to estimate the prevalence of Wegener's granulomatosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Cui, Yazhou; Li, Yan; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Heng; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Summary China lacks a registry for most rare diseases, so specific epidemiological data on those diseases are lacking. A strategy involving the DISMOD II model was recently formulated to estimate the epidemiological parameters of rare diseases, and this strategy has been used to study several rare diseases. The current study used this strategy to estimate the prevalence of one such rare disease, Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), in China based on its incidence, mortality, and rate of remission according to the software tool DISMOD II. The incidence of WG was calculated based on inpatient data from 100 hospitals throughout China. The cause-specific mortality from WG was estimated based on data from the National Vital Statistics System of the United States and adjusted for the Chinese population. The rate of disease remission was based on the results of previous study. The current results indicated that the prevalence of WG in China is 1.94/100,000, which is slightly lower than that in Europe and the United States. The mean age at onset of WG in China was calculated to be 38.9 years for males and 39.3 years for females and the duration of disease was 28 years for both male and female patients. These figures are similar to published data from other countries. In conclusion, the DISMOD II model was used to estimate the prevalence of WG in China, providing a basis to evaluate the potential disease burden and orphan drug use by patients with WG. The DISMOD II model could be used to estimate the prevalence of other rare diseases. PMID:26989646

  19. Selective killing of B-cell hybridomas targeting proteinase 3, Wegener's autoantigen

    PubMed Central

    Reiners, Katrin S; Hansen, Hinrich P; Krüssmann, Anne; Schön, Gisela; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Engert, Andreas; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge

    2004-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a rare disease characterized by granulomatous lesions, small vessel vasculitis and the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCAs) in the sera of affected patients. Their main target antigen is proteinase 3 (PR3), a neutrophil and monocyte-derived neutral serine protease. Since the standard treatment of this severe autoimmune disease, with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids, is associated with potential side-effects, the development of a more specific immunotherapeutic agent is warranted. The key role of ANCA in the pathogenesis of vasculitis and the effectiveness of anti-CD20 antibodies in patients with refractory WG points towards the importance of B cells in WG. We thus evaluated a new approach to selectively eliminate PR3-specific autoreactive B cells by targeting the B-cell receptor. For this purpose we used a bifunctional recombinant fusion protein consisting of the antigen PR3 and a toxin. The cytotoxic component of this novel fusion protein was the ribonuclease angiogenin, a human toxin with low immunogenicity. The toxin was stabilized by exchanging the catalytically relevant histidine in position 44 with glutamine to eliminate the autoproteolytic activity. PR3H44Q was fused either to the N terminus or to the C terminus of angiogenin. The recombinant proteins were expressed in 293T cells. Binding assays demonstrated the appropriate size and recognition by anti-PR3 antibodies. Using TUNEL technology, we demonstrated that these autoantigen toxins kill proteinase 3-specific B-cell hybridomas selectively by inducing apoptosis. The data indicate that autoantigen-toxins are promising tools in the treatment or co-treatment of autoimmune diseases in which the antigen is known. PMID:15147566

  20. "Remember to Hand out Medals": Peer Rating and Expertise in a Question-and-Answer Study Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponti, Marisa

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study of giving medals as part of a peer rating system in a question-and-answer (Q&A) study group on Python, a programming language. There are no professional teachers tutoring learners. The study aimed to understand whether and how medals, awarded to responses in a peer-based learning environment, can…

  1. 50 years of space science (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Roger-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    The launch of Sputnik-1 triggered my fascination for space at the age of 20. The past 50 years have allowed me to study the Sun with sounding rockets and satellites, revealing the complexity of our star, contributing to the understanding of its physics, and offering surprising manifestations of its behavior and of its effects on Earth. Building instruments for space astronomy, managing teams of space scientists and engineers, led me to become the science director of the European space agency between 1983 and 2001 where I formulated and managed the Horizon 2000 program, which led Europe to occupy the front row of world space science. The Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture offers me an opportunity, to describe the most spectacular achievements of this long-term plan and to outline some basic principles for reaching success, including the essential role of international cooperation with shared partnership. The Lecture also identifies key problems and controversial issues that space astronomy and exploration will face in the 21st century.

  2. Fiber optic displacement sensor for medal detection using fiber bundled probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, M.; Samian, Supadi, Pujiyanto, Yhuwana, Y. G. Yhun

    2016-03-01

    A simple fiber optic displacement sensor (FODS) based on intensity modulation technique is investigated using a bundle multimode plastic fiber as a probe for various medals detection. The sensor consists of a light source, a probe, and photodiode detector. The sensor is capable of measuring displacements of flat medals ranging from 0.05 to 4.2 mm using a red light source of wavelength 630 nm. The highest sensitivity of the sensor is found to be 0.0048 mV/μm over 50-650 µm for the gold medal. The sensor is highly sensitive at the front slope and very useful for close distance target. The simplicity of the design, high sensitivity, long dynamic range and the low cost of the fabrication make it suitable for wider applications in industries as position control and micro displacement measurement in the hazardous region.

  3. Gold medal award for life achievement in the application of psychology.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is Stuart Oskamp. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 117th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 7, 2009, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2009 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Archie L. Turner, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Anthony Jackson; Steven E. James; Ronald F. Levant; Gerald Koocher; Sandra Shullman; and Rosie Phillips Bingham, APA Board of Directors liaison. PMID:19618969

  4. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: David W. Johnson.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology is David W. Johnson. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504568

  5. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology: Sandra L. Shullman.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Sandra L. Shullman. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504569

  6. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Richard E. Nisbett.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is Richard E. Nisbett. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504571

  7. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Beatrice A. Wright.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in 4 areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Beatrice A. Wright. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are: Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504570

  8. How Earth works 100 years after Wegener's continental drift theory and IGCP 648

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. X.; Evans, D. A.; Zhong, S.; Eglington, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    It took half a century for Wegener's continental drift theory to be accepted as a fundamental element of the plate tectonic theory. Another half a century on, we are still unsure of the driving mechanism for plate tectonics: is it dominated by thermal convection, gravitational forces, or by a combination of mechanisms? Nonetheless, breakthroughs in the past decades put us in a position to make a major stride in answering this question. These include: (1) widely accepted cyclic occurrences of supercontinent assembly and break-up (whereas random occurrence of supercontinents was an equal possibility in the 1990s); (2) the discovery of two equatorial and antipodal large low seismic velocity provinces (LLSVPs) that dominate the lower mantle and appear to have been the base for almost all mantle plumes since at the Mesozoic, and of subduction of oceanic slabs all the way to the core-mantle boundary, which together suggesting whole-mantle convection; (3) the recognition of true polar wander (TPW) as an important process in Earth history, likely reflecting Earth's major internal mass redistribution events; and (4) rapidly enhancing computer modelling power enabling us to simulate all aspect of Earth's dynamic inner working. Many new yet often controversial ideas have been proposed, such a possible coupling in time (with an offset) and space between supercontinent cycle and superplume (LLSVP) events which oppose to the idea of static and long-lived LLSVPs, and the orthoversion v.s. introversion or extroversion models for supercontinent transition. To fully utilise these advances as well as the rapidly expanding global geoscience databases to address the question of how Earth works, an UNESCO-IUGS sponsored IGCP project No. 648 was formed to coordinate a global cross-disciplinary effort. We aim to achieve a better understanding of the supercontinent cycle, and examine the relationship between supercontinent cycle and global plume events. We will establish a series of global

  9. Increased expression of the secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    OHLSSON, S; FALK, R; YANG, J J; OHLSSON, K; SEGELMARK, M; WIESLANDER, J

    2003-01-01

    The secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is a low molecular weight, tissue-specific inhibitor of proteases, such as elastase and cathepsin G. It is the major local protease inhibitor in the upper airways. Proteinase 3, the main autoantigen in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), can degrade SLPI proteolytically. In addition, SLPI is sensitive to oxidative inactivation by myeloperoxidase-generated free oxygen radicals. SLPI also has an antimicrobial capacity that can be of interest, as infection is considered to play a role in the pathogenesis of WG. This study focuses on SLPI expression in patients suffering from WG, something that to our knowledge has not been explored hitherto. Serum samples and nasal biopsies were obtained from 12 Swedish WG patients, while buffy coats were obtained from 33 American WG patients. SLPI levels in serum were measured by means of ELISA and the protein was detected by means of immunohistochemistry in nasal biopsies. mRNA expression was studied by means of in situ hybridization on nasal biopsies and RT-PCR on leucocytes. IL-6 or ESR were measured as markers of inflammatory activity. Cystatin C or creatinine was measured as a marker of renal filtration. White blood cell counts were registered. In serum, we found close to normal SLPI levels, without any correlation to IL-6. Two patients had greatly elevated values, both of them suffering from severe renal engagement. Strong SLPI mRNA expression was found in nasal biopsies. RT-PCR on leucocyte mRNA showed normal or greatly elevated expression of SLPI mRNA, correlating with disease activity. Leukocyte SLPI expression seems to be up-regulated in active WG. Serum levels were measured in a small number of patients and were found to be close to normal. Lack of correlation to the acute phase response indicates a specific regulation. This might be linked to an altered protease/antiprotease balance. These findings could indicate that SLPI locally participates in the anti-inflammatory and

  10. [A case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis in the course of Wegener's granulomatosis].

    PubMed

    Idasiak-Piechocka, I; Oko, A; Łochyńska, K; Woźniak, A; Czekalski, S

    2000-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is characterized by granulomatous vasculitis of the respiratory tract and glomerulonephritis (GN). Prognosis of this disease is poor and about 20% of untreated patients die after one year from the onset. WG was recognized in 45-year-old patient on the basis of: 1) clinical symptoms (joint pain and swollen, purpura on the skin which appeared one week after respiratory tract infection, ulceration of the tonsils and lingula), 2) results of additional testing (X-chest-ray-infiltrates of both lungs), positive results of the cANCA (titre 1:640) and rapidly progressive renal failure [the increase of serum creatinine level (Pcr) from 123.7 to 707 mumol/l (1.4 to 8.0 mg/dl) during one week]. Renal biopsy revealed extracapillary GN (cellular crescents in 7 out of 8 glomeruli and scattered foci of fibrinoid necrosis of capillary walls in all). At the beginning of the treatment Pcr raised to 884 mumol/l (10 mg/dl) and the patient required hemodialysis. He was treated with methylprednisolone (M) at flash doses of 1000 mg/24 h by three days followed by 125 mg/24 h i.v.--because of peptic ulcer, with cyclophosphamide (C-150 mg/24 h p.p.), with trimetoprim/sulphametoxazole, with pentoxifylline and omeprazol. After six weeks of the treatment in the control kidney biopsy sclerotic changes in 10 out of 13 glomeruli and diffuse interstitial fibrosis were found. However, during the same time, we observed clinical remission of the disease and the decrease of Pcr to 176.8 mumol/l (2 mg/dl). The M dosis was reduced by 5 mg every weeks and the C dosis--to 50 mg (because of the increase of aminotransferase levels) After six months of the treatment Pcr was 132.6 mumol/l (1.5 mg/dl) and CANCA titer was 1:16. In this case of RPGN, despite off the progression of the morphological changes in the kidney, we obtained the clinical remission of the disease and significant decrease of Pcr level. These results suggest that aggressive treatment of WG is justified even in

  11. Effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen Process to Black Carbon Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ling; Li, Qinbin; He, Cenlin; Wang, Xin; Huang, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    We systematically investigated the effect of Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process to black carbon (BC) simulation by a global 3D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem constrained by measurements of BC scavenging efficiencies, concentration in air, deposition fluxes, concentration in snow and washout ratios. Including effect of WBF process reduces the annual mean BC scavenging efficiencies (the ratio of BC in cloud droplets to total BC) at all altitudes by 43-76% in the Arctic. For mid latitude BC scavenging efficiencies decrease by 8-22%, 23-39%, and 41-50% in lower (0-2 km), middle (2-5 km) and upper troposphere (5-10 km), respectively. Simulated BC in air in the Arctic and at mid altitude (˜4 km) in mid latitude increases by ˜40%, and the discrepancy reduces from -65% to -30%. Simulated median BC in snow decreases from 25.7 to 22.4 ng g‑1, by 15% in mid latitude and increases from 8.7 to 11.0 ng g‑1, by 26% in the Arctic and the comparison with observations improves. The model overestimates washout ratios (ratio of BC in fresh snow/rain to BC in surface air) at most of the sites by up to a factor of 165. With effect of WBF process included, the discrepancy decreases to a factor of 72. The simulated BC burden increases from 0.22 to 0.35 mg m‑2 yr‑1 when effect of WBF process is included, partly explains the scaled up of BC burden in Bond et al., 2013. Moreover, burden above 5 km increases from 22% to 27% when WBF process is included, indicating a higher forcing efficiency. We also found that BC simulation is insensitive to the temperature criteria between mixed phase clouds and ice clouds. The simulated BC burden is the same when the temperature is set as -15° C and -25° C. This study also suggests that more observations are needed to better distinguish riming dominated and WBF dominated conditions and better parameterize BC scavenging efficiency under the two conditions.

  12. 75 FR 30427 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Idaho, Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Laboratory of Anthropology, Moscow, ID AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is..., Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, Moscow, ID, that meet the definitions of ``unassociated... Laboratory of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the five cultural...

  13. Riccardo Giacconi to Receive National Medal of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    Riccardo Giacconi, very recently retired President of Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), will be awarded the National Medal of Science by President George W. Bush on March 14, according to the White House. Giacconi, who received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2002, will be honored for his pioneering research in X-ray astronomy and for his visionary leadership of major astronomy facilities. Established by Congress in 1959, the National Medal of Science is the Nation's highest honor for American scientists and is awarded annually by the President of the United States to individuals "deserving of special recognition for their outstanding contributions to knowledge." "We are extremely proud that Riccardo Giacconi has been selected to receive the nation's highest award for scientific achievement," said current AUI President Ethan J. Schreier, a long-term colleague of Dr. Giacconi. "It is another fitting recognition for an outstanding scientific career that has enhanced our basic understanding of the universe," Schreier added. Giacconi, known as the father of X-ray astronomy, used X-ray detectors launched on rockets to discover the first cosmic X-ray source in 1962. Because X-ray radiation is absorbed in Earth's atmosphere, space-based instruments are necessary to study it. Giacconi outlined a methodical program to investigate this new X-ray universe and, working with his research group at American Science and Engineering, Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts, developed the first space satellite dedicated to the new field of X-ray astronomy. Named Uhuru, this X-ray satellite observatory was launched in 1970 and subsequently discovered hundreds of X-ray sources. The ground-breaking work of Giacconi and his group led to the discovery of black holes, which to that point had been hypothesized but never seen. Giacconi was also the first to prove that the universe contains background radiation of X-ray light. Riccardo Giacconi has played a key role in many other landmark

  14. 1988 Horton Medal presented to Peter S. Eagleson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Eagleson, Peter S.

    It is indeed a great honor for me, and also a great pleasure, to present to you the 1988 recipient of the Robert E. Horton Medal, Peter S. Eagleson. Shortly after it became public that Pete was the winner of this year's medal, I commented to my wife that, although I had never given a citation for an AGU medalist, this was one I would really love to give. The reason is simple: there is no one in the world who better represents the standards of excellence that a hydrologist hopes to achieve and that hydrologists hope our discipline will attain than Peter Eagleson.Pete did not start his research career in hydrology. In fact, his Ph.D. thesis in 1956 and his research up to 1965 were mainly in the field of sediment sorting and transport by waves on beaches. During this period he also investigated problems related to flow-induced vibrations of plates. His research in these areas was extremely successful, producing three chapters in books and about 20 journal papers in addition to many technical reports and journal discussions. Indeed, Pete had made his mark in wave theory and sediment transport, but it was good fortune for our field that starting about 1964 his interest in hydrology overcame all his past experience and assured a reputation in the waves and sediment field, and thus he embarked on a new adventure—bringing into hydrology the scientific rigor that existed in more academically established disciplines. With his strong fluid mechanics background—he still teaches that subject to undergraduates at MIT—Pete was ideally suited to lead the field toward new problems and also toward new approaches to old problems . . . and this he did indeed! Just in 1967 he and his students published six papers, most of them in Water Resources Research, which had a strong, an almost immediate impact on the field of hydrology. Here was somebody who was tackling the modeling of overland flow with the scientific standards of fluid mechanics. At the same time, finally somebody had

  15. Shock at the millennium. I. Walter B. Cannon and Alfred Blalock.

    PubMed

    Chambers, N K; Buchman, T G

    2000-06-01

    Present management of shock derives, in part, from the classic investigations of Walter B. Cannon and Alfred Blalock. The intersections of their professional lives as recorded in the professional literature and in personal correspondence suggest that Blalock's pivotal studies of experimental shock were fueled, at least in part, by Cannon's inability to resolve the inconsistencies of the then-popular toxic theory of shock. Cannon appears to have substantially shaped Blalock's thought and work, initially as authority and competitor and later as colleague and friend. Blalock's experimental proof that injury precipitated obligatory locoregional fluid losses, the effects of which could be ameliorated by vigorous restoration of plasma volume, became a cornerstone of shock theory and therapy. PMID:10847639

  16. Discussion of Alfred Alder's preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky.

    PubMed

    Ansbacher, H L

    1981-07-01

    In his preface to The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky, Alfred Adler (1) found his theory of the dynamics of schizophrenia supported in the Diary, (2) alluded to Nijinsky's prepsychotic personality, and (3) briefly touched on the possibility and conditions of recovery. To add to the understanding of Adler's "Preface," this discussion (1) expands his theory of schizophrenia, (2) gives some concrete data of Nijinsky's prepsychotic personality, (3) describes two episodes of recovery subsequent to the "Preface," and (4) introduces an important aspect of Adler's theory, which he had to omit out of consideration for Nijinsky's wife, Romola-namely, her role in her husband's disorder. With the larger theoretical and historical context established. Adler's "Preface" can be appreciated for its predictive validity. PMID:7018451

  17. Alfred Russel Wallace's medical libertarianism: state medicine, human progress, and evolutionary purpose.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), naturalist and explorer of South America and the Malay Archipelago, secured his place in history by independently discovering the theory of natural selection. His letter outlining the theory was sent from Ternate in eastern Indonesia and received at Down House, according to Charles Darwin (1809-82), on June 18, 1858, prompting the now-famed evolutionist to rush his languishing manuscript to press. Wallace's contributions to evolutionary biology, biogeography, and anthropology are well known, but his medical views have received far less attention. Within the context of a strident populist antivaccination movement and an ominous elitist eugenics campaign, Wallace took his stand, which revealed itself in a libertarianism that defended traditional socialist constituencies (the working poor, the lumpenproletariat, and feminist reformers) against state-mandated medical interventions. Rather than viewing Wallace as a heterodox contrarian, this article argues that his positions were logical outgrowths of his medical libertarianism and evolutionary and social theories. PMID:23989935

  18. Capturing the will: Imposture, delusion, and exposure in Alfred Russel Wallace's defence of spirit photography.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Benjamin David

    2014-06-01

    The co-discoverer of natural selection, Alfred Russel Wallace, found himself deeply embroiled in a range of controversies surrounding the relationship between science and spiritualism. At the heart of these controversies lay a crisis of evidence in cases of delusion or imposture. He had the chance to observe the many epistemic impasses brought about by this crisis while participating in the trial of the American medium Henry Slade, and through his exchanges with the physiologist William Benjamin Carpenter and the psychical researcher Frederic Myers. These contexts help to explain the increasing value that Wallace placed on the evidence of spirit photography. He hoped that it could simultaneously break these impasses, while answering once and for all the interconnected questions of the unity of the psyche and the reliability of human observation. PMID:24603059

  19. Alfred Russel Wallace and the road to natural selection, 1844-1858.

    PubMed

    Smith, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom has had it that the naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace and his colleague Henry Walter Bates journeyed to the Amazon in 1848 with two intentions in mind: to collect natural history specimens, and to consider evidential materials that might reveal the causal basis of organic evolution. This understanding has been questioned recently by the historian John van Wyhe, who points out that with regard to the second matter, at least, there appears to be no evidence of a "smoking gun" variety proving it so. In the present essay the circumstances of Wallace's interest in the matter are reviewed, and van Wyhe is taken to task with alternate explanations for the facts he introduces in his argument. The conclusion is that Wallace almost certainly did have the second objective in mind when he left for both the Amazon, and the Far East. PMID:25424743

  20. The Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein Signaling Then and Now: A Tribute to Alfred G. Gilman.

    PubMed

    Sunahara, Roger K; Insel, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    The recent, unfortunate death of Alfred G. ("Al") Gilman, M.D., Ph.D., represents a sad signpost for an era spanning over 40 years in molecular pharmacology. Gilman's discoveries, influence, and persona were dominant forces in research and training in pharmacology. Here, we review the progression of ideas and knowledge that spawned early work by Gilman and collaborators (among them, one of the authors) and later efforts (including those of the other author) that have recently yielded a comprehensive and precise structural understanding of fundamental topics in pharmacology: the binding of ligands to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and the interaction of GPCRs with heterotrimeric G proteins and effector molecules. Those data provide new and important insights into the molecular basis that underlies affinity and efficacy, two of the most important features of drug action, which represent the latest chapter in the saga that Al Gilman's work helped launch. PMID:26984025

  1. [Doctor and poet as rivals. Sigmund Freud, Alfred von Berger and the narrative of female homosexuality].

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Starting from a passage in the Dora case history where Freud suggests some differences between a literary and a clinical narrative of female homosexuality, this paper presents examples which he might have had in mind. Besides Balzac's "La fille aux yeux d'or" (1834/35) it is in particular Alfred v. Berger's novella "Die Italienerin [The Italian woman]" (1904) which may have served as a model and counterpoint to the literary strategies used in Freud's case history. Freud had a relationship of long standing with Berger. This newly discovered source may provide a clue for the date at which Freud finalized the Dora manscript which he had held back for years. PMID:21598589

  2. Localization of α-adrenoceptors: JR Vane Medal Lecture

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, John C

    2015-01-01

    This review is based on the JR Vane Medal Lecture presented at the BPS Winter Meeting in December 2011 by J.C. McGrath. A recording of the lecture is included as supporting information. It covers his laboratory's work from 1990 to 2010 on the localization of vascular α1-adrenoceptors in native tissues, mainly arteries. Main points: (i) α1-adrenoceptors are present on several cell types in arteries, not only on medial smooth muscle, but also on adventitial, endothelial and nerve cells; (ii) all three receptor subtypes (α1A, α1B, α1D) are capable of binding ligands at the cell surface, strongly indicating that they are capable of function and not merely expressed. (iii) all of these cell types can take up an antagonist ligand into the intracellular compartments to which endocytosing receptors move; (iv) each individual subtype can exist at the cell surface and intracellularly in the absence of the other subtypes. As functional pharmacological experiments show variations in the involvement of the different subtypes in contractions of different arteries, it is concluded that the presence and disposition of α1-adrenoceptors in arteries is not a simple guide to their involvement in function. Similar locations of the subtypes, even in different cell types, suggest that differences between the distribution of subtypes in model systems do not directly correlate with those in native tissues. This review includes a historical summary of the alternative terms used for adrenoceptors (adrenergic receptors, adrenoreceptors) and the author's views on the use of colours to illustrate different items, given his partial colour-blindness. PMID:25377869

  3. Emergency department visits during an Olympic gold medal television broadcast

    PubMed Central

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Vermeulen, Marian J

    2011-01-01

    Background Practice pattern variations are often attributed to physician decision-making with no accounting for patient preferences. Objective To test whether a mass media television broadcast unrelated to health was associated with changes in the rate and characteristics of visits for acute emergency care. Design Time-series analysis of emergency department visits for any reason. Subjects Population-based sample of all patients seeking emergency care in Ontario, Canada. Measures The broadcast day was defined as the Olympic men’s gold medal ice hockey game final. The control days were defined as the 6 Sundays before and after the broadcast day. Results A total of 99 447 visits occurred over the 7 Sundays, of which 13 990 occurred on the broadcast day. Comparing the broadcast day with control days, we found no significant difference in the hourly rate of visits before the broadcast (544 vs 537, p = 0.41) or after the broadcast (647 vs 639, p = 0.55). In contrast, we observed a significant reduction in hourly rate of visits during the broadcast (647 vs 783, p < 0.001), equal to an absolute decrease of 409 patients, a relative decrease of 17% (95% confidence interval 13–21), or about 136 fewer patients per hour. The relative decrease during the broadcast was particularly large for adult men with low triage severity. The greatest reductions were for patients with abdominal, musculoskeletal or traumatic disorders. Conclusion Mass media television broadcasts can influence patient preferences and thereby lead to a decrease in emergency department visits. PMID:21915235

  4. Spiro K. Antiochos Receives 2013 John Adam Fleming Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2014-01-01

    The John Adam Fleming Medal is awarded for "original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences." Originality and technical leadership are exactly the characteristics that distinguish the research of Spiro K. Antiochos. Spiro possesses a truly unique combination of physical insight, creativity, and mastery of the concepts and mathematical and numerical tools of space physics. These talents have allowed him to develop completely original theories for major observational problems and to test and refine those theories using sophisticated numerical simulation codes that he himself helped to develop. Spiro's physical insight is especially impressive. He has an uncanny ability to identify the fundamental aspects of complex problems and to see physical connections where others do not. This can sometimes involve ideas that may initially seem counterintuitive to those with less creativity. Many of Spiro's revolutionary advances have opened up whole new areas of study and shaped the course of space physics. Examples include the breakout model for coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the S-web model for the slow solar wind, and the thermal nonequilibrium model for solar prominences. The breakout model is of special significance to AGU as it strives to promote science for the betterment of humanity. CMEs are enormous explosions on the Sun that can have major "space weather" impacts here on Earth. They affect technologies ranging from communication and navigation systems to electrical power grids. Breakout is the leading theory for why CMEs occur and may one day be the foundation for more accurate space weather forecasting.

  5. Alfred P. Southwick, MDS, DDS: dental practitioner, educator and originator of electrical executions.

    PubMed

    Christen, A G; Christen, J A

    2000-11-01

    The search for a modern, humane method of criminal execution was triggered by a freak accident which occurred in Buffalo, New York in 1881. Dr. Alfred P. Southwick (a former steam-boat engineer, noted dentist and dental educator) happened to witness an intoxicated man die after he inadvertently touched a live generator terminal. Southwick's initial reaction was shock. Later, as he pondered this tragic event, he concluded that electrocution was, at least, a quick and seemingly painless way to depart from this earth. As his thoughts turned to common methods of capital punishment, Alfred concluded that death by electrocution could become a more humane alternative, as compared with the more grisly methods (e.g., hanging, beheading by guillotine, garroting, suffocation and flaying). Working through the governor of New York and the state legislature, Southwick originated and successfully promoted the passage of laws which mandated electrical executions in New York and in approximately 20 other states. During 1888-1889, Southwick served on the state's three-person Electrical Death Commission, a group who reported that electrical execution was superior to all other methods. On January 1, 1889, the world's first electrical execution law went into effect. On August 6, 1890, William Francis Kemmler, who had murdered his mistress, was the first person to die in the electric chair. However, this public event became an amateurish spectacle: the initial surge of current did not cause Kemmler's immediate death and a second jolt was needed. Those who witnessed this bungled execution were stunned. Graphic and detailed criticism from both the press and the general public ran high. However, Dr. Southwick vigorously continued to support and finally achieve his goal--to humanize capital punishment through the legal use of electrical execution. PMID:11806253

  6. The William Houston Gold Medal of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh 2014, orthodontic cases.

    PubMed

    Almuzian, Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    The William Houston Medal is awarded to the individual achieving the highest mark at, the Membership in Orthodontics (MOrth) examination at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. As part of the examination the candidate must submit five clinical cases. Details of two cases treated by the winning candidate are presented in this paper. PMID:26082385

  7. 77 FR 61644 - President's Committee on the National Medal of Science Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION President's Committee on the National Medal of Science Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces...

  8. 76 FR 34103 - President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces...

  9. 75 FR 61520 - President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces...

  10. 77 FR 59992 - Announcement of Humanities Medal Design Competition Under the America COMPETES Reauthorization...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... the idea of the humanities--the study of literature, philosophy, history, and other subjects--into a... fields of art, sculpture, minting, and cultural management, along with 2-3 representatives of NEH. Judges..., history, philosophy--need to be conveyed in the design of the medal. This may be done through a...

  11. An Examination of Newbery Medal Books from the 1920s through the 2000s: Biblical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Content analysis was conducted to determine the frequency of the presence of positive Biblical virtues and paired opposite traits across 18 Newbery Medal books from the 1920s through the 2000s because the Newbery Award is a prestigious honor bestowed upon children's literature, and the criteria for selection among books specifically precludes…

  12. Discourse following award of Kepler Gold Medal. [Kepler Laws, planetary astronomy and physics, and Jupiter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    Kuiper briefly reviews Kepler's contributions to the field of planetary astronomy and physics, along with references to his own background in the study of stars, planets, and the solar system. He mentions his participation in NASA programs related to planetary astronomy. He concludes his remarks with thanks for being honored by the award of the Kepler Gold Medal.

  13. 76 FR 36176 - Pricing for National September 11 Memorial & Museum Commemorative Medal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... United States Mint Pricing for National September 11 Memorial & Museum Commemorative Medal ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum..., Associate Director for Sales and Marketing; United States Mint; 801 9th Street, NW.; Washington, DC...

  14. Andreas Vesalius and the Occo medals of Augsburg. Evidence of a professional friendship.

    PubMed

    Houtzager, H L

    2000-06-01

    The friendly connection that existed between Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) and his learned friends in Augsburg comprised three periods in the life of the emperor's court physician. The close ties that must have connected Adolphus Occo II and III and Vesalius are expressed in a number of medals carrying their images. PMID:11624585

  15. Benjamin Franklin's Commemorative Medal "Libertas Americana": A Study in Rhetorical Iconology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lester C.

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the underlying rhetorical functions of how Benjamin Franklin used the medal to praise the national characters of France and the United States in those two countries, while he also used it to influence government policy in Malta and to vindicate himself from criticism in England. (KEH)

  16. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology: Edwin A. Fleishman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Application of Psychology was awarded to Edwin A. Fleishman, for his significant contributions to the science and applications of psychology, which he has sustained over his remarkable career. He is cited for his research, which has had a profound influence on our understanding of human…

  17. The Newbery and Caldecott Awards: A Guide to the Medal and Honor Books. 2000 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Each year the Newbery and Caldecott Medals are awarded by the American Library Association for the most distinguished American children's books published the previous year. With its annotations for all winning titles and honor books since the inception of the awards (Newbery in 1922 to be awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished…

  18. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology: Janet Taylor Spence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Science of Psychology is awarded to Janet Taylor Spence. She is recognized for her outstanding scientific contributions that have had a profound theoretical and empirical impact on two areas of inquiry: Her early seminal research on the motivational properties of trait anxiety led the way to…

  19. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is awarded to Florence L. Denmark. She is recognized for her efforts to help legitimize the psychology of women by teaching the first doctoral psychology course in the field and through her scholarly texts and articles. She continues to have an impact on the…

  20. Milton M. Holland: Panola County Recipient of the Medal of Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This publication features an article about Milton M. Holland, a black American from East Texas, who is credited with being the first black Texan to have won the Congressional Medal of Honor during the U.S. Civil War. The articles in the issue concern Milton Holland and other black Americans who served in the Civil War. The articles include:…

  1. 32 CFR 901.13 - Children of Medal of Honor recipients category.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Children of Medal of Honor recipients category. 901.13 Section 901.13 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS APPOINTMENT TO THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY Nomination Procedures...

  2. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sale of âlistâ medals. 92.2 Section 92.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale...

  3. 31 CFR 92.2 - Sale of “list” medals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sale of âlistâ medals. 92.2 Section 92.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.2 Sale...

  4. C-ANCA-positive IgG fraction from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis induces lung vasculitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    WEIDEBACH, W; VIANA, V S T; LEON, E P; BUENO, C; LEME, A S; ARANTES-COSTA, F M; MARTINS, M A; SALDIVA, P H N; BONFA, E

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse in rats the ability of C-ANCA-positive IgG fraction in triggering inflammatory response on pulmonary tissue. Wistar rats (n = 18) were injected via the the internal jugular vein with 20 mg of total C-ANCA-positive IgG fraction isolated from serum of three different Wegener's granulomatosis patients obtained before therapy. Similarly, control rats were treated with IgG fraction from two rheumatoid arthritis patients (n = 7), IgG from six normal human sera (n = 15) or saline (n = 18), respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24h of injection for histological analysis of the lungs. Vasculitis and inflammatory infiltrate were consistently absent in rats injected with rheumatoid arthritis IgG or saline and in 14/15 of normal IgG treated animals. In contrast, marked vasculitis was observed in all 18 animals injected with C-ANCA-positive IgG fraction. The histological features were characterized by the presence of a perivascular pleomorphic cellular sheath, particularly around small vessels, endothelial adherence and diapedesis of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and presence of granuloma-like lesions. A dose–response relationship was observed between protein concentration of C-ANCA IgG sample and the intensity of the inflammatory response in the animals. In addition, IgG fraction with undetectable C-ANCA, obtained from one patient in remission after treatment, was not able to reproduce the pulmonary tissue alterations induced by its paired IgG that was positive for C-ANCA taken before therapy. The experimental model described herein may be useful to characterize more effectively the pathogenic mechanism of C-ANCA in Wegener's disease. PMID:12100022

  5. From evaporating pans to transpiring plants (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, Michael

    2013-04-01

    observations that win. That is the basis of science. In this Dalton Medal lecture we first examine pan evaporation observations and show why pan evaporation has declined. Armed with that knowledge we then investigate the consequences for plant water use and how this is directly coupled to the catchment water balance.

  6. "We all go a little mad sometimes": Alfred Hitchcock, American psychoanalysis, and the construction of the Cold War psychopath.

    PubMed

    Genter, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the image of the psychopath in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 film Psycho. The famed director’s portrayal of a psychologically damaged young man connected with a much larger discussion over political and sexual deviance in the early Cold War, a discussion that cantered on the image of the psychopath as the dominant threat to national security and that played upon normative assumptions about adolescent development and mother-son relations. PMID:20827837

  7. Generation of high-resolution wind fields from the dense meteorological station network WegenerNet in South-Eastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Christoph; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Fuchsberger, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    To investigate weather and climate on a local scale as well as for evaluating regional climate models (RCMs) the Wegener Center at the University of Graz established the long-term field experiment WegenerNet Feldbach region, a dense grid of 153 meteorological stations. The observations of these stations are managed by an automatic WegenerNet Processing system. This system includes a quality check of collected observations and a Data Product Generator (DPG), among other subsystems. Products already implemented in the DPG are gridded weather and climate products, generated from the main parameters temperature, precipitation and relative humidity (Kirchengast et. al., Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 95, 227-242, 2014). Missing elements are gridded wind fields from wind observations. Wind is considered as one of the most difficult meteorological variables to model and depends on many different parameters such as topography and surface roughness. Therefore a simple interpolation can only be performed in case of uniform characteristics of landscape. The presentation introduces our method of generation of wind fields from near real-time observations of the WegenerNet. Purpose of this work is to provide a database with 3D wind fields in a high spatial and time resolution as addition to the existing products, for evaluating convection permitting climate models as well as investigating weather and climate on a local scale. Core of the application is the diagnostic California Meteorological Model (CALMET). This model computes 3D wind fields based on meteorological observational data, a digital elevation model and land use categories. The application generates the required input files from meteorological stations of the WegenerNet Feldbach region and triggers the start of the CALMET model with these input files. In a next step the modeled wind fields are stored automatically every 30 minutes with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 m in the WegenerNet database. To verify the

  8. The prominent absence of Alfred Russel Wallace at the Darwin anniversaries in Germany in 1909, 1959 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Hossfeld, Uwe; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that the contribution of Alfred Russell Wallace (1823-1913) to the development of the "Darwinian" principle of natural selection has often been neglected. Here we focus on how the three anniversaries to celebrate the origin of the Darwin-Wallace theory in Germany in 1909, in 1959 in the divided country, as well as in 2009, have represented Charles Robert Darwin's and Alfred Russell Wallace's contributions. We have analyzed books and proceedings volumes related to these anniversaries, and the main result is that Wallace was almost always ignored, or only mentioned in passing. In 1909, Ernst Haeckel gave a talk in Jena, later published under the title The worldview of Darwin and Lamarck (Das Weltbild von Darwin und Lamarck), but not as the Darwin-Wallace concept. Haeckel mentions Wallace only once. In two important proceedings volumes from the 1959 anniversaries, Wallace was ignored. The only fair treatment of Wallace is given in another book, a collection of documents edited by Gerhard Heberer, for which the author selected nine key documents and reprinted excerpts (1959). Three of them were articles by Wallace, including the Sarawak- and Ternate-papers of 1855 and 1858, respectively. An analysis of the dominant themes during the celebrations of 2009 shows that none of the six topics had much to do with Wallace and his work. Thus, the tendency to exclude Alfred Russell Wallace is an international phenomenon, and largely attributable to the "Darwin industry". PMID:23975642

  9. Implementation of damage detection algorithms for the Alfred Zampa Memorial Suspension Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebinejad, I.; Sedarat, H.; Emami-Naeini, A.; Krimotat, A.; Lynch, Jerome

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated a number of different damage detection algorithms for structural health monitoring of a typical suspension bridge. The Alfred Zampa Memorial Bridge, a part of the Interstate 80 in California, was selected for this study. The focus was to implement and validate simple damage detection algorithms for structural health monitoring of complex bridges. Accordingly, the numerical analysis involved development of a high fidelity finite element model of the bridge in order to simulate various structural damage scenarios. The finite element model of the bridge was validated based on the experimental modal properties. A number of damage scenarios were simulated by changing the stiffness of different bridge components including suspenders, main cable, bulkheads and deck. Several vibration-based damage detection methods namely the change in the stiffness, change in the flexibility, change in the uniform load surface and change in the uniform load surface curvature were employed to locate the simulated damages. The investigation here provides the relative merits and shortcomings of these methods when applied to long span suspension bridges. It also shows the applicability of these methods to locate the decay in the structure.

  10. Sex research at the borders of gender: transvestites, transsexuals, and Alfred C. Kinsey.

    PubMed

    Meyerowitz, J J

    2001-01-01

    Sex researcher Alfred Kinsey's vision of sexual taxonomy continued to evolve after he published his first landmark volume on human sexuality, and his research into sexual subcultures went beyond his initial studies of homosexuality and prostitution. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, he developed a new interest in cross-dressing and cross-gender identification. This article outlines how and why he began to interview transvestites and transsexuals, and places his emerging vision of gendered behavior and gender identity within the scientific theories of his day. Kinsey rejected the prevailing views, preferring instead a behaviorist model of gender. He saw cross-dressing and crossgender identification as male phenomena and used them to speculate about sex differences in the capacity for psychological conditioning. In his usual style, he did not condemn transvestites or transsexuals, but he disapproved of the genital surgery requested by male-to-female transsexuals. It was here that Kinsey hit the limits of his well-known sexual liberalism in which he approved of all sexual variations that did not involve coercion. PMID:11420452

  11. The ornithologist Alfred Russel Wallace and the controversy surrounding the dinosaurian origin of birds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nizar; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2013-12-01

    Over many years of his life, the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) explored the tropical forests of Malaysia, collecting numerous specimens, including hundreds of birds, many of them new to science. Subsequently, Wallace published a series of papers on systematic ornithology, and discovered a new species on top of a volcano on Ternate, where he wrote, in 1858, his famous essay on natural selection. Based on this hands-on experience, and an analysis of an Archaeopteryx fossil, Wallace suggested that birds may have descended from dinosaurian ancestors. Here, we describe the "dinosaur-bird hypothesis" that originated with the work of Thomas H. Huxley (1825-1895). We present the strong evidence linking theropod dinosaurs to birds, and briefly outline the long and ongoing controversy around this concept. Dinosaurs preserving plumage, nesting sites and trace fossils provide overwhelming evidence for the dinosaurian origin of birds. Based on these recent findings of paleontological research, we conclude that extant birds indeed descended, with some modifications, from small, Mesozoic theropod dinosaurs. In the light of Wallace's view of bird origins, we critically evaluate recent opposing views to this idea, including Ernst Mayr's (1904-2005) arguments against the "dinosaur-bird hypothesis", and document that this famous ornithologist was not correct in his assessment of this important aspect of vertebrate evolution. PMID:23975643

  12. Deciphering the evolution of birdwing butterflies 150 years after Alfred Russel Wallace

    PubMed Central

    Condamine, Fabien L.; Toussaint, Emmanuel F. A.; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Genson, Gwenaelle; Sperling, Felix A. H.; Kergoat, Gael J.

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and fifty years after Alfred Wallace studied the geographical variation and species diversity of butterflies in the Indomalayan-Australasian Archipelago, the processes responsible for their biogeographical pattern remain equivocal. We analysed the macroevolutionary mechanisms accounting for the temporal and geographical diversification of the charismatic birdwing butterflies (Papilionidae), a major focus of Wallace’s pioneering work. Bayesian phylogenetics and dating analyses of the birdwings were conducted using mitochondrial and nuclear genes. The combination of maximum likelihood analyses to estimate biogeographical history and diversification rates reveals that diversity-dependence processes drove the radiation of birdwings, and that speciation was often associated with founder-events colonizing new islands, especially in Wallacea. Palaeo-environment diversification models also suggest that high extinction rates occurred during periods of elevated sea level and global warming. We demonstrated a pattern of spatio-temporal habitat dynamics that continuously created or erased habitats suitable for birdwing biodiversity. Since birdwings were extinction-prone during the Miocene (warmer temperatures and elevated sea levels), the cooling period after the mid-Miocene climatic optimum fostered birdwing diversification due to the release of extinction. This also suggests that current global changes may represent a serious conservation threat to this flagship group. PMID:26133078

  13. Deciphering the evolution of birdwing butterflies 150 years after Alfred Russel Wallace.

    PubMed

    Condamine, Fabien L; Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Genson, Gwenaelle; Sperling, Felix A H; Kergoat, Gael J

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and fifty years after Alfred Wallace studied the geographical variation and species diversity of butterflies in the Indomalayan-Australasian Archipelago, the processes responsible for their biogeographical pattern remain equivocal. We analysed the macroevolutionary mechanisms accounting for the temporal and geographical diversification of the charismatic birdwing butterflies (Papilionidae), a major focus of Wallace's pioneering work. Bayesian phylogenetics and dating analyses of the birdwings were conducted using mitochondrial and nuclear genes. The combination of maximum likelihood analyses to estimate biogeographical history and diversification rates reveals that diversity-dependence processes drove the radiation of birdwings, and that speciation was often associated with founder-events colonizing new islands, especially in Wallacea. Palaeo-environment diversification models also suggest that high extinction rates occurred during periods of elevated sea level and global warming. We demonstrated a pattern of spatio-temporal habitat dynamics that continuously created or erased habitats suitable for birdwing biodiversity. Since birdwings were extinction-prone during the Miocene (warmer temperatures and elevated sea levels), the cooling period after the mid-Miocene climatic optimum fostered birdwing diversification due to the release of extinction. This also suggests that current global changes may represent a serious conservation threat to this flagship group. PMID:26133078

  14. Alfred Russel Wallace and the destruction of island life: the Iguana tragedy.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Kleinhans, Simon

    2013-12-01

    The Galápagos Islands (Ecuador) are usually associated with the explorations and theoretical deductions of Charles Robert Darwin (1809-1882), but Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) also investigated these islands and published several reports on the living world of this unique archipelago. In contrast to Darwin, Wallace described the destruction of natural ecosystems by humans and foresaw the resulting extinction of species. Here, we outline two case studies pertinent to Wallace's prediction. First, we summarize the behavior of the predator-naive marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) on the Galápagos Islands, which are threatened by feral dogs and cats imported by humans. We also describe the unique life cycle of the spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura bakeri) from the island of Utila (Honduras), a rare species whose populations are declining because of habitat destructions. In contrast to these threatened, endemic island species, the Green iguana (Iguana iguana) is still widely distributed, although, as a result of de-forestation, in some areas of South America local populations have disappeared. We conclude that Wallace was correct in his prediction that, because of human activities, numerous species of animals and plants will be driven to extinction, notably on islands. PMID:23975644

  15. Bowen, Dufek, and Shelly Receive 2012 James B. Macelwane Medals: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardbeck, Jeanne; Hill, David

    2013-01-01

    David R. Shelly is awarded the 2012 Macelwane Medal for his revolutionary advances in understanding the nature of tectonic tremor and its role in the earthquake preparation process. His innovations in the study of this subtle "noise" from deep within the Earth has opened a new window into the processes governing the earthquake cycle on major plate boundary faults and the magmatic systems beneath active volcanoes.

  16. Low dose radiotherapy as an effective treatment in a patient with solitary Wegener's granulomatosis resistant to systemic treatment – case report

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Tomasz; Składowski, Krzysztof; Hejduk, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare disease (10 per 1 000 000 new cases per year), etiologically connected with necrotizing vasculitis of small to medium-size vessels. The disease occurs predominantly in the upper respiratory tract, lungs and kidneys, but any organ may be affected during the course of the illness. It may be difficult to diagnose, especially when c-ACNA antibodies (serologic symptom of Wegener's granulomatosis) are undetectable and chest X-ray is normal. Early diagnosis is crucial for treatment results. Untreated disease may lead to death. Cyclophosphamide used simultaneously with prednisone is the treatment of choice as the first line procedure. Resistance to standard systemic treatment may be a significant problem. New drugs (rituximab, infliximab) are still under clinical investigation, with promising results. Very limited data concerning effectiveness of radiation therapy exist. We present a report of a female patient with solitary form of Wegener's granulomatosis located in the facial region, who underwent successful radiation therapy with a complete response. PMID:23788974

  17. [The Roots of Idiographic Paleontology: Karl Alfred von Zittel's Methodology and Conception of the Fossil Record].

    PubMed

    Tamborini, Marco

    2015-12-01

    This paper examines Karl Alfred von Zittel’s practice in order to uncover the roots of so-called idiographic paleontology.The great American paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) defined the discipline of idiographic paleontology as illustration and description of the morphological features of extinct species. However, this approach does not investigate macroevolutionary patterns and processes. On the contrary, the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s implemented an epistemic methodology that illustrates macrovelutionary patterns and laws by combining idiographic data with a nomothetic form of explanation. This article elucidates the features of the idiographic data as well as the acquired knowledge coupled with this approach. First of all, Heinrich G. Bronn’s (1800–1862) statistical method is analyzed. Zittel’s practice arose as a reaction against the approximate conclusions reached by Bronn’s quantitative approach. Second, the details of Zittel’s methodology are described in order to bring out its peculiarities.The microscope played a pivotal role in creating and forming Zittel’s morphological data. This analysis sheds new light on the reasons behind the so-called ideographic paleontology, thus revising Gould’s historical reconstruction, as well as on the notion of paleontological data. However, even though Zittel aimed at reaching precise and stable conclusions,his data cannot be used for elucidating evolutionary mechanisms: they are scientific in a purely descriptive sense, but completely useless for biological investigations. Finally, this paper examines how Zittel’s methodology affects the contemporary paleobiological enterprise and thereby reflects upon the notion of natural history. PMID:26507378

  18. The color of complexes and UV-vis spectroscopy as an analytical tool of Alfred Werner's group at the University of Zurich.

    PubMed

    Fox, Thomas; Berke, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Two PhD theses (Alexander Gordienko, 1912; Johannes Angerstein, 1914) and a dissertation in partial fulfillment of a PhD thesis (H. S. French, Zurich, 1914) are reviewed that deal with hitherto unpublished UV-vis spectroscopy work of coordination compounds in the group of Alfred Werner. The method of measurement of UV-vis spectra at Alfred Werner's time is described in detail. Examples of spectra of complexes are given, which were partly interpreted in terms of structure (cis ↔ trans configuration, counting number of bands for structural relationships, and shift of general spectral features by consecutive replacement of ligands). A more complete interpretation of spectra was hampered at Alfred Werner's time by the lack of a light absorption theory and a correct theory of electron excitation, and the lack of a ligand field theory for coordination compounds. The experimentally difficult data acquisitions and the difficult spectral interpretations might have been reasons why this method did not experience a breakthrough in Alfred Werner's group to play a more prominent role as an important analytical method. Nevertheless the application of UV-vis spectroscopy on coordination compounds was unique and novel, and witnesses Alfred Werner's great aptitude and keenness to always try and go beyond conventional practice. PMID:24983805

  19. Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr., Winnebago Medal of Honor Recipient, 1924-1950. With Teacher's Guide. Native Americans of the Twentieth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, MN.

    A biography for elementary school students tells about Mitchell Red Cloud, Jr. (Winnebago), an American Indian Army corporal who received a Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery in the Korean War. Photographs of Corporal Red Cloud and his gravesite are included. A teaching guide following the bibliography contains information on the Medal of…

  20. Male sexuality and Alfred Kinsey's 0-6 scale: toward "a sound understanding of the realities of sex".

    PubMed

    Drucker, Donna J

    2010-01-01

    Using a 0-6 scale, Alfred Kinsey demonstrated that the complexity of human sexuality could best be represented on a continuum rather than as a binary. Kinsey developed the scale from models created by his predecessors in human sex research. A primary intention of the scale was to eradicate sexual identity categories altogether in order to eliminate sexual identity-based persecutions and to promote equal rights. As proponents and opponents of homosexual rights both depended on constructions of sexual identity to advance their agendas, Kinsey's ideal was never realized. The scale nonetheless continues to challenge postmodern associations of identity and sexuality. PMID:20924926

  1. WegenerNet climate station network region Feldbach/Austria: From local measurements to weather and climate data products at 1 km-scale resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabas, T.; Leuprecht, A.; Bichler, C.; Kirchengast, G.

    2010-12-01

    South-eastern Austria is characteristic for experiencing a rich variety of weather and climate patterns. For this reason, the county of Feldbach was selected by the Wegener Center as a focus area for a pioneering observation experiment at very high resolution: The WegenerNet climate station network (in brief WegenerNet) comprises 151 meteorological stations within an area of about 20 km × 15 km (~ 1.4 km × 1.4 km station grid). All stations measure the main parameters temperature, humidity and precipitation with 5 minute sampling. Selected further stations include measurements of wind speed and direction completed by soil parameters as well as air pressure and net radiation. The collected data is integrated in an automatic processing system including data transfer, quality control, product generation, and visualization. Each station is equipped with an internet-attached data logger and the measurements are transferred as binary files via GPRS to the WegenerNet server in 1 hour intervals. The incoming raw data files of measured parameters as well as several operating values of the data logger are stored in a relational database (PostgreSQL). Next, the raw data pass the Quality Control System (QCS) in which the data are checked for its technical and physical plausibility (e.g., sensor specifications, temporal and spatial variability). In consideration of the data quality (quality flag), the Data Product Generator (DPG) results in weather and climate data products on various temporal scales (from 5 min to annual) for single stations and regular grids. Gridded data are derived by vertical scaling and squared inverse distance interpolation (1 km × 1 km and 0.01° × 0.01° grids). Both subsystems (QCS and DPG) are realized by the programming language Python. For application purposes the resulting data products are available via the bi-lingual (dt, en) WegenerNet data portal (www.wegenernet.org). At this time, the main interface is still online in a system in which

  2. The SEAD global efficiency medal competition: accelerating market transformation for efficient televisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, Kavita; Bennich, Peter; Cockburn, John; Doi, Naoko; Garg, Sandeep; Garnaik, S.P.; Holt, Shane; Walker, Mike; Westbrook-Trenholm, Elizabeth; Lising, Anna; Pantano, Steve; Khare, Amit; Park, Won Young

    2013-10-15

    The Global Efficiency Medal competition, a cornerstone activity of the Super-efficient Equipment and Appliance Deployment (SEAD) Initiative, is an awards program that encourages the production and sale of super-efficient products. SEAD is a voluntary multinational government collaboration of the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM). This winner-takes-all competition recognizes products with the best energy efficiency, guides early adopter purchasers towards the most efficient product choices and demonstrates the levels of energy efficiency achievable by commercially available and emerging technologies. The first Global Efficiency Medals were awarded to the most energy-efficient flat panel televisions; an iconic consumer purchase. SEAD Global Efficiency Medals were awarded to televisions that have proven to be substantially more energy efficient than comparable models available at the time of the competition (applications closed in the end of May 2012). The award-winning TVs consume between 33 to 44 percent less energy per 2 unit of screen area than comparable LED-backlit LCD televisions sold in each regional market and 50 to 60 percent less energy than CCFL-backlit LCD TVs. Prior to the launch of this competition, SEAD conducted an unprecedented international round-robin test (RRT) to qualify TV test laboratories to support verification testing for SEAD awards. The RRT resulted in increased test laboratory capacity and expertise around the world and ensured that the test results from participating regional test laboratories could be compared in a fair and transparent fashion. This paper highlights a range of benefits resulting from this first SEAD awards competition and encourages further investigation of the awards concept as a means to promote energy efficiency in other equipment types.

  3. Rhythm Analyses Of Melodies Used To Obtain Women Marathon Gold Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacano, Munecazu; Yokokura, Saburo; Kajiwara, Yoko; Pavelka, Jan; Tanuma, Nobuhisa; Uemura, Tatsuhisa; Hashiguchi, Sumihisa; Sikula, Josef

    2005-11-01

    In Athena Olympics in 2004 a Japanese girl got the gold medal in Women Marathon games. Just before the beginning, she was listening to some domestic melodies in order to concentrate on the race. The rhythm or power of that music is found to have the typical 1/f noise characteristics. The 1/f music is found effective to concentrate as well as to relax themselves for a fairly long time range, while some short time trial runner uses a kind of white noise like music.

  4. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots. Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes. Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  5. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots.Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes.Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  6. Examining the Extent and Nature of Online Learning in American K-12 Education: The Research Initiatives of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picciano, Anthony G.; Seaman, Jeff; Shea, Peter; Swan, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In 1992, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation began its "Anytime, Anyplace Learning Program", the purpose of which was to explore educational alternatives for people who wanted to pursue an education via Internet technology. Part of this grant activity was a research award to the Babson College Survey Research Group to examine online learning in…

  7. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  8. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  9. [Webometrics – on the occasion of the awarding of the Derek John de Solla Price Medal, 2015].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2015-09-01

    The most significant recognition in scientometrics, the Derek John de Solla Price Medal was awarded in 2015 to Mike Thelwall. Thelwall is a dominant personality in webometrics studying the internet presence of scientific research with quantitative methods. In this paper the emergence, standing and directions of webometrics are briefly reviewed. PMID:26320601

  10. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  11. Learning Strategies in Play during Basic Training for Medal of Honor and Call of Duty Video Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziaeehezarjeribi, Yadi

    2010-01-01

    This study, based on experiential play methodology was used to explore student engagement while playing "Medal of Honor (2002)" and "Call of Duty (2003)". It identifies some of the key issues related to the use of video games and simulations during the training phase of game play. Research into the effects of gaming in education has been extremely…

  12. Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, masquerading as recalcitrant periodontitis in a patient with a diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Sokołowska-Wojdyło, Małgorzata; Florek, Aleksandra; Barańska-Rybak, Wioletta; Sikorska, Monika; Starzyńska, Anna; Drogoszewska, Barbara; Włodarkiewicz, Adam

    2013-02-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with similar presentation to various benign inflammatory diseases. Adequate biopsy is required for a diagnosis because this lymphoma frequently coexists with large amount of necrosis and inflammation. In this study, a case of a 49-year-old woman presenting with a 3-week history of right maxillary alveolar ridge pain with a subsequent diagnosis of periodontitis is described. The patient's clinical condition deteriorated over a period of 6 weeks. Computed tomography delineated involvement of the right maxillary sinus, posterior part of the right pharynx and right nasal cavity. Immunohistopathology initially revealed Wegener's granulomatosis, followed by extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma. Severe refractory periodontitis in a background of Wegener's granulomatosis may be the initial presentation of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. In addition to careful examination, radiographic and laboratory testing, multiple large biopsies should be taken for immunohistochemical analysis to obtain an appropriate diagnosis. PMID:23111392

  13. PSYCHOLOGY IN FRENCH ACADEMIC PUBLISHING IN THE LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY: ALFRED BINET, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR AT THE SCHLEICHER PUBLISHING HOUSE.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge

    2015-01-01

    To date, historians of psychology have largely ignored the role of academic publishing and the editorial policies of the late nineteenth century. This paper analyzes the role played by academic publishing in the history of psychology in the specific case of France, a country that provides a very interesting and unique model. Up until the middle of the 1890s, there was no collection specifically dedicated to psychology. Alfred Binet was the first to found, in 1897, a collection of works specifically dedicated to scientific psychology. He chose to work with Reinwald-Schleicher. However, Binet was soon confronted with (1) competition from other French publishing houses, and (2) Schleicher's management and editorial problems that were to sound the death knell for Binet's emerging editorial ambitions. The intention of this paper is to encourage the efforts of the pioneers of modern psychology to have their work published and disseminated. PMID:25975358

  14. [Alfred Th. Leber (1881-1954): a pioneer in tropical ophthalmology. Missing in the South Seas--rediscovered in India].

    PubMed

    Grüntzig, J; Mehlhorn, H

    1992-10-01

    In spite of the brief duration of German colonial rule during that period tropical medicine enjoyed a remarkable growth and development. This is the first account of the career of the pioneer of tropical ophthalmology, Alfred Theodor Leber (1881-1954); medical history had previously reported him missing in Java after the 1st world war. His career was greatly influenced by his uncle, Theodor Leber (1840-1917), the founder of experimental ophthalmology. Alfred Leber was the one who combined teaching and research in the subjects of ophthalmology and tropical medicine. During his first expedition as a private lecturer together with von Prowazek in Samoa (1910-1911), he discovered the involvement of the eye in filarial infections with Wuchereria bancrofti (Lebers fundus). In consideration of his extraordinary work he was appointed professor at the young age of 33. After his training at the eye clinic at Berlin University under von Michel he worked as senior physician with von Hippel in Göttingen. Both Ludwig Külz and the famous painter Emil Nolde joined him on his second expedition, to New Guinea, in 1913. During his expedition in summer 1914 World War I broke out. Leber could not return to Germany. He stayed in the neutral Dutch East Indies during these years. Favoured by the ravages of war, British and Australian authorities (Military Intelligence, War Office, Defence) succeeded in seizing some of Leber's research reports and kept them under lock and key. The "Leber-Külz medical demographic New Guinea expedition on behalf of the Reich's Colonial Office" was therefore known to the public only as "Emil Nolde's travels in the South Seas".(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1453664

  15. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Wegener's)

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  16. Un mode de révélation rare de la maladie de Wegener: une myocardite associée a une endocardite fibroblastique

    PubMed Central

    Arous, Salim; Bensahi, Ilham; Noureddine, Malika; Habbal, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    Nous rapportons à travers cette observation le cas rare d'une maladie de Wegener révélée par une myocardite associée à une endocardite fibroblastique. Le patient a été admis initialement dans un tableau d'insuffisance cardiaque globale, avec un trouble du rythme type flutter auriculaire à l'ECG. A l’échocardiographie le ventricule gauche était non dilaté, siège d'une dysfonction sévère, avec un dosage des troponines positif. Une insuffisance rénale sévère a été découverte fortuitement nécessitant une hémodialyse, associée à une anémie inflammatoire confirmée par la férritinémie et le myélogramme. Le dosage des c-ANCA était fortement positif confirmant le diagnostic. La TDM thoracique avait objectivé une pneumopathie basale droite. Après avoir démarré un traitement adapté comprenant une corticothérapie et un traitement immunosuppresseur, l’évolution a été favorable avec normalisation de la fonction systolique du ventricule gauche. Bien que les manifestations cardiaques cliniques évidentes soient rares, l'atteinte cardiaque au cours de la maladie de Wegener est décrite, nécessitant une orientation diagnostic rapide et une connaissance rigoureuse de cette maladie grave. PMID:27279960

  17. Biochar and Glomus caledonium Influence Cd Accumulation of Upland Kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) Intercropped with Alfred Stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-01-01

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (−62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks. PMID:24728157

  18. Biochar and Glomus caledonium influence Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance).

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-01-01

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (-62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks. PMID:24728157

  19. Engaging with Lyell: Alfred Russel Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers as reactions to Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology.

    PubMed

    Costa, J T

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) and Charles Darwin (1809-1882) are honored as the founders of modern evolutionary biology. Accordingly, much attention has focused on their relationship, from their independent development of the principle of natural selection to the receipt by Darwin of Wallace's essay from Ternate in the spring of 1858, and the subsequent reading of the Wallace and Darwin papers at the Linnean Society on 1 July 1858. In the events of 1858 Wallace and Darwin are typically seen as central players, with Darwin's friends Charles Lyell (1797-1875) and Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) playing supporting roles. This narrative has resulted in an under-appreciation of a more central role for Charles Lyell as both Wallace's inspiration and foil. The extensive anti-transmutation arguments in Lyell's landmark Principles of Geology were taken as the definitive statement on the subject. Wallace, in his quest to solve the mystery of species origins, engaged with Lyell's arguments in his private field notebooks in a way that is concordant with his engagement with Lyell in the 1855 and 1858 papers. I show that Lyell was the object of Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers through a consideration of the circumstances that led Wallace to send his Ternate paper to Darwin, together with an analysis of the material that Wallace drew upon from the Principles. In this view Darwin was, ironically, intended for a supporting role in mediating Wallace's attempted dialog with Lyell. PMID:24014172

  20. Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913): the forgotten co-founder of the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Hossfeld, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    The British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), who had to leave school aged 14 and never attended university, did extensive fieldwork, first in the Amazon River basin (1848-1852) and then in Southeast Asia (1854-1862). Based on this experience, and after reading the corresponding scientific literature, Wallace postulated that species were not created, but are modified descendants of pre-existing varieties (Sarawak Law paper, 1855). Evolution is brought about by a struggle for existence via natural selection, which results in the adaptation of those individuals in variable populations who survive and reproduce (Ternate essay, 1858). In his monograph Darwinism (1889), and in subsequent publications, Wallace extended the contents of Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) into the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution, with reference to the work of August Weismann (1834-1914). Wallace also became the (co)-founder of biogeography, biodiversity research, astrobiology and evolutionary anthropology. Moreover, he envisioned what was later called the anthropocene (i.e., the age of human environmental destructiveness). However, since Wallace believed in atheistic spiritualism and mixed up scientific facts and supernatural speculations in some of his writings, he remains a controversial figure in the history of biology. PMID:23982797

  1. Keeping the fire burning: Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Richer, Charles Féré and Alfred Binet.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was the one of the world's leading physicians during the final third of the 19th century. Rewarded in 1882 with the creation of the first chair in the diseases of the nervous system, he was extremely successful at recruiting loyal and talented students. Charcot himself never produced a general treatise on hysteria, but instead encouraged his pupils to write their own books. Here, we describe how the work on hysteria of Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Richer, Charles Féré and Alfred Binet was closely associated with Charcot, and how they remained faithful to their mentor. We will highlight the unusual personality of G. Gilles de la Tourette and the tragic end to his life, the exceptional artistic talent of P. Richer (writer and painter of his magnificently illustrated thesis), the prolific writing capacity of C. Féré (bearing witness to his broad fields of interest) and A. Binet (blessed with an extraordinary capacity for work, and author of The Psychology of Reasoning, before presenting his metric scale of intelligence). PMID:20938148

  2. Biochar and Glomus caledonium Influence Cd Accumulation of Upland Kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) Intercropped with Alfred Stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Lam, Cheung Lung; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-04-01

    Both biochar application and mycorrhizal inoculation have been proposed to improve plant growth and alter bioaccumulation of toxic metals. A greenhouse pot trial was conducted to investigate growth and Cd accumulation of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) intercropped with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) in a Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with Glomus caledonium and/or applied with biochar. Compared with the monocultural control, intercropping with stonecrop (IS) decreased kangkong Cd acquisition via rhizosphere competition, and also decreased kangkong yield. Gc inoculation (+M) accelerated growth and Cd acquisition of stonecrop, and hence resulted in further decreases in kangkong Cd acquisition. Regardless of IS and +M, biochar addition (+B) increased kangkong yield via elevating soil available P, and decreased soil Cd phytoavailability and kangkong Cd concentration via increasing soil pH. Compared with the control, the treatment of IS + M + B had a substantially higher kangkong yield (+25.5%) with a lower Cd concentration (-62.7%). Gc generated additive effects on soil alkalinization and Cd stabilization to biochar, causing lower DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations and post-harvest transfer risks.

  3. THE IMPORTANCE OF INSTRUMENT MAKERS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: THE CASE OF ALFRED BINET AT THE SORBONNE LABORATORY.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge

    2016-07-01

    The importance of instrument firms in the development of psychology, and science in general, should not be underestimated since it would not have been possible for various leading psychologists at the turn of the twentieth century to conduct certain experiments without the assistance of instrument makers, as is often the case today. To illustrate the historical perspective introduced here, the example of Alfred Binet is taken, as he is an interesting case of a psychologist working in close collaboration with various French instrument designers of the time. The objective of this article is twofold: (1) to show the considerable activity carried out by early psychologists to finalize new laboratory instruments in order to develop their research projects; (2) to reassess the work of a major figure in French psychology through his activity as a designer of precision instruments. The development of these new instruments would certainly have been difficult without the presence in Paris of numerous precision instrument manufacturers such as Charles Verdin, Otto Lund, Henri Collin, and Lucien Korsten, on whom Binet successively called in order to develop his projects in the field of experimental psychology. PMID:27159374

  4. On the importance of debate in (geo-)scientific research (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, V.

    2012-04-01

    It is of course a great honor to receive the Holmes medal from EGU. As past (founding) treasurer and later president of EUG, the medal carries special significance for me. It may be a good time to look back on the scientific path I have followed, pursuing research in the geosciences, with outstanding support from a number of family members (foremost my wife Michèle), mentors, colleagues and students. Chance, not planning, led me to attend a French school that trained mining engineers, then a US University that made me fall in love with geophysics and plate tectonics at a time when this scientific revolution was still going on, and finally the marvelous Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP), where I have spent the rest of my career to this day. To pursue on this path, I selected the rather separate fields of paleomagnetism (then linked to geology) and geomagnetism (then linked to physics). I have devoted much of my time to make sure that the two specialties would closely interact, including in the structure of our groups at IPGP. Geo- and paleo-magnetism have turned out (in a way reminiscent of geochemistry) to be powerful tools to explore a broad range of exciting scientific questions. Equipped with them, I have had the pleasure and good fortune to navigate from the discovery of geomagnetic secular variation impulses (with Jean-Louis Le Mouël), now inelegantly called "geomagnetic jerks", to that of propagating rifting of continents in the Afar depression, to fascinating work on the India-Asia collision in the Tibetan plateau and the Cenozoic paleogeography of the Indian ocean bordering continents, to the reconstruction of synthetic apparent polar wander paths for major continental masses (with Jean Besse) that have been widely used, to the understanding of the significance of the volume, age and short duration of massive flood basalt volcanism in the Deccan traps of India and their potential link to the biological mass extinction at the Cretaceous

  5. Melba Newell Phillips Medal Lecture 2013: Discipline-Based Education Research—A View From Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie McDermott, Lillian

    2014-08-01

    Preface: In thanking AAPT for the Melba Newell Phillips Medal, I want to emphasize that the accomplishments that have been recognized by this award have resulted from many contributions over many years by past and present members of the UW Physics Education Group. Support by the National Science Foundation has been critical. On a more personal level, I am also very much honored to have my name associated with Melba Newell Phillips through this award. I remember her warm welcome at my first AAPT meeting many years ago. Although we had not met before, she did not seem too busy to express interest in my work and to offer encouragement. I was impressed then (and still am) by her accomplishments in research and teaching, her political courage, and her service to the physics academic community. Abstract: This article presents an overview of research in physics education (PER) as it has been conducted by the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington. Examples from introductory physics illustrate the nature of our investigations and the application of our findings in the development of research-based and research-validated curriculum for university students and K-12 teachers. The results from our research provide strong evidence of the ongoing need for research on the learning and teaching of physics that is strongly discipline-based.

  6. Universality, Limits and Predictability of Gold-Medal Performances at the Olympic Games

    PubMed Central

    Radicchi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the Games held in ancient Greece, modern Olympics represent the world’s largest pageant of athletic skill and competitive spirit. Performances of athletes at the Olympic Games mirror, since 1896, human potentialities in sports, and thus provide an optimal source of information for studying the evolution of sport achievements and predicting the limits that athletes can reach. Unfortunately, the models introduced so far for the description of athlete performances at the Olympics are either sophisticated or unrealistic, and more importantly, do not provide a unified theory for sport performances. Here, we address this issue by showing that relative performance improvements of medal winners at the Olympics are normally distributed, implying that the evolution of performance values can be described in good approximation as an exponential approach to an a priori unknown limiting performance value. This law holds for all specialties in athletics–including running, jumping, and throwing–and swimming. We present a self-consistent method, based on normality hypothesis testing, able to predict limiting performance values in all specialties. We further quantify the most likely years in which athletes will breach challenging performance walls in running, jumping, throwing, and swimming events, as well as the probability that new world records will be established at the next edition of the Olympic Games. PMID:22808137

  7. In vitro production of anti-neutrophilocyte-cytoplasm-antibodies (ANCA) by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Mayet, W J; Hermann, E; Kiefer, B; Lehmann, H; Manns, M; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1991-01-01

    The frequent detection of anti-neutrophilocyte-cytoplasm-antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) led to the supposition that this disease might be of autoimmune nature. For some authors assume that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of human B-lymphocytes besides polyclonal activation could reveal the cryptic immune status against different autoantigens in patients with autoimmune diseases we investigated EBV-transformed B-lymphocytes from patients with Sjögren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease, WG and healthy blood donors. Two stable B-cell lines (Ho3, We1) could be established. Inhibition experiments showed that antibodies produced by transformed B-lymphocytes and serum ANCA (C-ANCA type) of 10 WG patients recognized the identical antigen. Stimulation of one clone (Ho3) with interleukin 6 (IL-6) led to a switch from IgM to IgG production. Antibodies produced by this clone also stained glomeruli of human frozen kidney sections. Western blot analysis using immunoaffinity purified antigen prepared from human granulocytes revealed a reaction with a protein of approx. 29 kD MW. Our data underscore some new aspects concerning the direct pathogenicity of C-ANCA confirming the hypothesis that the autoimmune B-cell repertoire in WG not only reflects a polyclonal B-cell activation but is shaped by antigen driven responses. PMID:1725964

  8. [The Carabinieri Vice-Brigadiere Salvo D'Acquisto Gold Medal for Military Valour. Champion of justice and social solidarity].

    PubMed

    Richero, G

    2006-01-01

    The paper recalls the life and the altruistic sacrifice that led Salvo D'Acquisto to be known and remebered as a hero. On the 23rd September 1943 the Carabinieri Vice-Brigadiere D'Acquisto saved 22 human lifes accusing himself of a presumed attack against the German occupants, although he was innocent. On the first anniversary of his execution by shooting, he was made gold medal for military valour. The cause for his beatification is currently under examination by the Holy See. PMID:16705888

  9. "Is This a Boy or a Girl?": Rethinking Sex-Role Representation in Caldecott Medal-Winning Picturebooks, 1938-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Thomas; Hiller, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    A number of previous studies have addressed gender role-stereotyping in Caldecott Award-winning picturebooks. Building upon the extensive scholarship examining representations of females in Caldecott books, this current study offers a critical investigation of how gender is represented in Caldecott Medal-winning literature from 1938 to 2011 by…

  10. Subduction Zone Concepts and the 2010 Chile Earthqake (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Huene, Roland

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge of convergent margin systems evolved from hypothesis testing with marine geophysical technology that improved over decades. Wegener's drift hypothesis, Holmes mantle convection, and marine magnetic anomaly patterns were integrated into an ocean spreading concept that won wide acceptance after ocean drilling confirmed the crustal younging trend toward the Mid-Atlantic ridge. In contrast, the necessary disposal of oceanic and trench sediment at convergent margins remained largely hypothetical. Fresh interpretations of some coastal mountains as exposing ancient convergent margin rock assemblages and the seismologist's "Wadati-Benioff" zone were combined into a widely-accepted hypothesis. A convergent margin upper plate was pictured as an imbricate fan of ocean sediment thrust slices detached from the lower plate. During the 1980s ocean drilling to test the hypothesis revealed what then were counter-intuitive processes of sediment subduction and subduction erosion. Rather than the proposed seaward growth by accretion, many margins had lost material from erosion. In current concepts, individual margins are shaped by the net consequences of subduction accretion, sediment subduction, and subduction erosion. Similarly, recently acquired age data from ancient subduction complexes reveal periods dominated by accretion separated by periods dominated by tectonic erosion. Globally, the recycling of continental crustal material at subduction zones appears largely balanced by magmatic addition at volcanic arcs. The longevity of the original imbricate fan model in text books confirms its pictorial simplicity, because geophysical images and drill core evidence show that it commonly applies to only a relatively small frontal prism. A better understanding of convergent margin dynamics is of urgent societal importance as coastal populations increase rapidly and as recent disastrous earthquakes and tsunamis verify. The shift in convergent margin concepts has developed through

  11. Alfred E. Bergeat (1866-1924): a distinguished volcanologist and ore deposit researching scientist at the mining academies of Freiberg (Saxony) and Clausthal (Harz mountains) in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffl, Fritz A.

    2010-06-01

    Alfred E. Bergeat, originated from a family, who produced gold-glance in a factory (porcelain painting), studied mineralogy and geology at the University of Munich from 1886 to 1892. Due to the results of his habilitation work on the volcanism of island arcs, especially of the Stromboli volcanic island in the Tyrrhenian Sea, he became a recognized volcanologist and specialist in volcanic petrography. He further became an explorer of syngenetic, epigenetic and deuterogenic ore deposits at the mining academies (Bergakademien) of Freiberg (Saxony) and Clausthal (Harz mountains). He described these ore deposits in a two-volume manual (1904-1906) which was summarized again in 1913. After his early death in 1924, the two manuals “Die Vulkane” (1925) and “Vulkankunde” (1927) were posthumously published by his colleague and friend Karl Sapper (1866-1945).

  12. Swedenborg, Linnaeus and brain research--and the roles of Gustaf Retzius and Alfred Stroh in the rediscovery of Swedenborg's manuscripts.

    PubMed

    Gordh, Torsten E; Mair, William G P; Sourander, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) at the end of his long life became famous as a visionary mystic and founder of a new religion. However, at younger age, he was recognized as a prominent mining engineer and natural philosopher, particularly interested in geology, mineralogy, cosmology, paleontology and last but not least physiology of the brain. In his Oeconomica regni animalis (1740) and in several posthumously published extensive manuscripts, he described and analyzed e.g. the structural and functional organization of the cerebral cortex, the hierarchical construction of the nervous system, the localization of the cerebrospinal fluid and the secretory functions of the pituitary gland. In these fields, he presented remarkable insights and far reaching conclusions which in some cases have been experimentally verified in modern times. In spite of family relations Swedenborg rarely met the 19 years younger Linnaeus. Linnaeus was not only the founder of the systemic botany but as physician a keen and to some extent original observer of neurological symptoms; one of the first who adequately described motor aphasia. To regard these two men, among the few Swedish authors of the 18th century whose names are still internationally well known, as early precursors of neurological research, seems justified. The young Canadian, Alfred H. Stroh (1878-1922), had a crucial importance for the research on the works of Swedenborg, and the rediscovery of his manuscripts. His work was supported and financed to a large extent by professor Gustaf Retzius, at that time the most prominent Swedish researcher in anatomy and histology. There are many reasons to be thankful for the important contributions made by Alfred Stroh and Gustaf Retzius to stimulate the interest for Emanuel Swedenborg in Sweden and internationally. PMID:17578815

  13. Accelerating progress on the road to safer sports: based on remarks of NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in the Neurosurgical Society of America (NSA) medal lecture.

    PubMed

    Goodell, Roger; Batjer, H Hunt; Ellenbogen, Richard G

    2014-10-01

    Roger Goodell was invited by the Neurosurgical Society of America (NSA) to give the keynote speech as the NSA Medalist 2013. As President of the NSA, and Co-Chairs of the National Football league's Head Neck and Spine Committee, we provided the introduction for Goodell. He was cited for his tireless advocacy on behalf of professional and student athletes. We noted that the National Football League has been a world leader in funding traumatic brain injury research and a catalyst for safety in youth and professional sports. Mr Goodell's national leadership in thinking and acting boldly on the subject of traumatic brain injury prevention and treatment was the primary motivation for awarding him the NSA medal. What follows is a transcript of his NSA Medal Lecture to the Neurosurgical Society of America. PMID:25232876

  14. The excluded philosophy of evo-devo? Revisiting C.H. Waddington's failed attempt to embed Alfred North Whitehead's "organicism" in evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Erik L

    2011-01-01

    Though a prominent British developmental biologist in his day, a close friend of Theodosius Dobzhansky, and a frequent correspondent with Ernst Mayr, C.H. Waddington did not enter the ranks of "architect" of the Modern Synthesis. By the end of his career, in fact, he recognized that other biologists reacted to his work "as though they feel obscurely uneasy"; and that the best that some philosophers of biology could say of his work was that he was not "wholly orthodox" (Waddington 1975c, 11). In this essay, I take Waddington's self-assessments at face value and explore three potential reasons why his work did not have more of a direct impact: Waddington's explicit support for the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead; a lack of institutional support; and Waddington's occasional marginalization from the core network of American neo-Darwinians. Though excluded from the Modern Synthesis in the mid-20th century, it now appears that Waddington's work does undergird the emerging evo-devo synthesis. Whether this indicates concomitant, if implicit, support for Whiteheadian philosophy is an interesting question not explored here. PMID:22696826

  15. Resister's logic: the anti-vaccination arguments of Alfred Russel Wallace and their role in the debates over compulsory vaccination in England, 1870-1907.

    PubMed

    Fichman, Martin; Keelan, Jennifer E

    2007-09-01

    In the 1880s, Alfred Russel Wallace, the celebrated co-discoverer of natural selection, launched himself into the centre of a politicised and polarised debate over the unpopular compulsory vaccination laws in England. Wallace never wavered in his belief that smallpox vaccination was useless and likely dangerous. Six years before his death, the anti-vaccinationists successfully secured a conscience clause that effectively dismantled the compulsory vaccination laws. Several other important Victorian scientists joined Wallace in the fight to repeal compulsory vaccination arguing that widely held views on the effectiveness of vaccination and evidence for immunity were inconclusive in the light of (then) contemporary standards of evidence. This article situates Wallace's anti-vaccination logic within the broader matrix of sociopolitical and cultural reform movements of the late Victorian era. Additionally it provides the first detailed analysis of his critique of vaccination science, in particular the role statistics played in his arguments. In this period, both pro-vaccinationists and anti-vaccinationists invested great efforts in collating and analysing statistical data sets that either supported or refuted the claims of vaccination's effectiveness. While each side presented 'controlled' case studies to support their assertions, without an unambiguous test to measure or demonstrate vaccination's effectiveness, the anti-vaccinationists continued to mount credible statistical critiques of vaccination science. PMID:17893067

  16. Using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques to Detect Changes to the Prince Alfred Hamlet Conservation Area in the Western Cape, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, P.; Lewarne, M.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and identifying the spatial-temporal changes in the natural environment is crucial for monitoring and evaluating conservation efforts, as well as understanding the impact of human activities on natural resources, informing responsible land management, and promoting better decision-making. Conservation areas are often under pressure from expanding farming and related industry, invasive alien vegetation, and an ever-increasing human settlement footprint. This study focuses on detecting changes to the Prince Alfred Hamlet commonage, near Ceres in the Cape Floral Kingdom. It was chosen for its high conservation value and significance as a critical water source area. The study area includes a fast-growing human settlement footprint in a highly productive farming landscape. There are conflicting development needs as well as risks to agricultural production, and both of these threaten the integrity of the ecosystems which supply underlying services to both demands on the land. Using a multi-disciplinary approach and high-resolution satellite imagery, land use and land cover changes can be detected and classified, and the results used to support the conservation of biodiversity and wildlife, and protect our natural resources. The aim of this research is to study the efficacy of using remote sensing and GIS techniques to detect changes to critical conservation areas where disturbances can be understood, and therefore better managed and mitigated before these areas are degraded beyond repair.

  17. Studying Vadose Zone Flow and Transport Processes: A Personal Look Back, ... and Forward (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Genuchten, Martinus Th.

    2010-05-01

    In this presentation, to be given at the occasion of my receipt of the John Dalton Medal from the European Geophysical Union, I provide a personal look back of studying subsurface flow and transport processes. Looking back, it is clear that tremendous advances have been made from the time I first started as a student some 40 years ago. Actually, compared to the thousands of years during which humans tried to manipulate the earth's surface for improved agricultural and engineering practices, it is truly amazing that Darcy's law for saturated flow was first formulated only some 150 years ago, and the Richards equation for unsaturated flow less than 80 years ago. In this presentation I will focus especially on alternative formulations for modeling fluid flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface, including the use of dual-porosity and dual-permeability models for nonequilibrium transport. The various approaches are illustrated by means of a large number of examples, from transport through well-controlled laboratory soil columns to flow and contaminant transport at the larger field scale. Looking forward, I will also give a personal view of what I believe comes next, and the topics I would work on if I could somehow start now all over again.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi induced differential Cd and P phytoavailability via intercropping of upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) with Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance): post-harvest study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Li, Jintian; Wu, Fuyong; Wu, Shengchun; Ye, Zhihong; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-12-01

    A post-harvest experiment was conducted further to our previous greenhouse pot study on upland kangkong (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) and Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) intercropping system in Cd-contaminated soil inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Previously, four treatments were established in the intercropping experiment, including monoculture of kangkong (control), intercropping with stonecrop (IS), and IS plus inoculation with Glomus caledonium (IS+Gc) or Glomus versiforme (IS+Gv). Both kangkong and stonecrop plants were harvested after growing for 8 weeks. Then, the tested soils were reclaimed for growing post-harvest kangkong for 6 weeks. In the post-harvest experiment, there were no significant differences between the IS and control treatments, except for a significantly decreased (p<0.05) soil available P concentration with IS treatment. Compared with IS, both IS+Gc and IS+Gv significantly decreased (p<0.05) soil DTPA-extractable (phytoavailable) Cd concentrations, but not total Cd, by elevating soil pH, causing significantly lower (p<0.05) Cd concentrations in both the root and shoot of kangkong. In addition, both Gc and Gv significantly increased (p<0.05) soil acid phosphatase activities and available P concentrations and hence resulted in significantly higher (p<0.05) plant P acquisitions. However, only Gv significantly increased (p<0.05) kangkong yield, while Gc only significantly elevated (p<0.05) the shoot P concentration. It suggested that AM fungi have played key roles in Cd stabilization and P mobilization in the intercropping system, and such positive responses seemed to be sustainable and valuable in post-harvest soils. PMID:23797707

  19. Alfred Vulpian and Jean-Martin Charcot in each other's shadow? From Castor and Pollux at La Salpêtrière to neurology forever.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier; Moulin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    While Alfred Vulpian (1826-1887) is not completely forgotten, he cannot match the uninterrupted celebrity which Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) still enjoys today. After becoming interne (residents) at the same institute in 1848, both were involved in shaping the cradle of what would become modern neurology. Both started work as chiefs at a La Salpêtrière service on January 1, 1862, making common rounds and studies, with several common publications. While their friendship remained 'for life', as stated by Charcot at Vulpian's funeral, their career paths differed. Vulpian progressed quicker and higher, being appointed full professor and elected at the Académie Nationale de Médecine and the Académie des Sciences several years before Charcot, as well as becoming dean of the Paris Faculty of Medicine. These positions also enabled him to support his friend Charcot in getting appointed full clinical professor and becoming the first holder of the chair of Clinique des Maladies du Système Nerveux in 1882. Before studying medicine, Vulpian had worked in physiology with Pierre Flourens, and his career always remained balanced between physiology and neurology, with remarkable papers. He introduced Charcot to optic microscopy during their La Salpêtrière years, indirectly helping him to become his successor to the chair of pathological anatomy in 1872. While Vulpian succeeded so well in local medical affairs, Charcot spent his time building up a huge clinical service and a teaching 'school' at La Salpêtrière, which he never left for over 31 years until his death. This 'school' progressively became synonymous with clinical neurology itself and perpetuated the master's memory for decades. Vulpian never had such support, although Jules Déjerine was his pupil and Joseph Babinski was his interne before becoming Charcot's chef de clinique (chief of staff) in 1885. This unusual switch in Parisian medicine contributed to Charcot's unaltered celebrity over more than a century

  20. Precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate: key processes bridging the bio- and geosciences (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    In this Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal lecture, I will focus on the biogeochemical cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) which is arguably one of the best example of a set processes that bridge the bio- and geosciences. The main reactions involved are calcification and dissolution that, respectively, manufacture and destroy calcium carbonate. Biology is intimately involved in these two processes which are key controls of the Earth's climate and leave remains that are of great use to human societies (as building materials) and geoscientists. I will illustrate the bridge between the bio- and geosciences by providing brief examples for each of the following four issues. (1) The marine cycle of CaCO3 and its relationship with climate. The release of CO2 by the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the uptake of CO2 by its dissolution are important controls of atmospheric CO2 and climate. The vertical distribution of Ψ, the ratio of CO2 released/used per CaCO3 precipitated/dissolved in the ocean will be shown to be consistent with the Högbom-Urey reactions. (2) The use of CaCO3 in paleooceanography. The remains of calcium carbonate shells and skeletons are wonderful archives of past environmental changes. Their isotopic composition and the concen-tration of trace elements are invaluable in the reconstruction of past climate. I will address the challenge of calibrating one of the proxies used to reconstruct past ocean pH. (3) The challenge of understanding calcification. Despite having been investigated for decades, many aspects of the physiological and molecular processes involved in calcification by marine organisms remain obscure. Recent breakthroughs, mostly on reef-building corals, will be briefly reviewed. (4) The response of calcification and dissolution to environmental change. The critical importance of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution as climate controls makes it vital to understand their response to global environmental changes such as ocean warming and

  1. Dillion Medal Prize Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Venkat

    2009-03-01

    Many aspects of polymer research have undergone a paradigm shift in the past decade, with an increased emphasis on technological applications which propose the use of materials and devices created by controlling matter from the atomic scales to the bulk commodity level. This talk will focus on multicomponent polymeric materials (block copolymers, rod-coil polymers and mixtures like polymer blends and polymer nanocomposites), which have played a central role in enabling this paradigm shift in the context of polymeric materials. In this talk, I will discuss our recent researches on developing simulation tools that can predict the structure, morphology and flow behavior of such multicomponent polymers. In contrast to conventional (``particle-based'') Monte Carlo and Molecular dynamics approaches, our methods work at a coarse-grained description of the system to predict the thermodynamics and dynamics of such multicomponent polymers. This talk will focus on an outline of the simulation strategies and present some results concerning both the equilibrium and dynamical properties of such materials.

  2. A Gold Medal Finish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 1999, Darryl Mitchell of Goddard Space Flight Center's Technology Commercialization Office (TCO) met with the U.S. Olympic Committee at the official training facility in Colorado Springs, Colorado, to offer assistance in transferring NASA technologies applicable to Olympic sports. Following the meeting with the Olympic committee, Mitchell was approached by U.S. Speedskating Long Track Program Director Finn Halvorsen, who eagerly voiced his interest in working with NASA to identify a means of improving performance for his team. According to Halvorsen, 'If (NASA) can put a man on the moon, surely they can help our skaters.' Mitchell and Halvorsen went to work uncovering NASA technologies that could boost the U.S. team's skating capabilities. Mitchell received a crash course in speedskating, and as a result, generated a lengthy list of promising NASA developments that could benefit the sport. From this list, he and his Goddard TCO partner, Joe Famiglietti, deliberated over whether a NASA mirror-polishing technique could possibly be adapted to the athletes speedskates. The polishing technique, developed by Jim Lyons, a 16-year optical engineering veteran of Goddard, was derived from the same principles used to create the optics for NASA's science observatories, such as the Hubble Space Telescope (highly polished optics are required by NASA to obtain sharp, clear images in space).

  3. Integrated Solid Earth Science: the right place and time to discover the unexpected? (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloetingh, Sierd

    2013-04-01

    go. Not only on a national level, such as pursued by the Netherlands Research School of Integrated Solid Earth Science (ISES), but also on a full European scale, such as the TOPO-EUROPE research program. This goes hand in hand with setting the stage for a pan-European research infrastructure for solid earth science by the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). Much of the unexpected remains to be discovered. The Holmes medal awarded by the European Geosciences Union, itself an example of the immense progress European earth scientists have made in joining forces, means a lot to me. I share it with my co-workers in my group, the close to 70 PhD students who worked with us, and other numerous colleagues and friends that all contributed immensely to the unexpected.

  4. The Japanese Emperor bestows Medal with Purple Ribbon on antioxidants and redox signaling editor Hideo Utsumi for contributions to redox biology.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Toshihiko; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2012-03-01

    On November 15, 2011, the Japanese Emperor bestowed the Medal with Purple Ribbon on Professor Hideo Utsumi for contributions to redox biology. Professor Utsumi was awarded Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from University of Tokyo in 1976, and started his professional career as Assistant Professor at Teikyo University. He visited Cologne University as fellow during 1978-1980. In 1982, he moved to Showa University as Associate Professor. In 1994, he moved to Kyushu University as Professor. During 2008-2010, he served as vice president of Kyushu University. From 2007 to now he serves as the Director of Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation. Beginning 2010 he serves as the Executive Director of the Center for Product Evaluation, Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. Professor Utsumi was the first to develop in vivo electron spin resonance (ESR; also known as electron paramagnetic resonance) imaging system in Japan and commercialized it to promote redox research. Over 30 in vivo ESR systems are currently used in Japan today. A compact or high-resolution Overhauser-enhanced MRI system has been developed by his group and will be available next year. His translational research activities have uniquely covered instrumentation, organic synthesis, and disease model applications. He synthesized many redox-sensitive compounds, and collaborated with clinicians to understand mechanisms underlying disease systems caused by redox imbalance using his compounds as tools. Thus, Professor Hideo Utsumi contributed a novel technology to investigate in vivo redox status in disease models. This technology platform has immense potential for bedside application to humans. PMID:22124212

  5. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  6. Frank Bursley Taylor - Forgotten Pioneer of Continental Drift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, George W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Frank B. Taylor was an American geologist who specialized in the glacial geology of the Great Lakes. This article discusses his work on the Continental Drift theory, which preceeded the work of Alfred Wegener by a year and a half. (MA)

  7. Eberhard Fahrbach (1948-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmer, Hartmut; Schauer, Ursula; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Rintoul, Steve

    2013-11-01

    Eberhard Fahrbach, an internationally known oceanographer, died on 21 April 2013 at age 65 after battling a brain tumor. He had retired 1 year earlier from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, where he directed research on observational oceanography.

  8. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    In the About AGU article "AGU Union Fellows elected for 2014," published in the 29 July 2014 issue of Eos (95(30), 272, doi:10.1022/ 2014EO300008), a joint research group affiliation was inadvertently omitted for one Fellow. Antje Boetius is with the Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven, Germany, and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.

  9. Earthquakes and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1977-01-01

    An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics, a concept which has revolutionized thinking in the Earth sciences in the last 10 years. The theory of plate tectonics combines many of the ideas about continental drift (originally proposed in 1912 by Alfred Wegener in Germany) and sea-floor spreading (suggested originally by Harry Hess of Princeton University). 

  10. Lovell, Alfred Charles Bernard [Sir Bernard] (1913-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Physicist and astronomer, born in Oldland Common, Gloucestershire, England. Worked on cosmic rays at Manchester, researched radar in the Second World War, and afterwards with J S HEY procured an ex-army mobile radar unit used to detect V-2 rockets and attempted to detect cosmic ray showers with it. Interference from the electric trams at Manchester displaced the work to the university's botanical...

  11. Fowler, William Alfred [`Willy'] (1911-95)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    American nuclear physicist, born in Pittsburgh, PA, worked at CalTech. Nobel prizewinner (1983). While at the Kellogg Laboratory studied the nuclear reactions of protons with the isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, the very reactions in the CN cycle identified at that time by HANS BETHE as occurring in the stars. Established the science of nuclear astrophysics. Found that there was a gap in the sequ...

  12. [Sigmund Freud's ambition and Alfred Adler].

    PubMed

    Lebzeltern, G

    1984-11-01

    Freud never admitted to himself that he possessed a greater-than-average sense of ambition, which manifested itself in dreams, malachievement and priority problems. A completely new picture of Freud arises from such a perspective. Freud experienced childhood trauma in the form of his relationship with his nephew, John, in whom both an intimate friend and hated enemy were incorporated. This experience left a life-long impression which predetermined the neurotic element in Freud's relationship with men. Freud's own interpretation being that he had been betrayed by Breuer, Fliess, Adler and Jung. That is why the sentencing of his Uncle Joseph to a term of imprisonment had such far-reaching consequences for Freud. A further noteworthy observation is the close connection between ambition and death wishes and also between ambition and guilt feelings. Who, after all, likes to admit to harbouring such feelings? It appeared necessary to investigate the extent to which Freud's excessive ambition influenced his relationships with Breuer, Fliess and Adler. Freud was never prepared to recognize that Adler's contribution consisted of revealing the importance of the natural laws governing those layers of the psyche nearer to the conscious. The picture of the whole person emerges only by a combination of psychoanalysis and individual psychology. PMID:6395508

  13. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Report for 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, New York, NY.

    This Sloan Foundation report for 1976 discusses foundation activities in the three facets of the General Program--(1) Education for the Public Service, (2) Economics and Management, and (3) Science and Technology--as well as in three Particular Programs--(1) Minority Engineering Education, (2) Technology in Education, and (3) Neuroscience. The…

  14. Alfred-Adler's Basic Concepts and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundin, Robert W.

    This book presents the basic principles of Adler's psychology. The first chapter looks at Adlerian psychology as it exists today, and examines earlier influences. The second chapter examines feelings of inferiority and compensation for these feelings. The third chapter considers the nature of goals and how they are formulated. The fourth chapter…

  15. Which are the best nations and institutions for revolutionary science 1987-2006? Analysis using a combined metric of Nobel prizes, Fields medals, Lasker awards and Turing awards (NFLT metric).

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    I have previously suggested that Nobel prizes can be used as a scientometric measurement of 'revolutionary science'; and that for this purpose it would be better if more Nobel prizes were awarded, especially in three new subjects of mathematics, medicine and computing science which have become major sciences over recent decades. In the following analysis of the last 20 years from 1987 to 2006, I use three prestigious prizes in mathematics (Fields medal), medicine (Lasker award for Clinical Medical Research) and computing science (A.M. Turing award) which are plausible surrogates for Nobel prizes. The combined Nobel-Fields-Lasker-Turing (NFLT) metric is strongly dominated by the USA. However the distribution implies that revolutionary science may be somewhat more broadly distributed than the pure Nobel metric suggests. The UK and France seem to be significant nations in some types of revolutionary science (although the UK has declined substantially as a centre of revolutionary science); and Germany, Switzerland, Japan, Russia, Denmark and Norway also feature. The top world institutions for revolutionary science according to NFLT are MIT, Stanford and Princeton - all in the USA - and the USA has 19 institutions with at least three prize-winners. Second is France, with three institutions having three or more winners; the UK and Norway have one each. The NFLT metric confirms previous observations that many public universities in the Western USA have now become a major focus of revolutionary science; and that Harvard has declined from its previous status as the top world centre of revolutionary science to about seventh-place. This analysis confirms the potential value of increasing the number of Nobel prizes as a means of identifying and monitoring centres of excellence in revolutionary science. PMID:17234353

  16. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  17. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener): clinical aspects and treatment.

    PubMed

    Comarmond, Cloé; Cacoub, Patrice

    2014-11-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis, which affects small- and medium-sized blood vessels and is often associated with cytoplasmic ANCA. GPA occurs in patients between 45 and 60 years old of both genders, and is rarely observed in blacks. The prevalence of GPA increases along a south-north gradient in Europe (20 to 150/million). The main clinical characteristics involve the upper and/or lower respiratory tract and kidneys. Ear, nose and throat manifestations with recurrent sinusitis and crusting rhinorrhea are usually severe. Lung nodules are frequently seen, sometimes excavated. Renal involvement is characterized by rapidly progressive necrotizing glomerulonephritis with extracapillary crescents. Limited forms of GPA predominantly affect the upper respiratory tract, whereas generalized forms of GPA include renal manifestations and/or alveolar hemorrhage and/or vital organ involvement with an altered general condition. The combination of immunosuppressant drugs and corticosteroids has converted this typically fatal illness into one in which 80% of patients achieve remission. However, despite considerable therapeutic progress over the last decades, relapses remain frequent (50% at 5 years), and maintenance treatment is now the main therapeutic challenge. PMID:25149391

  18. A presentation of cerebritis secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis (wegener).

    PubMed

    Norman, James; Pande, Ira; Taylor, Timothy; Gran, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Neurological manifestations of GPA are common, most frequently as a peripheral neuropathy. Cerebritis as a principal presentation is extremely rare. We report a patient who presented with subacute progression of ataxia, confusion, and vacant episodes. An MRI of her brain showed bilateral signal abnormalities in the cingulate and superior sagittal gyrus while a staging CT revealed a mass in the right upper lobe of the patient's lung with a satellite nodule. C-ANCA antibodies specific for PR3 at high titres were positive and a diagnosis of GPA was made. The patient was commenced on intravenous methylprednisolone followed by cyclophosphamide and responded well to treatment. GPA is a rare and treatable differential diagnosis for confused patients with acute or subacute neurological features and unusual MRI findings. PMID:24900930

  19. A Presentation of Cerebritis Secondary to Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Wegener)

    PubMed Central

    Norman, James; Pande, Ira; Taylor, Timothy; Gran, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Neurological manifestations of GPA are common, most frequently as a peripheral neuropathy. Cerebritis as a principal presentation is extremely rare. We report a patient who presented with subacute progression of ataxia, confusion, and vacant episodes. An MRI of her brain showed bilateral signal abnormalities in the cingulate and superior sagittal gyrus while a staging CT revealed a mass in the right upper lobe of the patient's lung with a satellite nodule. C-ANCA antibodies specific for PR3 at high titres were positive and a diagnosis of GPA was made. The patient was commenced on intravenous methylprednisolone followed by cyclophosphamide and responded well to treatment. GPA is a rare and treatable differential diagnosis for confused patients with acute or subacute neurological features and unusual MRI findings. PMID:24900930

  20. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Wegener's Granulomatosis) Accompanied by Dysuria

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Isao; Takizawa, Issei; Tachibana, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old male visited us with complaints of retarded urination, dysuria, gross hematuria, and fever. Urinalysis showed pyuria. Prostatic tumor with lung metastasis was suspected from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Transurethral prostatic biopsy and bronchoscopic biopsy only revealed fibrinoid necrosis and inflammatory infiltration. Right lateral maxillary sinusitis was also found by MRI. ANCA testing was positive with specificity for anti-PR3 (PR3-ANCA). On the basis of these results, Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) was diagnosed. GPA involving the prostate gland is unusual, and only a few cases have previously been reported. PMID:27034883

  1. Fathoming the hydrosphere (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    As Lord Kelvin observed: "If you can not measure it, you can not improve it." Measurement is the start of all scientific knowledge. Measurement sets science apart from metaphysical speculation. Measurement is not the last word in science but it is the first. In hydrology, progress in measurement methods has not been as rapid as in sister Earth sciences such as meteorology, oceanography, or geodynamics. Of the hundreds of scientific satellites, only one has hydrology as its main mission at the time of this writing (hopefully two at the time of the lecture). The closest we come to a large measurement infrastructure is an experimental watershed. Nothing wrong with an experimental watershed but it does not compare to, say, the Square Kilometer Array with its exabyte per day output. We tend to give up quickly because we will always have to work with effective parameters that can not be measured directly. We will never be able to know all stomata in a tree and how they interact with the turbulent flow through the canopy. We will never be able to know all pores in a soil and how water moves through them. But also effective parameters have to be measured, be it indirectly. No surprise then that my presentation will focus on measurements in hydrology and water management. First, the fun aspects and intellectual challenges of developing new measurement methods will be highlighted. From weighing trees to listening to rain to taking a stream's temperature, we have had many interesting experiences over the years. Second, the balance between model complexity and data availability will be discussed. Although there is a generally recognized need for parsimonious models in hydrology, formal approaches to finding the correct level of complexity are rare. Some complexity control approaches, borrowed from computer science, will be presented together with a hydrological application. As it turns out, these methods seem to predict nicely the onset of equifinality or the statistical illposedness of the inverse problem of finding effective parameters. Finally, an ambitious program will be presented that aims to shed light on Africa's climate and water resources, the TransAfrican HydroMeteorological Observatory or TAHMO. TAHMO's aim is to deploy and operate 20,000 hydroclimatological stations throughout subSaharan Africa. There are many aspects that are novel from the design of the stations, to deployment at schools, and a business model that should fund the system for decades to come. Given the global need for finding the water needed to produce our food by 2050 and the fact that Africa will have to play a major role in this effort, TAHMO addresses a scientific challenge of great societal importance.

  2. Small Colleges Need "Gold Medal Selfies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Higher education has been a favorite news topic for months. President Obama and the first lady have entered the national conversation, particularly around issues of cost and graduation rates for low-income students--addressing education in the State of the Union, at White House events, and in speeches across the nation. In the midst of these…

  3. New Frontier Congressional Gold Medal Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2009-05-01

    09/23/2010 Message received in the Senate: Returned to the Senate pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 1653. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2245, which became Public Law 111-44 on 8/7/2009. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. American Fighter Aces Congressional Gold Medal Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Manchin, Joe, III [D-WV

    2013-12-15

    03/27/2014 Held at the desk. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.685, which became Public Law 113-105 on 5/23/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Magnetometers for Geoscience (Christiaan Huygens Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Measuring the Earth's magnetic field is one of the first metrological actions of humankind, traceable till about 5000 years BC. It is remarkable that the interest in magnetic fields measurements still is growing and the scope of their applications is getting wider and wider. The progress in the recent 20-30 years in the development of magnetometers of different kinds is highly impressive. Currently practically all scales of the magnetic field values can be measured - from the huge magnetic fields of astronomical objects down to atto-Tesla levels. A modern flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) may cover an amazing dynamic range of the magnetic field, ranging from 10-4 down to 10-12 T, and even lower. The second most important parameter, the zero line drift, may reach below 10-5 of the full measurement scale per year. Development of state of the art FGMs requires profound research activity in various science disciplines: mathematics, metrology, electronics and material science to name a few. This talk reviews the principles of various types of existing magnetometers and their main performance aspects are compared. It is shown that the most suitable type of instrument for measurements of the magnetic fields in the range applicable for geosciences is the FGM. A few highlights of recent developments of FGMs, with record parameters concerning noise level and power consumption, are given. Techniques to lower the noise to a cutting edge level are described and a new physical phenomenon discovered during this development work is reported and explained. Advancement in flux-gate magnetometry is discussed and a few specific examples are presented: a) a one-second INTERMAGNET-compatible FGM, b) a super-low power FGM, c) the lowest available noise FGM and d) the smallest but sensitive FGM for nano-satellites. Finally some applications for FGM use in geosciences are given and envisaged progress in the future development in the field of magnetic observations is discussed.

  6. 'Peony Nebula' Star Settles for Silver Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Movie

    If our galaxy, the Milky Way, were to host its own version of the Olympics, the title for the brightest known star would go to a massive star called Eta Carina. However, a new runner-up now the second-brightest star in our galaxy has been discovered in the galaxy's dusty and frenzied interior. This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the new silver medalist, circled in the inset above, in the central region of our Milky Way.

    Dubbed the 'Peony nebula' star, this blazing ball of gas shines with the equivalent light of 3.2 million suns. The reigning champ, Eta Carina, produces the equivalent of 4.7 million suns worth of light though astronomers say these estimates are uncertain, and it's possible that the Peony nebula star could be even brighter than Eta Carina.

    If the Peony star is so bright, why doesn't it stand out more in this view? The answer is dust. This star is located in a very dusty region jam packed with stars. In fact, there could be other super bright stars still hidden deep in the stellar crowd. Spitzer's infrared eyes allowed it to pierce the dust and assess the Peony nebula star's true brightness. Likewise, infrared data from the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope in Chile were integral in calculating the Peony nebula star's luminosity.

    The Peony nebula, which surrounds the Peony nebular star, is the reddish cloud of dust in and around the white circle.

    The movie begins by showing a stretch of the dusty and frenzied central region of our Milky Way galaxy. It then zooms in to reveal the 'Peony nebula' star the new second-brightest star in the Milky Way, discovered in part by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  7. 1988 Ewing Medal to Wolfgang H. Berger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Robert C.; Berger, Wolfgang H.

    From simple suggestions sometimes spring great accomplishments. For Wolfgang Berger the beginning was a suggestion from his doctoral advisor, Fred Phleger, who said, in response to a question about what Wolf might pursue for a dissertation, “study planktonic foraminifera.”At the time the suggestion probably would not have been of interest to a geophysics or geochemistry student, but luckily for all of us, Wolfs early training was in paleontology and stratigraphy, and he took Fred's suggestion. The result has been a rich flow of ideas about the formation and preservation of biogenic sediments in the deep-sea carbonate dissolution, climatic change, global ocean productivity, and the Cenozoic ocean.

  8. Nicholson Medal Lecture: Scientists and Totalitarian Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li-Zhi

    1997-04-01

    In order to call for support for his policy in China from the scientific community outside of China, Li Peng, China's premier today and at the time of Tiananmen massacre in 1989, published an editorial of ``Science" magazine (July 5, 1996) titled ``Why China needs science ... and partners." This editorial brought a serious problem, which is originally faced by scientists in a totalitarian society, upon the scientific community in free societies outside. It is well known that the current attitude of the Chinese government toward science is what it was during the years of Mao and the Soviet Union: science is limited to provide instruments useful to the rulers, but any degree of freedom, such as to challenge ideas, required by science to change the totalitarian regime itself, is suppressed. Thus, the problem facing us is: how to help your colleagues and promote science in a totalitarian society, without becoming a partner of the injustices of that regime.

  9. Closing the balance (Louis Agassiz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeke, Michiel

    2015-04-01

    The 4000 Gt of ice that has been lost since 2003 by the ice sheets of Greenland and West Antarctica accounts for about 1/3 of recent global mean sea level rise. Especially the Greenland ice sheet is far out of balance: each year, 30% more mass leaves the ice sheet than is gained by snowfall at its surface; in Antarctica, this imbalance is currently less than 10%. To make matters worse, the mass loss is accelerating: each year it increases by about 10%, making it likely that the ice sheets will soon become the main source of global mean sea level rise. Given their huge volumes, they could remain so for centuries to come. Thirty years ago, the concept of rapid melting of the large ice sheets was purely theoretical. But since that time, the evolution of remote sensing techniques (altimetry, gravimetry and interferometry), in situ observations (automatic weather stations, mass balance and ice velocity measurements) and climate models has revealed a surprising diversity of mass loss mechanisms. This ranges from the relatively steady acceleration of large West-Antarctic ice streams to the highly variable (in space and time) flow speed of outlet glaciers in Greenland. Moreover, both ice sheets experience large interannual fluctuations in snowfall and melt, temporarily masking or accentuating the mass loss. In spite of all the technological developments, there is still room for exciting discoveries. In April 2011, a reservoir of liquid water twice the size of the Netherlands was discovered in the firn in southeast Greenland. In July 2012, an extreme melt event affected the entire Greenland ice sheet, with meltwater runoff destroying infrastructure in west Greenland that had been in place since the 1950's. And in 2014, two separate studies concluded that the mass loss in West Antarctica appears to be irreversible. When will it be possible to model and robustly predict the fully coupled system of atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and ice sheets? To start answering that question, we explore possibilities and outstanding challenges in the application of Earth System Models to ice sheet mass balance on one hand, and the use of very-high-resolution regional models to individual glacier basins and fjord systems on the other. These models need observations! We show a newly developed suitcase automatic weather station (iWS) for easy deployment in remote, glaciated regions, without compromising measurement accuracy.

  10. Dwight Nicholson Medal Lecture: Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2014-03-01

    I will present some background as to the current ``scientific state'' of our society and some ideas of how we got into the fix we are in. I will then describe The Physics Force a program we developed to popularize physics. It has proven to be a very successful and entertaining outreach program of the College of Science and Engineering in the University of Minnesota developed to make science exciting and fun for students of all ages, from 6 to 106. The Force performed variations of The Physics Circus, our most popular show, at Disney's Epcot Center, parts of it were shown on Newton's Apple and several of us have performed demonstrations on the Knoff-Hoff Show, a very successful German T.V. science program. The goal of The Physics Force is to show students and the public Science is Fun, Science is Interesting, and Science is Understandable. By all measures we have available, we are extremely successful in reaching our goals. In the last three year cycle of our University support about 110,000 residents of Minnesota (or about 2% of the total population) saw a Physics Force performance; over the last decade the total is around 250,000!

  11. Turcotte Receives 2003 William Bowie Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, Lawrence M.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2004-01-01

    ``Few have contributed more to fundamental geophysics, or been better at encouraging others to contribute, than Donald L. Turcotte. Don trained as an engineer, receiving a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1958. After a year at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, he joined the Cornell Graduate School of Aeronautical Engineering, rising to full professor. He established expertise on seeded combustion, magnetohydrodynamic and electrical phenomena in turbulent boundary layers, and shock waves and authored a book, Space Propulsion, and co-authored a textbook, Statistical Thermodynamics. ``In 1965 he went on sabbatical to Oxford and returned an Earth scientist. The catalyst was Ron Oxburgh. Plate tectonics was just on the horizon, and Don joined his quantitative abilities and physical intuition with Ron's skills and knowledge of geology to produce over the next decade a remarkable series of 24 papers that explored topics such as the many implications of the Earth's thermal boundary layer, ridge melting, subduction zone volcanism, and intraplate tectonics and magmatism, and established the physical bases for many of the processes operating on our planet. Shifting to the Cornell Department of Geological Sciences in 1973, Don explored virtually every aspect of physical Earth geology and became an expert on planetary remote sensing and geophysical interpretation. He published over 150 papers on thermal subsidence in sedimentary basins, two-phase hydrothermal porous media convection, lithosphere flexure, cyclic sedimentation, and stick-slip earthquakes and the lithospheres and mantles of the other planets. He worked and published with outstanding students and colleagues including Ken Torrance, Gerald Schubert, David Spence, Marc Parmentier, Bill Haxby, John Ockendon, Kevin Burke, Jud Ahern, Steve Emerman, and Charlie Angevine. In 1982 he published Geodynamics with Jerry Schubert, a book that became the primary reference in the field.

  12. Luhmann Receives 2007 John Adam Fleming Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher T.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2008-02-01

    This year's John Adam Fleming medalist quickly established a reputation as an innovative and productive scientist with a broad range of interests. She made early and seminal contributions to aeronomy, cosmic rays, and magnetospheric and planetary physics. She contributed importantly to the understanding of the interaction of the solar wind with the atmosphere and magnetic fields of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. She has examined the behavior of planetary rings, the interaction of interstellar neutrals with heliospheric plasmas, as well as the interaction of planetary neutrals with the heliosphere. She has led in the study of the interaction of the moon Titan with the Saturn magnetosphere, and most recently she developed a vigorous solar physics effort, leading the implementation of the IMPACT particle and field package on the twin STEREO mission, now entering its second year of successful operation.

  13. The theory of natural selection of Alfred Russel Wallace FRS.

    PubMed

    Bulmer, Michael

    2005-05-22

    Wallace's 1858 paper 'On the tendency of varieties to depart indefinitely from the original type' is often thought to present a theory of natural selection identical with that of Darwin. Examination of Wallace's argument shows that it is different from Darwin's because Wallace thought that an inferior variety could coexist with a superior variety until environmental deterioration forced the extinction of the inferior one. Other interpretations of Wallace's argument are re-examined in the light of this finding. PMID:16116703

  14. Alfred P. Gage and the Introductory Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This article is about a late 19th-century teacher of secondary school physics. I was originally interested in the apparatus that he sold. This led me to the physics books that he wrote, and these took me to his unusual ideas about ways to use laboratory time to introduce students to the phenomena of physics. More than 100 years later educational…

  15. Alfred P. Gage and the Introductory Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2016-03-01

    This article is about a late 19th-century teacher of secondary school physics. I was originally interested in the apparatus that he sold. This led me to the physics books that he wrote, and these took me to his unusual ideas about ways to use laboratory time to introduce students to the phenomena of physics. More than 100 years later educational ideas have now come full circle, and it is time to bring Gage and his texts and ideas to 21st-century physics teachers.

  16. The Ny-Alesund aerosol and ozone measurements intercomparison campaign 1997/1998 (NAOMI-1998)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuber, R.; Beyerle, G.; Beninga, I.; VonderGathen, P.; Rairoux, P.; Schrems, O.; Wahl, P.; Gross, M.; McGee, Th.; Iwasaka, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Shibata, T.; Klein, U.; Steinbrecht, W.

    1998-01-01

    An intercomparison campaign for Lidar measurements of stratospheric ozone and aerosol has been conducted at the Primary Station of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) in Ny-Alesund/Spitsbergen during January-February 1998. In addition to local instrumentation, the NDSC mobile ozone lidar from NASA/GSFC and the mobile aerosol lidar from Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) participated. The aim is the validation of stratospheric ozone and aerosol profile measurements according to NDSC guidelines. This paper briefly presents the employed instruments and outlines the campaign. Results of the blind intercomparison of ozone profiles are given in a companion paper and temperature measurements are described in this issue.

  17. WEGENER: Solid Body Dynamics Investigation of Venus. Results from Summer School Alpbach 2014.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, A.; Coyle, S.; Czeluschke, A.; Donaldson Hanna, K.; Donohoe, A.; Hu, H.; Koopmans, R.-J.; Lucchetti, A.; Mannel, T.; Nachon, M.; Nilsson, D.; Shelakhaev, N.; Suer, A.; Timoney, R.

    2015-10-01

    The work presented in this paper was performed by the Orange Team during Summer School Alpbach 2014, which mainly concerns about geophysics of terrestrial planets. A mission is designed to investigate the past and current tectonic and volcanic activity on Venus. During the mission, a simultaneous observations from topographic, magnetic and gravitational measurements will be performed and the combination of the information has the potential to provide an improved understanding of the formation and evolution of the planet.

  18. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's disease): An updated review of ocular disease manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kubaisi, Buraa; Abu Samra, Khawla; Foster, C. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a potentially lethal systemic disorder that is characterized by necrotizing vasculitis of small arteries and veins. The respiratory system is most commonly affected in limited forms of the disease, however upper and lower respiratory system, systemic vasculitis, and necrotizing glomerulonephritis are the characteristic components of the disease triad. The peak incidence is observed at 64–75 years of age, with a prevalence of 8–10 per million depending on geographic location. In this review we focus on the ocular manifestations of the disease which occur in nearly in one third of the patients. In addition we describe the neuro-ophthalmic complications which occur in up to half of cases. We also discuss the current systemic treatment options including corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and the available biologic response modifiers including rituximab. The disease remains difficult to diagnose due to the generalized symptomatic presentation of patients with GPA. As a result, several sets of diagnostic criteria have been developed which include clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to varying extents. Early diagnosis and multi-specialty collaboration among physicians is necessary to adequately manage the disease and the potential complications that may result from drugs used in the treatment of the disease. Despite recent advances, more research is necessary to prevent the high rates of mortality from the disease itself and from therapeutic side effects. PMID:27195187

  19. Earth Evolution and Dynamics (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, Trond H.

    2016-04-01

    While physicists are fantasizing about a unified theory that can explain just about everything from subatomic particles (quantum mechanics) to the origin of the Universe (general relativity), Darwin already in 1858 elegantly unified the biological sciences with one grand vision. In the Earth Sciences, the description of the movement and deformation of the Earth's outer layer has evolved from Continental Drift (1912) into Sea-Floor Spreading (1962) and then to the paradigm of Plate Tectonics in the mid-to-late 1960s. Plate Tectonics has been extremely successful in providing a framework for understanding deformation and volcanism at plate boundaries, allowed us to understand how continent motions through time are a natural result of heat escaping from Earth's deep interior, and has granted us the means to conduct earthquake and volcanic hazard assessments and hydrocarbon exploration, which have proven indispensable for modern society. Plate Tectonics is as fundamentally unifying to the Earth Sciences as Darwin's Theory of Evolution is to the Life Sciences, but it is an incomplete theory that lacks a clear explanation of how plate tectonics, mantle convection and mantle plumes interact. Over the past decade, however, we have provided compelling evidence that plumes rise from explicit plume generation zones at the margins of two equatorial and antipodal large low shear-wave velocity provinces (Tuzo and Jason). These thermochemical provinces on the core-mantle boundary have been stable for at least the last 300 million years, possibly the last 540 million years, and their edges are the dominant sources of the plumes that generate large igneous provinces, hotspots and kimberlites. Linking surface and lithospheric processes to the mantle is extremely challenging and is only now becoming feasible due to breakthroughs in the estimation of ancient longitudes before the Cretaceous, greatly improved seismic tomography, recent advances in mineral physics, and new developments in our understanding of the dynamics of true polar wander. Dramatic improvements in computational capacity and numerical methods that efficiently model mantle flow while incorporating surface tectonics, plumes, and subduction, have emerged to facilitate further study - We are now capitalizing on these recent advances so as to generate a new Earth model that links plate tectonics with shallow and deep mantle convection through time, and which includes elements such as deeply subducted slabs and stable thermochemical piles with plumes that rise from their edges. It is still unclear, though, why lower mantle structures similar to today would have existed since the Early Phanerozoic (540 Ma), and perhaps for much longer time. Could large-scale upwellings act as an anchor for mantle structure that also controls where downward flow and subduction occurs? Or could it be that subduction keeps itself in place? These are open questions, and at the moment we do not even know with certainty whether Tuzo and Jason were spatially stable for much longer than 300 Myr; we can only state that their stability before Pangea formed is consistent with palaeomagnetic and geological data, but is not necessarily required.

  20. Ocean-shelf interaction and exchange (Fridtjof Nansen Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthnance, John M.

    2016-04-01

    A brief review will be given of physical processes where shallow shelf seas border the deep ocean, including waves that travel and propagate responses around the ocean boundary. Some implications for ocean-shelf exchange of water and its physical and biochemical contents will be discussed, along with an outline of some studies estimating these exchanges. There will be an emphasis on the north-west European shelf edge. A recent study is the project FASTNEt: "Fluxes across sloping topography of the North East Atlantic". This aims to resolve seasonal, interannual and regional variations. Novel and varied measurements have been made in three contrasting sectors of shelf edge: the Celtic Sea south-west of Britain, the Malin-Hebrides shelf west of Scotland and the West Shetland shelf north of Scotland. Previous studies established the existence of flow along the continental slope in these areas, more persistently poleward in northern sectors. Modelling aims to diagnose and estimate the contribution of various processes to transports and to exchange along and across the slope. Estimates obtained so far will be presented; overall transport from drifters and moored current meters; effective "diffusivity" from drifter dispersion and salinity surveys; other estimates of velocity variance contributing to exchange. In addition to transport by the along-slope flow, possible process contributions which may be estimated include internal waves and their Stokes drift, tidal pumping, eddies and Ekman transports, in a wind-driven surface layer and in a bottom boundary layer. Overall estimates of exchange across the shelf edge here are large by global standards, several m**2/s (Sverdrups per 1000 km). However, the large majority of this exchange is in tides and other motion of comparably short period, and is only effective for water properties or contents that evolve on a time-scale of a day or less.

  1. Dr. Chad E. Finn, 2013 Wilder Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Chad Finn took over the leadership of the USDA-ARS small fruit breeding program in Corvallis, Oregon in 1993 after three years working as an extension horticulturist in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since taking over this program he has developed what is...

  2. Newbery and Caldecott Medal Books, 1966-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingman, Lee, Ed.

    The Newbery and Caldecott children's book awards for the years 1966 to 1975 are covered. A resume of the book, an excerpt, the author's acceptance speech, and a biography of the author are provided for each of the ten Newbery award books. Some also have an author's note. For the Caldecott award books there are a book summary, the artist's…

  3. Does hydrology have a soul?(Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Upmanu

    2014-05-01

    Water is the distinguishing feature of Earth. Its presence sustains life, business, energy and romance. Hydrology is the science of water. Hence, it is one of the most relevant and exciting of the planetary sciences. But, does hydrology as it is taught and practiced today achieve this potential? Is understanding and predicting the hydrological cycle really in the domain of today's hydrologists? I intend to present a personal view of some puzzles as well as fundamental issues that define hydrology as a fertile ground of scientific inquiry that emerges at the intersection of the planetary and life sciences, and of course human behavior. I plan to outline 5 main questions whose explicit or implicit pursuit characterizes the essence of the hydrological being.

  4. Oersted Medal Lecture, January 6, 2015: AAPT, TPT, and Me

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamola, Karl C.

    2016-01-01

    AAPT established The Physics Teacher more than 50 years ago as a magazine for high school teachers. Over the decades, the publication has evolved in a number of important ways, and I was privileged to play a part in that evolution. I will describe some of the important preparation I received for that role and share some of the insights I gained during my 13 years as editor. I'll outline the history of The Physics Teacher, leading to its eventually becoming a peer-reviewed journal serving a very broad audience. I will also discuss TPT's role in the physics teaching community and the important positive influence it has had on the evolution of AAPT. I'll conclude with some observations and conclusions drawn from my more than 40 years of teaching experience.

  5. Milankovitch theory - hits and misses (Milutin Milankovitch Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, W. H.

    2012-04-01

    Milankovitch Theory has become an important tool in geologic practice and thought, and is sufficiently conspicuous to provide a rewarding target for criticism. The chief problem arising has to do with the prominence of a cycle near 100,000 years, whose origin is not clear. Most practitioners, presumably, would accept a close relationship of that cycle to precession of the equinoxes (that is, cyclic changes in seasonality), along with dynamical properties oft he system that enhance the amplitude of the 100-kyrcycleat the expense of others. In any case, Milankovitch Theory has proved useful, both for age assignments and for stimulating thought about relationships between climate change and sedimentation, as is readily evident from the relevant literature. It would be difficult to replace. Neither does it seem desirable to do so: the chief problem noted in regard of the theory (the 100-kyr problem) is not necessarily a part of the theory, which is concerned with change rather than with condition. The 100-kyr cycle is linked to condition. The problem raised by critics seems to be the time scale of integration of change, a problem not addressed in Milankovitch Theory. A necessity for additional processes and mechanisms not considered in Milankovitch Theory can not be excluded.

  6. Macelwane Medal talk: Mars Exploration - A look forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    One of two neighbors in the Sun's habitable zone, Mars offers a unique opportunity for exploration. Over 60% of the surface is >3.5 Gyr, offering a window into the first billion years of the evolution of a terrestrial planet, including processes such as early crust formation, early atmospheric evolution, and the effects of late heavy bombardment. The past decade of exploration by orbiters and rovers has revolutionized our understanding of the planet. Two of the most exciting discoveries are (1) the discovery of over a dozen aqueous, potentially habitable environments - lacustrine, hydrothermal, pedogenic - in the ancient Mars geologic record, delineated by geomorphology and mineralogy and (2) the presence of near-surface mid-latitude surface ice and recurring slope linae that may imply intermittent liquid brines in near-polar environments today. Near-term funded future robotic exploration plans entail a caching rover, an orbiter focused on ice and potential seep modeling, and return of samples from one landing site. Recent findings and changes in the exploration landscape motivate a number of possible new possibilities and opportunties: (a) multiple exploration rovers to sample ancient Mars' diverse, potentially habitable environments scouting to understand the planet's history and for signs of life; (b) the importance of commercial space exploration efforts and private efforts to move beyond Earth.

  7. A scientist interested in soils (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, F. C.

    2009-04-01

    These are the most important findings of my scientific carrier. Unfrozen water in frozen soils - In continental Antarctica, the intense cold, the paucity of liquid water and low biological activity posed the question on whether the surficial, grayish, sandy, material devoided of plants and humus could be legitimately called soils. This question was raised since 1916 when Antarctic soils were first analyzed. The question was later resolved by waiving the U.S.D.A requirements for the presence of higher plants. Nevertheless, one cannot usher the apparently lifeless, unconsolidated material into the realm of soils just by changing a definition! Proofs are required to show that soil formation in continental Antarctica is a present day process. This confermation was obtained by detecting ionic migration in frozen xeric soils. The experiment showed that radioactive ions, 36Cl- and 22Na+, moved in the unfrozen interfacial films of water at the surface of soil particles. The higly dissociated and corrosive nature of the unfrozen water could explain, also, the observed weathering in situ. Dynamic Pedology and Podzolization - For studying the process of podzolization, I used a different approach to the traditional pedological investigations; I called this approach dynamic Pedology. Dynamic pedology involves the collection, analysis and interpretation of the soil solution obtained in the field through lysimetry. Traditional pedology by analyzing the solid phase averages the sum total of all the processes since the soil initiated its development. Dynamic pedology is suitable for examining current processes. In weathering studies, soil solution composition allows to verify the thermodynamic stability of minerals. Also, the proton donors proposed as responsible for formation of soils can be identified in the soil solution. Contrasting with the drab, colorless Antarctic soils, the podzols are some of the most photogenic and aesthetic soils of the world. Soil solutions was collected from 45 tension lysimeters located in the central Cascades Mountains U.S.A. and analyzed for pH, major cations and anions and DOC. The study lasted 15 years. From the interpretation of these data I was able to produce a new theory for the process of podzolization that explained the presence of imogolite. The theory is based on the presence of two major proton donors that originate two chemical compartments. The upper one included the O, E and Bhs horizons.The lower, the Bs, the C and ground water. In the upper compartment, the organic acids acted as the major proton donors and complexing agents; here, the low pH depresses the dissociation of carbonic acid. In the lower compartment the major proton donor is carbonic acid formed by the high partial pressure of CO2and the rise in pH. These two compartments rule two contrasting reactions: congruent and incongruent dissolution. The mineralas in the E and Bhs are congruently dissolved, although neogenic minerals are seasonally possible .The solution in this compartment is undersaturated with rispect to imogolite equilibrium, hence it is thermodynamically unstable. In the incongruent dissolution compartment, imogolite is present and thermodamic stable. The suspended fraction of the solution shows, in the upper compartment humic particles containig metals, in the lower compartment, only mineral grains were present. This theory appears also valid for Japan and northern Alaska. The Role of Podzolization in the Formation of Peatland - In south eastern Alaska, following a chronosequence of marine terraces, it was discovered that podzolization was related to the formation of bogs, the final stage of plant succession.The formation of peatland was caused by the deterioration of the internal drainage as an iron-cemented pan developed during podzolization. Only extensive windthrow, a common phenomenon in S.E. Alaska, could revert the trend toward paludification by mechanically breaking the pan and creating windthrow mounds on which a new forest can be established.

  8. Improving the Geologic Time Scale (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradstein, Felix M.

    2010-05-01

    The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) provides the framework for the physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth. The time scale is the tool "par excellence" of the geological trade, and insight in its construction, strength, and limitations enhances its function and its utility. Earth scientists should understand how time scales are constructed and its myriad of physical and abstract data are calibrated, rather than merely using ages plucked from a convenient chart or card. Calibration to linear time of the succession of events recorded in the rocks on Earth has three components: (1) the standard stratigraphic divisions and their correlation in the global rock record, (2) the means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record, and (3) the methods of effectively joining the two scales, the stratigraphic one and the linear one. Under the auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international stratigraphic divisions and their correlative events are now largely standardized, especially using the GSSP (Global Stratigraphic Section and Point) concept. The means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record are objectives in the EARTH TIME and GTS NEXT projects, that also are educating a new generation of GTS dedicated scientists. The U/Pb, Ar/Ar and orbital tuning methods are intercalibrated, and external error analysis improved. Existing Ar/Ar ages become almost 0.5% older, and U/Pb ages stratigraphically more realistic. The new Os/Re method has potential for directly dating more GSSP's and its correlative events. Such may reduce scaling uncertainty between the sedimentary levels of an age date and that of a stage boundary. Since 1981, six successive Phanerozoic GTS have been published, each new one achieving higher resolution and more users. The next GTS is scheduled for 2011/2012, with over 50 specialists taking part. New chapters include an expanded planetary time scale, sequence stratigraphy, Osmium, Carbon and Oxygen stratigraphy, the Cryogenian period, history of the plants, hominid prehistory, and last but not least the Anthropocene. The Cambrian Period is radically improved with 10 standard stages and detailed trilobite biochronology. Ordovician now has a stable international stages and graptolites scale. The integration of a refined 100 and 400 ka sedimentary cycles scale and a truly high-resolution U/Pb ages scale for the Mississippian is a major step towards the global Carboniferous GTS. The Devonian GTS leaves to be desired with lack of firm definitions for its upper boundary, and the long Emsian stage; it also lacks age dates. Its stages scaling is disputed. The Rhaetian and Norian stages in the Triassic and the Berriasian stage in the Cretaceous urgently require lower boundary definitions, and also boundary age dates. The single ~400 ka eccentricity component is very stable and can extend orbital tuning from the Cenozoic well into the Mesozoic portion of the GTS. Jurassic and Cretaceous now have long orbitally tuned segments. A completely astronomical-tuned Geological Time Scale (AGTS) for the Cenozoic is within reach showing unprecedented accuracy, precision and resolution. Burdigalian in the Miocene, and Lutetian, Bartonian and Priabonian stages in the Eocene still require formal definition. The K/T boundary will become about 0.5 ± 0.1 Ma older. After 25 years of research and authorship in the GTS it behoves me to especially thank my colleagues James Ogg, Frits Agterberg, John McArthur and Roger Cooper for longstanding collaboration. As a final note I urge construction of more regional time scales(like developed ‘down under') calibrated to the standard global GTS, to scale regional rock units.

  9. Sagan Medal Paper: Improving Impact in Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D.

    2004-11-01

    Carl Sagan was masterful at reaching a wide public. He had great native talent as an educator, and he worked hard to hone his ability to promote his image as a television personality. Through TV as well as writing, he reached a far wider audience than would have been possible by classroom teaching or other direct personal contact. While none of us is "another Sagan", we can draw lessons from his use of media to leverage his message. One way to multiply our impact is through contributing to textbooks. I jumped at the opportunity to take on the popular George Abell college astronomy texts when the author unexpectedly died. I hoped that as a planetary scientist involved in NASA missions, I could do a better job than most astronomers to convey the excitement of planetary exploration. One edition of a text can reach tens of thousands of students and may represent the only college science course they will take. In the 1980s it was difficult for educators and writers to obtain high quality NASA images. Voyager and other missions issued press releases of first products, but the later, more carefully processed images were unavailable. By selecting the best planetary images and making them available with captions as slide sets, I could reach another large audience. Later I helped establish the NASA-USGS Planetary Photojournal for web-based images and captions. Developing websites for the public is today one of the best ways to broaden the impact of our work. My impact hazard website is now a decade old and exceeds a million hits a month. I also distribute "NEO News" via e-mail to more than 800 readers. I believe that the public is hungry for reliable, understandable information. We can all look at ways to use modern technology to help provide it.

  10. Grove Medal Address - investing in the fuel cell business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasul, Firoz

    Successful commercialization of fuel cells will require significant investment. To attract this funding, the objective must be commercially driven and the financing will have to be viewed as an investment in the business of fuel cells rather than just the funding of technology development. With the recent advancements in fuel cells and demonstrations of fuel cell power systems in stationary and transport applications, an industry has begun to emerge and it is attracting the attention of institutional and corporate investors, in addition to the traditional government funding. Although, the strategic importance of fuel cells as a versatile, efficient and cleaner power source of the future as well as an `engine' for economic growth and job creation has now been understood by several governments, major corporations have just begun to recognize the enormous potential of the fuel cell for it to become as ubiquitous for electrical power as the microprocessor has become for computing power. Viewed as a business, fuel cells must meet the commercial requirements of price competitiveness, productivity enhancement, performance and reliability, in addition to environmental friendliness. As fuel cell-based products exhibit commercial advantages over conventional power sources, the potential for higher profits and superior returns will attract the magnitude of investment needed to finance the development of products for the varied applications, the establishment of high volume manufacturing capabilities, and the creation of appropriate fuel and service infrastructures for these new products based on a revolutionary technology. Today, the fuel cell industry is well-positioned to offer the investing public opportunities to reap substantial returns through their participation at this early stage of growth of the industry.

  11. Mantle convection: concensus and queries (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal convection driven by surface cooling and internal heat production is the cause of endogenic activity of all planets, expressed as tectonic activity and volcanism for solid planets. The sluggish convection of the silicated mantle also controls the activity of the metallic core and the possibility of an active dynamo. A glimpse of the internal structure of Earth's mantle is provided by seismic tomography. However, both the limited resolution of seismic methods and the complexity of the relations between seismic velocities and the thermo-mechanical parameters (mostly temperature and density), leave to the geodynamicist a large degree of interpretation. At first order, a very simple model of mantle heterogeneities, only built from the paleogeographic positions of Cenozoic and Mesozoic slabs, explains the pattern and amplitude of Earth's plate motions and gravity field, while being in agreement with long wavelength tomography. This indicates that the mantle dynamics is mostly controlled by thermal anomalies and by the dynamics of the top boundary layer, the lithosphere. However, the presence of various complexities due to variations in elemental composition and to phase transitions is required by seismology, mineralogy and geochemistry. I will review how these complexities affect the dynamics of the transition zone and of the deep mantle and discuss the hypothesis on their origins, either primordial or as a consequence of plate tectonics. The rheologies that are used in global geodynamic models for the mantle and the lithosphere remain very simplistic. Some aspects of plate tectonics (e.g., the very existence of plates, their evolution, the dynamics of one-sided subductions...) are now reproduced by numerical simulations. However the rheologies implemented and their complexities remain only remotely related to that of solid minerals as observed in laboratories. The connections between the quantities measured at microscopic scale (e.g., mineralogy, grainsize, mechanisms of creeping, anisotropy, preferential shape orientations, water content...), their macroscopic averages, and the retroaction between them, are still unclear. The understanding of these relations would explain why Earth has plate tectonics while the other planets of the solar system, including her sister planet Venus, do not. As plate tectonics can be advocated to be a major ingredient for life to developp, we can speculate that a better understanding of the interaction between rheology and geodynamics would help us to estimate on what extrasolar planets including super earths, life might be expected.

  12. Uncertainty Quantification in Geophysical Sciences (Lewis Fry Richardson Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talagrand, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainty is ubiquitous in science to some degree, and so is the need for quantifying it. This may be especially true of geophysical sciences, concerning in particular prediction of events of potential major consequences in, e.g., seismology, vulcanology, climatology or meteorology. A review will be made of the various methods that are used in geophysical sciences for quantifying uncertainty, especially in the context of prediction. The strong nonlinearity and chaotic character of many of the physical laws that govern the evolution of the systems of interest significantly complicates the situation. From a directly practical point of view, ensemble methods, in which the uncertainty on the state of the system of interest is described by a set of points in the corresponding state space, are developing rapidly. These methods and their performance will be presented, together with a number of questions they raise : prior identification of uncertainties, objective validation, dimension of ensembles and cost efficiency, limitations.

  13. Mark A. Cane Receives 2013 Maurice Ewing Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philander, S. George

    2014-01-01

    Mark Cane started his career when theories for the ocean circulation were "dreamlike" (in the words of Henry Stommel). He made major contributions to a complete change in those perceptions by producing theoretical results that explain and by developing computer models that simulate realistically the variability of the complex system of tropical currents, undercurrents, and countercurrents. His results served as the basis for the design of several international field programs in the three tropical oceans whose different dimensions and different surface winds provide stringent tests for the results concerning the interactions between the waves and currents that determine how the oceans adjust to changing winds.

  14. Some Problems of the Lithosphere (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory A.

    2015-04-01

    In 1911 Augustus Love published a monograph: Some Problems of Geodynamics which in part dealt with the problem of isostasy and the support of mountain belts. In doing so he was one of the first authors to use the concept of the lithosphere. Although his analysis used the framework of linear elasticity, he clearly recognised that the evident structural heterogeneity of the Earth's crust could not simply be interpreted in terms of elastic displacement, and he had no simple explanation for what processes had produced the major topographic features of the Earth: continents, oceans and mountain belts. Today we have a far more complete understanding of those processes, but there are still unresolved problems. In this presentation I will focus on two of those problems that are of particular interest in understanding the geological evolution of the continents: the relationship of near-surface faults and ductile deformation in the lithosphere, and the stability of continental lithosphere in actively deforming zones. While the lithosphere certainly manifests elastic strain, most notably in the context of earthquakes and seismic waves, the large strains that have shaped the continents result from diffuse ductile strain at the deeper levels, coupled with movement on fault planes in the upper crust. Although plates in many regions move coherently with little internal deformation, the stresses that act on different parts of a plate may cause broad deformation zones to develop within a plate interior. Plate boundaries that cross continental regions also typically involve broadly distributed deformation. In recent years the distribution of deformation in such regions is measured accurately using GPS, and in general is explained well by a model in which the lithosphere behaves as a thin viscous sheet, albeit with a non-linear temperature-dependent viscosity law. Such models are broadly consistent with laboratory deformation experiments on small rock samples. However, the relationship between faulting and earthquake activity and the continuous deformation field below the seismogenic layer continues to be poorly understood. Prominent surface faults may be a natural consequence of the localization of strain caused by processes within the ductile layer such as shear heating, grain-size reduction, or simply the interaction of non-Newtonian constitutive law and irregular geometry. Where intra-plate convergence occurs the lithosphere must thicken, and the question naturally arises as to whether the thickened lithosphere will remain stable or somehow be removed by convective overturn with underlying asthenophere. Such overturn is expected of a viscous lithospheric layer that is denser than the asthenosphere; it will be denser because it is colder, unless there is some compositional contrast which makes it intrinsically buoyant. A relatively low viscosity is required, however, in order that the instability can grow at a sufficiently fast rate to overcome diffusive stabilisation of the temperature field. The high stresses created by plate convergence may provide the mechanism that activates the viscosity (and explains why the lithosphere elsewhere is generally stable). High-resolution tomographic investigations find convincing evidence of small-scale mantle drips occurring beneath recently active orogenic zones such as the western USA and the SE Carpathians. However, seismic observations of thickened lithosphere remaining beneath Tibet apparently contradict the interpretation of mantle overturn suggested by recent volcanism and uplift. Although the Tibetan mantle lithosphere may be relatively buoyant, the possibility that this layer has overturned internally may allow these conflicting interpretations to be reconciled.

  15. MHD Dynamo phenomenon in our lab (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailitis, Agris

    2016-04-01

    Celestial objects generate magnetic field very like technical dynamo do. Field induces current in a moving electroconductor. The induced current amplifies magnetic field. At large enough product conductivity time's velocity time's size amplification exceeds losses and situation without magnetic field is impossible. Such scenario is obvious for technical dynamo made from insolated wire but not so for uniform conductor as in celestial bodies. Development of the idea took literally the entire 20th century. Discovery of sunspot magnetic fields at the century rise and laboratory verification at the very fall. At thirties Cowling noticed that geometrically simple shaped (axially symmetrical) field can't sustain itself. Process must be more complex, somehow spatially fragmented. At the middle of century Parker and Steenbeck saw such fragmentation in a turbulent structure of hydrodynamic flow. Shortly after his α-effect approach was made ready Steenbeck invited us to think on molten Na experiments for theory verification. The first idea was to push the Na flow through the hand-blown pipe maze. Similar industrial scale experiment after years and regardless of us was realized in Karlsruhe. Seeking for something cheaper we stopped at Ponomarenko idea - axially symmetric helical flow can't generate axi-simmetric field but it can generate azimuthally structured one. The mathematical model was modified to experimental conditions and numerically optimized. The Dynamo stand was built and it works. Even after optimization Dynamo stand exceeds usual size of hydraulic experiments. 2m3 of molten Na circulate there by means of propeller powered from 200kW motor. When circulation exceeds 0.6 m3/s (at 120°C) seemingly from nowhere appears magnetic field. Twisted field pattern slowly (about 1.5Hz) rotates round flow axis. Up to 0.1T field stay as long as stay circulation and temperature. When sodium is heated up or slowed down the field is slowly dying out. Phenomenon is much richer then underlining mathematical model. Followed by dozens of fields sensor it shows lot of anomalies and variations. More details in the lecture.

  16. 1987 William Bowie Medal to Robert N. Clayton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Julian R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    In my mind's eye I still see Bob Clayton as he was first introduced to me by Sam Epstein, nodding hello from behind an extraction line at Caltech [the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena], where he was a graduate student. After getting his degree in chemistry, Bob went to Penn State [Pennsylvania State University, University Park] for 2 years but was lured to Chicago in 1958 when Harold Urey “retired.” Bob is exceedingly conscientious and more dedicated to excellence in science than anyone I know, and he awed those who may have expected a replacement for Urey by striding along his own new and clearly blazed trails. But Bob does the very best job possible in everything he does; in research, in teaching, in administration, and in service activities, and I'm glad I won't be around to worry about the void he leaves at retirement. Incidentally, I find it awkward in his presence to say anything good about him. He does not engage in small talk and unnecessary speculation and does not express subjective opinions; I fear he will challenge these Clayton-directed judgments as subjective, irrespective of their laudatory nature.

  17. Soroosh Sorooshian Receives 2013 Robert E. Horton Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2014-01-01

    It is a true honor to be named the 2013 Robert E. Horton medalist by AGU. To be considered for such an honor, one must be nominated for consideration. I am grateful to Jasper Vrugt for having led my nomination and to colleagues who wrote supporting letters on my behalf.

  18. Fascinating Plasma Structures (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    In this lecture I will discuss three plasma realms, which have attracted my particular attention because of their fascinating observable fine structure and the complex underlying physics. The structure is, of course, owed to the pervading magnetic field. But it is in particular the role of magnetic tensions that will be highlighted. The three plasma phenomena are: (1) cometary plasma tails, where magnetic tensions transfer momentum from the solar wind under mass loading by the comet; (2) auroral arcs, which owe their energy influx to the release of magnetic shear stresses; and (3) solar prominences, in which cool plasma embedded in the hot corona is subject to a balance of magnetic shear stresses and gravity. The last subject is a recent topic of my research and still bears many secrets. Images and movies will be supplemented by brief characterizations of the key physical processes.

  19. Mark A. Cane Receives 2013 Maurice Ewing Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    I must first pay tribute to Klaus Wyrtki, a hero of mine who passed away earlier this year. At a time when ideas about El Niño pointed all over the place, he told me that Bjerknes's hypothesis was the way forward. He was right, of course, but Bjerknes stopped short of explaining the oscillatory nature of ENSO, and it took Klaus's tide gauge data to show that ocean dynamics is the answer. His analysis was masterful, but there would have been nothing much to analyze without his incredible effort to deploy those tide gauges in atolls and islands throughout the tropical Pacific. My magnum opus may fairly be described as translating Bjerknes-Wyrtki into a numerical model.

  20. Measuring Sea Level Change (Vening Meinesz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, Philip L.

    2010-05-01

    For over 75 years, the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) at the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory has maintained the global data bank for long term sea level change information from tide gauges. This data set has in recent years received most attention in studies of sea level rise related to climate change. However, it is also valuable in research into ocean circulation variability (oceanography), vertical land movements (geology) and geodetic datums (geodesy). This presentation will review some of the main applications of mean sea level information so far. In addition, it will point to the role of tide gauges within what is becoming a powerful combination of gauges, GPS, absolute gravity, satellite altimetry and space gravity for the study of sea and land level variations on a global basis. However, changes in mean levels are only one part of sea level research. Other topics include changes in extreme sea levels which are of practical importance as well as being interesting scientifically. Recent studies have begun to investigate changes in extremes worldwide, identifying those areas where secular changes in extremes tend to be determined by those in mean values, and areas where they are not. In addition, intriguing recent work has identified regional changes in ocean tides which are larger than expected from secular change in the tidal potential. Such tidal changes are also important within studies of extremes. This presentation will attempt to show the wide range of studies possible with a copious globally-distributed tide gauge data set, many of which are very relevant to the understanding of a changing world.

  1. Bernard J. Wood Receives 2013 Harry H. Hess Medal: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Albrecht W.

    2014-01-01

    As Harry Hess recognized over 50 years ago, mantle melting is the fundamental motor for planetary evolution and differentiation. Melting generates the major divisions of crust mantle and core. The distribution of chemical elements between solids, melts, and gaseous phases is fundamental to understanding these differentiation processes. Bernie Wood, together with Jon Blundy, has combined experimental petrology and physicochemical theory to revolutionize the understanding of the distribution of trace elements between melts and solids in the Earth. Knowledge of these distribution laws allows the reconstruction of the source compositions of the melts (deep in Earth's interior) from their abundances in volcanic rocks. Bernie's theoretical treatment relates the elastic strain of the lattice caused by the substitution of a trace element in a crystal to the ionic radius and charge of this element. This theory, and its experimental calibrations, brought order to a literature of badly scattered, rather chaotic experimental data that allowed no satisfactory quantitative modeling of melting processes in the mantle.

  2. Oersted Medal Address 2012: Narrative and Witz in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrow, Charles H.

    2012-06-01

    Physics is the syntax and grammar of science; it is the rules. Therefore, you must learn physics to write, speak, or do good science. But knowing the rules of physics won't make you a good physicist or a good physics teacher any more than knowing grammar will make you a good writer. To bring physics alive you need strong narratives and interesting content. I will describe three examples: A course—"The Physics of Living in Space"; a textbook—Modern Introductory Physics; and a project—Astronomy's Discoveries and Physics Education. I will also show examples of what I mean by "Witz" and why it is important in physics.

  3. Faults and Earthquakes (Louis Néel Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    2015-04-01

    I have been studying fault rocks and fault mechanics for 40 years, trying to understand mechanisms of earthquakes. A basic strategy has been to study fault rocks for understanding deformation and transport processes in fault zones at depths, to reproduce the same processes in laboratory experiments and determine mechanical and transport properties of faults, and to conduct earthquake modeling based on measured properties and compare with natural earthquakes. I will try to give an overview of the progress of fault studies in the last 25 years, emphasizing the importance of such integrated studies. The following four topics will be covered from my own perspectives of fault and earthquake studies. High-velocity frictional properties of faults in relation to earthquake rupture dynamics will be the main focus, but the lecture will cover lithosphere rheology, initiation processes of earthquake-induced landslides, and a basin evolution and pore-pressure development as relevant topics. [1] Friction to flow law A simple friction to flow law merges strength profiles of lithosphere and velocity-dependency models of faults that have been used widely in the last three decades to characterize the thickness and internal structures of the lithosphere and to model earthquake cycles and earthquake rupture propagations, respectively. The law allows analyzing earthquake generations including frictional, transitional and flow properties at shallow to deep faults across a lithosphere. Analyses shows how strength profile evolve during earthquake cycles. The law can be extended to describe brittle to high-temperature flow properties across a lithosphere, and realistic analysis of earthquake generation and interseismic deformation, including postseismic deformation, will be possible. [2] High-velocity weakening of fault and a source of diverse seismic activities Extensive studies in the last two decades demonstrated that faults undergo dramatic weakening at seismic slip rates, through mechanisms such as flash heating/bulk heating of gouge, frictional melting, and thermochemical pressurization. It is likely that earthquake nucleation is controlled by rate and state frictional properties at slow slip rates, whereas high-velocity weakening can affect the growth processes of large earthquakes. Combinations of those slow and high-velocity properties can produce very diverse seismic and aseismic fault motions. I will also discuss technical problems in building friction apparatuses to extend the high-velocity friction studies to wet environments and to higher normal stresses and temperatures. [3] Catastrophic landslides triggered by earthquakes Tsaoling landslide in Taiwan is the largest and well-documented landslide among many landslides triggered by the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. The landslide occurred along a very flat bedding surface, and a Newmark analysis using high-velocity frictional properties quantitatively reproduced the initiation and runaway processes of the landslide, elucidating the importance of slip weakening of landslide surface. The method has many applications to earthquake-triggered landslides. [4] Basin evolution and pore pressure development Pore-pressure distribution in the earth is poorly known at present. Analysis of basin evolution, using measured permeability and storage capacity of all formations of a basin, revealed the sedimentation and fluid flow processes in the last 30 Ma that lead to the development of abnormal pore pressure below about 4 km in depths. Modeling based on measured transport properties will be useful to solve many problems such as fluid flow in the earth, effect of water on earthquake generation, waste isolation, and CCS.

  4. Ice - not just H2O (Louis Agassiz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. W.

    2009-04-01

    Many of the important properties and uses of ice that fascinate cryospheric scientists actually depend on impurities that are present: isotopic variants of water molecules, small amounts of soluble and insoluble material derived from the aerosol and gas phase, and the trace constituents of the air bubbles that make up around 10% of the volume of ice at atmospheric pressure. In this lecture, I will first discuss how these impurities, and their location within the ice structure, affect local properties of the ice such as the electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, which scale up to give ice sheets their geophysical properties. I will then consider how the concentrations of different impurities are used to give unique records of palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental properties, extending so far 800,000 years back in time. This will be illustrated particularly with data from the EPICA Dome C ice core. Bringing the presentation full circle (and towards Agassiz!), I will discuss how the data from ice cores and other palaeoclimatic archives are starting to lead us towards understanding of the causes of the most prominent feature of late Quaternary climate: the huge glacial/interglacial swings in temperature, that are accompanied by the waxing and waning, roughly every 100,000 years, of great northern hemisphere ice sheets.

  5. The Sun, stars and planets (Christiaan Huygens Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2010-05-01

    Using stellar occultations as a tool to probe the planetary atmospheres has resulted in significant contributions to the exploration of our solar system. The technique of solar occultation has been well known for decades, but because of stars being so faint objects with respect to the Sun this technique was not very popular in the 70's. While fostering the idea of stellar occultations, I tried to avoid the unfortunate fate of Giordano Bruno, who was burned to death on February 17, 1600: he had dared to declare that the stars were objects like the sun, only much more remote. This talk will illustrate some results obtained by the star occultation technique by one scientific example on each of the three planets which are equipped with a stellar occultation instrument: GOMOS on ENVISAT (ozone monitoring), SPICAM on board Mars Express (temperature profiles), and SPICAV on Venus Express (SO2). I will also talk about Cristiaan Huygens, the first to discuss (according to the historical review of Pierre Connes) the problem of extra-solar planets in modern scientific terms which are still valid to day. Finally, I will address the threat to the planet Earth posed by Mankind, with some discussions about demography and geo-engineering.

  6. The Voyager spacecraft /James Watt International Gold Medal Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacock, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Voyager Project background is reviewed with emphasis on selected features of the Voyager spacecraft. Investigations by the Thermo-electric Outer Planets Spacecraft Project are discussed, including trajectories, design requirements, and the development of a Self Test and Repair computer, and a Computer Accessed Telemetry System. The design and configuration of the spacecraft are described, including long range communications, attitude control, solar independent power, sequencing and control data handling, and spacecraft propulsion. The development program, maintained by JPL, experienced a variety of problems such as design deficiencies, and process control and manufacturing problems. Finally, the spacecraft encounter with Jupiter is discussed, and expectations for the Saturn encounter are expressed.

  7. Nicholson Medal for Human Outreach Lecture: Inceasing Diversity in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, David

    2012-03-01

    Two initiatives designed to increase diversity in physics, astronomy, and related fields will be described. First, the programs of the National Society of Hispanic Physicists (NSHP), including its partnership with the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans (SACNAS) and with the National Society of Black Physicists (NSHP) as well as others will be presented as well as a summary of the outcome of a recent planning meeting supported by the American Physical Society. The basic ingredients of the Fisk/Vanderbilt Master's to PhD Bridge Program will be presented. The program has made Fisk University the number one producer of Master's degrees in physics to African Americans, and Vanderbilt University the number one producer of PhD degrees in physics, astronomy, and materials science to African American students and soon to become the number one producer of PhD degrees in these areas to Hispanic students. Members are being sought for NSHP and partner institutions for the Bridge program.

  8. A random walk on water (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2009-04-01

    Randomness and uncertainty had been well appreciated in hydrology and water resources engineering in their initial steps as scientific disciplines. However, this changed through the years and, following other geosciences, hydrology adopted a naïve view of randomness in natural processes. Such a view separates natural phenomena into two mutually exclusive types, random or stochastic, and deterministic. When a classification of a specific process into one of these two types fails, then a separation of the process into two different, usually additive, parts is typically devised, each of which may be further subdivided into subparts (e.g., deterministic subparts such as periodic and aperiodic or trends). This dichotomous logic is typically combined with a manichean perception, in which the deterministic part supposedly represents cause-effect relationships and thus is physics and science (the "good"), whereas randomness has little relationship with science and no relationship with understanding (the "evil"). Probability theory and statistics, which traditionally provided the tools for dealing with randomness and uncertainty, have been regarded by some as the "necessary evil" but not as an essential part of hydrology and geophysics. Some took a step further to banish them from hydrology, replacing them with deterministic sensitivity analysis and fuzzy-logic representations. Others attempted to demonstrate that irregular fluctuations observed in natural processes are au fond manifestations of underlying chaotic deterministic dynamics with low dimensionality, thus attempting to render probabilistic descriptions unnecessary. Some of the above recent developments are simply flawed because they make erroneous use of probability and statistics (which, remarkably, provide the tools for such analyses), whereas the entire underlying logic is just a false dichotomy. To see this, it suffices to recall that Pierre Simon Laplace, perhaps the most famous proponent of determinism in the history of philosophy of science (cf. Laplace's demon), is, at the same time, one of the founders of probability theory, which he regarded as "nothing but common sense reduced to calculation". This harmonizes with James Clerk Maxwell's view that "the true logic for this world is the calculus of Probabilities" and was more recently and epigrammatically formulated in the title of Edwin Thompson Jaynes's book "Probability Theory: The Logic of Science" (2003). Abandoning dichotomous logic, either on ontological or epistemic grounds, we can identify randomness or stochasticity with unpredictability. Admitting that (a) uncertainty is an intrinsic property of nature; (b) causality implies dependence of natural processes in time and thus suggests predictability; but, (c) even the tiniest uncertainty (e.g., in initial conditions) may result in unpredictability after a certain time horizon, we may shape a stochastic representation of natural processes that is consistent with Karl Popper's indeterministic world view. In this representation, probability quantifies uncertainty according to the Kolmogorov system, in which probability is a normalized measure, i.e., a function that maps sets (areas where the initial conditions or the parameter values lie) to real numbers (in the interval [0, 1]). In such a representation, predictability (suggested by deterministic laws) and unpredictability (randomness) coexist, are not separable or additive components, and it is a matter of specifying the time horizon of prediction to decide which of the two dominates. An elementary numerical example has been devised to illustrate the above ideas and demonstrate that they offer a pragmatic and useful guide for practice, rather than just pertaining to philosophical discussions. A chaotic model, with fully and a priori known deterministic dynamics and deterministic inputs (without any random agent), is assumed to represent the hydrological balance in an area partly covered by vegetation. Experimentation with this toy model demonstrates, inter alia, that: (1) for short time horizons the deterministic dynamics is able to give good predictions; but (2) these predictions become extremely inaccurate and useless for long time horizons; (3) for such horizons a naïve statistical prediction (average of past data) which fully neglects the deterministic dynamics is more skilful; and (4) if this statistical prediction, in addition to past data, is combined with the probability theory (the principle of maximum entropy, in particular), it can provide a more informative prediction. Also, the toy model shows that the trajectories of the system state (and derivative properties thereof) do not resemble a regular (e.g., periodic) deterministic process nor a purely random process, but exhibit patterns indicating anti-persistence and persistence (where the latter statistically complies with a Hurst-Kolmogorov behaviour). If the process is averaged over long time scales, the anti-persistent behaviour improves predictability, whereas the persistent behaviour substantially deteriorates it. A stochastic representation of this deterministic system, which incorporates dynamics, is not only possible, but also powerful as it provides good predictions for both short and long horizons and helps to decide on when the deterministic dynamics should be considered or neglected. Obviously, a natural system is extremely more complex than this simple toy model and hence unpredictability is naturally even more prominent in the former. In addition, in a complex natural system, we can never know the exact dynamics and we must infer it from past data, which implies additional uncertainty and an additional role of stochastics in the process of formulating the system equations and estimating the involved parameters. Data also offer the only solid grounds to test any hypothesis about the dynamics, and failure of performing such testing against evidence from data renders the hypothesised dynamics worthless. If this perception of natural phenomena is adequately plausible, then it may help in studying interesting fundamental questions regarding the current state and the trends of hydrological and water resources research and their promising future paths. For instance: (i) Will it ever be possible to achieve a fully "physically based" modelling of hydrological systems that will not depend on data or stochastic representations? (ii) To what extent can hydrological uncertainty be reduced and what are the effective means for such reduction? (iii) Are current stochastic methods in hydrology consistent with observed natural behaviours? What paths should we explore for their advancement? (iv) Can deterministic methods provide solid scientific grounds for water resources engineering and management? In particular, can there be risk-free hydraulic engineering and water management? (v) Is the current (particularly important) interface between hydrology and climate satisfactory?. In particular, should hydrology rely on climate models that are not properly validated (i.e., for periods and scales not used in calibration)? In effect, is the evolution of climate and its impacts on water resources deterministically predictable?

  9. The importance of sea-level research (Plinius Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    200 million people worldwide live in coastal regions less than 5 meters above sea level. By the end of the 21st century, this figure is estimated to increase to 500 million. These low-lying coastal regions are vulnerable to changes in sea level brought about by climate change, storms or earthquakes. But the historic and instrumental record is too short to fully understand the climate relationships and capture the occurrence of the rare, but most destructive events. The coastal sedimentary record provides a long-term and robust paleo perspective on the rates, magnitudes and spatial variability of sea-level rise and the frequency (recurrence interval) and magnitude of destructive events. Reconstructions of paleo sea level are important for identifying the meltwater contributions, constraining parameters in Earth-Ice models, and estimating past and present rates of spatially variable sea-level change associated glacial isostatic adjustment, sediment compaction and tidal range variability. Sea-level reconstructions capture multiple phases of climate and sea-level behavior for model calibration and provide a pre-anthropogenic background against which to compare recent trends. Pre-historic earthquakes (Mw>8.0) are often associated with abrupt and cyclical patterns of vertical land-motion that are manifest in coastal sedimentary archives as abrupt changes in relative sea level. Geologic evidence of paleoearthquakes elucidates characteristic and repeated pattern of land-level movements associated with the earthquake-deformation cycle. Tsunamis and storms leave behind anomalous and characteristic sediment that is incorporated into the coastal sedimentary record often as evidence of a high-energy event affecting a low-energy, depositional environment. Records of tsunamis developed from the sedimentary deposits they leave behind improve understanding of tsunami processes and frequency by expanding the age range of events available for study. Reconstructions of paleo storms may reveal spatial and temporal variability of tropical cyclone activity and provided insight into their relationship with global climatic changes.

  10. The Era of Computational Seismology (Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, Jeroen

    2013-04-01

    The quality of tomographic images of the Earth's interior and earthquake source models is closely tied to our ability to efficiently and accurately simulate 3D seismic wave propagation. For decades seismologists have used asymptotic, approximate methods to address the forward problem in seismology, namely, given a seismic source and a 3D Earth model, accurately simulate the associated wave motions. In recent years, modern numerical methods and parallel computers have facilitated fully 3D simulations of seismic wave propagation at unprecedented resolution and accuracy, heralding the age of computational seismology. The current focus is on harnessing the power of these sophisticated forward modeling tools to enhance the quality of images of the Earth's interior and the earthquake rupture process, that is, to address the inverse problem. Traditional tomographic methods utilize traveltime and dispersion information obtained by comparing data with simulations, and interpret such measurements based on ray theory or other approximate methods. Because of the limitations of these approximate techniques, only certain parts of seismograms can be used, and initial models are generally restricted to be layered or spherically symmetric. With modern numerical modeling tools we are now going well beyond classical tomography, using fully 3D initial models and utilizing as much information contained in seismograms as possible. The ultimate goal is broad band full waveform inversion utilizing entire seismograms. Surprisingly, one tomographic iteration may be performed based on just two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one calculation for the current model and a second 'adjoint' calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers as simultaneous, fictitious sources. Seismic imaging based on adjoint methods assimilates seismographic information into 3D models of elastic (seismic wavespeeds) and anelastic (quality factors) structure. These methods fully account for the physics of wave excitation, propagation, and interaction by numerically solving the inhomogeneous equations of motion for a heterogeneous anelastic solid. Such methods require the execution of complex workflows, involving extensive pre- and post-processing of observed and simulated seismograms. After successful applications of adjoint tomography in southern California and Europe, we are currently moving toward adjoint tomography of the entire planet. The objective is to image Earth's global interior based on full waveform inversion, thereby facilitating a deeper understanding of its physics and chemistry. To start with, we selected 255 earthquakes and gathered data from global seismographic networks. Our strategy is to invert for crust and mantle structure jointly, thereby avoiding any bias introduced into upper-mantle images due to commonly used 'crustal corrections'. Our ultimate aim is to harness more than 6,000 magnitude 5-7 earthquakes digitally recorded over the past 20 years.

  11. Keith Beven Receives 2012 Robert E. Horton Medal: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beven, Keith

    2013-01-01

    I am extremely grateful to Jeff McDonnell for having led this nomination and for his very generous citation. I am also, of course, deeply honored by this award, particularly since I have the greatest respect for Robert Horton as perhaps the most important hydrologist of the twentieth century. Certainly as far as I know, he is the only hydrologist to have a waterfall named after him, near his home in Voorheesville, N. Y. That respect was deepened when a few years ago I had the opportunity to look over just a small selection of the 94 boxes of his papers in the National Archives. That showed that he had a much greater appreciation of the complexity of hydrological systems than he is given credit for in current textbooks. It is that complexity that I have struggled with throughout my career, complexity that is so poorly represented by the available measurement techniques and that makes hydrological prediction so difficult and shot through with epistemic uncertainties, i.e., uncertainties that arise from lack of knowledge rather than random natural variability. The GLUE methodology was mentioned in the citation. It is an on-going research program that tries to deal with uncertainty in nonideal real-world applications when simple statistical assumptions may not be enough.

  12. A Local Vision on Soil Hydrology (John Dalton Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.

    2012-04-01

    After shortly looking back to some research trails of the past decades, and touching on the role of soils in our environmental machinery, a vision on the future of soil hydrology is offered. It is local in the sense of being based on limited experience as well as in the sense of focussing on local spatial scales, from 1 m to 1 km. Cornerstones of this vision are (i) rapid developments of quantitative observation technology, illustrated with the example of ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and (ii) the availability of ever more powerful compute facilities which allow to simulate increasingly complicated model representations in unprecedented detail. Together, they open a powerful and flexible approach to the quantitative understanding of soil hydrology where two lines are fitted: (i) potentially diverse measurements of the system of interest and their analysis and (ii) a comprehensive model representation, including architecture, material properties, forcings, and potentially unknown aspects, together with the same analysis as for (i). This approach pushes traditional inversion to operate on analyses, not on the underlying state variables, and to become flexible with respect to architecture and unknown aspects. The approach will be demonstrated for simple situations at test sites.

  13. Surfaces and interfaces of glass and ceramics; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Special Topics in Ceramics, Alfred University, Alfred, N.Y., August 27-29, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frechette, V. D. (Editor); Lacourse, W. C.; Burdick, V. L.

    1974-01-01

    The characterization of surfaces and interfaces is considered along with the infrared spectra of several N-containing compounds absorbed on montmorillonites, applications of surface characterization techniques to glasses, the observation of electronic spectra in glass and ceramic surfaces, a method for determining the preferred orientation of crystallites normal to a surface, and the friction and wear behavior of glasses and ceramics. Attention is given to the wear behavior of cast surface composites, an experimental investigation of the dynamic and thermal characteristics of the ceramic stock removal process, a dynamic elastic model of ceramic stock removal, and the structure and properties of solid surfaces. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  14. Citation for presentation of the 2010 Alfred Treibs Award to John Volkman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Jan W.

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decades, Dr. John Volkman has established himself as a world authority on the discovery and application of biomarkers in organic geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, petroleum geochemistry and palaeoclimatology. His work has laid the foundation on which much modern biomarker research is based and his studies of lipids in microalgae, in particular, have had a considerable influence and is widely cited. He has identified many new compounds including sterols, alcohols, diols and hydrocarbons. He has written a large number of review papers which are commonly used by younger organic geochemists to become acquainted with the field and as reference work by many others. John Volkman is truly exceptional in the breadth of expertise, his ability to integrate different sub-disciplines and his openness for young organic geochemists to act as a sparring-partner in scientific discussions. John has achieved this very impressive record even though he has not been employed as a “hard-core” organic geochemist for the last two decades but has nevertheless remained active in organic geochemistry in his “free” time. In addition, John's contributions to more applied fields of research are also numerous.

  15. 78 FR 19009 - Gary Alfred Shearer, M.D.; Decision And Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... proceeding under section 304, 21 U.S.C. 824, of the CSA.'' Zhiwei Lin, 77 FR 18862, 18864 (2012) (citing... Kentucky, not Florida.) \\16\\ See Michael G. Dolin, M.D., 65 FR 5661 (2000); see also Philip E. Kirk, M.D., 48 FR 32887 (1983), aff'd sub nom. Kirk v. Mullen, 749 F.2d 297 (6th Cir. 1984). \\17\\ See 28...

  16. Scenic memory of the Shoah--"the adventuresome life of Alfred Silbermann".

    PubMed

    Grünberg, Kurt

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the late psychosocial sequelae of extreme trauma and its impact on the Second Generation in Germany. The example of the short-term analysis of a Shoah survivor and his relationship to his son conducted in his home environment shows how psychic consequences of extreme traumatization and more particularly their unconscious transgenerational transmission to the Second Generation mainly take place as part of unconscious "scenes". The concept of "scenic memory of the Shoah" goes beyond the classical type of transference. PMID:23470970

  17. Sex will never be the same: the contributions of Alfred C. Kinsey.

    PubMed

    Bullough, Vern L

    2004-06-01

    Kinsey built upon what other European and American researchers had done, but in his male volume he was much more critical of his predecessors than he was in the female volume. Although he mentioned many of the European sex researchers, several were conspicuous by their absence and, at times, he seemed very moralistic (e.g., that Hirschfeld was not an objective researcher because of his campaign for gay rights or the failure of H. Ellis to have face-to-face contact with his participants). He had little positive to say about psychiatrists in general, although he imparted a more positive message in the female volume. If bibliographical citations are any example, Kinsey explored much more widely in the social sciences in the female volume than he did in the male volume, indicating that he himself acquired greater expertise over the years. Certainly, the female volume was a more well rounded treatment. Overall, the effect of his books was to change the way people looked at sex; indeed, sex could never be the same again. PMID:15129046

  18. Handbook for Faculty and Administration of Alfred University. 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred Univ., NY.

    Included in this faculty and administration handbook are descriptions of the responsibilities of university administrators, deans, and faculty (and a 1974 organizational chart), provisions of faculty recruitment, selection, and appointment including teaching load and salary scale, By-Laws of the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred…

  19. Project Update: Alfred Kiger Savoy Elementary School Modernization and Co-Location Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    21st Century School Fund, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Savoy Elementary School Modernization and Co-Location project is designed to meet a number of important goals for Washington, D.C. Public Schools (DCPS) and the District of Columbia. It will improve the teaching and learning conditions for Savoy Elementary School so that they are in excellent condition, can support a high quality curriculum,…

  20. The Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler: Toward an Adlerian Vocational Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, C. Edward, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Presents an Adlerian vocational theory with several hypotheses and corollaries regarding: (a) life style, (b) work as life task, (c) family atmosphere and relationships, and (d) early recollections. Develops predictive vocational statements and offers the resulting framework as a stimulant to generate further study of Adlerian vocational…

  1. [Work in a psychosocial care center: an analysis based on Alfred Schütz].

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jacó Fernando; Camatta, Marcio Wagner; Nasi, Cíntia

    2007-12-01

    This essay aimed at understanding the work of a mental health team in a Psychosocial Care Center. It was based on Albert Schütz's phenomenological sociology ideas. Qualitative research was the methodological base of this study, in which statements were submitted to comprehensive analysis. Information was collected by interviewing eight people between July and September, 2006. The thematic units were social behavior, relevance, and interactive relations. Results revealed an innovative form of mental health care, allowing a dynamic vision of the team, who organize their experiences during their daily work in search of psychosocial rehabilitation. This study allowed understanding the work in a Psychosocial Care Center, providing support for teams that act in this context for a better understanding of their work in mental health. PMID:18464467

  2. The Alfred Hospital experience of resumption of cardiac activity after withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy.

    PubMed

    Sa, Yong; S, D'Souza; S, Philpot; Dv, Pilcher

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of donation after circulatory death programs in Australia and New Zealand, greater knowledge is needed about physiologic variation in haemodynamic activity following withdrawal of cardiorespiratory support. The ANZICS Statement on Death and Organ Donation allows provision for variation in the observation times between two and five minutes after cessation of the circulation prior to declaration of death. We report our experience of two cases, the first where electrical activity and pulse returned after a 102 second pause and the second where electrical activity returned after a three minute pause; both longer than previously reported cases. PMID:27608344

  3. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry.

  4. 76 FR 17672 - Alfred E. Boyce, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... v. U.S. Dept. of Justice, 873 F.2d 1089, 1091 (8th Cir. 1989); Thomas E. Johnston, 45 FR 72311 (1980... '' (emphasis supplied). Roy Chi Lung, 74 FR 20346, 20347 (2009); Scott Sandarg, D.M.D., 74 FR 17528, 174529 (2009); John B. Freitas, D.O., 74 FR 17524, 17525 (2009); Roger A. Rodriguez, M.D., 70 FR 33206,...

  5. "Gulliver's Travels" by Alfred Silver with Music by Stephen Naylor. Cue Sheet for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterfall, Milde; Flynn, Rosalind, Ed.

    Designed to be used before and after attending a musical adaptation of Jonathan's Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" (performed by the Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia), this cue sheet presents information about the performance and suggests activities that can be done with classmates, friends, or family members. Beginning with an illustration of aspects…

  6. Geology of California. Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.M.; Webb, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two introductory chapters familiarize readers with basic geologic concepts. The following chapters describe the geology of each of California's 11 geomorphic provinces; the San Andreas fault and offshore geology are discussed in two separate chapters. Four appendices acquaint readers with technical words and terms, common minerals and rocks in California, geologic time, and geologic theories that pertain to California. During the 1960s evidence collected from the east Pacific sea floor off the western coast of North America gave scientists supporting data for Alfred Wegener's 1910 theory of continental drift. In addition to the confirmation of continental drift, since the 1960s scientists have discovered paleomagnetism, sea-floor spreading, exotic and suspect terranes, and polar wandering. These important concepts have had far reaching effects about how we understand the geology of California and how this region has evolved through geologic time. Improved investigative procedures enable earth scientists to comprehend previously puzzling aspects of California's geology.

  7. Quality assurance of solar UV irradiance in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Gröbner, Julian; Hülsen, Gregor; Wuttke, Sigrid; Schrems, Otto; De Simone, Sara; Gallo, Veronica; Rafanelli, Claudio; Petkov, Boyan; Vitale, Vito; Edvardsen, Kåre; Stebel, Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    The first Arctic intercomparison of three solar ultraviolet (UV) spectroradiometers and two multifilter radiometers was held in May and June 2009 at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, Norway. The transportable reference spectroradiometer QASUME acted as reference instrument for this intercomparison. The measurement period extended over eleven days, comprising clear sky and overcast weather conditions. Due to the high latitude, measurements could be performed throughout the day during this period. The intercomparison demonstrated that the solar UV measurements from all instruments agreed to within +/-15% during the whole measurement period, while the spectroradiometer from the Alfred-Wegener Institute agreed to better than +/-5%. This intercomparison has demonstrated that solar UV measurements can be performed reliably in the high-latitude Arctic environment with uncertainties comparable to mid-latitude sites. PMID:20221466

  8. Instability Rules: The Ten Most Amazing Ideas of Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, Charles

    2002-03-01

    World-altering discoveries that reveal a universe of uncertainty and constant change Whether probing the farthest reaches of the vast universe or exploring the microscopic world of genetics and the subatomic world of quantum mechanics, Instability Rules is a remarkably informative and engaging look at ten milestone discoveries and their discoverers-a wide range of very human personalities whose insights have dramatically altered our most basic assumptions about human existence during the last century. The stories include Edwin Hubble and the expanding universe, Alfred Wegener and continental drift, Neils Bohr and quantum mechanics, Alan Turing and artificial intelligence, and James Watson and Francis Crick and DNA. Also covering discoveries of the twenty-first century that are already refining these and other ideas, Instability Rules is an exhilarating, sometimes amusing encounter with the defining scientific discoveries of our age.

  9. An updated estimate of tornado occurrence in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotzek, Nikolai

    Results from a survey on average tornadic activity in Europe conducted among the participants of the European Conference on Severe Storms (ECSS) 2002 are presented. Compared to Alfred Wegener's estimate of "at least 100 tornadoes per year in Europe" the present survey shows a total of 329±12 tornadoes over land and water per year based on observations, and more than twice as many cases (697±36) for an estimate of the expected true climatological number, accounting for present underreporting in many European countries. Traditionally, European tornado numbers include waterspouts. For comparison to the current number of 1170 observed tornadoes over land per year in the USA, the European numbers are 169±9 per year based on observations, and 304±25 based on estimates. As European severe weather research is rapidly developing, one can expect less underreporting in the future, leading to an augmented database for upcoming surveys like the present one.

  10. Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

  11. ESSReS-PEP, an international and interdisciplinary postgraduate education concept on Earth and Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfeld, Klaus; Lohmann, Gerrit; Ladstätter-Weißenmayer, Annette; Burrows, John

    2013-04-01

    Promoting young researchers is a major priority of the German Helmholtz Association. Since more than five years graduate and postgraduate education in the field of Earth System and Environmental Science has been established in Bremen and Bremerhaven, north-western Germany. Using the network and collaboration of experts and specialists on observational and paleoclimate data as well as on statistical data analysis and climate modelling from two Universities and the Helmholtz research institute on Polar and Marine Research, master and PhD students are trained to understand, decipher and cope with the challenges of recent climate change on an highly interdisciplinary and inter-institutional level. The existing research infrastructure at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven (AWI), University of Bremen, and Jacobs University Bremen offers a unique research environment to study past, present and future changes of the climate system, with special focus on high latitudinal processes. It covers all kind of disciplines, climate science, geosciences and biosciences, and provides a consistent framework for education and qualification of a new generation of expertly trained, internationally competitive master and PhD students. On postgraduate level, the Postgraduate Programme Environmental Physics (PEP) at the University of Bremen (www.pep.uni-bremen.de) educates the participants on the complex relationship between atmosphere, hydrosphere (ocean), cryosphere (ice region) and solid earth (land). Here, the learning of experimental methods in environmental physics at the most advanced level, numerical data analysis using supercomputers, and data interpretation via sophisticated methods prepare students for a scientific career. Within cooperation with the Ocean University of China (OUC) students are participating one year in the PEP programme during their master studies since 2006, to get finally a double degree of both universities. At the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar

  12. Some species tolerate ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels lead to rising ocean acidity, which can harm corals and many other species of ocean life. Acidification causes calcium carbonate, which corals usually need to build skeletons, to dissolve. “Every day, ocean acidification is taking up the weight of 6 million midsize cars' worth of carbon, said Nina Keul, a graduate student at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Germany during a 7 December press conference at the AGU Fall Meeting. Somewhat surprising, though, is that some species are more tolerant of acidic conditions than scientists had expected. For instance, Keul exposed a species of foraminifera, Ammonia tepida, to seawater with varying acidity and varying carbonate ion concentrations. Previous studies had found that foraminifera growth declined with decreasing carbonate levels, but Keul's foraminifera continued to grow in the acidic conditions. She said that the mechanism that allows this species to tolerate the low carbonate conditions is as yet unknown.

  13. Operational tsunami modelling with TsunAWI - recent developments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakowsky, N.; Androsov, A.; Fuchs, A.; Harig, S.; Immerz, A.; Danilov, S.; Hiller, W.; Schröter, J.

    2013-06-01

    In this article, the tsunami model TsunAWI (Alfred Wegener Institute) and its application for hindcasts, inundation studies, and the operation of the tsunami scenario repository for the Indonesian tsunami early warning system are presented. TsunAWI was developed in the framework of the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) and simulates all stages of a tsunami from the origin and the propagation in the ocean to the arrival at the coast and the inundation on land. It solves the non-linear shallow water equations on an unstructured finite element grid that allows to change the resolution seamlessly between a coarse grid in the deep ocean and a fine representation of coastal structures. During the GITEWS project and the following maintenance phase, TsunAWI and a framework of pre- and postprocessing routines was developed step by step to provide fast computation of enhanced model physics and to deliver high quality results.

  14. On solving the momentum equations of dynamic sea ice models with implicit solvers and the elastic-viscous-plastic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losch, Martin; Danilov, Sergey

    Experiments with idealized geometry are used to compare model solutions of implicit VP- and explicit EVP-solvers in two very different ice-ocean codes: the regular-grid, finite-volume Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) and the Alfred Wegener Institute Finite Element Ocean Model (FEOM). It is demonstrated that for both codes the obtained solutions of implicit VP-and EVP-solvers can differ significantly, because the EVP solutions tend to have smaller ice viscosities ("weaker" ice). EVP solutions tend to converge only slowly to implicit VP solutions for very small sub-cycling time steps. Variable resolution in the unstructured-grid model FEOM also affects the solution as smaller grid cell size leads to smaller viscosity in EVP solutions. Models with implicit VP-solvers can block narrow straits under certain conditions, while EVP-models are found to always allow flow as a consequence of lower viscosities.

  15. Transport Pathways of Pollution Plumes into the Canadian Arctic during RACEPAC and NETCARE 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoor, P. M.; Bozem, H.; Koellner, F.; Schneider, J.; Schulz, C.; Burkart, J.; Willis, M. D.; Herber, A. B.; Borrmann, S.; Wendisch, M.; Ehrlich, A.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC and NETCARE 2014. The measurements were performed in May and July 2014 out of Inuvik and Resolute Bay with the POLAR 6 DC-3 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) and focused on cloud processes in the Canadian Arctic as well as transport processes of pollution. CO and CO2 measurements indicate that long range transport from various sources affected the arctic lower troposphere during spring /summer 2014. Whereas the high latitudes were relatively unaffected by pollution plumes from lower latitudes, the more southern parts of the arctic regions were strongly perturbed by pollution from various sources. These events are likely connected to biomass burning. We also performed measurements of local emissions from shipping, to investigate their potential to penetrate the arctic boundary layer and affect the arctic free troposphere thereby becoming part of the large scale flow.

  16. TsunaFLASH Benchmark and Its Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranowo, Widodo; Behrens, Joern

    2010-05-01

    In the end of year 2008 TsunAWI (Tsunami unstructured mesh finite element model developed at Alfred Wegener Institute) by Behrens et al. (2006 - 2008) [Behrens, 2008], had been launched as an operational model in the German - Indonesian Tsunami EarlyWarning System (GITEWS) framework. This model has been benchmarked and verified with 2004 Sumatra-Andaman mega tsunami event [Harig et al., 2008]. A new development uses adaptive mesh refinement to improve computational efficiency and accuracy, this approach is called TsunaFLASH [Pranowo et al., 2008]. After the initial development and verification phase with stabilization efforts, and study of refinement criteria, the code is now mature enough to be validated with data. This presentation will demonstrate results of TsunaFLASH for the experiments with diverse mesh refinement criteria, and benchmarks; in particular the problem set-1 of IWLRM, and field data of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 event.

  17. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) with hard palate and bronchial perforations treated with rituximab - a case report.

    PubMed

    Kosałka, Joanna; Bazan-Socha, Stanisława; Zugaj, Anna; Ignacak, Maria; Zuk, Joanna; Sokołowska, Barbara; Musiał, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 57-year-old woman suffering from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), who in the seventh months of immunosuppressive treatment (cyclophosphamide) progressed with new pulmonary changes and perforations of the hard palate and bronchi. Rituximab was introduced resulting in B-cell depletion and disappearance of anti-PR3 antibody. Palatal holes have substantially diminished and all bronchial perforations disappeared, covered by fibrous tissue. In the fourth month after rituximab administration, large scarring obstruction of the right main bronchus with upper and middle lobes atelectasis emerged. Because of increasing dyspnoea, stenotic bronchus was re-opened by bronchoscopy. Intervention was complicated by bilateral pneumothorax and later, on the seventh day, by fatal pulmonary bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the first report of GPA refractory to cyclophosphamide complicated by palatal and bronchial perforations. PMID:25133814

  18. Symbiogenesis, natural selection, and the dynamic Earth.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, U

    2009-08-01

    One century ago, Constantin S. Mereschkowsky introduced the symbiogenesis theory for the origin of chloroplasts from ancient cyanobacteria which was later supplemented by Ivan E. Wallin's proposal that mitochondria evolved from once free-living bacteria. Today, this Mereschkowsky-Wallin principle of symbiogenesis, which is also known as the serial primary endosymbiosis theory, explains the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic cells and hence the emergence of all eukaryotes (protists, fungi, animals and plants). In 1858, the concept of natural selection was described independently by Charles Darwin and Alfred R. Wallace. In the same year, Antonio Snider-Pellegrini proposed the idea of shifting continents, which was later expanded by Alfred Wegener, who published his theory of continental drift eight decades ago. Today, directional selection is accepted as the major cause of adaptive evolution within natural populations of micro- and macro-organisms and the theory of the dynamic Earth (plate tectonics) is well supported. In this article, I combine the processes and principles of symbiogenesis, natural selection and the dynamic Earth and propose an integrative 'synade-model' of macroevolution which takes into account organisms from all five Kingdoms of life. PMID:19399544

  19. The theologician Alfred Jeremias (1864-1935) of Leipzig and the history of early astronomy; (German Title: Der Leipziger Theologe Alfred Jeremias (1864-1935) und die Geschichte der frühen Astronomie )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgauds, Hans-Joachim

    We present, after a short sketch of the life of A. Jeremias, his concept of historical development and bis political views. Jeremias carried out religious studies at Leipzig University, and was one of the main proponents of "Panbabylonism", the notion that the Babylonian astral world view has given its imprint to all world cultures. He substantiated his views in handbooks as well as polemic brochures. The astronomical knowledge assigned to the Babylonians by the panbabylonists Winckler, Jeremias and Weidner is summarized, and the concept of precession is discussed in some detail. Obviously there were no contacts to astronomers of Leipzig Observatory, and Jeremias' poorly substantiated views were justiy dismissed by later scientists like O. Neugebauer.

  20. Beyond Courseware: A Report and Bibliography Prepared for the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation on Computing Technology in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bantz, David; And Others

    This annotated bibliography is based on a literature search which was commissioned to complement the report on a conference hosted by Dartmouth University (New Hampshire) in October 1988. An introductory essay describes the conference, which brought together 30 educators from a wide variety of institutions for 3 days to reflect on the…

  1. The Eye of the Storm. The Seventh Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Survey of Broadcast Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Marvin; Sklar, Zachary

    This book, the seventh in a series surveying broadcast journalism, provides behind-the-scenes details of news coverage during 1978-79, evaluating the growth and sophistication of the news media. The first section of the book discusses the treatment of major issues and news events, including the "odd couple" of politics and broadcasting, the…

  2. Towards Improved Considerations of Risk in Seismic Design (Plinius Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    The aftermath of recent earthquakes is a reminder that seismic risk is a very relevant issue for our communities. Implicit within the seismic design standards currently in place around the world is that minimum acceptable levels of seismic risk will be ensured through design in accordance with the codes. All the same, none of the design standards specify what the minimum acceptable level of seismic risk actually is. Instead, a series of deterministic limit states are set which engineers then demonstrate are satisfied for their structure, typically through the use of elastic dynamic analyses adjusted to account for non-linear response using a set of empirical correction factors. From the early nineties the seismic engineering community has begun to recognise numerous fundamental shortcomings with such seismic design procedures in modern codes. Deficiencies include the use of elastic dynamic analysis for the prediction of inelastic force distributions, the assignment of uniform behaviour factors for structural typologies irrespective of the structural proportions and expected deformation demands, and the assumption that hysteretic properties of a structure do not affect the seismic displacement demands, amongst other things. In light of this a number of possibilities have emerged for improved control of risk through seismic design, with several innovative displacement-based seismic design methods now well developed. For a specific seismic design intensity, such methods provide a more rational means of controlling the response of a structure to satisfy performance limit states. While the development of such methodologies does mark a significant step forward for the control of seismic risk, they do not, on their own, identify the seismic risk of a newly designed structure. In the U.S. a rather elaborate performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) framework is under development, with the aim of providing seismic loss estimates for new buildings. The PBEE framework consists of the following four main analysis stages: (i) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to give the mean occurrence rate of earthquake events having an intensity greater than a threshold value, (ii) structural analysis to estimate the global structural response, given a certain value of seismic intensity, (iii) damage analysis, in which fragility functions are used to express the probability that a building component exceeds a damage state, as a function of the global structural response, (iv) loss analysis, in which the overall performance is assessed based on the damage state of all components. This final step gives estimates of the mean annual frequency with which various repair cost levels (or other decision variables) are exceeded. The realisation of this framework does suggest that risk-based seismic design is now possible. However, comparing current code approaches with the proposed PBEE framework, it becomes apparent that mainstream consulting engineers would have to go through a massive learning curve in order to apply the new procedures in practice. With this in mind, it is proposed that simplified loss-based seismic design procedures are a logical means of helping the engineering profession transition from what are largely deterministic seismic design procedures in current codes, to more rational risk-based seismic design methodologies. Examples are provided to illustrate the likely benefits of adopting loss-based seismic design approaches in practice.

  3. Three decades of harnessing the GPS data explosion for geophysics (Vening Meinesz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation, I attempt to convey the immensity of the task that faced the geodesy community three decades ago, and continues to challenge us, to harness all potentially valuable GPS data available in the world for geophysical science. It would be fair to see that three decades ago, we were struggling with controlled tests just to get GPS geodesy working, and had little time to imagine the flood of data today. Yet the geodesy community has succeeded in meeting this challenge. Today, for example, the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory produces and makes publicly available coordinate time series for over 12,000 geodetic GPS station around the globe with various data intervals, latencies, and reference frames. About 8,000 stations have their daily time series updated every week, with 4,000 being updated the next day with coordinates at daily and 5 minute intervals. About 2,000 stations have their time series updated every hour with coordinates at 5 minute intervals. I will show examples of how these time series are being used by NGL and many other scientists to study a wide variety of geophysical topics, including plate tectonics, earthquake modeling, seismic and tsunami hazard, volcanic deformation, water resources, mountain growth, terrestrial reference frame realization, glacial isostatic adjustment, ice sheet melting, sea level rise and coastal subsidence, and even fundamental physics, using GPS atomic clocks to probe the nature of dark matter in the universe. The explosion in GPS data has challenged us to invent new data processing algorithms and develop robust automation in order to keep up with the flood. This explosion has been exponential, and therefore it can be said that it is not a recent phenomena, but rather that it began in the earliest years of GPS geodesy, and has always posed a challenge to us. Over the course of my post-doctoral career starting in late 1985, I have had the good fortune to witness the key developments that have taken place since the early years of geodetic GPS and over the course of three decades. These developments continue today as strongly as ever. Essential innovations have included, for example, automation of GPS cycle slip detection and mitigation, carrier phase ambiguity resolution, the birth and operation of the IGS for reliable orbit and clock estimation, the invention of algorithms that scale linearly with the number of stations, and the deep integration of GPS solutions into the ITRF, providing measures of accuracy, precision, and stability. As a recent example of automation, I show a new non-parametric algorithm to estimate station velocities quickly and robustly, without need to detect and correct for outliers, seasonal signals, and discontinuities in the time series steps that commonly occur due to equipment changes. The complete automation from data collection to production of station velocities (and, now, velocity time series) allows us to process all potentially valuable data, and to focus more on discovery and analysis of the results for geophysical applications, often with great redundancy in the data leading to high statistical significance and more robust scientific conclusions. I show by example that another benefit of this capability to process all data in a robust turn-key fashion is to enhance the opportunity for making discoveries, without necessarily planning all of the steps that can lead us to discovery's door.

  4. What can High Resolution Inertial Rotation Sensing do for the Geosciences? (Christiaan Huygens Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Karl Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Strap-Down inertial gyroscopes are essential for the attitude control of aircrafts - they keep helicopters and planes in the sky. What if the same technology is strapped to the Earth? It will allow the observation and understanding of the geophysical processes behind minute changes of the rate of rotation as well as variations of the orientation of the instantaneous axis of rotation of the Earth. Unlike the highly dynamic aircraft motion geophysical signals are very small and act on much longer timescales. Therefore we have to make a suitable gyro for the application in the Geosciences significantly more sensitive and stable than aircraft gyros, improving them by many orders of magnitude. Large scale optical interferometers suggest themselves for this purpose, but the requirements are demanding. We have built and explored a variety of monolithic and heterolithic ring lasers, spanning areas between 1 and more than 800 m2. On this road of applying a locally installed high resolution active optical interferometer to a global measurement quantity (earth rotation), we have encountered a number of serious challenges some of which already puzzled Christiaan Huygens some 300 years ago.

  5. Lithosphere rheology and dynamics: interplays between models and data (Stephan Mueller Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    Our vision of the mechanisms of lithosphere dynamics and mantle-lithosphere interactions becomes less and less blurred. Yet, many key questions remain open due to the (principally) insufficient observational and experimental constraints. For instance, the effective rheological parameters are still poorly known, and the respective roles of the mantle and lithosphere in tectonic and geodynamic processes are not sufficiently well understood, specifically in terms of their inferences for the dynamic topography, collision processes and continental breakup, formation of passive continental margins, feedbacks between tectonic and surface processes, formation of large-scale faults, intraplate seismicity, survival and destruction of cratons. For continents and continental margins, the uncertainties of the data are especially considerable due to the complex structure and history of continental plates. For example, in one continental rheology model, dubbed "jelly sandwich", the strength mainly resides in crust and mantle, while in the alternative models the mantle is weak and the strength is limited to the upper crust. In this context, thermo-mechanical multi-physical numerical modelling has become an essential tool for studying complex lithosphere-scale processes, for testing, validating and verifying rheological, geodynamic and geological concepts and, moreover, for providing stronger constraints on … the data itself. State-of-the-art models account for rheological and mineralogical structure of the lithosphere, phase changes and fluid circulation, and implement high resolution calculations, so that their outputs can be directly matched with multi-disciplinary geological and geophysical observations. I here will review the advances in understanding the lithosphere rheology and mechanics and its interactions of the lithosphere with the mantle, first, by discussing the constraints from rock mechanics, elastic thickness, earthquake data and long-term observations and, second, by examining the physical plausibility of various rheological assumptions within numerical models. For the latter, I present the results of thermo-mechanical numerical experiments aimed at testing the possible tectonic and geodynamic implications of different rheological assumptions in a number of geodynamic settings. In particular, we show, on the basis of the numerical experiments, that even if there is certainly no single rheology model for continents, the "jelly sandwich" concept with "dry" olivine flow law and ductile lower crust seem to represent better the long term behavior of the lithosphere in most geodynamic scenarios. I then discuss the results of recent numerical models of mantle-lithosphere interactions. In particular, we show that the dynamic topography is strongly reduced and modulated due to the complex mechanical response of the continental crust, while, in presence of active mantle upwellings, even very weak far-field forces are both sufficient and necessary for initiation of localized continental breakup , narrow rifting or for formation of mega-scale strike-slip faults. These findings demonstrate the dominant role of the thermos-rheological structure of the continental crust and of the far-field stress/velocity conditions and intra-plate stresses in controlling surface and lithospheric dynamics during mantle-lithosphere interactions.

  6. John H. Dillon Medal Talk: Protein Fibrils, Polymer Physics: Encounter at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2011-03-01

    Aggregation of proteins is central to many aspects of daily life, ranging from blood coagulation, to eye cataract formation disease, food processing, or neurodegenerative infections. In particular, the physical mechanisms responsible for amyloidosis, the irreversible fibril formation of various proteins implicated in protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Creutzfeldt-Jakob or Huntington's diseases, have not yet been fully elucidated. In this talk I will discuss how polymer physics and colloidal science concepts can be used to reveal very useful information on the formation, structure and properties of amyloid protein fibrils. I will discuss their physical properties at various length scales, from their collective liquid crystalline behavior in solution to their structural features at the single molecule length scale and show how polymer science notions can shed a new light on these interesting systems. 1) ``Understanding amyloid aggregation by statistical analysis of atomic force microscopy images'' J. Adamcik, J.-M. Jung, J. Flakowski, P. De Los Rios, G. Dietler and R. Mezzenga, Nature nanotechnology, 5, 423 (2010)

  7. Understanding soil organic matter formation and stabilization (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2015-04-01

    During the biomass formation/decomposition cycle carbon dioxide (CO2), the main gas driving global warming, is either released from or stabilized in the organic matter of soils. One of the most fundamental functions of soil organic matter is the provision of metabolic energy which drives soil biological processes. In essence, it is the transformation of carbon by plant, micro- and macro-biological processes that provides energy and results in the establishment of a cycle that connects above- and belowground energy transformations. The amount and type of organic matter accumulated in soils is controlled, among other factors by intrinsic soil properties, specifically soil texture and the associated aggregate structures. Soil development leads to the formation of aggregated structures composed of a highly complex mixture of different mineral and organic constituents. The resulting soil type specific carbon sequestration can strongly be affected by soil management, varying greatly with the type and intensity of land use. The processes of formation and stabilization of organic matter through organo-mineral interactions in aggregated soil structures are controlled at the sub-µm scale. Understanding the binding of organic matter in these fine soil structures is thus key to elucidate the biogeochemical soil processes that are part of the carbon cycle as well as to evaluate the effects of soil management on the carbon cycle. I will discuss open questions for understanding these processes and how we can approach them by combining state-of-the-art analytical techniques with innovative experiments.

  8. Mars: History of Climate Change and Evolution of the Water Cycle (Runcorn-Florensky Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James W.

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric general circulation models are becoming more and more sophisticated and can now be analyzed at various scales, and include variations in atmospheric water vapor content, orbital parameters and surface properties. A wide variety of geological evidence indicates that the climate on Mars has changed during its past history. We are now approaching the time when synergism is developing between studies of the observed geological record and predictions and results of climate models. Geological evidence for climate change ranges in physical scale from layering in the polar caps and sediments, to meters-thick ice-rich layers extending from high to mid-latitudes, to kilometers-thick polar and circumpolar deposits. Clear temporal changes in the mineralogy and alteration style of surface and subsurface materials signal long-term climate change. Evidence is found throughout the geologic record of Mars, ranging from interpreted Amazonian tropical mountain glaciers to much longer term trends implied by the temporal distribution of geological features such as valley networks and outflow channels. Furthermore, there is strong evidence for changes in the hydrological cycle of Mars that reflect long-term climate change. For the last ~80% of its history (the Hesperian and Amazonian) Mars appears to have been a very cold, hyper-arid polar desert, similar to the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. During this time, the hydrologic system on Mars has been horizontally layered, with the near-surface hydrologic cycle involving water movement between the atmosphere, polar caps, the surface and regolith at various latitudes; variations in spin-axis orbital parameters caused significant surface redistribution of ice and dust, and abundant ice has been sequestered beneath glacial debris-cover in the mid-latitudes for several hundred million years. Existing groundwater is sequestered below a globally continuous cryosphere; liquid water occasionally emerged to the surface during magmatic events that cracked or melted the cryosphere, forming outlet channels. In contrast, many believe that Mars was "warm and wet" during the first 20% of its history (the Noachian); in this scenario, there was no global cryosphere, and the hydrological cycle was vertically integrated. Geological evidence for this includes extensive valley network systems, hundreds of closed-basin and open-basin lakes, depositional fans and deltas, and integrated systems that extend for thousands of kilometers across the surface. Major outstanding questions include the causes and the duration of these more clement conditions in the Noachian, whether they led to the formation and evolution of life, why they changed in the late Noachian-Hesperian, the duration of the change, how the climate stabilized to its current state, whether any early-evolving life could survive this transition, and if so, where such life might reside today. The questions raised by the long-term climate history of Mars provide a compelling framework for future robotic and human exploration.

  9. Scale-invariance of sediment patterns - the fingerprint of fundamental drivers (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to the realms of magmatism and metamorphism, most depositional processes can be observed directly at the earth's surface. Observation of sediment patterns advanced significantly with the advent of remote sensing and 3D reflection seismics. Remote sensing is particularly relevant for the present topic because it documents mainly Holocene sediments - the best objects to link depositional processes to products. Classic examples of scale-invariant geometry are channel-fan systems, i.e. river-delta and canyon-fan complexes. The underlying control in both instances is the energy-dispersion of a channeled stream of water that discharges in a body of still water. The resulting fan-shaped sediment accumulations are scale-invariant over 7 orders of magnitude in linear size. The Mesozoic-Cenozoic record shows comparable trends and patterns. Further examples of depositional scale-invariance include foresets of non-cohesive sediments and braided-channel deposits. Reefs and carbonate platforms offer an example of scale-invariance related to biotic growth. Shallow-water carbonate platforms rimmed by reefs or reef-rimmed atolls with deep lagoons are characteristic morphologies of tropical carbonate deposits. The structure has been compared to a bucket where stiff reef rims hold a pile of loose sediment. Remote sensing data from the Maldive, Chagos and Laccadive archipelagos of the Indian Ocean show that bucket structures are the dominant depositional pattern from meter-size reefs to archipelagos of hundreds of kilometers in diameter, i.e. over more than 4 orders of magnitude in linear size. Over 2.5 orders of magnitude, the bucket structures qualify as statistical fractals. Ecologic and hydrodynamic studies on modern reefs suggest that the bucket structure is a form of biotic self-organization: The edge position in a reef is favored over the center position because bottom shear is higher and the diffusive boundary layer between reef and water thinner. Thus, the reef edge has easier access to nutrients. Moreover, the edge is less likely to be buried by sediment. The bucket structure is an ecologic response to these conditions. Buckets have been documented from all periods of the Phanerozoic and analogous structures from the late Proterozoic show that the microbial carbonate factory also built buckets. We conclude that a voyage through scales in the sediment realm reveals islands of scale-invariance wherever a single principle dominates the sedimentation process.

  10. Mountain building and mantle dynamics: a journey through the Tethyan belt (Stephan Mueller Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenna, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    The style of mantle convection beneath large oceanic plates is rather well established. On the other hand, we still have a loose grasp of what happen beneath continental plate, especially beneath mobile and convergent margins, where we expect to have vigorous convection. Here, I present some considerations about the style and evolution of mantle convection beneath convergent/collisional zones as constrained by geological - seismological data and modelling. I will consider the Alpine-Tethyan belt as a case study, exploring the idea that the style of mountain building can be used as a proxy to reconstruct mantle dynamics. The Tertiary evolution of the Tethyan belt indeed offers a unique opportunity to discuss about mountain building and mantle dynamics, as it include region such as the Mediterranean, where collision is still in its incipient stage producing Apennines style orogen, to the Himalayan-Tibetan belt, where collisional process reaches its extreme consequence. We classified those two belts as end members of a wide range of orgen. On one side, the of "slab pull" orogen, where subduction is mainly confined to the upper mantle, and rollback trench motion lead to moderately thick crustal stacks and reduced topographic signal, such as in the Mediterranean. On the other side, the "slab suction" orogen, where whole-mantle convection cells ("conveyor belts") lead to the more extreme expressions of orogeny, such as the largely thickened crust and high plateaus of present-day Tibet. For the slab suction type, deep mantle convection produces the unique conditions to drag plates toward each other, irrespective of their nature and other boundary conditions. Based on mantle circulation modeling and tectonic reconstructions, we surmise that the forces necessary to sustain slab-suction mountain building in those orogens derive, after transient slab ponding, from the mantle drag induced upon slab penetration into the lower mantle, and from an associated surge of mantle upwelling beneath Africa. This surge of mantle convection drags plates against each other, generating the necessary compressional forces to create and sustain these two orogenic belts. If this "bottom-up" tectonic model is correct, the geological records of orogeny cycle and of the topographic evolution along mobile belt can be used to decipher time-dependent mantle convection. Our main conclusion is that beneath the Tethyan belt we should imagine a multi-scale style of convection operating at different time and length scale, with a small scale convection style in the upper most part of the upper mantle embedded within a larger/slower and intermittent large scale whole mantle convection.

  11. Dansgaard-Oeschger events and their reflection in speleothems (Hans Oeschger Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Matthews, Miryam

    2013-04-01

    Speleothems in karstic cave environments form by passage of meteoric water through the overlying soils, where the water dissolves CO2 to form carbonic acid, which in turn dissolves the host-rock carbonate. Degassing of the carbonate supersaturated meteoric water leads to the formation of calcite speleothems, which therefore can be considered as the end product in the much larger sea-atmosphere-land cycle. Their stable isotopic and geochemical composition reflect the environmental conditions above the cave, which in turn depend on larger scale parameters such as isotopic composition of the rainfall source, atmospheric storm patterns, ocean-land heat transfer. In this talk I specifically address the potential of using speleothems to look at short term climatic events: the Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events; rapid climate changes first observed in Greenland ice cores by Hans Oeschger with Willi Dansgaard and suggested to occur during the last glacial period. Many researches now show that D-O events are globally synchronous and can be identified in the marine and terrestrial climate records. Given, the ability to accurately date speleothems and to perform high-resolution studies of stable isotopes, trace elements and various other proxies (e.g., fluid inclusions, 'clumped isotopes' thermometry), it has become clear that speleothems enable us to better date the exact timing of D-O events and to understand the climatic response on land in different parts of the world to their occurrence, i.e., to address specific questions on the marine-atmosphere interaction, sea surface temperature, rainfall generation and their influence on human habitation and dispersal. Since the stable isotopic signal in speleothems primarily is a function of temperature and isotopic composition of rainfall, short time climatic events can be registered in fast growing speleothems. Indeed recent studies clearly demonstrate that D-O events are registered in speleothems, for example, vegetation changes in Western Europe show good correlation with D-O events1; changes in the monsoon intensity during glacials are recorded in Chinese speleothems2; the response of the Indian Ocean hydrological cycle to temperature changes in Greenland ice cores are recorded in speleothems from Oman3. D-O events are also registered in the mid-latitude, Eastern Mediterranean (EM) speleothems and marine cores4,5,6. Of special interest are the responses to D-O 15 and 14. The multiple proxy speleothems record from the southern extension of the high altitude Alpine karst in Mount Hermon7, shows that from ~56 ka to 51 ka several major pulses of wet and warm episodes occurred. This is expressed by vegetation development, and significant snow melting that drained a large amount of water to the Dead Sea Rift Valley. Speleothems from the Middle-East and Arabia demonstrate that during these D-O wet pulses, the African monsoon and westerly storm/rainfall systems intensified, resulting in the 'greening' of the Sahara. A major question that is currently under investigation using speleothems is the recent Modern Human migration out of Africa at 60-50 ka into the Levant and Europe: is this migration is related to D-O 15 and 14? So called "D-O events" are also found in mid-Holocene speleothems from Soreq Cave, central Israel8. High-resolution (~3 to 20 years) speleothems records reveal a ~1500 years cyclicity pattern similar to Bond cycles. Superimposed on these cycles are rapid climate changes (RCC) resembling the structure of D-O events, The characteristic "dogtooth" shaped isotopic changes indicate rather fast (~50-100 years) trends of increase in rainfall (up to ~30%) and vegetation development, followed by gradual aridification over a longer period of ~100-500 years. This climate oscillation is also expressed in the archeological cultural record. It is not clear yet what cause these RCC, and it is possible that of all potential climate forcing mechanisms, the most probable was solar variability, but this needs to be further investigated. 1Genty et al., 2003 Nature, 833-837; 2Wamg et al., Nature, 2008, 1090-1093; 3Burns et al., 2003, Science, 301, 1365-1367; 4Almogi-Labin et al., 2009 Quat. Sci. Rev 28, 2882-2896; 5Bar-Matthews et al., 1998 EPSL 166, 85-95; 6Bar-Matthews et al., 2003 GCA, 67, 3181-3199;7Ayalon et al., 2013 Quat.Sci. Rev., 59, 43-56. 8Bar-Matthews and Ayalon, 2011 The Holocene 21, 163-171;

  12. "Days of future passed" - climate change and carbon cycle history (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissert, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    With the beginning of the fossil fuel age in the 19th century mankind has become an important geological agent on a global scale. For the first time in human history action of man has an impact on global biogeochemical cycles. Increasing CO2 concentrations will result in a perturbation of global carbon cycling coupled with climate change. Investigations of past changes in carbon cycling and in climate will improve our predictions of future climate. Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations will drive climate into a mode of operation, which may resemble climate conditions in the deep geological past. Pliocene climate will give insight into 400ppm world with higher global sea level than today. Doubling of pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 levels will shift the climate system into a state resembling greenhouse climate in the Early Cenozoic or even in the Cretaceous. Carbon isotope geochemistry serves as tool for tracing the pathway of the carbon cycle through geological time. Globally registered negative C-isotope anomalies in the C-isotope record are interpreted as signatures of rapid addition (103 to a few 104 years) of CO2 to the ocean-atmosphere system. Positive C-isotope excursions following negative spikes record the slow post-perturbation recovery of the biosphere at time scales of 105 to 106 years. Duration of C-cycle perturbations in earth history cannot be directly compared with rapid perturbation characterizing the Anthropocene. However, the investigation of greenhouse pulses in the geological past provides insight into different climate states, it allows to identify tipping points in past climate systems and it offers the opportunity to learn about response reactions of the biosphere to rapid changes in global carbon cycling. Sudden injection of massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is recorded in C-isotope record of the Early Cretaceous. The Aptian carbon cycle perturbation triggered changes in temperature and in global hydrological cycling. Changes in physical and chemical oceanography are reflected in widespread black shale deposition ("Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a"), in carbonate platform drowning and in biocalcification crises. "Days of future passed" (Moody Blues, 1967) reminds us that the past provides essential information needed for decisions to be made in the interest of mankind's future.

  13. Microporous materials under extreme conditions - EMU Medal for Excellence in Research 2013 presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. Diego

    2014-05-01

    Zeolites are a class of "microporous materials" characterised by open-structures with cavities (i.e. channels or cages) with free diameters smaller than 20 Å. In Nature, zeolites with SiO4-AlO4-PO4-tetrahedra form open frameworks; polar molecules (in particular H2O) and monovalent or divalent cations, which are commonly exchangeable, are the extra-framework species. The selective cation-exchange capacity, along with T-induced reversible hydration/dehydration and the catalytic activity (mainly promoted by Brønsted acid sites) of zeolites have made this class of natural or synthetic materials an object of attention for their advanced technological applications, spanning from water treatment, soil remediation, cements production, biomedical and veterinary applications, gas separation to catalysis in the petroleum industry and nuclear-waste processing. As a consequence, zeolites are an important bulk commodity: the world production of natural zeolites in 2012 was about 2,800,000 tons and the consumption of synthetic zeolites was approximately 1,900,000 tons. Over the last 60 years, many experiments have addressed the behaviour of zeolites in response to applied temperature, describing the mechanisms of T-induced dehydration, cation migration and the rearrangement of extra-framework species. On the other hand, experiments on zeolite at high pressure have been done only in the last 10-15 years, shedding new insight into the elastic behaviour and phase stability in response to changing pressure, coupled with the P-induced deformation mechanisms at the atomistic level, P-induced over-hydration and its corresponding volume expansion, P-induced amorphization processes along with the effect of pressure on the ionic conductivity of zeolites. The comparative elastic analysis and the high-P structural data of zeolites so far reported allow us to make some generalizations: 1) The range of compressibility among this class of open-framework silicates is large, with bulk moduli ranging between 15 - 70 GPa; 2) Microporosity does not necessarily imply high compressibility, as several zeolites are less compressible than other non-zeolitic rock-forming minerals; 3) Compressibilities of zeolites do not seem to be directly related to microporosity, at least if we model microporosity with the "framework density"; 4) The flexibility observed in zeolites under hydrostatic compression is mainly governed by tilting of rigid tetrahedra around O atoms that behave as hinges within the framework. P-induced tilting commonly leads to continuous rearrangement of the framework without any phase transition. More rarely, tilting induces displacive phase transitions, and isothermal P-induced reconstructive phase transitions (i.e. with change in framework topology), have not been reported in this class of materials; 5) Deformation mechanisms in response to applied pressure are generally dictated by the topological configuration of the framework rather than the Si/Al-distribution or the extra-framework content. The channel content governs the compressibility of the cavities, leading to different unit-cell-volume compressibilities in isotypic structures.

  14. A bill to award the Congressional Gold Medal to Shimon Peres.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Ayotte, Kelly [R-NH

    2013-08-01

    03/14/2014 Held at the desk. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2939, which became Public Law 113-114 on 6/9/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Evolution of damage during deformation in porous granular materials (Louis Néel Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Ian

    2014-05-01

    'Crackling noise' occurs in a wide variety of systems that respond to external forcing in an intermittent way, leading to sudden bursts of energy release similar to those heard when crunching up a piece of paper or listening to a fire. In mineral magnetism ('Barkhausen') crackling noise occurs due to sudden changes in the size and orientation of microscopic ferromagnetic domains when the external magnetic field is changed. In rock physics sudden changes in internal stress associated with microscopically brittle failure events lead to acoustic emissions that can be recorded on the sample boundary, and used to infer the state of internal damage. Crackling noise is inherently stochastic, but the population of events often exhibits remarkably robust scaling properties, in terms of the source area, duration, energy, and in the waiting time between events. Here I describe how these scaling properties emerge and evolve spontaneously in a fully-dynamic discrete element model of sedimentary rocks subject to uniaxial compression at a constant strain rate. The discrete elements have structural disorder similar to that of a real rock, and this is the only source of heterogeneity. Despite the stationary loading and the lack of any time-dependent weakening processes, the results are all characterized by emergent power law distributions over a broad range of scales, in agreement with experimental observation. As deformation evolves, the scaling exponents change systematically in a way that is similar to the evolution of damage in experiments on real sedimentary rocks. The potential for real-time failure forecasting is examined by using synthetic and real data from laboratory tests and prior to volcanic eruptions. The combination of non-linearity and an irreducible stochastic component leads to significant variations in the precision and accuracy of the forecast failure time, leading to a significant proportion of 'false alarms' (forecast too early) and 'missed events' (forecast too late), as well as an over-optimistic assessments of forecasting power and quality when the failure time is known (the 'benefit of hindsight'). The evolution becomes progressively more complex, and the forecasting power diminishes, in going from ideal synthetics to controlled laboratory tests to open natural systems at larger scales in space and time.

  16. Space Geodesy: The Cross-Disciplinary Earth science (Vening Meinesz Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, C. K.

    2012-04-01

    Geodesy during the onset of the 21st Century is evolving into a transformative cross-disciplinary Earth science field. The pioneers before or after the discipline Geodesy was defined include Galileo, Descartes, Kepler, Newton, Euler, Bernoulli, Kant, Laplace, Airy, Kelvin, Jeffreys, Chandler, Meinesz, Kaula, and others. The complicated dynamic processes of the Earth system manifested by interactions between the solid Earth and its fluid layers, including ocean, atmosphere, cryosphere and hydrosphere, and their feedbacks are linked with scientific problems such as global sea-level rise resulting from natural and anthropogenic climate change. Advances in the precision and stability of geodetic and fundamental instrumentations, including clocks, satellite or quasar tracking sensors, altimetry and lidars, synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR), InSAR altimetry, gravimetry and gradiometry, have enabled accentuate and transformative progress in cross-disciplinary Earth sciences. In particular, advances in the measurement of the gravity with modern free-fall methods have reached accuracies of 10-9 g (~1 μGal or 10 nm/s2) or better, allowing accurate measurements of height changes at ~3 mm relative to the Earth's center of mass, and mass transports within the Earth interior or its geophysical fluids, enabling global quantifications of climate-change signals. These contemporary space geodetic and in situ sensors include, but not limited to, satellite radar and laser altimetry/lidars, GNSS/SLR/VLBI/DORIS, InSAR, spaceborne gravimetry from GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment twin-satellite mission) and gradiometry from GOCE (Global Ocean Circulation Experiment), tide gauges, and hydrographic data (XBT/MBT/Argo). The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) study, the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), substantially narrowed the discrepancy between observation and the known geophysical causes of sea-level rise, but significant uncertainties remain, notably in the discrepancies of contributions from the ice-reservoirs (ice-sheet and mountain glaciers/ice caps) and our knowledge in the solid Earth glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), to the present-day and 20th Century global sea-level rise. Here we report our use of contemporary space geodetic observations and novel methodologies to address a few of the open Earth science questions, including the potential quantifications of the major geophysical contributions to or causing present-day global sea-level rise, and the subsequent narrowing of the current sea-level budget discrepancy.

  17. Earth surface dynamics - dispatches from the flats (Ralph Alger Bagnold Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Earth's surface is shaped by the physical, chemical and biological processes operating on it and the interactions amongst them. No single discipline can lay claim to this surface, nor offer a full explanation of its dynamics. Only interdisciplinary approaches can unlock answers to key questions such as how do erosion and tectonics interact to build mountains, how do landscapes respond to climate change, how can we read processes from the sedimentary record, what is the role of erosion in Earth's carbon cycle, and how can we give reliable early warning of damaging earth surface process events? The wastelands between established academic fields are rich and bountiful and replete with steep learning curves and pitfalls for the naïve. In this lecture, I shall scour the interfaces of geophysics, geochemistry and geomorphology for understanding of the mechanisms, controls and impacts of mass wasting in steep mountain settings, ending up in remarkably flat places to find new insight into the dynamics of Earth's surface.

  18. Medaling in Education: Elder of the Year Teaches TCU Students to Walk on Both Sides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brien, Luella

    2010-01-01

    The heart of Little Big Horn College (LBHC) is wrapped in the passion of Joseph Medicine Crow. Medicine Crow, 96, a nationally renowned tribal elder and historian, has been influencing education on the Crow Reservation in Montana for decades. As one of the founding members of the Crow Education Commission, he helped start LBHC in 1980. Medicine…

  19. Marine data management: from early explorers to e-infrastructures (Ian McHarg Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Ocean observations have been made for as long as Man has been exploring the seas. Early Phoenician and Viking explorers developed extensive knowledge of currents, tides and weather patterns that they shared directly with their peers. Eighteenth century log books from whaling ships and the voyages of explorers, such as Captain Cook, documented sea conditions and weather patterns, and it is these records that are used today to extend oceanographic records back to a time before systematic observing of the ocean began. This historical information is now being used to address the grand challenges being faced by Society in the 21st century in ways that the 18th century seafarers could never have imagined. Systematic ocean observation and the science of modern oceanography began in the late 19th century with the voyages of HMS Challenger. Since these early scientific cruises ocean observation has become more and more sophisticated. Increasingly diverse types of equipment mounted on different types of platforms are generating huge amounts of data delivered in a variety of formats and conforming to a range of standards and best practice. It is this heterogeneity of marine data that has presented one of the greatest challenges for the modern researcher. As marine research becomes increasingly international, cross-disciplinary and multiscale, it presents new and more complex challenges for data stewardship. Increasingly large volumes of interoperable data are needed to address fundamental questions such as the assessment of Man's impact on the marine environment or the sustainable exploitation of available marine resources whilst maintaining the good environmental status of the ocean. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the acquisition and sharing of information about the marine environment from the earliest explorers to the modern day. It will look at some of the challenges faced by today's marine researcher seeking to make use of multidisciplinary and sometimes unfamiliar data, the data manager responsible for its stewardship, and the thousands of organisations and institutions around the world tasked with providing access to the vast volumes of data needed to support this increasingly global approach to marine research.

  20. Cangene gold medal award lecture - Genomic analysis and modification of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Karlene H; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2012-03-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of 17 Gram-negative predominantly environmental bacterial species that cause potentially fatal opportunistic infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Although its prevalence in these individuals is lower than that of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa , the Bcc remains a serious problem in the CF community because of the pathogenicity, transmissibility, and inherent antibiotic resistance of these organisms. An alternative treatment for Bcc infections that is currently being developed is phage therapy, the clinical use of viruses that infect bacteria. To assess the suitability of individual phage isolates for therapeutic use, the complete genome sequences of a panel of Bcc-specific phages were determined and analyzed. These sequences encode a broad range of proteins with a gradient of relatedness to phage and bacterial gene products from Burkholderia and other genera. The majority of these phages were found not to encode virulence factors, and despite their predominantly temperate nature, a proof-of-principle experiment has shown that they may be modified to a lytic form. Both the genomic characterization and subsequent engineering of Bcc-specific phages are fundamental to the development of an effective phage therapy strategy for these bacteria. PMID:22339239

  1. Jets and macroturbulent "cascades" in atmospheres, oceans and the laboratory (Lewis Fry Richardson Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Peter L.

    2016-04-01

    The banded organization of clouds associated with intense zonal (east-west) jet streams and large-scale oval vortices on Jupiter and Saturn have long fascinated astronomers and atmospheric dynamicists for many years. The current view is that these features are a manifestation of strongly anisotropic energy transfers within a highly turbulent fluid on a rapidly rotating, spherical planet that is energised at relatively small scales, either by free convection or baroclinic instabilities. The details are still not fully understood, however. Energy exchanges in the Earth's atmosphere and oceans, and on other planets, are similarly complex, with evidence of both upscale and downscale transfers and formation of zonal jet-like features. In this lecture we will explore insights from laboratory experiments on both small scales and on the Coriolis platform in Grenoble, France that investigate plausible physical analogues of such atmospheric or oceanic circulations, energized mainly by free thermal convection with strong background rotation. Weak, eddy-driven jets may be obtained through anisotropic energy exchanges, though (for reasons to be discussed) it is not possible to match Jupiter's parameter regime very closely in the laboratory. We will compare the dynamics and energetics of our laboratory experiment with new measurements of energy exchanges, spectra and structure functions in Jupiter's atmosphere from analysis of Cassini spacecraft images, which indicate some new directions for models of gas giant atmospheric circulations.

  2. 78 FR 48724 - President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces the...: Tuesday, September 3, 2013, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Place: National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson...

  3. 77 FR 70483 - President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces the...: Monday, December 10, 2012, 8:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Place: National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson...

  4. Nationwide high-resolution mapping of hazards in the Philippines (Plinius Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagmay, Alfredo Mahar Francisco A.

    2015-04-01

    The Philippines being a locus of typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions, is a hotbed of disasters. Situated in a region where severe weather and geophysical unrest is common, the Philippines will inevitably suffer from calamities similar to those experienced recently. With continued development and population growth in hazard prone areas, it is expected that damage to infrastructure and human losses would persist and even rise unless appropriate measures are immediately implemented by government. Recently, the Philippines put in place a responsive program called the Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards (NOAH) for disaster prevention and mitigation. The efforts of Project NOAH are an offshoot of lessons learned from previous disasters that have inflicted massive loss of lives and costly damage to property. Several components of the NOAH program focus on mapping of landslide, riverine flood and storm surge inundation hazards. By simulating hazards phenomena over IFSAR- and LiDAR-derived digital terrain models (DTMs) using high-performance computers, multi-hazards maps of 1:10,000 scale, have been produced and disseminated to local government units through a variety of platforms. These detailed village-level (barangay-level) maps are useful to identify safe evacuation sites, planning emergency access routes and prepositioning of search and rescue and relief supplies during times of crises. They are also essential for long-term development planning of communities. In the past two years, NOAH was instrumental in providing timely, site-specific, and understandable hazards information to the public, considered as best practice in disaster risk reduction management (DRR). The use of advanced science and technology in the country's disaster prevention efforts is imperative to successfully mitigate the adverse impacts of natural hazards and should be a continuous quest - to find the best products, put forth in the forefront of battle against disasters.

  5. Iron oxides as pedoenvironmental indicators: state of the art, answers and questions (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent, J.

    2012-04-01

    The colour and magnetic properties of soils largely reflect the content and mineralogy of their iron oxides, which in turn relate to the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the soil environment. For more than 50 years, soil mineralogists and chemists have collected data for iron oxides in soils formed in widely different environments and tried to understand the complex nature of the different suites and formation pathways for these minerals via laboratory experiments. The discovery of ferrihydrite —the poorly crystalline precursor of most Fe oxides— in 1971, and the recognition of its common presence in soils, raised interest in deciphering the environmental factors that affect its transformation into goethite and hematite, the two most abundant crystalline iron oxides in soil. Field observations were consistent with laboratory experiments in which temperature, water activity, pH, foreign ions and organic matter were found to play a key role in the crystallization of ferrihydrite. Thus, the hematite/(hematite + goethite) ratio increased with increasing temperature and also with the likelihood of seasonal soil drying. Exploiting this ratio as a (pedo)environment indicator is, however, not devoid of problems derived from insufficient knowledge of the interactions between the influential chemical variables, difficulties in quantifying the two minerals and changes brought about by reductive dissolution. Soil formation usually leads to magnetic enhancement as a result of the production of magnetite and/or maghemite, which are ferrimagnetic iron oxides, and, possibly, an ordered ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite, as suggested by recent laboratory experiments. The concentration of pedogenic ferrimagnets as estimated via proxies such as magnetic susceptibility or frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility has been found to relate to climate variables [particularly (paleo)rainfall] in many studies reported over the last 30 years. However, extracting accurate environmental information from magnetic data is hampered by a still incomplete understanding of (i) the pathways through which pedogenic ferrimagnets are formed, and the chemical and biological factors that affect them; and (ii) the genetic relationships between ferrimagnets and other iron oxides. Competing hypotheses on these issues will be presented and their usefulness for pedoenvironmental interpretations discussed.

  6. Discovering habitable environments and life in the Saturn System (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2015-04-01

    One of the most notable scientific adventures of our time is being conducted jointly by Europe and the United States around the solar system's great ringed planet, Saturn. The Cassini-Huygens mission arrived in orbit in 2004, and the Huygens probe descended through Titan's atmosphere in January 2005. Titan's surface has been found to host a rich and still-enigmatic methane cycle, complete with lakes, seas, rivers and rain. Enceladus is jetting its interior volatiles into space, where the Cassini Orbiter detected and measured a number of species within the resulting plume. These include water, organic molecules, nitrogen compounds, and salts. Cassini radio science detected the presence within both Enceladus and Titan of internal water oceans. Variability with orbital phase of the Enceladus plume, also discovered by the Cassini Orbiter, makes a convincing case for the jets themselves being derived from the deep interior and controlled by tidal forces. Both Enceladus and Titan host potentially habitable environments, and they represent unique opportunities for testing whether either or both of these bodies harbor life. Titan's interior will be difficult to access, but its large surface hydrocarbon seas can be explored in situ with Huygens-like vehicles. The Cassini Orbiter determined the liquid in Titan's seas to be methane and ethane, which raises the question of whether simple chemistry can evolve into autocatalysis and self-replication in a non-aqueous liquid environment. In effect, is there an exotic kind of "life" in the Titan seas? Enceladus is perhaps more straightforward: given that the interior water ocean as expressed through the plume appears to satisfy the formal requirements for habitability, is biological activity occurring there? Answering these questions will require a new generation of robotic vehicles beyond Cassini-Huygens -- and new opportunities for international collaborations in planetary exploration.

  7. From Cradle to Grave: Research on Atmospheric Aerosols (Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Generally, the sizes of aerosol particles are in the range 0.001 - 100 μm. Atmospheric aerosols are of interest mainly because of their effects on health and climate. Concerning health, many epidemiological studies have shown a link between increased mortality/morbidity and increased PM10 or PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 and 2.5 μm, respectively). Concerning climate, aerosol particles scatter and absorb light (known as the direct effect on climate), and modify cloud properties (with a variety of effects known as indirect effects). These effects are influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol particles, which makes these properties important to be measured. Atmospheric aerosol particles are produced by a large variety of sources, and are either emitted as primary particles (i.e., they are directly emitted as particles into the atmosphere) or formed by secondary processes (i.e., by transformation of emitted precursor gases). While the formation pathways of secondary inorganic aerosols such as nitrate and sulfate in general are reasonably well understood, the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is still an area of active research. A wide variety of gaseous precursors contribute to SOA, and their aerosol yields depend on a wide variety of conditions. In addition, it is still largely unknown to which extent and under which conditions oxidized organic molecules can contribute to nucleation, i.e., the formation of new particles. Elimination of aerosol particles from the atmosphere mostly occurs by wet deposition, where the ice phase plays an important role. Even though cloud glaciation augments precipitation formation and affects cloud radiative properties little is still known about mixed-phase cloud formation via heterogeneous nucleation. To elucidate some of the involved mechanisms in situ research in such mixed phase clouds has been performed in a series of Cloud Aerosol Characterization Experiments (CLACE) at the high altitude research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl). This presentation will give an overview on recent laboratory experiments and field campaigns. The lab studies relate to SOA formation from a variety of precursors as well as the formation of new particles from gaseous sulfuric acid in combination with other precursor gases where the latter experiments have been performed in the CLOUD experiment at CERN. The field studies relate to the latest developments of source apportionment studies for the organic aerosol, which build on positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometer data, as well as to aerosol cloud interaction studies on the Jungfraujoch.

  8. Gold Medal! An Event-Based Science Module. Student Edition. Physiology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school students to learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event-based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork, independent research, hands-on investigations, and…

  9. Gold Medal!: An Event-Based Science Module. Teacher's Guide. Physiology Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    This book is designed for middle school life science or physical science teachers to help their students learn scientific literacy through event-based science. Unlike traditional curricula, the event- based earth science module is a student-centered, interdisciplinary, inquiry-oriented program that emphasizes cooperative learning, teamwork,…

  10. On Goal-Oriented, Hydrogeological Site Investigation: A Holistic Approach (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Yoram

    2016-04-01

    UQ (for Uncertainty Quantification) is a critical element of groundwater management and by extension, of hydrological site investigation. While it is clear that UQ is an important goal, there is ambiguity as to what the target of the UQ should be, and how to make UQ relevant in the context of public policy. Planning for UQ (meaning what measurements to take, where, how many, what frequency, etc.), one could consider environmental performance parameters (EPMs, such as concentrations or travel time) as the targets of site investigation. But there is a need to go beyond EPMs, and to consider the uncertainty related to impacts such as enhanced cancer-risk due to groundwater contamination or, more generally, to decisions facing regulators. In any case, UQ requires site investigation, and decision-makers, who end up paying for it, are not really interested in EPMs: they care about making operational decisions that are defensible legally and justified from the perspective of public good. The key to UQ, whether considering EPMS or operational decisions concerning the public good, is defining a suitable strategy for site investigation. There is a body of published works on relating site investigations with EPMs, but much less is known on how to support operational decisions with strategies for site characterization. In this lecture, I will address this issue and I will outline a comprehensive approach for addressing it using a statistical formalism that couples hypothesis testing with Bayesian statistics. I refer to this approach as goal-oriented site investigation. I will show how site investigation strategies, with specifics such as which measurements to take and where, could be related to goals lined with operational decisions. This includes (1) defining the relevant goals; (2) formulating hypotheses; (3) defining alternative strategies for site investigation and (4) evaluating them in terms of probabilities for making errors in accepting or rejecting the hypotheses.

  11. Organics in the atmosphere: From air pollution to biogeochemical cycles and climate (Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakidou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Organics are key players in the biosphere-atmosphere-climate interactions. They have also a significant anthropogenic component due to primary emissions or interactions with pollution. The organic pool in the atmosphere is a complex mixture of compounds of variable reactivity and properties, variable content in C, H, O, N and other elements depending on their origin and their history in the atmosphere. Multiphase atmospheric chemistry is known to produce organic acids with high oxygen content, like oxalic acid. This water soluble organic bi-acid is used as indicator for cloud processing and can form complexes with atmospheric Iron, affecting Iron solubility. Organics are also carriers of other nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus. They also interact with solar radiation and with atmospheric water impacting on climate. In line with this vision for the role of organics in the atmosphere, we present results from a global 3-dimensional chemistry-transport model on the role of gaseous and particulate organics in atmospheric chemistry, accounting for multiphase chemistry and aerosol ageing in the atmosphere as well as nutrients emissions, atmospheric transport and deposition. Historical simulations and projections highlight the human impact on air quality and atmospheric deposition to the oceans. The results are put in the context of climate change. Uncertainties and implications of our findings for biogeochemical and climate modeling are discussed.

  12. Volatile-rich Melts in the Earth's Upper Mantle (AGU Kuno Medal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2013-04-01

    The onset of silicate magma generation in the Earth's upper mantle influences the thermal evolution of the planet, fluxes of key volatiles to the exosphere, and geochemical and geophysical properties of the mantle. Although carbonatitic fluid with variable water content could be stable ≤250 km beneath mid oceanic ridges [1-3], owing to the small fraction (<< 1 wt.%), its effects on the mantle properties are unclear. Geophysical measurements, however, suggest that melts of greater volume may be present down to ~200 km [4-6] but large melt fractions is thought to be restricted to shallower depths. In this Kuno Award lecture, I will discuss the recent advancements on our understanding of deeper silicate melt generation induced by CO2-H2O volatiles and the relative stability of silicate versus carbonatitic melt in various tectonic settings. I will present recent experiments on carbonated peridotites that constrain the location and the slope of the onset of silicate melting in the mantle [7]. The new finding is that the pressure-temperature slope of carbonated silicate melting is steeper than the solidus of volatile-free peridotite and as a consequence the silicate melting of dry peridotite+CO2 beneath ridges commences at ~180 km. Accounting for the effect of 50-200 ppm of mantle H2O on freezing point depression, the onset of silicate melting for a sub-ridge mantle with ~100 ppm CO2 becomes as deep as ~220-300 km [7]. This melting generates a kimberlitic magma with ~25 wt.% dissolved CO2 and 1-5 wt.% dissolved H2O. Based on the recent constraints of oxygen fugacity of the mantle in the garnet peridotite field [2, 3], we suggest that on a global scale, carbonated silicate melt generation at ~250-180 km deep redox solidus, with destabilization of metal and majorite in the upwelling mantle, explains oceanic low-velocity zone and electrical conductivity structure of the mantle. In locally oxidized domains (i.e., higher than average Fe3+/Fetotal), deeper carbonated silicate melt may contribute to the X-discontinuity. Furthermore, the new experimental results along with the electrical conductivity of molten carbonated peridotite [8] and that of the oceanic upper mantle [6] suggest that if CO2-rich melt is the only possible agent to explain the high electrical conductivity of the asthenospheric mantle then the mantle at depth is CO2-rich but H2O-poor; higher H2O content in the mantle enhances melting, lowers the CO2 content and likely the conductivity of such melts. Finally, carbonated silicate melts restrict the stability of carbonatite in the Earth's deep oceanic upper mantle and the inventory of carbon, water, and other highly incompatible elements at ridges becomes controlled by flux of the former [7]. Although the stability of carbonatitic melt may be eliminated beneath oceanic ridges at all depths, beneath continents stability of carbonatitic melt is expected. Archean cratonic mantle (geotherms corresponding to surface heat flux of 40-50 mW m-2) crosses the carbonated peridotite solidus, at a depth of ~100-220 km [9]; thus considering the oxygen fugacity profile for cratons [3], carbonatitic melt is expected to be stable at 100-180 km depths, at a narrow temperature window of 1000-1100 °C. Elevated geotherms similar to those of the Proterozoic (surface heat flux of ~50 mW m-2) and Phanerozoic terrains (surface heat flux of >60-80 mW m-2) would stabilize carbonatitic melt as shallow as 70-100 km [9]. A combination of geothermal and oxygen fugacity gradient with depth thus explains why carbonatitic melt is much more common on continents but rare beneath oceans. [1] Dasgupta R. and Hirschmann M. M. (2006). Nature 440, 659-662; [2] Rohrbach A. and Schmidt M. W. (2011). Nature 472, 209-212; [3] Stagno V. et al. (2013). Nature 493, 84-88; [4] Dalton C. A. et al. (2008). JGR 113 (B9), B09303; [5] Hammond W. C. and Toomey D. R. (2003). JGR 108, 2176; [6] Lizarralde D. et al. (1995). JGR 100 (B9), 17837-17854. [7] Dasgupta R. et al. (2013). Nature 493, 211-215. [8] Yoshino T. et al. (2012). PEPI 194-195, 1-9. [9] Dasgupt

  13. Let us keep observing and play in sand boxes (Henry Darcy Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.

    2012-04-01

    Henry Darcy was a civil engineer recognized for a number of technical achievements and scientific discoveries. The sand column experiments for which he is known revealed the linear relationship that exists between fluid motion and driving forces at low velocities. Freeze and Back (1983) stated, ''The experiments carried out by Darcy with the help of his assistant, Ritter, in Dijon, France in 1855 and 1856 represent the beginning of groundwater hydrology as a quantitative science." Because of the prominence given to this experiment, two important facts behind Darcy's contributions to subsurface hydrology have not received much attention. First, Darcy was not only a good engineer, but he was also a highly respected scientist whose knowledge of both the fundamentals of fluid mechanics and the natural world of geology led to better conceptualizing and quantifying of groundwater processes at relevant scales to solve practical problems. The experiments for which he is known may have already been conceived, based on his theoretical understanding, and the results were anticipated (Brown 2002). Second, Darcy, through his contributions with Dupuit, showed that they understood hydrologeology at a regional scale and developed methods for quantification at the scale of geologic stratum (Ritz and Bobek, 2008). The primary thesis of this talk is that scientific contributions such as the one Darcy made require appreciation and a thorough understanding of fundamental theory coupled with observation and recording of phenomena both in nature and in the laboratory. Along with all of the significant theoretical, mathematical modeling, and computational advances we have made in the last several decades, laboratory experiments designed to observe phenomena and processes for better insight, accurate data generation, and hypothesis development are critically important to make scientific and engineering advances to address some of the emerging and societally important problems in hydrology and water resources engineering. Kleinhans et al. (2010) convincingly argued the same point, noting, "Many major issues of hydrology are open to experimental investigation." Current and emerging problems with water supply and their hydrologic implications are associated with sustainability of water as a resource for global food production, clean water for potable use, protection of human health, and impacts and implications of global warming and climate change on water resources. This talk will address the subsurface hydrologic science issues that are central to these problems and the role laboratory experimentation can play in helping to advance the basic knowledge. Improved understanding of fundamental flow, transport, reactive, and biological processes that occur at the pore-scale and their manifestation at different modeling and observational scales will continue to advance the subsurface science. Challenges also come from the need to integrate porous media systems with bio-geochemical and atmospheric systems, requiring observing and quantifying complex phenomena across interfaces (e.g., fluid/fluid in pores to land/atmospheric in the field). This talk will discuss how carefully designed and theory driven experiments at various test scales can play a central role in providing answers to critical scientific questions and how they will help to fill knowledge gaps. It will also be shown that careful observations will lead to the refinement of existing theories or the development of new ones. Focusing on the subsurface, the need to keep observing through controlled laboratory experimentation in various test scales from small cells to large sand boxes will be emphasized. How the insights obtained from such experiments will complement modeling and field investigations are highlighted through examples.

  14. Acceptance of the Samuel Epstein Medal and Science Innovation Award by James Farquhar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, James

    2015-06-01

    Thank you Mark for your kind introduction. I am deeply honored to receive this award and to be here to honor the memory of Sam Epstein. If I think back to my time as a graduate student, I remember reading many articles by Sam Epstein and those who worked with him. What I saw was an incredible breadth of applications and a willingness to let the science guide and to address all sorts of questions - questions that extend from understanding animals, plants, the oceans, partitioning at high temperature, fluids in the crust, nebular chemistry, the list goes on and on and on. As a graduate student I struggled and did my best to hang on, but I had dreams of being able to do science following a model specifically like the one he saw Sam had pursued. I had one time to meet Sam and speak with him, and I saw curiosity, decency, and an interested positive outlook that I imagine was part of what led to his enormous impact on the field.

  15. The 2016 Case for Mantle Plumes and a Plume-Fed Asthenosphere (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.

    2016-04-01

    The process of science always returns to weighing evidence and arguments for and against a given hypothesis. As hypotheses can only be falsified, never universally proved, doubt and skepticism remain essential elements of the scientific method. In the past decade, even the hypothesis that mantle plumes exist as upwelling currents in the convecting mantle has been subject to intense scrutiny; from geochemists and geochronologists concerned that idealized plume models could not fit many details of their observations, and from seismologists concerned that mantle plumes can sometimes not be 'seen' in their increasingly high-resolution tomographic images of the mantle. In the place of mantle plumes, various locally specific and largely non-predictive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origins of non-plate boundary volcanism at Hawaii, Samoa, etc. In my opinion, this debate has now passed from what was initially an extremely useful restorative from simply 'believing' in the idealized conventional mantle plume/hotspot scenario to becoming an active impediment to our community's ability to better understand the dynamics of the solid Earth. Having no working hypothesis at all is usually worse for making progress than having an imperfect and incomplete but partially correct one. There continues to be strong arguments and strong emerging evidence for deep mantle plumes. Furthermore, deep thermal plumes should exist in a mantle that is heated at its base, and the existence of Earth's (convective) geodynamo clearly indicates that heat flows from the core to heat the mantle's base. Here I review recent seismic evidence by French, Romanowicz, and coworkers that I feel lends strong new observational support for the existence of deep mantle plumes. I also review recent evidence consistent with the idea that secular core cooling replenishes half the mantle's heat loss through its top surface, e.g. that the present-day mantle is strongly bottom heated. Causes for discrepancies between idealized plume/hotspot models and geochronological observations will also be briefly discussed. A further consequence of the existence of strong deep mantle plumes is that hot plume material should preferentially pond at the base of the lithosphere, draining towards and concentrating beneath the regions where the lithosphere is thinnest, and asthenosphere is being actively consumed to make new tectonic plates - mid-ocean ridges. This plume-fed asthenosphere hypothesis makes predictions for the structure of asthenosphere flow and anisotropy, patterns of continental edge-volcanism linked to lateral plume drainage at continental margins, patterns of cratonic uplift and subsidence linked to passage from hotter plume-influenced to cooler non-plume-influenced regions of the upper mantle, and variable non-volcanic versus volcanic modes of continental extension linked to rifting above '~1425K cool normal mantle' versus 'warm plume-fed asthenosphere' regions of upper mantle. These will be briefly discussed. My take-home message is that "Mantle Plumes are almost certainly real". You can safely bet they will be part of any successful paradigm for the structure of mantle convection. While more risky, I would also recommend betting on the potential reality of the paradigm of a plume-fed asthenosphere. This is still a largely unexplored subfield of mantle convection. Current observations remain very imperfect, but seem more consistent with a plume-fed asthenosphere than with alternatives, and computational and geochemical advances are making good, falsifiable tests increasingly feasible. Make one!

  16. Through Layers of Mud and Time: Lacustrine Archives of Quaternary Climate Variation (Hans Oeschger Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Sherilyn Claire

    2014-05-01

    Lake sediments record climate dynamics and ecosystem response at resolutions ranging from sub-annual to millions of years, dependent upon on the age and depositional characteristics of the basin. Thus, they provide a rich archive for elucidating environmental dynamics at a range of temporal scales. In this lecture, I will discuss a selection of examples from lacustrine sequences in the Americas that provide insight into the magnitude, duration, forcing, and impacts of Quaternary climate variability. The first set of examples deals with hydroclimate variation during the Holocene in the North American continental interior. In agricultural regions, lake studies documented intervals of drought that were more persistent than any in recorded history, now referred to as "megadroughts". Subsequent tree-ring compilations have shown that these megadroughts were widespread throughout western NA during the last 1000 years. In the central Great Plains during Medieval times (~900-1300 CE), moisture deficits persisted for multiple decades and were sufficient to drop the water table, kill off native grassland vegetation, and mobilize sand dunes, as demonstrated by coupled lacustrine and geomorphic records. A network of late-Holocene lacustrine records spanning the Great Plains and northern Rocky Mountain regions shows that major climate excursions were synchronous across the northern tier of the continental interior, reflecting large-scale atmospheric dynamics driven by temperature variation in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Lake records also have been instrumental in documenting tropical moisture variation associated with fluctuations in the South American Summer Monsoon (SASM). High lake levels and wet periods in the tropical Andes are correlated with cold intervals in the North Atlantic region at multiple temporal scales, from orbital to millennial to centennial, reflecting intensification of the SASM. Large changes in moisture availability (P-E) occurred on ~100 ka (eccentricity) cycles, synchronous with global glacial cycles. Both precessional and millennial signals also are evident in Andean lake records, although the relative strength of insolation in pacing moisture variation appears to be reduced during times of high ice volume. Indeed, some of the largest excursions in effective moisture in tropical South America are associated with the Heinrich events. Finally, lacustrine archives offer the extraordinary potential to evaluate the role of climate in biotic processes, including landscape evolution and patterns of diversification and extinction through time by integration of multiple independent proxies contained in the same samples. Thus, I'll discuss several examples of the linkages between climate and evolutionary processes at both short and long temporal scales.

  17. You Showed Your Whiteness: You Don't Get a "Good" White People's Medal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cleveland; Juarez, Brenda G.

    2009-01-01

    The White liberal is a person who finds themselves defined as White, as an oppressor, in short, and retreats in horror from that designation. The desire to be and to be known as a good White person stems from the recognition that Whiteness is problematic, recognition that many White liberals try to escape by being demonstrably different from…

  18. Kroll, Murakami, and Seneviratne Receive 2013 James B. Macelwane Medals: Citation for Sonia I. Seneviratne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    If you have ever wondered why heat waves can last that long and whether future climate change will increase droughts, then you should contact Sonia Seneviratne, a talented young scientist whose research is characterized by vigor, deep insight, and a keen eye for the important research questions. In her young career, Sonia has become one of the world's leading experts in the field of atmosphere-land surface interactions. She has already contributed a number of outstanding papers to this rapidly growing field, thereby shaping and influencing it in a defining matter. Sonia has tackled important and fascinating problems associated with the exchange of energy, momentum, and water between the atmosphere and the land surface and identified the key role of soil moisture in controlling heat waves and the onset and duration of droughts. Working at the interface between atmospheric, vegetation, and soil sciences and combining models with data analyses, she has written a number of exceptional papers that are not only novel and interesting but also hugely important for many people and institutions that are affected by droughts and heat waves.

  19. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 1221 - Congressional Space Medal of Honor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., the star surmounted by a light blue enamel cloud bank with five lobes edged in gold bearing a five... the space program of the United States. The stylized glory cloud alludes to the glory in the coat...

  20. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 1221 - Congressional Space Medal of Honor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., the star surmounted by a light blue enamel cloud bank with five lobes edged in gold bearing a five... the space program of the United States. The stylized glory cloud alludes to the glory in the coat...