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Sample records for alfredo benso paolo

  1. Age constraints of the Wassa and Benso mesothermal gold deposits, Ashanti Belt, Ghana, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Avila, Luis A.; Bourassa, Yan; Miller, John; Perrouty, Stéphane; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Campbell McCuaig, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Ashanti Belt in Ghana hosts numerous multi-million ounce gold deposits and is one of the most richly gold endowed Paleoproterozoic belts of the West African Craton. This work shows that the Wassa mineralized intrusion is part of the Sefwi Group. This unit at Wassa is strongly magnetic and show a distinctly high response in regional magnetic data sets compared to other units of equivalent age within the belt. The unit is inferred to be a lateral extension of an exposed fragment of what defines the substrate to the Tarkwa Basin sediments. The Wassa deposit, located in the eastern limb of the belt, is hosted within mafic to intermediate volcanic flows that are interbedded with minor horizons of volcaniclastics, clastic sediments. The clastic sediments include wackes and magnetite rich sedimentary layers, presumably derived from banded iron formations. The previously described sequence is intruded by syn-volcanic mafic intrusives and felsic porphyries rocks that are all part of the Birimian stratigraphy. Two new key SHRIMP II U-Pb ages were determined as part of this study: a new age of 2191 ± 6 Ma was determined on magmatic zircon grains of the Wassa porphyry host rock, which now represents the oldest known felsic intrusion hosting gold mineralization in the Ashanti Belt region. The Benso gold deposit system, which is located in the eastern limb of the Ashanti Belt approximately 38 km southwest of Wassa is hosted within a series of volcanic units intruded by mafic to intermediate units. A SHRIMP II U-Pb age of 2157 ± 5 Ma was determined from magmatic zircons obtained from a granodiorite of the G-Zone of the Benso deposit. This granodiorite is the main host rock for gold mineralization and thus the age provides an upper constraint for mineral emplacement. The newly determined ages provide an upper constraint for the gold mineralization within this region of the Ashanti Belt. They also support recent structural studies that have interpreted that the Wassa

  2. Ghosts of Mathematicians Past: Paolo Ruffini

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzherbert, John

    2016-01-01

    Paolo Ruffini (1765-1822) may be something of an unknown in high school mathematics; however his contributions to the world of mathematics are a rich source of inspiration. Ruffini's rule (often known as "synthetic division") is an efficient method of dividing a polynomial by a linear factor, with or without a remainder. The process can…

  3. Ghosts of Mathematicians Past: Paolo Ruffini

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzherbert, John

    2016-01-01

    Paolo Ruffini (1765-1822) may be something of an unknown in high school mathematics; however his contributions to the world of mathematics are a rich source of inspiration. Ruffini's rule (often known as "synthetic division") is an efficient method of dividing a polynomial by a linear factor, with or without a remainder. The process can…

  4. [Alfredo Lanari, a clinical research style].

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    The institutionalization of clinical research in Argentina reached its point of greatest maturity with the creation, in 1957, of the Institute of Medical Investigations (Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas) of the Faculty of Medicine of the Universidad de Buenos Aires, and the drive of the man who was its director for almost 20 years, Alfredo Lanari. In this paper I analyze the ways in which he generated a style of clinical research and a referential position in local medical field that allowed him to carry out said institutional realization. This achievement was the result of a personal enterprise and at the same time part of a larger context of transformations within the medical discipline world-wide and at the Universidad de Buenos Aires. This study was carried out combining oral and documentary sources, such as interviews with physicians at the Institute of Medical Investigations, members of the journal Medicina and of the Argentine Society of Clinical Investigation (Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Clínica), as well as academic files and scientific articles.

  5. STS-120 Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski (left) and Paolo Ne

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-11-07

    STS-120 Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski (left) and Paolo Nespoli talk before their return to flight to Houston. A welcoming ceremony for the crew is planned at NASA's Hangar 276 on the south end of Ellington Field in Texas. On the 15-day mission, the STS-120 crew continued the construction of the station with the installation of the Harmony Node 2 module and the relocation of the P6 truss. They landed Nov. 7 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

  6. [Paolo Zacchia--the spiritual father of forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Händel, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    Paolo Zacchia (1584-1659) was the personal physician of the popes Innocent X and Alexander VII, legal advisor to the Rota Romana and head of the health system in the Papal States. His most important work, written in Latin, is entitled "Quaestiones Medico-Legales" and was published in 9 volumes between 1621 and 1651. Even after Zacchia's death comprehensive reprints were published at several places up to the late 18th century. Zacchia covered all the medicolegal issues of his time including the problem of "malpractice" and medical ethics. He is rightly considered an outstanding representative of his profession, whose "Quaestiones Medico-Legales" gave legal medicine its name.

  7. A strange horn between Paolo Mantegazza and Charles Darwin.

    PubMed

    Garbarino, Carla; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    During the preparation of an exhibition in Pavia dedicated to the centennial anniversary of the death of the Italian Pathologist Paolo Mantegazza, a strange cheratinic horn was found at the Museum for the History of the University of Pavia labelled as 'spur of a cock transplanted into an ear of a cow.' After some historical investigation, we found this strange object was at the centre of a scientific correspondence between Mantegazza and Charles Darwin, who made reference to it in his book The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication.

  8. Paolo Sarpi and the first Copernican tidal theory.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ron

    2014-12-01

    Despite his demanding religious responsibilities, Paolo Sarpi maintained an active involvement in science between 1578 and 1598- as his Pensieri reveal. They show that from 1585 onwards he studied the Copernican theory and recorded arguments in its favour. The fact that for 1595 they include an outline of a Copernican tidal theory resembling Galileo's Dialogue theory is well known. But examined closely, Sarpi's theory is found to be different from that of the Dialogue in several important respects. That Sarpi was a Copernican by 1592 is revealed by other of his pensieri, whereas at that time we know that Galileo was not. The examination of Sarpi's tidal theory and of the work of Galileo in this period indicates that the theory Sarpi recorded in 1595 was of his own creation. The appreciation that the theory was Sarpi's and that Galileo subsequently came to change his views on the Copernican theory and adopted the tidal theory has major implications for our understanding of the significance of Sarpi's contribution to the Scientific Revolution. Moreover, it appears that several of the most significant theoretical features of the tidal theory published by Galileo in the Dialogue - and which proved of lasting value - were in reality Sarpi's.

  9. Master of Disaster: Paolo Bacigalupi's Dystopian Tales Are Infuriating, Disturbing, and Impossible to Put down

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Paolo Bacigalupi, a rising sci-fi star who has walked away with the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and, most recently, the Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature--the Young Adult Library Services Association's top prize for prose. That's pretty impressive for a guy who's published…

  10. Master of Disaster: Paolo Bacigalupi's Dystopian Tales Are Infuriating, Disturbing, and Impossible to Put down

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Paolo Bacigalupi, a rising sci-fi star who has walked away with the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and, most recently, the Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature--the Young Adult Library Services Association's top prize for prose. That's pretty impressive for a guy who's published…

  11. [Eugenics and immigration selection: notes on the debate between Alfredo Ellis Junior, Oliveira Vianna, and Menotti Del Picchia, 1926].

    PubMed

    El-Dine, Lorenna Ribeiro Zem

    2016-12-01

    This text analyzes the bill submitted by Alfredo Ellis Junior to the São Paulo legislature in August 1926, which would allow studies to be made of immigrants in São Paulo in order to orient immigration selection policies. It highlights the opinions of Menotti Del Picchia and Oliveira Vianna about the research agenda put forward by Alfredo Ellis Junior, focusing on the different conceptions about the race issue and immigration held in the 1920s. We suggest that Menotti Del Picchia's divergence from Alfredo Ellis Junior and Oliveira Vianna could be interpreted as a dispute between literati and scientists over the legitimacy of their respective knowledge about the Brazilian reality and the proposal of policies for the country.

  12. ["Caciquismo" and medical profession: the case of Alfredo Alegre, 1915-1924].

    PubMed

    Fresquet Febrer, José L

    2015-01-01

    The professional recognition and sanitary reforms that physicians sought from the political powers throughout the constitutional era of the reign of Alfonso XIII were a continuation of those from the XIXth century. One of the most important demands was that rural physicians should answer directly to the State, especially with reference to salaries, rather than to municipal authorities generally held by caciques. There were constant problems between them. This work presents the case of the physician from El Pobo, Alfredo Alegre, whose conviction put health professionals, students and most of society on the warpath, joining their demands to a petition for pardon. This tragic story, apart from showing the importance of the daily press as a source, highlights the difficulties offered by professional practice in rural areas submerged in the past and the inability of politicians to resolve problems during one of the most hectic periods of our history.

  13. Alfredo Dugès' type specimens of amphibians and reptiles revisited.

    PubMed

    Flores-Villela, Oscar; Ríos-Muñoz, César A; Magaña-Cota, Gloria E; Quezadas-Tapia, Néstor L

    2016-03-14

    The type specimens of amphibians and reptiles of the Museo de Historia Natural Alfredo Dugès, at the University of Guanajuato (MADUG) were reviewed following Smith & Necker's (1943) summary. Owing to this collection's eventful history and its historical importance as the oldest herpetological collection in Mexico, a review of its conservation status was needed. After many years, the collection has received proper recognition at the University of Guanajuato with a portion of the herpetological types considered "Precious Assets" of the university. We found 34 type specimens pertaining to 18 taxa; six are additional specimens to those previously reported; six herpetological types are missing, including the body of the type of Adelophis copei. All specimens are in good to reasonable condition except for the type of Rhinocheilus antonii, which has dried out completely. All specimens are illustrated to show their condition.

  14. Questioning medicine in seventeenth-century Rome: the consultations of Paolo Zacchia.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Jacalyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the life and contributions of Paolo Zacchia (1584-1659) before analyzing 85 Latin consilia (or consultations) in his Quaestiones medico-legales. Topics include death, paternity, sexuality, disease, and miracles. Because the consilia cite the rest of his treatise, they open the entire work, elucidating applications of theory. This research relied on the construction of a database, built on subject, date, and citations. The paper closes with historiographic suggestions for why this prominent author has been ignored in North America.

  15. [EMBALMING IN 19TH-20TH CENTURY LOMBARDY: PAOLO GORINI AND GIUSEPPE PARAVICINI].

    PubMed

    Carli, Alberto; Piombino-Mascali, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The Gorini Museum, later renamed Gorini Anatomical Collection, was founded in 1981 by pathologist Antonio Allegri. Many of the anatomical pieces created by scientist Paolo Gorini between 1843 and 1881 are held in the ancient chapterhouse of the Old Hospital of Lodi. These remains bear witness to Gorini's preparation skills and represent a precious historical and scientific heritage. Beyond the Gorini anatomical collection, the Museum has recently acquired the specimens prepared by Giuseppe Paravicini, a scientist and physician who developed a preservation method for educational and funerary purposes. Both the Gorini and the Paravicini specimens represent a unique opportunity to assess the evolution of preparation arts in terms of materials employed and the results achieved, and will successfully engage the general public with the world of anatomical mummies.

  16. [Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos: criminal and legal aspects of serial homicide with over 200 victims].

    PubMed

    Benecke, Mark; Rodriguez y Rowinski, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    This is the first scientific report on the crimes of the homosexual paedophile sadist Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos, based on a research stay of the authors in Columbia, and including discussions with the investigators, and the offender. Between 1992 and 1999, Garavito killed more than 200 children in the core age span between 8 and 13 years (as an exception, 6 to 16 years). His modus operandi remained stable. During daytime, he lured children of a lower social status out of crowded parts of the city into hidden areas that were overgrown with high plants. Garavito promised either payment for easy work, or drugs, or made other socially believable offers. The children were tied up, tortured, raped, and killed by at least one cut in the lateral part of the neck, or by decapitation. During the killings, Garavito was drunk. Even after his arrest (for attempted sexual abuse under a wrong identity) it was not immediately possible to track his crimes since Garavito had frequently changed his places of stay and his jobs. He also grew different hairdos and used wrong names. During his still ongoing confessions, he directs the investigators correctly to all scenes of crime spread over large parts of Columbia. In our report, we give an overview over the course of investigations, hint to similarities in the cases of the German serial killer Denke (1920's) and homosexual paedophile serial killer Jürgen Bartsch (1960's), and give preliminary impressions on the offender's personality. Furthermore, the violent environment and juridical peculiarities in Columbia are discussed. In spite of a total penalty of 2600 years in prison, it is formally well possible that Garavito will be released out of prison within the next 10 to 20 years, i.e. even before the maximum sentence of 40 years will be over.

  17. An interview with Alfredo Falcone and Lisa Salvatore: RECOURSE and trifluridine/tipiracil in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Alfredo; Salvatore, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    Professor Alfredo Falcone and Dr Lisa Salvatore speak to Roshaine Gunawardana, Managing Commissioning Editor: Professor Alfredo Falcone is the Director of the Department of Oncology and the Specialization School at the University Hospital of Pisa, Italy. He trained in Pisa and Genoa, Italy, and has held major positions in Italian oncology since 2000. He currently has more than 300 publications, including papers in peer-reviewed international and national journals, book chapters, and more than 600 abstracts of presentations to international and national conferences. The majority of his papers regard clinical and translational research, with a particular focus on metastatic colorectal cancer. Dr Lisa Salvatore is a medical oncologist in the Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery at the University of Pisa. She has been an author on about 40 publications in major peer-reviewed publications and has made numerous presentations in national and international conferences. Her main interest is focused on clinical and translational research in metastatic colorectal cancer.

  18. Temporal trends in marital structure and isonymy in S. Paolo Albanese, Italy.

    PubMed

    Pettener, D

    1990-12-01

    In the fifteenth century, after the Turkish conquest of the Balkan area, Albanian communities migrated to Southern Italy. I investigated temporal trends in isolation from 1820 to 1982 in one of these communities, the population of S. Paolo Albanese, Basilicata, which still uses the original language and religious rites. Marital structure is characterized by a high average frequency of village endogamy (75.2%). Among the exogamous marriages there is a preference for mates from Italo-Albanian settlements, with higher values in the 1800s. The distribution of marital distances reflects the positive assortative mating by ethnic community. The mean frequency of isonymous marriages was 9.01% from 1820 to 1982. These results indicate that total inbreeding from isonymy is a reliable indicator of isolation, showing temporal trends related to changes in endogamy. Fr accounts for the greater percentage of Ft in relation to the small population size and regularly decreases with time. The breakdown of isolation, as documented by the decrease in population size, endogamy, and inbreeding, is a recent feature (since 1960).

  19. Chromosomenindividualität or Entmischung? The debate between Paolo Della Valle and Edmund B. Wilson.

    PubMed

    Volpone, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, the Italian cytologist Paolo Della Valle developed a theory of instable chromosomes (teoria dei cromosomi labili). He radically criticized the so-called Sutton-Boveri hypothesis (Martins and Martins, Genetics and Molecular Biology, 22:261-271, 1999), focusing on numerical constancy in the species and individuality. On the basis of bibliographical review and personal observations, he maintained that the chromosomes were neither stable bodies, nor permanent structures, but transitory cellular materials, resulting from the periodical rearrangement of the chromatin during the cell division. German and English-speaking biologists reacted. The paper shows some content of the argumentations used by Thomas H. Montgomery and especially Edmund B. Wilson. The discussion was characterized by the same data which is interpretedby different scholars in different ways. And the point is that no one of them had the decisive test to demonstrate his own point of view. Wilson simply invoked on his behalf a certain 'common sense', defending at least a 'high degree of constancy'. The debate waned along with the reception of Morgan's chromosome theory of heredity, but only the advent of molecular biology definitively stated the nature of chromosomes as permanent structures of the cell.

  20. Paolo Nespoli Individual EMU Suit Photo - Proofs.Photo Date: January 12, 2016. Location: Building 8, Room 183 - Photo Studio. Photographer: Robert Markowitz

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-12

    JSC2016e000629 (01/12/2016) --- Expedition 52 crewmember ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli in full spacesuit (EMU) . Photo Date: January 12, 2016. JSC NASA Photographer: Robert Markowitz

  1. [The ideas that are seen. Form and perception in Goethe and Paolo Bozzi].

    PubMed

    Giacomoni, Paola

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a comparative analysis of Paolo Bozzi's experimental phenomenology and of J.W. Goethe's morphological method, which is considered one of the Italian scholar's sources of inspiration. Starting from Bozzi's education within the Gestalt psychology tradition, under the guidance of Gaetano Kanizsa, and taking into account also the recent interest shown for Bozzi by several exponents of the analytic tradition, this work draws attention to the basic features of the methodology adopted by the perceptologist in his work. In this regard, what proves to be fundamental is the role played by the various techniques of inter-observation by means of an active and practical approach to the material, rather than a purely contemplative one. Bozzi's interest in Goethe's naturalistic writings, from the morphological ones to the Farbenlehre (Theory of colours), makes it possible to highlight significant analogies and conceptual continuities with Goethe's epistemology. First of all, a link between these two styles of research is provided by the subject "form," or Gestalt, and its direct, accurate observation, as well as its presence in non-conventional contexts and its non-metaphysical character. Furthermore, it is evident that both authors employ a conception of experiment that is repeatable, conducted almost always in conditions that are open and not of the laboratory. Not less relevant is their scientific style, in which the distinction between the context of discovery and the context of justification plays no role. At the same time the extraordinary communication skills of both authors play a crucial role: their non-academic way of writing accompanied by a sense of rigour and correctness makes the results outstanding and unique.

  2. [Maternal mortality in the Hospital General de Matamoros Dr. Alfredo Pumarejo Lafaurie for a period of 10 years].

    PubMed

    González-Rosales, Ricardo; Ayala-Leal, Isabel; Cerda-López, Jorge Alejandro; Cerón-Saldaña, Miguel Angel

    2010-04-01

    In Mexico, maternal mortality has fallen substantially in recent decades. Although according to the Secretaria de Salud, in Tamaulipas the maternal mortality rate has increased in recent years. Despite these facts, Tamaulipas ranks among the ten institutions with the lowest level of maternal mortality. To describe the basic elements of epidemiologic behavior of maternal mortality during a period of ten years at the Gynecology and Obstetrics department of the Hospital General de Matamoros Dr. Alfredo Pumarejo Lafaurie in Tamaulipas, Mexico. A descriptive, transverse, retrospective and a cases series research was carried out at the Gynecology and Obstetrics department of the Hospital General de Matamoros Dr. Alfredo Pumarejo Lafaurie in Tamaulipas, Mexico. There was a revision of the expedients of direct and indirect obstetric maternal deaths occurred from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2007. We used descriptive statistics with central trend measurements and standard deviation. 30 obstetric maternal deaths were registered. Maternal death ratio was 87.2 x 100,000 live births during the 10 years. The average age of patients was 25.1 +/- 7.8 years old. 54% were in their first pregnancy. Only 20% had adequate prenatal control. Direct obstetric causes were 60% and indirect obstetric causes 40%. The main causes of maternal deaths were preeclampsia/eclampsia (27%), obstetric hemorrhage (20%) and gravid-puerperal sepsis (13%). 83% was foreseeable. It was noted a clear trend towards the reduction in the maternal mortality ratio in the decade from 1998 to 2007. Preeclampsia-eclampsia and obstetric hemorrhage remain the main causes of maternal death. The maternal mortality ratio tended to invest when comparing the first five years with the last five years of the study, which talks about improvements in management and direct obstetric causes prevention.

  3. Raman Investigation of Precious Jewelry Collections Preserved in Paolo Orsi Regional Museum (Siracusa, Sicily) Using Portable Equipment.

    PubMed

    Barone, Germana; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Raneri, Simona; Jehlička, Jan; Vandenabeele, Peter; Lottici, Pier Paolo; Lamagna, Gioconda; Manenti, Angela Maria; Bersani, Danilo

    2016-09-01

    This work is a part of a large scientific project aimed at highlighting the potential of portable Raman equipment in characterizing jewelry materials preserved in museums, carried out in collaboration with gemologists and archeologists. In detail, we report the results of a measurement campaign performed for the study of gems and jewels preserved in the well-known Medagliere section at the Paolo Orsi Regional Museum of Siracusa (Sicily). The studied materials consist of exquisite examples of engraved loose gems and really rare examples of Hellenistic-Roman jewels, mainly coming from relevant Sicilian archaeological sites. Portable Raman measurements have been carried out using two instruments equipped with different excitation wavelengths. The obtained results have allowed for a complete characterization of the studied gemological materials, also suggesting sometimes misclassification for some valuable objects and gems.

  4. [Alfredo Tramoyeres Cases (1910-2002): first chairman of the Department of Urology at the Ciudad Sanitaria La Fe. Documentary-historical analysis of his works].

    PubMed

    Cánovas Ivorra, José Antonio; Tramoyeres Galvañ, Alfredo; Sánchez Ballester, Francisco; De la Torre Abril, Luis; Ordoño Domínguez, Felipe; Navalón Verdejo, Pedro; Pérez Albacete, Mariano; López Alcina, Emilio; Zaragoza Orts, Julio

    2004-12-01

    Urology, having been part of general surgery for centuries, was completely consolidated as a medical speciality in the middle of the XX Century as the result of years of evolution and development, and all the studies and works of certain authors that represent today the mainstays of our speciality. Valencia in the middle of the 20th century saw the birth of new hospitals including the "Ciudad Sanitaria La Fe". Alfredo Tramoyeres Cases was the first chairman of the Department of Urology. This article reviews his long and fertile professional life. We have reviewed all his scientific works. The articles have been obtained from Medicina Española, Revista Española de Cirugía Traumatológica y Ortopedia, and Archivos Españoles de Urología. His most important urological work is his doctoral thesis with the title "Sigmoid-procto-ureterostomy: personal modification" published in Valencia in 1976. For his biography we used the" Biographic and bibliographic history of the Spanish Urology over the XX century" and interviews with family members. We emphasize his thorough description of the various types of urinary diversion. He covers the topics of bladder diverticula and bladder neck disorders, in which he supports surgical treatment. Finally, he sets out the rupture of the posterior urethra and various treatments for prostate cancer at that time. Alfredo Tramoyeres Cases contributed to the definitive consolidation of our speciality in the area of Valencia during the second half of the XX century, through his long professional life, with his interesting scientific contributions.

  5. Career perspective: Paolo Cerretelli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article is an autobiographical account of my career as a human physiologist. I have spent 55 years traversing mountains, continents, seas, and skies, carrying out research in the laboratories of several international institutions as well as in the field. My scientific roots, approach to the mountains and altitude populations, both in Europe and in Asia, together with an account of my experimental studies at altitude, including extreme conditions, shall be presented together with pertinent occasional reflections of a personal nature. PMID:24438551

  6. Should the definition of "sleep hygiene" be antedated of a century? A historical note based on an old book by Paolo Mantegazza, rediscovered. To place in a new historical context the development of the concept of sleep hygiene.

    PubMed

    Gigli, Gian Luigi; Valente, Mariarosaria

    2013-05-01

    The article contains a historical note on the concept of sleep hygiene, developed in 1977 by Peter Hauri, who developed a set of sleep-promoting rules, considered the fundament for sleep-hygiene techniques. Somnologists, unanimously ascribed to Hauri the fatherhood of the lucky term, while numerous books included at least a section on sleep hygiene. "Inadequate sleep hygiene" was included as a nosological entity in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. This article intends to demonstrate that the concept of sleep hygiene was developed many years before, thanks to the pioneering work of Paolo Mantegazza, a scientist and a professor in the Medical School of the University of Pavia, Italy. After presenting briefly the history of the University of Pavia and illustrating the profile of Paolo Mantegazza, the article presents the original book published by Mantegazza in 1864 (second edition in 1865). The authors report extensive citations of Mantegazza's original book dealing with sleep hygiene. Mantegazza's indications, compared with Hauri's rules show important similarities. The authors support the view that the fatherhood of sleep hygiene should be acknowledged to Mantegazza and antedated to 1864. Hauri keeps the merit of giving more solid scientific roots to the concept of sleep hygiene and of inserting it in the frame of modern sleep medicine.

  7. For the relief of Alfredo Ramirez Vasquez.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Pastor, Ed [D-AZ-4

    2009-01-09

    02/05/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. They are listening to comments from Italian astronaut Paolo Angelo Nespoli, who is with the European Space Agency. The members are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. They are listening to comments from Italian astronaut Paolo Angelo Nespoli, who is with the European Space Agency. The members are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  9. A Storybook Romance: Dante's Paolo and Francesca. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This lesson plan highlights one episode in the "Divine Comedy" to provide students with an introduction to Dante's poem. After a brief introduction to the opening of the "Divine Comedy," which portrays Dante as a pilgrim guided by the poet Virgil on a journey through the Christian afterlife toward God, students read Canto 5 of…

  10. A bill for the relief of Alfredo Plascencia Lopez and Maria Del Refugio Plascencia.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-03-02

    03/02/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1140) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. A bill for the relief of Alfredo Plascencia Lopez and Maria Del Refugio Plascencia.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2009-01-06

    01/06/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S98) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. A bill for the relief of Alfredo Plascencia Lopez and Maria Del Refugio Plascencia.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2013-03-18

    03/18/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1896) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Don DePaolo: Geo and Bio Sequestration

    ScienceCinema

    Don DePaolo:

    2016-07-12

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  14. Self-esteem of adult women living in a peripheral area of São Paolo city, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodolpho, Juliana Reale Caçapava; Silva, Talita Cristina Cardoso; Hoga, Luiza Akiko Komura; Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the level of self-esteem (SE) and its associations with women's sociodemographic characteristics and social status. Adult women (N = 120) living in a peripheral area of Sao Paulo City in Southeastern Brazil were randomly included in our study. We found significant associations between higher SE scores and higher schooling (p =.02), participation in religious meetings in the church (p =.022), and practice of leisure activities (p <.001). The inclusion of a broader range of activities should be provided in health care and educational settings aiming at the improvement of women's SE levels.

  15. "If it isn't ultimately aimed at policy, it's not worth doing": interview of George W. Comstock by Alfredo Morabia.

    PubMed

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2013-04-01

    George W. Comstock (1915-2007), MD, MPH, DrPH, was lecturer and then professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health from 1956 to 2007 and served as editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Epidemiology from 1979 to 1988. This interview of George W. Comstock took place in Hagerstown, Maryland, in the spring of 1990. The selection of questions and answers published here represent approximately 10% of the whole interview, which had been reviewed and hand-corrected by Dr. Comstock. He first describes how epidemiology was taught at Hopkins in the 1950s and 1960s. He then distinguishes "epidemiology per se" from a "practical epidemiology" that works closely with local health departments, and he finally expresses his wish that in the future, epidemiology would become more widely involved in policy and accepted by policy makers.

  16. Comment on «Tidal notches in the Mediterranean Sea: A comprehensive analysis» by Fabrizio Antonioli, Valeria Lo Presti, Alessio Rovere, Luigi Ferranti, Marco Anzidei, Stefano Furlani, Giuseppe Mastronuzzi, Paolo E. Orru, Giovanni Scicchitano, Gianmaria Sannino, Cecilia R. Spampinato, Rossella Pagliarulo, Giacomo Deiana, Eleonora de Sabata, Paolo Sansò, Matteo Vacchi and Antonio Vecchio. Quaternary Science Reviews 119 (2015) 66-84

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelpidou, Niki; Pirazzoli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The paper of Antonioli et al. (2015) presents observations of 73 sites with erosion notches, which are called tidal notches, which in fact appear to be of various genetic origins, because a combination of several physical chemical and biological processes of formation is considered including, in addition to intertidal bioerosion, also carbonate rock solution, wetting and drying and wave abrasion that would produce different types of notches. Among the erosion notches, some «roof notches», in which the notch lacks a floor, are distinguished. For these isolated roofs, we would tend to ascribe erosion to dissolution by a freshwater spring undercutting a limestone cliff at sea level. Accompanying a rise in sea level, dissolution by freshwater will tend to continuously displace the roof of the notch upwards, while the base of the notch, dissolved, will tend to be missing. For such isolated roof of a solution notch, protruding above the waterline, the term «visor» has been proposed by Evelpidou et al. (2011).

  17. Special Operations Forces Aviation on a Shoestring Budget: An Effectiveness Analysis of Light and Medium Fixed Wing Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    XXI Seminario Internacional Cátedra Alfredo Kindelán, Madrid, Spain, November 14, 2011). 2 have clearly demonstrated the benefit of dedicated and...to the XXI Seminario Internacional Cátedra Alfredo Kindelán, Madrid, Spain, 14 November 2011, and has been adopted by NATO. In his speech at the...domestic, regional, and transnational threats. As Lieutenant General Kisner declared in his Speech to XXI Seminario Internacional Catedra Alfredo

  18. Cinema and Pedagogy: An Urban Education Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Karen Ann; Vellani, Al-Munir

    2014-01-01

    In "Cinema Paradiso" (Tomatore, 1988), Salvatore's love of movies came from spending his earlier, young life inside a cinema with the fatherly projectionist Alfredo, now blind and bitter. Alfredo is right. Life is much harder, yes, yet still very much "like in the movies" filled with frustrated actions, performed inside blind…

  19. Cinema and Pedagogy: An Urban Education Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Karen Ann; Vellani, Al-Munir

    2014-01-01

    In "Cinema Paradiso" (Tomatore, 1988), Salvatore's love of movies came from spending his earlier, young life inside a cinema with the fatherly projectionist Alfredo, now blind and bitter. Alfredo is right. Life is much harder, yes, yet still very much "like in the movies" filled with frustrated actions, performed inside blind…

  20. PREFACE: The IX Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amore, Paolo; Aranda, Alfredo; Bashir, Adnan; Mondragón, Myriam; Raya, Alfredo

    2006-05-01

    The IX Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields was held in the beautiful city of Colima, in the South-West of Mexico, from 17-22 November 2003. The proceedings of the Workshop were delayed due to problems with a previous publisher, we are very grateful that Journal of Physics: Conference Series kindly agreed to publish the proceedings rapidly at this late stage. The Workshop aimed to cover, through invited lectures delivered by internationally known experts, the most recent developments in the field. There was also a series of short seminars as well as a poster session, which allowed the whole community to participate with their most recent research results. A special session was dedicated to awarding the Division Medal to Professor Benjamin Grinstein, from The University of California, San Diego, for his outstanding contributions to the field. This volume contains the written version of the material presented at the Workshop. The Workshop was attended by more than 100 participants, including faculty members, postdocs and graduate students. It was organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society, and generously sponsored by several institutions: Universidad de Colima, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás Hidalgo, Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV), Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (Conacyt). The Local Organizing Committee was integrated by Paolo Amore, Alfredo Aranda, Carlos Moisés Hernóndez Suórez (Director of the Physics Faculty), Arturo Gonzólez Larios, Enrique Farías Martínez, and Myriam Cruz Calvario, all from the University of Colima. The members of the National Organizing Committee were Adnan Bashir (IFM-UMSHN), Jens Erler (IF-UNAM), Heriberto Castilla Valdés (CINVESTAV-U.Zacatenco), Gabriel López Castro (CINVESTAV-U.Zacatenco), Myriam Mondragón (IF-UNAM) and Luis Villaseñ or (IFM-UMSHN). We gratefully acknowledge the help given by

  1. Three-dimensional modeling in the study of subsidence in mining Acquaresi (Sardinia South - West) - Francesco Muntoni (1) Teresa Balvis (2) Paolo Bevilacqua (3) (1) Geological, Mining Park of Sardinia - Via Monteverdi, 16 09016 - Iglesias (2) freelance (3) Department of Engineering and Architecture - University of Trieste, Via Valerio 10 - Trieste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntoni, F.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subsidence and subsequent landslides in mining areas are very frequent, the study examines the proposed mining area of Acquaresi (Sardinia South - West), interested in the years between 1991 and 2003 by major subsidence phenomena and consequent events landslides. The valley of Acquaresi is particularly important, not only for its mines, but also for the aspect related to the geomorphological evolution morphotectonic in the context of Paleozoic lithologies, which have a rectangular structure parallel to the coastline. To make measurements and analysis of the evolution of human morphostructural and throughout the industry, it was considered appropriate to create a three-dimensional model that would allow a synoptic view with the different information available to the industry. E 'was created a model using the points listed extrapolated from the Regional Technical Map scale 1:10,000, the map at scale 1:2000 dell'IGEA and the values of a detailed survey of the study area, measured at a scale 1: 500. How MicroStation CAD software was used, with whom it is made of a TIN high detail taking into account then is, if possible, of quoted points, roads, major infrastructure, contour lines (lines-intermediate-auxiliary), buildings and lines coast. The model was supported and shaped (draping) image obtained by integrating the color orthophotos of the area in 1:10,000 scale of the Autonomous Region of Sardinia and photos to scale 1:2,000 made to run dall'IGEA spa at the last event of the landslide. The use of aerial photographs, a scale similar to that of cartography, has allowed us to achieve excellent results by superimposing the frames of the areas of interest on models made, with views that appear to be consistent with the technical papers, with a maximum error of less than that of the reference mapping. Moreover, to emphasize the tectonic lineations, morphological aspects and changes in landscape and environment, it was considered appropriate to use a three-dimensional model, thanks to software used in this trial, with a high detail 3D visualization. Starting from the Regional Technical Map has been possible to realize the DEM file, then perform an interpolation with a point layer containing elevation values recorded separately and then superimpose the orthophoto to 3D surface. It was also decided to use a terrain model DTM knitted irregular TIN compared to a regular grid pattern GRID, because the first best response to the need to have a shirt that exploited all possible points present and identifiable in the territory. With the use of a TIN was thus possible to insert also the points detected by the GPS in the country to verify the area of detachment of the landslide, thus being able to increase the detail in the area of observation. Getting a noticeable "jump" quality: moving from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional display. The model thus obtained has allowed a very good point of the area: they are easy to locate the outcrops of the different lithological structures, facilitating the study and evaluation for interventions of recovery.

  2. High-Temperature Material Lattice Combining Low Thermal Expansion, High Stiffness and Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    previous work by Sigmund [10-11], Guedes and Kikuchi [12], and Bensoe et al [13] to determine how each constituent and void spaces should be distributed...351-368. 12 Guedes , J.M. and Kikuchi, N. “Preprocessing and Postprocessing for Materials Based on the Homogenization Method with Adaptive Finite...Element Methods.” Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering 83 (1990): 143-198. 13 Bendsoe, M.P., Guedes , J.M., Haber, R.B, Pedersen, P

  3. Pepper Oil Surprise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Paolo Nespoli perform the Pepper Oil Surprise experiment from Potlatch Elementary School in Potlatch, Idaho. This research investigates the interaction of liquid pepper/...

  4. Region 6: New Mexico Adequate Letter (8/21/2003)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Carl Edlund, Director, to Alfredo Santistevan regarding MVEB's contained in the latest revision to the Albuquerque Carbon Monoxide State Implementation Plan (SIP) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  5. Erratum to “Comparison of inclusive particle production in 14.6 GeV/c proton-nucleus collisions with simulation” [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 246 (2006) 309

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, David

    2007-01-01

    Several reference citations were incomplete. Ref. [6] should be replaced by [1], [8] should be replaced by [2] and [16] should be replaced by [3]. We regret the oversight and thank Alfredo Ferrari for pointing out the problems.

  6. 75 FR 61573 - Unblocking of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons Pursuant to Executive Order 12978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... blocked pursuant to the Order: 1. ALZATE SALAZAR, Luis Alfredo, c/o COINTERCOS S.A., Bogota, Colombia; c/o... (Colombia); Passport AF828495 (Colombia) (individual) 7. PEREZ NARVAEZ, Oliverio, Avenida 4 No. 7-75,...

  7. 2017 Solar Eclipse, Ames Research Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    Taking a break from their duties at the Ames Vertical Gun Range to look up at the eclipse over Ames Research Center in Mountain View are from left to right are Alfredo "Freddie" Perez, Chuck Cornelison, Don Bowling, Adam Parish

  8. Eating Healthy Ethnic Food

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shao (barbecued) Steamed rice Dishes without MSG added Italian Red sauces Primavera (no cream) Piccata (lemon) Sun- ... instead of an Alfredo (white, creamy) sauce in Italian dishes are easy to make. Looking for tips ...

  9. Examination of Post-Service Health-Related Quality of Life Among Rural and Urban Military Members of The Millennium Cohort Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Kazis, Lewis E., Austin Lee, Avron Spiro, III, William H. Rogers, Xinhua S. Ren, Donald R. Miller, Alfredo Selim, Alaa Hamed, and Samuel C. Haffer. 2004a...Avron Spiro, III, Alfredo Selim, Mark Linzer, Susan M. Payne, Dorcas Mansell, and B. Graeme Fincke. 2004c. “Patient-reported Measures of Health: The...Diagnostic Utility.” Presented at the annual meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, San Antonio , TX. Weeks, William B., Lewis

  10. SRI International: Description of the FASTUS System Used for MUC-4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    sentences with no other triggers, as i n Hector Oqueli and Gilda Flores were assassinated yesterday . Gilda Flores was a member of the Democratic...of Message 48 of TST2 is as follows : Noun Group : Salvadoran President-elec t Name : Alfredo Cristian i Verb Group : condemned Noun Group...group in the second conjunct . Thus, in the sentence Salvadoran President-elect Alfredo Cristiani condemned the terrorist killing of Attorney Gen

  11. FASTUS: A System for Extracting Information from Natural-Language Text

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-19

    President-elect Alfredo Cristiani condemned the terrorist killing of Attorney General Roberto Garcia Alvarado and ac- cused the Farabundo Marti National...occupations of victims when they occur in sentences with no other triggers, as in Hector Oqueli and Gilda Flores were assassinated yesterday. Gilda Flores was...of the second pass for the first sentence of Message 48 of i ST2 is as follows: Noun Group: Salvadoran President-elect Name: Alfredo Cristiani Verb

  12. Toward a Better Implementation of the Audio-Lingual Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdman, Albert

    1970-01-01

    Revised version of a paper presented at the Fifth Symposium of the PILEI, Programa Interamericano de Linguistica y Ensenanza de Idiomas (Inter-American Program on Linguistics and Foreign Language Instruction), Sao Paolo, Brazil, January 11, 1969. (DS)

  13. Nespoli works with ERB2 Hardware

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-08

    ISS026-E-017685 (8 Jan. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, works with European Recording Binocular (ERB2) hardware in the Harmony node of the International Space Station.

  14. Nespoli works with ERB2 Hardware

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-08

    ISS026-E-017683 (8 Jan. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, works with European Recording Binocular (ERB2) hardware in the Harmony node of the International Space Station.

  15. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Paolo Nespoli of ESA answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Nespoli in the FGB

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-21

    ISS026-E-018932 (21 Jan. 2011) --- While wearing a communication system headset, European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, closes a hatch in the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station.

  17. Nespoli and Kaleri during emergency scenario drill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-11

    ISS026-E-016965 (11 Jan. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri (foreground) and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, participate in an emergency scenarios drill in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  18. Nespoli and Kaleri during emergency scenario drill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-11

    ISS026-E-016970 (11 Jan. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri (right) and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, participate in an emergency scenarios drill in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  19. Nespoli and Kaleri during emergency scenario drill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-11

    ISS026-E-016963 (11 Jan. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri (foreground) and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, participate in an emergency scenarios drill in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  20. Pedagogy of the Oppressed: A Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman-Lessing, Rosalyn

    1973-01-01

    The author responds affirmatively to Paolo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, that states students are oppressed, manipulated, and controlled by an educational system that holds they are inferior. (Author/PG)

  1. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Paolo Nespoli of ESA lays roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-31

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: CEO - Arena de Sao Paolo. View used for Twitter message: Cloudy skies over São Paulo Brazil

  3. Toward a Better Implementation of the Audio-Lingual Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdman, Albert

    1970-01-01

    Revised version of a paper presented at the Fifth Symposium of the PILEI, Programa Interamericano de Linguistica y Ensenanza de Idiomas (Inter-American Program on Linguistics and Foreign Language Instruction), Sao Paolo, Brazil, January 11, 1969. (DS)

  4. Nespoli during HRF Blood Sample Collection in the Columbus Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-04

    ISS026-E-024511 (4 Feb. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman, Expedition 26 flight engineer, uses a still camera to photograph European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, flight engineer, in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  5. Nespoli removes docking mechanism to the ATV Hatch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-25

    ISS026-E-029722 (25 Feb. 2011) --- As part of inverse activities onboard the International Space Station, European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, removes the docking mechanism to gain access to the ATV hatch.

  6. Nespoli removes docking mechanism to the ATV Hatch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-25

    ISS026-E-029719 (25 Feb. 2011) --- As part of inverse activities onboard the International Space Station, European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, removes the docking mechanism to gain access to the ATV hatch.

  7. Nespoli removes docking mechanism to the ATV Hatch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-25

    ISS026-E-029718 (25 Feb. 2011) --- As part of inverse activities onboard the International Space Station, European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, removes the docking mechanism to gain access to the ATV hatch.

  8. Nespoli removes docking mechanism to the ATV Hatch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-25

    ISS026-E-029725 (25 Feb. 2011) --- As part of inverse activities onboard the International Space Station, European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, removes the docking mechanism to gain access to the ATV hatch.

  9. Nespoli works with Arabidopsis Seeds in the Columbus Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-17

    ISS026-E-027966 (17 Feb. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, works with hardware containing Arabidopsis seeds in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  10. Nespoli prepares to exercise on the COLBERT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-13

    ISS026-E-021305 (13 Jan. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, prepares to exercise using the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  11. "Walk Softly and Carry a Big Stick": An Analysis of the Impact of Colonialism/Imperialism on the Operational Art for Campaign Planners Assigned to AFRICOM Using the Darfur Crisis as a Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    provide some recommendations to operational planners. I want to thank Dr. Paolo Tripodi for his mentorship throughout this process. His role as a...http://www.africom.mil/AboutAFRICOM.asp. (accessed September 5, 2008). 25 15 Greg Mills, Terence McNamee, Mauro De Lorenzo, and Matt-hew Utley, "AFRICOM...Center for Strategic & International Studies. June 8, 2008. https://forums.csis.org/africa/?p=119&print=1, (accessed December 12,2008). 23 Paolo

  12. "Making the Margins Chaos": Romantic and Antiromantic Readings of La Maravilla

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlston, Erin G.

    2005-01-01

    Alfredo Vea Jr.'s 1993 novel "La Maravilla" depicts a 1950s squatter community on the edge of Phoenix. The community, Buckeye Road, questions notions of U.S. American identity as middle-class, WASP, and heterosexual. Buckeye can easily be viewed as a romanticized utopia that offers an alternative to consumer capitalism, urban sprawl, the…

  13. Accommodating Student Swirl: When Traditional Students Are No Longer the Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2004-01-01

    The term "student swirl" was coined by Alfredo de los Santos and Irene Wright in 1990, along with the term "double-dipping" (concurrent enrollment at two institutions), to characterize the back-and-forth, multi-institutional attendance pattern common among students attending community colleges. However, traditional…

  14. Accommodating Student Swirl: When Traditional Students Are No Longer the Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2004-01-01

    The term "student swirl" was coined by Alfredo de los Santos and Irene Wright in 1990, along with the term "double-dipping" (concurrent enrollment at two institutions), to characterize the back-and-forth, multi-institutional attendance pattern common among students attending community colleges. However, traditional…

  15. Experimental Results that Question the Ramirez-Castaneda Model for Teaching Reading to First Grade Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, S. Alan; Rodriquez, Samuel

    1980-01-01

    Results of a study conducted with first-grade Mexican American children indicate that direct reading instruction to precise behavioral objectives is more effective than teaching to Mexican American children's supposed "cultural learning styles" as recommended by Manuel Ramirez and Alfredo Castaneda in 1974. (GT)

  16. The Educational Needs of Minority Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1974

    This publication contains three essays dealing with the educational problems and needs of Mexican Americans, black Americans, and American Indians. In his essay on Mexican Americans, Alfredo Castaneda discusses the undemocratic character of American public education, and stresses the need for democratic cultural pluralism. He devotes his essay…

  17. Reducing Disproportionate Representation of Culturally Diverse Students in Special and Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J., Ed.; Zamora-Duran, Grace, Ed.

    This book discusses the disproportionate representation of students from minority backgrounds in special education and gifted classes, and presents strategies that practitioners can use to better address the educational needs of all students. Chapter 1, "Disproportionate Representation: A Contentious and Unresolved Predicament" (Alfredo J. Artiles…

  18. 1988 Annual Report. (The Hydrologic Engineering Center)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Brunner Hydraulic Engineer Randy Hills Hydraulic Engineer David M. Goldman Hydraulic Engineer Penni R. Baker Computer Programmer Analyst Alfred T. Onodera...Engineer Alfredo E. Montalvo Hydraulic Engineer Michael W. Burnham Hydraulic Engineer Dennis J. Huff Hydraulic Engineer David T. Ford Hydraulic Engineer...William J. Charley Hydraulic Engineer Robert D. Carl Hydraulic Engineer Gloria F. Briley Secretary (Typing) Rochelle Barkin Computer System Analyst

  19. Salient Issues in Mathematics Education Research for Minorities. Proceedings from an NIE Sponsored Meeting (Seattle, Washington, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1980

    The six brief papers in this document were prepared for an NIE-sponsored meeting in April 1980. Claudette Bradley poses questions (but no answers) on factors affecting American Indians. Alberta Castaneda stresses the need to ascertain how young children learn mathematical ideas. Tony Alfredo Gallegos notes inadequacies of Spanish bilingual…

  20. Southeast Asia Report, No. 1287.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-18

    Re- monsada, alias "Kuman- der Itok." Injured were Rogelio : Sumbalod, 28, Rosendo Sumbalod, -25, Noe Ber- naldez, 22, Vidal Berse, 27, and...Alfredo Briones who had gone into hiding since the filing of the charges against them, will be tried separately once they are arrested by the au

  1. Minimum Fuel Trajectory Design in Multiple Dynamical Environments Utilizing Direct Transcription Methods and Particle Swarm Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    MINIMUM-FUEL TRAJECTORY DESIGN IN MULTIPLE DYNAMICAL ENVIRONMENTS UTILIZING DIRECT TRANSCRIPTION METHODS AND PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION THESIS...250 MINIMUM-FUEL TRAJECTORY DESIGN IN MULTIPLE DYNAMICAL ENVIRONMENTS UTILIZING DIRECT TRANSCRIPTION METHODS AND PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION THESIS... Education and Training Command in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Astronautical Engineering Alfredo G

  2. Paulo Freire on Higher Education: A Dialogue at the National University of Mexico. SUNY Series, Teacher Empowerment and School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar, Miguel; And Others

    This volume presents a dialogue in 1984 between internationally recognized philosopher/educator, Paulo Freire, and Miguel Escobar, Alfredo L. Fernandez, and Gilberto Guevara-Niebla, educators at the National University of Mexico, on educational emancipation and the role of higher education. The dialogues address the relationships between education…

  3. Security Engineering Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-24

    University of Virginia Co PI: Dr. Peter Beling , Associate Professor, University of Virginia Dr. Alfredo Garcia, Associate Professor, University of...Kevin Skadron, Ron Williams, and Peter Beling Research Scientist: Carl Elks Graduate Students: Rick Jones, Barbara Luckett Georgia Tech integration

  4. Paulo Freire on Higher Education: A Dialogue at the National University of Mexico. SUNY Series, Teacher Empowerment and School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar, Miguel; And Others

    This volume presents a dialogue in 1984 between internationally recognized philosopher/educator, Paulo Freire, and Miguel Escobar, Alfredo L. Fernandez, and Gilberto Guevara-Niebla, educators at the National University of Mexico, on educational emancipation and the role of higher education. The dialogues address the relationships between education…

  5. "Making the Margins Chaos": Romantic and Antiromantic Readings of La Maravilla

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlston, Erin G.

    2005-01-01

    Alfredo Vea Jr.'s 1993 novel "La Maravilla" depicts a 1950s squatter community on the edge of Phoenix. The community, Buckeye Road, questions notions of U.S. American identity as middle-class, WASP, and heterosexual. Buckeye can easily be viewed as a romanticized utopia that offers an alternative to consumer capitalism, urban sprawl, the…

  6. Experimental Results that Question the Ramirez-Castaneda Model for Teaching Reading to First Grade Mexican Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, S. Alan; Rodriquez, Samuel

    1980-01-01

    Results of a study conducted with first-grade Mexican American children indicate that direct reading instruction to precise behavioral objectives is more effective than teaching to Mexican American children's supposed "cultural learning styles" as recommended by Manuel Ramirez and Alfredo Castaneda in 1974. (GT)

  7. Enhancing Research in Networking & System Security, and Forensics, in Puerto Rico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-03

    other than abstracts): 28.00 20.00 08/26/2013 08/28/2012 Received Paper Dr. Aury M. Curbelo, Dr. Alfredo Cruz. Faculty Attitudes Toward Teaching Ethical ... Hacking to Computer and Information Systems Undergraduates Students, 11th Latin American and Caribbean Conference for Engineering and Technology

  8. United States National Strategy in Panama

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-05

    Panama. A Country Study (DA Pam 550-48), p. xxvii. 11. 1b"d., p. xxvi. 41 12. Jan Knippers Black and Edmundo Flores , "Historical Setting," in Panama...encourage Japan and west European countries to help Panama. Alfredo Maduro, President of the Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture of Panama

  9. Latin America Report No. 2689.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    officers against not so much the person of Alfredo Stroessner as against the main people around him, including his son Gustavo Stroessner. As far as we can...domestic and foreign companies involved in the project. According to our sources, these figures include Gustavo Stroessner and Generals Andres Rodriguez... Gustavo , who has been singled out as the main partner of not only De Bernardi and General Rodriguez but also (and this is more serious) of the famous

  10. The Hydrologic Engineering Center Annual Report 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Engineer David M. Goldman Hydraulic Engineer Harry W. Dotson Hydraulic Engineer Harold E. Kjbik Hydraulic Engineer Robert L. Barkau Hydraulic Engineer...Dennis J. Huff Hydraulic Engineer David T. Ford Hydraulic Engineer . Alfredo E. Montalvo Hydraulic Engineer Michael W- Burnham Hydraulic Engineer William J...Charley Civil Engineer Robert D. Carl Hydraulic Engineer Margaret E. Bonhag Sec (Typing) Rochelle Barkin Computer Sys. Anal. Kimberly A. Powell

  11. A Framework for Improving Integrative Factors in C3I Systems of the Argentine Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    improving integrative factors in C3I systems of the Argentine Army by Eduardo Alfredo Trotta Major, Argentine Army Ingeniero Militar, Escuela...commander’s intelligence, not as substitute of it. 39 Decision Aids can help military personnel by reducing stress, information overload and manual ...its antijamming characteristics. The system design goals include a manual -mode interface with the ACUS, and in the near future, an automated-mode

  12. Final LDRD Report for Projects # 52797 and # 93362: Rational Understanding and Control of the Magnetic Behavior of Nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. John

    2006-11-01

    This is the final LDRD report for projects # 52797 and # 93362 that funded a five year research program directed by Prof. Z. John Zhang at the Georgia Institute of Technology Chemistry Department. Prof. Zhang was awarded this funding after winning a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) in 2001 with Sandia as the DOE sponsoring lab. The project PI was Blake Simmons and the PM was Alfredo Morales. The page intentionally left blank

  13. Brazil and the Vital South Atlantic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Weekly, p. 42-45 London 7 April 1984 Dzidzienyo, Anani. Relaciones Africanas y Latino Americanos Contemnporaneas: Problemas y Perspectivas . Brown...Resources to Carry on a War, Officers Say " New York Times, p. 1. 14 May 1984 Hayes, Margaret D. Brazil y el Atlantico Sur: cambios en las perspectivas de...Alfredo. "Marinha de Brasil: Atnalidodes e Perspectivas ." (Lecture on the Brazilian Naval War College.) Rio de Janeiro, Braz~I. 31 Agosto 1984. Kelly

  14. Normative Command and Control Influences: A Study of Cohesion in Terrorist Organizations and Their Effect on Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    59. 167 Alfredo Filler, “The Abu Sayyaf Group: A Growing Menace to Civil Society,” in The Global Threat of Terror: Ideological, Material, and...of the madrassa served as Taliban governors, military commanders, and other civil -service positions in the government.331 The success of these...as vested in formalized rules and work proceses . The societal lens, on the other hand, explores why society allows these organizations to develop

  15. Development of the Damage Tolerance Criteria for an Aging Fleet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-20

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) UNIVERSIDAD DE SANTIAGO DE CHILE , 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER AV. L. B. OHIGGINS...3363, EST. CENTRAL, SANTIAGO, CHILE 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR...Alberto Monsalve G. Universidad de Santiago de Chile Co researcher Nicolás Valencia R. Academia Politécnica Aeronáutica Alfredo Artigas A

  16. Flocking in Distributed Control and Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    of the agents are nonlinear, nonidentical, unknown, and subject to external disturbances. Distributed neural networks are used to approximate the...convex nutrient profiles. These results suggest that swarming-like approaches for the control of networked agents may provide an additional level of...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0309 Flocking in Distributed Control and Optimization Alfredo Garcia UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA Final Report 06/01/2015

  17. To Be a Co-Worker in the Kingdom of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witonsky, Trudi

    2013-01-01

    In 1903, in the introduction to his ground-breaking, seminal work, "The Souls of Black Folks", W.E. B. Du Bois calls for a vision of our country in which African Americans can become "co-worker[s] in the kingdom of culture." In this article I make the case that the use of a novel like "Gods Go Begging" by Alfredo Vea…

  18. Latin America Report No. 2739

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    LE PETIT SAMEDI SOIR, 23-29 Jul 83) 59 HONDURAS Petroleum Consumption Up; National Debt Increases ( Victor Hugo Alvarez; LA TRIBUNA, 12 Aug 83... Victor Hugo Alvarez] [Text] While fuel conservation measures drafted by the Interinstitutional Energy Commission at the end of last year remain...During the incident, the painter Francisco Toledo , the photographer Rafael Doniz and Alfredo Valdivieso were injured. This last victim has been

  19. High-Order Particle-Mesh Algorithms for Computation of Particle-Laden Shocked Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-31

    SDSU Hesam Abasi Ph.D. student, University of Illinois at Chicago Juan Rueda International M.Sc. student, University of Valladolid Alfredo de...Gregorio International M.Sc. student, University of Valladolid Antonio de Gregorio International M.Sc. student, University of Valladolid...Research Reports, CSRC-2012-1. 11. De Gregorio, Antonio , “Assesing the Performance of a Three-Dimensional Hybrid Central/WENO Finite Difference

  20. The Impact of Contemporary Conflicts Between Latin American Nations on Regional Stability and Cooperation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-12

    1 "Gobierno Chi leno Altera Verdad Historia Sabre Problema Maritimo," Presencio (La Paz), 3 November 1989, p.1. 2. Jack Child, Geopolitics and...Nacional, 1979. 12. Carmona, Guillermo L. Historia de las Fronteras de Chile, Santiago: Editorial Andres Bello, 1981. 13. Carrizosa, Alfredo V. Colombia Y...1988, p. 3. 36. English, Adrian J. Latin America. London: Jane’s Publishing, 1988. 37. Escobar, Jorge. El Derecho al Mar. La Paz: Escobari, 1979. 38

  1. The Southern Cone and Antarctica. Strategies for the 1990’s.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    1976), p. 188. • .. . . ° . . . . • . - ~ * *.. N % ~ % *’~*’s -82- 300scar Pinochet de la Barra, Antirtica aho 2000: nuevas perspectivas politicas y...nm EEZ around the Galapagos Islands is extended southward to the Pole according to Julio Tobar Donoso y Alfredo Luna Tobar, Derecho territorial...ecuatoriano (Quito: Artes Grificas Cia., Ltda., 1979), pp. 253-5. That the Tobar y Luna assertion is official policy is confirmed by Mario Ribadeneira

  2. Neurorehabilitation applied to specific learning disability: Study of a single case.

    PubMed

    Bilancia, Giovanni; Marazzi, Moreno; Filippi, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Specific Learning Disorders (SLD) therefore represent chronic, not temporary disorders with varying degrees of expression throughout life. The beginning of imaging, anatomy and genetics studies have made it possible to investigate the brain organization of individuals suffering from SLD (Deheane, 2009). The purpose of this paper is to describe a treatment method for reading and writing disorders through an intervention based on the integration of a sublexical method and a neuropsychological approach, with assistive technologies in the study of a single case. The protocol is based on the modularization theory (Karmiloff-Smith, 1990). The data presented in this paper with a A-B-A basic experimental drawing. This study confirms the degree of effectiveness of the treatments based on the automated identification of syllables and words together with the integrated enhancement of neuropsychological aspects such as visual attention and phonological loop (Benso, 2008), although in the follow-up condition only some abilities maintain the progress achieved. As previously mentioned, the SLD represents a chronic disorder, consequently the treatment does not solve the root cause of the problem, but can grant a use of the process decidedly more instrumental to everyday life.

  3. Nespoli in Node 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-11-02

    ISS016-E-008792 (2 Nov. 2007) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Paolo Nespoli, STS-120 mission specialist, rests in his sleeping bag in the Harmony node of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery is docked with the station.

  4. STS-120 crew on Discovery middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-31

    S120-E-007889 (1 Nov. 2007) --- Astronauts Pam Melroy (left), STS-120 commander; George Zamka (bottom right), pilot; and European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli, mission specialist, sleep in their sleeping bags, which are secured on the middeck of the Space Shuttle Discovery while docked with the International Space Station.

  5. EEK--A Cockroach!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Julien, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Students from thirteen fifth-grade classrooms from six different elementary schools investigate the preferred escape routes of cockroaches. These identified routes of 90-, 120-, 150-, and 180-degrees are the research findings of Paolo Dominici, an Italian scientist. The students used rubber cockroaches and lizards to map out these escape routes.…

  6. Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) Knowledge Enhancement Events: Legal Authorities Working Group After Action Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-15

    Gablehouse Tim Gablehouse Calkins & Granberg, LLC Hard Dave CDEM Hodges Lori Denver Holloman Bruce CDEM Keller Scott NCR Krebs Kathleen Clear...DiPaolo dipaoloelizabeth@gmail.com 303-332-6336 LeeAnn Steinhour lasteinhour@gmail.com Gablehouse Calkins & Granberg, LLC Timothy Gablehouse

  7. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-12-01

    The 2016 Paolo Farinella Prize has been awarded to Greek physicist Kleomenis Tsiganis at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, for his work on the applications of celestial mechanics to the dynamics of planetary systems, including the development of the “Nice model”, which describes the migrations of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune during the early phases of the solar system's evolution.

  8. Nespoli works with BXF Hardware in the US Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-22

    ISS027-E-007156 (22 March 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 27 flight engineer, prepares to install Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  9. Nespolia moving the Neurospat Hardware in the Columbus Module during Expedition 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-20

    ISS026-E-012919 (20 Dec. 2010) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, moves the Neurospat hardware (including light shield and frame) used for the Bodies in the Space Environment (BISE) experiment, in the Columbus Module aboard the International Space Station.

  10. Constructing Knowledge with Silk Road Visuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisland, Beverly Milner

    2008-01-01

    In this study a group of elementary teachers use illustrations, rather than written text, to introduce their students to the peoples and places of the ancient silk routes. The illustrations are from two picture books; "Marco Polo," written by Gian Paolo Cesaerani and illustrated by Piero Ventura (1977), and "We're Riding on a…

  11. From Self-Organized to Extended Criticality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-26

    Texas, Denton, TX, USA 2 Centro EXTREME, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy 3 Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica-CNR, Pisa, Italy 4 Department of Physics...Netherlands Klaus Linkenkaer-Hansen, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Netherlands *Correspondence: Paolo Allegrini , Istituto di Fisiologia

  12. Cooperation-Induced Topological Complexity: A Promising Road to Fault Tolerance and Hebbian Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-16

    Information Science Directorate, United States Army Research Office, Durham, NC, USA 4 Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica del Consiglio Nazionale delle...Vadim Uritsky, Catholic University of America at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA *Correspondence: Paolo Allegrini , Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica

  13. Exploring Fear: Rousseau, Dewey, and Freire on Fear and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Andrea; Stengel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Fear is not the first feature of educational experience associated with the best-known progressive educational theorists--Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and Paolo Freire. But each of these important thinkers did, in fact, have something substantive to say about how fear functions in the processes of learning and growth. Andrea English and…

  14. Enacting Teaching and Learning in the Interaction Process: "Keys" for Developing Skills in Piano Lessons through Four-Hand Improvisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laroche, Julien; Kaddouch, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Embodied mind theories underline the role of the body in the act of knowing. According to the enactive approach, we learn to perceive and to know through our bodily interactions with the world (Varela, Thompson & Rosch, 1991). However, such an approach remains incomplete as long as sociality is not taken into account (Froese & Di Paolo,…

  15. Nespoli cuts Kondratyev's hair in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-15

    ISS026-E-017715 (15 Jan. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli assists cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev of Russia's Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) with a haircut in the Kibo laboratory on the International Space Station. The two Expedition 26 flight engineers used a vacuum cleaner to remove free-floating hair particles from the air.

  16. Coleman cuts Nespoli's hair in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-15

    ISS026-E-017741 (15 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman assists European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli with a haircut in the Kibo laboratory on the International Space Station. The two Expedition 26 flight engineers used a vacuum cleaner (partially out of frame) to remove free-floating hair particles from the air.

  17. Coleman cuts Nespoli's hair in the JPM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-15

    ISS026-E-017736 (15 Jan. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman assists European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli with a haircut in the Kibo laboratory on the International Space Station. The two Expedition 26 flight engineers used a vacuum cleaner (partially out of frame) to remove free-floating hair particles from the air.

  18. STS-120 Crewmembers during payload egress training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-09

    JSC2007-E-18065 (9 April 2007) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Paolo Nespoli, STS-120 mission specialist, dons a training version of his shuttle launch and entry suit in preparation for a training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center. United Space Alliance suit technicians Toni Cost-Davis (left) and Ryan Carabaja assisted Nespoli.

  19. Nespoli conducts ham radio session in the SM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-08

    ISS026-E-016991 (8 Jan. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, conducts a ham radio session from the Zvezda Service Module of the International Space Station with students at Universit? degli studi di Bari ?Cittadella Mediterranea della Scienza,? Bari, Italy.

  20. Multimodal Integration of High Resolution EEG and Functional Magnetic Resonance: a Simulation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Luca Romani3, Paolo Maria Rossini2, and Febo Cincotti4 1 Dip. Fisiologia umana e Farmacologia , Università "La Sapienza", Rome, 2 “AFAR", Ospedale...Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Dip. Fisiologia umana e Farmacologia , Università "La Sapienza", Rome Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring

  1. STS-120 crew in the Orbiter Docking Compartment (ODC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-25

    S120-E-006402 (25 Oct. 2007) --- STS-120 crewmembers gather in the Orbiter Docking Compartment (ODS) after hatch opening between the International Space Station and Space Shuttle Discovery. Pictured (clockwise) are astronauts George Zamka (white shirt), pilot; Daniel Tani, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, Scott Parazynski and European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli, all mission specialists. Astronaut Pam Melroy, commander, is out of frame.

  2. Coleman and Nespoli in the Cupola Module during Japanese Kounotori HTV-2 Transfer Vehicle Relocation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-18

    ISS026-E-028067 (18 Feb. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli and NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, operate the Canadarm2 controls inside the International Space Station?s Cupola to relocate the Japanese Kounotori2 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV2) from the Harmony node nadir port to Harmony?s zenith port.

  3. Nespoli in the FGB during Expedition 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-21

    ISS026-E-018912 (21 Jan. 2011) --- While wearing a communication system headset, European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, uses a flashlight while checking an Absolute Pressure gauge in the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station.

  4. Nespoli in the FGB during Expedition 26

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-21

    ISS026-E-018914 (21 Jan. 2011) --- While wearing a communication system headset, European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, uses a flashlight while checking an Absolute Pressure gauge in the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station.

  5. Reevaluating the Basic Public Speaking Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Diana G.

    This essay develops the position that the basic public speaking course is in need of reevaluation. Topics discussed include the importance of adopting a critical pedagogical stance, Paolo Freire's (1983) banking versus problem-posing concepts of education, the problems arising from the prevalent use of teaching assistants as public speaking…

  6. From Freire to Religious Pluralism: Exploring Dialogue in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linden, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The educational work of Paolo Freire on dialogue took place in a specific context: poverty and oppression in Brazil and Latin America in the 1960s. Similarly, Buber and Levinas were engaged in, or reflected on, contemporary philosophical debates. During the last half century, the irruption of the "Third World" into geopolitics has been,…

  7. Nespoli in FGB/Zarya module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-25

    S120-E-006421 (25 Oct. 2007) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Paolo Nespoli, STS-120 mission specialist, photographed in the Zarya module of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery is docked with the station. Various food stowage cases are visible at left.

  8. In Quest of the Universal Language: Romance and the History of an Idea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillman, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    The new English translation of Paolo Rossi's classic study, "Logic and the Art of Memory," presents a useful opportunity to examine contemporary efforts to understand what its subtitle calls "the quest for universal language." At the same time, a seventeenth-century philosophical romance, Thomas Urquhart's, "Jewel," affords a good test case for…

  9. EEK--A Cockroach!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Julien, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Students from thirteen fifth-grade classrooms from six different elementary schools investigate the preferred escape routes of cockroaches. These identified routes of 90-, 120-, 150-, and 180-degrees are the research findings of Paolo Dominici, an Italian scientist. The students used rubber cockroaches and lizards to map out these escape routes.…

  10. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Randy Bresnik of NASA visit Red Square to lay roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Randy Bresnik of NASA visit Red Square prepare to lay roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Nespoli during Kazbek Fit Check in the Soyuz TMA-20/25S

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-13

    ISS027-E-013433 (13 April 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 27 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Sokol launch and entry suit, is pictured in the Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft currently docked to the Rassvet Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM1) of the International Space Station. Nespoli was conducting a fit check of his Kazbek couch in the Soyuz.

  13. Nespoli and Melroy in Node 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-31

    ISS016-E-008106 (31 Oct. 2007) --- Astronauts Pam Melroy, STS-120 commander, and European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli, mission specialist, are pictured in the Harmony node of the International Space Station during a congratulatory phone call from the president of Italy. A module of Harmony floats freely in the foreground.

  14. Teacher-Training Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Leslie

    1977-01-01

    The Sociedade Brasileira de Cultura Inglesa of Sao Paolo, Brazil, is an English teaching center which also runs an introductory course to train teachers of English. This article describes some of the projects completed by prospective teachers; they include language games, pictures, cartoons, role-playing and writing creative dialogue. (CHK)

  15. Transforming to Teach: Teaching Religion to Today's Black College Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Monica A.

    2007-01-01

    Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction…

  16. Test Rover Sinks into Prepared Soil

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-30

    While a test rover rolls off a plywood surface into a prepared bed of soft soil, rover team members Colette Lohr left and Kim Lichtenberg center eye the wheels digging into the soil and Paolo Bellutta enters the next driving command.

  17. The Trouble with Disciplining Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreet, C. Shaun

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the author focuses on intersectionality as a heuristic means toward an open and affirming classroom and as a model grounded in a larger history of calls for anti-oppressive pedagogy. Three critical pivots set the background to this article. The first is Paolo Freire, who clearly connected social justice with pedagogy and contended…

  18. Teacher-Training Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Leslie

    1977-01-01

    The Sociedade Brasileira de Cultura Inglesa of Sao Paolo, Brazil, is an English teaching center which also runs an introductory course to train teachers of English. This article describes some of the projects completed by prospective teachers; they include language games, pictures, cartoons, role-playing and writing creative dialogue. (CHK)

  19. Expedition 52-53 Crew Docks to the Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-28

    After launching earlier in the day in their Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 52-53 Soyuz Commander Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Randy Bresnik of NASA and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency arrived at the International Space Station on July 28.

  20. Community Service-Learning and Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alison

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), to provide new insights into community service-learning (CSL) in higher education. While CSL literature acknowledges the influences of John Dewey and Paolo Freire, discussion of the potential contribution of cultural-historical activity theory, rooted in the work of…

  1. Capability through Participatory Democracy: Sen, Freire, and Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Michael; Patton, Rikki

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores possible important relationships and sympathies between Amartya Sen's Capabilities Approach framework for understanding the human condition and the educational ideas of John Dewey and Paolo Freire. All three focus on the importance of democratic values in a fair, well-functioning society, while Sen and Freire especially…

  2. USAF Combat Rescue Helicopter: Addressing Joint Force Capability Shortfalls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-07

    Untapped Combat Power.” Master’s Thesis, Air War College, 2005. DiPaolo, Marc C., Lee DePalo, Michael Healy, Glenn Hecht , Mike Trumpfheller. “A...Defense (May 2012): 46-49. Peck, Michael . “Combat Rescue Units See Shift in Missions.” National Defense (May 2006). Rolfsen, Bruce. “Air Force

  3. MARES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-01

    iss052e024957 (Aug. 1, 2017) --- Astronaut Paolo Nespoli ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module and adjusted pads and constraints for the Sarcolab-3 ankle protocol. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and postflight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.

  4. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Expedition 52 flight engineer Randy Bresnik of NASA pose for group photograph at the conclusion of their crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. jsc2010e196411

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-15

    (16 Dec. 2010) --- At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, NASA astronaut Catherine (CadY) Coleman and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, give a thumbs up signal just prior to walkout leading up to today's (Dec. 16 Kazakhstan time) launch aboard the Soyuz TMA 20. Soyuz commander Dmitry Kondratyev of Roscosmos is out of frame. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Capability through Participatory Democracy: Sen, Freire, and Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Michael; Patton, Rikki

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores possible important relationships and sympathies between Amartya Sen's Capabilities Approach framework for understanding the human condition and the educational ideas of John Dewey and Paolo Freire. All three focus on the importance of democratic values in a fair, well-functioning society, while Sen and Freire especially…

  7. Exploring Fear: Rousseau, Dewey, and Freire on Fear and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Andrea; Stengel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Fear is not the first feature of educational experience associated with the best-known progressive educational theorists--Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and Paolo Freire. But each of these important thinkers did, in fact, have something substantive to say about how fear functions in the processes of learning and growth. Andrea English and…

  8. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017mf as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jujia; Zheng, Xiangming; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 340-900 nm) of SN 2017mf, discovered by Fabio Briganti and Paolo Campaner (ISSP), on UT Jan.22.95 2017 with the 2.4 m telescope (LJT + YFOSC) at LiJiang Gaomeigu Observatory of Yunnan Observatories (YNAO).

  9. STS-120 crew during NBL training with Dan Tani

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-18

    JSC2007-E-46556 (18 Sept. 2007) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Paolo Nespoli (with communication headset), STS-120 mission specialist, participates in a training session at a console in the simulation control area in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the Sonny Carter Training Facility (SCTF) near Johnson Space Center. Dina E. Contella (left) and Sarah Kazukiewicz Korona (center) assisted Nespoli.

  10. From Freire to Religious Pluralism: Exploring Dialogue in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linden, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The educational work of Paolo Freire on dialogue took place in a specific context: poverty and oppression in Brazil and Latin America in the 1960s. Similarly, Buber and Levinas were engaged in, or reflected on, contemporary philosophical debates. During the last half century, the irruption of the "Third World" into geopolitics has been,…

  11. Expedition 50 Qualification Exams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-24

    Expedition 50 backup crew members, NASA astronaut Jack Fisher, left, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, center, and ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, left, answer questions from the press ahead of their Soyuz qualification exams, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Expedition 50 Qualification Exams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-24

    Expedition 50 backup crew members NASA astronaut Jack Fisher, left, and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, answer questions from the press ahead of their Soyuz qualification exams with ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 50 Qualification Exams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-24

    Expedition 50 backup crew members, ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, left, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, center, and NASA astronaut Jack Fisher don their Sokol suits ahead of their Soyuz qualification exams, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Expedition 50 Qualification Exams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-24

    Expedition 50 backup crew members, ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, left, Russian Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, center, and NASA astronaut Jack Fisher meet with mission managers during their Soyuz qualification exams, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 50 Qualification Exams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-24

    Expedition 50 backup crew member, NASA astronaut Jack Fisher, dons his Sokol suit ahead of his Soyuz qualification exams with Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, and ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Monday, Oct. 24, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. RaPAL Bulletin, Numbers 5-13, 1988-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RaPAL Bulletin, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This document consists of a 3-year compilation (9 issues) of the RaPAL (Research and Practice in Adult Literacy) Bulletin. Typical articles are: "Student Involvement in Research" (a report of a workshop by Alex Golightly, Nick Nicola, and Marilyn Stone); part of a dialogue between Paolo Freire and Ira Shor, writer/educators of Brazil and…

  17. Enacting Teaching and Learning in the Interaction Process: "Keys" for Developing Skills in Piano Lessons through Four-Hand Improvisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laroche, Julien; Kaddouch, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Embodied mind theories underline the role of the body in the act of knowing. According to the enactive approach, we learn to perceive and to know through our bodily interactions with the world (Varela, Thompson & Rosch, 1991). However, such an approach remains incomplete as long as sociality is not taken into account (Froese & Di Paolo,…

  18. Influence of Gender on Specialty Choices in a Brazilian Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueiredo, Jose Fernando de Castro; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Specialty choices for medical school graduates of the University of Sao Paolo (Brazil) in 1975-84 and 1989-94 were analyzed by gender. Results showed women predominating in pediatrics and men in surgery and orthopedics in both periods, with no gender predominance in other specialties. Significant changes occurred in specialty choice patterns…

  19. Interpolating Polynomial Macro-Elements with Tension Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Univ. Calgary, 1978. Paolo Costantini Dipartimento di Matematica " Roberto Magari" Via del Capitano 15 53100 Siena, Italy costantini~unisi. it Carla...Manni Dipartimento di Matematica Via Carlo Alberto 10 10123 Torino, Italy manniDdm .unito. it

  20. RaPAL Bulletin, Numbers 5-13, 1988-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RaPAL Bulletin, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This document consists of a 3-year compilation (9 issues) of the RaPAL (Research and Practice in Adult Literacy) Bulletin. Typical articles are: "Student Involvement in Research" (a report of a workshop by Alex Golightly, Nick Nicola, and Marilyn Stone); part of a dialogue between Paolo Freire and Ira Shor, writer/educators of Brazil and…

  1. The Pigna Paper Mill and the Exercise Books of the "New Italy" (1870-1960)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascenzi, Anna

    2008-01-01

    For the very first time this in-depth paper studies the archives of the historic Paolo Pigna Paper Mill in Alzano Lombardo (Bergamo, Italy), which played a leading role in Italian history and culture: so much so that it ended up with fusing its own image to the very market where it operated, that is, the Italian schools. After being taken over by…

  2. Myriam Krasilchik: A Brazilian Science Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizzo, Nelio Marco Vincenzo; Kelly, Peter Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Tells the story of Brazilian science educator Myriam Krasilchik who, in 1990, became dean of the University of Sao Paolo's School of Education. She provided leadership in the creation of Science Teaching Centers in Brazil and has been active in international science education organizations. (SM)

  3. Coleman and Nespoli with Asian Seed Package in Kibo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-26

    ISS027-E-008229 (26 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Cady Coleman and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 27 flight engineers, are pictured near a bag of space seeds floating freely in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  4. Bayesian Statistical Model Checking with Application to Stateflow/Simulink Verification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-13

    Bayesian Statistical Model Checking with Application to Stateflow/Simulink Verification Paolo Zuliani, André Platzer , Edmund M. Clarke January 13...Legay, A. Platzer , and P. Zuliani. A Bayesian approach to Model Checking biological systems. In CMSB, volume 5688 of LNCS, pages 218–234, 2009. 21 [16

  5. NATO and Energy Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-21

    1 This study was originally a memorandum for Senator Richard Lugar and is printed as a CRS report with his permission. 2 Paolo Scaroni , “Europeans...Must Face the Threat to Energy Supplies,” Financial Times, Jan. 18, 2006, p. 15. Scaroni is head of ENI, the large Italian energy firm. 3 See CRS

  6. NATO and Energy Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-21

    1 This study was originally a memorandum for Senator Richard Lugar and is printed as a CRS report with his permission. 2 Paolo Scaroni , “Europeans...Must Face the Threat to Energy Supplies,” Financial Times, Jan. 18, 2006, p. 15. Scaroni is head of ENI, the large Italian energy firm. 3 See CRS

  7. NATO and Energy Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-15

    1 This study was originally a memorandum for Senator Richard Lugar and is printed as a CRS report with his permission. 2 Paolo Scaroni , “Europeans...Must Face the Threat to Energy Supplies,” Financial Times, January 18, 2006, p. 15. Scaroni is head of ENI, the large Italian energy firm. 3 See CRS

  8. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brasil) Antoniadis, Ignatios (CERN, Geneva, Switzerland) Arminjon, Mayeul (CNRS, Section of Theoretical Physics, France) Banados, Max (University of Oxford, UK) Basilakos, Spyros (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Bastos, Catarina (IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Bertolami, Orfeu (IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Bevilaqua, Leandro Ibiapina (Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil) Bezerra De Mello, Eugenio (Dept. de Física, CCEN Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Brazil) Blake, Russ (Readify Pty Ltd, Australia) Bogdanos, Charalampos (LPT-Orsay, France) Burinskii, Alexander (Gravity Research Group NSI, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) Cadonati, Laura (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA) Cadoni, Mariano (Università di Cagliari, Italy) Capone, Monica (University of Turin, Italy) Cavaglià, Marco (University of Mississippi, USA) Chirco, Goffredo (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Christodoulakis, Theodosios (University of Athens, Greece) Domingues Zarro, Carlos Augusto ((IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Durrer, Ruth (Université de Genève, Département de Physique Théorique, Switzerland) Fagnocchi, Serena (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Finazzi, Stefano (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Francia, Dario (University Paris 7 - APC, France) Ghosh, Subir (Indian Statistical Institute, India) Gomberoff, Andres (Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile) Grumiller, Daniel (Institute for Theoretical Physics Vienna University of Technology, Austria) Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo (IFM, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Mexico) Hsu, Steve (University of Oregon, USA) Ichinose, Shoichi (University of Shizuoka, SFNS, Japan) Kiefer, Claus (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Cologne, Germany) Kokkotas, Kostas (Theoretical Astrophysics, Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Germany) Kothawala, Dawood (IUCAA, Pune

  9. Data of cost-optimal solutions and retrofit design methods for school renovation in a warm climate.

    PubMed

    Zacà, Ilaria; Tornese, Giuliano; Baglivo, Cristina; Congedo, Paolo Maria; D'Agostino, Delia

    2016-12-01

    "Efficient Solutions and Cost-Optimal Analysis for Existing School Buildings" (Paolo Maria Congedo, Delia D'Agostino, Cristina Baglivo, Giuliano Tornese, Ilaria Zacà) [1] is the paper that refers to this article. It reports the data related to the establishment of several variants of energy efficient retrofit measures selected for two existing school buildings located in the Mediterranean area. In compliance with the cost-optimal analysis described in the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive and its guidelines (EU, Directive, EU 244,) [2], [3], these data are useful for the integration of renewable energy sources and high performance technical systems for school renovation. The data of cost-efficient high performance solutions are provided in tables that are explained within the following sections. The data focus on the describe school refurbishment sector to which European policies and investments are directed. A methodological approach already used in previous studies about new buildings is followed (Baglivo Cristina, Congedo Paolo Maria, D׳Agostino Delia, Zacà Ilaria, 2015; IlariaZacà, Delia D'Agostino, Paolo Maria Congedo, Cristina Baglivo; Baglivo Cristina, Congedo Paolo Maria, D'Agostino Delia, Zacà Ilaria, 2015; Ilaria Zacà, Delia D'Agostino, Paolo Maria Congedo, Cristina Baglivo, 2015; Paolo Maria Congedo, Cristina Baglivo, IlariaZacà, Delia D'Agostino,2015) [4], [5], [6], [7], [8]. The files give the cost-optimal solutions for a kindergarten (REF1) and a nursery (REF2) school located in Sanarica and Squinzano (province of Lecce Southern Italy). The two reference buildings differ for construction period, materials and systems. The eleven tables provided contain data about the localization of the buildings, geometrical features and thermal properties of the envelope, as well as the energy efficiency measures related to walls, windows, heating, cooling, dhw and renewables. Output values of energy consumption, gas emission and costs are given for a

  10. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P < 0.00001). Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

  11. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevers, Jan G. P. W.

    2016-09-01

    For many years a good introductory book for undergraduate and postgraduate students on remote sensing of the Earth's land surface, which was not starting with an emphasis on traditional photographic techniques, was missing. In 2010 the first edition of the book Fundamentals of Satellite Remote Sensing by Emilio Chuvieco and Alfredo Huete was published by CRC Press and it was filling this gap. Now the second edition by Emilio Chuvieco was published by CRC Press. This second edition is made more attractive by the use of colour and including colour illustrations instead of the black-and-white ones in the first edition.

  12. The 1992-1993 Army Food Preference Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    4.10 1 Cinnamon Sweet Rolls 7.39 1 Dried Dates 3.98 2 Soft Serve Ice Cream 7.37 2 Decaffeinated Coffee 3.92 1 Apple Pie 7.36 1&2 Buttermilk 3.61...juice, decaffeinated coffee and buttermilk were listed. The first item also was on the 1983 list. 5. Stewed prunes was the lowest preference item...Iced Tea 19.65 1 Sardines 6.57 1&2 Brewed Coffee 19.40 2 Chicken Ala King 6.55 2 Bananas 18.97 1&2 Fettuccini Alfredo 6.48 1 Oranges 18.12 1

  13. Costs of the War in Colombia: A Strategic Vision of the End of the Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    German Espejo, “El Gasto en Seguridad y Defensa en Colombia: De la Contención a la Ofensiva”, Fundación Seguridad y Democracia . Available from... Democracia http://www.seguridadydemocracia.org/. Bogotá, November 2004. Rangel, Alfredo. Colombia: Guerra en el Fin de Siglo, Bogotá: Tercer Mundo... Democracia , Bogota DC, October 2004. Lieutenant Colonel Roberta A. Woods. U.S. Army “Analysis of the United states Policy for Support of Plan Colombia.” Carlisle Barracks: USAWC Strategic Research Project, November 2000. 20

  14. [The role of the Faculty of Medicine in the process of academic modernization and professionalization at the University of Buenos Aires, 1955-1958: issues in debate and points of convergence].

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucía

    2010-01-01

    The article analyzes the relations between the process of academic modernization at the University of Buenos Aires in the mid-1950s and the individuals who led this process, influenced by innovative views, transformations, and people from the Faculty of Medicine. This reconstruction of the debates, proposals, and actual changes at the Faculty focuses especially on Alfredo Lanari, who, at the First Congress on Medical Education, held by the Argentinean Medical Association in 1957, put forward ideas on clinical research, teaching, and health care that showed how complicated full-time work would be for someone with the professional profile of a clinical researcher.

  15. Increased Anti-Money Laundering Banking Regulations and Terrorism Prosecutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Alfredo Daza Morales 144 2006 1:06-cr-20373-JAL USA v. Batiste et al. Narseal Batiste 49 Year Docket Number Case Defendant 145 2006 1:06-cr...v. Ibague et al. Edilma Morales Loaiza 219 2007 1:07-cr-00248-RCL USA v. Aguilar Ramirez Gerardo Antonio Aguilar Ramirez 220 2007 1:07-cr-00248-RCL...Robinson 251 2008 2:07-cr-00708-TC USA v. Dotson Nicholas Glenn Dotson 252 2008 3:08-cr-00390-NVW USA v. Pacheco Alma de Paz Pacheco 253 2008 2:08

  16. First records of Synoeca septentrionalis Richards, 1978 (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Epiponini) in the Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Rodolpho S. T.; Andena, Sergio R.; Carvalho, Antonio F.; Costa, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nests of Synoeca septentrionalis were collected in two Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest localities (Itabuna and Santa Terezinha, in the state of Bahia and Alfredo Chaves in the state of Espírito Santo). Synoeca septentrionalis was previously recorded only from Central America and northwestern South America. This findingextends its geographical distribution to Northeast and Southeast regions of Brazil, and represents the first record for Synoeca septentrionalis in the Brazilian Atlantic Rain forest, raising to three the number of Synoeca species known from Bahia State. PMID:22368453

  17. First records of Synoeca septentrionalis Richards, 1978 (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Epiponini) in the Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Rodolpho S T; Andena, Sergio R; Carvalho, Antonio F; Costa, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Nests of Synoeca septentrionalis were collected in two Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest localities (Itabuna and Santa Terezinha, in the state of Bahia and Alfredo Chaves in the state of Espírito Santo). Synoeca septentrionalis was previously recorded only from Central America and northwestern South America. This findingextends its geographical distribution to Northeast and Southeast regions of Brazil, and represents the first record for Synoeca septentrionalis in the Brazilian Atlantic Rain forest, raising to three the number of Synoeca species known from Bahia State.

  18. ESO 50th Anniversary Gala Dinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirey, R.

    2012-12-01

    To formally mark the 50th anniversary of the signing of the ESO Convention, a gala dinner was held in the Munich Residenz. A brief report of the event is presented and the speeches are reproduced. The speakers were the President of the Council, Xavier Barcons; the German Minister for Education and Research, Prof. Dr Annette Schavan; the Bavarian State Minister for Science, Research and the Arts, Dr Wolfgang Heubisch; physics Nobel Laureate, Brian Schmidt; the current Director General, Tim de Zeeuw and the Chilean Minister of Foreign Affairs, Alfredo Moreno Charme.

  19. International Symposium on Organosilicon Chemistry (8th) Held in St. Louis Missouri on 7-12 June 1987.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-13

    22 P.O. Box 101 69191 Saint-Fons Cedex, France Fushun, Sichuan People’s Republic of China Jorge Cervantes Facultad de Quimica Yung-Lin Chen...Chemistry Alessandro Degl’Innocenti Northern Illinois University Centro C.N.R. Composti Eterociclici DeKalb, Illinois 60115 Dipartimento di Chimica Organica ...8217 ’qt’ ff" ’ ’ ’’or Alfredo Ricci James Rozell Dipartimento de Chimica Organica Department of Chemistry University of Florence University of Texas Via

  20. VIII Workshop on Catastrophic Disruption in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Bagatin, Adriano Campo

    2015-03-01

    The Catastrophic Disruption (CD) Workshops have become a tradition for the various communities interested in collisional processes. The first one was organized in 1985 by the missed Prof. Paolo Farinella from the University of Pisa and his colleague Paolo Paolicchi, who understood the fundamental importance of collisional processes in the history of the Solar System. It was followed by subsequent workshops in Belgrade (Serbia, 1987), Kyoto (Japan, 1990), Gubbio (Italy, 1993), the Timberline Lodge (Oregon, USA, 1998), Cannes (France, 2003) and Alicante (Spain, 2007). The CD workshops are typically separated by 3-6 years, accounting for the required amount of time to perform subsequent advances in the field motivating the interest of the relevant scientific community for getting together to discuss new results and evolving directions in the field.

  1. Networks in Cell Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Mark; Caldarelli, Guido; De Los Rios, Paolo; Rao, Francesco; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Introduction; 1. Network views of the cell Paolo De Los Rios and Michele Vendruscolo; 2. Transcriptional regulatory networks Sarath Chandra Janga and M. Madan Babu; 3. Transcription factors and gene regulatory networks Matteo Brilli, Elissa Calistri and Pietro Lió; 4. Experimental methods for protein interaction identification Peter Uetz, Björn Titz, Seesandra V. Rajagopala and Gerard Cagney; 5. Modeling protein interaction networks Francesco Rao; 6. Dynamics and evolution of metabolic networks Daniel Segré; 7. Hierarchical modularity in biological networks: the case of metabolic networks Erzsébet Ravasz Regan; 8. Signalling networks Gian Paolo Rossini; Appendix 1. Complex networks: from local to global properties D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 2. Modelling the local structure of networks D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 3. Higher-order topological properties S. Ahnert, T. Fink and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 4. Elementary mathematical concepts A. Gabrielli and G. Caldarelli; References.

  2. Experimental Setup for the Quantification of the Cardiopulmonary Responses to Different Artificial Respiratory Loads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Anna M. Bianchi1, Giuseppe Baselli1, Marco Ghislanzoni1,2, Paolo Navalesi3, Sergio Cerutti1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Polytechnic of...a further validation on a larger number of subjects. REFERENCES [1] Pagani , M., Lombardi, F., Guzzetti, S., Rimoldi, O., Furlan, R...Baselli G., Cerutti S., Civardi S., Malliani A., Orsi G., Pagani M., Rizzo G., “Parameter extraction from heart rate variabilità signals in digs

  3. Robust Behavior-Based Control for Distributed Multi-Robot Collection Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Press: New York. [18] Henrik Hautop Lund and Luigi Pagliarini, \\Robocup jr. with lego mindstorms," in Proceedings of the 2000 IEEE Interna- tional...Conference on Robotics and Automation, San Francisco, CA, April 2000, IEEE. [19] Mattias Lindstrom, Anders Oreback, and Henrik I. Christensen, \\Berra: A...ior Fusion using Voting, Ph.D. thesis, Institute of Electronic Systems, Alborg University, Denmark, 1998. [23] Paolo Pirjanian, Henrik I. Christensen

  4. Nespoli works with ALTEA-SHIELD Hardware in the US Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-23

    ISS027-E-017243 (23 April 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 27 flight engineer, works with Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts (ALTEA) Shield isotropic equipment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. ALTEA-Shield isotropic dosimetry uses existing ALTEA hardware to survey the radiation environment in the Destiny laboratory in 3D. It also measures the effectiveness and shielding properties of several materials with respect to the perception of anomalous light flashes.

  5. Nespoli installs ALTEA-SHIELD Hardware in the US Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-23

    ISS027-E-017249 (23 April 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 27 flight engineer, works with Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts (ALTEA) Shield isotropic equipment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. ALTEA-Shield isotropic dosimetry uses existing ALTEA hardware to survey the radiation environment in the Destiny laboratory in 3D. It also measures the effectiveness and shielding properties of several materials with respect to the perception of anomalous light flashes.

  6. Nespoli installs ALTEA-SHIELD Hardware in the US Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-23

    ISS027-E-017245 (23 April 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 27 flight engineer, works with Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts (ALTEA) Shield isotropic equipment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. ALTEA-Shield isotropic dosimetry uses existing ALTEA hardware to survey the radiation environment in the Destiny laboratory in 3D. It also measures the effectiveness and shielding properties of several materials with respect to the perception of anomalous light flashes.

  7. Nespoli installs ALTEA-SHIELD Hardware in the US Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-23

    ISS027-E-017246 (23 April 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 27 flight engineer, works with Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts (ALTEA) Shield isotropic equipment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. ALTEA-Shield isotropic dosimetry uses existing ALTEA hardware to survey the radiation environment in the Destiny laboratory in 3D. It also measures the effectiveness and shielding properties of several materials with respect to the perception of anomalous light flashes.

  8. Nespoli photographs ALTEA-SHIELD Hardware in the US Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-23

    ISS027-E-017237 (23 April 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 27 flight engineer, works with Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts (ALTEA) Shield isotropic equipment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. ALTEA-Shield isotropic dosimetry uses existing ALTEA hardware to survey the radiation environment in the Destiny laboratory in 3D. It also measures the effectiveness and shielding properties of several materials with respect to the perception of anomalous light flashes.

  9. Nespoli photographs ALTEA-SHIELD Hardware in the US Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-23

    ISS027-E-017236 (23 April 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 27 flight engineer, works with Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts (ALTEA) Shield isotropic equipment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. ALTEA-Shield isotropic dosimetry uses existing ALTEA hardware to survey the radiation environment in the Destiny laboratory in 3D. It also measures the effectiveness and shielding properties of several materials with respect to the perception of anomalous light flashes.

  10. Expedition 26 Docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-18

    Vitaly Davyidov, second from right, Deputy Head of the Russian Federal Space Agency, answers reporter’s questions during a Soyuz post-docking press conference at the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia on Saturday, Dec. 18, 2010. The Soyuz TMA-20 docked to the International Space Station carrying Expedition 26 Soyuz Commander Dmitry Kondratyev, Flight Engineer Catherine Coleman and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Vulnerabilities in Bytecode Removed by Analysis, Nuanced Confinement and Diversification (VIBRANCE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Browne, Eric Bush, Doug Smith, and Arnaud Venet Kestrel Technology , LLC Martin Rinard, Jeff Perkins, Jordan Eikenberry, Douglas Kramm, Paolo Piselli...Institute) Henny Sipma, Matthew Barry, Anca Browne, Eric Bush, Doug Smith, and Arnaud Venet (Kestrel Technology , LLC) Martin Rinard, Jeff Perkins, Jordan...S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Kestrel Institute 3260 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304 Kestrel Technology

  12. Expedition 26 Crewmembers in sleeping quarters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-25

    ISS026-E-012167 (25 Dec. 2010) --- Three of the six crew members aboard the International Space Station peek out of their sleeping quarters on Christmas morning to view the station’s decorations and gifts. Shown, from left, are European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, Expedition 26 commander, and NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman, flight engineer

  13. Expedition 26 Crewmembers in sleeping quarters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-25

    ISS026-E-012169 (25 Dec. 2010) --- Three of the six crew members aboard the International Space Station peek out of their sleeping quarters on Christmas morning to view the station?s decorations and gifts. Shown, from left, are European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, Expedition 26 commander, and NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman, flight engineer.

  14. Expedition 26 Docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-18

    Kirk Shireman, third from right, NASA's deputy ISS program manager, answers reporter’s questions during a Soyuz post-docking press conference at the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia on Saturday, Dec. 18, 2010. The Soyuz TMA-20 docked to the International Space Station carrying Expedition 26 Soyuz Commander Dmitry Kondratyev, Flight Engineer Catherine Coleman and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  15. Expedition 24 Prelaunch Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-13

    Expedition 24 European Space Agency back-up crew member Paolo Nespoli listens to a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Monday, June 14, 2010. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 24 NASA Flight Engineers Shannon Walker and Douglas Wheelock, and Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin is scheduled for Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 3:35 a.m. Kazakhstan time. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  16. Nespoli in the Cupola Module during Japanese Kounotori HTV-2 Transfer Vehicle Relocation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-18

    ISS026-E-028062 (18 Feb. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, is pictured in the Cupola of the International Space Station. Nespoli and NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman (out of frame), flight engineer, operated the Canadarm2 controls inside the Cupola to relocate the Japanese Kounotori2 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV2) from the Harmony node nadir port to Harmony?s zenith port.

  17. European Science Notes. Volume 39, Number 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    offices, residential Paolo Cielo (National Research rooms, and similar small-volume enclo- Council, Quebec, Canada) described the sures. He discussed...Pulse lengths of measurements. Elevated metro noise is 1.0 us are typical for imaging. He an important problem for which little described a time... tre National de la Recherche Scientifi- of Papers, The 12th InternationaZ Laser que [CNRS], France) and Prowell, in Radar Conference (Aix-en-Provence

  18. Proceedings of the Sixth International Cryocoolers Conference Held in Plymouth, Massachusetts on 25-26 October 1990 Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    DiPaolo, "The Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Molecular Sieves at Low Pressures and Temperatures. The Effect of Preadsorbed Water," ]2ś~ a II...environmental conditions. A second, related reliability issue is the possibility of dynamic piston contact during operation; such contact could be...clearance seals, there is a very narrow gap between the housing and the shafts. Gas damping plays a significant role in shaft dynamics and hence magnetic

  19. Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-16

    ktdud* Sccumy Oass/Kjoon) Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lanzano, Paolo 13 «. TYPE OF REPORT Final 13b...spectral density. 20. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 13 UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED D SAME AS RPT n OTIC USERS 22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...Research Laboratory ’^^ SSZ ’.Washington. DC 20375-5000 NRLrMemorandum Report-6138 Inversion Algorithms for Geophysical Problems p. LANZANO Space

  20. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Randy Bresnik of NASA, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, and backup crew members, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, Mark Vande Hei of NASA, and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), right, pose for a group photograph in Red Square after having laid roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 26 Prelaunch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-15

    Expedition 26 NASA Flight Engineer Catherine Coleman has her Russian Sokol suit pressure checked prior to her launch at the Baikonur Cosmodrome Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2010 in Kazakhstan. Coleman and fellow Expedition 26 crew members Soyuz Commander Dmitry Kondratryev and ESA Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli launched in their Soyuz TMA-20 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan the following morning at 1:09 a.m. local time. (Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. Expedition 26 Prelaunch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-15

    Expedition 26 European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli has his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2010. Nespoli and fellow Expedition 26 crew members Soyuz Commander Dmitry Kondratryev and NASA Flight Engineer Catherine Coleman launched in their Soyuz TMA-20 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan the following morning at 1:09 a.m. local time. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 26 Crewmembers pose with European Matroshka-R Phantom Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-11

    ISS026-E-033131 (11 March 2011) --- Russian cosmonauts Alexander Kaleri (left foreground), Oleg Skripochka (right foreground), Dmitry Kondratyev (left background) and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, all Expedition 26 flight engineers, pose for a photo with the European Matroshka-R Phantom experiment in the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) of the International Space Station. Matroshka, the name for the traditional Russian set of nestling dolls, is an antroph-amorphous model of a human torso designed for radiation studies.

  4. Expedition 53-54 Crew Safely Onboard the Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-13

    After docking their Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft to the Poisk module on the Russian segment of the International Space Station, Expedition 53-54 Soyuz Commander Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos and flight engineers Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba of NASA were greeted by station Commander Randy Bresnik of NASA and flight engineers Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency, as the hatches between the spacecraft were opened.

  5. Nespoli and Kaleri at ATV/BRTK Control Panel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-24

    ISS026-E-029257 (24 Feb. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli (left) and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, monitor the approach and docking of the European Space Agency's "Johannes Kepler" Automated Transfer Vehicle-2 (ATV-2). The ATV2 automatically docked with the aft end of the International Space Station's Zvezda Service Module at 10:59 a.m. (EST) on Feb. 24, 2011.

  6. Nespoli and Kaleri at ATV/BRTK Control Panel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-24

    ISS026-E-029210 (24 Feb. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli (foreground) and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, monitor the approach and docking of the European Space Agency's "Johannes Kepler" Automated Transfer Vehicle-2 (ATV-2). The ATV2 automatically docked with the aft end of the International Space Station's Zvezda Service Module at 10:59 a.m. (EST) on Feb. 24, 2011.

  7. Nespoli and Kaleri at ATV/BRTK Control Panel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-24

    ISS026-E-029266 (24 Feb. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli (left) and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Kaleri, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, monitor the approach and docking of the European Space Agency's "Johannes Kepler" Automated Transfer Vehicle-2 (ATV-2). The ATV2 automatically docked with the aft end of the International Space Station's Zvezda Service Module at 10:59 a.m. (EST) on Feb. 24, 2011.

  8. Non-Collisional Kinetic Model for Non-Neutral Plasmas in a Penning Trap: General Properties and Stationary Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-24

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012554 TITLE: Non-Collisional Kinetic Model for Non-Neutral Plasmas in a...following report: TITLE: Non-Neutral Plasma Physics 4. Workshop on Non-Neutral Plasmas [2001] Held in San Diego, California on 30 July-2 August 2001...Kinetic Model for Non-Neutral Plasmas in a Penning Trap: General Properties and Stationary Solutions Gianni G.M. Coppa, Paolo Ricci Istituto

  9. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 prime and backup crews: Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Randy Bresnik of NASA, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and, Mark Vande Hei of NASA pose for group photograph at the conclusion of their crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Seamless Integration of Detection and Therapy for Breast Cancer using Targeted Engineered Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    have spread to regional lymph nodes (stage III). Overall, 50% of surgically treated patients sufferCorresponding author: Fortina, P. (paolo.fortina...Detection of lymph node involvement in hematologic malignancies using micromagnetic resonance lymphan- giography with a gadolinum-labeled dendrimer...nanoparticle. Neoplasia 7, 984–991 42 Kobayashi, H. et al. (2004) Lymphatic drainage imaging of breast cancer in mice by micro-magnetic resonance

  11. STS-120 crew along with Expedition crew members Dan Tani and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    JSC2007-E-41540 (9 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Pamela A. Melroy, STS-120 commander, and European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli, mission specialist, use the virtual reality lab at Johnson Space Center to train for their duties aboard the space shuttle and space station. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare the entire team for dealing with space station elements.

  12. STS-120 crew along with Expedition crew members Dan Tani and Sandra Magnus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    JSC2007-E-41528 (9 Aug. 2007) --- Astronauts Scott E. Parazynski (seated) and European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli, both STS-120 mission specialists, use the virtual reality lab at Johnson Space Center to train for their duties aboard the space shuttle and space station. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare the entire team for dealing with space station elements.

  13. STS-120 Crew Return

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-11-08

    JSC2007-E-098010 (8 Nov. 2007) --- "Look, I'm seeing double," European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli appears to be saying as he points toward a life size photo cutout (out of frame) of astronaut Clay Anderson, seated to his right, during the Discovery crew's Nov. 8 welcome home ceremony at Houston's Ellington Field. The two mission specialists were joined by their five STS-120 crewmates on the stage of Ellington's hangars.

  14. KSC-03PD-3094

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. They are listening to comments from Italian astronaut Paolo Angelo Nespoli, who is with the European Space Agency. The members are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  15. Supporting members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  16. Expedition 52 GCTC Museum Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Paolo Nespoli of ESA signs a guest book at the "Memorial working study of Yuri Gagarin" at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. The memorial study represents Gagarin's working study in the way it was abandoned by Gagarin on March 27, 1968 before leaving for the airfield for training flight that became his last. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. The French Jesuit Mission to Thailand in the 1680s and the Establishment of a Major Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar; Orchiston, Wayne; Komonjinda, Siramas

    2012-09-01

    The first great Thai ruler to encourage the adoption of Western culture and technology was King Narai, and his enlightened attitude led to the rapid development of Thailand. King Narai also had a passion for astronomy, and he pursued this interest by allowing French Jesuit missionaries to set up a large modern well-equipped astronomical observatory in Lopburi Province between AD 1685 and 1687. This was known as the Wat San Paolo Observatory, and King Narai and the missionaries observed a total lunar eclipse on 10 December 1685 and a partial solar eclipse on 30 April 1688. These observations and others made at Wat San Paolo Observatory during the 1680s marked the start of modern scientific astronomy in Thailand. In this paper we discuss King Narai's scientific and other interests, the founding of the Wat San Paolo Observatory, the missionaries who conducted the astronomical programs, their instruments and their observations. We also describe the surviving ruins of the Observatory and their interpretation as a site of national scientific importance in Thailand.

  18. General background and approach to multibody dynamics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Paolo; Gasbarri, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Multibody dynamics for space applications is dictated by space environment such as space-varying gravity forces, orbital and attitude perturbations, control forces if any. Several methods and formulations devoted to the modeling of flexible bodies undergoing large overall motions were developed in recent years. Most of these different formulations were aimed to face one of the main problems concerning the analysis of spacecraft dynamics namely the reduction of computer simulation time. By virtue of this, the use of symbolic manipulation, recursive formulation and parallel processing algorithms were proposed. All these approaches fall into two categories, the one based on Newton/Euler methods and the one based on Lagrangian methods; both of them have their advantages and disadvantages although in general, Newtonian approaches lend to a better understanding of the physics of problems and in particular of the magnitude of the reactions and of the corresponding structural stresses. Another important issue which must be addressed carefully in multibody space dynamics is relevant to a correct choice of kinematics variables. In fact, when dealing with flexible multibody system the resulting equations include two different types of state variables, the ones associated with large (rigid) displacements and the ones associated with elastic deformations. These two sets of variables have generally two different time scales if we think of the attitude motion of a satellite whose period of oscillation, due to the gravity gradient effects, is of the same order of magnitude as the orbital period, which is much bigger than the one associated with the structural vibration of the satellite itself. Therefore, the numerical integration of the equations of the system represents a challenging problem. This was the abstract and some of the arguments that Professor Paolo Santini intended to present for the Breakwell Lecture; unfortunately a deadly disease attacked him and shortly took him

  19. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    wavefront corrector ophthalmic adaptive optics: design and alignment (oral paper) / Alfredo Dubra and David Williams. High speed simultaneous SLO/OCT imaging of the human retina with adaptive optics (oral paper) / M. Pircher ... [et al.]. Characterization of an AO-OCT system (oral paper) / Julia W. Evans ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for retina imaging (oral paper) / Guohua Shi ... [et al.]. Development, calibration and performance of an electromagnetic-mirror-based adaptive optics system for visual optics (oral paper) / Enrique Gambra ... [et al.]. Adaptive eye model (poster paper) / Sergey O. Galetskzy and Alexty V. Kudryashov. Adaptive optics system for retinal imaging based on a pyramid wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Sabine Chiesa ... [et al.]. Modeling of non-stationary dynamic ocular aberrations (poster paper) / Conor Leahy and Chris Dainty. High-order aberrations and accommodation of human eye (poster paper) / Lixia Xue ... [et al.]. Electromagnetic deformable mirror: experimental assessment and first ophthalmic applications (poster paper) / L. Vabre ... [et al.]. Correcting ocular aberrations in optical coherence tomography (poster paper) / Simon Tuohy ... [et al.] -- pt. 4. Adaptive optics in optical storage and microscopy. The application of liquid crystal aberration compensator for the optical disc systems (invited paper) / Masakazu Ogasawara. Commercialization of the adaptive scanning optical microscope (ASOM) (oral paper) / Benjamin Potsaid ... [et al.]. A practical implementation of adaptive optics for aberration compensation in optical microscopy (oral paper) / A. J. Wright ... [et al.]. Active focus locking in an optically sectioning microscope using adaptive optics (poster paper) / S. Poland, A. J. Wright, J. M. Girkin. Towards four dimensional particle tracking for biological applications / Heather I. Campbell ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics for microscopy (poster paper) / Xavier Levecq -- pt. 5. Adaptive optics in lasers

  20. EDITORIAL The 17th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2011-02-01

    -correlation function for graphs with and without time-reversal symmetry: the open system case Michał Ławniczak, Szymon Bauch, Oleh Hul and Leszek Sirko Independent nonclassical tests for states and measurements in the same experiment Alfredo Luis and Ángel Rivas On the classical capacity of quantum Gaussian channels Cosmo Lupo, Stefano Pirandola, Paolo Aniello and Stefano Mancini Entropic inequalities for center-of-mass tomograms Margarita A Man'ko Semiclassical dynamics for an ion confined within a nonlinear electromagnetic trap Bogdan M Mihalcea Zeno-like phenomena in STIRAP processes B Militello, M Scala, A Messina and N V Vitanov A beam splitter with second-order nonlinearity modeled as a nonlinear coupler V Peřinová, A Lukš and J Křepelka Energy-level shifts of a uniformly accelerated atom between two reflecting plates L Rizzuto and S Spagnolo Cross-Kerr nonlinearities in an optically dressed periodic medium K Słowik, A Raczyński, J Zaremba, S Zielińska-Kaniasty, M Artoni and G C La Rocca An approximate effective beamsplitter interaction between light and atomic ensembles Richard Tatham, David Menzies and Natalia Korolkova Stochastic simulation of long-time nonadiabatic dynamics Daniel A Uken, Alessandro Sergi and Francesco Petruccione

  1. The modality shift effect and the effectiveness of warning signals in different modalities.

    PubMed

    Rodway, Paul

    2005-10-01

    Which is better, a visual or an auditory warning signal? Initial findings suggested that an auditory signal was more effective, speeding reaction to a target more than a visual warning signal, particularly at brief foreperiods [Bertelson, P., & Tisseyre, F. (1969). The time-course of preparation: confirmatory results with visual and auditory warning signals. Acta Psychologica, 30. In W.G. Koster (Ed.), Attention and Performance II (pp. 145-154); Davis, R., & Green, F. A. (1969). Intersensory differences in the effect of warning signals on reaction time. Acta Psychologica, 30. In W.G. Koster (Ed.), Attention and Performance II (pp. 155-167)]. This led to the hypothesis that an auditory signal is more alerting than a visual warning signal [Sanders, A. F. (1975). The foreperiod effect revisited. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 27, 591-598; Posner, M. I., Nissen, M. J., & Klein, R. M. (1976). Visual dominance: an information-processing account of its origins and significance. Psychological Review, 83, 157-171]. Recently [Turatto, M., Benso, F., Galfano, G., & Umilta, C. (2002). Nonspatial attentional shifts between audition and vision. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 28, 628-639] found no evidence for an auditory warning signal advantage and showed that at brief foreperiods a signal in the same modality as the target facilitated responding more than a signal in a different modality. They accounted for this result in terms of the modality shift effect, with the signal exogenously recruiting attention to its modality, and thereby facilitating responding to targets arriving in the modality to which attention had been recruited. The present study conducted six experiments to understand the cause of these conflicting findings. The results suggest that an auditory warning signal is not more effective than a visual warning signal. Previous reports of an auditory superiority appear to have been caused by using different

  2. Role of cardiotrophin-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms and adipose core clock genes in mice and characterization of 24-h circulating CT-1 profiles in normal-weight and overweight/obese subjects.

    PubMed

    López-Yoldi, Miguel; Stanhope, Kimber L; Garaulet, Marta; Chen, X Guoxia; Marcos-Gómez, Beatriz; Carrasco-Benso, María Paz; Santa Maria, Eva M; Escoté, Xavier; Lee, Vivien; Nunez, Marinelle V; Medici, Valentina; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo; Sáinz, Neira; Huerta, Ana E; Laiglesia, Laura M; Prieto, Jesús; Martínez, J Alfredo; Bustos, Matilde; Havel, Peter J; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria J

    2017-04-01

    Cardiotrophin (CT)-1 is a regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we analyzed whether CT-1 also acts to peripherally regulate metabolic rhythms and adipose tissue core clock genes in mice. Moreover, the circadian pattern of plasma CT-1 levels was evaluated in normal-weight and overweight subjects. The circadian rhythmicity of oxygen consumption rate (Vo2) was disrupted in aged obese CT-1-deficient (CT-1(-/-)) mice (12 mo). Although circadian rhythms of Vo2 were conserved in young lean CT-1(-/-) mice (2 mo), CT-1 deficiency caused a phase shift of the acrophase. Most of the clock genes studied (Clock, Bmal1, and Per2) displayed a circadian rhythm in adipose tissue of both wild-type (WT) and CT-1(-/-) mice. However, the pattern was altered in CT-1(-/-) mice toward a lower percentage of the rhythm or lower amplitude, especially for Bmal1 and Clock. Moreover, CT-1 mRNA levels in adipose tissue showed significant circadian fluctuations in young WT mice. In humans, CT-1 plasma profile exhibited a 24-h circadian rhythm in normal-weight but not in overweight subjects. The 24-h pattern of CT-1 was characterized by a pronounced increase during the night (from 02:00 to 08:00). These observations suggest a potential role for CT-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms.-López-Yoldi, M., Stanhope, K. L., Garaulet, M., Chen, X. G., Marcos-Gómez, B., Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Santa Maria, E. M., Escoté, X., Lee, V., Nunez, M. V., Medici, V., Martínez-Ansó, E., Sáinz, N., Huerta, A. E., Laiglesia, L. M., Prieto, J., Martínez, J. A., Bustos, M., Havel, P. J., Moreno-Aliaga, M. J. Role of cardiotrophin-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms and adipose core clock genes in mice and characterization of 24-h circulating CT-1 profiles in normal-weight and overweight/obese subjects. © FASEB.

  3. The Crust Has Changed: Evidence for and implications of age dependent Sm/Nd ratios in juvenile continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    The Nd isotope systematics of crustal granites and their presumed source materials are used to reconstruct the Sm/Nd ratios of the continental crust with distinct mantle extraction ages (based on DePaolo, 1988 EPSL and Bennett and DePaolo, 1987 GSA Bull). A more extensive, literature-derived data set for the western USA supports the isotopic mapping of Bennett and DePaolo. Calculated Sm/Nd ratios of the crust show a secular increase from the Archean to approximately 1.5 Ga. Modern island arc lavas, analogs for juvenile continental crust have the lowest Sm/Nd, consistent with the inferred trend from the granites. Possible reasons for the increasing Sm/Nd include changes in the Sm/Nd ratio of the mantle reservoir and/or changes in the mineralogy of the reservoir from which the crust was extracted. It is postulated that the primary control of Sm/Nd in the continental crust is the residual mineralogy in the reservoirs from which the crust was extracted. This is possible because changes in the geothermal gradient through Earth's history affect the residual mineralogy during the extraction of continental crust. Recent phase equilibria studies relevant to modern island arcs suggest that accessory minerals such as allanite buffer the LREE budget from the subducting sediment and basaltic slab, the primary source of REE in island arc lavas. Crust production early in Earth's history likely occurred at temperatures too high for allanite stability, meaning Sm/Nd ratios were likely controlled by garnet and/or amphibole in either subducted crust or the mantle reservoir. Modeling results will show how changing residual mineralogy during crust extractions can produce the observed changes in Sm/Nd ratios. More broadly the inferred time dependence for Sm/Nd may relate to the silica content of juvenile crust throughout Earth's history.

  4. Expedition 52-53 Soyuz Mating and Rocket Rollout Video File

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-26

    At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft and its Soyuz booster are transported from the Integration Facility to the launch pad on a railcar July 26 for final preparations before launch July 28 to the International Space Station. The Soyuz MS-05 will carry Expedition 52-53 Soyuz Commander Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Randy Bresnik of NASA and Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency) to the orbital complex for a four-and-a-half month mission.

  5. jsc2017e101932

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-22

    jsc2017e101932 (July 22, 2017) --- At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 52-53 Flight Engineer Randy Bresnik (right) pitches in with a shovel full of dirt July 22 and he and his crewmates, Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, left) and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (center) plant a tree in Bresnik’s name in traditional pre-launch ceremonies. The trio will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  6. [A Fragment Of De speculis comburentibus of Regiomontanus Copied by Toscanelli and Inserted in the Books of Leonardo (Codex Atlanticus, 611rb / 915ra)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    This article studies a fragment on the conic sections that appear in the Codex Atlanticus, fols. 611rb/915ra. Arguments are put forward to assemble these two folios. Their comparison with the Latin texts available before 1500 shows that they derive from the De speculis comburentibus of Alhacen and the De speculis comburentibus of Regiomontanus, joined together in his autograph manuscript (Vienna, Oster. Nationalbibliothek, Cod. 5258). Having identified the sources, and discussed their mathematics, the issue of their transmission is targeted. It is shown that these notes were written by Paolo dal Pozzo Toscanelli, through whom they reached the notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci.

  7. jsc2017e095971

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-16

    jsc2017e095971 (July 16, 2017) --- At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 52-53 crewmember Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) answers a reporter’s question July 16 as his crewmates, Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (left) and Randy Bresnik of NASA (right) look on. The trio flew to the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for final pre-launch training for their launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft and a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Beth Weissinger

  8. jsc2017e095969

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-16

    jsc2017e095969 (July 16, 2017) --- At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 52-53 crewmember Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) answers a reporter’s question July 16 as his crewmates, Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (left) and Randy Bresnik of NASA (right) look on. The trio flew to the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for final pre-launch training for their launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft and a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Beth Weissinger

  9. Japanese Kounotori HTV-2 Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-27

    ISS026-E-020932 (27 Jan. 2011) --- Backdropped by Earth?s horizon and the blackness of space, the International Space Station's Canadarm2 grapples the unpiloted Japanese Kounotori2 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV2) as it approaches the station. NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, used the station?s robotic arm to attach the HTV2 to the Earth-facing port of the station?s Harmony node. The attachment was completed at 9:51 a.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2011.

  10. Japanese Kounotori HTV-2 Transfer Vehicle Relocation from Node 2 Nadir to Zenith Port

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-18

    ISS026-E-028057 (18 Feb. 2011) --- In the grasp of the International Space Station?s Canadarm2, the Japanese Kounotori2 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV2) is relocated from the Harmony node nadir port to Harmony?s zenith port. NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, moved the HTV2, operating the station?s robotic arm from the controls inside the Cupola. The Canadian-built Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), is visible at center.

  11. Japanese Kounotori HTV-2 Transfer Vehicle Relocation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-18

    ISS026-E-028076 (18 Feb. 2011) --- In the grasp of the International Space Station?s Canadarm2, the Japanese Kounotori2 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV2) is relocated from the Harmony node nadir port to Harmony?s zenith port. NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, moved the HTV2, operating the station?s robotic arm from the controls inside the Cupola. A cloud-covered part of Earth and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  12. Japanese Kounotori HTV-2 Transfer Vehicle Relocation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-18

    ISS026-E-028081 (18 Feb. 2011) --- In the grasp of the International Space Station?s Canadarm2, the Japanese Kounotori2 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV2) is relocated from the Harmony node nadir port to Harmony?s zenith port. NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, moved the HTV2, operating the station?s robotic arm from the controls inside the Cupola. A cloud-covered part of Earth and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  13. Expedition 27 Crew with HTV2 Poster and Paper Cranes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-27

    ISS027-E-007888 (27 March 2011) --- In honor of those affected by the Tohoku-Kanto Earthquake in Japan, Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev (center), Expedition 27 commander; European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli and NASA astronaut Cady Coleman, both flight engineers, are pictured with paper cranes (origami craft) which they folded to be placed in the Kounotori2 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV-2). The HTV2 is scheduled to be released by the International Space Station?s robotic arm at 11:45 a.m. EDT on March 28, and re-enter Earth?s atmosphere on March 29, 2011.

  14. jsc2017e101934

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-22

    jsc2017e101934 (July 22, 2017) --- At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 52-53 Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, left) waters a tree previously planted in his name July 22 as his crewmates, Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (center) and Randy Bresnik of NASA (right) look on. The trio will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  15. jsc2017e101935

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-22

    jsc2017e101935 (July 22, 2017) --- At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 52-53 Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (center) waters a tree previously planted in his name July 22 as his crewmates, Randy Bresnik of NASA (left) and Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, right) look on. The trio will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  16. Long-time asymptotic analysis of the Korteweg–de Vries equation via the dbar steepest descent method: the soliton region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavedoni, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    We address the problem of long-time asymptotics for the solutions of the Korteweg–de Vries equation under low regularity assumptions. We consider decaying initial data admitting only a finite number of moments. For the so-called ‘soliton region’, an improved asymptotic estimate is provided, in comparison with the one in Grunert and Teschl (2009 Math. Phys. Anal. Geom. 12 287–324). Our analysis is based on the dbar steepest descent method proposed by Miller and McLaughlin. Dedicated to Dora, Paolo and Sanja, with deep gratitude for their love and support.

  17. Response to the "Comment on Chemical and Toxicological Investigations of a Previously Unknown Poisonous European Mushroom Tricholoma terreum".

    PubMed

    Yin, Xia; Feng, Tao; Li, Zheng-Hui; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2016-04-11

    Recently, Dr. Paolo Davoli and his colleagues stated that the conclusions drawn by us were misleading from a mycotoxicological perspective, as they cast doubts on the edibility of a mushroom species (Tricholoma terreum) that has been always recognized as safe. Unfortunately, they made a mistake, and seriously misinterpreted our data, which resulted in scepticism of our research. Saponaceolides B and M were tested for their stabilities heating directly on and boiling in water. It is undoubted that both saponaceolides B and M are capable of withstanding prolonged heating during cooking.

  18. The Dynamics o f Institutional Reform in Contemporary Italian Politics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    Guglielmetti, Paolo, and Rosa, Giuseppe, "Il mezzogiorno tra squilibri e segnali di vitalita’," Rivista di politica economica , series III, no. 2...and Giuseppe Rosa, "Il mezzogiorno tra squilibri e segnali di vitalita’," R di p economica , series III, no. 2, February 1992, 97-8. 1 64 for hope. The...34Riforme contro i partiti? Un commento," Rivista Italiana di Scienza Politica , vol. 21, no. 3, December 1991, 409-418. "Breve guida alle riforme

  19. A psychoanalytic consideration of Pasolini's Salo.

    PubMed

    Salvage, David

    2005-01-01

    Salo represented the culmination of Pier Paolo Pasolini's career as a filmmaker and engages several questions concerning the nature of perversion and the excitement with the negative. Through exploration of Pasolini's motives and techniques for creating this film, an analysis is offered of the creative process that does not seek to create an aesthetically pleasing compromise formation of psychic conflict, nor a form of erotizing sadomasochism. Rather, this film is explored as an example of a lucid and psychoanalytically informed artwork that speaks to the psychic fascination with what is purely negative--thanatos--which is not mediated by libido.

  20. KSC-07pd2716

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-120 Mission Specialist Paolo Nespoli tries on his gloves with his launch and entry suit, preparing for launch. Nespoli represents the European Space Agency. The fitting is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities the crew is undertaking at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT also includes emergency egress procedures, equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-120, which will carry the Italian-built U.S. Node 2 to the International Space Station, is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  1. KSC-07pd2718

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-120 Mission Specialist Paolo Nespoli has his helmet fitted on his launch and entry suit, preparing for launch. The fitting is part of terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT, activities the crew is undertaking at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The TCDT also includes emergency egress procedures, equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown. Mission STS-120, which will carry the Italian-built U.S. Node 2 to the International Space Station, is targeted for launch on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  2. Expedition 27 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-23

    Expedition 27 Flight Engineer Cady Coleman waves hello and talks on a satellite phone to her family shortly after she and Commander Dmitry Kondratyev and Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli landed in their Soyuz TMA-20 southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Nicola Cusano e il foro astronomico al castello di Andraz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dona', G.

    Cardinal Nicolas from Cues (1401-1464) was friend of Paolo Toscanelli and one of the first supporters of heliocentrism. He carved a tube in the south western wall of a room of the castle of Andraz. It was possibly used to calculate the date of the winter solstice, in order to evaluate the corrections needed to the Julian calendar then in use. The astronomical use of this tube is described. The accuracy achievable in the measurement of the solstice is surprising. It is possible that the tubes made by Gerbert of Aurillac (945-1003) were used with similar awareness.

  4. Nespoli and Vittori in Kibo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-23

    ISS027-E-036175 (23 May 2011) --- Inside the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo lab on the International Space Station (ISS), European Space Agency astronauts Paolo Nespoli (left) and Roberto Vittori display the Italian flag during an Earth-to-space phone tag-up with Italian President Giorgio Napolitano. Nespoli has been on the station for over five months and is due to return to Earth in less than 24 hours. Vittori is on a 16-day mission of the space shuttle Endeavour, joined by five NASA astronauts. This occasion is the second time two Italian astronauts have been in space together and the first time in the last 15 years.

  5. The CD4 molecule, the human immunodeficiency virus and anti-idiotypic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Del Guercio, P; Zanetti, M

    1987-01-01

    The CD4 molecule is the cellular receptor for human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV). Administration of antibodies to the equivalent molecule in mice (L3T4) induces unresponsiveness to antigens given to or around the same time. Here Paolo del Guercio and Maurizio Zanetti suggest that in AIDS patients anti-idiotypic antibodies elicited to anti-HIV antibodies may bind to CD4 molecules, inducing unresponsiveness to viral and other antigens as anti-L3T4 antibodies do in mice. This possibility may hinder attempts to establish anti-HIV immunity by vaccination.

  6. Expedition 27 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-24

    Expedition 27 Commander Dmitry Kondratyev, left, is seen after arriving at the Chkalovsky airport outside Star City, Russia several hours after he and Flight Engineers Paolo Nespoli and Cady Coleman landed in their Soyuz TMA-20 southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Expedition 27 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-24

    Chief, Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Sergei Krikalev shakes hands and welcomes home Expedition 27 Commander Dmitry Kondratyev at the Chkalovsky airport outside Star City, Russia several hours after Kondratyev and Flight Engineers Paolo Nespoli and Cady Coleman landed in their Soyuz TMA-20 southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Expedition 27 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-23

    Expedition 27 Flight Engineer Cady Coleman answers reporters questions in traditional Kazakh dress during a press conference at the Karaganda airport shortly after she and Commander Dmitry Kondratyev and Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli landed in their Soyuz TMA-20 southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 27 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-24

    Expedition 27 Commander Dmitry Kondratyev, left, shakes hands with Deputy Chair of the State Commission Mr. Skorobogotov after Kondratyev arrived at the Chkalovsky airport outside Star City, Russia and several hours after he and Flight Engineers Paolo Nespoli and Cady Coleman landed in their Soyuz TMA-20 southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Expedition 27 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-24

    Kazakh performers at the Karaganda Airport in Kazakhstan play music prior to a welcome home ceremony for Expedition 27 Commander Dmitry Kondratyev, and, Flight Engineers Paolo Nespoli, and Cady Coleman, after the three landed in their Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft in a remote area southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. History of the early dipteran systematics in Italy: from Lyncei to Battista Grassi.

    PubMed

    Baccetti, B

    2008-12-01

    This presentation starts with Galileo's discovery of the microscope and the first Lyncei. Giovanni Heckius and Francesco Stelluti demonstrated different kinds of mosquitoes. Later, in Florence, the Academy of Cimento solved the problem of mosquito reproduction with the discoveries of Francesco Redi, Pietro Paolo da Sangallo, Giuseppe Del Papa and Giovanni Maria Lancisi in the 18th century. In 19th century Eugenio Ficalbi reviewed the Italian Culicids. Once Battista Grassi solved the cycle of Anopheles and Plasmodia, further researches followed by Golgi, Celli, Marchiafava, Bastianelli and Bignami, as well as by Roland Ross.

  12. MSSP Associate Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.

    2015-08-01

    MSSP is pleased to announce the appointment of three distinguished researchers, Professors Jerome Antoni, Spilios Fassois and Paolo Pennacchi, as Associate Editors. The broad coverage of MSSP research topics demands editorial expertise in several disciplines and the appointment of an editorial team of the highest quality is essential in maintaining and further enhancing the reputation of MSSP as a journal at the forefront of modern experimental mechanics that combines dynamic systems with measurement technology, signal processing and active control. Brief descriptions of the backgrounds and experience of the Associate Editors are provided in the following paragraphs.

  13. Nespoli conducts a test run with the French/CNES Neuroscientific Research Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-12

    ISS026-E-027000 (12 Feb. 2011) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, conducts a test run with the French/CNES neuroscientific research experiment ?3D-Space? (SAP) in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. While floating freely, Nespoli used the ESA multipurpose laptop with a prepared hard disk drive, data storage on a memory card, and an electronic pen table connected to it. 3D-Space, which involves distance, writing and illusion exercises, is designed to test the hypothesis that altered visual perception affects motor control.

  14. Expedition 52-53 Launches to the International Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-28

    Expedition 52-53 Soyuz Commander Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Randy Bresnik of NASA and Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency) launched on the Russian Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft July 28 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The trio began a six-hour journey to the International Space Station and the start of a four-and-a-half month mission on the outpost. The footage contains the crew’s prelaunch activities including their departure from their crew quarters, suit-up in the Cosmodrome’s Integration Facility, walk out to the crew bus and arrival at the launch pad to board the spacecraft.

  15. Video File - Expedition 52-53 Crew Docks to the Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-28

    Expedition 52-53 Soyuz Commander Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Flight Engineers Randy Bresnik of NASA and Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency) launched on the Russian Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft July 28 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The trio began a six-hour journey to the International Space Station and the start of a four-and-a-half month mission on the outpost. The footage contains the crew’s prelaunch activities including their departure from their crew quarters, suit-up in the Cosmodrome’s Integration Facility, walk out to the crew bus and arrival at the launch pad to board the spacecraft.

  16. Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    DePaolo, Don [Director, LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2016-07-12

    Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  17. L'espace du mouvement: Une analyse des conflits dans les interactions entre institutrice et eleves d'une ecole maternelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, Izabel

    1995-01-01

    The research described in this article, winner of the Gottfried Hausmann Prize for 1994, was carried out in a kindergarten in São Paolo, Brazil, using the theory developed by Henri Wallon. The aim was to examine how primary school children are affected in their development by: (a) unnecessary restrictions placed on their physical movements during lessons; and (b) failure to organize the classroom space in a way that assists the learning process. The author concludes that these factors lead to tensions in the classroom which could be avoided through a different approach to movement and space.

  18. Expedition 27 Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-23

    Russian Search and rescue helicopters are seen as they prepare for the landing of the Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft with Expedition 27 Commander Dmitry Kondratyev and Flight Engineers Paolo Nespoli and Cady Coleman in a remote area southeast of the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. NASA Astronaut Coleman, Russian Cosmonaut Kondratyev and Italian Astronaut Nespoli are returning from more than five months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 26 and 27 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. jsc2017e096663

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-17

    jsc2017e096663 (July 17, 2017) --- In the Integration Facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 52-53 crewmember Randy Bresnik of NASA flashes a smile as he enters the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft July 17 during a fit check dress rehearsal. Bresnik, Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: Andrey Shelepin/Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

  20. jsc2017e096672

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-17

    jsc2017e096672 (July 17, 2017) --- In the Integration Facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 52-53 crewmember Randy Bresnik of NASA flashes a smile as he enters the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft July 17 during a fit check dress rehearsal. Bresnik, Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: Andrey Shelepin/Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

  1. The STS-120 crew members are ready for their return flight to Ho

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-11-07

    The STS-120 crew members are ready for their return to flight to Houston. From left are Pilot George Zamka, Mission Specialists Paolo Nespoli, Doug Wheelock, Stephanie Wilson and Scott Parazynski, and Commander Pamela Melroy. A welcoming ceremony for the crew is planned at NASA's Hangar 276 on the south end of Ellington Field in Texas. On the 15-day mission, the STS-120 crew continued the construction of the station with the installation of the Harmony Node 2 module and the relocation of the P6 truss. They landed Nov. 7 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

  2. iss052e056245

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    iss052e056245 (Aug. 21, 2017) --- As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.

  3. iss052e056122

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    iss052e056122 (Aug. 21, 2017) --- As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.

  4. iss052e056225

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    iss052e056225 (Aug. 21, 2017) --- As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.

  5. iss052e056222

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    iss052e056222 (Aug. 21, 2017) --- As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.

  6. [Poisons in literature and iconography during the age of Pietro d'Abano].

    PubMed

    Morpurgo, Piero

    2008-01-01

    The fear of poisons belongs to the scientific knowledge from Antiquity till the Modern Era. Here the reader will find sources and resources on the idea of poisons; from Nicander of Colofon to Paolo Uccello. This paper rely on literary sources that have been part of the scientific milieu of Pietro d'Abano and his commentators: Cecco d'Ascoli, Guido da Pisa, Gregorio d'Arezzo, Jean de Mandeville. The essay describes illuminated manuscripts and masterpieces of art witnessing the concern for poisons.

  7. Towards a People-Centred Education: Possibilities and Struggles in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Swee-Hin; Floresca-Cawagas

    1997-09-01

    Focusing on the Philippines, the article describes the role played by people's movements and non-governmental organizations in empowering citizens and combating injustice. Educational programmes are an important element in this struggle. The authors cite examples of what Paolo Freire called the "pedagogy of dialogue", which seeks to develop creative, critical enquiry and self-reliant understanding. Such programmes have made an impact in areas such as women's empowerment, poverty-alleviation and the combating of environmental destruction. The authors argue that this type of education can also play an important role in challenging the materialist vision of progress and awakening people to deeper values.

  8. An investigation of MAGSAT and complementary data emphasizing precambrian shields and adjacent areas of West Africa and South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Accomplishments with regard to the mapping and analysis of MAGSAT data for the investigation of correlations between the magnetic field characteristics of South American and African shields are reported. Significant results in the interpretation of the global total-field anomalies and the anomaly patterns of Africa and South America are discussed. The central position of the Brazilian shield tends to form a negative total-field anomaly, consistent with findings for shields in equatorial Africa. Sedimentary sequences in the Amazon basin and in the Rio de Janeiro-Sao Paolo areas exhibit positive anomalies, also consistent with equatorial Africa. Results for the Caribbean Sea and Guyana regions are also described.

  9. Expedition 52 GCTC Museum Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 backup crew members, Norishige Kanai, seated left, Alexander Misurkin, and Mark Vande Hei, seated right, sign a guest book at the "Memorial working study of Yuri Gagarin" at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) as Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, standing left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Randy Bresnik of NASA, look on, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. The memorial study represents Gagarin's working study in the way it was abandoned by Gagarin on March 27, 1968 before leaving for the airfield for training flight that became his last. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Expedition 52 GCTC Museum Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, seated left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, seated center, Randy Bresnik of NASA, seated right, joined by backup crew members, Norishige Kanai, standing left, Alexander Misurkin, not pictured, and Mark Vande Hei, right, are seen as they sign a guest book at the "Memorial working study of Yuri Gagarin" at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. The memorial study represents Gagarin's working study in the way it was abandoned by Gagarin on March 27, 1968 before leaving for the airfield for training flight that became his last. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 52 GCTC Museum Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, seated left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, seated center, Randy Bresnik of NASA, seated right, joined by backup crew members, Norishige Kanai, standing left, Alexander Misurkin, and Mark Vande Hei, right, are seen as they sign a guest book at the "Memorial working study of Yuri Gagarin" at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. The memorial study represents Gagarin's working study in the way it was abandoned by Gagarin on March 27, 1968 before leaving for the airfield for training flight that became his last. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Nations Hospitable to Organized Crime and Terrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    Antonio Paulo Namburete, “Organised Crime in Mozambique and Its Impact Within the Regional and International Context,” in M. Hough and A. Du Plessis...LAP20021206000030). 730 “El Caso Lino Oviedo y su conexión con la Argentina” [The Lino Oviedo Case and Its Connection with Argentina], Página1 2...Trafficking,” New Vision [Kampala], 15 July 2001. <http://allafrica.com> Namburete, Antonio Paolo. “Organised Crime in Mozambique and Its Impact Within

  13. Faunistic Catalog of the Caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera) of Parque Nacional do Itatiaia and its Surroundings in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Leandro Lourenço; Nessimian, Jorge Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The Atlantic Forest is considered one of the world's biological diversity hotspots, and is increasingly threatened by the rapid destruction and fragmentation of its natural areas. The caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Itatiaia massif, an Atlantic Forest highland area, are inventoried and cataloged here. The catalog is based on examination of bibliographies, field work on many localities of Itatiaia massif (including Parque Nacional do Itatiaia — PNI), and the entomological collection Professor José Alfredo Pinheiro Dutra (DZRJ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. A total of 92 species are recorded, representing about 17% of the known Brazilian Trichoptera fauna. Leptoceridae, Hydropsychidae, and Philopotamidae are the families most represented. The high species richness, as well as the remarkable patterns of species distribution, may be related to the characteristics of Mantiqueira mountain range. PMID:22958122

  14. Nova in Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2007-11-01

    Nova Puppis 2007 was discovered visually by Alfredo Jose Serra Pereira, Carnaxide, Portugal, on November 14.23 UT at visual magnitude 7.0. The discovery was announced in IAU Circular No. 8895 (Daniel W. E. Green, Ed.). The nova is located at 08:16:17.99 -34:15:25.0 (J2000, J. Young and H. Rhoades, Table Mountain Observatory, near Wrightwood, CA). Nothing was visible down to magnitude 8 on November 6.23, 7.22, 8.23, 10.23, and 11.22 UT. Young reports that a red image of the field from the Digitized Sky Survey contains a point source at an approximate magnitude of 20. No spectra have yet been published. Please report observations to the AAVSO International Database as N PUP 2007.

  15. Committees and sponsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    International Advisory Committee Richard F CastenYale, USA Luiz Carlos ChamonSão Paulo, Brazil Osvaldo CivitareseLa Plata, Argentina Jozsef CsehATOMKI, Hungary Jerry P DraayerLSU, USA Alfredo Galindo-UribarriORNL & UT, USA James J KolataNotre Dame, USA Jorge López UTEP, USA Joseph B NatowitzTexas A & M, USA Ma Esther Ortiz IF-UNAM Stuart PittelDelaware, USA Andrés SandovalIF-UNAM Adam SzczepaniakIndiana, USA Piet Van IsackerGANIL, France Michael WiescherNotre Dame, USA Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (Chair)IF-UNAM Roelof BijkerICN-UNAM Ruben FossionICN-UNAM David LizcanoININ Sponsors Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAMInstituto de Física, UNAMInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones NuclearesDivisión de Física Nuclear de la SMFCentro Latinoamericano de Física

  16. Global Enhanced Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    By carefully measuring the wavelengths and intensity of visible and near-infrared light reflected by the land surface back up into space, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Team can quantify the concentrations of green leaf vegetation around the world. The above MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) map shows the density of plant growth over the entire globe. Very low values of EVI (white and brown areas) correspond to barren areas of rock, sand, or snow. Moderate values (light greens) represent shrub and grassland, while high values indicate temperate and tropical rainforests (dark greens). The MODIS EVI gives scientists a new tool for monitoring major fluctuations in vegetation and understanding how they affect, and are affected by, regional climate trends. For more information, read NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Land Group/Vegetation Indices, Alfredo Huete, Principal Investigator, and Kamel Didan, University of Arizona

  17. New occurrences of microvertebrate fossil accumulations in Bauru Group, Late Cretaceous of western São Paulo state, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alveş, Y. M.; Bergqvist, L. P.; Brito, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the results of several palaeontological expeditions to four Upper Cretaceous fossil microsites of the Adamantina and Presidente Prudente formations in western São Paulo State, Brazil. Despite the fragmentary condition of the fossils recovered, they represent an important record of vertebrate microremains. The material, recovered through screen washing, comprises teeth and scales of Lepisosteidae; two morphotypes of Halecostomi teeth with similarities to Characiformes and Amiiformes; a Teleostei tooth of molariform shape; fin spines of Siluriformes; teeth of possible Baurusuchidae, Notosuchia (probably Adamantinasuchus or Mariliasuchus), Neosuchia (probably Itasuchus or Goniopholis), and other Mesoeucrocodylia indet.; probable teeth of Abelisauroidea, other Theropoda indet., and a phalanx of Aves. The comparative microvertebrate fossil accumulation from western São Paulo State provides evidence that: 1) floodplain channels accumulate large concentrations of microremains; 2) coarse sandstone privileges enamel tissues like teeth and scales; 3) new vertebrate fossil records have been discovered in Florida Paulista, Alfredo Marcondes, and Alvares Machado outcrops.

  18. [A challenge to Peronism's social justice: hydatidosis in the province of Buenos Aires, 1946-1952].

    PubMed

    Valobra, Adriana

    2007-01-01

    This analysis of the sanitary policies enforced in the province of Buenos Aires by Domingo Alfredo Mercante--Juan Domingo Perón's right-hand man--focuses on one of his most fascinating efforts: the eradication of hydatidosis. In exploring an issue largely forgotten by historiography, the article describes how the Mercante administration (1946-52) used statistical, socioeconomic, and symbolic legitimization to place hydatidosis on the State agenda. The administration's strategies are also pinpointed: the passing of regulatory laws against this endemic disease; the creation of specific state anti-hydatidosis institutions; the creation of space for information and for interdisciplinary, interministerial, and even supranational education aimed at achieving greater knowledge of the disease and at the exchange of experiences; and, lastly, the definition of initiatives focused on relief, treatment, and prevention in animals and people.

  19. Global Enhanced Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    By carefully measuring the wavelengths and intensity of visible and near-infrared light reflected by the land surface back up into space, the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Team can quantify the concentrations of green leaf vegetation around the world. The above MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) map shows the density of plant growth over the entire globe. Very low values of EVI (white and brown areas) correspond to barren areas of rock, sand, or snow. Moderate values (light greens) represent shrub and grassland, while high values indicate temperate and tropical rainforests (dark greens). The MODIS EVI gives scientists a new tool for monitoring major fluctuations in vegetation and understanding how they affect, and are affected by, regional climate trends. For more information, read NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Land Group/Vegetation Indices, Alfredo Huete, Principal Investigator, and Kamel Didan, University of Arizona

  20. [The influence of non-verbal communication in nursing care].

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla Cristina Viana; Shiratori, Kaneji

    2005-01-01

    The present study is linked to the Center for Researching and Testing in Nursing at the Nursing School Alfredo Pinto - UNIRIO, and it started during the development of a monograph. The object of the study is the meaning of non-verbal communication under the optics of the nursing course undergraduates. The study presents the following objectives: to determine how non-verbal communication is comprehended among college students in nursing and to analyze in what way that comprehension influences nursing care. The methodological approach was qualitative, while the dynamics of sensitivity were applied as strategy for data collection. It was observed that undergraduate students identify the relevance and influence of non-verbal communication along nursing care, however there is a need in amplifying the knowledge of non-verbal communication process prior the implementation of nursing care.

  1. Faunistic catalog of the caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera) of Parque Nacional do Itatiaia and its surroundings in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Leandro Lourenço; Nessimian, Jorge Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The Atlantic Forest is considered one of the world's biological diversity hotspots, and is increasingly threatened by the rapid destruction and fragmentation of its natural areas. The caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Itatiaia massif, an Atlantic Forest highland area, are inventoried and cataloged here. The catalog is based on examination of bibliographies, field work on many localities of Itatiaia massif (including Parque Nacional do Itatiaia - PNI), and the entomological collection Professor José Alfredo Pinheiro Dutra (DZRJ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. A total of 92 species are recorded, representing about 17% of the known Brazilian Trichoptera fauna. Leptoceridae, Hydropsychidae, and Philopotamidae are the families most represented. The high species richness, as well as the remarkable patterns of species distribution, may be related to the characteristics of Mantiqueira mountain range.

  2. Structural analysis of the Itapucumí Group in the Vallemí region, northern Paraguay: Evidence of a new Brasiliano/Pan-African mobile belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanha, Ginaldo Ademar da Cruz; Warren, Lucas; Boggiani, Paulo César; Grohmann, Carlos Henrique; Cáceres, Alberto Arias

    The Neoproterozoic (Ediacaran) Itapucumí Group in northern Paraguay is composed of carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, including ooid grainstones, marls, shales and sandstones, containing Cloudina fossils in the eastern region. It is almost undeformed over the Rio Apa Cratonic Block but shows a strong deformational pattern at its western edge. A detailed structural analysis of the Itapucumí Group was conducted in the Vallemí Mine, along with a regional survey in other outcrops downstream in the Paraguay River and in the San Alfredo, Cerro Paiva and Sargento José E. López regions. In the main Vallemí quarry, the structural style is characterized by an axial-plane slaty cleavage in open to isoclinal folds, sometimes overturned, associated with N-S trending thrust faults and shear zones of E-vergence and with a low-grade chlorite zone metamorphism. The structural data presented here are compatible with the hypothesis of a newly recognized mobile belt on the western side of the Rio Apa Cratonic Block, with opposite vergence to that of the Paraguay Mobile Belt in Brazil. Both belts are related to the Late Brasiliano/Pan-African tectonic cycle with a Lower Cambrian deformation and metamorphism age. The deformation could be due to the late collision of the Amazonian Craton with the remainder of Western Gondwana or to the western active plate boundary related to the Pampean Belt. The structural and lithologic differences between the western Itapucumí Group in the Vallemí and Paraguay River region and the eastern region, near San Alfredo and Cerro Paiva, suggest that this group could be divided into two lithostratigraphic units, but more stratigraphic and geochronological analyses are required to confirm this possibility.

  3. Seawater calcium isotopic ratios across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, E. M.; Paytan, A.

    2009-12-01

    We reconstructed the evolution of the seawater calcium (Ca) isotopic ratio from marine (pelagic) barite and bulk calcium carbonate over the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT), a period of extreme and rapid change in the global calcite compensation depth (CCD) (Lyle et al., 2008). The CCD is controlled by the balance between calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution in deep sea sediments. Large fluctuations in the CCD may cause changes in the concentration of dissolved Ca in seawater and its isotopic composition if accompanied by imbalances in marine Ca sources and sinks (De La Rocha and DePaolo, 2000). Our results show that the permanent deepening of the CCD during the EOT, which coincided with the major Cenozoic glaciation around 34 million years ago (Zachos et al., 2001), was not accompanied by a significant long-term change in the isotopic ratio of Ca in seawater or its sink (calcium carbonate). A simple isotopic mass balance model is constructed to compare predicted and observed isotopic fluctuations. References: Lyle, M. et al. Pacific Ocean and Cenozoic evolution of climate. Rev. Geophys. 46, 1-47 (2008). De La Rocha, C. L. & DePaolo, D. J. Isotopic evidence for variations in the marine calcium cycle over the Cenozoic. Science 289, 1176-1178 (2000). Zachos, J., Pagani, M., Sloan, L., Thomas, E. & Billups, K. Trends, rhythms, and aberrations in global climate 65 ma to present. Science 292, 686-693 (2001).

  4. A Spectral Study of a New Class of Radio Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Eric S.

    2003-01-01

    This document serves as a final technical report for NASA grants NAG5-9995 and NAG5-9533, entitled 'A Spectral Study of a New Class of Radio Quasars.' The purpose of these grants were to support observations made using the BeppoSAX satellite. The observations took place over two years and covered two SAX observing cycles, respectively AO-3 and AO-4. During this time, I was employed both at Johns Hopkins University (NAG5-9995) and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (NAG5-9533). As the research on these grants was on the same subject and my employment at JHU and UMBC has been consecutive, this document therefore covers both grants. The targets for these observations were four radio-loud quasars chosen from the first two X-ray selected samples of such objects. These were the brightest examples of the newly found class of X-ray loud flat-spectrum radio quasars, which prior to 1997, had never been seen before. However, my previous work with collaborators Paolo Padovani and Paolo Giommi on the DXRBS survey showed that they make up about 25% of the population of flat-spectrum radio quasars, but had not been seen before because of selection biases (all previous samples of these objects had been compiled in the radio). The purpose of the SAX observations was to investigate the shape of their X-ray spectrum, which would tell us where the peak of their synchrotron emission was located.

  5. A Spectral Study of a New Class of Radio Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Eric S.

    2003-01-01

    This document serves as a final technical report for NASA grants NAG5-9995 and NAG5-9533, entitled 'A Spectral Study of a New Class of Radio Quasars.' The purpose of these grants were to support observations made using the BeppoSAX satellite. The observations took place over two years and covered two SAX observing cycles, respectively AO-3 and AO-4. During this time, I was employed both at Johns Hopkins University (NAG5-9995) and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (NAG5-9533). As the research on these grants was on the same subject and my employment at JHU and UMBC has been consecutive, this document therefore covers both grants. The targets for these observations were four radio-loud quasars chosen from the first two X-ray selected samples of such objects. These were the brightest examples of the newly found class of X-ray loud flat-spectrum radio quasars, which prior to 1997, had never been seen before. However, my previous work with collaborators Paolo Padovani and Paolo Giommi on the DXRBS survey showed that they make up about 25% of the population of flat-spectrum radio quasars, but had not been seen before because of selection biases (all previous samples of these objects had been compiled in the radio). The purpose of the SAX observations was to investigate the shape of their X-ray spectrum, which would tell us where the peak of their synchrotron emission was located.

  6. Retracing diagenetic processes in marine porewaters using Ca isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ockert, C.; Teichert, B. M.; Kaufhold, S.; Gussone, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) isotope ratios of marine organic and inorganic mineral precipitates are used to monitor changes in the oceanic Ca-budget and in paleo-temperature, and serve as a proxy for the trophic level of organisms in the food chain (c.f. Skulan et al., 1997; Zhu et al., 1998). However, during interaction between sediments and porewater, the Ca isotopic composition of marine porewaters might be shifted, bearing the potential to alter the Ca isotope proxy records. While processes, such as partial dissolution of calcareous shells and carbonate recrystallization have been studied (Fantle and DePaolo, 2007; Turchyn and DePaolo 2011), other diagenetic processes such as ion exchange with clay minerals have not been taken into account while studying Ca isotope profiles of porewaters. Nevertheless, first experiments and the investigation of natural porewaters indicate that this process has a significant effect on the Ca isotope composition in marine porewaters. Laboratory experiments aimed to determine if Ca isotope fractionation occurs during Ca adsorption and exchange with ammonium on clay minerals. The results show that Ca adsorption in a seawater environment is associated with fractionation, where light Ca is preferably adorbed. The addition of ammonium to the experimental set up caused partial release of Ca accompanied by isotope fractionation. Based on the results of the experiments, model calculations tested the impact of varying clay mineral type, content and sediment porosity, revealing that ion exchange processes with clay minerals predominantly shift the porewater signal to lighter values. This is in agreement with observations by Teichert et al. (2009), who found a correlation of ammonium-concentration and δ44/40Ca ratios in the porewater of drill core samples from the Cascadia accretionary margin (ODP Leg 204). Calcium isotope ratios of natural marine porewaters of three sites in the North Atlantic (IODP Expedition 303) show that the correlation between

  7. Static and dynamic characterization of alluvial deposits in the Tiber River Valley: New data for assessing potential ground motion in the City of Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzano, F.; Caserta, A.; Govoni, A.; Marra, F.; Martino, S.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a case study conducted on the Holocene alluvial deposits of the Tiber River valley, in the city of Rome. The main test site selected for the study, Valco S. Paolo, is located about 2 km South of Rome's historical centre. The alluvial deposits were dynamically characterized in a comprehensive way via site investigations and geotechnical laboratory tests. Normalized shear modulus decay and damping curves (G/G0 and D/D0 vs γ) were obtained for the dominantly fine-grained levels. The curves demonstrate that these levels have a more marked shear stiffness decay if compared with the underlying Pliocene bedrock. Decay curves from laboratory tests for the Tiber alluvia correlated well with the trend of the function proposed by Hardin and Drnevich, making it possible to derive their specific interpolation function coefficients. Use was made of the extrapolation of the findings from the Valco S. Paolo test site to a large part of Rome's historical centre by means of two other test sites, supported by an engineering-geology model of the complex spatial distribution of the Tiber alluvia. The experimental Valco S. Paolo Vs profile was extrapolated to the other test sites on the basis of a stratigraphic criterion; the analysis of seismic noise measurements, obtained for the three test sites, validated the engineering-geology based extrapolation and showed that the main rigidity contrast occurs inside the alluvial body (at the contact with the underlying basal gravel-level G) and not between the alluvia and the Plio-Pleistocene bedrock, composed of highly consistent clay (Marne Vaticane). The 1D modeling of local seismic response to the maximum expected earthquakes in the city of Rome confirms that the deposits have one principal mode of vibration at about 1 Hz. However, the simulation also evidenced that the silty-clay deposits (level C), making up the most part of the Tiber alluvial body, play a key role in characterizing the soil column

  8. Red, White and Black: Colors of Beauty, Tints of Health and Cosmetic Materials in Early Modern English Art Writing.

    PubMed

    Sammern, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Alongside Richard Haydocke's translation of Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo's treatise on painting (1598), the article examines concepts of color concerning cosmetics, painting and complexion as they relate to aesthetics, artistic and medical practice in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Beginning with white and red as ideal colors of beauty in Agnolo Firenzuola's Discourse on the beauty of women (1541), the essay places color in relation to major issues in art, medicine and empiricism by discussing beauty as a quality of humoral theory and its colors as visual results of physiological processes. Challenging the relation of art and nature, gender and production, Lomazzo's account of complexion and Haydocke's additions on cosmetic practices and face-painting provide key passages that shed light on the relation of cosmetics colors, art writing and artistic practices at the convergence of the body, art and medicine in the context of the emerging English virtuosi around 1600.

  9. The Risks of Childbirth:

    PubMed Central

    De Renzi, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Summary In seventeenth-century Rome a popular financial scheme made it crucial to establish if pregnancy or childbirth had caused a woman's death. Courts sought medical advice, and this prompted physicians to reconsider the issues. Their disagreements provide historians with evidence from which to reassess received views of early modern doctors' involvement with birthing bodies. Among others, Paolo Zacchia intervened, revealing discord between physicians and jurists on how to establish the causes of death. One of his testimonies in a case shows more broadly how legal, medical, and lay views on pregnancy and childbirth intersected in courts of law. In Roman tribunals the very distinction between healthy and preternatural births was contentious, and the parties had an interest in having births either proved healthy in medical terms or construed as pathological. The controversies, the author argues, challenge historical expectations about early modern perceptions, including the boundaries between female and male, private and public, healthy and pathological. PMID:21196603

  10. KSC-07pd2022

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-07-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, STS-120Mission Specialist Paolo Nespoli practices using a tool on the main bus switching unit that is part of the payload on the mission. A main bus switching unit is used for power distribution, circuit protection and fault isolation on the space station's power system. The units route power to proper locations in the space station, such as from solar arrays through umbilicals into the U.S. Lab. The unit will be installed on the external stowage platform 2 attached to the Quest airlock for temporary storage. Discovery is targeted to launch mission STS-120 no earlier than Oct. 20. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  11. KSC-07pd2021

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-07-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, STS-120 crew members inspect the main bus switching unit that is part of the payload on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Paolo Nespoli, Doug Wheelock and Scott Parazynski. Wheelock is practicing using a tool on the unit. Nespoli represents the European Space Agency. A main bus switching unit is used for power distribution, circuit protection and fault isolation on the space station's power system. The units route power to proper locations in the space station, such as from solar arrays through umbilicals into the U.S. Lab. The unit will be installed on the external stowage platform 2 attached to the Quest airlock for temporary storage. Discovery is targeted to launch mission STS-120 no earlier than Oct. 20. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  12. KSC-07pd2020

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-07-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, STS-120 crew members inspect the main bus switching unit that is part of the payload on their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Paolo Nespoli, Doug Wheelock and Scott Parazynski. Wheelock is practicing using a tool on the unit. Nespoli represents the European Space Agency. A main bus switching unit is used for power distribution, circuit protection and fault isolation on the space station's power system. The units route power to proper locations in the space station, such as from solar arrays through umbilicals into the U.S. Lab. The unit will be installed on the external stowage platform 2 attached to the Quest airlock for temporary storage. Discovery is targeted to launch mission STS-120 no earlier than Oct. 20. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  13. [Reply to “Did the Italian Government approve an obsolete project to save Venice?” by P.A. Pirazzoli] Obsolete? No. Necessary! Yes. The gates will save Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bras, Rafael L.; Harleman, Donald R. F.; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rizzoli, Paolo

    We are confused by Paolo Antonio Pirazzoli's argument in these pages that the proposed sea gates to protect Venice from flooding by exceptional tides will not work in the event of sea-level rise. In fact, the two case studies he provides show that they would protect the city. In his examples, Pirazzoli arbitrarily adds a very large, 50-cm sea-level rise to the peak level of the October 1976 flood, which was a week-long event. A 50-cm rise in sea level corresponds to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's central value within an extraordinary range that he cites as 9-88 cm of sea-level rise at the end of 100 years. Even if one accepts this number, given the range of uncertainty, recall that it is the assumed sea-level rise at the end of 100 years.

  14. Pavia, September, 1961: a window on muscles and nerves.

    PubMed

    Mazzarello, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In September 1961, the First International Congress of Electromyography (EMG) was held at the University of Pavia. This event proved to be a sort of foundation stone for the further development of EMG as an organized field. Many of the most distinguished clinical neurophysiologists attended this congress and took an active part in it, delivering important lectures and scientific communications on the various aspects of EMG, including electroneurography. They included: Henri Gastaut, Fritz Buchthal, Jean Edouard Desmedt, Eric Kugelberg, Roger W. Gilliatt, John A. Simpson, Albrecht Struppler, Irena Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, and Howard Edward Lambert. The congress was organized by Paolo Pinelli, at the time a young and brilliant clinical neurophysiologist who had learned the EMG procedure in Copenhagen under the guidance of Fritz Buchthal. Various scientific and social aspects of this important congress are outlined in this paper.

  15. Utility of the Barona demographic equations to estimate premorbid intelligence: information from the WAIS-R standardization sample.

    PubMed

    Paolo, A M; Ryan, J J; Tröster, A I; Hilmer, C D

    1996-05-01

    The WAIS-R (Wechsler, 1981) and elderly WAIS-R standardization samples (Ryan, Paolo, & Brungardt, 1990) were combined to evaluate the utility of the Barona demographic regression equations (Barona, Reynolds, & Chastain, 1984) to estimate premorbid intelligence. The equations underestimated ability for persons with IQs less than 80 and overestimated ability of subjects with IQs greater than 119. The equations also overestimated the IQs of 247 persons with confirmed brain dysfunction. Because this overestimation occurred for impaired persons with IQs less than 90, it is difficult to determine whether the difference reflects true intellectual deterioration or statistical artifact. Abnormal cut-off scores at the 10% and 5% levels are provided to allow clinicians to detect abnormal discrepancies between the estimated and obtained IQs.

  16. Pasolini's Edipo Re: myth, play, and autobiography.

    PubMed

    Pipolo, Tony

    2013-08-01

    The pervasive influence of the Oedipus complex on world culture is a given, yet throughout the long history of motion pictures only one major filmmaker has tackled the literary source that inspired Freud. The film, Edipo Re, directed by Italian poet, novelist, and social and political activist Pier Paolo Pasolini, not only reconstructs the myth and adapts Sophocles' tragedy, but uses both as a basis of cinematic autobiography. This paper is a detailed analysis of the formal, stylistic, and thematic dimensions of this film, illustrating the complex manner in which Pasolini interweaves myth, play, and autobiography into a unique cinematic achievement. This analysis is followed by speculations on the implications of the film's structure and techniques and on what they reveal about Pasolini's character, his sexual profile, and the ignominious murder that ended his life.

  17. jsc2017e095972

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-17

    jsc2017e095972 (July 16, 2017) --- With a tree-shrouded statue of Vladimir Lenin serving as a backdrop at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 52-53 crewmember Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (left) answers a reporter’s question July 16 as his crewmates, Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Randy Bresnik of NASA (right) look on. The trio flew to the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for final pre-launch training for their launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft and a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Beth Weissinger

  18. jsc2017e095967

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-16

    jsc2017e095967 (July 16, 2017) --- With a tree-shrouded statue of Vladimir Lenin serving as a backdrop at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 52-53 crewmember Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) answers a reporter’s question July 16 as his crewmates, Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (left) and Randy Bresnik of NASA (right) look on. The trio flew to the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for final pre-launch training for their launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft and a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Beth Weissinger

  19. jsc2017e095968

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-16

    jsc2017e095968 (July 16, 2017) --- With a tree-shrouded statue of Vladimir Lenin serving as a backdrop at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 52-53 crewmember Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) answers a reporter’s question July 16 as his crewmates, Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency (left) and Randy Bresnik of NASA (right) look on. The trio flew to the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for final pre-launch training for their launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft and a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Beth Weissinger

  20. Unpiloted Japanese Kounotori HTV-2 Transfer Vehicle

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-27

    ISS026-E-021017 (27 Jan. 2011) --- The unpiloted Japanese Kounotori2 H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV2) approaches the International Space Station, delivering more than four tons of food and supplies to the space station and its crew members. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched HTV2 aboard an H-IIB rocket from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan at 12:37 a.m. (EST) (2:27 p.m. Japan time) on Jan. 22, 2011. NASA astronaut Catherine (Cady) Coleman and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, both Expedition 26 flight engineers, used the station’s robotic Canadarm2 to attach the HTV2 to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony node. The attachment was completed at 9:51 a.m. (EST) on Jan. 27, 2011.

  1. jsc2017e095970

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-17

    jsc2017e095970 (July 16, 2017) --- With a tree-shrouded statue of Vladimir Lenin serving as a backdrop at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, the Expedition 52-53 prime and backup crewmembers and some family members pose for pictures July 16 before the crewmembers flew to the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for final pre-launch training. From left to right are backup crewmembers Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Mark Vande Hei of NASA and Alexander Misurkin of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and prime crewmembers Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and his family, including his wife Alexandra, Randy Bresnik of NASA and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency and his wife, Alexandra. Ryazanskiy, Bresnik and Nespoli will launch July 28 from Baikonur on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Beth Weissinger

  2. jsc2017e095966

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-16

    jsc2017e095966 (July 16, 2017) --- At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 52-53 crewmembers Randy Bresnik of NASA (left), Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and his wife, Alexandra and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency and his wife, Alexandra (right), walk to busses July 16 waiting to take them to a nearby airport for a flight to their launch site at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. In Baikonur, they will conduct final training for their launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Beth Weissinger

  3. Division B Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, H.; Green, D. W. E.; Samus, N. N.; Aksnes, K.; Gilmore, A. C.; Nakano, S.; Sphar, T.; Tichá, J.; Williams, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during Honolulu General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Tuesday, 11 August 2015. The meeting was attended by Hitoshi Yamaoka (President), Daniel Green (Director of the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams, CBAT, via Skype), Steven Chesley (JPL), Paul Chodas (JPL), Alan Gilmore (Canterbury University), Shinjiro Kouzuma (Chukyo University), Paolo Mazzali (Co-Chair of the Supernova Working Group), Elena Pian (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa), Marion Schmitz (chair IAU Working Group Designations + NED), David Tholen (University of Hawaii), Jana Ticha (Klet Observatory), Milos Tichy (Klet Observatory), Giovanni Valsecchi (INAF\\slash Italy), Gareth Williams (Minor Planet Center). Apologies: Nikolai Samus (General Catalogue of Variable Stars, GCVS).

  4. jsc2017e096664

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-17

    jsc2017e096664 (July 17, 2017) --- In the Integration Facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, unidentified Expedition 52-53 crewmembers display toys from their children July 17 outside their Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft during a fit check dress rehearsal. The toys are hung above the crewmembers’ heads in the Soyuz’ descent module compartment as weightless, or “zero-g” indicators during the launch phase of the mission. Randy Bresnik of NASA, Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: Andrey Shelepin/Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center

  5. FUTURE PERSPECTIVES IN MELANOMA RESEARCH. Meeting report from the “Melanoma Research: a bridge from Naples to the World. Napoli, December 5th–6 th2011”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    After more than 30 years, landmark progress has been made in the treatment of cancer, and melanoma in particular, with the success of new molecules such as ipilimumab, vemurafenib and active specific immunization. After the first congress in December 2010, the second edition of “Melanoma Research: a bridge from Naples to the World” meeting, organized by Paolo A. Ascierto (INT, Naples, Italy), Francesco M. Marincola (NIH, Bethesda, USA), and Nicola Mozzillo (INT, Naples, Italy) took place in Naples, on 5–6 December 2011. We have identified four new topics of discussion: Innovative Approaches in Prevention, Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment, New Pathways and Targets in Melanoma: An Update about Immunotherapy, and Combination Strategies. This international congress gathered more than 30 international faculty members and was focused on recent advances in melanoma molecular biology, immunology and therapy, and created an interactive atmosphere which stimulated discussion of new approaches and strategies in the field of melanoma. PMID:22551296

  6. 2017 Total Solar Eclipse - ISS Transit - (NHQ201708210203)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    2017 Total Solar Eclipse - ISS Transit - (NHQ201708210203) In this video captured at 1,500 frames per second with a high-speed camera, the International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  7. Discussing epigenetics in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    With the goal of discussing how epigenetic control and chromatin remodeling contribute to the various processes that lead to cellular plasticity and disease, this symposium marks the collaboration between the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) in France and the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Organized by Paolo Sassone-Corsi (UCI) and held at the Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences at the UCI campus December 15–16, 2011, this was the first of a series of international conferences on epigenetics dedicated to the scientific community in Southern California. The meeting also served as the official kick off for the newly formed Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at the School of Medicine, UCI (http://cem.igb.uci.edu). PMID:22414797

  8. Discussing epigenetics in Southern California: a report from the International Symposium on Epigenetic Control and Cellular Plasticity, UCI, December 15-16, 2011.

    PubMed

    Rattner, Barbara P

    2012-04-01

    With the goal of discussing how epigenetic control and chromatin remodeling contribute to the various processes that lead to cellular plasticity and disease, this symposium marks the collaboration between the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) in France and the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Organized by Paolo Sassone-Corsi (UCI) and held at the Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences at the UCI campus December 15-16, 2011, this was the first of a series of international conferences on epigenetics dedicated to the scientific community in Southern California. The meeting also served as the official kick off for the newly formed Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at the School of Medicine, UCI (http://cem.igb.uci.edu).

  9. STS-120 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member STS-120 crew headed toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. Onboard were astronauts Pam Melroy, commander; George Zamka, pilot; Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli and Daniel Tani, all mission specialists. Discovery linked up with the station for a joint mission of continued construction, The mission delivered the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony. During the 14-day mission, the crew installed Harmony, and moved and deployed the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position.

  10. STS-120 Pilot George Zamka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Astronaut George Zamka, STS-120 pilot, is seated at the pilot's station on the forward flight deck of the Space Shuttle Discovery during rendezvous and docking operations with the International Space Station (ISS). The STS-120 mission launched from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. The crew also included Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Stephanie D. Wilson, all mission specialists; Pamela A. Melroy, commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer; and Paolo A. Nespoli, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA). Major objectives included the installation of the P6 solar array of the port truss and delivery and installment of Harmony, the Italian-built U.S. Node 2 on the ISS.

  11. STS-120 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member STS-120 crew headed toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. Onboard were astronauts Pam Melroy, commander; George Zamka, pilot; Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli, and Daniel Tani, all mission specialists. Discovery linked up with the station for a joint mission of continued construction. The mission delivered the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony. During the 14-day mission, the crew installed Harmony, and moved and deployed the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position.

  12. STS-120 Pilot George Zamka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Astronaut George Zamka, STS-120 pilot, is seated at the pilot's station on the forward flight deck of the Space Shuttle Discovery during rendezvous and docking operations with the International Space Station (ISS). The STS-120 mission launched from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. The crew also included Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Stephanie D. Wilson, all mission specialists; Pamela A. Melroy, commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer; and Paolo A. Nespoli, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA). Major objectives included the installation of the P6 solar array of the port truss and delivery and installment of Harmony, the Italian-built U.S. Node 2 on the ISS.

  13. STS-120 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member STS-120 crew headed toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. Onboard were astronauts Pam Melroy, commander; George Zamka, pilot; Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli and Daniel Tani, all mission specialists. Discovery linked up with the station for a joint mission of continued construction, The mission delivered the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony. During the 14-day mission, the crew installed Harmony, and moved and deployed the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position.

  14. STS-120 on Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A photographer used a fisheye lens attached to an electronic still camera to record a series of photos of the Space Shuttle Discovery at the launch pad while the STS-120 crew was at Kennedy Space Center for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test in October 2007. The STS-120 mission launched from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. The crew included Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Stephanie D. Wilson, all mission specialists; George D. Zamka, pilot; Pamela A. Melroy, commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer; and Paolo A. Nespoli, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA). Major objectives included the installation of the P6 solar array of the port truss and delivery and installment of Harmony, the Italian-built U.S. Node 2 on the International Space Station (ISS).

  15. STS-120 Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These seven astronauts took a break from training to pose for the STS-120 crew portrait. Pictured from the left are astronauts Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Stephanie D. Wilson, all mission specialists; George D. Zamka, pilot; Pamela A. Melroy, commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer; and Paolo A. Nespoli, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA). The crew members were attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. Tani joined Expedition 16 as flight engineer after launching to the International Space Station (ISS) and is scheduled to return home on mission STS-122. STS-120 launched October 23, 2007 with the main objectives of installing the U.S. Node 2, Harmony, and the relocation and deployment of the P6 truss to its permanent location.

  16. STS-120 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member STS-120 crew headed toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. Onboard were astronauts Pam Melroy, commander; George Zamka, pilot; Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli and Daniel Tani, all mission specialists. Discovery linked up with the station for a joint mission of continued construction. The mission delivered the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony. During the 14-day mission, the crew installed Harmony, moved and deployed the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position.

  17. An early literary description of emotional syncope in the Fifth Canto of Dante Alighieri's Commedia: 'E caddi come corpo morto cade'.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Estañol; Guillermo, Delgado; Eduardo, Jiménez-Mayo; Horacio, Sentíes-Madrid; Madrid, Horacio Sentíes

    2014-07-01

    Dante's Divine Comedy is universally acclaimed as one of the great masterpieces in world literature. It is written in first person singular and this gives an intimate acquaintance with the vision of the poet. In the Fifth Canto, he exquisitely describes the story of Paolo Malatesta and Francesca da Rimini, illicit lovers killed by Francesca's husband, Gianciotto Malatesta. The story, dramatically told by Francesca, deeply moves the poet, who suddenly faints. In the words of Dante himself: 'E caddi come corpo morto cade' (And fell, even as a dead body falls). This probably is the first literary description of an emotional syncope in world literature. We found that three great plastic artists (John Flaxman, William Blake and Gustave Doré) captured the crucial moment of the syncope in three extraordinary images left for posterity.

  18. BCL-2 family proteins as regulators of mitochondria metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gross, Atan

    2016-08-01

    The BCL-2 family proteins are major regulators of apoptosis, and one of their major sites of action are the mitochondria. Mitochondria are the cellular hubs for metabolism and indeed selected BCL-2 family proteins also possess roles related to mitochondria metabolism and dynamics. Here we discuss the link between mitochondrial metabolism/dynamics and the fate of stem cells, with an emphasis on the role of the BID-MTCH2 pair in regulating this link. We also discuss the possibility that BCL-2 family proteins act as metabolic sensors/messengers coming on and off of mitochondria to "sample" the cytosol and provide the mitochondria with up-to-date metabolic information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  19. jsc2017e100897

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-18

    jsc2017e100897 (July 18, 2017) --- At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, the Expedition 52-53 prime and backup crewmembers raised the flags of the U.S., Russia, Italy and Kazakhstan July 18 during traditional pre-launch ceremonies. From left to right are Sergey Ryazanskiy and Alexander Misurkin of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) raising the Russian flag, Mark Vande Hei and Randy Bresnik of NASA raising the U.S. flag, Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency raising the flag of Italy and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) raising the flag of Kazakhstan. Ryazanskiy, Bresnik and Nespoli will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  20. jsc2017e100896

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-18

    jsc2017e100896 (July 18, 2017) --- At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, the Expedition 52-53 prime and backup crewmembers raised the flags of the U.S., Russia, Italy and Kazakhstan July 18 during traditional pre-launch ceremonies. From left to right are Sergey Ryazanskiy and Alexander Misurkin of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) raising the Russian flag, Mark Vande Hei and Randy Bresnik of NASA raising the U.S. flag, Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency raising the flag of Italy and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) raising the flag of Kazakhstan. Ryazanskiy, Bresnik and Nespoli will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  1. Emerging role of Lon protease as a master regulator of mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Pinti, Marcello; Gibellini, Lara; Nasi, Milena; De Biasi, Sara; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Lon protease is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease highly conserved throughout the evolution, crucial for the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis. Lon acts as a chaperone of misfolded proteins, and is necessary for maintaining mitochondrial DNA. The impairment of these functions has a deep impact on mitochondrial functionality and morphology. An altered expression of Lon leads to a profound reprogramming of cell metabolism, with a switch from respiration to glycolysis, which is often observed in cancer cells. Mutations of Lon, which likely impair its chaperone properties, are at the basis of a genetic inherited disease named of the cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal (CODAS) syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Isotopic Tracers for Waste Fluid Tracking and Fluid-Soil Interactions: Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop and advance isotopic methods for characterizing fluid flow and chemical transport through the vadose zone to groundwater. Previous research has been concentrated on developing and comparing different isotopic systems (e.g., hydrogen, oxygen and strontium isotopes) for determining fluid infiltration rates and pathways in the vadose zone (e.g., Maher et al., 2003; DePaolo et al., 2004; Singleton et al., in press). The focus of our current efforts is on using the isotopic compositions of different chemical phases (e.g., uranium, nitrate) to track their movement through the vadose zone. Preliminary results indicate that this will be a powerful tool for assessing environmental risks associated with vadose zone contamination.

  3. Expedition 53-54 Crew Docks to the Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-13

    After launching in their Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 53-54 Soyuz Commander Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos and flight engineers Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba of NASA arrived at the International Space Station Sept. 13. Following their six-hour journey, they docked their Soyuz to the Poisk module on the Russian segment of the complex. Misurkin, Vande Hei and Acaba opened hatches and were greeted by station Commander Randy Bresnik of NASA and flight engineers Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency. As the hatches were opened, the families of the newly arrived crew members and American and Russian space officials viewed the activities from a conference facility in Baikonur.

  4. ]U.S. Commercial Cargo Ship Departs Space Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-17

    The SpaceX/Dragon cargo craft departed the International Space Station Sept. 17, one month after delivering more than three tons of supplies and scientific experiments for the station’s residents. Expedition 53 Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency and station Commander Randy Bresnik used the Cnadarm2 robotic arm to release Dragon after it was detached from the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module. Dragon was scheduled to move to a safe distance away from the station for its engine to conduct a deorbit burn, enabling it to drop out of orit for a parachute-assisted splashdown in the Pacific southwest of Long Beach, California. Dragon was launched on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from the Kennedy Space Center on Aug. 14, arriving at the orbital outpost Aug. 16.

  5. Astronaut Moments: Randy Bresnik

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-12

    Astronaut Moments with NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik. Bresnik and his crewmates, cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency), will launch on the Russian Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft at 11:41 a.m. on July 28. They are scheduled to return to Earth in December. The crew members will continue several hundred experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science currently underway and scheduled to take place aboard humanity's only permanently occupied orbiting lab. HD download link: https://archive.org/details/jsc2017m000414_Astronaut-Moments-Randy-Bresnik _______________________________________ FOLLOW THE SPACE STATION! Twitter: https://twitter.com/Space_Station Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ISS Instagram: https://instagram.com/iss/

  6. Shutting down the pore: The search for small molecule inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Šileikytė, Justina; Forte, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) is now recognized as playing a key role in a wide variety of human diseases whose common pathology may be based in mitochondrial dysfunction. Recently, PTP assays have been adapted to high-throughput screening approaches to identify small molecules specifically inhibiting the PTP. Following extensive secondary chemistry, the most potent inhibitors of the PTP described to date have been developed. This review will provide an overview of each of these screening efforts, use of resulting compounds in animal models of PTP-based diseases, and problems that will require further study. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  7. The Fading of the Narrow-Line Region in 3C 390.3: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, J.; Wamsteker, W.

    1988-07-01

    The Letter "The Fading of the Narrow-Line Region in 3C 390.3" by J. Clavel and W. Wamsteker (Ap. J. [Letters], 320, L9 [1987]) contains an error in the last two sentences of section IIIb: The density we compute for the broad line region (BLR) gas is wrong by a factor of 10 exactly and should read 10^11^ cm^-3^ instead of 10^10^. Such a density is about 30 times larger than the canonical 10^9.5^ cm^-3^ value generally used in model calculations but similar to the density inferred for the BLR in NGC 4151 by J. Clavel et al. (Ap. J., 321, 251 [1987]). The authors are grateful to Paolo Padovani from STScI for bringing this error to their attention.

  8. Is there any relation between chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and multiple sclerosis? – a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Jedynak, Waldemar; Cieszanowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Summary Though the etiology of multiple sclerosis remains unknown, the widely accepted explanation is that it has an autoimmune inflammatory background. In 2006 Paolo Zamboni renewed the somewhat forgotten vascular theory of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, proposing the new entity of ‘chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency’. As a result of this hypothesis, Zamboni suggested an endovascular treatment for multiple sclerosis involving venoplasty of the internal jugular vein and the azygos vein. Unfortunately, several teams have tried to replicate Zamboni’s results without success. In this review, we present a chronological description of the results of the studies conducted by Zamboni and the later attempts to replicate his work. The main conclusion is that, taking into account results that are currently available, we should remain cautious and routine use of this treatment in patients should not be advisable. PMID:24917892

  9. Kitchen table wisdom: a Freirian approach to medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann B; Burgess, Jane D; Danvers, Karina; Malone, Janice; Winfield, Subrena D; Saunders, Lois

    2005-01-01

    Most interventions to promote medication adherence are based on psychological theories of individual behavior. In contrast, this article describes the theory and practice of a socially based adherence intervention that is guided by the educational principles of Paolo Freire. This approach asserts that adherence is influenced by the patient's social context and attempts to improve adherence through identifying social constraints on adherence behavior. The program builds on the traditions of patient education through home nursing visits. Using a dialectic process of dialogue and problem solving and working with a team that includes a nurse and a peer-educator, patients are encouraged to act to change their social environment to support their desire to achieve high levels of medication adherence. This strategy does not replace, but rather supplements, traditional methods of understanding individual patient behavior and allows the patient and the nurse to consider potential solutions to adherence challenges in the larger social context.

  10. jsc2017e100895

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-18

    jsc2017e100895 (July 18, 2017) --- In the town of Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 52-53 backup crewmembers Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA, second from left), Alexander Misurkin of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, second from right) and Mark Vande Hei of NASA (far right) enjoy a traditional cup of tea in a mockup of a Russian “yurt” or tent in Baikonur’s space museum July 18 as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies. They are serving as backups to Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, Randy Bresnik of NASA and Paolo Nespoli of the European Space Agency, who will launch July 28 on the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome for a five-month mission on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  11. jsc2010e188227

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-26

    In front of St. Basil’s Cathedral at Red Square in Moscow Nov. 26, 2010, Expedition 26 prime and backup crew members posed for pictures as part of ceremonial activities leading to the launch of the Expedition 26 crew in the Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Dec. 16 (Kazakhstan time). Among those at the Kremlin were JAXA astronaut Satoshi Furukawa (left), backup flight engineer and backup Soyuz commander Anatoly Ivanishin (second from left), NASA’s Mike Fossum (third from left), backup flight engineer; NASA’s Cady Coleman (fourth from left), Expedition 26 prime flight engineer, prime Soyuz commander Dmitry Kondratyev (fifth from left) and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli (far right), prime flight engineer. Credit: NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  12. 2017 Total Solar Eclipse - ISS Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. 2017 Total Solar Eclipse - ISS Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  14. 2017 Total Solar Eclipse - ISS Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    This composite image, made from 4 frames, shows the International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 from , Northern Cascades National Park in Washington. Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. 2017 Total Solar Eclipse - ISS Transit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    This composite image, made from seven frames, shows the International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  16. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    'Past' prize for astrophysicists Three astrophysicists have won the "past" division of the 2009 Dan David Prize for their work on imaging the cosmic microwave background. Paolo de Bernardis of the University of Rome La Sapienza and Andrew Lange of the California Institute of Technology received the award for leading the BOOMERANG experiment, while Paul Richards of the University of California, Berkeley, was honoured for his work on the MAXIMA experiment. The trio will share a 1m prize from the Dan David Foundation based in Israel, which has given three such awards - for achievements with an impact on the world's past, present and future - every year since 2002. Some 10% of the prize will go to support outstanding astrophysics doctoral students. Other recipients of the 2009 prizes are former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair for "present leadership" in the Middle East; and Robert Gallo, an AIDS researcher at the University of Maryland, for "future global public health".

  17. Cultural Alimentation in Latin America

    SciTech Connect

    2005-12-15

    Le Prof. Paolo Freire(nom?) a dirigé en Brésil un plan national d'alphabétisatation d'adultes. La base de sa méthode est d'essayer de ne pas rester sur la mécanique du mot, mais de le relier avec la réalité sociale et donner un réveillement critique de la conscience populaire en face de la réalité historique du pays. Il était professeur d'histoire et de philosophie de Récife, puis exilé et depuis il était prof. à Harvard, a travaillé à l'Unesco et est maintenant conseiller spécial à l'Office d'Education du centre oecuménique des églises

  18. Pavia, September, 1961: a window on muscles and nerves

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarello, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Summary In September 1961, the First International Congress of Electromyography (EMG) was held at the University of Pavia. This event proved to be a sort of foundation stone for the further development of EMG as an organized field. Many of the most distinguished clinical neurophysiologists attended this congress and took an active part in it, delivering important lectures and scientific communications on the various aspects of EMG, including electroneurography. They included: Henri Gastaut, Fritz Buchthal, Jean Edouard Desmedt, Eric Kugelberg, Roger W. Gilliatt, John A. Simpson, Albrecht Struppler, Irena Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, and Howard Edward Lambert. The congress was organized by Paolo Pinelli, at the time a young and brilliant clinical neurophysiologist who had learned the EMG procedure in Copenhagen under the guidance of Fritz Buchthal. Various scientific and social aspects of this important congress are outlined in this paper. PMID:22687169

  19. KSC-07pd2799

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During emergency egress from Launch Pad 39A, STS-120 crew members are in the slidewire basket. In front, Mission Specialist Paolo Nespoli holds the release lever. Behind him are Mission Specialists Daniel Tani and Scott Parazynski. The basket can carry them to a safe landing site below, if needed. Nespoli represents the European Space Agency. The activity is part of the prelaunch terminal countdown demonstration test, or TCDT. The TCDT at NASA's Kennedy Space Center provides astronauts and ground crews an opportunity to participate in various launch preparation activities, including equipment familiarization and emergency training. The STS-120 mission will deliver the U.S. Node 2 module, named Harmony, aboard space shuttle Discovery to the International Space Station. Discovery is targeted to launch on its 14-day mission at 11:38 a.m. EDT on Oct. 23. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  20. Quantum physics and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    There is a widely used and successful theory of ``chemical reaction networks,'' which provides a framework describing systems governed by mass action kinetics. Computer science and population biology use the same ideas under a different name: ``stochastic Petri nets.'' But if we look at these theories from the perspective of quantum theory, they turn out to involve creation and annihilation operators, coherent states and other well-known ideas--yet in a context where probabilities replace amplitudes. I will explain this connection as part of a detailed analogy between quantum mechanics and stochastic mechanics which we've produced several results on recently, including the recent analytical results uniting quantum physics and complex networks. Our general idea is about merging concepts from quantum physics and complex network theory to provide a bidirectional bridge between both disciplines. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  1. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    Alba Paolo (Università di Torino) Becattini Francesco (Università di Firenze) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonaccorso Angela (INFN Pisa) Colonna Maria (INFN-LNS Catania) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) De Angelis Giacomo (INFN-LNL Legnaro) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Gattobigio Mario (INLN, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, France) Gensini Paolo (INFN Lecce) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (Università del Salento) Giusti Carlotta (Università di Pavia) Greco Vincenzo (Università di Catania) Grossi Eduardo (Università di Firenze) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Lavagno Andrea (Politecnico di Torino) Logoteta Domenico (Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Lombardo Maria Paola (INFN-LNF Frascati) Lo Meo Sergio (ENEA Bologna) Mannarelli Massimo (INFN-LNGS Assergi) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pirrone Sara (INFN Catania) Puglisi Armando (Università di Catania) Radici Marco (INFN Pavia) Rinaldi Matteo (Università di Perugia) Roggero Alessandro (Università di Trento) Rolando Valentina (Università di Ferrara) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Ruggieri Marco (Università di Catania) Salmè Gianni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Scopetta Sergio (Università di Perugia) Taiuti Mauro (Università di Genova) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Viviani Michele (INFN Pisa) Vorabbi Matteo (Università di Pavia)

  2. High Concentrations of Ozone Air Pollution on Mount Everest: Health Implications for Sherpa Communities and Mountaineers.

    PubMed

    Semple, John L; Moore, G W Kent; Koutrakis, Petros; Wolfson, Jack M; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    Semple, John L., G.W. Kent Moore, Petros Koutrakis, Jack M. Wolfson, Paolo Cristofanelli, and Paolo Bonasoni. High concentrations of ozone air pollution on Mount Everest: health implications for Sherpa communities and mountaineers. High Alt Med Biol. 17:365-369, 2016.-Introduction: Populations in remote mountain regions are increasingly vulnerable to multiple climate mechanisms that influence levels of air pollution. Few studies have reported on climate-sensitive health outcomes unique to high altitude ecosystems. In this study, we report on the discovery of high-surface ozone concentrations and the potential impact on health outcomes on Mount Everest and the high Himalaya. Surface ozone measurements were collected during ascending transects in the Mount Everest region of Nepal with passive nitrite-coated Ogawa filter samplers to obtain 8-hour personal exposures (2860-5364 m asl). In addition, the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid, a GAW-WMO Global Station sited in the Khumbu Valley (5079 m asl), collected ozone mixing ratios with photometric gas analyzer. Surface ozone measurements increased with altitude with concentrations that exceed 100 ppb (8-hour exposure). Highest values were during the spring season and the result of diverse contributions: hemispheric background values, the descent of ozone-rich stratospheric air, and the transport of tropospheric pollutants occurring at different spatial scales. Multiple climate factors, including descending stratospheric ozone and imported anthropogenic air masses from the Indo-Gangetic Plain, contribute to ambient ozone exposure levels in the vicinity of Mount Everest that are similar to if not higher than those reported in industrialized cities.

  3. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  4. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  5. PREFACE: International Workshop: Meson Production at Intermediate and High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, Giorgio; Bossi, Fabio; Levi Sandri, Paolo; Pedroni, Paolo; Schmieden, Hartmut

    2012-03-01

    The International Workshop 'Meson Production at Intermediate and High Energies' was held in the 'Capo Peloro Resort' Hotel in Messina, Italy on November 10-11, 2011. The workshop was organized by the University of Messina and 'Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo', in the wonderful setting of the confluence between the Ionian and Tyrrhenian seas, the center of the ancient historical and mythological civilizations of the Mediterranean countries. The main purpose of this workshop was to deal with aspects of electromagnetic and strong forces by meson photoproduction and the electron-positron collider, and to search for dark energy. The subjects covered at the workshop in Messina involved the main activities of the laboratories of Europe and countries overseas. The topics included: Baryon spectroscopy and 'missing resonances' Polarization observables Pseudoscalar and vector meson production through e.m. and hadronic reactions Hadron cross section measurements Measurements with polarized target and/or beam Editors: Giorgio GiardinaUniversity of Messina Fabio BossiINFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati Paolo Levi SandriINFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati Paolo PedroniINFN - Sezione di Pavia Hartmut SchmiedenUniversity of Bonn Organizing Committee: Chairman:G GiardinaMessina, Italy Co-Chairman:F BossiFrascati, Italy Co-Chairman:P Levi SandriFrascati, Italy Co-Chairman:P PedroniPavia, Italy Co-Chairman:H SchmiedenBonn, Germany Scientific Secretary:G MandaglioUniversity of Messina, Italy Local Organizing Committee: F Curciarello, V De Leo, G Fazio, G Giardina, G Mandaglio and M Romaniuk Organizing Institutions: Messina logoFBP logo University of MessinaFondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina) Sponsored by: University of Messina, Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina) and INFN Sezione di Catania http://newcleo.unime.it/workshop2011/ Group Photo 1 Group Photo 2

  6. PREFACE: XXXVI Symposium on Nuclear Physics (Cocoyoc 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Morales-Agiss, Irving; Martínez-Quiroz, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    logo The XXXVI Symposium on Nuclear Physics, organized by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the Mexican Physical Society, took place from 7-10 January, 2013. As it is customary, the Symposium was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, in the state of Morelos, Mexico. Conference photograph This international venue with many years of tradition was attended by outstanding physicists, some of them already regulars to this meeting and others who joined us for the first time; a total of 45 attendees from different countries (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico and the United States). A variety of topics related to nuclear physics (nuclear reactions, radioactive beams, nuclear structure, fundamental neutron physics, sub-nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, among others) were presented in 26 invited talks and 10 contributed posters. Local Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (IF-UNAM)) Enrique Martínez-Quíroz (ININ)) Irving Morales-Agiss (ICN-UNAM)) International Advisory Committee Osvaldo Civitarese (UNLP, Argentina) Jerry P Draayer (LSU, USA)) Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri (ORNL, USA)) Paulo Gomes (UFF, Brazil)) Piet Van Isacker (GANIL, France)) James J Kolata (UND, USA)) Reiner Krücken (TRIUMF, Canada)) Jorge López (UTEP, USA)) Stuart Pittel (UD, USA)) W Michael Snow (IU, USA)) Adam Szczepaniak (IU, USA)) Michael Wiescher (UND, USA)) A list of participants is available in the PDF

  7. The UP College of Nursing Collaborating Center for Nursing Development in Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Yapchiongco, A S

    1990-01-01

    Officially designated as one of WHO's Collaborating Centers for Nursing Development (CCND), the UP College of Nursing in the Philippines will take on a leading role in achieving "health for all" through primary health care (PHC). The 1978 Declaration of Alma-Ata called for the goal of health for all by the year 2000, and recognized the key role of the nursing profession in this effort. In order to be designated a WHO collaborating center, an institution must be able to provide scientific and technical leadership at the national and international level, must be a stable institution, and must have the capacity to contribute to WHO programs. A WHO collaborating center forms part of an international network of institutions. Having become such a center, the UP College will form part of the Global Network for Nursing Development, organized in March 1987. The Global Network's functions include: 1) coordinating activities and promoting technical cooperation; 2) disseminating and exchanging informational; 3) monitoring trends in health services development and assessing their implications for nursing development; 4) supporting research; 5) gathering support and resources; and 6) promoting the goals of nursing development. As part of the Global Network, the UP College has developed a 4-year plan to fulfill the network's functions. During the June 1989 inauguration of the CCND, the Philippine Secretary of Health, Dr. Alfredo R. A. Bengzon, noted the country's lopsided ratio of health personnel per population, and issued a challenge to the UP College to lead the country in accelerating nursing development.

  8. Invited commentary: The context and challenge of von Pettenkofer's contributions to epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, Gerald M; Susser, Ezra

    2007-12-01

    Max von Pettenkofer is largely remembered for swallowing cholera vibrio, trying thereby to falsify the claim of his rival, the contagionist Robert Koch, that the bacillus he had isolated was cholera's sufficient cause. In this issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, Alfredo Morabia reminds us that von Pettenkofer was more than this futile gesture. He was a 19th century public health leader whose multifactorial theory of cholera etiology deeply influenced the dominant anticontagionist school of disease transmission. His authority was undercut by the massive 1892 cholera epidemic in Hamburg, Germany. As it took off, the German government sent in Koch, who successfully contained the epidemic through interventions that von Pettenkofer regularly repudiated-quarantine, disinfection, and the boiling of water. The authors situate the antagonism between these two individuals within a broader scientific and political context that includes the evolution of miasma theory and debates over the role of governments confronted by epidemic disease. They also note that Koch's approach, which focused narrowly on the agent and its eradication, was missing key elements required for applying germ theory to public health. As scientists later incorporated biologic, host, and environmental factors into the germ theory paradigm, they reintroduced some of the complexity that had previously characterized the miasma model.

  9. [Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A detection using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its correlation with coagulase and thermonuclease tests].

    PubMed

    Suarez, María José; Arias, María Laura; del Mar Gamboa, María

    2008-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogenic bacterium, widely distributed on nature and associated to general infection and food borne outbreaks. The relationship between this bacterium and food borne outbreaks has been done, historically, using several tests, including coagulase, thermonuclease and actually, PCR for the genes codifying for the enterotoxin responsible of clinical symptoms. The objective of this work is to detect enterotoxin A codifying gene through PCR in a group of S. aureus strains isolated from food samples, and also to correlate the presence of this gene with the production of coagulase and thermonuclease enzymes. A total of 69 staphylococcal strains were analyzed, 58 obtained from non pasteurized milk samples from the Estación Experimental Alfredo Volio Mata and 11 from the Food and Water Microbiology Laboratory collection, Universidad de Costa Rica. Coagulase, thermonuclease and enterotoxin A were analyzed in all the strains, and a statistical correlation was performed in order to verify possible associations. Results show that there is no correlation between the three variables, nevertheless, all coagulase positive strains were thermonuclease positive, and all enterotoxin positive strains were coagulase and thermonuclease positive, but not inversely. These results show that the use of presumptive or indirect tests for establishing entorotoxigenity of S. aureus strains is not truthful, more sensible and specific analysis, as PCR, shall be performed.

  10. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, C; Ortiz-Morales, M; Bujdud-Pérez, J M; Magaña-Cota, G E; Mejía-Falcón, R

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIEL*a*b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 microm x 246 microm) that was the case for the lead white pigment.

  11. The mind as skills and dispositions: on normativity and mediation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Svend

    2012-03-01

    On the occasion of the critique of Alfredo Gaete and Carlos Cornejo, this article explains and extends the hybrid theory of the mind that I recently presented in this journal. Taking inspiration from Rom Harré's program for a hybrid psychology, the theory is supposed to be integrative and aims to broaden Harré's hybrid psychology by including not just the brain, but also the body, social practices, and technological artifacts as mediators of the mind. The mind is understood not as a substance of any kind, but as a set of skills and dispositions to act, think, and feel. This implies a normative view of the mind, according to which psychological phenomena do not simply happen, but are done, and can consequently be done more or less well. I provide arguments in favor of grounding psychology in normativity rather than conscious experience, and I explain why the emphasis on mediators does not represent a threat to the ontological primacy of the person in psychology.

  12. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frausto-Reyes, C.; Ortiz-Morales, M.; Bujdud-Pérez, J. M.; Magaña-Cota, G. E.; Mejía-Falcón, R.

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIE L* a* b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 μm × 246 μm) that was the case for the lead white pigment.

  13. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  14. PREFACE: DISCRETE 2010: Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domenico, Antonio; Bini, Cesare; Bloise, Caterina; Bossi, Fabio; Faccini, Riccardo; Gauzzi, Paolo; Isidori, Gino; Lipari, Paolo; Ludovici, Lucio; Silvestrini, Luca

    2011-12-01

    , Portugal, from 3 to 7 December 2012. Roma, November 2011 The Editors Antonio Di Domenico Cesare Bini Caterina Bloise Fabio Bossi Riccardo Faccini Paolo Gauzzi Gino Isidori Paolo Lipari Lucio Ludovici Luca Silvestrini The PDF file also contains committee, secretariat, sponsor and participant lists, plus the conference poster and photograph.

  15. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  16. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  17. [Global Bioethics and Biocultural Ethics].

    PubMed

    Rozzi, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The biocultural ethic recovers an understanding of the vital links between the life habits of the coinhabitants (humans and other-than-human) that share a habitat. The ″3Hs″ formal framework of the biocultural ethics provides a conceptual and methodological tool to understand and to better manage complex eco-social or biocultural systems in heterogeneous regions of the planet. From the global bioethics originally proposed by V.R. Potter, the integration of theory and praxis promoted by Alfredo Pradenas in the Bioethics Society of Chile, and the conceptual framework of biocultural ethics (including traditions of philosophical thought, scientific and Amerindians), I develop a comparative analysis of: 1. an ecosystemic and intercultural concept of the human body, 2. an intercultural understanding of health with complementary Western and Native American medicinal practices, and 3. an appreciation and respect for the fundamental links among the life habits, the habitats where they take place, and the well-being and identity of the communities of cohabitants. Implicit links in the ″3Hs″ biocultural ethics are present in the archaic meanings of the term ethos. This understanding retrieves a primordial root in the genesis of Western ethics, which did not start bounded to how to inhabit or dwell, but also considered where to inhabit and with whom to co-inhabit. I propose to restore the complexity and breadth of the concept of ethics originated in Ancient Greece, to reaffirm the common roots of bioethics and environmental ethics contained in Potter's global bioethics, and to incorporate the systemic and contextual perspective of the biocultural ethic that values biological and cultural diversity (and their interrelationships), to sustain a conception of human health interconnected with the sustainability of the biosphere.

  18. [Law 6/84: "an inappropriate law"].

    PubMed

    Barroco, L E

    1994-01-01

    The intervention of Dr. Luis Elmano Barroco was evaluated at a meeting on March 19, 1994, on the topic of the state of abortion after 10 years of the new abortion law. Some aspects of the law of 1984 are characterized as inappropriate and inadequate because of the experience of the maternity ward of Dr. Alfredo da Costa. It was expected that in the wake of the publication of the law, official health care institutions would provide services for termination of pregnancy in accordance with legal indications. However, a survey carried out by the Association for Family Planning in July 1993 revealed that more than 50% of hospitals did not perform abortions because of the inexistence of specialized services or lack of resources or on grounds of conscientious objection. Even a revision of the abortion law does not take into consideration the fact that before 12 weeks of gestation it is difficult to precisely confirm grave lesions or the physical and psychological state of health of the pregnant woman which could be potentially life threatening. It was not taken into account either that it is impossible to diagnose definitively chromosomal aberrations, severe diseases, and fetal malformation before the 16th week. The law did not contemplate the prevailing socioeconomical conditions either that lead to clandestine abortion with high morbidity and mortality from cervical lesions, uterine perforation, infections, sepsis, and salpingitis. Prenatal diagnosis for eugenic abortion can be carried out by cytogenetic analysis of the amniotic fluid and ecography, but such diagnosis probably amounts to only 30-40% of risk cases in the whole country. A recent study by the Johns Hopkins University indicated that the chance of survival of a child born before 24 weeks is nil, therefore the limit of induced abortion should be extended to the 24th week to facilitate diagnosis of possible genetic abnormalities.

  19. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Balraj

    1996-07-01

    Abstract:The evaluated spectroscopic data are presented for known nuclides of mass 64 (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge). Excited-state data are nonexistent for 64Mn and 64Fe. Radioactive decay data for 64Mn are not available and those for 64Fe, 64Co and 64Ge are not considered definitive. The following nuclides have not yet been identified but, amongst other nuclides, have been included in theoretical calculations: 64Ca (92Ma60,91To03,91Hi10); 64Cr (95Re20,95Ri05,95Au04); 64As (95Au04); 64Se (93Sh11). The literature available up to June 25, 1996 has been consulted. This work supersedes earlier evaluations of A=64 published in Nuclear Data Sheets (91Si03,79Ha35,74Au04,67Ve09). Cutoff Date:Literature available up to June 25, 1996 has been consulted. General Policies and Organization of Material:See the January issue of Nuclear Data Sheets. Acknowledgments:The evaluator thanks Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri at Chalk River for discussions and communicating results of his recent in-beam experiment on 64Zn, prior to publication. General Comments:The statistical analysis of γ-ray data and deduced level schemes is carried out through computer codes available at Isotopes Project, Berkeley and Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven. The methodology and procedures for some of these codes are described by 86BrZQ and 86Br21. A general 3% uncertainty is assumed in quoted theoretical internal conversion coefficients taken mainly from 68Ha53. The values of μ and Q are from compilation by 89Ra17, when available.

  20. The Role of Psychological Adjustment in the Decision-making Process for Voluntary Termination of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sereno, Sara; Leal, Isabel; Maroco, João

    2013-01-01

    Background This study's objective was to evaluate the role of psychological adjustment in the decision-making process to have an abortion and explore individual variables that might influence this decision. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we sequentially enrolled 150 women who made the decision to voluntarily terminate a pregnancy in Maternity Dr. Alfredo da Costa, in Lisbon, Portugal, between September 2008 and June 2009. The instruments were the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), Satisfaction with Social Support Scale (SSSS), Emotional Assessment Scale (EAS), Decision Conflict Scale (DCS), and Beliefs and Values Questionnaire (BVQ). We analyzed the data using Student's T-tests, MANOVA, ANOVA, Tukey's post-hoc tests and CATPCA. Statistically significant effects were accepted for p<0.05. Results The participants found the decision difficult and emotionally demanding, although they also identified it as a low conflict decision. The prevailing emotions were sadness, fear and stress; but despite these feelings, the participants remained psychologically adjusted in the moment they decided to have an abortion. The resolution to terminate the pregnancy was essentially shared with supportive people and it was mostly motivated by socio-economic issues. The different beliefs and values found in this sample, and their possible associations are discussed. Conclusion Despite high levels of stress, the women were psychologically adjusted at the time of making the decision to terminate the pregnancy. However, opposing what has been previously reported, the women presented high levels of sadness and fear, showing that this decision was hard to make, triggering disruptive emotions. PMID:24163799

  1. The profile of the dermatoses in children with the HIV virus at the Fundação de Medicina Tropical do Amazonas.

    PubMed

    Dias, Eleonora Dantas; Cunha, Maria da Graça Souza; Talhari, Sinésio

    2012-01-01

    The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) constitutes a sub-epidemic in Brazil. Due to the increasing number of women infected by the virus, the vertical transmission increased substantially, and due to the lack of adequate prophylactic treatment, many children are infected and show manifestations of the disease in early ages. Multiple systems are affected by the HIV virus, and the skin is often the first organ to be involved. The objective of this study is to analyze the clinic, dermatological and epidemiological profiles of children carriers of the virus in the City of Manaus aiming at identifying the most frequent dermatoses that affect these children and try to relate these dermatoses to the immunologic deterioration. A study was conducted where children carriers of the HIV virus from the Fundação Alfredo da Matta and Fundação de Medicina Tropical were studied from March 2007 to July 2008. These children were submitted to dermatological and laboratorial exams such as viral load dosage and CD4+ and CD8+ counts. During the study period, 70 HIV + children were examined; all of them had AIDS and had been contaminated by vertical transmission. The average number of dermatoses by children was 1.73, and 95.5% had at least one dermatosis during the study period. The most frequent manifestations were atopic dermatitis (22.9%), childhood prurigo (20%) and warts (18,6%). Children with HIV/AIDS have more skin disorders than children without HIV/AIDS. There was no statistical difference between the children in the group using ARVT and the group that wasn't using it.

  2. A historical overview of leprosy epidemiology and control activities in Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carolina; Pedrosa, Valderiza Lourenço; Dias, Luiz Carlos; Braga, Andréa; Chrusciak-Talhari, Anette; Santos, Mônica; Penna, Gerson Oliveira; Talhari, Sinésio; Talhari, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is an ancient infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. According to comparative genomics studies, this disease originated in Eastern Africa or the Near East and spread with successive human migrations. The Europeans and North Africans introduced leprosy into West Africa and the Americas within the past 500 years. In Brazil, this disease arrived with the colonizers who disembarked at the first colonies, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador and Recife, at the end of the sixteenth century, after which it was spread to the other states. In 1854, the first leprosy cases were identified in State of Amazonas in the north of Brazil. The increasing number of leprosy cases and the need for treatment and disease control led to the creation of places to isolate patients, known as leprosaria. One of them, Colonia Antônio Aleixo was built in Amazonas in 1956 according to the most advanced recommendations for isolation at that time and was deactivated in 1979. The history of the Alfredo da Matta Center (AMC), which was the first leprosy dispensary created in 1955, parallels the history of leprosy in the state. Over the years, the AMC has become one of the best training centers for leprosy, general dermatology and sexually transmitted diseases in Brazil. In addition to being responsible for leprosy control programs in the state, the AMC has carried out training programs on leprosy diagnosis and treatment for health professionals in Manaus and other municipalities of the state, aiming to increase the coverage of leprosy control activities. This paper provides a historical overview of leprosy in State of Amazonas, which is an endemic state in Brazil.

  3. [Drug-addicted mothers].

    PubMed

    Correia, M A; Oliveria, A P; Almeida, J P; Sing, C K; Nobrega, J D

    1995-01-01

    Drug addiction in Portuguese women has greatly increased recently and affects women of child-bearing age. The lack of scientific knowledge of the influence of drug addiction on pregnancy led us to create a model to approach the problem. With that purpose, a Clinic for Pregnant Drug Addicts was opened in the Alfredo da Costa Maternity Hospital in 1989, intended to set up a special permanent team to provide personalized pre-natal care. This clinic should be considered an integral part of multi-disciplinary action covering obstetrics, pediatrics, anesthesiology, nursing, clinical psychology and social assistance. The evolution of 164 pregnant women was monitored from October 1989 to December 1992, urine and amniotic fluid was analysed in 51 women. Due to the difficulty in applying standard criteria to the pregnancies observed, three levels of pre-natal care for the aforementioned 51 pregnant women, who are the object of this study, are proposed. The pre-natal observation of 164 pregnant drug addicts revealed that 74% were aged from 20 to 29 years, 49% had completed compulsory education, 59% were unemployed, 61% were unmarried and 82% had not planned their baby and had attended their first pre-natal clinic in the 19th week of pregnancy. The women's partners were drug addicts in 80% of cases. Their toxicological history revealed that 29% of them began taking drugs between the ages of 11 and 15, cannabis-based products being the first drug in 67% and opium-based in 28% of cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Paraguay.

    PubMed

    1987-06-01

    In 1986, the population of Paraguay stood at 4 million, with an annual growth rate of 2.7%. The infant mortality rate was 64/1000 live births and life expectancy was 62 years. The literacy rate was 81%. Of the labor force of 1.2 million, 44% were employed in the agricultural sector, 34% were in industry and commerce, 18% were in the services sector, and 4% were employed by the government. The gross national product (GNP) was US $3.31 billion in 1985, with an annual growth rate of 5% and a per capita GNP of $660. The inflation rate was 25.2% in 1985. Paraguay is a constitutional republic with a powerful executive branch. Since assuming power in 1954, President Alfredo Stroessner has been concerned with the re-establishment of internal order as a basis for economic development. The Colorado Party, the military, and the government bureaucracy are the pillars of the Stroessner regime. Although this regime has brought stability and economic growth, this has been achieved at considerable cost to political rights and individual liberties. Obstacles to development have included fluctuating prices for major export items, the long and expensive river or land routes that foreign trade must traverse, a small domestic market, and internal and external trade barriers. Despite these limitations, agricultural production has grown rapidly, especially cotton and soybeans for export. Paraguay has exceptional hydroelectric potential and is expected to become the world's largest exporter of hydroelectric energy within the next decade. The country's stable government, conservative fiscal policies, and laissezfaire approach to trade and investment have brought economic improvement to a broad segment of society. In addition, the government has attempted to ameliorate rural poverty with a land program.

  5. Highlights from the history of sexual medicine.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, Dirk; Glina, Sidney

    2010-06-01

    Today, we have a clear concept of sexual medicine and how to define this medical discipline. But historically, the unification of sexuality and medicine was not a given condition. Medicine was mainly focused on human reproduction and how to prevent and treat sexually transmitted diseases. Hardly any other aspect would have met the interest of medical doctors for centuries. Historical review that can only highlight developments and milestones of sexual medicine and is not intended to be encyclopedic. Perhaps, the first true medicalization of sexuality was the dreadful anti-masturbation campaign led by doctors, beginning with Tissot, since the middle of the 18th century. In the 2nd half of the 19th century, first pioneers like the physician Paolo Mantagazza were systematically addressing issues related to human sexuality. This highly developing scientific field and medical community were destroyed after 1933 by the political influence of the national socialists in Europe. After World War II, a new era started with the works of Alfred Kinsey and other sexologists mainly in the United States of America. The term sexual medicine was established around 1970, most likely in Europe, and subsequently resulted in a new worldwide academic and clinical speciality.

  6. Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

  7. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  8. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  9. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  10. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) blankets used on the orbiters. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  11. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttle engine. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  12. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  13. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) Barbara R. Morgan, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) and Bjarni V. Tryggvason look at the hardware exhibits, such as the engine actuator on the table. Tryggvason is with the Canadian Space Agency. The 1998 ASCAN class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. Other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the other international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, and Marcos Pontes.

  14. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF and the crew headquarters.

  15. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, Ron Woods (left) shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) an Apollo-style space suit and how it differs from the current suits. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  16. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  17. How much urban population matters? Exploring the drivers of carbon emissions in 84 cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Lankao, P.

    2010-12-01

    Just as urban centers register different levels and paths of development, cities do not contribute at the same level to global warming. Carbon emissions per capita in cities from high-income countries such as Texas and the District of Columbia are 19-20 fold as high compared with those in Sao Paolo, Delhi and Kolkata. Yet, other wealthy cities such as Stockholm and Barcelona also have low levels of emissions per capita. This presentation will draw on results from a quantitative research effort covering 84 cities to show that population dynamics are not the only determinant of urban emissions. Many different factors account for the diverse levels and sources of urban carbon emissions: (a) differences both in their national/regional energy systems and in how energy generation, transportation and other emitters operate; (b) levels of economic development and affluence as measured by gross domestic product (GDP) per capita; (c) technology and technological innovations and acquisition; (d) climatic situation, altitude and location in relation to energy sources; (e) demographic structure and dynamics of a city; (f) urban function and city’s economic base; (g) urban form (spatial structure) and related to this, the lay out and structure of a city’s transportation system; and (h) the wider institutional setting of the city.

  18. Early Solar System Alkali Fractionation Events Recorded by K-Ca Isotopes in the Yamato-74442 LL-Chondritic Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatsunori, T.; Misawa, K.; Okano, O.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simon, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Radiogenic ingrowth of Ca-40 due to decay of K-40 occurred early in the solar system history causing the Ca-40 abundance to vary within different early-former reservoirs. Marshall and DePaolo ] demonstrated that the K-40/Ca-40 decay system could be a useful radiogenic tracer for studies of terrestrial rocks. Shih et al. [3,4] determined 40K/40Ca ages of lunar granitic rock fragments and discussed the chemical characteristics of their source materials. Recently, Yokoyama et al. [5] showed the application of the K-40/Ca-40 chronometer for high K/Ca materials in ordinary chondrites (OCs). High-precision calcium isotopic data are needed to constrain mixing processes among early solar system materials and the time of planetesimal formation. To better constrain the solar system calcium isotopic compositions among astromaterials, we have determined the calcium isotopic compositions of OCs and an angrite. We further estimated a source K/Ca ratio for alkali-rich fragments in a chondritic breccia using the estimated solar system initial Ca-40/Ca-44.

  19. GPU-powered model analysis with PySB/cupSODA.

    PubMed

    Harris, Leonard A; Nobile, Marco S; Pino, James C; Lubbock, Alexander L R; Besozzi, Daniela; Mauri, Giancarlo; Cazzaniga, Paolo; Lopez, Carlos F

    2017-06-28

    A major barrier to the practical utilization of large, complex models of biochemical systems is the lack of open-source computational tools to evaluate model behaviors over high-dimensional parameter spaces. This is due to the high computational expense of performing thousands to millions of model simulations required for statistical analysis. To address this need, we have implemented a user-friendly interface between cupSODA, a GPU-powered kinetic simulator, and PySB, a Python-based modeling and simulation framework. For three example models of varying size, we show that for large numbers of simulations PySB/cupSODA achieves order-of-magnitude speedups relative to a CPU-based ordinary differential equation integrator. The PySB/cupSODA interface has been integrated into the PySB modeling framework (version 1.4.0), which can be installed from the Python Package Index (PyPI) using a Python package manager such as pip . cupSODA source code and precompiled binaries (Linux, Mac OS/X, Windows) are available at github.com/aresio/cupSODA (requires an Nvidia GPU; developer.nvidia.com/cuda-gpus ). Additional information about PySB is available at pysb.org. c.lopez@vanderbilt.edu ; paolo.cazzaniga@unibg.it. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. [Evaluation of the treatment with levodropropizine of respiratory diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, A; Zuccotti, G V; Vignati, B; Pogliani, L; Sala, M; Riva, E

    1989-01-01

    Sometimes, antitussives can be a valid adjuvant to respiratory tract infections treatment. Although not always needed, this therapeutic support can be extremely useful in selected cases, and when patient is resident and monitored. In this line, the efficacy of a new peripheral antitussive, levodropropizine (Dompé farmaceutici, Milan), has been evaluated in 70 children inpatients of the Pediatric Department at san Paolo Hospital - Milan University - from September 1987 to May 1988. Thirty one male and 29 female children, aged 4 years and 6 months +/- 3 years and 5 months, suffering from various respiratory tract diseases were included in the study. Underlying diseases were represented by 21 acute bronchitis, 20 asthmatic attacks, 18 bronchopneumonia, 11 tracheitis, 6 acute episodes of chronic bronchitis, 2 hypoglottis laryngitis, 1 pertussis, 1 spontaneous pneumothorax. All parents gave their oral informed consent. The basic treatments were antibiotics in 44 patients associated or not with beta 2 agonists (31), theophylline (15), corticosteroids via aerosol (9) or parenterally (3), immunomodulators (2). Treatment with levodropropizine in the oral drops formulation at 2 mg pro kg a day was continued for 5 days and withdrawn according to the clinical evolution. Cough was registered by means of appropriate record forms given to the parents as well as with 120' tape recording whenever possible, i.e. 60 minutes before and 60 minutes after drug administration, on day one and 2. At treatment end, parents and investigator gave an antitussive efficacy judgement. Tolerability was evaluated as per clinical evolution and laboratory parameters.

  1. KSC-07pd2193

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-120 crew is at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT. Inspecting the thermal protection system, or TPS, tiles under space shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3 is Mission Specialist Paolo A. Nespoli, a European Space Agency astronaut from Italy. Among the activities standard to a CEIT are harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The STS-120 mission will deliver the Harmony module, christened after a school contest, which will provide attachment points for European and Japanese laboratory modules on the International Space Station. Known in technical circles as Node 2, it is similar to the six-sided Unity module that links the U.S. and Russian sections of the station. Built in Italy for the United States, Harmony will be the first new U.S. pressurized component to be added. The STS-120 mission is targeted to launch on Oct. 20. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton

  2. Aging, High Altitude, and Blood Pressure: A Complex Relationship.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Torlasco, Camilla; Salvi, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Bilo, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    Parati, Gianfranco, Juan Eugenio Ochoa, Camilla Torlasco, Paolo Salvi, Carolina Lombardi, and Grzegorz Bilo. Aging, high altitude, and blood pressure: A complex relationship. High Alt Biol Med 16:97-109, 2015.--Both aging and high altitude exposure may induce important changes in BP regulation, leading to significant increases in BP levels. By inducing atherosclerotic changes, stiffening of large arteries, renal dysfunction, and arterial baroreflex impairment, advancing age may induce progressive increases in systolic BP levels, promoting development and progression of arterial hypertension. It is also known, although mainly from studies in young or middle-aged subjects, that exposure to high altitude may influence different mechanisms involved in BP regulation (i.e., neural central and reflex control of sympathetic activity), leading to important increases in BP levels. The evidence is less clear, however, on whether and to what extent advancing age may influence the BP response to acute or chronic high altitude exposure. This is a question not only of scientific interest but also of practical relevance given the consistent number of elderly individuals who are exposed for short time periods (either for leisure or work) or live permanently at high altitude, in whom arterial hypertension is frequently observed. This article will review the evidence available on the relationship between aging and blood pressure levels at high altitude, the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this complex association, as well as some questions of practical interest regarding antihypertensive treatment in elderly subjects, and the effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure response during high altitude exposure.

  3. [Migrant workers in agriculture and animal husbandry: experiences of health surveillance].

    PubMed

    Somaruga, C; Troja Martinazzoli, M G; Brambilla, G; Colosio, C

    2011-01-01

    In Italy, 5 millions migrants live and work. Among them, the employment rate is much higher in comparison with the Italians' one (75% versus 62%). The well known "healthy migrant effect" is confirmed by statistics from the National Institute for Statistics: according to it, migrants access the National Health System for pregnancy and delivery and for accidents. The chronic pathology is not a major concern. Moreover, their work ability is generally complete, without any limitation. Nevertheless, migrants seem to represent a vulnerable subgroup with regard to the risk of 1) occupational injuries: this is strongly linked with the risk of Tetanus infection; 2) disorders of the metabolism, like hyperglycaemia and hyperlipemia, which is linked to a higher cardiovascular risk. In this light data from health surveillance carried out by the International centre for Rural Health of the San Paolo University Hospital in agricultural setting in the Region of Lombardy and the participation of the Centre itself to the Promovax EC-cofunded project are presented.

  4. KSC-99pp1159

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes

  5. KSC-99pp1164

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes

  6. KSC-99pp1161

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes

  7. KSC-99pp1162

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes

  8. KSC-99pp1160

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes

  9. KSC-99pp1163

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes

  10. What do we not know about mitochondrial potassium channels?

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Michał; Augustynek, Bartłomiej; Kulawiak, Bogusz; Koprowski, Piotr; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Szewczyk, Adam

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we summarize our knowledge about mitochondrial potassium channels, with a special focus on unanswered questions in this field. The following potassium channels have been well described in the inner mitochondrial membrane: ATP-regulated potassium channel, Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel, the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channel, and the two-pore domain TASK-3 potassium channel. The primary functional roles of these channels include regulation of mitochondrial respiration and the alteration of membrane potential. Additionally, they modulate the mitochondrial matrix volume and the synthesis of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria. Mitochondrial potassium channels are believed to contribute to cytoprotection and cell death. In this paper, we discuss fundamental issues concerning mitochondrial potassium channels: their molecular identity, channel pharmacology and functional properties. Attention will be given to the current problems present in our understanding of the nature of mitochondrial potassium channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Benedetta; Ranieri, Rebecca; Masu, Annamaria; Selle, Valerio; Scarone, Silvio; Gambini, Orsola

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and depression is still controversial. Our objective was to compare the prevalence of depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in a population of patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism and a control group without thyroid disease. The authors enrolled 123 consecutive outpatients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism undergoing follow-up at the endocrinology department of San Paolo Hospital in Milan and 123 controls without thyroid disease under the charge of general physicians.All patients and controls underwent an evaluation by means of a psychiatric interview; Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D); Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); and serum thyroid stimulating hormone, free T4, and free T3 levels. Patients were also screened for thyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroglobulin antibodies. Patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism had a prevalence of depressive symptoms of 63.4% at HAM-D and 64.2% at MADRS; 22 patients (17.9%) had a diagnosis of depressive episode (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria). The control group had a prevalence of depressive symptoms of 27.6% at HAM-D and 29.3% at MADRS, and only seven controls had a diagnosis of depressive episode. The prevalence of depressive symptoms between these two groups was statistically different. This study underlines a strong association between subclinical hypothyroidism and depressive symptoms, which could have some important diagnostic and therapeutic implications in the clinical practice.

  12. KSC-99pp1171

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-30

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot-high astronomical symbol for the planet Mercury was constructed by General Dynamics, the Atlas airframe contractor, and dedicated in 1964 in honor of those who flew in the Mercury 7 capsule. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes

  13. [Medicine and enlightenment in New Spain].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A

    1998-01-01

    Fundamental ideas of the cultural movement of Enlightenment were drawn up and encouraged in England by John Locke and introduced into continental Europe by Voltaire. The essence of this movement was defined by I. Kant in 1784. These new ideas were projected into the field of medicine initially with the systematization of anatomical studies by Winslow, Vicq d' Azyr and Sénac in France, by S. Th. Sömmerring and von Haller in Germany, and by Paolo Mascagni and other anatomists in Italy. This movement settled in Spain toward the middle of the XVIII century, due to Father Feijóo and his pupils such as Piquer and Casal. In New Spain, which maintained cultural and scientific relationship with the Old World, the leaders of the movement were José Antonio Alzate in the field of biology and José Ignacio Bartolache in that of medicine. These were the founders of the first scientific journals: the "Diario Literario" (Literary Journal) by Alzate (1768) and the "Mercurio Volante" (Flying Mercury) by Bartolache (1772). Latter this physician had to face the great epidemic outbreak of smallpox in 1779. Due to that, he attributed great importance to the psychological aspect of the problem and supported the variolization proceeding introduced into Mexico by Doctor Henri Morel. Moreover, two scientific expeditions, which reached New Spain at the end of the XVIII century, allowed to systematize the study of the American vegetables and to acknowledge the usefulness of botany and chemistry as auxiliary sciences of medicine.

  14. Glutamine transport. From energy supply to sensing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Pochini, Lorena; Galluccio, Michele; Indiveri, Cesare

    2016-08-01

    Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in plasma and is actively involved in many biosynthetic and regulatory processes. It can be synthesized endogenously but becomes "conditionally essential" in physiological or pathological conditions of high proliferation rate. To accomplish its functions glutamine has to be absorbed and distributed in the whole body. This job is efficiently carried out by a network of membrane transporters that differ in transport mechanisms and energetics, belonging to families SLC1, 6, 7, 38, and possibly, 25. Some of the transporters are involved in glutamine traffic across different membranes for metabolic purposes; others are involved in specific signaling functions through mTOR. Structure/function relationships and regulatory aspects of glutamine transporters are still at infancy. In the while, insights in involvement of these transporters in cell redox control, cancer metabolism and drug interactions are arising, stimulating basic research to uncover molecular mechanisms of transport and regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cultural Alimentation in Latin America

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le Prof. Paolo Freire(nom?) a dirigé en Brésil un plan national d'alphabétisatation d'adultes. La base de sa méthode est d'essayer de ne pas rester sur la mécanique du mot, mais de le relier avec la réalité sociale et donner un réveillement critique de la conscience populaire en face de la réalité historique du pays. Il était professeur d'histoire et de philosophie de Récife, puis exilé et depuis il était prof. à Harvard, a travaillé à l'Unesco et est maintenant conseiller spécial à l'Office d'Education du centre oecuménique des églises

  16. Ballistic penetration test results for Ductal and ultra-high performance concrete samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III

    2010-03-01

    This document provides detailed test results of ballistic impact experiments performed on several types of high performance concrete. These tests were performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility using a 50 caliber powder gun to study penetration resistance of concrete samples. This document provides test results for ballistic impact experiments performed on two types of concrete samples, (1) Ductal{reg_sign} concrete is a fiber reinforced high performance concrete patented by Lafarge Group and (2) ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) produced in-house by DoD. These tests were performed as part of a research demonstration project overseen by USACE and ERDC, at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research (STAR) facility. Ballistic penetration tests were performed on a single stage research powder gun of 50 caliber bore using a full metal jacket M33 ball projectile with a nominal velocity of 914 m/s (3000 ft/s). Testing was observed by Beverly DiPaolo from ERDC-GSL. In all, 31 tests were performed to achieve the test objectives which were: (1) recovery of concrete test specimens for post mortem analysis and characterization at outside labs, (2) measurement of projectile impact velocity and post-penetration residual velocity from electronic and radiographic techniques and, (3) high-speed photography of the projectile prior to impact, impact and exit of the rear surface of the concrete construct, and (4) summarize the results.

  17. Investigating mortality heterogeneity among neighbourhoods of a highly industrialised Italian city: a meta-regression approach.

    PubMed

    Gianicolo, Emilio Antonio Luca; Mangia, Cristina; Cervino, Marco

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of various predictors to explain spatial mortality heterogeneity in Taranto. Direct age-adjusted death rates (ADR) at a neighbourhood level for the period 1998-2010 were examined. SO2, PM10, distance from pollution sources, and socioeconomic status (SES) were tested as predictors within a meta-regression framework. We used τ (2) to quantify heterogeneity in ADR and I (2) statistic with 95 % confidence intervals to estimate the proportion of total variation across neighbourhoods attributable to the between-neighbourhood heterogeneity. High heterogeneity resulted for all and natural causes of death for both genders. One neighbourhood (Paolo VI) was detected as an outlier for all predictors except SO2, among males. After accounting for SES, moderate heterogeneity among residuals was observed for all-causes of death and was correlated with SO2. Higher concentrations of PM10 were observed in neighbourhoods close to the industrial site and higher concentrations of SO2 in neighbourhoods more distant from the industrial site. SES and air pollutants were predictors of spatial heterogeneity in ADR. Different distributions of SO2 and PM10 in the city suggested two exposure patterns.

  18. KSC01pp0823

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-19

    At a signing ceremony between the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and NASA for a Framework for Cooperation to build the Habitation Module for the International Space Station, Italian astronauts with the European Space Agency pose with NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin. On the left is Roberto Vittori and on the right is Paolo A. Nespoli. The Framework is a potential bilateral cooperative agreement that could result in ASI development of a U.S. Habitation Module for the International Space Station. This agreement allows the U.S. to explore an alternative approach to achieve full crew habitation for the ISS. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between NASA and ASI will be required to formally document NASA and ASI’s respective responsibilities in a legally binding document. The Framework signed today would form the basis for a potential MOU which NASA and ASI would sign after completion of the program assessment and subsequent negotiations. The ceremony took place at the IMAX Theater, Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex

  19. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  20. Cancer prevention for global health: a report from the ASPO International Cancer Prevention Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Dejana; Boffetta, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Meyskens, Frank

    2012-09-01

    As cancer incidence and mortality rates increase in low- and middle-income countries, the need for cancer prevention and control research directed to these countries becomes increasingly important. The American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) is a community of professionals in cancer prevention and control whose mission is to "foster the continuing development of investigators and the exchange and translation of scientific information to reduce the cancer burden." In the session presented at the ASPO 36th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC in March 2012, chaired by Drs. Frank Meyskens and Dejana Braithwaite, Dr. Paolo Boffetta discussed some of the achievements in global cancer prevention and suggested that future efforts focus on three major causes of cancer: tobacco-use, infections, and overweight/obesity. Dr. Timothy Rebbeck presented an overview of prostate cancer research in sub-Saharan Africa and highlighted how the complex nature of prostate cancer etiology and outcomes can be addressed through capacity-building research partnerships. Cancer is an emerging public health challenge in developing countries because of the aging and expansion of the population and increased prevalence of cancer risk factors such as smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, and reproductive factors. There are opportunities to reduce the growing cancer burden through the development of research capacity and the application of resource-appropriate interventions. ©2012 AACR

  1. Narrativity and enaction: the social nature of literary narrative understanding.

    PubMed

    Popova, Yanna B

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an understanding of literary narrative as a form of social cognition and situates the study of such narratives in relation to the new comprehensive approach to human cognition, enaction. The particular form of enactive cognition that narrative understanding is proposed to depend on is that of participatory sense-making, as developed in the work of Di Paolo and De Jaegher. Currently there is no consensus as to what makes a good literary narrative, how it is understood, and why it plays such an irreplaceable role in human experience. The proposal thus identifies a gap in the existing research on narrative by describing narrative as a form of intersubjective process of sense-making between two agents, a teller and a reader. It argues that making sense of narrative literature is an interactional process of co-constructing a story-world with a narrator. Such an understanding of narrative makes a decisive break with both text-centered approaches that have dominated both structuralist and early cognitivist study of narrative, as well as pragmatic communicative ones that view narrative as a form of linguistic implicature. The interactive experience that narrative affords and necessitates at the same time, I argue, serves to highlight the active yet cooperative and communal nature of human sociality, expressed in the many forms than human beings interact in, including literary ones.

  2. The multitude of iron-sulfur clusters in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Gnandt, Emmanuel; Dörner, Katerina; Strampraad, Marc F J; de Vries, Simon; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory complex I couples the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of protons across the membrane. Complex I contains one non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide and, depending on the species, up to ten iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters as cofactors. The reason for the presence of the multitude of Fe/S clusters in complex I remained enigmatic for a long time. The question was partly answered by investigations on the evolution of the complex revealing the stepwise construction of the electron transfer domain from several modules. Extension of the ancestral to the modern electron input domain was associated with the acquisition of several Fe/S-proteins. The X-ray structure of the complex showed that the NADH oxidation-site is connected with the quinone-reduction site by a chain of seven Fe/S-clusters. Fast enzyme kinetics revealed that this chain of Fe/S-clusters is used to regulate electron-tunneling rates within the complex. A possible function of the off-pathway cluster N1a is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  3. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis and its role in the respiratory chain structure.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Fabra, María; Navas, Plácido; Brea-Calvo, Gloria

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a unique electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is synthesized on-site by a nuclear encoded multiprotein complex. CoQ receives electrons from different redox pathways, mainly NADH and FADH2 from tricarboxylic acid pathway, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that support key aspects of the metabolism. Here we explore some lines of evidence supporting the idea of the interaction of CoQ with the respiratory chain complexes, contributing to their superassembly, including respirasome, and its role in reactive oxygen species production in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We also review the current knowledge about the involvement of mitochondrial genome defects and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase mutations in the induction of secondary CoQ deficiency. This mechanism would imply specific interactions coupling CoQ itself or the CoQ-biosynthetic apparatus with the respiratory chain components. These interactions would regulate mitochondrial CoQ steady-state levels and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Women with TSC: Relationship between Clinical, Lung Function and Radiological Features in a Genotyped Population Investigated for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Imeri, Gianluca; Palumbo, Giuseppina; La Briola, Francesca; Tresoldi, Silvia; Volpi, Angela; Gualandri, Lorenzo; Ghelma, Filippo; Alfano, Rosa Maria; Montanari, Emanuele; Gorio, Alfredo; Lesma, Elena; Peron, Angela; Canevini, Maria Paola; Centanni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The advent of pharmacological therapies for lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) has made early diagnosis important in women with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), although the lifelong cumulative radiation exposure caused by chest computer tomography (CT) should not be underestimated. We retrospectively investigated, in a cohort of TSC outpatients of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) 1) the role of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) for LAM diagnosis, 2) the association between LAM and other features of TSC (e.g. demography, extrapulmonary manifestations, genetic mutations, etc.), and 3) the characteristics of patients with multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MMPH). Eighty-six women underwent chest CT scan; pulmonary involvement was found in 66 patients (77%; 49% LAM with or without MMPH, and 28% MMPH alone). LAM patients were older, with a higher rate of pneumothorax, presented more frequently with renal and hepatic angiomyolipomas, and tended to have a TSC2 mutation profile. PFTs, assessed in 64% of women unaffected by cognitive impairments, revealed a lower lung diffusion capacity in LAM patients. In multivariate analysis, age, but not PFTs, resulted independently associated with LAM diagnosis. Patients with MMPH alone did not show specific clinical, functional or genetic features. A mild respiratory impairment was most common in LAM-TSC patients: In conclusions, PFTs, even if indicated to assess impairment in lung function, are feasible in a limited number of patients, and are not significantly useful for LAM diagnosis in women with TSC. PMID:27171001

  5. Does the combination use of two pain assessment tools have a synergistic effect?

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Pain management is a very important aspect in the intensive care unit (ICU), as adequate pain control has been shown to be associated with better clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. A Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) ranging from 0 to 10 (0, no pain; 10, maximum pain), which is based on a patient's self-report, is the gold standard for pain evaluation in patients who can communicate their pain intensity. On the other hand, it is very difficult to evaluate the degree of pain in critically ill patients owing to decreased consciousness level, delirium, and the effect of sedation for mechanical ventilation management. The Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS) and Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT) have been developed for pain assessment in patients who cannot self-report their pain intensity, and recent research has confirmed their efficacy in clinical trials. In the study by Paolo et al., published in this journal, they have demonstrated that discriminant and criterion validities of BPS and CPOT are good for the assessment of pain in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. Besides, the authors have also shown that the combination use of these two tools is superior to the use of each tool individually. In this commentary, I would like to describe the importance and the difficulty of pain assessment in critically ill patients, discuss the validity and the reliability of the two major pain assessment tools, BPS and CPOT, and consider the future direction of pain assessment in the ICU.

  6. DRP1-dependent apoptotic mitochondrial fission occurs independently of BAX, BAK and APAF1 to amplify cell death by BID and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Oettinghaus, Björn; D'Alonzo, Donato; Barbieri, Elisa; Restelli, Lisa Michelle; Savoia, Claudia; Licci, Maria; Tolnay, Markus; Frank, Stephan; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-08-01

    During apoptosis mitochondria undergo cristae remodeling and fragmentation, but how the latter relates to outer membrane permeabilization and downstream caspase activation is unclear. Here we show that the mitochondrial fission protein Dynamin Related Protein (Drp) 1 participates in cytochrome c release by selected intrinsic death stimuli. While Bax, Bak double deficient (DKO) and Apaf1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were less susceptible to apoptosis by Bcl-2 family member BID, H(2)O(2), staurosporine and thapsigargin, Drp1(-/-) MEFs were protected only from BID and H(2)O(2). Resistance to cell death of Drp1(-/-) and DKO MEFs correlated with blunted cytochrome c release, whereas mitochondrial fragmentation occurred in all cell lines in response to all tested stimuli, indicating that other mechanisms accounted for the reduced cytochrome c release. Indeed, cristae remodeling was reduced in Drp1(-/-) cells, potentially explaining their resistance to apoptosis. Our results indicate that caspase-independent mitochondrial fission and Drp1-dependent cristae remodeling amplify apoptosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  7. Indications from space geodesy, gravimetry and seismology for slow Earth expansion at present - comment on "The Earth expansion theory and its transition from scientific hypothesis to pseudoscientific belief" by Sudiro (2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.

    2016-12-01

    In a recent article in this journal, Paolo Sudiro (2014) considered the long history of the expanding Earth theory and its recent descent into what he termed "pseudoscientific belief". The expanding Earth theory contends that the radius of the Earth was once one-half to two-thirds of its current value, with the Earth's continents forming a continuous sialic cover over the Earth. The theory has had two main variants: slow expansion at about 0.5 mm yr-1 radial increase since the time of Earth's formation and fast expansion at about 5 mm yr-1 since the Triassic. Focusing on Maxlow's model, Sudiro thoroughly addresses the possibly insurmountable difficulties of the fast version, such as an improbably high density and surface gravity prior to 200 Ma. He omits, however, any discussion of the slow expansion model, which has a longer history and far fewer theoretical difficulties. Moreover, recent evidence from space geodesy, gravimetry and seismology indicates that the Earth at present may be slowly expanding at 0.1-0.4 mm yr-1. It is concluded that Sudiro's obituary of the expanding Earth theory as a whole must be considered premature at this time.

  8. 1998 astronaut candidates tour CCAS facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot-high astronomical symbol for the planet Mercury was constructed by General Dynamics, the Atlas airframe contractor, and dedicated in 1964 in honor of those who flew in the Mercury 7 capsule. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  9. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) take part in fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  10. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft fuselage of the orbiter Atlantis. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  11. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  12. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  13. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  14. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  15. 1998 astronaut candidates tour CCAS facilities copy form; photos beginning with 99PD are only availa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During the Apollo Program, Launch Complex 34 was the site of the first Saturn I and Saturn IB launches, as well as the tragic fire in which the Apollo I astronauts lost their lives. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  16. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  17. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the thermal protection system on the orbiters, such as Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  18. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  19. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as the Multi- Purpose Logistics Module at right. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSPF. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  20. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) get a close-up view of the tiles, part of the thermal protection system, on the underside of the orbiter Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  1. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  2. Probing of protein localization and shuttling in mitochondrial microcompartments by FLIM with sub-diffraction resolution.

    PubMed

    Söhnel, Anna-Carina; Kohl, Wladislaw; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Rieger, Bettina; Busch, Karin B

    2016-08-01

    The cell is metabolically highly compartmentalized. Especially, mitochondria host many vital reactions in their different microcompartments. However, due to their small size, these microcompartments are not accessible by conventional microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM) classifies not only mitochondria, but different microcompartments inside mitochondria. Sensor proteins in the matrix had a different lifetime than probes at membrane proteins. Localization in the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane could be distinguished by significant differences in the lifetime. The method was sensitive enough to monitor shifts in protein location within mitochondrial microcompartments. Macromolecular crowding induced by changes in the protein content significantly affected the lifetime, while oxidizing conditions or physiological pH changes had only marginal effects. We suggest that FLIM is a versatile and completive method to monitor spatiotemporal events in mitochondria. The sensitivity in the time domain allows for gaining substantial information about sub-mitochondrial localization overcoming diffraction limitation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  3. The Somma-Vesuvius complex and the Phlaegrean Fields caldera: New chronological data of several eruptions of the Copper-Middle Bronze Age period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passariello, Isabella; Lubritto, Carmine; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Guan, Yongjing; Terrasi, Filippo

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating of short-lived sample materials is a useful tool applied to date deposits of volcanic eruptions. Several archaeological sites discovered and excavated in Campania witnessed important volcanic eruptions, which occurred in the Copper and Middle Bronze Ages. These eruptions come from the Somma-Vesuvius complex and the Phlaegrean Fields caldera. At least four Plinian eruptions have been identified in the eruptive history of Somma-Vesuvius, interspersed by interplinian events, called protohistoric, which occurred between Avellino and Pompeii. At S. Paolo Belsito a stratigraphic sequence below Avellino and above the first two protohistoric events after Avellino were highlighted; while Nola (Naples) gives new information on the chronology of Avellino. Sites like Caivano and Gricignano D'Aversa, involved by the Agnano 3, Paleoastroni 2 and Agnano Monte Spina eruptions were highlighted and investigated. In this work, we want to clarify the chronology of some eruptions by comparing our results with previous data. Charcoal, bone and seed samples were collected, treated and measured at the CIRCE laboratory in Caserta.

  4. New Constraints on Archean-Paleoproterozoic Carbonate Chemistry and pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättler, C. L.; Higgins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Very few constraints exist on Archean and Proterozoic seawater chemistry, leaving huge uncertainties on the boundary conditions for the evolution of life and a habitable environment. Ancient carbonate chemistry, which is intimately related to oceanic pH and atmospheric pCO2, remains particularly uncertain, despite its importance for understanding environments and temperatures on early Earth. Using a new application of high-precision calcium isotope measurements, we present data from the Tumbiana Formation (2.7 Ga, Western Australia), the Campbellrand Platform (2.6 Ga, South Africa) and the Pethei Group (1.9 Ga, Northwest Territories, Canada) that allow us to place constraints on carbonate chemistry both before and after the Great Oxidation Event. By analogy with calcium isotope behavior in sulfate minerals (Blättler and Higgins, 2014) and Mono Lake (Nielsen and DePaolo, 2013), we infer a lower limit on the ratio of calcium ions to carbonate alkalinity during deposition of these three sedimentary sequences. These data rule out the soda ocean hypothesis (Kempe and Degens, 1985) and make further predictions about the role of CO2 in solving the faint young Sun problem.

  5. Optimising the weighting of the water retention index using sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, William; Vandecasteele, Ine

    2015-04-01

    A robust composite indicator was developed to assess the capacity of the landscape to regulate and retain water passing through it at Pan-European scale. The "Water Retention Index" (WRI) takes into account the role of interception by vegetation, the water-holding capacity of the soil, and the relative capacity of the bedrock to allow percolation of water, as well as the influence of soil sealing and slope gradient. A delicate issue in composite indicators is however the relative weighting of each variable used in the indicator - strong correlations and skewness are known to cause unequal influence of the input variables, even though the weighting coefficients are equal (Paruolo et al, 2013). To understand the effects of the weightings in the WRI, penalised splines were used to calculate the first order sensitivity index of each variable used in the construction of the WRI, allowing the true influence of each input to be determined. Furthermore, the weighting coefficients were optimised using an iterative nonlinear algorithm to find the coefficients which resulted in the most equal influence of each input to the indicator. In principle, this approach can be used to improve the weighting of many different kinds of composite indicator, the results of which are often used as the basis for important policy decisions at the European level. Paruolo, Paolo, Michaela Saisana, and Andrea Saltelli. "Ratings and rankings: voodoo or science?." Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society) 176.3 (2013): 609-634.

  6. Prefazione al terzo volume di GERBERTVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The symposium dedicated to Gerbert on 12.52012 was held at the Vallicelliana Library, in the Borromini hall. The title was Gerberto and Borromini, in order to evidence the link between Gerbert (938 ca. - 1003) and the Ticinese architect who saved his tumb, during the restauration of the Cathedral of Rome St. John in Laterano in 1648. It is possibile that from his residence in the Lateran Gerbert could observe the stars with his tubes, which are presented by C. Sigismondi in this volume. During his trips to Italy, alone and following the archbishop Adalbero of Reims Gerbert could have passed in the Chiusa Valley and influence with his astronomical knowledges the builders of the Sacra of S. Michele, this is the subject of Laura C. Paladino study. Abbo of Fleury is contemporary to Gerbert and he had the same vast interests. He studied in England and they are presented together in the paper of Paolo Rossi. Veronica Regoli shows the link between Gerbert, Dante and Jerusalem.

  7. A moral dilemma.

    PubMed

    Arruda, R

    1994-09-01

    During the end of the 1980s, all AIDS prevention campaigns in Brazil mentioning condoms were automatically vetoed by the Catholic Church. The Church's influence upon the government, however, has decreased over the years such that government pamphlets now carry specific, graphic instructions on how to use condoms. This realistic approach to prevention taken by the government has been implemented even though the Church still refuses to endorse condom use and avoids mentioning them in the context of AIDS prevention. Even though the Catholic Church tries to deny that people, young and old alike, have sex solely for pleasure outside of the confines of heterosexual, marital relationships, it must increasingly face reality even within its own ranks. Even though only one priest has thus far openly declared his HIV status, at least 25 of the 1410 priests in Sao Paolo are thought to have died of AIDS in the last five years, while a senior source in the Church believes that more than 40 priests out of a total 14,000 could be seriously ill; no one knows how many are asymptomatically HIV-seropositive. It is clear that HIV cases identified and suspected thus far among the clergy were the result of sexual activity. In this context, the Church has become less verbally opposed to AIDS prevention campaigns, provides care for the sick without moral condemnation, and tends to support its HIV-seropositive priests.

  8. Bioenergetic relevance of hydrogen sulfide and the interplay between gasotransmitters at human cystathionine β-synthase.

    PubMed

    Vicente, João B; Malagrinò, Francesca; Arese, Marzia; Forte, Elena; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Merely considered as a toxic gas in the past, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is currently viewed as the third 'gasotransmitter' in addition to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), playing a key signalling role in human (patho)physiology. H2S can either act as a substrate or, similarly to CO and NO, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration, in the latter case by targeting cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX). The impact of H(2)S on mitochondrial energy metabolism crucially depends on the bioavailability of this gaseous molecule and its interplay with the other two gasotransmitters. The H(2)S-producing human enzyme cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), sustaining cellular bioenergetics in colorectal cancer cells, plays a role in the interplay between gasotransmitters. The enzyme was indeed recently shown to be negatively modulated by physiological concentrations of CO and NO, particularly in the presence of its allosteric activator S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet). These newly discovered regulatory mechanisms are herein reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Regional flaps in head and neck reconstruction: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Colletti, Giacomo; Tewfik, Karim; Bardazzi, Alessandro; Allevi, Fabiana; Chiapasco, Matteo; Mandalà, Marco; Rabbiosi, Dimitri

    2015-03-01

    Starting from our experience with 45 consecutive cases of regional pedicled flaps, we have underlined the effectiveness and reliability of a variety of flaps. The marketing laws as applied to surgical innovations are reviewed to help in the understanding of why regional flaps are regaining wide popularity in head and neck reconstruction. From January 2009 to January 2014, 45 regional flaps were harvested at San Paolo Hospital to reconstruct head and neck defects. These included 35 pectoralis major muscular and myocutaneous flaps, 4 lower trapezius island or pedicled flaps, 3 supraclavicular flaps, 2 latissimus dorsi pedicled flaps, and 1 fasciocutaneous temporal flap. The basic literature of marketing regarding the diffusion of new products was also reviewed. Two myocutaneous pectoralis major flaps were complicated by necrosis of the cutaneous paddle (one complete and one partial). No complete loss of any of the 45 flaps was observed. At 6 months of follow-up, 2 patients had died of multiple organ failure after prolonged sepsis. The 43 remaining patients had acceptable morphologic and functional results. Regional and free flaps appear to compete in many cases for the same indications. From the results of the present case series, regional flaps can be considered reliable reconstructive choices that are less expensive than their free flap alternatives. The "resurrection" of regional flaps can be partially justified by the changes in the global economy and the required adaptation of developed and developing countries. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of the Sinc method to a dynamic elasto-plastic problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdella, K.; Yu, X.; Kucuk, I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the application of Sinc bases to simulate numerically the dynamic behavior of a one-dimensional elastoplastic problem. The numerical methods that are traditionally employed to solve elastoplastic problems include finite difference, finite element and spectral methods. However, more recently, biorthogonal wavelet bases have been used to study the dynamic response of a uniaxial elasto-plastic rod [Giovanni F. Naldi, Karsten Urban, Paolo Venini, A wavelet-Galerkin method for elastoplasticity problems, Report 181, RWTH Aachen IGPM, and Math. Modelling and Scient. Computing, vol. 10, 2000]. In this paper the Sinc-Galerkin method is used to solve the straight elasto-plastic rod problem. Due to their exponential convergence rates and their need for a relatively fewer nodal points, Sinc based methods can significantly outperform traditional numerical methods [J. Lund, K.L. Bowers, Sinc Methods for Quadrature and Differential Equations, SIAM, Philadelphia, 1992]. However, the potential of Sinc-based methods for solving elastoplasticity problems has not yet been explored. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the possible application of Sinc methods through the numerical investigation of the unsteady one dimensional elastic-plastic rod problem.

  11. ["Fabulous things". Drug narratives about coca and cocaine in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Wahrig, Bettina

    2009-12-01

    This contribution focuses on the history of Coca leaves and Cocaine in the second half of 19th century Europe. Even though, to date, no direct link has been established between the activities of the Milano physician Paolo Mantegazza, and the Göttingen chemist Friedrich Wöhler, it is not a mere coincidence that both published their findings in the same year, namely, 1859. Mantegazza authored the first treatise claiming that Coca had psychoactive qualities and touted its broad therapeutic faculties; he claimed that it should be introduced into European pharmacotherapy. In Wöhler's laboratory, cocaine was isolated from leaves by his pupil Alfred Niemann; later, Wilhelm Lossen refined and corrected Niemann's results. Narratives about medicinal drugs often streamline history into a story that starts with multiple meanings and impure matters and ends with well-defined substances, directed at clear-cut diseases and symptoms. In the case of Coca, however, the pure substance triggered no such process well into the 1880s, whereas the leaves continued to circulate as an exotic, pluripotent drug whose effects where miraculous and yet difficult to establish.

  12. KSC-07pd2209

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, STS-120 crew members practice handling tools they will use during the mission. Around the table, at center, dressed in blue flight suits are Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Paolo A. Nespoli and Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Daniel M. Tani. Between Wheelock and Nespoli is Allison Bolinger, an EVA technician with NASA. In the foreground is Dina Contella, a thermal protection system specialist with NASA. Nespoli is a European Space Agency astronaut from Italy. The STS-120 crew is at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which includes harness training, inspection of the thermal protection system and camera operation for planned extravehicular activities, or EVAs. The STS-120 mission will deliver the Harmony module, christened after a school contest, which will provide attachment points for European and Japanese laboratory modules on the International Space Station. Known in technical circles as Node 2, it is similar to the six-sided Unity module that links the U.S. and Russian sections of the station. Built in Italy for the United States, Harmony will be the first new U.S. pressurized component to be added. The STS-120 mission is targeted to launch on Oct. 20. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton

  13. Calcium Isotopic Composition of Bulk Silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.; Ionov, D. A.; Liu, F.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Huang, F.

    2016-12-01

    Ca isotopes are used to study the accretion history of the Earth and terrestrial planets, but, Ca isotopic composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) remains poorly constrained [1]. To better understand the Ca isotopic composition of BSE, we analyzed 22 well studied peridotite xenoliths from Tariat (Mongolia), Vitim (southern Siberia) and Udachnaya (Siberian Craton). These samples include both fertile and highly depleted garnet and spinel peridotites that show no or only minor post-melting metasomatism or alteration. Ca isotope measurements were done on a Triton-TIMS using double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The data are reported as δ44/40Ca (relative to NIST SRM 915a). Results for geostandards are consistent with those from other laboratories. 2 standard deviations of SRM 915a analyses are 0.13‰ (n=48). δ44/40Ca of both and fertile and refractory peridotites range from 0.79 to 1.07‰ producing an average of 0.93±0.12‰ (2SD). This value defines the Ca isotopic composition of the BSE, which is consistent with the average δ44/40Ca of oceanic basalts ( 0.90‰)[2,3]. [1] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292; [2] Valdes et al (2014) EPSL 394; [3]DePaolo (2004) RMG 55.

  14. Surgical treatment of painful lesions of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Allevi, Fabiana; Lozza, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Nerve-related complications are being reported with increasing frequency following oral and dental surgery, and typically involve the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We assess herein the etiology of neuropathic pain related to IAN injuries, and describe the various surgical treatment techniques available. Between 2007 and 2013, 19 patients were referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) with pain in the area supplied by the IAN, which developed following endodontic treatment, oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery. All patients underwent IAN surgery by several different microsurgical procedures. Most of the patients affected by pain before surgery experienced complete or partial amelioration of symptoms. All patients receiving sural nerve grafts were pain-free 12 months after surgery. In five patients the operation was unsuccessful. In 78.94% of cases, a significant increase in nerve function was observed. Pain following IAN surgical damage may be addressed by microsurgery; nerve substitution with a sural nerve interpositional graft appears to represent the most efficacious procedure. Scar releasing, nerve decompression and nerve substitution using vein grafts are less effective. Removal of endodontic material extravasated into the mandibular canal is mandatory and effective in patients experiencing severe pain. Surgery should be performed within 12 months postoperatively, ideally during the first few weeks after symptoms onset.

  15. The computational power of time dilation in special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    The Lorentzian length of a timelike curve connecting both endpoints of a classical computation is a function of the path taken through Minkowski spacetime. The associated runtime difference is due to time-dilation: the phenomenon whereby an observer finds that another's physically identical ideal clock has ticked at a different rate than their own clock. Using ideas appearing in the framework of computational complexity theory, time-dilation is quantified as an algorithmic resource by relating relativistic energy to an nth order polynomial time reduction at the completion of an observer's journey. These results enable a comparison between the optimal quadratic Grover speedup from quantum computing and an n=2 speedup using classical computers and relativistic effects. The goal is not to propose a practical model of computation, but to probe the ultimate limits physics places on computation. Parts of this talk are based on [J.Phys.Conf.Ser. 229:012020 (2010), arXiv:0907.1579]. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  16. Giuseppe Sergi. The portrait of a positivist scientist.

    PubMed

    Cerro, Giovanni

    2017-06-09

    Giuseppe Sergi (1841-1936) was one of the most important anthropologists and psychologists of the age of positivism and this article focuses on three domains of his scientific research: degeneration, eugenics and race. His concept of degeneration is defined as the development of special forms of human adaptation to the environment. This issue is closely related to his theory of the "stratification of character", which had a profound impact on Italian psychiatry and criminal anthropology in the late nineteenth century. Thus, special emphasis is placed on the differences between Sergi and Cesare Lombroso regarding their definitions of criminality and genius. Concerning eugenics, the article analyzes Sergi's key role in the Italian context, discussing his eugenic program based on both repression and education. His remedies against the spread of degeneration included not only radical and repressive measures, but also the improvement of popular education and the living conditions of the working class. In the field of physical anthropology, the article examines Sergi's morphological method of classifying ethnic groups. Although sharply criticized in Italy and abroad, this method had two major effects. First, it led to the definitive split between Sergi and Paolo Mantegazza and to the foundation of the Societá Romana di Antropologia in 1893. Second, it was the starting point for Sergi's theory of Mediterranean "stock", which claimed that European populations were of African origin in contrast to contemporary theories of Aryan supremacy. The article ends with a look at the heated debate over Sergi's Mediterraneanism during the period of Fascism.

  17. A Methodological Approach to Communication with Extraterrestrials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascheri, Valeria

    The problem of communicating with extraterrestrial intelligence (CETI) has been debated by scholars of different disciplines but, in my opinion, we have to consider the problems connected with it before proposing a suitable language. We don't know anything about extraterrestrial world and its nature and this point is a fundamental one regarding the problem of the language; actually we understand each other because we know, at least generally, what matter we are dealing with, either objects or events happened or something we are able to know referring to past experiences. That's why we must concetrate our efforts on working on the physical nature of universe and the knowledge both civilizations share about it; therefore some scholars have proposed to use the mathematical language (see Paolo Musso's paper) as universal, anyway using it the problem of communicating can't be solved because of it's rigidity and limited field of expression. Others have proposed a pictorical language but it has a high anthropocentric value intrinsically. My topic is to draw attention to an important problem connected with any language, that of intentionality; even if we might find a universal language, it wouldn't be taken for granted we can really understand each other because we need to understand the object involved in the dialogue. Consequently, in order not to fall into misleading languages, I propose here a methodological approach as a necessary, but perhaps not sufficient, condition to venture this matter, to communicate something more than a self-proclaiming message.

  18. KSC-99pp1172

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-30

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During the Apollo Program, Launch Complex 34 was the site of the first Saturn I and Saturn IB launches, as well as the tragic fire in which the Apollo I astronauts lost their lives. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes

  19. Narrativity and enaction: the social nature of literary narrative understanding

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Yanna B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an understanding of literary narrative as a form of social cognition and situates the study of such narratives in relation to the new comprehensive approach to human cognition, enaction. The particular form of enactive cognition that narrative understanding is proposed to depend on is that of participatory sense-making, as developed in the work of Di Paolo and De Jaegher. Currently there is no consensus as to what makes a good literary narrative, how it is understood, and why it plays such an irreplaceable role in human experience. The proposal thus identifies a gap in the existing research on narrative by describing narrative as a form of intersubjective process of sense-making between two agents, a teller and a reader. It argues that making sense of narrative literature is an interactional process of co-constructing a story-world with a narrator. Such an understanding of narrative makes a decisive break with both text-centered approaches that have dominated both structuralist and early cognitivist study of narrative, as well as pragmatic communicative ones that view narrative as a form of linguistic implicature. The interactive experience that narrative affords and necessitates at the same time, I argue, serves to highlight the active yet cooperative and communal nature of human sociality, expressed in the many forms than human beings interact in, including literary ones. PMID:25202286

  20. Clock-genes and mitochondrial respiratory activity: Evidence of a reciprocal interplay.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Rosella; Cela, Olga; Merla, Giuseppe; Augello, Bartolomeo; Rubino, Rosa; Quarato, Giovanni; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years mounting evidences have highlighted the tight correlation between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Although at the organismal level the central timekeeper is constituted by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei practically all the peripheral tissues are equipped with autonomous oscillators made up by common molecular clockworks represented by circuits of gene expression that are organized in interconnected positive and negative feed-back loops. In this study we exploited a well-established in vitro synchronization model to investigate specifically the linkage between clock gene expression and the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Here we show that synchronized cells exhibit an autonomous ultradian mitochondrial respiratory activity which is abrogated by silencing the master clock gene ARNTL/BMAL1. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial OxPhos system resulted in dramatic deregulation of the rhythmic clock-gene expression and a similar result was attained with mtDNA depleted cells (Rho0). Our findings provide a novel level of complexity in the interlocked feedback loop controlling the interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  1. Discussion on ``Foundations of the Second Law''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbey, Robert; Ao, Ping; Beretta, Gian Paolo; Cengel, Yunus; Foley, Andrew; Freedman, Steven; Graeff, Roderich; Keck, James C.; Lloyd, Seth; Maroney, Owen; Nieuwenhuizen, Theodorus M.; Weissman, Michael

    2008-08-01

    This article reports an open discussion that took place during the Keenan Symposium "Meeting the Entropy Challenge" (held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on October 4, 2007) following the short presentations—each reported as a separate article in the present volume—by Seth Lloyd, Owen Maroney, Silviu Guiasu, Ping Ao, Jochen Gemmer, Bernard Guy, Gian Paolo Beretta, Speranta Gheorghiu-Svirschevski, and Dorion Sagan. All panelists and the audience were asked to address the following questions • Why is the second law true? Is it an inviolable law of nature? If not, is it possible to develop a perpetual motion machine of the second kind? • Are second law limitations objective or subjective, real or apparent, due to the nature of physical states or the representation and manipulation of information? Is entropy a physical property in the same sense as energy is universally understood to be an intrinsic property of matter? • Does the second law conflict with quantum mechanics? Are the differences between mechanical and thermodynamic descriptions of physical phenomena reconcilable? Does the reversible law of motion of hamiltonian mechanics and quantum mechanics conflict with the empirical observation of irreversible phenomena?

  2. Ensino e divulgação de astronomia no Planetário de Campinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, R. P.

    2003-08-01

    Projeto desenvolvido em 1981 por professores da Unicamp, sob a coordenação do Prof. Dr. Carlos Alfredo Argüello propunha a instalação de um Planetário em Campinas. Convênio firmado em 1982 entre a Unicamp, a Prefeitura de Campinas, a Funcamp e a Academia de Ciências do Estado de São Paulo, possibilitou a aquisição de um planetário Zeiss ZKP2, através do MEC, e em 28 de outubro de 1987 foi inaugurado o Planetário de Campinas. Desde então várias atividades de ensino e divulgação da Astronomia foram desenvolvidas regularmente. A verificação dos registros das atividades realizadas mostra um alto índice de atendimento, considerada a capacidade das instalações (sala de projeção para 60 pessoas, auditório com 45 poltronas e hall de exposições). As atividades dirigidas ao público, estudantes e professores, atenderam cerca de 400.000 participantes nos quase 16 anos de sua existência. Além de sessões públicas e escolares, com duração de 1 hora, são oferecidas às escolas vários outros tipos de atividades, com duração de 2,5 horas. Abordam diversos temas e são dirigidas a diferentes níveis de escolaridade. Cursos para o público e para professores, palestras, exposições e eventos especiais completam o quadro de atividades regulares. Mesmo enfrentando quase sempre dificuldades financeiras e administrativas verifica-se que o Planetário de Campinas realizou um trabalho quantitativamente e qualitativamente satisfatório, prestando bom serviços à comunidade de Campinas e de outras cidades de São Paulo e outros Estados. Isso é também atestado pela grande procura de reservas para suas atividades.

  3. [Gestational diabetes and the new screening test's impact].

    PubMed

    Massa, Ana Catarina; Rangel, Ricardo; Cardoso, Manuela; Campos, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Em 2011, foi introduzido um novo rastreio para a diabetes gestacional que permitiu um diagnóstico mais precoce e de maior número de casos com o intuito de reduzir complicações maternas e perinatais. O objectivo deste estudo foi avaliar a prevalência da diabetes gestacional, comparar resultados obstétricos e perinatais do anterior e presente rastreio e os resultados e realização da prova de reclassificação pós-parto. Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo em gestações simples e diabetes gestacional diagnosticados em 2009 (n = 223) e 2012 (n = 237), vigiadas na Maternidade Dr. Alfredo da Costa, Portugal. Após consulta de processos clínicos procedeu-se à análise de características demográficas, história médica e obstétrica, aumento ponderal durante a gravidez, idade gestacional do diagnóstico, terapêutica utilizada, resultados perinatais e reclassificação pós-parto, seguida de comparação destas variáveis entre os anos de 2009 e 2012. Resultados: Em 2012, houve maior prevalência de diabetes gestacional, ganho ponderal inferior (p < 0,001), maior recurso à terapêutica farmacológica (p < 0,001) e aumento dos casos diagnosticados no primeiro e segundo trimestres (p < 0,001). Relativamente aos resultados neonatais, o peso médio do recém-nascido ao nascer foi significativamente menor (p = 0,001) com diminuição dos recém-nascidos grandes para a idade gestacional (p = 0,002). A taxa de reclassificação pós-parto foi semelhante nos dois anos mas em 2012 houve um aumento dos resultados normais e diminuição das anomalias da glicémia em jejum. Discussão: Critérios mais apertados do actual rastreio permitiram a redução da maioria das complicações da diabetes gestacional levantando novas questões. Conclusão: A introdução do actual rastreio resultou num aumento de prevalência, diagnóstico mais precoce e redução da macrossomia.

  4. El Salvador.

    PubMed

    1993-02-01

    Background notes on El Salvador capsulizes specific statistical and descriptive information on geography, demography, government. and economic conditions. The man text describes the people, their history and the nature of the peace process, principal government officials, political conditions, human rights, the state of the economy, foreign relations, and relations with the US. In 1992, the estimated population was about 5 million of which 89% are mestizo (Spanish-Indian), 10% Indian, and 1% Caucasian. 58% live in rural areas. It is largely Roman Catholic. Literacy is about 65% among adults. 6 years of education are compulsory. 40% are engaged in agriculture, 27% in services, and 16% in industry. The gross domestic product was $5.1 billion; per capita income was $1160. El Salvador's history has been marked by frequent revolutions. Almost every present since 1932 has been a military officer. In the more recent past (1969-80), Honduras and El Salvador fought over borders; a peace treaty was signed in 1980, but it was not until 1992 that the land in dispute was awarded by the International Court of Justice to Honduras. During the 1970, efforts by Duarte were made toward democratic reform, but fraud and corruption contributed to the rise of armed guerrilla warfare as a means to bring about change. There were rightist and leftists groups accelerating violence; event he Salvadoran armed forces engaged in lawlessness. The judicial system failed. Nicaragua after 1979 supplied arms and munitions to 5 guerrilla groups. Duarte returned to power and his junta initiated land reform and nationalized banks and marketing of coffee and sugar. The elections in 1982 led to the transfer of power to Alvaro Magana. The new constitution in 1983 appeased some, but land reforms still did not satisfy guerrillas. Duarte was elected again in 1984 and Alfredo Christiani in 1989 in a peaceful transfer of power. In 1991 and 1992 peace accords were signed with the guerrillas. During this 12-year

  5. [Recurrent upper respiratory tract obstruction in children].

    PubMed

    Sacre Hazouri, J A

    1999-01-01

    The systematic approach of the pediatric patient with recurrent upper airway obstruction (RUAO) must be based on a through clinical history, physical examination, and the adequate use of the laboratory and diagnostic procedures, which must complement the correct identification of the causes of UAO and its interrelation with comorbid conditions as allergic rhinitis, rhinosinusitis and adenoiditis, with or without significant hypertrophy. this work, is to propose the study protocol of the patient with recurrent upper airway obstruction used in our own Instituto Privado de Alergia, Inmunología y Vías Respiratorias. We studied in a prospective fashion, a cohort of 117 pediatric patients, 12 years old and under, with clinical complaints of RUAO. 2/3 of these patients had a suggestive cytology pattern of nasal allergy and infection at the same time, following the method proposed by Dr. Alfredo Jalowayski from UC San Diego. The use of conventional radiology (lateral neck x ray) in the diagnosis of hypertrophy/hyperplasia of adenoidal tissue is useful and give us an orientation regarding the adenoidal size in 75% of the patients; nevertheless, it should not be considered as the most sensible diagnostic procedure to decide the best therapeutic option. If this study shows a decrease in diameter of the airway between the hard palate and the adenoidal shadow of 20% or more, we should proceeded with a flexible rhinopharyngoscopy to evaluate not only the real size of the adenoidal tissue, its mucosal appearance and its relation within the posterior pharynx with the Eustaquian tube (oto-pharyngeal tube-OPT). The endoscopic procedure is easy to perform, even in small children and showed us that almost half of the patients with abnormal lateral X-ray, have at least some degree of OFT obstruction. Aside from these results, the nasopharyngoscope give us useful information about comorbid and or existing conditions such as allergic rhintis, nasal polyposis, status of the osteomeatal

  6. Media event at ESOC: closest encounter between ESA's comet chaser Rosetta and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-02-01

    , Gerhard Schwehm, Head of Solar System Science Operations Division & Rosetta Mission Manager 03:10 - Introductory comments on approach ; Paolo Ferri, Head of Solar and Planetary Missions Division and Rosetta Flight Operations Director Comments on eclipse, Andrea Accomazzo, Rosetta Spacecraft Operations Manager Comments on closest approach/eclipse, Andrea Accomazzo & Paolo Ferri 03:15 - Closest approach to Mars, eclipse starts 03:17 - Ground stations, Manfred Lugert, Head of Ground Facilities Operations Division 03:28 - Occultation ends - signal back 03:30 - Imagery from Rosetta and Mars Express , Uwe Keller, Mas-Planck Institute 03:40 - Comments on eclipse end and telemetry acquisition, Andrea Accomazzo, 03:52 - Conclusions, Manfred Warhaut, Head of Mission Operations Department 04 :00 - End of event

  7. Iron cycling in the Amazon River Basin: the isotopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson, Franck; Vieira, Lucieth; Mulholland, Daniel; Seyler, Patrick; Sondag, Francis; Allard, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    With the global climate change and increasing anthropic pressure on nature, it is important to find new indicators of the response of complex systems like the Amazon River Basin. In particular, new tracers like iron isotopes may tell us much on processes such as the chemical exchanges between rivers, soils and the biosphere. Pioneering studies revealed that for some river waters, large δ57Fe fractionations are observed between the suspended and dissolved load (Bergquist and Boyle, 2006), and isotopic variations were also recognized on the suspended matter along the hydrological cycle (Ingri et al., 2006). On land, soil studies from various locations have shown that δ57Fe signatures depend mostly on the weathering regime (Fantle and DePaolo, 2004; Emmanuel et al., 2005; Wiederhold et al., 2007; Poitrasson et al., 2008). It thus seems that Fe isotopes could become an interesting new tracer of the exchanges between soils, rivers and the biosphere. We therefore conducted Fe isotope surveys through multidisciplinary field missions on rivers from the Amazon Basin. It was confirmed that acidic, organic-rich black waters show strong Fe isotope fractionation between particulate and dissolved loads. Furthermore, this isotopic fractionation varies along the hydrological cycle, like previously uncovered in boreal waters suspended matter. In contrast, unfiltered waters show very little variation with time. It was also found that Fe isotopes remain a conservative tracer even in the case of massive iron loss during the mixing of chemically contrasted waters such as the Negro and Solimões tributaries of the Amazon River. Given that >95% of the Fe from the Amazon River is carried as detrital materials, our results lead to the conclusion that the Fe isotope signature delivered to the Atlantic Ocean is undistinguishable from the continental crust value, in contrast to previous inferences. The results indicate that Fe isotopes in rivers represent a promising indicator of the

  8. Prefazione al quarto volume di GERBERTVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The fourth volume of GERBERTVS contains the acts of the symposia held in Rome, at the Odeion hall of Lettere faculty in Sapienza University on December 7, 2012 Gerbert Homo Novus and on March 13, 2013 on the pre and post humanistic figures. Laura C. Paladino presents the didactical activity of Gerbert as from Richer of Reims who completed his Historia Francorum in 998, before the election of Gerbert to the pontifical soil. Among these activities there is the teaching of astronomy and mathematics and the abacus, to which a special article of Jorge Nuno Silva is dedicated. The abacus increased dramatically the rapidity of the computations and some algoritms thaught by Gerbert and reported by his former student Bernelinus is very reliably invented by Gerbert himself, as Silva demostrates in his paper. Giancarlo Pani presents the relation between Galileo and Kepler, at the end of the humanistic period, showing interesting insights on the rather asymmetrical exchange of information between the two greater astronomer of 1600. Veronica Regoli presents the Cosmos of Dante, the ideal structure of the Divine Comedy. Patrick Demouy presents the new biography of Flavio G. Nuvolone where the great novelty is the noble origin of Gerbert from Carlat family, but before the marriage of his (presumed) father. His birth is shifted back to 938 with technical demostrations. Paolo Zanna compares the magisterium of Gerbert-Sylvester II and that one of John Paul II and pope Francesco. Finally C. Sigismondi presents the work and the activities of Pawel Max Maksym (1983-2013) who founded the Observatory &"Pope Sylvester II" in the town of Bukowiec, near Lodz, Poland.

  9. Endoscopic treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leaks with the use of lower turbinate grafts: a retrospective review of 125 cases.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Michele; Felippu, Alexandre

    2009-12-01

    Endoscopic transnasal approaches to the skull base have revolutionized the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulae, making repair less invasive and more effective compared with craniotomy or extracranial techniques. This study evaluated, retrospectively, the results of endoscopic repair of dural defects with the use of mucoperiostal grafts taken from the lower turbinate. Between January 1997 and January 2007, 125 cases of anterior skull base CSF fistulae were treated endoscopically at the Instituto Felippu de Otorrinolaringologia, Sao Paolo, Brazil, and at the Department of Otolaryngology of the University Hospital "Ospedali Riuniti", Foggia, Italy. Fistula closure was achieved by overlay apposition of a lower turbinate mucoperiostal graft fixated with fibrin glue and Surgicell. The etiology of the fistula was accidental trauma in 41 cases, iatrogenic trauma in 29, skull base tumour in 12, and spontaneous in 43. The site of the defect was the sphenoid sinus in 43 patients, the cribriform plate in 42, the anterior ethmoid roof in 21, the posterior ethmoid roof in 17, and the posterior wall of the frontal sinus in 2. The success rate at first attempt was 94.4%; the 7 cases of postoperative recurrent CSF leakage involved patients presenting with spontaneous fistula and elevated intracranial pressure; 5 of these had a body-mass index > 30 and 3 suffered from diabetes mellitus. In our hands, the success rate of endoscopic fistula repair was high, even in defects larger than 2 cm. Success rates may be further improved with accurate diagnosis of elevated intracranial pressure, a contributing factor to failure of spontaneous fistula repair.

  10. Deficiency in the mouse mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 2 gene is associated with cardiac noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Jason E; Waymire, Katrina G; Flierl, Adrian; Sweeney, Katelyn M; Angelin, Alessia; MacGregor, Grant R; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    The mouse fetal and adult hearts express two adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) isoform genes. The predominant isoform is the heart-muscle-brain ANT-isoform gene 1 (Ant1) while the other is the systemic Ant2 gene. Genetic inactivation of the Ant1 gene does not impair fetal development but results in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in postnatal mice. Using a knockin X-linked Ant2 allele in which exons 3 and 4 are flanked by loxP sites combined in males with a protamine 1 promoter driven Cre recombinase we created females heterozygous for a null Ant2 allele. Crossing the heterozygous females with the Ant2(fl), PrmCre(+) males resulted in male and female ANT2-null embryos. These fetuses proved to be embryonic lethal by day E14.5 in association with cardiac developmental failure, immature cardiomyocytes having swollen mitochondria, cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation, and cardiac failure due to hypertrabeculation/noncompaction. ANTs have two main functions, mitochondrial-cytosol ATP/ADP exchange and modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). Previous studies imply that ANT2 biases the mtPTP toward closed while ANT1 biases the mtPTP toward open. It has been reported that immature cardiomyocytes have a constitutively opened mtPTP, the closure of which signals the maturation of cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesize that the developmental toxicity of the Ant2 null mutation may be the result of biasing the cardiomyocyte mtPTP to remain open thus impairing cardiomyocyte maturation and resulting in cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation and failure of trabecular maturation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon in Underland (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    ScienceCinema

    DePaolo, Donald J. (Director, Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2); NCGC Staff

    2016-07-12

    'Carbon in Underland' was submitted by the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'entertaining animation and engaging explanations of carbon sequestration'. NCGC, an EFRC directed by Donald J. DePaolo at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from seven institutions: LBNL (lead) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Ohio State University, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO{sub 2} is 'to use new investigative tools, combined with experiments and computer simulations, to build a fundamental understanding of molecular-to-pore-scale processes in fluid-rock systems, and to demonstrate the ability to control critical aspects of flow, transport, and mineralization in porous rock media as applied to geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Research topics are: bio-inspired, CO{sub 2} (store), greenhouse gas, and interfacial characterization.

  12. Psychological well-being and posttraumatic growth in caregivers of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cormio, Claudia; Romito, Francesca; Viscanti, Giovanna; Turaccio, Marina; Lorusso, Vito; Mattioli, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Although research has shown that many cancer patients report positive life changes following cancer diagnosis, there are few data in the literature related to PTG in caregivers of cancer patients. However, the few studies available have shown that this kind of positive changes can also be experienced by family members. The aims of this study were to explore PTG in caregivers of cancer patients and to investigate correlations between the Posttraumatic growth, psychological status and QoL of caregivers and those of patients, taking into account also clinical and socio-demographic aspects. Methods: We enrolled 60 patient/caregiver pairs in the Department of Medical Oncology of the National Research Center “Giovanni Paolo II” in Bari. Both patients and caregivers were assessed using the following scales: Posttraumatic growth Inventory (PTGI); Hospital anxiety and depression scale; Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36); ECOG Performance Status. Clinical and socio-demographic data were collected. Results: Caregivers showed significantly higher scores than patients in the dimension of “personal strength.” Furthermore, we found a significantly close association between anxiety and depression of caregivers with those of patients. Younger caregivers were better than older ones in terms of physical activity, vitality, mental health, and social activities. Although the degree of relationship with the patient has no significant effect on the dependent variables of the study, it was found that caregivers with a degree of kinship more distant to the patient have less physical pain than the closest relatives. Conclusion: Results of the present study show that caregivers of cancer patients may experience post-traumatic growth as the result of their caregiver role. It would be interesting to investigate in future research which factor may mediate the presence of post-traumatic growth. PMID:25477853

  13. Report Of The Cospar WG On "Future Of Space Astronomy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, Pietro; Space Astronomy*, Cospar WG on Future of

    2011-09-01

    The COSPAR President on April 20, 2010 appointed the "Future of Space Astronomy” Working Group under the aegis of Commission E, with the aim to analyze the difficult situation of space astronomy over the next two decades and recommend ways to improve the prospects. Having assessed the scientific needs and the current plans of the main space agencies worldwide, the WG has identified some major concerns about the lack of a secured future for Space Astronomy. In fact, astronomers today have access to an impressive set of space missions and ground-based observatories that gives them nearly continuous coverage of the electromagnetic spectrum from the gamma-ray to the radio regions. But the picture becomes concerning and critical in the next 10 - 15 years, when current space astronomy missions will have ended and new missions will be much less numerous. Astronomy is a difficult observational science requiring continuous and simultaneous access to the full electromagnetic spectrum to explore our complex Universe and to pursue answers to fundamental scientific questions. The history of space astronomy, especially the past three decades, has demonstrated clearly the importance and benefits of access to the gamma-ray, X-ray, UV-optical, near IR and far-IR spectrum from space. So far the only planned observatory class missions, proposed to NASA-ESA-JAXA are JWST (2018), WFIRST/EUCLID (2018-2020), Athena (ex IXO, 2022) and LISA. The latter two under re-scope in an ESA alone scenario with a cost <1B€. We will present the main WG outcome with a number of recommendations and, finally, suggest a road map for the next decades. *WG membership: Pietro Ubertini (Chair), Italy, Neil Gehrels (Co-Chair), USA, Ian Corbett (IAU liason), UK, Paolo De Bernardis, Italy, Marcos Machado, Argentina, Matt Griffin, UK, Michael Hauser, USA, Ravinder K. Manchanda, India, Nobuyuki Kawai, Japan, Shuang-Nan Zhang, China, Mikhail Pavlinsky, Russia

  14. Workflow in Clinical Trial Sites & Its Association with Near Miss Events for Data Quality: Ethnographic, Workflow & Systems Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Araujo de Carvalho, Elias Cesar; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Claudino, Wederson; Lima Reis, Luiz Fernando; Schmerling, Rafael A.; Shah, Jatin; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Background With the exponential expansion of clinical trials conducted in (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) and VISTA (Vietnam, Indonesia, South Africa, Turkey, and Argentina) countries, corresponding gains in cost and enrolment efficiency quickly outpace the consonant metrics in traditional countries in North America and European Union. However, questions still remain regarding the quality of data being collected in these countries. We used ethnographic, mapping and computer simulation studies to identify/address areas of threat to near miss events for data quality in two cancer trial sites in Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings Two sites in Sao Paolo and Rio Janeiro were evaluated using ethnographic observations of workflow during subject enrolment and data collection. Emerging themes related to threats to near miss events for data quality were derived from observations. They were then transformed into workflows using UML-AD and modeled using System Dynamics. 139 tasks were observed and mapped through the ethnographic study. The UML-AD detected four major activities in the workflow evaluation of potential research subjects prior to signature of informed consent, visit to obtain subject́s informed consent, regular data collection sessions following study protocol and closure of study protocol for a given project. Field observations pointed to three major emerging themes: (a) lack of standardized process for data registration at source document, (b) multiplicity of data repositories and (c) scarcity of decision support systems at the point of research intervention. Simulation with policy model demonstrates a reduction of the rework problem. Conclusions/Significance Patterns of threats to data quality at the two sites were similar to the threats reported in the literature for American sites. The clinical trial site managers need to reorganize staff workflow by using information technology more efficiently, establish new standard procedures and manage

  15. PREFACE: International Seminar on Strong and Electromagnetic Interactions in High Energy Collisions 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, Giorgio; Sandorfi, Andrew; Pedroni, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    The International Seminar 'Strong and Electromagnetic Interaction in High Energy Collisions' was held in the Conference Hall 'Ettore Majorana' of the Department of Physics in Messina, Italy on October 12, 2012. The Seminar was organized by the University of Messina and 'Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo', with the aim of presenting and discussing the results of the current experiments and also new plans involving research at INFN-LNF (Italy), JLAB (USA), LHC-CERN, ELSA (Bonn), MAMI (Mainz). The main purpose of this Seminar was to deal with aspects of electromagnetic and strong forces by meson photoproduction and the electron-positron collider, and to search for dark energy. The recent results on hadron contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment and kaon interferometry at the DAFNE facility were also discussed. Editors: Giorgio Giardina (University of Messina), Andrew M Sandorfi (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, USA), Paolo Pedroni (INFN 'Sezione di Pavia') Organizing Committee: Chairman: G Giardina (Messina - Italy) Co-Chairman: A M Sandorfi (Newport News, USA) Co-Chairman: P Pedroni (Pavia - Italy) Scientific Secretary: G Mandaglio (University of Messina - Italy) Organizing Institutions: University of Messina Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina) Topics: Meson photoproduction and baryon resonances Muon anomaly (g-2) Recent results in experiments at the Large Hadron Collider Kaon interferometry Local Organizing Committee: F Curciarello, V De Leo, G Fazio, G Giardina, G Mandaglio, M Romaniuk Sponsored by: University of Messina, Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina), INFN Sezione di Catania Web-Site: http://newcleo.unime.it/IntSem2012

  16. Astronomy in the Age of Leonardo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, B. L.

    1997-12-01

    In the 1450s, when Leonardo da Vinci was born, horoscopes were still based primarily on the 13th-century tables developed in the court of Alfonso el Sabio of Spain. By the 15th century European astronomers were computing revised forms of the tables. In Italy, for example, Giovanni Bianchini of Ferrara completed his Tabulae astronomicae in the 1440s. It was finally published posthumously in Venice in 1495. By the 1480s Domenico Maria Novara, a professor of astronomy in Bologna, was publishing annual prognostications of eclipses, conjunctions, and other celestial phenomena. Against this background of traditional astronomy in Italy, two Florentines recorded observations of the sun and moon, comets, and meteorology. Paolo dal Pozzi Toscanelli flourished in the first half of the 15th century and Leonardo da Vinci in the last half. Their observations of celestial phenomena were not primarily for astronomical purposes; they were spinoffs of other pursuits such as medicine, astrology, optics, engineering, and studies of light and shadow. As a physician and cartographer, Toscanelli practiced astrology, studied omens, observed comets and plotted their paths on homemade maps. He also was associated with the construction of a gnomon at the top of the Duomo to observe the summer solstice. It was this project that may have brought him into contact with the young artisan, Leonardo da Vinci. As a painter, Leonardo's approach to science and engineering was to observe, sketch and analyze. His interest in light and shadow led him to notice how the earth, moon and planets all reflect sunlight. His extant manuscripts have geometric sketches for eclipses and for the phenomenon known as "old moon in new moon's arms." Unfortunately, because neither Toscanelli nor Leonardo published their observations, they made no impact on the history of astronomical thought or observation. Their contemporaries did not know or write about their work. Astronomers in the 16th century did not know about

  17. Pb and Sr isotopic constraints on lithospheric magma sources during Mesozoic continental margin arc initiation, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, A.P. . Dept. of Geology); Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Initiation of the Mesozoic Cordilleran arc in the southwestern US is marked by plutonism from about 241--213 Ma, exposed in the Granite Mountains in the southwestern Mojave Desert, through the Transverse Ranges to the Colorado River trough in southeastern California and southwestern Arizona. Plutons range in composition from diorite to granite, but quartz monzonite and monzodiorite predominate. Plutons intruded 1,700 to 1,100 Ma rocks of the Mojave crustal province [as defined isotopically by Wooden and Miller (1990) and Bennett and DePaolo (1987)], and episomal plutons locally intruded its deformed cratonal/miogeoclinal cover. Plutons emplaced during arc initiation overlap isotopically with local Proterozoic basement rocks, but typically have less radiogenic [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb, [sup 208]Pb/[sup 204]Pb and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr than adjacent, more voluminous Middle-Late Jurassic and Late Cretaceous arc plutons. Among early arc plutons, an inter-suite trend toward more radiogenic Pb and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr at similar silica contents reflects regional basement isotopic variability. Generally high Sr contents, low Rb/Sr and limited REE data suggest this inter-suite variations records heterogeneity in eclogite/garnet amphibolite facies mafic lithospheric magma sources, corresponding to mafic lower crust and/or upper mantle formed during 1,700 Ma orogenesis or rift-related magmatism at 1,100 Ma. Intra-suite trends toward less radiogenic Pb at constant or more radiogenic Sr reflect involvement of a U and Th depleted, silicic intracrustal contaminant. Distinctive magma sources and limited crustal interaction during emplacement probably reflects the relatively cool thermal structure of the nascent Cordilleran continental margin arc.

  18. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  19. Carbon in Underland (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.; NCGC Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Carbon in Underland' was submitted by the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'entertaining animation and engaging explanations of carbon sequestration'. NCGC, an EFRC directed by Donald J. DePaolo at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from seven institutions: LBNL (lead) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Ohio State University, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO{sub 2} is 'to use new investigative tools, combined with experiments and computer simulations, to build a fundamental understanding of molecular-to-pore-scale processes in fluid-rock systems, and to demonstrate the ability to control critical aspects of flow, transport, and mineralization in porous rock media as applied to geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Research topics are: bio-inspired, CO{sub 2} (store), greenhouse gas, and interfacial characterization.

  20. Energy Frontier Research Centers: A View from Senior EFRC Representatives (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    ScienceCinema

    Drell, Persis (SLAC); Armstrong, Neal (University of Arizona); Carter, Emily (Princeton University); DePaolo, Don (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory); Gunnoe, Brent (University of Virginia)

    2016-07-12

    A distinguished panel of scientists from the EFRC community provide their perspective on the importance of EFRCs for addressing critical energy needs at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Persis Drell, Director at SLAC, served as moderator. Panel members are Neal Armstrong (Director of the Center for Interface Science: Solar Electric Materials, led by the University of Arizona), Emily Carter (Co-Director of the Combustion EFRC, led by Princeton University. She is also Team Leader of the Heterogeneous Functional Materials Center, led by the University of South Caroline), Don DePaolo (Director of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2, led by LBNL), and Brent Gunnoe (Director of the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization, led by the University of Virginia). The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting

  1. Isaac Newton: Eighteenth-century Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A. Rupert

    1999-05-01

    This new product of the ever-flourishing Newton industry seems a bit far-fetched at first sight: who but a few specialists would be interested in the historiography of Newton biography in the eighteenth century? On closer inspection, this book by one of the most important Newton scholars of our day turns out to be of interest to a wider audience as well. It contains several biographical sketches of Newton, written in the decades after his death. The two most important ones are the Eloge by the French mathematician Bernard de Fontenelle and the Italian scholar Paolo Frisi's Elogio. The latter piece was hitherto unavailable in English translation. Both articles are well-written, interesting and sometimes even entertaining. They give us new insights into the way Newton was revered throughout Europe and how not even the slightest blemish on his personality or work could be tolerated. An example is the way in which Newton's famous controversy with Leibniz is treated: Newton is without hesitation presented as the wronged party. Hall has provided very useful historical introductions to the memoirs as well as footnotes where needed. Among the other articles discussed is a well-known memoir by John Conduitt, who was married to Newton's niece. This memoir, substantial parts of which are included in this volume, has been a major source of personal information for Newton biographers up to this day. In a concluding chapter, Hall gives a very interesting overview of the later history of Newton biography, in which he describes the gradual change from adoration to a more critical approach in Newton's various biographers. In short, this is a very useful addition to the existing biographical literature on Newton. A J Kox

  2. Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin dam-hydraulic system, travel time and temperature modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, Bishnu; Imberger, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    SummaryTiete River System in the State of Sao Paolo, Brazil is characterized by complex hydraulics and operational problems due to series of dams and point and diffuse inflows along the river. A one dimension Lagrangian river model was developed and applied to the 313 km reach of the Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin from the Penha Dam to the head water of Bara Bonita Reservoir, a stretch of river that includes six small to medium size dams (3.4-22 m high) including the Pirapora Reservoir and 26 inflows into the river (11 tributaries, 9 diffuse source areas, and discharges of 4 cities stormwater and 2 wastewater treatment plants. The conservative tracer transport and temperature model that accounts for the short and long wave radiation and heat transfers at the free surface was included and solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The time variable catchment input to the model was the simulated output of the external hydrological model called Runoff Load Model which results were provided by CETESB. The numerical treatment of series of dams and spillway (that included uncontrolled overflow spillway, gate-controlled ogee spillway; and underflow gates and tunnels) and parameterisation of hydraulic jumps are described. Special attention was focused on the high spatial and temporal variation of flows in Tiete River Basin, a result of the large variation in catchment inflows and channel geometry due to dams and reservoirs along the river. Predicted and measured spatial and seasonal variation of flow and temperature profiles along the river show good agreement. The simulated travel time of conservative tracer is compared against the CETESB's 1982 and 1984 field study data in a 254 km reach of the Middle Tiete River that again shows good agreement. Being Lagrangian in construction, this new model is computationally efficient making it an ideal tool for long term simulation for water resource planning, management and operation decision making in a large and complex river

  3. K-Ca Dating of Alkali-Rich Fragments in the Y-74442 and Bhola LL-Chondritic Breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, T; Misawa, K.; Okano, O; Shih, C. -Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simon, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Alkali-rich igneous fragments in the brecciated LL-chondrites, Krahenberg (LL5) [1], Bhola (LL3-6) [2], Siena (LL5) [3] and Yamato (Y)-74442 (LL4) [4-6], show characteristic fractionation patterns of alkali and alkaline elements [7]. The alkali-rich fragments in Krahenberg, Bhola and Y-74442 are very similar in mineralogy and petrography, suggesting that they could have come from related precursor materials [6]. Recently we reported Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of alkali-rich igneous rock fragments in Y-74442: nine fragments from Y-74442 yield the Rb-Sr age of 4429 plus or minus 54 Ma (2 sigma) for lambda(Rb-87) = 0.01402 Ga(exp -1) [8] with the initial ratio of Sr-87/Sr-86 = 0.7144 plus or minus 0.0094 (2 sigma) [9]. The Rb-Sr age of the alkali-rich fragments of Y-74442 is younger than the primary Rb-Sr age of 4541 plus or minus 14 Ma for LL-chondrite whole-rock samples [10], implying that they formed after accumulation of LL-chondrite parental bodies, although enrichment may have happened earlier. Marshall and DePaolo [11,12] demonstrated that the K-40 - Ca-40 decay system could be an important chronometer as well as a useful radiogenic tracer for studies of terrestrial rocks. Shih et al. [13,14] and more recently Simon et al. [15] determined K-Ca ages of lunar granitic rocks, and showed the application of the K-Ca chronometer for K-rich planetary materials. Since alkali-rich fragments in the LL-chondritic breccias are highly enriched in K, we can expect enhancements of radiogenic Ca-40. Here, we report preliminary results of K-Ca isotopic systematics of alkali-rich fragments in the LL-chondritic breccias, Y-74442 and Bhola.

  4. The Phase I CORDEX RegCM hyper-MAtrix (CREMA) experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, F.

    2013-12-01

    An ensemble of regional climate model (RCM) projections was produced with the RegCM4 modeling system as a first contribution to the CORDEX framework by the RegCM modeling community, the Phase I CORDEX RegCM hyper-MAtrix (CREMA) experiment. A total of 34 regional projections were completed covering the period 1970-2100 over five different CORDEX domains, Africa, Central America, South America, South Asia and the Mediterranean. The projections use different combinations of three driving GCMs (HadGEM, MPI and GFDL), two greenhouse gas concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) and different land surface and convection schemes, which allows a first exploration of different sources of uncertainty. The paper will describe the CREMA phase I experiment and discuss some basic results from a first analysis of these runs, with emphasis on extreme events (including tropical storms), variability and regional circulations of relevance for the different domains (e.g. the monsoon). The CREMA Phase I experiment was completed as a collaboration between the Abdus Salam ICTP and the U. San Paolo, CICESE, and the Indian Institute of Technology, and the results from this first analysis are being published in a special issue of Climatic Change. The data from these projections is freely available following the CORDEX data policy for eventual further analysis and use in impact assessment studies. We plan to incrementally populate the CREMA ensemble with further simulations employing more driving GCMs and model configurations and to compare our resultswith other models participating to the CORDEX effort.

  5. Relationship Between Occupational Physical Activity and Subclinical Vascular Damage in Moderate-Altitude Dwellers.

    PubMed

    Ujka, Kristian; Bruno, Rosa Maria; Bastiani, Luca; Bernardi, Eva; Sdringola, Paolo; Dikic, Nenad; Basyal, Bikash; Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sundarshan; Basnyat, Buddha; Cogo, Annalisa; Pratali, Lorenza

    2017-09-01

    Ujka, Kristian, Rosa Maria Bruno, Luca Bastiani, Eva Bernardi, Paolo Sdringola, Nenad Dikic, Bikash Basyal, Sanjeeb Sundarshan Bhandari, Buddha Basnyat, Annalisa Cogo, and Lorenza Pratali. Relationship between occupational physical activity and subclinical vascular damage in moderate-altitude dwellers. High Alt Med Biol. 18:249-257, 2017. Occupational physical activity (OPA) has been associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) events. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between OPA and markers of subclinical vascular damage among a moderate-altitude population living in the rural village of Chaurikharka (Nepal; 2600 m sea level). Seventy-two individuals (age 42 ± 15 years, ranges 15-85 years, 23 men) were enrolled. Physical activity (PA) was evaluated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), carotid ultrasound assessment, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were performed. OPA was 9860 ± 5385 Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET)-minutes/week, representing 77% of total energy expenditure, with 97% of the population performing high-intensity PA. In the univariate analysis, OPA was significantly associated with PWV (β = 0.474, p = 0.001) and carotid stiffness (CS) (β = 0.29, p = 0.019). In the multivariate analysis, including age, sex, oxygen saturation, mean blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and OPA, OPA remained an independent predictor of PWV (β = 0.403, p = 0.001) but not of CS (β = 0.028, p = 0.8). OPA remained an independent predictor of PWV independently from the Framingham risk score (FRS). High-intensity OPA shows a positive, independent association with aortic stiffness in Himalayan moderate-altitude dwellers. This study suggests how vigorous OPA performed in moderate altitude may be a CV risk factor.

  6. Outcomes of 195 consecutive patients undergoing 2-port pars plana vitrectomy with slit-lamp illumination system for posterior segment disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tavolato, Marco; Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Cian, Roberto; Galan, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 2-port 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy with a slit-lamp illumination system in different vitreoretinal pathologies. : Retrospective, consecutive, interventional case series. One hundred and ninety-five consecutive eyes of 195 patients underwent 20-gauge 2-port pars plana vitrectomy with a combination of slit-lamp illumination and a plano-concave contact lens, at the San Paolo Ophthalmology Center, from September 2005 through November 2007. Postoperative visual acuity at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months; intraoperative and postoperative complication rate; and surgical time were evaluated. All patients completed 6 months of follow-up. The mean overall visual acuity was 0.74 ± 0.03 (mean ± SD) at baseline, improving to 0.56 ± 0.03 (P < 0.0001), 0.48 ± 0.03 (P < 0.0001), and 0.43 ± 0.03 (P < 0.0001) at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. No intraoperative complications occurred. Postoperative complications included retinal detachment in three patients, epiretinal membrane recurrence in three eyes, persistent macular hole in four eyes, and phthisis in one eye. Cataract formation was observed in 25 eyes. The total mean surgical time was 28.3 ± 10.1 minutes. No one had hypotony after the surgical procedure, and no cases of endophthalmitis were observed. Conversion to standard three-port vitrectomy was not necessary in any of the cases. Two-port 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy with slit-lamp illumination is a safe and effective procedure for posterior segment surgeries.

  7. Soft qualities in healthcare. Method and tools for soft qualities design in hospitals' built environments.

    PubMed

    Capolongo, S; Bellini, E; Nachiero, D; Rebecchi, A; Buffoli, M

    2014-01-01

    The design of hospital environments is determined by functional requirements and technical regulations, as well as numerous protocols, which define the structure and system characteristics that such environments need to achieve. In order to improve people's well-being and the quality of their experience within public hospitals, design elements (soft qualities) are added to those 'necessary' features. The aim of this research has been to experiment a new design process and also to create health care spaces with high environmental quality and capable to meet users' emotional and perceptual needs. Such needs were investigated with the help of qualitative research tools and the design criteria for one of these soft qualities - colour - were subsequently defined on the basis of the findings. The colour scheme design for the new San Paolo Hospital Emergency Department in Milan was used as case study. Focus groups were fundamental in defining the project's goals and criteria. The issues raised have led to believe that the proper procedure is not the mere consultation of the users in order to define the goals: users should rather be involved in the whole design process and become co-agents of the choices that determine the environment characteristics, so as to meet the quality requirements identified by the users themselves. The case study has shown the possibility of developing a designing methodology made by three steps (or operational tools) in which users' groups are involved in the choices, loading to plan the environments where compliance with expectations is already implied and verified by means of the process itself. Thus, the method leads to the creation of soft qualities in Healthcare.

  8. Scholars and scientists in the history of the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Bocci, Guido; Ribatti, Domenico

    2017-09-01

    The discovery of the lymphatic system has a long and fascinating history. The interest in anatomy and physiology of this system paralleled that of the blood cardiocirculatory system and has been maybe obscured by the latter. Paradoxically, if the closed blood system appeared open in Galen's anatomy and physiology, and took a very long time to be correctly described in terms of pulmonary and general circulation by ibn Al-Nafis/Michael Servetus/Realdo Colombo and William Harvey, respectively, the open lymphatic system was incorrectly described as a closed circuit connected with arteries and veins. In ancient times only macroscopic components of the lymphatic system have been described, although misinterpreted, including lymph nodes and lacteals, the latter being easily identified because of their milk-like content. For about 15 centuries the dogmatic acceptance of Galen's notions did not allow a significant progress in medicine. After Vesalius' revolution in anatomical studies, new knowledge was accumulated, and the 17th century was the golden age for the investigation of the lymphatic system with several discoveries: gut lacteals (Gaspare Aselli), cloacal bursa (Hieronimus Fabricius of Acquapendente), reservoir of the chyle (Jean Pecquet), extra-intestinal lymphatic vessels (Thomas Bartholin and Olaus Rudbeck dispute), hepatic lymph circulation (Francis Glisson). In the Enlightenment century Frederik Ruysch described the function of lymphatic valves, and Paolo Mascagni provided a magnificent iconography of the lymphatic network in humans. In recent times, Leonetto Comparini realized three-dimensional reconstructions of the liver lymphatic vessels, and Kari Alitalo discovered the lymphatic growth factor/receptor system. Far from a complete understanding of its anatomy and function, the lymphatic system still needs to be profoundly examined. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  9. Detecting Slow Deformation Signals Preceding Dynamic Failure: A New Strategy For The Mitigation Of Natural Hazards (SAFER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinciguerra, S.; Colombero, C.; Comina, C.; Umili, G.

    2015-12-01

    Rock slope monitoring is a major aim in territorial risk assessment and mitigation. The use of "site specific" microseismic monitoring systems can allow to detect pre-failure signals in unstable sectors within the rock mass and to predict the possible acceleration to the failure. To this aim multi-scale geophysical methods can provide a unique tool for an high-resolution imaging of the internal structure of the rock mass and constraints on the physical state of the medium. We present here a cross-hole seismic tomography survey coupled with laboratory ultrasonic velocity measurements and determination of physical properties on rock samples to characterize the damaged and potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW, Italy). Results allowed to achieve two main advances, in terms of obtaining: i) a lithological interpretation of the velocity field obtained at the site, ii) a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granite (weathering and anisotropy) of the cliff. A microseismic monitoring system developed by the University of Turin/Compagnia San Paolo, consisting of a network of 4 triaxial geophones (4.5 Hz) connected to a 12-channel data logger, has been deployed on the unstable granitic cliff. More than 2000 events with different waveforms, duration and frequency content were recorded between November 2013 and July 2014. By inspecting the acquired events we identified the key parameters for a reliable distinction among the nature of each signal, i.e. the signal shape (in terms of amplitude, duration, kurtosis) and the frequency content (maximum frequency content and frequency distribution). Four main classes of recorded signals can be recognised: microseismic events, regional earthquakes, electrical noises and calibration signals, and unclassified events (probably grouping rockfalls, quarry blasts, other anthropic and natural sources of seismic noise).

  10. “Media, politics and science policy: MS and evidence from the CCSVI Trenches”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2009, Dr. Paolo Zamboni proposed chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) as a possible cause of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although his theory and the associated treatment (“liberation therapy”) received little more than passing interest in the international scientific and medical communities, his ideas became the source of tremendous public and political tension in Canada. The story moved rapidly from mainstream media to social networking sites. CCSVI and liberation therapy swiftly garnered support among patients and triggered remarkable and relentless advocacy efforts. Policy makers have responded in a variety of ways to the public’s call for action. Discussion We present three different perspectives on this evolving story, that of a health journalist who played a key role in the media coverage of this issue, that of a health law and policy scholar who has closely observed the unfolding public policy developments across the country, and that of a medical ethicist who sits on an expert panel convened by the MS Society of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to assess the evidence as it emerges. Summary This story raises important questions about resource allocation and priority setting in scientific research and science policy. The growing power of social media represents a new level of citizen engagement and advocacy, and emphasizes the importance of open debate about the basis on which such policy choices are made. It also highlights the different ways evidence may be understood, valued and utilized by various stakeholders and further emphasizes calls to improve science communication so as to support balanced and informed decision-making. PMID:23402260

  11. Adherence to guidelines in the use of biological agents to treat psoriasis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Miriam Sanches do Nascimento; de Camargo, Iara Alves; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Guyatt, Gordon; de Camargo, Mayara Costa; Lopes, Luciane Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Objective In São Paolo, Brazil, patients can appeal to the courts, registering law suits against the government claiming the need for biological agents for treatment of psoriasis. If the lawsuits are successful, which is usually the case, the government then pays for the biologic agent. The extent to which the management of such patients, after gaining access to government payment for their biologic agents, adheres to authoritative guidelines, is uncertain. Methods We identified patients through records of the State Health Secretariat of São Paulo from 2004 to 2011. We consulted guidelines from five countries and chose as standards only those recommendations that the guidelines uniformly endorsed. Pharmacy records provided data regarding biological use. Guidelines not only recommended biological agents only in patients with severe psoriasis who had failed to respond to topical and systemic therapies (eg, ciclosporin and methotrexate) but also yearly monitoring of blood counts and liver function. Results Of 218 patients identified in the database, 3 did not meet eligibility criteria and 12 declined participation. Of the 203 patients interviewed, 91 were still using biological medicine; we established adherence to laboratory monitoring in these patients. In the total sample, management failed to meet standards of prior use of topical and systemic medication in 169 (83.2%) patients. Of the 91 patients using biological medicine at the time of the survey, 23 (25.2%) did not undergo appropriate laboratory tests. Conclusions Important discrepancies exist between clinical practice and the recommendations of guidelines in the management of plaintiffs using biological drugs to treat psoriasis. PMID:24598304

  12. Evolution of Seawater 44Ca/40Ca Through the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, P. R.; Gopalan, K.; Norris, R. D.; MacIsaac, C.; Liu, X.; MacDougall, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    We analyzed the Ca concentrations and 44Ca/40Ca ratios of surface ocean planktonic (Morozovella, Acarinina, Dentoglobigerina) and benthic (Gavelinella) foraminifera of Late Cretaceous to Late Oligocene ages from DSDP and ODP sites in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans in order to fill a major gap in the Phanerozoic seawater 44Ca/40Ca curve (Farkass et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2007). Our new 44Ca/40Ca data indicate a general increase in foraminiferan-based seawater 44Ca/40Ca from ~-1.3 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW in Late Cretaceous to ~0.0 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW in Early Miocene (Heuser et al., Paleocean. 20, 2005; Sime et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2007). In detail, the 44Ca/40Ca ratio stepped abruptly from ~-1.3 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW to a slightly higher value of ~-1.1 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW across the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. A slight positive excursion of ~0.2 ‰ above the background value occurred after the Paleocene Thermal Maximum (55 Ma) but otherwise, the Paleocene to Middle Eocene ratio is relatively stable at ~-1.0 ‰ δ44Ca/40CaSW. The most prominent increase in foraminiferan-based seawater 44Ca/40Ca occurred from Late Eocene to Late Oligocene, roughly coincident with the initial phase of the rapid and steady rise of marine carbonate 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the Tertiary (e.g., DePaolo and Ingram, Science 227, 1985).

  13. A Prediction of Increase in Subglacial Volcanism Beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) as Future Deglaciation Caused by Ocean Circulation Proceeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; LeMasurier, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Many decades of aeromagnetic surveying (e.g. Behrendt, 1964; 2013; and others) over the West Antarctic Ice sheet (WAIS) have shown >1000 high amplitude, shallow source magnetic anomalies interpreted as as indicating subglacial volcanic centers of late Cenozoic age to presently active. Similar anomalies exist over exposed volcanic rocks bordering the WAIS in places.Recent papers (e.g. Wouters et al., 2015; Paolo, et al.; 2015 and others) based on satellite altimetry have shown dramatic thinning and retreat of ice shelves, particularly those bordering the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, caused by melting from circulation of warming sea water. Previous workers have shown that when ice shelves collapse, the ice streams previously dammed by them accelerate an order of magnitude higher velocity, and surface elevation decreases. GRACE satellite interpretations (e.g. Velicogna et al., and others) indicate mass loss of WAIS in recent years.The bed elevation beneath the WAIS deepens inland from the Amundsen and Bellingshausen coasts, although high relief volcanic topography is present in a number of areas beneath the ice.Crowley et a. (2015) have shown that glacial cycles may drive production of oceanic crust by lowering pressure in the mantle resulting in increased melting and magma production. Increased volcanism due to deglaciation in Iceland has apparently produced increased in volcanic activity there. Deglaciation of the Norwegian continental shelf has resulted in faulting of the sea floor and similar faulting has been reported of the Ross Sea shelf following deglaciation there.I suggest here that as the WAIS collapses in the future resulting from climate change, an increase in volcanic activity beneath the ice might be expected. This may provide a feedback mechanism for increase in ice melting.

  14. A pore scale modeling approach to isotopic fractionation during reactive transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Parmigiani, A.; Shafei, B.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    The stable isotope compositions of reactant and product species are commonly utilized in the analysis of biogeochemical cycling, contaminant remediation and paleo-proxy records. While novel analytical models for isotopic exchange during steady state mineral growth are poised to offer new insights into these fields, commonly encountered transient conditions such as variable saturation state, flow rate and porosity/permeability present a formidable challenge. The problem arises from the precipitation of new mineral that is isotopically variant normal to the plane of growth, reflecting the temporal evolution of the adjacent, supersaturated fluid (e.g. Pearce et al., 2012; Druhan et al., 2013). Reactive transport models intended to describe isotopic exchange between the fluid and mineral surface then incur error through the use of a bulk mineral isotopic ratio rather than tracking a spatially variable isotopic composition within the solid. Here we present a novel multi-species, pore-scale reactive transport code based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) capable of simulating the individual isotopes of calcium during fractionating, kinetically controlled precipitation of calcite from a supersaturated, flowing fluid. The isotopic composition of the mineral surface in contact with the advecting fluid is tracked through time by computing the averaged isotopic composition of the solid fraction over small solid volume fraction bins. This method allows us to model isotopic composition zoning at a scale smaller than that of the computational grid, thus effectively distinguishing the isotopic ratio of the mineral surface in contact with the fluid from the remainder of the solid phase. Druhan, J.L.; Steefel, C.I.; Williams, K.H.; DePaolo, D.J. (2013) Calcium isotope fractionation in groundwater: Molecular scale processes influencing field scale behavior. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta., in press. Pearce, C.R.; Saldi, G.D.; Schott, J.; Oelkers, E.H. (2012) Isotopic fractionation

  15. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic study of the Glen Mountains layered complex: initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.D.; Unruh, D.M.; Gilbert, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for rocks and minerals of the Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC), a midcontinent mafic layered intrusion in the Wichita Mountains of southwestern Oklahoma, constrain the time of initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and provide information on the chemistry of the early Paleozoic mantle. Four whole-rock samples define a Rb-Sr isochron corresponding to a maximum crystallization age of 577 +/- 165 Ma and an initial Sr isotopic composition of 0.70359 +/- 2. A three-point Sm-Nd mineral-whole-rock (internal) isochron for an anorthositic gabbro provides a crystallization age of 528 +/- 29 Ma. These data suggest that the GMLC was emplaced into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the initial phase of rifting along the southern margin of the North American craton in the early Paleozoic. This Sm-Nd internal isochron age is within analytical uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages for granites and rhyolites from the Wichita Mountains; therefore, mafic and felsic magmatism may have been contemporaneous within the rift during the early stages of development. Hybrid rocks and composite dikes in the Wichita Mountains provide field evidence for contemporaneous mafic and felsic magmas. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic data suggest that magmas parental to the GMLC were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, Nd isotopic data for the GMLC plot distinctly below data for the depleted mantle source cited by DePaolo and thus suggest that the parental magmas of the GMLC were either contaminated by Proterozoic crust of the southern midcontinent or were derived from a heterogenous mantle source region that had variable initial Nd isotopic compositions.

  16. The Project Serapis: High Resolution Seismic Imagingof The Campi Flegrei Caldera Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Chiarabba, C.; de Franco, R.; Makris, J.; Michelini, A.; Musacchio, G.; Serapis Group

    expected NE-SW and SE-NW structural trends and it has been designed to get 2D/3D images of the crustal structure at a regional scale. A denser 2D network of 35 OBSs has been deployed in the bay of Pozzuoli aimed at detecting and modeling reflected/converted waves from 1 the possible shallow to deep discontinuities beneath the Campi Flegrei caldera. The main target of this particular receiver lay-out is the detailed imaging of the magma chamber top, expected at 4-5 km depth, according to temperature measurements in wells and sparse seismic observations. About 5000 shots have been performed dur- ing the SERAPIS experiment, at an average spatial spacing of 125 m, for a total ship travel path of 620 km. All of the seismic lines have been re-sampled at least twice, using a staggered configuration, which results in a smaller source spacing (less than 65m). In the gulf of Pozzuoli the source array had a geometry of a 5x5 km grid, slightly shifted south with respect to the OBS array. Seismic signals produced by air- guns have been well detected up to 50-60 km distance and the whole Campi Flegrei, Ischia and Procida on-land networks have recorded high quality seismograms pro- duced by the gridded source array in the bay of Pozzuoli. Due to the extended and very dense source and receiver arrays used for SERAPIS, this campaign can provide an innovative contribution to the accurate reconstruction of the Campi Flegrei caldera structure and to the definition of its feeding system at depth. *SERAPIS group: Auger Emmanuel, Bernard Marie-Lise, Bobbio Antonella, Bonagura Mariateresa, Cantore Luciana, Convertito Vincenzo, D'Auria Luca, De Matteis Raffaella, Emolo Anto- nio, Festa Gaetano, Gasparini Paolo, Giberti Grazia, Herrero Andre, Improta Luigi, Lancieri Maria Flora, Nielsen Stefan, Nisii Vincenzo, Russo Guido, Satriano Clau- dio, Simini Mariella, Vassallo Maurizio, Bruno Pier Paolo, Buonocunto Ciro, Capello Marco, Del Pezzo Edoardo, Galluzzo Danilo, Gaudiosi Germana, Giuliana Alessio

  17. PREFACE: XIV Mexican School on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Adnan; Contreras, Guillermo; Raya, Alfredo; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-03-01

    de Física de Altas Energías. At a personal level, we are very grateful to Dr Juan Carlos D'Olivo (President of the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías), Dr Pedro Mata Vázquez (Director of COECyT), Dr Ricardo Becerril Bárcenas (Director of the Institute of Physics and Mathematics, UMSNH), Dr Rigoberto Vera Mendoza (Director of the Faculty of Science, UMSNH) and Dr José Napoleón Guzmán Ávila (Coordinator of Scientific Research, UMSNH) for their invaluable support in all organizational matters, which enabled the school to become a reality. We gratefully acknowledge the help of our colleagues in the organizing committee: Alexis Aguilar, Alejandro Ayala, Wolfgang Bietenholz, Alberto Güijosa, Gabriela Murguía, Sarira Sahu (UNAM), Eduard de la Cruz Burelo, Abdel Pérez-Lorenzana (CINVESTAV), Elena Cáceres (UCOL), David Delepine (UG), Mariana Kirchbach (UASLP), Ildefonso León (UAS), Juan Carlos Arteaga-Velázquez (for his impeccable work in managing the web page of the school) and Víctor Villanueva (UMSNH). Most of them contributed to the extra work involved in refereeing the contributions submitted for this publication. Many thanks also go to all the student volunteers for the efficiency and dedication with which they carried out their duties. At the registration desk, we relied on the hard work of Xiomara Gutiérrez, Enif Gutiérrez (UMSNH) and Mara Diaz Pancardo. Several post docs and PhD students provided invaluable support in all organizational matters: Adolfo Huet, Cliffor Compeán, Rocío Bermúdez, Saúl Sánchez, Anabel Trejo, Iraís Rubalcava, Khépani Raya, José Juan González, Saúl Hernández Ortiz (UMSNH), Alfredo Galaviz, and Alan Aganza (USON). Their help in carrying out the organization of the school was essential and without their collaboration, this school would not have been the same. We also acknowledge the help of the administrative secretary Maria Esperanza Jaramillo of IFM (UMSNH). We would like to take this opportunity to thank

  18. Factors associated with HPV-DNA clearance in a cohort of HIV-positive patients: role of cART and gender

    PubMed Central

    Suardi, Elisa; Bai, Francesca; Comi, Laura; Pandolfo, Alessandro; Rovati, Marco; Barco, Ambra; Dalzero, Serena; Cassani, Barbara; Marchetti, Giulia; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to assess any factors associated with dysplasia regression and with HPV clearance in a cohort of HIV+ patients, with particular focus on cART and gender. Methods Asymptomatic HIV+ patients of the San Paolo Infectious Disease (SPID) cohort who underwent anoscopy/gynaecological evaluation were enrolled. Anal/cervical brushing were analyzed for: HPV-PCR detection/genotyping (HR-HPV), cytologic abnormalities (Bethesda System 2001: LSIL-HSIL). Demographics and HIV-related parameters were evaluated at baseline. Activated CD8+/CD38+ lymphocytes were measured (flow citometry). Patients were examined at baseline (T0) and at 12–18 months visit (T1). HPV clearance was defined as negativisation of HPV at T1; SIL regression (SIL-R) and progression (SIL-P) were defined as change from HSIL/LSIL to a lower-grade/absence of dysplasia and as change from absence of HSIL/LSIL to a higher-grade dysplasia at T1, respectively. Mann Whitney test, Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression were used. Results A total of 189 patients were examined, 60 (32%) were women. One hundred fifty patients (79%) were HPV+, 113 (75%) harboured HR-HPV; 103 (68%) showed LSIL/HSIL at T0 (32% of women and 65% of men) (all were HPV-positive). No differences in demographics and HIV-related markers were found between patients with SIL-P (33, 41%) and patients with SIL-R (47, 59%). HPV+ patients who cleared HPV (28, 18%) were found to be more frequently female, heterosexual infected, more frequently on cART and with lower Log10 HIV-RNA and lower levels of CD8+/CD38+ % compared with HPV persistence group (Table 1). No differences in PI exposure were found between the two groups (p=.08). Interestingly, also when only HR-HPV were considered, clearance was associated with exposure to cART (naïve 4%, vs cART 86%, p=.048). In multivariate analysis, heterosexuals (AOR 5.123, 95% CI 1.5–17.5 vs homosexuals) were independently associated to HPV clearance, whereas CD8+/CD38+% (AOR 0

  19. Numerical modeling of forceful pluton emplacement and associated deformation at different crustal levels - instantaneous, continuous or episodic intrusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Nabelek, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    ) in upper parts of the pluton. By examing the chamber overpressure generated by injection of magma (Jellinek and DePaolo, 2003) and the overpressure related to magma buoyancy (Karlstrom et al, 2010), eruption during high-frequency magma input may be promoted by the magma buoyancy while an eruption during low-frequency input may be caused by injection of a large magma batch.

  20. Technial Programme Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    Chairpersons Dr Dinesh Sathyamoorthy, Science & Technology Research Institute for Defence (STRIDE), Ministry of Defence, Malaysia Associate Professor Sr Dr Abdul Rashid Mohamed Shariff, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia Dr Ahmad Fikri Abdullah, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia Dr Farrah Melissa Muharram, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia Members Professor Dr Li Jing, Beijing Normal University, China Professor Dr Iyyanki Muralikrishna, Administrative Staff College of India (ASCI), India Professor Dr Alias Abdul Rahman, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia Professor Dr Ismat Mohamed El Hassan, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia Professor Dr George Miliaresis, Open University of Cyprus, Cyprus Professor Dr Christine Pohl, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia Professor Dr Mahender Kotha, Goa University, India Associate Professor Dr Paolo Gamba, University of Pavia, Italy Associate Professor Dr Behara Seshadri Daya Sagar, Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), India Associate Professor Sr Ranjit Singh, Infrastructure University Kuala Lumpur (IUKL), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Abdul Nasir Matori, Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP), Malaysia Associate Dr Lucian Dragut, West University of Timişoara, Romania Associate Professor Dr Saied Pirasteh, Islamic Azad University, Iran Associate Professor Dr Peter Yuen, Cranfield University, United Kingdom Associate Professor Dr Lim Hwee San, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Wayan Suparta, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Tuong Thuy Vu, The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Maged Mahmoud Marghany, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Rami Al-Ruzouq, University of Sharjah, UAE Associate Professor Dr Biswajeet Pradhan, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Helmi Zulhaidi Mohd Shafri, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia

  1. The Increasing Challenge of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrè, Mario; Geraci, Daniela M.; Bonura, Celestino; Saporito, Laura; Graziano, Giorgio; Insinga, Vincenzo; Aleo, Aurora; Vecchio, Davide; Mammina, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colonization and infection by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli (MDR GNB) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are increasingly reported. We conducted a 5-year prospective cohort surveillance study in a tertiary NICU of the hospital “Paolo Giaccone,” Palermo, Italy. Our objectives were to describe incidence and trends of MDR GNB colonization and the characteristics of the most prevalent organisms and to identify the risk factors for colonization. Demographic, clinical, and microbiological data were prospectively collected. Active surveillance cultures (ASCs) were obtained weekly. Clusters of colonization by extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were analyzed by conventional and molecular epidemiological tools. During the study period, 1152 infants were enrolled in the study. Prevalences of colonization by MDR GNB, ESBL-producing GNB and multiple species/genera averaged, respectively, 28.8%, 11.7%, and 3.7%. Prevalence and incidence density of colonization by MDR GNB and ESBL-producing GNB showed an upward trend through the surveillance period. Rates of ESBL-producing E coli and K pneumoniae colonization showed wide fluctuations peaking over the last 2 years. The only independent variables associated with colonization by MDR GNB and ESBL-producing organisms and multiple colonization were, respectively, the days of NICU stay (odds ratio [OR] 1.041), the days of exposure to ampicillin–sulbactam (OR 1.040), and the days of formula feeding (OR 1.031). Most clusters of E coli and K pneumoniae colonization were associated with different lineages. Ten out of 12 clusters had an outborn infant as their index case. Our study confirms that MDR GNB are an increasing challenge to NICUs. The universal once-a-week approach allowed us to understand the epidemiology of MDR GNB, to timely detect new clones and institute contact precautions, and to assess risk factors. Collection of these data can be an

  2. Ar-Ar Ages of Detrital Hornblendes from Glacial Sediments of the North Sea Trough Mouth Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, S. R.; Haflidason, H.; Sejrup, H. P.

    2007-12-01

    consistent with that implied by the Nd isotope data from fine grained sediments reported for glacial intervals by DePaolo et al. (2006, EPSL, v. 298, pp. 394- 410). It is well known that much of the debris carried by icebergs is fine grained, and thus this provenance match suggests that it is likely that much of the fine grained material may also be carried to this site by icebergs.

  3. Highlights of Astronomy, Vol. 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Ian

    2010-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Gruber Cosmology Prize Lecture; Part II. Invited Discourses; Part III. Joint Discussions: 1. Dark matter in early-type galaxies Léon V. E. Koopmans and Tommaso Treu; 2. Diffuse light in galaxy clusters Magda Arnaboldi and Ortwin Gerhard; 3. Neutron stars - timing in extreme environments Tomaso Belloni, Mariano Méndez and Chengmin Zhang; 4. Progress in understanding the physics of Ap and related stars Margarida Cunha; 5. Modelling the Milky Way in the age of Gaia Annie C. Robin; 6. Time and astronomy Pascale Defraigne; 7. Astrophysical outflows and associated accretion phenomena Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex C. Raga; 8. Hot interstellar matter in elliptical galaxies Dong-Woo Kim and Silvia Pellegrini; 9. Are the fundamental constants varying with time? Paolo Molaro and Elisabeth Vangioni; 10. 3D views on cool stellar atmospheres - theory meets observation K. N. Nagendra, P. Bonifacio and H. G. Ludwig; 11. New advances in helio- and astero-seismology; 12. The first galaxies - theoretical predictions and observational clues; 13. Eta Carinae in the context of the most massive stars Theodore R. Gull and Augusto Damineli; 14. The ISM of galaxies in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre; 15. Magnetic fields in diffuse media Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex Lazarian; 16. IHY global campaign - whole heliosphere interval; Part IV. Special Sessions: SpS 1. IR and sub-mm spectroscopy - a new tool for studying stellar evolution Glenn Wahlgren, Hans Käufl and Florian Kerber; SpS 2. The international year of astronomy Pedro Russo, Catherine Cesarsky and Lars Lindberg Christensen; SpS 3. Astronomy in Antarctica in 2009 Michael G. Burton; SpS 4. Astronomy education between past and future J. P. De Greve; SpS 5. Accelerating the rate of astronomical discovery Ray P. Norris; SpS 6. Planetary systems as potential sites for life Régis Courtin, Alan Boss and Michel Mayor; SpS 7. Young stars, brown dwarfs, and protoplanetary disks Jane Gregorio

  4. The ATPase Inhibitory Factor 1 (IF1): A master regulator of energy metabolism and of cell survival.

    PubMed

    García-Bermúdez, Javier; Cuezva, José M

    2016-08-01

    entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  5. MOMO - Revisited in light of 142Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, M.

    2009-12-01

    million years), which evolves after major overturn events during crust formation. It may be that the MOMO slope slightly declines through time due to mixing between the two reservoirs. Nevertheless, the implications of having early mantle with non-chondritic Sm/Nd ratios for issues like the abundance of U, Th, K, the Ar reservoir and the Urey ratio are similar for both models. The Cenozoic manifestation of the enriched (MOMO) mantle is the PREMA basalts (with ɛNd~ +5 and 87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.7035). The PREMA composition and D-MORB essentially form the “historical” mantle array proposed by DePaolo &Wasserburg (1976).

  6. Impacts and Ophiolites: A Way to Recognize Large Terrestrial Impact Basins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    That Chicxulub Crater is located on ~35 km thick continental crust is apparently inconsistent with oceanic crustal/upper mantle geochemical signatures detected globally in the KT boundary impact layer [1-5 and unpublished Cr isotope data from the Yin lab at UC Davis] since introduction of the Alvarez hypothesis [6]. Apparent excavation and ejection of mafic/ultramafic target rock by the KT boundary impact might imply an additional KT impact site involving oceanic lithosphere. We speculate: 1) The Greater Antilles island chain ophiolite belt marks the rim of a ~700 km diameter impact basin, deformed and dismembered from an originally circular form by at least 50 million years of left lateral shear on the North American-Caribbean transform plate boundary; 2) Other ophiolite segments may similarly mark rims of large impact basins deformed to greater or lesser extent by, and serving as strain markers for, relative plate motions over geologic time; 3) The Greater Antilles/Chicxulub and Sulu Sea Basin/Spratly Island cases may constitute doublet craters of similar size ratio and separation distance; 4) Plate boundaries may be formed or modified by such impacts. Problems include: 1) The KT fireball layer should be tens of cm thick rather than a few mm thick [8-9]; 2) Impact basins of this size/scale are not expected in the Phanerozoic/Proterozoic [10]; References: [1] DePaolo D. J. et al. 1983. EPSL 64:356-373. [2] Hildebrand A. R. and Boynton W. V. 1988, LPI Contributions 673:78-79. [3] Hildebrand A. R. and Boynton W. V.. 1990. Science 248:843-847. [4] Montanari A. et al. 1983. Geology 11:668. [5] Bohor B. F. et al. 1989. Meteoritics 24:253. [6] Alvarez L. W. et al. 1980 Science 208:1095-1108. [7][8] Grieve R.A.F. and Cintala M.J. 1992 Meteoritics 27: 526-538. [9] Pierazzo E. et al. 1997 Icarus 127/2:408-423. [10] Ivanov B.A. et al. 2002 Asteroids III 89-101

  7. Reconstruction of Past Ocean Salinity and Temperature from Pore Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. D.; Adkins, J. F.; Simons, M.; Minson, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean sediment pore fluid profiles of Cl- and δ18O can be used to reconstruct Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ocean bottom temperatures and salinities (McDuff 1985,Schrag and DePaolo 1993, Schrag 1996, Paul et al. 2001, Adkins et al. 2002, Malone et al. 2004). Such reconstructions require use of a computational model of tracer transport and diffusion in sediments. Previous work inferred the boundary condition at the sediment-water interface by assuming its shape, for example that it scaled to the global mean sea level history. However, this approach assumes a simple relationship between local water properties and the global mean as well as a fixed spatial distribution of ocean water properties, relationships that are not supported by modern observations. Assuming the boundary condition shape scales to the local benthic δ18O history, another method previously used, requires constraints on the relationship between temperature, δ18O, and salinity. Further, as the evolution of concentrations in ocean sediment pore fluids is a diffusion-dominated problem, the solution to the inverse problem is not unique. It is difficult using previous methods to assign objective error bars to reconstructed temperatures and salinities. We seek to avoid the assumption that bottom water property histories scale to the sea level, and thus also avoid the assumption that there exists a simple relationship between bottom water properties at distantly spaced points in the ocean. We then seek to re-calculate previously reported bottom water salinities and temperatures and obtain robust error estimates on these values. To accomplish these goals, we consider two different approaches: linear regularization techniques and Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. Using synthetic examples, we show that within the context of the necessary assumptions, linear regularization techniques can be informative, and that salinity and δ18O of bottom water at the LGM are robust features of the data

  8. Osmium isotope evidence for Early to Middle Proterozoic mantle lithosphere stabilization and concomitant production of juvenile crust in Dish Hill, CA peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armytage, Rosalind M. G.; Brandon, Alan D.; Peslier, Anne H.; Lapen, Thomas J.

    2014-07-01

    The 187Os/188Os compositions in peridotite samples from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) can be used to constrain the timing of melt extraction and potentially test the link between large-scale mantle melting and juvenile crust production. The SCLM has often experienced a complex history such that some lithophile elements such as REEs (rare earth elements) in these rocks typically record overprinting during metasomatism. New 187Os/188Os, major and trace element compositional data were obtained on sixteen Dish Hill peridotite xenoliths (California, USA) and are used to examine these issues. The samples show strong correlations between 187Os/188Os and indicators of melt depletion such as Lu abundance in clinopyroxene, modal abundance of clinopyroxene, bulk rock Al2O3 and the Cr# (Cr/(Cr + Al) in spinel. These relationships indicate that metasomatism did not compromise the 187Os/188Os systematics. The data appear to form two melt depletion trends consistent with Re depletion model ages (TRD) obtained from the two Al2O3 versus 187Os/188Os trends are 2.1 ± 0.5 Ga and 1.3 ± 0.3 Ga (±95% conf.). It has been suggested that the SCLM under Dish Hill may be fragments of oceanic lithosphere emplaced as the result of Farallon plate subduction during the Late Cretaceous (Luffi et al., 2009). However, the strong melt depletion trends, major element compositions and Re-depletion ages are not consistent with the interpretation of this suite of xenoliths having an oceanic lithospheric origin. Rather, the 2.1 Ga age coincides with Nd model ages of 2-2.3 Ga (Bennett and DePaolo, 1987; Rämö and Calzia, 1998) for the overlying Mojavia crustal province. The 1.3 Ga age is consistent with large-scale A-type magmatism in the nearby region at this time that is purported to be the result of mantle plume melting processes. Therefore, data from this study point to the SCLM under Dish Hill being formed by two ancient mantle-melting events, which could be the result of

  9. Characteristics of newly diagnosed COPD patients treated with triple inhaled therapy by general practitioners: a real world Italian study.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Fabiano; Santus, Pierachille; Terraneo, Silvia; Peruzzi, Elena; Muscianisi, Elisa; Ripellino, Claudio; Pegoraro, Valeria

    2017-09-07

    Factors predicting prescriptions of triple therapy were investigated in a large group of general practitioners in Italy. In the population treated by identified general practitioners, a cohort of newly diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients was extracted from IMS Health Longitudinal Database during the period 2010-2013. From the diagnosis, 1-year follow-up was evaluated. Thirty-two thousand forty-six newly diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients were evaluated (57.7% male, mean age 67 years). During 2 years prior to diagnosis less than 13% of patients were requested with a pulmonology evaluation and less than 5% with a spirometry; 65.1% cases were prescribed with a respiratory drug, which in 9.6% of cases was inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist fixed-dose combination. Two thousand and twenty eight patients (6.3% of the newly diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients) were treated with triple therapy during the first year of follow-up, whose 858 (42.3%) starting immediately, and 762 (37.6%) following an initial treatment with inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist fixed-dose combination. Being older, being requested with pulmonologist evaluation or spirometry, being prescribed with a inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist fixed-dose combination at diagnosis resulted independent predictors of triple therapy use. ENSURING CORRECT PRESCRIPTIONS FOR EARLY-STAGE DISEASE: An improved education program for doctors promoting correct use of medication for chronic lung disease is needed in Italy. Current guidelines state that inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) should be reserved for patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but it appears that doctors do not always follow this advice. Fabiano Di Marco, at San Paolo Hospital-Università degli Studi di Milano, and co-workers analyzed data from 32,046 COPD patients newly-diagnosed by family doctors in Italy between 2010 and 2013

  10. PREFACE: 32nd UIT (Italian Union of Thermo-fluid-dynamics) Heat Transfer Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    volume would like to sincerely thank the authors for presenting their works at the conference and in this special issue. Special thanks are also due to the Scientific Committee, to all the reviewers, and to all the authors for their accurate revision process of each paper for this special issue. Special thanks go to the Organizing Committee, chaired by Prof. Paolo Di Marco. Walter Grassi (Chairman of the Scientific Committee), Alessandro Franco, Nicola Forgione, Daniele Testi - Editors of the Special Issue

  11. The U-series comminution approach: where to from here

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Heather; Turner, Simon; Afonso, Juan; Turner, Michael; Hesse, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the rates of landscape evolution in response to climate change is inhibited by the difficulty of dating the formation of continental detrital sediments. The 'comminution age' dating model of DePaolo et al. (2006) hypothesises that the measured disequilibria between U-series nuclides (234U and 238U) in fine-grained continental (detrital) sediments can be used to calculate the time elapsed since mechanical weathering of a grain to the threshold size ( 50 µm). The comminution age includes the time that a particle has been mobilised in transport, held in temporary storage (e.g., soils and floodplains) and the time elapsed since final deposition to present day. Therefore, if the deposition age of sediment can be constrained independently, for example via optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, the residence time of sediment (e.g., a palaeochannel deposit) can be determined. Despite the significant potential of this approach, there is still much work to be done before meaningful absolute comminution ages can be obtained. The calculated recoil loss factor and comminution age are highly dependent on the method of recoil loss factor determination used and the inherent assumptions. We present new and recently published uranium isotope data for aeolian sediment deposits, leached and unleached palaeochannel sediments and bedrock samples from Australia to exemplify areas of current uncertainty in the comminution age approach. In addition to the information gained from natural samples, Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted for a synthetic sediment sample to determine the individual and combined comminution age uncertainties associated to each input variable. Using a reasonable associated uncertainty for each input factor and including variations in the source rock and measured (234U/238U) ratios, the total combined uncertainty on comminution age in our simulation (for two methods of recoil loss factor estimation: weighted geometric and surface area

  12. Sudden and Fulminant Deaths of Healthy Children in Italy During the 2010-11 and 2011-12 Seasons: Results of an Online Study

    PubMed Central

    Prandoni, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic in Italy has been viewed as a false alarm, and it has not been properly understood based on historical precedents and more in-depth studies that have been conducted in other countries. Some of these studies have pointed to a phenomenon of sudden and fulminant death among healthy children, which is not the sole prerogative of pandemic influenza, but was, in 2009, a more frequent occurrence than in previous years. The purpose of this study is to gather such cases occurring during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 seasons. Google Search was used in order to find cases of children and teens with no reported preexisting conditions of relevance and who died suddenly and unexpectedly after exhibiting flu-like symptoms during the two seasons. During the 2010-11 season, 29 deaths were found to meet the above conditions, 18 of which were fulminant and 11 sudden. For the 2011-12 season, there were ten such cases: five fulminant and five sudden. Most of these cases occurred during the period of maximum circulation of the flu virus. Fulminant deaths were three times more frequent during 2010-11 season and involved children of a higher average age than the more recent season. It is not possible to come to any definite conclusions, but there is reason to suspect that the driver of this significant increase may be the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Regardless of how reading these results, it is advisable that the surveillance systems be strengthened and more recent study techniques be adopted in order to determine the causes of similar deaths in the future. Acknowledgments Prof. Gaetano Thiene, Department of Medical Diagnostic Sciences and Special Therapies, University of Padua; Prof. Paolo Prandoni, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padua; Prof. Pierluigi Lopalco, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control Stockholm; Sharon Sanders, Editor-in-Chief & President of the International FluTrackers Forum; Giuseppe Michieli, Director of the Italian

  13. The evolution of anatomical illustration and wax modelling in Italy from the 16th to early 19th centuries

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Alessandro; Conti, Gabriele; Solinas, Paola; Loy, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Although the contribution to anatomical illustration by Vesalius and his followers has received much attention, less credit has been given to Veslingius and particularly Fabricius. By 1600, Fabricius had amassed more than 300 paintings that together made the Tabulae Pictae, a great atlas of anatomy that was highly admired by his contemporaries. Many of his new observations were incorporated into subsequent books, including those by Casserius, Spighelius, Harvey and Veslingius. Also of importance were the Tabulae by Eustachius (1552), which, although only published in 1714, greatly influenced anatomical wax modelling. In 1742, Pope Benedict XIV established a Museum of Anatomy in Bologna, entrusting to Ercole Lelli the creation of several anatomical preparations in wax. Felice Fontana realised that the production of a large number of models by the casting method would make cadaveric specimens superfluous for anatomical teaching and in 1771 he asked the Grand Duke to fund a wax-modelling workshop in Florence as part of the Natural History Museum, later known as La Specola. Fontana engaged Giuseppe Ferrini as his first modeller and then the 19-year-old Clemente Susini who, by his death in 1814, had superintended the production of, or personally made, more than 2000 models. In 1780, the Austrian Emperor Joseph II visited La Specola and ordered a great number of models for his Josephinum museum; these were made by Fontana with the help of Clemente Susini and supervised by the anatomist Paolo Mascagni. It is, however, in Cagliari that some of Susini’s greatest waxes are to be found. These were made when he was free of Fontana’s influence and were based on dissections made by Francesco Antonio Boi (University of Cagliari). Their distinctive anatomical features include the emphasis given to nerves and the absence of lymphatics in the brain, a mistake made on earlier waxes. The refined technical perfection of the anatomical details demonstrates the closeness of the

  14. The evolution of anatomical illustration and wax modelling in Italy from the 16th to early 19th centuries.

    PubMed

    Riva, Alessandro; Conti, Gabriele; Solinas, Paola; Loy, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Although the contribution to anatomical illustration by Vesalius and his followers has received much attention, less credit has been given to Veslingius and particularly Fabricius. By 1600, Fabricius had amassed more than 300 paintings that together made the Tabulae Pictae, a great atlas of anatomy that was highly admired by his contemporaries. Many of his new observations were incorporated into subsequent books, including those by Casserius, Spighelius, Harvey and Veslingius. Also of importance were the Tabulae by Eustachius (1552), which, although only published in 1714, greatly influenced anatomical wax modelling. In 1742, Pope Benedict XIV established a Museum of Anatomy in Bologna, entrusting to Ercole Lelli the creation of several anatomical preparations in wax. Felice Fontana realised that the production of a large number of models by the casting method would make cadaveric specimens superfluous for anatomical teaching and in 1771 he asked the Grand Duke to fund a wax-modelling workshop in Florence as part of the Natural History Museum, later known as La Specola. Fontana engaged Giuseppe Ferrini as his first modeller and then the 19-year-old Clemente Susini who, by his death in 1814, had superintended the production of, or personally made, more than 2000 models. In 1780, the Austrian Emperor Joseph II visited La Specola and ordered a great number of models for his Josephinum museum; these were made by Fontana with the help of Clemente Susini and supervised by the anatomist Paolo Mascagni. It is, however, in Cagliari that some of Susini's greatest waxes are to be found. These were made when he was free of Fontana's influence and were based on dissections made by Francesco Antonio Boi (University of Cagliari). Their distinctive anatomical features include the emphasis given to nerves and the absence of lymphatics in the brain, a mistake made on earlier waxes. The refined technical perfection of the anatomical details demonstrates the closeness of the

  15. A Combined He and Os Isotopic Study of the HSDP-2 Core from Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Walker, R. J.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kurz, M. D.

    2004-12-01

    Combined osmium and helium isotope systematics of hotspot lavas have the potential to reveal information about the deep Earth. A high 3He/4He ratio may represent an undegassed reservoir, generally associated with the lower mantle. There are two Os isotopes that can be studied to help to further elucidate the problem. The decay of 187Re to 187Os is the more frequently cited system; however, in terms of lower mantle processes, the decay of 190Pt to 186Os may be extremely useful. Both of these Os isotopes are enriched in the core relative to chondritic values. In a previous study, Brandon et al. (1999) examined several Hawaiian volcanoes for both He and Os isotopes. A correlation was noted between the 3He/4He, 187Os/188Os and 186Os/188Os ratios. In terms of 3He/4He and 187Os/188Os space, the three commonly cited Hawaiian end-members (Kea, Koolau and Loihi members) were clearly defined. A strong positive correlation was also observed for 186Os/188Os versus 3He/4He. These correlations were interpreted as a possible signature of core-mantle interaction. There were some limitations to previous studies. Only 2-3 samples from each volcano were studied, with these samples generally being subaerially erupted. The He data utilized were often not for the same samples for which the Os data were collected (volcano averages for He were used on some samples). With the introduction of data from the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP-2), which drilled 2.84 km into the Mauna Kea volcanics (DePaolo et al., 2000), an extensive history of a single volcano can be observed (from the early submarine stages to the later subaerial rocks). In the current study a detailed Os isotopic analysis of several samples that span a large depth range of the HSDP-2 core, in conjunction with previously collected He isotopic data (Kurz et al., 2004), was conducted. The samples define a relatively narrow range of slightly suprachondritic 187Os/188Os ratios (0.12865-0.13056), despite having a large

  16. An overview on the history of pedology and soil mapping in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolari, C.

    2012-04-01

    In Italy, the word pedology (pedologia) was introduced in a text book as synonym of soil science for the first time in 1904 by Vinassa de Regny. In the literature, the term cohabitates with the words agrology (agrologia), agro-geology (agro-geologia), agricultural geognostic (geognostica agraria), geopedology (geo-pedologia) used in different historical moments by differently rooted soil scientists. When early pedologists started with systematic studies of soils, their characteristics and geography, they were strongly influenced by their cultural background, mainly geology and agro-chemistry. Along the time, the soil concept evolved, as did the concept of pedology, and this is somehow witnessed by the use of different Italian words with reference to soil: suolo, terreno, terra. Differently from agro-chemists, early pedologists based the soil study on the field description of soil profile. This was firstly based on the vertical differentiation between humus rich layers and "inactive" layers and later on, as long as the discipline evolved, on the presence of genetic horizons. The first complete soil map of Italy is dated 1928. Its Author, the geologist De Angelis d'Ossat, was the president of the organising committee of the 1924 International Soil Conference of Rome, where the International Society of Soil Science was founded. The map was based on the geological map of Italy, drafted in scale 1:1,000,000 after the creation of the Kingdom of Italy in 1861. The internal disputes within the Geological Society, together with the scarce interest of most of geologists for soil, did not facilitate the birth of a central soil survey. Soil mapping was mainly conducted by universities and research institutes, and we had to wait until 1953 for a new soil map (scale 1:3,125,000) at national level to be realised by Paolo Principi, based on literature data. In 1966 a new 1:1,000,000 soil map of Italy was eventually published by a national committee, led by Fiorenzo Mancini. This

  17. Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) distribution in two differents soil types (Podzol and Andosol) under natural forest cover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Romero, Marta; Papa, Stefania; Verstraeten, Arne; Cools, Nathalie; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Coppola, Elio

    2017-04-01

    Andosols are young soils that shall know a successive evolution towards pedological types where the dominant pedogenetic processes are more evident. Vegetation and climate influence Andosols evolution to other order of soils. In cold and wet climates or on acid vulcanite under heavy leaching young Andosols could change into Podzols (Van Breemn and Buurman, 1998). Were investigated a Podzol soil (World References Base, 2014) at Zoniën (Belgium), were and an Andosol soil (World References Base, 2014) at Lago Laceno (Avellino, Italy). This study shows the data on the SOC (Soil Organic Carbon) fractionation in two profiles from two natural pine forest soils. Together with the conventional activities of sampling and analysis of soil profile were examined surveys meant to fractionation and characterization of SOC, in particular: Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Total Extractable Carbon (TEC) soil contents were determined by Italian official method of soil analysis (Mi.P.A.F. (2000)). Different soil C fractions were also determined: Humic Acid Carbon (HAC), Fulvic Acid Carbon (FAC), Not Humic Carbon (NHC) and Humin Carbon (Huc) fractions were obtained by difference. In the whole profile, therefore, were also assayed cellulose and lignin contents. The aim of this work was to compare the distribution of different soil organic components in a podzol and a soil with andic properties. The data show great similarity, among the selected profiles, in the organic components distribution estudied. References: - Mi.P.A.F. - Ministero per le Politiche Agricole e Forestali - Osservatorio Nazionale Pedologico e per la Qualità del Suolo (2000): Metodi Ufficiali di Analisi Chimica del Suolo. In: Franco Angeli (Editor), Collana di metodi analitici per l'agricoltura diretta da Paolo Sequi, n. 1124.2, Milano, Italy. - Van Breemn N. and Buurman P. (1998) Chapter 12 Formation of Andisols. In: Soil formation. Kluwer Ed., Wageningen, The Netherlands, 271-289. -Ussiri D.A.N., Johnson C

  18. The development of pain medicine in Italy and the rest of Europe 40 years after the first International Association for the Study of Pain Congress.

    PubMed

    Varrassi, Giustino; Paladini, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Professor Giustino Varrassi and Antonella Paladini speak to Jade Parker, Commissioning Editor: Professor Giustino Varrassi is Full Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine in the LUdeS University, Valletta, Malta. He graduated at the Medical School of the University 'La Sapienza' (Rome, Italy) in 1973, and became board certified in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care in 1976 and in Pneumology in 1978, both in the same Medical School. He is currently President of the European League Against Pain and of the Paolo Procacci Foundation, and is a founding member of both of these. He is also a member of the World Institute of Pain, and a member of the Board of the Associazione Italiana per lo Studio del Dolore. He has been an invited speaker at more than 500 congresses (national and international), mainly in obstetric anesthesia and pain medicine. He is also the author of approximately 500 papers, published in international and national scientific journals, and 46 book chapters, mainly on obstetric anesthesia and pain medicine. He is the editor of 31 books and congress proceedings, including a textbook on obstetric anesthesia. He has also been the organizer of around 40 congresses, including European and World congresses on Pain Medicine. Professor Antonella Paladini is an Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at the L'Aquila University, Italy. She has recently been nominated as Associate Professor of Anesthesiology in the LUdeS University, in Valletta, Malta. She graduated in medicine at L'Aquila University in 1989, and has got her Board Certification with laude in Anesthesia in 1992 and served as anesthetist in few teaching hospitals, mainly in cardiac surgery departments. Since 2000, she is in charge of the L'Aquila University, and has addressed her interests toward pain medicine. In 2004, she got the Board Certificate in Pain Medicine, with laude, in the University of Verona. She has a huge scientific production, with over 60 papers published in

  19. Investigating crustal contamination: a case study from the Bolivian Altiplano, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, C. L.; Davidson, J. P.; Nowell, G.

    2010-12-01

    : Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 140, pp. 157-170. DePaolo, D.J., (1981). Trace element and isotopic effects of combined wallrock assimilation and fractional crystallization. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 53, pp. 189-202. Spera, F. J., and Bohrson, W, A., (2001). Energy-Constrained Open-System Magmatic Processes I: General Model and Energy-Constrained Assimilation and Fractional Crystallization (EC-AFC) Formulation. Journal of Petrology 42, pp. 999-1018.

  20. Sm-Nd isotopic study of Precambrian/Cambrian sedimentary provenance in the Great Basin and implications for the tectonic evolution of the western US

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Nd isotopic compositions and Sm-Nd model ages were determined for 14 Precambrian to Cambrian clastic miogeoclinal and 2 Lower Paleozoic eugeoclinal metasedimentary rocks in the Great Basin to determine the sediment source regions and constrain the tectonic evolution of the western margin of the continental US Upper Precambrian (McCoy Creek Group-MCG) and Lower Cambrian miogeoclinal sandstones and shales have homogeneous 147SM/144Nd values (.110 to .119) but show a regional variation in measured element of/sub Nd/, from values of -18 and -26 (T/sub DM/=1.9 and 2.5Ga) in the Pilot and Ruby Ranges in N. Nevada, to values clustering at -11 and -18 (T/sub DM/=1.3 and 1.9Ga) in the Deep Creek and Schell Creek Ranges in the east-central Great Basin. The isotopic variations in the MCG correspond spatially to changes in the element of/sub ND/(0) and T/sub DM/ Precambrian basement adjacent to the miogeocline, suggesting that the MCG were derived from these crustal terranes and were deposited close to the paleocontinental margin of the western US. An element of/sub Nd/(0)=22.14 (T/sub DM/=2.1 Ga) for deeper water miogeoclinal sediment in the southern Great Basin (Wyman Fm-White Mountains, California) requires a source either in nearby T/sub DM/=2.2Ga crust in the S. Sierra Nevada (Bennett and DePaolo, 1984), or in T/sub DM/>2.0Ga crustal terranes to the north, with the sediment having been transported southward via Precambrian longshore currents. Feldspathic sandstone of the Cambrian Harmony Formation in north-central Nevada has element of/sub Nd/(0)=-25.22 (T/sub DM/=2.4Ga), consistent with a northerly source in Archean crust of present-day Idaho, while Ordovician shale of the Vinini Fm. in central Nevada has element of/sub Nd/(0)=-17.6, identical to values for the MCG exposed directly to the east.