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Sample records for alfven ion cyclotron

  1. Conversion of compressional Alfven waves into ion-cyclotron waves in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Amagishi, Y.; Tsushima, A.; Inutake, M.

    1982-04-26

    Axisymmetric compressional Alfven (fast) waves, which propagate into a region of an increasing magnetic field in a cylindrical plasma, are observed to be converted into ion-cyclotron (slow) waves via ion-cyclotron resonances.

  2. Observation of fast-ion Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yang; Heidbrink, W. W.; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R.; Vincena, S.; Carter, T. A.; Gekelman, W.; Leneman, D.; Pribyl, P.

    2008-10-15

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance ({omega}-k{sub z}v{sub z}={omega}{sub f}) between fast ions and shear Alfven waves is experimentally investigated ({omega}, wave frequency; k{sub z}, axial wavenumber; v{sub z}, fast-ion axial speed; {omega}{sub f}, fast-ion cyclotron frequency). A test particle beam of fast ions is launched by a Li{sup +} source in the helium plasma of the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)], with shear Alfven waves (SAW) (amplitude {delta} B/B up to 1%) launched by a loop antenna. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer measures the nonclassical spreading of the beam, which is proportional to the resonance with the wave. A resonance spectrum is observed by launching SAWs at 0.3-0.8{omega}{sub ci}. Both the magnitude and frequency dependence of the beam-spreading are in agreement with the theoretical prediction using a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that launches fast ions with an initial spread in real/velocity space and random phases relative to the wave. Measured wave magnetic field data are used in the simulation.

  3. Fast Ion Induced Shearing of 2D Alfven Eigenmodes Measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, Ben; Classen, I.G.J.; Domier, C. W.; Heidbrink, W.; Luhmann, N.C.; Nazikian, Raffi; Park, H.K.; Spong, Donald A; Van Zeeland, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional images of electron temperature perturbations are obtained with electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) on the DIII-D tokamak and compared to Alfven eigenmode structures obtained by numerical modeling using both ideal MHD and hybrid MHD-gyrofluid codes. While many features of the observations are found to be in excellent agreement with simulations using an ideal MHD code (NOVA), other characteristics distinctly reveal the influence of fast ions on the mode structures. These features are found to be well described by the nonperturbative hybrid MHD-gyrofluid model TAEFL.

  4. Coupling and spatial structure of Alfven-ion-cyclotron waves in GAMMA 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iimura, T.; Saito, Y.; Iwamoto, Y.; Okada, T.; Sumida, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Gamma 10 Team

    2013-10-01

    In the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror, anisotropy-driven Alfven wave, referred as Alfven ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave, have been spontaneously excited in high-beta discharges. Density fluctuation, which we measured with a reflectometer, shows fruitful interactions of AIC waves with externally applied ICRF waves and with themselves. These wave-wave coupling phenomena are found to be an important issue for mirror-confinement of high-energy ions in GAMMA 10; the amount of axially transported high-energy ions of greater than 6 keV measured with a semiconductor detector demonstrated significant modulation by the difference frequencies between simultaneously excited AIC waves (about 100 kHz). This indicates pitch-angle scattering due to the excited low-frequency Alfven waves. We present detailed characteristics of the coupling phenomena observed in GAMMA 10 and also spatial structure of the spontaneously excited AIC waves, which we have investigated by using a two-channel reflectometer. This work is partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from JSPS, Japan (No. 25400531) and by the bidirectional collaborative research programme of the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan (NIFS12KUGM067).

  5. Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance of fast ions with circularly polarized shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yang; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhou Shu; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R.; Carter, T. A.; Vincena, S.; Lilley, M. K.

    2009-05-15

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between fast ions and shear Alfven waves (SAWs) has been experimentally investigated with a test-particle fast-ion (Li{sup +}) beam launched in the helium plasma of the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. Left- or right-hand circularly polarized SAWs are launched by an antenna with four current channels. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer characterizes the resonance by measuring the nonclassical spreading of the averaged beam signal. Left-hand circularly polarized SAWs resonate with the fast ions but right-hand circularly polarized SAWs do not. The measured fast-ion profiles are compared with simulations by a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that uses the measured wave field data.

  6. Generation of Alfven-ion cyclotron waves on auroral field lines in the presence of heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, R. L.; Temerin, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Observation of electromagnetic waves in the low-altitude auroral zone at frequencies between the proton and helium gyrofrequencies suggests that Alfven-ion cyclotron waves modified by the presence of helium ions are being excited. Estimates of the growth rates for this mode indicate that the auroral electron beam can provide the free energy for the instability. The effect of the heavy ions is to decrease the group velocity of the waves, leading to larger convective growth. Theoretical wave spectra are computed in the local approximation, which assumes that the gradient scale lengths in density and magnetic field are constant over the ray paths. Narrow banded spectral peaks similar to observations may be produced when the thickness of the electron beam is small (200 m at 3000 km altitude). Narrow beams also limit growth of whistler mode waves, which compete for the free energy of the electron beam.

  7. Generation of plasma rotation in a tokamak by ion-cyclotron absorption of fast Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; P. Bonoli

    2000-06-13

    Control of rotation in tokamak plasmas provides a method for suppressing fine-scale turbulent transport by velocity shear and for stabilizing large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities via a close-fitting conducting shell. The experimental discovery of rotation in a plasma heated by the fast-wave minority ion cyclotron process is important both as a potential control method for a fusion reactor and as a fundamental issue, because rotation arises even though this heating process introduces negligible angular momentum. This paper proposes and evaluates a mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport in a tokamak is governed by a diffusion equation with a no-slip boundary condition at the plasma surface and with a torque-density source that is a function of radius. When the torque density source consists of two separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a non-zero central rotation velocity results, even when the total angular momentum input vanishes. Secondly, the authors show that localized ion-cyclotron heating can generate regions of positive and negative torque density and consequently central plasma rotation.

  8. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Maneva, Y. G.; Ofman, L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  9. DO OBLIQUE ALFVEN/ION-CYCLOTRON OR FAST-MODE/WHISTLER WAVES DOMINATE THE DISSIPATION OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE NEAR THE PROTON INERTIAL LENGTH?

    SciTech Connect

    He Jiansen; Tu Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Yao Shuo

    2012-01-20

    To determine the wave modes prevailing in solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales, we study the magnetic polarization of small-scale fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the data sampling direction (namely, the solar wind flow direction, V{sub SW}) and analyze its orientation with respect to the local background magnetic field B{sub 0,local}. As an example, we take only measurements made in an outward magnetic sector. When B{sub 0,local} is quasi-perpendicular to V{sub SW}, we find that the small-scale magnetic-field fluctuations, which have periods from about 1 to 3 s and are extracted from a wavelet decomposition of the original time series, show a polarization ellipse with right-handed orientation. This is consistent with a positive reduced magnetic helicity, as previously reported. Moreover, for the first time we find that the major axis of the ellipse is perpendicular to B{sub 0,local}, a property that is characteristic of an oblique Alfven wave rather than oblique whistler wave. For an oblique whistler wave, the major axis of the magnetic ellipse is expected to be aligned with B{sub 0,local}, thus indicating significant magnetic compressibility, and the polarization turns from right to left handedness as the wave propagation angle ({theta}{sub kB}) increases toward 90 Degree-Sign . Therefore, we conclude that the observation of a right-handed polarization ellipse with orientation perpendicular to B{sub 0,local} seems to indicate that oblique Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves rather than oblique fast-mode/whistler waves dominate in the 'dissipation' range near the break of solar wind turbulence spectra occurring around the proton inertial length.

  10. Ion cyclotron emission due to the newly-born fusion products induced fast Alfven wave radiative instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-08-01

    The velocity distribution functions of the newly born (t = 0) charged fusion products of tokamak discharges can be approximated by a monoenergetic ring distribution with a finite v{sub {parallel}} such that v{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} v{sub {parallel}} {approx} v{sub j} where (M{sub j}V{sub j}{sup 2}/2) = E{sub j}, the directed birth energy of the charged fusion product species j of mass M{sub j}. As the time t progresses these distribution functions will evolve into a Gaussian in velocity with thermal spreadings given by the perpendicular and parallel temperatures T{sub {perpendicular}j}(t) = T{sub {parallel}j}(t) with T{sub j}(t) increasing as t increases and finally reaches an isotropic saturation value of T{sub {perpendicular}j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) = T{sub {parallel}j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) = T{sub j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) {approx} [M{sub j}T{sub d}E{sub j}/(M{sub j} + M)]{sup 1/2}, where T{sub d} is the temperature of the background deuterium plasma ions, M is the mass of a triton or a neutron for j = protons and alpha particles, respectively, and {tau}{sub j} {approx} {tau}{sub sj}/4 is the thermalization time of the fusion product species j in the background deuterium plasma and {tau}{sub sj} is the slowing-down time. For times t of the order of {tau}{sub j} their distributions can be approximated by a Gaussian in their total energy. Then for times t {ge} {tau}{sub sj} the velocity distributions of these fusion products will relax towards their appropriate slowing-down distributions. Here the authors will examine the radiative stability of all these distributions. The ion cyclotron emission from energetic ion produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  11. Ion-neutral collision effect on an Alfven wave

    SciTech Connect

    Amagishi, Y.; Tanaka, M. Department of High Energy Engineering Science, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816 )

    1993-07-19

    This paper reports that ion-neutral collisions in a magnetized plasma cause a drastic change in the dispersion relation of the shear Alfven wave with poloidal mode number [ital m]=0, connecting to the branch of the [ital m]=+1 compressional Alfven wave at frequencies below the ion-cyclotron frequency. An anomaly of the dispersion then appears on the refractive index curve and a wave packet in this frequency range undergoes strong amplitude damping and profile deformation. It is confirmed that the Kramers-Kronig relation holds for the dielectric function, estimated from both the measured refractive index and damping rate.

  12. Compressibility and cyclotron damping in the oblique Alfven wave

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.K. )

    1989-11-01

    Compressibility, magnetic compressibility, and damping rate are calculated for the obliquely propagating Alfven shear wave in high- and low-beta Vlasov plasmas. There is an overall increase in compressibility as beta is reduced from {beta} = 1 to {beta}{much lt}1. For high obliquity {theta} and low frequency ({omega} {much lt} {Omega}{sub p}) the compressibility C follows a k{sup 2} wave number dependence; for high {theta} and low {beta} the approximation C(k) {approx} k{sub n}{sup 2} {identical to} (kV{sub A}/{Omega}{sub p}){sup 2} holds for wave numbers up to the proton cyclotron resonance, where {Omega}{sub p} is the proton cyclotron frequency and V{sub A} is the Alfven velocity. Strong proton cyclotron damping sets in at k{sub n} of the order of unity; the precise k{sub n} position of the damping cutoff increases with decreasing {beta} and increasing {theta}. Hence compressibility can exceed unity near the damping cutoff for high-{theta} waves in a low-{beta} plasma. The magnetic compressibility of the oblique Alfven wave also has a k{sup 2} dependence and can reach a maximum value of the order of 10% at high wave number. It is shown that Alfven compressibility could be the dominant contributor to the near-Sun solar wind density fluctuation spectrum for k>10{sup {minus}2} km{sup {minus}1} and hence might cause some of the flattening at high wave number seen in radio scintillation measurements. This would also be consistent with the notion that the observed density spectrum inner scale is a signature of cyclotron damping.

  13. Measurements, modelling and electron cyclotron heating modification of Alfven eigenmode activity in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, Michael; Heidbrink, W.; Nazikian, Raffi; Austin, M. E.; Cheng, C Z; Chu, M. S.; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Holcomb, C T; Hyatt, A. W.; Kramer, G.; Lohr, J.T.; Mckee, G. R.; Petty, C C.; Prater, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Spong, Donald A

    2009-01-01

    Neutral beam injection into reversed magnetic shear DIII-D plasmas produces a variety of Alfvenic activity including toroidicity and ellipticity induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE/EAE, respectively) and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAE) as well as their spatial coupling. These modes are studied during the discharge current ramp phase when incomplete current penetration results in a high central safety factor and strong drive due to multiple higher order resonances. It is found that ideal MHD modelling of eigenmode spectral evolution, coupling and structure are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. It is also found that higher radial envelope harmonic RSAEs are clearly observed and agree with modelling. Some discrepancies with modelling such as that due to up/down eigenmode asymmetries are also pointed out. Concomitant with the Alfvenic activity, fast ion (FIDA) spectroscopy shows large reductions in the central fast ion profile, the degree of which depends on the Alfven eigenmode amplitude. Interestingly, localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) near the mode location stabilizes RSAE activity and results in significantly improved fast ion confinement relative to discharges with ECH deposition on axis. In these discharges, RSAE activity is suppressed when ECH is deposited near the radius of the shear reversal point and enhanced with deposition near the axis. The sensitivity of this effect to deposition power and current drive phasing as well as ECH modulation are presented.

  14. POSSIBLE EVIDENCE OF ALFVEN-CYCLOTRON WAVES IN THE ANGLE DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC HELICITY OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    He Jiansen; Tu Chuanyi; Yao Shuo; Tian Hui; Marsch, Eckart

    2011-04-20

    The fluctuating magnetic helicity is considered an important parameter in diagnosing the characteristic modes of solar wind turbulence. Among them is the Alfven-cyclotron wave, which is probably responsible for the solar wind plasma heating, but has not yet been identified from the magnetic helicity of solar wind turbulence. Here, we present the possible signatures of Alfven-cyclotron waves in the distribution of magnetic helicity as a function of {theta}{sub VB}, which is the angle between the solar wind velocity and local mean magnetic field. We use magnetic field data from the STEREO spacecraft to calculate the {theta}{sub VB} distribution of the normalized reduced fluctuating magnetic helicity {sigma}{sub m}. We find a dominant negative {sigma}{sub m} for 1 s < p < 4 s (p is time period) and for {theta}{sub VB} < 30 deg. in the solar wind outward magnetic sector, and a dominant positive {sigma}{sub m} for 0.4 s < p < 4 s and for {theta}{sub VB}>150 deg. in the solar wind inward magnetic sector. These features of {sigma}{sub m} appearing around the Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron frequencies may be consistent with the existence of Alfven-cyclotron waves among the outward propagating fluctuations. Moreover, right-handed polarized waves at larger propagation angles, which might be kinetic Alfven waves or whistler waves, have also been identified on the basis of the {sigma}{sub m} features in the angular range 40 deg. < {theta}{sub VB} < 140 deg. Our findings suggest that Alfven-cyclotron waves (together with other wave modes) play a prominent role in turbulence cascading and plasma heating of the solar wind.

  15. Proton, Helium and Minor Ion Interactions with Circularly Polarized Alfven and Ion-cyclotron waves in the Expanding Solar Wind: Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velli, M.; Liewer, P. C.; Goldstein, B. E.

    2000-05-01

    We present simulations of parallel propagating Alfvén waves in the accelerating solar wind and their interactions with protons, alpha particles, and minor ions using an expanding box hybrid code (Liewer et al., 1999). In this model, the average solar wind flow speed is a given external function, and the simulation domain follows a plasma parcel as it expands both in the radial and transverse directions accordingly: the decrease of Alfvén speed and density with distance from the Sun are taken into account self-consistently. It is therefore possible to carry out a detailed study of frequency drifting and the coming into resonance with the waves at different radial locations of particles with differing charge to mass ratios. Simulations of monochromatic waves as well as waves with well-developed spectra are presented for plasmas with one, two and three ion species. We observe preferential heating and acceleration of protons and minor ions. Under some conditions, we obtain the scaling observed in coronal hole solar wind: the heavy ion temperature is proportional to its mass (Liewer et al., 2000). A comparison with predictions from models based on such quasi-linear or linear analyses will also be presented. P. C. Liewer, M. Velli and B. E. Goldstein, in Solar Wind Nine, S. Habbal, R. Esser, J. V. Hollweg, P. A. Isenberg, eds., (AIP Conference Proceedings 471, 1999) 449. P. C. Liewer, M. Velli, and B. E. Goldstein, in Proc. ACE 2000 Conference (2000) to be published.

  16. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  17. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  18. Subcyclotron Instability of Alfven Eigenmodes due to Energetic Ions in Low Aspect Ratio Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenko; E. Fredrickson; E. Belova; C.Z. Cheng; D. Gates; R. White

    2003-08-21

    High-frequency modes with frequencies below the fundamental cyclotron frequency of thermal ions were observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Based on the measured spectrum of high-frequency modes they are identified as Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAEs) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAEs). CAEs have similar time evolution as plasma parameters change, while GAEs may intersect due to q-profile relaxation. A theory has been developed to study the properties of these modes. Both types of instabilities are driven by the tangential neutral-beam injection in NSTX. Beam ions excite CAEs/GAEs through the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. The main source for the drive is the velocity space anisotropy of the beam ion distribution function. Simulations of the effect CAEs/GAEs may have on plasma ions indicate that these modes may provide a channel for efficient energy transfer from fast ions directly to thermal ions.

  19. Electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum associated with the drift Alfven-cyclotron instability

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Kicheol; Ryu, Chang-Mo; Yoon, Peter H.

    2012-07-15

    The present paper investigates the electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum associated with the drift Alfven-cyclotron instability by means of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, which may be plausibly associated with a current disruption event. The current disruption event shows localized high-amplitude electromagnetic fluctuations. In recent theories, these fluctuation characteristics are shown to correspond to the drift Alfven-cyclotron instability. A simulation is carried out to clarify this instability. The simulation shows that the drift Alfven-cyclotron instabilities are excited in two frequency regimes, a relatively low frequency mode propagating in a quasi-perpendicular direction while the second high-frequency branch propagating in a predominantly parallel propagation direction, consistent with observations as well as with a recent theory.

  20. Ion Cyclotron Waves at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.; Cowee, M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The observation of ion cyclotron waves was generally expected well before Cassini arrived at Titan in 2004, because strong ion cyclotron waves were seen at Io where its atmosphere interacted with the corotating magnetospheric plasma. However, the region of the interaction of the Saturnian magnetospheric plasma with the Titan atmosphere has been quite devoid of ion cyclotron waves. Finally, on pass T63, ion cyclotron waves were seen briefly. More recently, on pass T98, a longer sequence of ion cyclotron waves also occurred. On pass T63, the pick-up ion signature is that of both H+ and H2+, while on pass T98, only H+ ion cyclotron waves are observed. We examine the strength of these waves and their region of occurrence in the light of our previous work on the expected occurrence of these waves.

  1. Nature and effects of ion-cyclotron fluctuations in TMX

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T.A.; Poulsen, P.; Smith, G.R.

    1982-02-19

    In the tandem mirror experiment (TMX), coherent oscillations have been identified as resulting from the Alfven ion-cyclotron instability. Although the drive for this instability is localized in the end cell, the waves generated propagate out of the unstable region and interact with the central-cell ions. This interaction leads to an experimentally observed scaling of the stored end-cell energy with axial ion end-loss current.

  2. Stochastic Ion Heating at the Magnetopause due to Kinetic Alfven Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

    2001-08-10

    The magnetopause and boundary layer are typically characterized by large amplitude transverse wave activity with frequency below the ion cyclotron frequency. The signatures of the transverse waves suggest that they are kinetic Alfven waves with wavelength on the order of the ion gyroradius. We investigate ion motion in the presence of large amplitude kinetic Alfven waves with wavelength the order of rho(subscript ''i'') and demonstrate that for sufficiently large wave amplitude (delta B(subscript ''perpendicular'')/B(subscript ''0'') > 0.05) the particle orbits become stochastic. As a result, low energy particles in the core of the ion distribution can migrate to higher energy through the stochastic sea leading to an increase in T(subscript ''perpendicular'') and a broadening of the distribution. This process can explain transverse ion energization and formation of conics which have been observed in the low-latitude boundary layer.

  3. Cherenkov radiation of shear Alfven waves in plasmas with two ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2012-09-15

    A calculation is presented of the radiation pattern of shear Alfven waves generated by a burst of charged particles in a charge-neutral plasma with two-ions of differing charge-to-mass ratios. The wake pattern is obtained for the inertial and kinetic regimes of wave propagation. Due to the presence of two ion-species, the Alfven waves propagate within two different frequency bands separated by a gap. One band is restricted to frequencies below the cyclotron frequency of the heavier species and the other to frequencies between the ion-ion hybrid frequency and the cyclotron frequency of the lighter species. The radiation pattern in the lower frequency band is found to exhibit essentially the same properties reported in a previous study [Van Compernolle et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 082101 (2008)] of a single species plasma. However, the upper frequency band differs from the lower one in that it always allows for the Cherenkov radiation condition to be met. The methodology is extended to examine the Alfvenic wake of point-charges in the inertial and adiabatic regimes. The adiabatic regime is illustrated for conditions applicable to fusion-born alpha particles in ITER.

  4. Investigation of an ion-ion hybrid Alfven wave resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Vincena, S. T.; Farmer, W. A.; Maggs, J. E.; Morales, G. J.

    2013-01-15

    A theoretical and experimental investigation is made of a wave resonator based on the concept of wave reflection along the confinement magnetic field at a spatial location where the wave frequency matches the local value of the ion-ion hybrid frequency. Such a situation can be realized by shear Alfven waves in a magnetized plasma with two ion species because this mode has zero parallel group velocity and experiences a cut-off at the ion-ion hybrid frequency. Since the ion-ion hybrid frequency is proportional to the magnetic field, it is expected that a magnetic well configuration in a two-ion plasma can result in an Alfven wave resonator. Such a concept has been proposed in various space plasma studies and could have relevance to mirror and tokamak fusion devices. This study demonstrates such a resonator in a controlled laboratory experiment using a H{sup +}-He{sup +} mixture. The resonator response is investigated by launching monochromatic waves and impulses from a magnetic loop antenna. The observed frequency spectra are found to agree with predictions of a theoretical model of trapped eigenmodes.

  5. On Properties of Compressional Alfven Eigenmode Instability Driven by Superalfvinic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-02-06

    Properties of the instability of Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE) in tokamak plasmas are studied in the cold plasma approximation with an emphasis on the instability driven by the energetic minority Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) ions. We apply earlier developed theory [N.N. Gorelenkov and C.Z. Cheng, Nuclear Fusion 35 (1995) 1743] to compare two cases: Ion Cyclotron Emission (ICE) driven by charged fusion products and ICRH Minority driven ICE (MICE) [J. Cottrell, Phys. Rev. Lett. (2000)] recently observed on JET [Joint European Torus]. Particularly in MICE spectrum, only instabilities with even harmonics of deuterium-cyclotron frequency at the low-field-side plasma edge were reported. Odd deuterium-cyclotron frequency harmonics of ICE spectrum between the cyclotron harmonics of protons can be driven only via the Doppler-shifted cyclotron wave-particle resonance of CAEs with fusion products, but are shown to be damped due to the electron Landau damping in experiments on MI CE. Excitation of odd harmonics of MICE with high-field-side heating is predicted. Dependencies of the instability on the electron temperature is studied and is shown to be strong. Low electron temperature is required to excite odd harmonics in MICE.

  6. Electrostatic Wave Generation and Transverse Ion Acceleration by Alfvenic Wave Components of BBELF Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George; Mukhter, Ali

    2007-01-01

    We present results here from 2.5-D particle-in-cell simulations showing that the electrostatic (ES) components of broadband extremely low frequency (BBELF) waves could possibly be generated by cross-field plasma instabilities driven by the relative drifts between the heavy and light ion species in the electromagnetic (EM) Alfvenic component of the BBELF waves in a multi-ion plasma. The ES components consist of ion cyclotron as well as lower hybrid modes. We also demonstrate that the ES wave generation is directly involved in the transverse acceleration of ions (TAI) as commonly measured with the BBELF wave events. The heating is affected by ion cyclotron resonance in the cyclotron modes and Landau resonance in the lower hybrid waves. In the simulation we drive the plasma by the transverse electric field, E(sub y), of the EM waves; the frequency of E(sub y), omega(sub d), is varied from a frequency below the heavy ion cyclotron frequency, OMEGA(sub h), to below the light ion cyclotron frequency, OMEGA(sub i). We have also performed simulations for E(sub y) having a continuous spectrum given by a power law, namely, |Ey| approx. omega(sub d) (exp -alpha), where the exponent alpha = _, 1, and 2 in three different simulations. The driving electric field generates polarization and ExB drifts of the ions and electrons. When the interspecies relative drifts are sufficiently large, they drive electrostatic waves, which cause perpendicular heating of both light and heavy ions. The transverse ion heating found here is discussed in relation to observations from Cluster, FAST and Freja.

  7. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Boozer, A.; Delgardo-Aparicio, L.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; White, R.

    2010-07-13

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  8. Experiments on ion cyclotron damping at the deuterium fourth harmonic in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Baity, F.W.; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Mau, T.K.; Porkolab, M.

    1999-05-01

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the energetic ions of an injected beam is evaluated in the DIII-D tokamak. Ion cyclotron resonance absorption at the fourth harmonic of the deuteron cyclotron frequency is observed with deuterium neutral beam injection (f = 60 MHz, B{sub T} = 1.9 T). Enhanced D-D neutron rates are evidence of absorption at the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Characteristics of global energy confinement provide further proof of substantial beam acceleration by the rf. In many cases, the accelerated deuterons cause temporary stabilization of the sawtooth (monster sawteeth), at relatively low rf power levels of {approximately}1 MW.

  9. Effect of two ion species on the propagation of shear Alfven waves of small transverse scale

    SciTech Connect

    Vincena, S. T.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2010-05-15

    The results of a theoretical modeling study and experimental investigation of the propagation properties of shear Alfven waves of small transverse scale in a plasma with two ion species are reported. In the two ion plasma, depending on the mass of the heavier species, ion kinetic effects can become prominent, and significant parallel electric fields result in electron acceleration. The theory predicts the appearance of frequency propagation gaps at the ion-ion hybrid frequency and between harmonics of the lower cyclotron frequency. Within these frequency bands spatial structures arise that mix the cone-propagation characteristics of Alfven waves with radially expanding ion Bernstein modes. The experiments, performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility (BaPSF) at UCLA, consist of the spatial mapping of shear waves launched by a loop antenna. Although a variety of two ion-species combinations were explored, only results from a helium-neon mix are reported. A clear signature of a shear wave propagation gap, as well as propagation between multiple harmonics, is found for this gas combination. The evanescence of shear waves beyond the reflection point at the ion-ion hybrid frequency in the presence of an axial magnetic field gradient is also documented.

  10. Radial Structure of Alfven Eigenmodes in the DIII-D Tokamak through Electron-Cyclotron-Emission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, M. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Austin, M. E.; Boivin, R. L.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Makowski, M. A.; McKee, G. R.; Wang, G.

    2006-09-29

    The spatial structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes in DIII-D is obtained from electron-cyclotron-emission measurements. Peak measured temperature perturbations are of similar magnitude for both toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes and found to be {delta}T{sub e}/T{sub e}{approx_equal}0.5%. Simultaneous measurements of density fluctuations using beam-emission spectroscopy indicate {delta}n{sub e}/n{sub e}{approx_equal}0.25%. Predictions of the measured temperature and density perturbation profiles as well as {delta}T{sub e}/{delta}n{sub e} from the ideal magnetohydrodynamic code NOVA are in close agreement with experiment.

  11. Relativistic electromagnetic ion cyclotron instabilities.

    PubMed

    Chen, K R; Huang, R D; Wang, J C; Chen, Y Y

    2005-03-01

    The relativistic instabilities of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves driven by MeV ions are analytically and numerically studied. As caused by wave magnetic field and in sharp contrast to the electrostatic case, interesting characteristics such as Alfve nic behavior and instability transition are discovered and illuminated in detail. The instabilities are reactive and are raised from the coupling of slow ions' first-order resonance and fast ions' second-order resonance, that is an essential extra mechanism due to relativistic effect. Because of the wave magnetic field, the nonresonant plasma dielectric is usually negative and large, that affects the instability conditions and scaling laws. A negative harmonic cyclotron frequency mismatch between the fast and slow ions is required for driving a cubic (and a coupled quadratic) instability; the cubic (square) root scaling of the peak growth rate makes the relativistic effect more important than classical mechanism, especially for low fast ion density and Lorentz factor being close to unity. For the cubic instability, there is a threshold (ceiling) on the slow ion temperature and density (the external magnetic field and the fast ion energy); the Alfve n velocity is required to be low. This Alfve nic behavior is interesting in physics and important for its applications. The case of fast protons in thermal deuterons is numerically studied and compared with the analytical results. When the slow ion temperature or density (the external magnetic field or the fast ion energy) is increased (reduced) to about twice (half) the threshold (ceiling), the same growth rate peak transits from the cubic instability to the coupled quadratic instability and a different cubic instability branch appears. The instability transition is an interesting new phenomenon for instability. PMID:15903591

  12. Ion temperature in plasmas with intrinsic Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Wang, C. B.

    2014-10-15

    This Brief Communication clarifies the physics of non-resonant heating of protons by low-frequency Alfvenic turbulence. On the basis of general definition for wave energy density in plasmas, it is shown that the wave magnetic field energy is equivalent to the kinetic energy density of the ions, whose motion is induced by the wave magnetic field, thus providing a self-consistent description of the non-resonant heating by Alfvenic turbulence. Although the study is motivated by the research on the solar corona, the present discussion is only concerned with the plasma physics of the heating process.

  13. Ion cyclotron waves at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    During the interaction of Titan's thick atmosphere with the ambient plasma, it was expected that ion cyclotron waves would be generated by the free energy of the highly anisotropic velocity distribution of the freshly ionized atmospheric particles created in the interaction. However, ion cyclotron waves are rarely observed near Titan, due to the long growth times of waves associated with the major ion species from Titan's ionosphere, such as CH4+ and N2+. In the over 100 Titan flybys obtained by Cassini to date, there are only two wave events, for just a few minutes during T63 flyby and for tens of minutes during T98 flyby. These waves occur near the gyrofrequencies of proton and singly ionized molecular hydrogen. They are left-handed, elliptically polarized, and propagate nearly parallel to the field lines. Hybrid simulations are performed to understand the wave growth under various conditions in the Titan environment. The simulations using the plasma and field conditions during T63 show that pickup protons with densities ranging from 0.01 cm-3 to 0.02 cm-3 and singly ionized molecular hydrogens with densities ranging from 0.015 cm-3 to 0.25 cm-3 can drive ion cyclotron waves with amplitudes of ~0.02 nT and of ~0.04 nT within appropriate growth times at Titan, respectively. Since the T98 waves were seen farther upstream than the T63 waves, it is possible that the instability was stronger and grew faster on T98 than T63.

  14. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  15. Reversed Shear Alfv'en Eigenmode Stabilization by Localized Electron Cyclotron Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zeeland, M. A.; Lohr, J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Nazikian, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Austin, M. E.; Rhodes, T. L.; Holcomb, C.; Makowski, M. A.; McKee, G. R.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2007-11-01

    Reversed shear Alfv'en eigenmode (RSAE) activity in DIII-D is observed to be stabilized by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) near the minimum of the safety factor (qmin) in neutral beam heated discharges with reversed magnetic shear. The degree of RSAE stabilization and the volume averaged neutron production (Sn) are highly dependent on ECH deposition location relative to qmin. Ideal MHD simulations predict RSAE existence during ECH, indicating that the mode disappearance is due to kinetic effects not taken into account by the ideal MHD model. While discharges with ECH stabilization of RSAEs have higher Sn than discharges with significant RSAE activity, neutron production remains strongly reduced (up to 60%), indicating the bulk of the deficit is not due to RSAEs alone.

  16. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physics programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.

  17. Cyclotron axial ion-beam-buncher system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1982-02-11

    Adiabatic ion bunching is achieved in a cyclotron axial ion injection system through the incorporation of a radio frequency quadrupole system, which receives ions from an external ion source via an accelerate-decelerate system and a focusing einzel lens system, and which adiabatically bunches and then injects the ions into the median plane of a cyclotron via an electrostatic quadrupole system and an inflection mirror.

  18. High-Frequency Electrostatic Wave Generation and Transverse Ion Acceleration by Low Alfvenic Wave Components of BBELF Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George; Mukhter, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Satellite observations in the auroral plasma have revealed that extremely low frequency (ELF) waves play a dominant role in the acceleration of electrons and ions in the auroral plasma. The electromagnetic components of the ELF (EMELF) waves are the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves below the cyclotron frequency of the lightest ion species in a multi-ion plasma. Shear Alfv6n waves (SAWS) constitute the lowest frequency components of the ELF waves below the ion cyclotron frequency of the heaviest ion. The -2 mechanism for the transfer of energy from such EMELF waves to ions affecting transverse ion heating still remains a matter of debate. A very ubiquitous fe8ture of ELF waves now observed in several rocket and satellite experiments is that they occur in conjunction with high-frequency electrostatic waves. The frequency spectrum of the composite wave turbulence extends from the low frequency of the Alfvenic waves to the high frequency of proton plasma frequency and/or the lower hybrid frequency. The spectrum does not show any feature organized by the ion cyclotron frequencies and their harmonics. Such broadband waves consisting of both the EM and ES waves are now popularly referred as BBELF waves. We present results here from 2.5-D particle-in-cell simulations showing that the ES components are directly generated by cross- field plasma instabilities driven by the drifts of the ions and electrons in the EM component of the BBELF waves.

  19. A PARALLEL-PROPAGATING ALFVENIC ION-BEAM INSTABILITY IN THE HIGH-BETA SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Maruca, Bennett A. E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-08-10

    We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves are driven unstable by an isotropic (T{sub {alpha}} = T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}) population of alpha particles drifting parallel to the magnetic field at an average speed U{sub {alpha}} with respect to the protons. We derive an approximate analytic condition for the minimum value of U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability and refine this result using numerical solutions to the hot-plasma dispersion relation. When the alpha-particle number density is {approx_equal} 5% of the proton number density and the two species have similar thermal speeds, the instability requires that {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 1, where {beta}{sub p} is the ratio of the proton pressure to the magnetic pressure. For 1 {approx}< {beta}{sub p} {approx}< 12, the minimum U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability ranges from 0.7v{sub A} to 0.9v{sub A}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. This threshold is smaller than the threshold of {approx_equal} 1.2v{sub A} for the parallel magnetosonic instability, which was previously thought to have the lowest threshold of the alpha-particle beam instabilities at {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 0.5. We discuss the role of the parallel Alfvenic drift instability for the evolution of the alpha-particle drift speed in the solar wind. We also analyze measurements from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups and show that the U{sub {alpha}} values measured in solar-wind streams with T{sub {alpha}} Almost-Equal-To T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} are approximately bounded from above by the threshold of the parallel Alfvenic instability.

  20. Spectral analysis of ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) wave field measurements in the Tara Central Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Golovato, S.N.; Horne, S.F.

    1987-12-01

    A simple spectral analysis technique has been developed to analyse the digital signals from an array of magnetic probes for ICRF field measurements in the Tara Tandem Mirror central cell. The wave dispersion relations of both the applied ICRF and the Alfven Ion Cyclotron Instability have been studied and the waves have been identified as slow in cyclotron waves. The radial profiles of field amplitude and wave vectors were also generated. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Scott, Jill R.; McJunkin, Timothy R.

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  2. Alfven waves and associated energetic ions downstream from Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Belcher, J. W.; Richardson, J. D.; Smith, C. W.

    1991-02-01

    Low-frequency waves have been observed in the solar wind downstream from Uranus. These waves are observed by the Voyager spacecraft for more than 2 weeks after the encounter with Uranus and are present during this period whenever the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented such that field lines intersect the Uranian bow shock. The magnetic field and velocity components transverse to the background field are strongly correlated, consistent with the interpretation that these waves are Alfvenic and/or fast-mode waves. The waves appear to propagate along the magnetic field lines outward from Uranus and are right-hand polarized. Theory suggests that these waves are generated in the upstream region by a resonant instability with a proton beam streaming along the magnetic field lines. The solar wind subsequently carries these waves downstream to the spacecraft location. These waves are associated with the presence of energetic ions observed by the low-energy charged particle instrument. These ions appear two days after the start of the wave activity and occur thereafter whenever the Alfven waves occur, increasing in intensity away from Uranus. The ions are argued to originate in the Uranian magnetosphere, but pitch-angle scattering in the upstream region is required to bring them downstream to the spacecraft location.

  3. ALFVEN-WAVE TURBULENCE AND PERPENDICULAR ION TEMPERATURES IN CORONAL HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2010-09-01

    Low-frequency Alfven-wave turbulence causes ion trajectories to become chaotic, or 'stochastic', when the turbulence amplitude is sufficiently large. Stochastic orbits enable ions to absorb energy from the turbulence, increasing the perpendicular ion temperature T{sub perpendiculari} even when the fluctuation frequencies are too small for a cyclotron resonance to occur. In this paper, an analytic expression for the stochastic heating rate is used in conjunction with an observationally constrained turbulence model to obtain an analytic formula for T{sub perpendiculari} as a function of heliocentric distance r, ion mass, and ion charge in coronal holes at 2 R{sub sun} {approx}< r {approx}< 15 R{sub sun}. The resulting temperature profiles provide a good fit to observations of protons and O{sup +5} ions at 2 R {sub sun} {approx}< r {approx}< 3 R{sub sun} from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS). Stochastic heating also offers a natural explanation for several detailed features of the UVCS observations, including the preferential and anisotropic heating of minor ions, the rapid radial increase in the O{sup +5} temperature between 1.6 R{sub sun} and 1.9 R{sub sun}, and the abrupt flattening of the O{sup +5} temperature profile as r increases above 1.9 R{sub sun}.

  4. Coherent anomalous resistivity in the region of electrostatic shocks. [satellite observation of ion cyclotron wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, R. L.; Hudson, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    Anomalous resistivity in a phase-coherent electrostatic ion cyclotron wave in the region of the auroral electrostatic shocks observed by the S3-3 satellite is considered. It is shown that current-driven shocks and anomalous resistivity will be most important above 5,000 km, where the electron drift velocity is maximized and parallel electric fields are possible. A model for the parallel field based on the dissipation of an Alfven wave pulse by current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron turbulence is presented. In the model, coherent electrostatic ion cyclotron waves lead to anomalous resistivity by electron trapping, producing parallel electric fields greater than 1 mV/m, and may set up the parallel populations necessary to support oblique electrostatic shocks.

  5. Electron-cyclotron-resonance ion sources (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    The physical principles are described and a brief survey of the present state is given of ion sources based on electron-cyclotron heating of plasma in a mirror trap. The characteristics of ECR sources of positive and negative ions used chiefly in accelerator technology are presented. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Experiments on ion cyclotron damping at the deuterium fourth harmonic in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.; Baity, F. W.; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Mau, T. K.; Petty, C. C.; Porkolab, M.

    1999-09-20

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the energetic ions of an injected beam is evaluated in the DIII-D tokamak. Ion cyclotron resonance absorption at the fourth harmonic of the deuteron cyclotron frequency is observed with deuterium neutral beam injection (f=60 MHz, B{sub T}=1.9 T). Enhanced D-D neutron rates are evidence of absorption at the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Characteristics of global energy confinement provide further proof of substantial beam acceleration by the rf. In many cases, the accelerated deuterons cause temporary stabilization of the sawtooth (''monster sawteeth''), at relatively low rf power levels of {approx}1 MW. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Alfven waves and associated energetic ions downstream from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Belcher, J.W.; Richardson, J.D. ); Smith, C.W. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors report the observation of low-frequency waves in the solar wind downstream from Uranus. These waves are observed by the Voyager spacecraft for more than 2 weeks after the encounter with Uranus and are present during this period whenever the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented such that the field lines intersect the Uranian bow shock. The magnetic field and velocity components transverse to the background field are strongly correlated, consistent with the interpretation that these waves are Alfvenic and/or fast-mode waves. The waves have a spacecraft frame frequency of about 10{sup {minus}3} Hz, and when first observed near the bow shock have an amplitude comparable to the background field. As the spacecraft moves farther from Uranus, the amplitude decays. The waves appear to propagate along the magnetic field lines outward from Uranus and are right-hand polarized. Theory suggests that these waves are generated in the upstream region by a resonant instability with a proton beam streaming along the magnetic field lines. The solar wind subsequently carries these waves downstream to the spacecraft location. These waves are associated with the presence of energetic (> 28 keV) ions observed by the low-energy charged particle instrument. These ions appear two days after the start of the wave activity and occur thereafter whenever the Alfven waves occur, increasing in intensity away from Uranus. The ions are argued to originate in the Uranian magnetosphere, but pitch-angle scattering in the upstream region is required to bring them downstream to the spacecraft location.

  8. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at proton cyclotron harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaston, C. C.; Bonnell, J. W.; McFadden, J. P.; Ergun, R. E.; Carlson, C. W.

    2002-11-01

    Waves with frequencies in the vicinity of the proton cyclotron frequency and its harmonics are commonly observed from the Fast Auroral Snapshot spacecraft when traversing regions of auroral particle acceleration. In areas of upward current, large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies within 5% of the local proton gyrofrequency Ωp and its harmonics are often observed where upstreaming ion beams exist. These waves have electric field (E1) and magnetic field (B1) amplitudes of up to 1 V m-1 and 2 nT with the ratio E1/B1 as small as c. The waves occur in the low-altitude portion of the primary auroral acceleration potential, where plasma densities are ≤1 cm-3. It is shown how these waves grow through inverse Landau resonance with a cold field-aligned electron beam superimposed on an accelerated and magnetically mirrored plasma sheet electron component in the absence of any significant plasma densities at energies below ˜100 eV. Significantly, the drift velocity of the cold beam (voeb) is several times larger than its thermal velocity veb, and it is this feature that allows the wave to become electromagnetic at cyclotron harmonics while simultaneously giving rise to broadband electrostatic emissions spanning the first few cyclotron harmonics as is observed.

  9. Xe/+/ -induced ion-cyclotron harmonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.

    Xenon ion sources on an ejectable package separated from the main payload during the flights of Porcupine rockets F3 and F4 which were launched from Kiruna, Sweden on March 19 and 31, 1979, respectively. The effects of the xenon ion beam, detected by the LF (f less than 16 kHz) wideband electric field experiment and analyzed by using a sonograph, are discussed. Particular attention is given to the stimulation of the ion-cyclotron harmonic waves which are usually linked to the local proton gyro-frequency, but are sometimes related to half that frequency. It was found that in a plasma dominated by O(+) ions, a small amount (1-10%) of protons could cause an effect such that the O(+) cyclotron harmonic waves are set up by the hydrogen ions, the net result being the observation of harmonic emissions separated by the hydrogen ion gyro frequency.

  10. Cassini observations of ion cyclotron waves and ions anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.; Dols, V. J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Tokar, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    In Saturn's equatorial, inner magnetosphere, the production of fresh ions in a pick-up distribution generates ion cyclotron waves. These waves are a sensitive indicator of fresh plasma production, but the quantitative relation between wave properties and ionization rates is nontrivial. We present a combined analysis of Cassini MAG and CAPS data, from a variety of equatorial orbits between 2005 and 2012. Using the MAG data, we determine the amplitude and peak frequency of ion cyclotron waves. From the CAPS data we extract the parallel and perpendicular velocity distribution of water group ions. We compare these results with hybrid simulations of the ion cyclotron instability and relate the observed wave amplitudes and ion velocity distributions to the production rate of pickup ions. The resulting relation between wave and plasma properties will allow us to infer ion production rates even at times when no direct ion measurements are available.

  11. Parametric instabilities of parallel propagating incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nariyuki, Y.; Hada, T.; Tsubouchi, K.

    2007-12-15

    Large amplitude, low-frequency Alfven waves constitute one of the most essential elements of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the fast solar wind. Due to small collisionless dissipation rates, the waves can propagate long distances and efficiently convey such macroscopic quantities as momentum, energy, and helicity. Since loading of such quantities is completed when the waves damp away, it is important to examine how the waves can dissipate in the solar wind. Among various possible dissipation processes of the Alfven waves, parametric instabilities have been believed to be important. In this paper, we numerically discuss the parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma using a one-dimensional hybrid (superparticle ions plus an electron massless fluid) simulation, in order to explain local production of sunward propagating Alfven waves, as suggested by Helios/Ulysses observation results. Parameter studies clarify the dependence of parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves on the ion and electron beta ratio. Parametric instabilities of coherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma are vastly different from those in the cold ions (i.e., MHD and/or Hall-MHD systems), even if the collisionless damping of the Alfven waves are neglected. Further, ''nonlinearly driven'' modulational instability is important for the dissipation of incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma regardless of their polarization, since the ion kinetic effects let both the right-hand and left-hand polarized waves become unstable to the modulational instability. The present results suggest that, although the antisunward propagating dispersive Alfven waves are efficiently dissipated through the parametric instabilities in a finite ion beta plasma, these instabilities hardly produce the sunward propagating waves.

  12. Oxygen Ion Heat Rate within Alfvenic Turbulence in the Cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Singh, Nagendra; Chandler, Michael O.

    2009-01-01

    The role that the cleft/cusp has in ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling makes it a dynamic and important region. It is directly exposed to the solar wind, making it possible for the entry of electromagnetic energy and precipitating electrons and ions from dayside reconnection and other dayside events. It is also a significant source of ionospheric plasma, contributing largely to the mass loading of the magnetosphere with large fluxes of outflowing ions. Crossing the cusp/cleft near 5100 km, the Polar instruments observe the common correlation of downward Poynting flux, ion energization, soft electron precipitation, broadband extremely low-frequency (BB-ELF) emissions, and density depletions. The dominant power in the BB-ELF emissions is now identified to be from spatially broad, low frequency Alfv nic structures. For a cusp crossing, we determine using the Electric Field Investigation (EFI), that the electric and magnetic field fluctuations are Alfv nic and the electric field gradients satisfy the inequality for stochastic acceleration. With all the Polar 1996 horizontal crossings of the cusp, we determine the O+ heating rate using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI). We then compare this heating rate to other heating rates assuming the electric field gradient criteria exceeds the limit for stochastic acceleration for the remaining crossings. The comparison suggests that a stochastic acceleration mechanism is operational and the heating is controlled by the transverse spatial scale of the Alfvenic waves.

  13. Ion-cyclotron instability in magnetic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1987-02-02

    This report reviews the role of ion-cyclotron frequency instability in magnetic mirrors. The modes discussed here are loss-cone or anisotropy driven. The discussion includes quasilinear theory, explosive instabilities of 3-wave interaction and non-linear Landau damping, and saturation due to non-linear orbits. (JDH)

  14. Monte-Carlo Orbit/Full Wave Simulation of Fast Alfven Wave (FW) Damping on Resonant Ions in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Tang, V.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.

    2005-09-26

    To simulate the resonant interaction of fast Alfven wave (FW) heating and Coulomb collisions on energetic ions, including finite orbit effects, a Monte-Carlo code ORBIT-RF has been coupled with a 2D full wave code TORIC4. ORBIT-RF solves Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations to follow trajectories of test ions in 2D axisymmetric numerical magnetic equilibrium under Coulomb collisions and ion cyclotron radio frequency quasi-linear heating. Monte-Carlo operators for pitch-angle scattering and drag calculate the changes of test ions in velocity and pitch angle due to Coulomb collisions. A rf-induced random walk model describing fast ion stochastic interaction with FW reproduces quasi-linear diffusion in velocity space. FW fields and its wave numbers from TORIC are passed on to ORBIT-RF to calculate perpendicular rf kicks of resonant ions valid for arbitrary cyclotron harmonics. ORBIT-RF coupled with TORIC using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number has demonstrated consistency of simulations with recent DIII-D FW experimental results for interaction between injected neutral-beam ions and FW, including measured neutron enhancement and enhanced high energy tail. Comparison with C-Mod fundamental heating discharges also yielded reasonable agreement.

  15. EFFECTS OF ALFVEN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-06-10

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfven waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  16. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  17. Anomalous Flattening of the Fast-Ion Profile during Alfven-Eigenmode Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; White, R. B.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Austin, M. E.; Makowski, M. A.; McKee, G. R.

    2007-12-14

    Neutral-beam injection into plasmas with negative central shear produces a rich spectrum of toroidicity-induced and reversed-shear Alfven eigenmodes in the DIII-D tokamak. The first application of fast-ion D{sub {alpha}} (FIDA) spectroscopy to Alfven-eigenmode physics shows that the central fast-ion profile is anomalously flat in the inner half of the discharge. Neutron and equilibrium measurements corroborate the FIDA data. The current density driven by fast ions is also strongly modified. Calculations based on the measured mode amplitudes do not explain the observed fast-ion transport.

  18. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-09-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  19. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  20. Electrostatic electron and ion cyclotron harmonic waves in Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Kurth, W. S.; Cairns, I. H.; Gurnett, D. A.; Poynter, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    Voyager 2 observations of electrostatic electron and ion cyclotron waves detected in Neptune's magnetosphere are presented. Both types of emission appear in a frequency band above the electron and ion (proton) cyclotron frequencies, respectively, and are tightly confined to the magnetic equator occurring within a few degrees of it. The electron cyclotron modes including an intense upper hybrid resonance emission excited by an unstable loss cone distribution of low-density superthermal electrons. The ion cyclotron waves are interpreted as hydrogen Bernstein modes including an intense lower hybrid resonance emission excited by an unstable ring distribution of low-density pickup N(+) ions deriving from the satellite Triton.

  1. Electronuclear ion fusion in an ion cyclotron resonance reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    1996-12-01

    A method and apparatus for generating nuclear fusion by ion cyclotron resonance in an ion trap reactor. The reactor includes a cylindrical housing having an axial axis, an internal surface, and first and second ends. First and second end plates that are charged are respectively located at the first and second ends of the cylindrical housing. A gas layer is adsorbed on the internal surface of the cylindrical housing. Ions are desorbed from the gas layer, forming a plasma layer adjacent to the cylindrical housing that includes first ions that have a same charge sign as the first and second end plates. A uniform magnetic field is oriented along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. Second ions, that are unlike the first ions, but have the same charge sign, are injected into the cylindrical housing along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. A radio frequency field resonantly accelerates the injected second ions at the cyclotron resonance frequency of the second ions. The second ions circulate in increasing helical orbits and react with the first ions, at the optimum energy for nuclear fusion. The amplitude of the radio frequency field is adjusted to accelerate the second ions at a rate equal to the rate of tangential energy loss of the second ions by nuclear scattering in the first ions, causing the ions to continually interact until fusion occurs.

  2. Stochastic heating and acceleration of minor ions by turbulent Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Wang, B.; Yoon, P. H.; Wu, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    The heating and acceleration of ions in the solar corona and the solar wind is a longstanding topic in solar-terrestrial physics. SOHO observations show that minor heavy ions have higher perpendicular temperature anisotropy and their outflow velocities are significantly higher than that of protons in the solar corona. It is also known that heavy ions, with mass-proportional temperatures, flow faster than the protons by approximately the local Alfven speed in the fast solar wind. The present work addresses the stochastic heating of minor ions by obliquely-propagating low-frequency Alfven waves. An important characteristic of the stochastic heating is unearthed by means of test particle simulation. That is, when the wave amplitude exceeds some threshold condition for stochasticity, the quasi-asymptotic kinetic temperature associated with the minor ions becomes independent of the wave amplitude and proportional to the ion mass, and it always approaches the value dictated by the Alfven speed, to wit, Tkin≈mivA2/2. During the course of the heating process the minor ions gain a net average parallel speed, v||˜vA in the laboratory frame. The physical mechanism for the asymptotically independent heating is the pickup process that involves the formation of spherical shell velocity distribution function via the pitch-angle scattering. These results are generally consistent with observational properties of minor ions. In the corona, minor ions may be not fully picked up and just a partial shell velocity distribution is formed. Thus, the minor ion temperature is highly anisotropic, and flow faster than protons by a fraction of the local Alfven speed. On the other hand, in the interplanetary space, the fully spherical shell velocity distribution may have been nearly formed, so the minor ion temperature is proportional to their mass, and flow faster than protons by about the local Alfven speed.

  3. Ion Behavior in an Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Trap

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We recently described a new electrically compensated trap in FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and developed a means of tuning traps of this general design. Here, we describe a continuation of that research by comparing the ion transient lifetimes and the resulting mass resolving powers and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios that are achievable in the compensated vs. uncompensated modes of this trap. Transient lifetimes are ten times longer under the same conditions of pressure, providing improved mass resolving power and S/N ratios. The mass resolving power as a function of m/z is linear (log-log plot) and nearly equal to the theoretical maximum. Importantly, the ion cyclotron frequency as a function of ion number decreases linearly in accord with theory, unlike its behavior in the uncompensated mode. This linearity should lead to better control in mass calibration and increased mass accuracy than achievable in the uncompensated mode. PMID:21499521

  4. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is very well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis of modern

  5. Global Simulation of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on ring current (RC) ion and radiation belt (RB) electron dynamics strongly depend on such particle/wave characteristics as the phase-space distribution function, frequency, wave-normal angle, wave energy, and the form of wave spectral energy density. The consequence is that accurate modeling of EMIC waves and RC particles requires robust inclusion of the interdependent dynamics of wave growth/damping, wave propagation, and particles. Such a self-consistent model is being progressively developed by Khazanov et al. [2002 - 2007]. This model is based on a system of coupled kinetic equations for the RC and EMIC wave power spectral density along with the ray tracing equations. We will discuss the recent progress in understanding EMIC waves formation mechanisms in the inner magnetosphere. This problem remains unsettled in spite of many years of experimental and theoretical studies. Modern satellite observations by CRRES, Polar and Cluster still do not reveal the whole picture experimentally since they do not stay long enough in the generation region to give a full account of all the spatio-temporal structure of EMIC waves. The complete self-consistent theory taking into account all factors significant for EMIC waves generation remains to be developed. Several mechanisms are discussed with respect to formation of EMIC waves, among them are nonlinear modification of the ionospheric reflection by precipitating energetic protons, modulation of ion-cyclotron instability by long-period (Pc3/4) pulsations, reflection of waves from layers of heavy-ion gyroresonances, and nonlinearities of wave generation process. We show that each of these mechanisms have their attractive features and explains certain part experimental data but any of them, if taken alone, meets some difficulties when compared to observations. We conclude that development of a refined nonlinear theory and further correlated analysis

  6. A room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the DC-110 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A. Bogomolov, S.; Lebedev, A.; Loginov, V.; Yazvitsky, N.

    2014-02-15

    The project of the DC-110 cyclotron facility to provide applied research in the nanotechnologies (track pore membranes, surface modification of materials, etc.) has been designed by the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). The facility includes the isochronous cyclotron DC-110 for accelerating the intensive Ar, Kr, Xe ion beams with 2.5 MeV/nucleon fixed energy. The cyclotron is equipped with system of axial injection and ECR ion source DECRIS-5, operating at the frequency of 18 GHz. This article reviews the design and construction of DECRIS-5 ion source along with some initial commissioning results.

  7. Monte Carlo orbit/full wave simulation of ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave damping on resonant ions in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Chiu, S.C.; Heidbrink, W.W.

    2005-07-15

    To investigate the experimentally observed interaction between beam ion species and fast Alfven wave (FW), a Monte Carlo code, ORBIT-RF [V. S. Chan, S. C. Chiu, and Y. A. Omelchenko, Phys. Plasmas 9, 501 (2002)], which solves the time-dependent Hamiltonian guiding center drift equations, has been upgraded to incorporate a steady-state neutral beam ion slowing-down distribution, a quasilinear high harmonic radio frequency diffusion operator and the wave fields from the two-dimensional ion cyclotron resonance frequency full wave code (TORIC4) [M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, 1 (1999)]. Comparison of ORBIT-RF simulation of power absorption with fixed amplitudes of FW fields from TORIC4 power absorption calculation, which assumes Maxwellian plasma distributions, attains agreement within a factor of two. The experimentally measured enhanced neutron rate is reproduced to within 30% from ORBIT-RF simulation using a single dominant toroidal and poloidal wave number.

  8. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-05-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfvénic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate √ {n_α /n_e } driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. More recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusion devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. We discuss further prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.

  9. Ion cyclotron emission studies: Retrospects and prospects

    DOE PAGES

    Gorelenkov, N. N.

    2016-06-05

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) studies emerged in part from the papers by A.B. Mikhailovskii published in the 1970s. Among the discussed subjects were electromagnetic compressional Alfv,nic cyclotron instabilities with the linear growth rate similar ~ √(nα/ne) driven by fusion products, -particles which draw a lot of attention to energetic particle physics. The theory of ICE excited by energetic particles was significantly advanced at the end of the 20th century motivated by first DT experiments on TFTR and subsequent JET experimental studies which we highlight. Recently ICE theory was advanced by detailed theoretical and experimental studies on spherical torus (ST) fusionmore » devices where the instability signals previously indistinguishable in high aspect ratio tokamaks due to high toroidal magnetic field became the subjects of experiments. Finally, we discuss prospects of ICE theory applications for future burning plasma (BP) experiments such as those to be conducted in ITER device in France, where neutron and gamma rays escaping the plasma create extremely challenging conditions fusion alpha particle diagnostics.« less

  10. Excitation of Alfven waves by a spiraling ion beam in the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shreekrishna; van Compernolle, Bart; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Heidbrink, William; Carter, Troy

    2013-10-01

    A hydrogen ion beam (15 kV, 10 A) has been obliquely injected from the end of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) into a large magnetoplasma (n ~1012 cm-3, Te ~ 4 eV, B = 1.0 - 1.8 kG, 19 m long, 0.6 m diam) for performing fusion-relevant fast-ion studies. The beam was produced using a recently upgraded ion source that utilizes a hot-cathode LaB6 plasma source and a multi-aperture three-grid beam-extractor. Measurements of the beam profiles at multiple axial locations (up to 18 m distance from the source) have evinced a spiraling ion-beam (current-density ~ 60 mA/cm2, pitch angle in the plasma ~ 53°) that propagates with an Alfvenic speed (beam speed/Alfven speed = 0.5 - 1.2). Although the beam generates other waves, we will focus on the spontaneous generation of shear Alfven waves by the beam. To investigate the role of the resonant wave-particle interaction, an Alfven wave in the direction of the beam propagation was launched from an antenna. The ratio of beam-speed to wave phase-speed was varied. Initial results demonstrate spatial growth of the launched wave under suitable conditions for the resonant wave particle interaction. Work supported by US DOE and NSF and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, UCLA.

  11. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in a two-ion component plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszcynsky, David M.; Merlino, Robert L.; D'Angelo, Nicola

    1988-01-01

    The excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves is studied in a single-ended Q machine in a two-ion component plasma (Ca+ and K+). Over a large range of relative concentrations of Cs+ and K+ ions, two modes are excited with frequencies greater than the respective cyclotron frequencies of the ions. The results are discussed in terms of a fluid theory of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a two-ion component plasma.

  12. Fullerenes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Janossy, A.; Palinkas, J.

    2006-03-15

    Fullerene plasmas and beams have been produced in our electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) originally designed for other purposes. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a traditional ion source with solenoid mirror coils to generate highly charged ions. The variable frequencies NIRS-KEI-1 and NIRS-KEI-2 are ECR ion sources built from permanent magnets and specialized for the production of carbon beams. The paper summarizes the experiments and results obtained by these facilities with fullerenes. Continuous effort has been made to get the highest C{sub 60} beam intensities. Surprisingly, the best result was obtained by moving the C{sub 60} oven deep inside the plasma chamber, very close to the resonance zone. Record intensity singly and doubly charged fullerene beams were obtained (600 and 1600 nA, respectively) at lower C{sub 60} material consumption. Fullerene derivatives were also produced. We mixed fullerenes with other plasmas (N, Fe) with the aim of making new materials. Nitrogen encapsulated fullerenes (mass: 720+14=734) were successfully produced. In the case of iron, two methods (ferrocene, oven) were tested. Molecules with mass of 720+56=776 were detected in the extracted beam spectra.

  13. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F.W.; Murakami, M.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Smirnov, A.P.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2005-09-26

    The absorption of fast Alfven waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from fourth to eighth is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on Maxwellian ion species is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the eighth harmonic if the fast ion beta and the background plasma density are both high enough. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  14. Electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron instability - Theory and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Omidi, N.

    1992-01-01

    Linear theory and 1D and 2D hybrid simulations are employed to study electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron (EMIIC) instability driven by the relative streaming of two field-aligned ion beams. The characteristics of the instability are studied as a function of beam density, propagation angle, electron-ion temperature ratios, and ion beta. When the propagation angle is near 90 deg the EMIIC instability has the characteristics of an electrostatic instability, while at smaller angles electromagnetic effects play a significant role as does strong beam coupling. The 2D simulations point to a narrowing of the wave spectrum and accompanying coherent effects during the linear growth stage of development. The EMIIC instability is an important effect where ion beta is low such as in the plasma-sheet boundary layer and upstream of slow shocks in the magnetotail.

  15. Folded waveguide coupler for ion cyclotron heating

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, T.L.; Chen, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of waveguide coupler for plasma heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is described. The coupler consists of a series of interleaved metallic vanes within a rectangular enclosure analogous to a wide rectangular waveguide that has been ''folded'' several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a plate is attached which contains coupling apertures in each fold or every other fold of the waveguide, depending upon the wavenumber spectrum desired. This plate serves primarily as a wave field polarizer that converts coupler fields to the polarization of the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma. Theoretical estimates indicate that the folded waveguide is capable of high-efficiency, multimegawatt operation into a plasma. Bench tests have verified the predicted field structure within the waveguide in preparation for high-power tests on the Radio Frequency Test Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  16. Small amplitude Kinetic Alfven waves in a superthermal electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Mahmood, Sahahzad; Qamar, Anisa; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-11-01

    We are investigating the propagating properties of coupled Kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves in a low beta plasma having superthermal electrons and positrons. Using the standard reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) type equation is derived which describes the evolution of Kinetic Alfven waves. It is found that nonlinearity and Larmor radius effects can compromise and give rise to solitary structures. The parametric role of superthermality and positron content on the characteristics of solitary wave structures is also investigated. It is found that only sub-Alfvenic and compressive solitons are supported in the present model. The present study may find applications in a low β electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons and positrons.

  17. Differential turbulent heating of different ions in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Elizarov, L.I.; Ivanov, A.A.; Serebrennikov, K.S.; Vostrikova, E.A.

    2006-03-15

    The article considers the collisionless ion sound turbulent heating of different ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The ion sound arises due to parametric instability of pumping wave propagating along the magnetic field with the frequency close to that of electron cyclotron. Within the framework of turbulent heating model the different ions temperatures are calculated in gas-mixing ECRIS plasma.

  18. Energization of ionospheric ions by electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Interactions between ionospheric ions and electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves are studied numerically in an investigation of a possible mechanism for the energization of the low-energy ionospheric ions flowing along geomagnetic field lines to high altitudes. Ion equations of motion are solved numerically for a given number of O(+), He(+) and He(2+) ions initially in a Maxwellian distribution. All the ions considered are found capable of undergoing stochastic acceleration by a coherent electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron wave with parameters typical of the auroral plasma above 1 earth radius. The fraction of the initial ion population undergoing heating depends strongly on the mass, charge and initial temperature of the ion species, with O(+) ions only heated when their initial temperature is approximately greater than the hydrogen temperature and the lighter ions able to be heated even when cold, due to cyclotron resonant stochastic heating.

  19. Excitation of ion-acoustic perturbations by incoherent kinetic Alfven waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, J. T.; Shukla, P. K.

    2007-12-15

    The dispersion relation for ion-acoustic perturbations (IAPs) in the presence of incoherent kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) in plasmas is derived. The wave-kinetic-approach is used to study the nonlinear interactions between an ensemble of random phase KAWs and IAPs. It is found that incoherent KAW spectrum is unstable against IAPs. The instability growth rates for particular cases are obtained. The present instability offers the possibility of heating ions in a turbulent magnetoplasma composed of incoherent KAWs.

  20. Suppression of cyclotron instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources by two-frequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-08-15

    Multiple frequency heating is one of the most effective techniques to improve the performance of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources. The method increases the beam current and average charge state of the extracted ions and enhances the temporal stability of the ion beams. It is demonstrated in this paper that the stabilizing effect of two-frequency heating is connected with the suppression of electron cyclotron instability. Experimental data show that the interaction between the secondary microwave radiation and the hot electron component of ECR ion source plasmas plays a crucial role in mitigation of the instabilities.

  1. Drift-Alfven turbulence of a parallel shearing flow of the finite beta plasma with warm ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-09-01

    It was predicted [Mikhailenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 020701 (2016)] that two distinct drift-Alfven instabilities may be developed in the parallel shearing flow of finite beta plasmas ( 1 ≫β≫me/mi ) with comparable ion and electron temperatures. The first one is the shear-flow-modified drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping and exists in the shearless plasma as well. The second one is the shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the combined effect of the velocity shear and ion Landau damping and is absent in the shearless plasma flows. In the present paper, these drift-Alfven instabilities are examined numerically and analytically by including the electromagnetic response of the ions. The levels of the drift-Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of ion scattering by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same nonlinear effect of ion scattering, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating resulting from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence.

  2. Nonresonant interaction of heavy ions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, J.; Gendrin, R.

    1985-01-01

    The motion of a heavy ion in the presence of an intense ultralow-frequency electromagnetic wave propagating along the dc magnetic field is analyzed. Starting from the basic equations of motion and from their associated two invariants, the heavy ion velocity-space trajectories are drawn. It is shown that after a certain time, particles whose initial phase angles are randomly distributed tend to bunch together, provided that the wave intensity b-sub-1 is sufficiently large. The importance of these results for the interpretation of the recently observed acceleration of singly charged He ions in conjunction with the occurrence of large-amplitude ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere is discussed.

  3. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, XianLu Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-15

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H− ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H− ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H− ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H− beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  4. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, XianLu; Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-01

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H- ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H- ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H- ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H- beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  5. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Helium Branch Induced by Multiple Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Triggered Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Omura, Y.; Grison, B.; Pickett, J. S.; Dandouras, I. S.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions with rising tones between the H+ and He+ cyclotron frequencies were found in the inner magnetosphere by the recent Cluster observations. Another type of EMIC wave with a constant frequency is occasionally observed below the He+ cyclotron frequency after the multiple EMIC triggered emissions. We performed a self-consistent hybrid simulation with a one-dimensional cylindrical magnetic flux model approximating the dipole magnetic field of the Earth's inner magnetosphere. In the presence of energetic protons with a sufficient density and temperature anisotropy, multiple EMIC triggered emissions are reproduced due to the nonlinear wave growth mechanism of rising-tone chorus emissions, and a constant frequency wave in the He+ EMIC branch is subsequently generated. Through interaction with the multiple EMIC rising-tone emissions, the velocity distribution function of the energetic protons is strongly modified. Because of the pitch angle scattering of the protons, the gradient of the distribution in velocity phase space is enhanced along the diffusion curve of the He+ branch wave, resulting in the linear growth of the EMIC wave in the He+ branch.

  6. Modelling of Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douai, D.; Wauters, T.; Lyssoivan, A.; Marchuk, O.; Wünderlich, D.; Brémond, S.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P.; Pegourié, B.; Van Oost, G.

    2011-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) is envisioned in ITER to clean the wall from impurities, to control the wall isotopic ratio and the hydrogen recycling in the presence of the toroidal magnetic field. Various experiments and modelling are advancing to consolidate this technique. In this contribution the modeling of ICWC is presented, which can be divided in two parts: plasma description and plasma wall interaction. Firstly a 0D plasma model, based on a set of energy and particle balance equations for Maxwellian Hydrogen and Helium species, is presented. The model takes into account elementary collision processes, coupled RF power, particle confinement, wall recycling, and active gas injection and pumping. The RF plasma production process is based mainly on electron collisional ionization. The dependency of the plasma parameters, the Hydrogen and Helium partial pressures and neutral or ionic fluxes on pressure and RF power are quantitatively in good agreement with those obtained experimentally on TORE SUPRA. Secondly an extension of the 0D model including the description of the wall interaction is presented and compared to TORE SUPRA multi-pulse ICWC discharges.

  7. Particle simulation of Alfven waves excited at a boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, F.S.; Tonge, J.W.; Morales, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) code has been developed that is capable of describing the propagation of compressional and shear Alfven waves excited from a boundary. The code is used to elucidate the properties of Alfven wave cones radiated from sources having transverse scale comparable to the electron skin depth. Good agreement between theoretical predictions and simulation results is found over a wide range of frequencies. An investigation has been undertaken of the effect of hot ions on the Alfven wave cones. The PIC simulations demonstrate that as the ion temperature is increased there is a reversal in the cone angle. The reversal implies that there is a cross-field focusing of the shear Alfven waves. This is a feature which is presently being considered in studies of field-line resonances in the earth's magnetic field. The PIC results also illustrate the damping of shear modes due to the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with hot ions.

  8. Ion Cyclotron Waves at Titan: Harbingers of Atmospheric Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Neubauer, F.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-04-01

    When a flowing magnetized plasma intercepts a neutral atmosphere such as Titan's exosphere, we expect that any atoms or molecules that become ionized by photoionization impact ionization or charge exchange could lead to the acceleration and pick-up of those newly formed ions. This process creates an ion distribution function that often is highly unstable to the production of ion-cyclotron waves. Such waves have been observed in the Earth's polar cusp [1], at the Moon [2], at Mars [3], at Io [4], and at Enceladus [5]. We had expected also to observe these waves at Titan but neither the Voyager Titan passage nor the early Cassini Titan flybys produced ion-cyclotron waves. Modelling studies have suggested that the growth time is long and the waves will not grow until some distance far downstream. However, on two passes by Titan T63 and T98, ion cyclotron waves have been seen with the T98 wave field having been much more pronounced. Figure 1 below shows the transverse and compressional power as dynamic spectra versus time on the T98 inbound pass to Titan. The ion cyclotron waves clearly arise at the expected frequency just below the piston cyclotron frequency. It is remarkable that no such waves are seen outbound at T98.This is in agreement with the initial trajectories of newborn ions which lead away from the dense deeper atmosphere inbound and into the dense deeper atmosphere outbound. On the T63 pass, a short period of waves was seen near the proton and H2+ cyclotron frequencies. We discuss these rare ion cyclotron waves at Titan in the light of hybrid simulations of ion pickup under conditions in Saturn's outer magnetosphere.

  9. Probing the hydrogen exosphere of Mars with ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-09-01

    Ion cyclotron waves are generated during the interaction between the solar wind and the Martian exosphere. When the atmospheric neutrals are ionized in the solar wind, the fresh ions are accelerated by the electric field and gyrate around the magnetic field in the solar wind, in a process called ion pick-up. As the ions gyrate, ion cyclotron waves grow from the free energy of the highly anisotropic distribution of these fresh ions, with left-handed polarization and a wave frequency near the ion's gyro-frequency. Observations of the ion cyclotron waves enable us to study the atmospheric loss due to solar wind pick-up process. At Mars, the exospheric hydrogen is picked up by the solar wind and produces proton cyclotron waves. The Mars Global Surveyor detected proton cyclotron waves which extend from the magnetosheath of Mars to over 12 Mars radii with amplitudes that vary slowly with distance. A hybrid simulation is applied to study the wave generation and evolution due to solar wind pick-up to try to understand the relation between the wave energy and pickup rate. By comparing the wave observations and the hybrid simulation results, we hope to better understand the hydrogen exosphere configuration and the loss of water from Mars.

  10. Ion cyclotron waves around Mars: observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Cowee, M. M.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-04-01

    Ion cyclotron waves are generated during the interaction between the solar wind and the Martian exosphere. When the atmospheric neutrals are ionized in the solar wind, the fresh ions are accelerated by the electric field and gyrate around the magnetic field in the solar wind, in a process called ion pick-up. In the meanwhile, ion cyclotron waves grow from the free energy of the largely anisotropic distribution of these fresh ions, with left-handed polarization and a wave frequency near the ion's gyrofrequency. Observations of the ion cyclotron waves enable us to study the atmospheric loss due to solar wind pick-up process. At Mars, the exospheric hydrogen is picked up by the solar wind and produces proton cyclotron waves. The Mars Global Surveyor detected proton cyclotron waves which extend from the magnetosheath of Mars to over 12 Mars radii with amplitudes that vary slowly with distance. A hybrid simulation is applied to study the wave generation and evolution due to solar wind pick-up to try to understand the relation between the wave energy and pickup rate. By comparing the wave observations and the hybrid simulation results, we hope better understand the hydrogen exosphere configuration and the loss of water from Mars.

  11. A laboratory study of collisional electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Cartier, S. L.; Merlino, R. L.; Dangelo, N.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of neutral-particle collisions on electrostatic ion cyclotron instability are analyzed. Experiments were conducted in the Q machine of Motley (1975) with a cesium plasma in which the neutral gas pressure in the main chamber varied from about 5 microtorr-10 mtorr. The relation between electrostatic ion cyclotron wave amplitude and frequency and neutral argon pressure is examined. It is observed that over the full range of neutral pressure the frequency changes by less than 10 percent and the ion cyclotron waves continue to be excited and reach amplitudes of at least several percent at values of the neutral pressure where the ion-neutral collision frequency/ion gyrofrequency is about 0.3.

  12. Particle-in-cell simulations of the excitation mechanism for fusion-product-driven ion cyclotron emission from tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Cook, James; Chapman, Sandra

    2009-11-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) was the first collective radiative instability, driven by fusion products, observed on JET and TFTR. Strong emission occurs at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population at the outer mid-plane. Its intensity scales linearly with fusion reactivity, including its time evolution during a discharge. The emission mechanism is probably the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI), involving resonance between: fast Alfv'en waves; cyclotron harmonic waves supported by the energetic particle population and by the background thermal plasma; and a subset of the centrally born fusion products, just inside the trapped-passing boundary, whose drift orbits make large radial excursions. The linear growth rate of the MCI has been intensively studied analytically, and yields good agreement with several key observational features of ICE. To address outstanding issues in the nonlinear ICE regime, we have developed a particle-in-cell code which self-consistently evolves electron and multi-species ion macroparticles and the electromagnetic field. We focus on the growth rate of the MCI, as it evolves from the linear into the nonlinear regime for JET-like parameters.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Waves Driven by Plasma Currents Generated by Low-Frequency Alfven Waves in a Multi-Ion Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George

    2004-01-01

    When multi-ion plasma consisting of heavy and light ions is permeated by a low-frequency Alfven (LFA) wave, the crossed-electric-and-magnetic field (E x B), and the polarization drifts of the different ion species and the electrons could be quite different. The relative drifts between the charged-particle species drive waves, which energize the plasma. Using 2.5-dimensional (2.5-D) particle-in-cell simulations, we study this process of wave generation and its nonlinear consequences in terms of acceleration and heating plasma. Specifically, we study the situation for LFA wave frequency being lower than the heavy-ion cyclotron frequency in a multi-ion plasma. We impose such a wave to the plasma assuming that its wavelength is much larger than that of the waves generated by the relative drifts. For better understanding, the LFA-wave driven simulations are augmented by those driven by initialized ion beams. The driven high-frequency (HF) wave modes critically depend on the heavy ion density nh; for small values of nh, the lower hybrid (LH) waves dominate. On the other hand, for large nh a significantly enhanced level of waves occurs over a much broader frequency spectrum below the LH frequency and such waves are interpreted here as the ion Bernstein (IB) mode near the light ion cyclotron harmonics. Irrespective of the driven wave modes, both the light and heavy ions undergo significant transverse acceleration, but for the large heavy-ion densities, even the electrons are significantly accelerated in the parallel direction by the waves below the LH frequency. Even when the LFA wave drive is maintained, the ion heating leads to the cessation of HF wave excitation just after a few cycles of the former wave. On the basis of marginal stability seen in the simulations, an empirical relation for LFA wave amplitude, frequency and ion temperature is given.

  14. Effects of ion-neutral collisions on Alfven waves: The presence of forbidden zone and heavy damping zone

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, C. J.; Lee, L. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Wang, C. B.

    2013-03-15

    Alfven waves are low-frequency transverse waves propagating in a magnetized plasma. We define the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0} as {omega}{sub 0}=kV{sub A}cos{theta}, where k is the wave number, V{sub A} is the Alfven speed, and {theta} is the angle between the wave vector and the ambient magnetic field. There are partially ionized plasmas in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasma systems, such as in the solar chromosphere, interstellar clouds, and the earth ionosphere. The presence of neutral particles may modify the wave frequency and cause damping of Alfven waves. The effects on Alfven waves depend on two parameters: (1) {alpha}=n{sub n}/n{sub i}, the ratio of neutral density (n{sub n}), and ion density (n{sub i}); (2) {beta}={nu}{sub ni}/{omega}{sub 0}, the ratio of neutral collisional frequency by ions {nu}{sub ni} to the Alfven frequency {omega}{sub 0}. Most of the previous studies examined only the limiting case with a relatively large neutral collisional frequency or {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1. In the present paper, the dispersion relation for Alfven waves is solved for all values of {alpha} and {beta}. Approximate solutions in the limit {beta} Much-Greater-Than 1 as well as {beta} Much-Less-Than 1 are obtained. It is found for the first time that there is a 'forbidden zone (FZ)' in the {alpha}-{beta} parameter space, where the real frequency of Alfven waves becomes zero. We also solve the wavenumber k from the dispersion equation for a fixed frequency and find the existence of a 'heavy damping zone (HDZ).' We then examine the presence of FZ and HDZ for Alfven waves in the ionosphere and in the solar chromosphere.

  15. Dissipation of Alfven Waves via Generation of High-Frequency Electrostatic Waves and Transverse Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhter, A.; Singh, N.; Khazanov, G.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite observations in the auroral plasma have revealed that extremely low frequency (ELF) waves play a dominant role in the acceleration of electrons and ions in the auroral plasma. The electromagnetic components of the ELF (EMELF) waves are the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves below the cyclotron frequency of the lightest ion species in a multi-ion plasma. Shear Alfvén waves (SAWs) constitute the lowest frequency components of the ELF waves below the ion cyclotron frequency of the heaviest ion. The mechanism for the transfer of energy from such EMELF waves to ions affecting transverse ion heating still remains a matter of debate. A very ubiquitous feature of ELF waves now observed in several rocket and satellite experiments is that they occur in conjunction with high-frequency electrostatic waves. The frequency spectrum of the composite wave turbulence extends from the low frequency of the Alfvénic waves to the high frequency of proton plasma frequency and/or the lower hybrid frequency. The spectrum does not show any feature organized by the ion cyclotron frequencies and their harmonics. Such broadband waves consisting of both the EM and ES waves are now popularly referred as BBELF waves. We present results here from 2.5-D particle-in- cell simulations showing that the ES components are directly generated by cross-field plasma instabilities driven by the drifts of the ions and electrons in the EM component of the BBELF waves. We also demonstrate that the ES wave generation is directly involved in the transverse acceleration of ions (TAI) as commonly measured with the BBELF wave events. In the simulation we drive the plasma by the transverse electric field, Ey, of the EM waves; the frequency of Ey is varied from a frequency below the heavy ion cyclotron frequency to below the light ion cyclotron frequency. We have also performed simulations for Ey having a continuous spectrum given by a power law with different spectral indexes. The driving electric

  16. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  17. Simultaneous observations of electrostatic oxygen cyclotron waves and ion conics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Scales, W.; Vago, J.; Arnoldy, R.; Garbe, G.; Moore, T.

    1989-01-01

    A sounding rocket launched to 927 km apogee during an auroral substorm encountered regions of large quasi-static electric fields (not greater than 400 mV/m), ion conics (up to 700 eV maximum observed energy), and fluctuating electric fields near the oxygen cyclotron frequency. Since the fluctuating electric fields frequently exhibited spectral peaks just above the local oxygen cyclotron frequency, and since the fluctuating electric fields were linearly polarized, they are positively identified as electrostatic oxygen cyclotron waves (EOCW). The maximum amplitude of the EOCW was about 5 mV/m rms. The EOCW closely correlated with the presence of ion conics. Because of the relatively low amplitude of the EOCW and their relatively low coherence, it cannot be concluded that they are solely responsible for the production of the ion conics.

  18. Heavy-ion injection from tandems into an isochronous cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    LeVine, M.J.; Chasman, C.

    1981-01-01

    A design has been realized for the injection of heavy ion beams generated by the BNL 3-stage tandem facility into a proposed isochronous cyclotron. The tandem beams are bunched into +- 1/sup 0/ R.F. phase (less than or equal to 0.5 nsec) in two stages. The beam is then injected into the cyclotron through a valley, past a hill, and into the next valley on to a stripper foil. Only a single steerer is required to make trajectory corrections for the different beams. Two achromats are used to regulate the tandem potential and to provide phase control. A final section of the injection optics provides matching of transverse phase space to the acceptance of the cyclotron. The calculations use realistic tandem emittances and magnetic fields for the cyclotron based on measurements with a model magnet.

  19. High intensity ion beam injection into the 88-inch cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Wutte, Daniela; Clark, Dave J.; Laune, Bernard; Leitner,Matthaeus A.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    2000-05-31

    Low cross section experiments to produce super-heavyelements have increased the demand for high intensity heavy ion beams atenergies of about 5 MeV/nucleon at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory. Therefore, efforts are underway to increasethe overall ion beam transmission through the axial injection line andthe cyclotron. The ion beam emittance has been measured for various ionmasses and charge states. Beam transport simulations including spacecharge effects were performed for both of the injection line and the ionsource extraction. The relatively low nominal injection voltage of 10 kVwas found to be the main factor for ion beam losses, because of beam blowup due to space charge forces at higher intensities. Consequently,experiments and simulations have been performed at higherinjectionenergies, and it was demonstrated that the ion beams could still becentered in the cyclotron at these energies. Therefore, the new injectorion source VENUS and its ion beam transport system (currently underconstruction at the 88-Inch Cyclotron) are designed for extractionvoltages up to 30 kV.

  20. Numerical model of electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Bondarchenko, A.; Efremov, A.; Loginov, V.

    2015-12-01

    Important features of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) operation are accurately reproduced with a numerical code. The code uses the particle-in-cell technique to model the dynamics of ions in ECRIS plasma. It is shown that a gas dynamical ion confinement mechanism is sufficient to provide the ion production rates in ECRIS close to the experimentally observed values. Extracted ion currents are calculated and compared to the experiment for a few sources. Changes in the simulated extracted ion currents are obtained with varying the gas flow into the source chamber and the microwave power. Empirical scaling laws for ECRIS design are studied and the underlying physical effects are discussed.

  1. Development of a high current H(-) ion source for cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Etoh, H; Aoki, Y; Mitsubori, H; Arakawa, Y; Mitsumoto, T; Yajima, S; Sakuraba, J; Kato, T; Okumura, Y

    2014-02-01

    A multi-cusp DC H(-) ion source has been designed and fabricated for medical applications of cyclotrons. Optimization of the ion source is in progress, such as the improvement of the filament configuration, magnetic filter strength, extraction electrode's shape, configuration of electron suppression magnets, and plasma electrode material. A small quantity of Cs has been introduced into the ion source to enhance the negative ion beam current. The ion source produced 16 mA of DC H(-) ion beam with the Cs-seeded operation at a low arc discharge power of 2.8 kW.

  2. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  3. Excitation of Alfven eigenmodes by low energy beam ions in the DIII-D and JET tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Budny, R. V.; Fu, G. Y.; Kramer, G. J.; Solomon, W. M.; White, R. B.; Alper, B.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Borba, D.; Makowski, M. A.; Strait, E. J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    Core localized Alfven eigenmodes in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] plasmas are driven by deuterium neutral beam ions traveling well below the Alfven speed. Modes are observed in reverse magnetic shear discharges with deuterium ion velocities as low as 0.23 and 0.16 of the Alfven speed parallel to the magnetic field in DIII-D and JET plasmas, respectively. Ellipticity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in DIII-D and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in JET are excited by deuterium ions traveling well below the fundamental passing ion resonance condition, indicating the role of high-order resonances in driving these modes. NOVA-K analysis reveals many high-order resonances as contributing to the mode drive at high central safety factor due to the correspondingly large poloidal orbit width and the decrease in the perpendicular scale length of the modes.

  4. Linear analysis of ion cyclotron interaction in a multicomponent plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendrin, R.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Omura, Y.; Quest, K.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism by which hot anisotropic protons generate electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in a plasma containing cold H(+) and He(+) ions is quantitatively studied. Linear growth rates (both temporal and spatial) are computed for different plasma parameters: concentration, temperature,and anisotropy of cold He(+) ions and of hot protons. It is shown that: (1) for parameters typical of the geostationary altitude the maximum growth rates are not drastically changed when a small proportion (about 1 to 20 percent) of cold He(+) ions is present; (2) because of the important cyclotron absorption by thermal He(+) ions in the vicinity of the He(+) gyrofrequency, waves which could resonate with the bulk of the He(+) distribution cannot be generated. Therefore quasi-linear effects, in a homogeneous medium at least, cannot be responsible for the heating of He(+) ions which is often observed in conjunction with ion cyclotron waves. The variation of growth rate versus wave number is also studied for its importance in selecting suitable parameters in numerical simulation experiments.

  5. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  6. Relationship Between Alfvenic Fluctuations and Heavy Ion Heating in the Cusp at 1 Re

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Singh, Nagendra

    2008-01-01

    We look at the effect of heavy ion heating from their coupling with observed broadband (BB-ELF) emissions. These wave fluctuations are common to many regions of the ionosphere and magnetosphere and have been described as spatial turbulence of dispersive Alfven waves (DAW) with short perpendicular wavelengths. With Polar passing through the cusp at 1 Re in the Spring of 1996, we show the correlation of their wave power with mass-resolved O+ derived heating rates. This relationship lead to the study of the coupling of the thermal O+ ions and these bursty electric fields. We demonstrate the role of these measurements in the suggestion of DAW and stochastic ion heating and the observed density cavity characteristics.

  7. Alfven waves, alpha particles, and pickup ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    Past studies of the properties of Alfven waves in the solar wind have indicated that (1) the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations is almost always smaller than expected on the basis of the amplitude of the field fluctuations, even when the anisotropy of the plasma is taken into account, and (2) the alpha particles do not participate in the wave motions because they 'surf' on the waves carried by the proton fluid. Ulysses data are used to demonstrate that (1) the discrepancy between the velocity and field fluctuations is greater at high heliographic latitudes than in the ecliptic plane, and (2) the alphas do participate in the waves, being either in phase or out of phase with the proton motions depending on whether the differential flow speed between the alphas and protons is greater than or less than the 'observed' wave speed, B(sub o)(delta v squared / delta B squared)exp 1/2, as determined from the ratio of the amplitudes of the velocity and magnetic fluctuations. It is proposed that the modification of Alfven wave propagation speed is due to pressure anisotropies resulting from asymmetric distributions of interstellar pickup ions. If the proposed explanation is correct, it indicates that scattering of pickup ions onto a (bi)spherical shell may not be as complete as generally supposed.

  8. Dispersion characteristics of kinetic Alfven waves in a multi-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Chandu; Jayapal, R.; Sreekala, G.; Jose, Blesson; Savithri Devi, E.; Antony, S.

    2014-06-01

    The stability of the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) has been studied in a plasma composed of electrons, hydrogen and positively and negatively charged oxygen ions. Using the two potential theory of Hasegawa, we have derived an expression for the frequency and growth/damping rate of the KAW. The dispersion relation derived in this paper is a generalization of the dispersion relation of Hasegawa on two counts: (i) we use a more generalized distribution function and show that our relation reduces to the dispersion relation of Hasegawa in the limiting case, and (ii) it is applicable to a multi-ion plasma containing lighter ions and positively and negatively charged heavier ions. We find the growth rate of the wave increases with increasing drift velocities of the electrons. Negatively charged oxygen ions (O-) decrease the growth rate; however, the growth rate is very sensitively dependent on O- ion density, especially when its density is greater than that of the positively charged oxygen ions (O+). Interestingly, the dispersion characteristics of KAWs can be made insensitive to the presence of the heavier ions by an appropriate choice of their densities and temperatures.

  9. Characteristics of Short Wavelength Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E D; Podesta, M; Bortolon, A; Crocker, N A; Gerhardt, S P; Bell, R E; Diallo, A; LeBlanc, B; Levinton, F M

    2012-12-19

    Most Alfvenic activity in the frequency range between Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes and roughly one half of the ion cyclotron frequency on NSTX [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557], that is, approximately 0.3 MHz up to ≈ 1.2 MHz, are modes propagating counter to the neutral beam ions. These have been modeled as Compressional and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE and GAE) and are excited through a Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with the beam ions. There is also a class of co-propagating modes at higher frequency than the counter-propagating CAE and GAE. These modes have been identified as CAE, and are seen mostly in the company of a low frequency, n=1 kink-like mode. In this paper we present measurements of the spectrum of these high frequency CAE (hfCAE), and their mode structure. We compare those measurements to a simple model of CAE and present evidence of a curious non-linear coupling of the hfCAE and the low frequency kink-like mode.

  10. Multi-ion, multi-event test of ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, Ann M.

    1993-01-01

    The multi-ion, multi-event study of ion cyclotron resonance heating has been funded to study ion energization through ion cyclotron resonance with low frequency broadband electromagnetic turbulence. The modeling algorithm for the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of oxygen ions was presented in Crew et al. (1990). Crew and his co-authors developed a two-parameter representation of selected oxygen conic distributions and modelled the conic formation in terms of resonance heating. The first year of this study seeks to extend the work of Crew and his co-authors by testing the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to helium ion conic distributions, using data obtained from the Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer and the Plasma Wave Instrument on Dynamics Explorer 1.

  11. The multi-ion, multi-event test of ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, Ann M.

    1993-01-01

    The multi-ion, multi-event study of ion cyclotron resonance heating was funded to study ion energization through ion cyclotron resonance with low frequency broadband electromagnetic turbulence. The initial work on the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of oxygen ions was presented in Crew et al. Crew and his co-authors developed a two-parameter representation of selected oxygen conic distributions and modeled the conic formation in terms of resonance heating. The first year seeks to extend the work of Crew and his co-authors by testing the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to helium ion conic distributions, using data obtained from the Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer and the Plasma Wave Instrument on Dynamics Explorer 1.

  12. Dispersion characteristics of kinetic Alfven waves in a multi-ion cometary plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayapal, R.; Abraham, Noble P.; Blesson, Jose; Antony, S.; Anilkumar, C. P.; Venugopal, Chandu

    We have studied the stability of the kinetic Alfven wave in a plasma composed of hydrogen and positively and negatively charged oxygen ions and electrons which approximates very well the plasma environment around comet Halley. In the direction parallel to the magnetic field, the electrons have been modelled by a drifting Maxwellian distribution. In the perpendicular direction, another ring simulated by a loss cone type distribution, obtained by subtracting two Maxwellians with different temperatures, model all the constituents of the plasma. The dispersion relation derived for KAWs is a generalisation of the pioneering dispersion relation of Hasegawa on two counts: it has been extended to a plasma described by a generalised distribution function and to a multi - ion plasma containing positively and negatively charged ions. We find that the dispersion characteristics of the KAW can be made independent of the heavy ion parameters by an appropriate choice of densities and temperatures. The source of free energy for the instability is the drift velocity of the electrons; the growth rate increases with increasing drift velocity of the electrons. The positively charged heavier ions enhance the instability while the negatively charged heavier ions tend to damp the wave.

  13. Heating by waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main aspects of heating with the fast wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are reviewed. First, the ion cyclotron resonance mechanism, fundamental and harmonics, is examined. Then the properties of fast wave dispersion are reviewed, and the principles of minority and higher cylcotron harmonic heating are discussed. An elementary coupling model is worked out in order to outline the computation of the electrical properties of ICRF antennas. Using the simple model, the antenna radiation pattern inside the plasma is computed and the effect of phasing on the k spectrum and on the antenna radiation properties is illustrated. The quasi linear-Fokker-Planck computation of the deformation of distribution functions due to Radio-Frequency (RF) and tail formation are briefly discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in magnetospheric plasmas Nonlocal aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of the effect of the magnetic shear and the finite size of current channel on the electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability for the space plasmas is illustrated. A non-local treatment is used. When the channel width Lc, is larger than the shear length Ls, there is a large reduction in the growth rate along with a noteworthy reduction of the band of the unstable perpendicular wavelengths. For Lc less than or = Ls/10 the growth rate is not much altered from its local value, however for Lc/pi i less than or = 10 to the second power the growth rate starts falling below the local value and vanishes for Lc pi i. The non-local effects lead to enhanced coherence in the ion cyclotron waves. Previously announced in STAR as N84-14917

  15. Design options for an ITER ion cyclotron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, D. W.; Baity, F. W.; Bigelow, T. S.; Ryan, P. M.; Goulding, R. H.; Carter, M. D.; Stallings, D. C.; Batchelor, D. B.; Hoffman, D. J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent changes have occurred in the design requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron system, requiring in-port launchers in four main horizontal ports to deliver 50 MW of power to the plasma. The design is complicated by the comparatively large antenna-separatrix distance of 10-20 cm. Designs of a conventional strap launcher and a folded waveguide launcher that can meet the new requirements are presented.

  16. Linear and nonlinear physics of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability of fusion-born ions in relation to ion cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajal, L. Cook, J. W. S.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.

    2014-01-15

    The magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI) probably underlies observations of ion cyclotron emission (ICE) from energetic ion populations in tokamak plasmas, including fusion-born alpha-particles in JET and TFTR [Dendy et al., Nucl. Fusion 35, 1733 (1995)]. ICE is a potential diagnostic for lost alpha-particles in ITER; furthermore, the MCI is representative of a class of collective instabilities, which may result in the partial channelling of the free energy of energetic ions into radiation, and away from collisional heating of the plasma. Deep understanding of the MCI is thus of substantial practical interest for fusion, and the hybrid approximation for the plasma, where ions are treated as particles and electrons as a neutralising massless fluid, offers an attractive way forward. The hybrid simulations presented here access MCI physics that arises on timescales longer than can be addressed by fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations and by analytical linear theory, which the present simulations largely corroborate. Our results go further than previous studies by entering into the nonlinear stage of the MCI, which shows novel features. These include stronger drive at low cyclotron harmonics, the re-energisation of the alpha-particle population, self-modulation of the phase shift between the electrostatic and electromagnetic components, and coupling between low and high frequency modes of the excited electromagnetic field.

  17. Electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in a nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, S. L.; Dangelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves excited in a single-ended cesium Q machine with a nonuniform magnetic field are described. The electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves are generated in the usual manner by drawing an electron current to a small exciter disk immersed in the plasma column. The parallel and perpendicular (to B) wavelengths and phase velocities are determined by mapping out two-dimensional wave phase contours. The wave frequency f depends on the location of the exciter disk in the nonuniform magnetic field, and propagating waves are only observed in the region where f is approximately greater than fci, where fci is the local ion-cyclotron frequency. The parallel phase velocity is in the direction of the electron drift. From measurements of the plasma properties along the axis, it is inferred that the electron drift velocity is not uniform along the entire current channel. The evidence suggests that the waves begin being excited at that axial position where the critical drift velocity is first exceeded, consistent with a current-driven excitation mechanism.

  18. Apparent electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in the diffuse aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    Emissions that have properties consistent with electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been observed at low altitude in the diffuse aurora by a sounding rocket payload. Peaks were observed in the power spectrum of the electric field near the hydrogen and oxygen ion cyclotron frequencies. Doppler shift and polarization analyses have been performed using EIC wave parameters derived from linear theory. Both analyses indicated that these emissions had properties consistent with those expected for H(+) and O(+) EIC waves. The two analyses indicated that both emission bands were due to waves propagating eastward parallel to the poleward boundary of the diffuse aurora. The large local cold plasma density and resulting Landau damping require that the source be local. Magnetometer data indicated the presence of a downward parallel current density of 5 microamps/sq m. Sufficient free energy for the waves was available from this current, although the waves were observed frequently at altitudes where the ion-neutral collision frequency exceeded the oxygen cyclotron frequency.

  19. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  20. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Cavallo, A.; Cohen, S.; Colestock, P.; Greene, G.; Hammett, G.; Hinnov, E.; Hosea, J.

    1985-03-01

    Results from ICRF heating experiments in the D-/sup 3/He minority regime on the PLT tokamak are reported. At the highest coupled rf power of 2.6 MW, a central ion temperature of 3.6 keV has been measured in plasmas with a central density of 5 x 10/sup 13/cm/sup -3/. The central value of the electron temperature is strongly modulated by the sawtooth internal relaxation and reaches values in excess of 3 keV. No deterioration of the ion heating efficiency has been found in the investigated range of plasma parameters.

  1. Alfven eigenmode stability and fast ion loss in DIII-D and ITER reversed magnetic shear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, Michael; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Heidbrink, W.; Kramer, G.; Spong, Donald A; Austin, M. E.; Fisher, R K; Munoz, M G; Gorelenkova, M.; Luhmann, N.C.; Murakami, Masanori; Nazikian, Raffi; Park, J. M.; Tobias, Ben; White, R.

    2012-01-01

    Neutral beam injection into reversed-magnetic shear DIII-D plasmas produces a variety of Alfvenic activity including toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs) and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs). With measured equilibrium profiles as inputs, the ideal MHD code NOVA is used to calculate eigenmodes of these plasmas. The postprocessor code NOVA-K is then used to perturbatively calculate the actual stability of the modes, including finite orbit width and finite Larmor radius effects, and reasonable agreement with the spectrum of observed modes is found. Using experimentally measured mode amplitudes, fast ion orbit following simulations have been carried out in the presence of the NOVA calculated eigenmodes and are found to reproduce the dominant energy, pitch and temporal evolution of the losses measured using a large bandwidth scintillator diagnostic. The same analysis techniques applied to a DT 8 MA ITER steady-state plasma scenario with reversed-magnetic shear and both beam ion and alpha populations show Alfven eigenmode instability. Both RSAEs and TAEs are found to be unstable with maximum growth rates occurring for toroidal mode number n = 6 and the majority of the drive coming from fast ions injected by the 1MeV negative ion beams. AE instability due to beam ion drive is confirmed by the non-perturbative code TAEFL. Initial fast ion orbit following simulations using the unstable modes with a range of amplitudes (delta B/B = 10(-5)-10(-3)) have been carried out and show negligible fast ion loss. The lack of fast ion loss is a result of loss boundaries being limited to large radii and significantly removed from the actual modes themselves.

  2. Twisted electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K

    2013-01-01

    We show the existence of a twisted electrostatic ion-cyclotron (ESIC) wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) in a magnetized dusty plasma. For our purposes, we derive a 3D wave equation for the coupled ESIC and dust ion-acoustic (DIA) waves from the hydrodynamic equations that are composed of the continuity and momentum equations, together with Poisson's equation. The 3D wave equation reveals the formation of a braided or twisted ESIC wave structure carrying OAM. The braided or twisted ESIC wave structure can trap and transport plasma particles in magnetoplasmas, such as those in Saturn's F-ring and in the forthcoming magnetized dusty plasma experiments. PMID:23410477

  3. Coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeraj, T.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves is examined in three component magnetized plasma consisting of electrons, protons, and alpha particles. In the theoretical model relevant to solar wind plasma, electrons are assumed to be superthermal with kappa distribution and protons as well as alpha particles follow the fluid dynamical equations. A general linear dispersion relation is derived for such a plasma system which is analyzed both analytically and numerically. For parallel propagation, electrostatic ion cyclotron (proton and helium cyclotron) and ion acoustic (slow and fast) modes are decoupled. For oblique propagation, coupling between the cyclotron and acoustic modes occurs. Furthermore, when the angle of propagation is increased, the separation between acoustic and cyclotron modes increases which is an indication of weaker coupling at large angle of propagation. For perpendicular propagation, only cyclotron modes are observed. The effect of various parameters such as number density and temperature of alpha particles and superthermality on dispersion characteristics is examined in details. The coupling between various modes occurs for small values of wavenumber.

  4. Backward mode of the ion-cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-08-15

    The backward modes of the surface ion-cyclotron wave are investigated in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma. The dispersion relation of the backward mode of the surface ion-cyclotron wave is obtained using the specular reflection boundary condition with the plasma dielectric function. The result shows that the nonthermal effect suppresses the wave frequency as well as the group velocity of the surface ion-cyclotron wave. It is also found that the nonthermal effect on the surface ion-cyclotron wave increases with an increase of the wave number. In addition, it is found that the propagation domain of the surface ion-cyclotron wave increases with an increase of the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the electron gyrofrequency. It is also found that the nonthermal effect increases the propagation domain of the surface ion-cyclotron wave in a semi-bounded magnetized Lorentzian plasma.

  5. Sawtooth control in ITER using ion cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J P; Johnson, T.; Asunta, O.; Bonoli, P.; Choi, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Jucker, M.; Sauter, O.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modeling of the effects of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the stability of the internal kink mode suggests that ICRH should be considered as an essential sawtooth control tool in ITER. Sawtooth control using ICRH is achieved by directly affecting the energy of the internal kink mode rather than through modification of the magnetic shear by driving localized currents. Consequently, ICRH can be seen as complementary to the planned electron cyclotron current drive actuator, and indeed will improve the efficacy of current drive schemes. Simulations of the ICRH distribution using independent RF codes give confidence in numerical predictions that the stabilizing influence of the fusion-born alphas can be negated by appropriately tailored minority (3)He ICRH heating in ITER. Finally, the effectiveness of all sawtooth actuators is shown to increase as the q = 1 surface moves towards the manetic axis, whilst the passive stabilization arising from the alpha and NBI particles decreases.

  6. Sawtooth control in ITER using ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J. P.; Johnson, T.; Asunta, O.; Bonoli, P.; Choi, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Jucker, M.; Sauter, O.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical modelling of the effects of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the stability of the internal kink mode suggests that ICRH should be considered as an essential sawtooth control tool in ITER. Sawtooth control using ICRH is achieved by directly affecting the energy of the internal kink mode rather than through modification of the magnetic shear by driving localized currents. Consequently, ICRH can be seen as complementary to the planned electron cyclotron current drive actuator, and indeed will improve the efficacy of current drive schemes. Simulations of the ICRH distribution using independent RF codes give confidence in numerical predictions that the stabilizing influence of the fusion-born alphas can be negated by appropriately tailored minority 3He ICRH heating in ITER. Finally, the effectiveness of all sawtooth actuators is shown to increase as the q = 1 surface moves towards the manetic axis, whilst the passive stabilization arising from the alpha and NBI particles decreases.

  7. Observation of a high-confinement regime in a tokamak plasma with ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wagner, F.; Wesner, F.; Bäumler, J.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fritsch, R.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; v. Gierke, G.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hofmann, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Izvozchikov, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; van Mark, E.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Puri, S.; Rapp, H.; Röhr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schmitter, K.-H.; Schneider, F.; Setzensack, C.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Zasche, D.

    1987-01-01

    The H mode in ion cyclotron-resonance-heated plasmas has been investigated with and without additional neutral beam injection. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating can cause the transition into a high-confinement regime (H mode) in combination with beam heating. The H mode, however, has also been realized-for the first time-with ion cyclotron-resonance heating alone in the D (H)-hydrogen minority scheme at an absorbed rf power of 1.1 MW.

  8. Grating monochromator for electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shouichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-15

    Recently, we started to observe optical line spectra from an ECR plasma using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for beam tuning because it allows the extraction of the desired ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research gives new insights into its simplification. In this paper, the grating monochromator method for beam tuning of a Hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN azimuthal varying field (AVF) cyclotron is described.

  9. Acceleration of suprathermal ions by lightning-generated ion cyclotron waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Shklyar, David

    Lightning-induced emissions play important role in ion dynamics in the low-altitude magnetosphere. In particular, resonant interaction of ions with lower hybrid waves excited by lightning discharges leads to efficient ion heating; and the interaction with ion cyclotron waves is considered as a preheating mechanism. Such resonant wave-particle interaction is usually considered in two limiting cases: in the framework of quasi-linear theory, when the interaction with small amplitude wide spectrum waves is assumed, and in the case of monochromatic waves. In this report, we discuss resonant interaction of ions with special ion cyclotron wave packets which do not correspond to any of these cases. Some of wave packets formed of ion cyclotron waves generated by lightning strokes have a peculiar type of trajectories: they get stuck in the region where wave frequency becomes close to the local ion cyclotron frequency. These wave packets are characterized by wave frequency and wave vector which vary in space and time and, thus, along particle trajectory. What is more, the wave vector increases linearly with time. We derive the equations describing resonant interaction of ions with such ion cyclotron wave packets and obtain the resonance conditions. For suprathermal ions under consideration, the first cyclotron resonance gives the main contribution to resonant interaction. We show that the resonance condition for this resonance is defined by the detuning of the wave frequency from the local ion cyclotron frequency. The equations of motion have been solved numerically for test particles. Numerical results and analytical estimates demonstrate the essential difference between the interaction under consideration and the case of wide spectrum waves described by quasi-linear theory. Whereas the latter leads to particle diffusion in the phase space, the interaction we study leads to preferential ion acceleration. Hence, the ion energization has a non-diffusive character. The results

  10. Ion beam driven resonant ion-cyclotron instability in a magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2014-03-15

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves are excited by axial ion beam in a dusty plasma via Cerenkov and slow cyclotron interaction. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived in the presence of positively/negatively charged dust grains. The minimum beam velocity needed for the excitation is estimated for different values of relative density of negatively charged dust grains. It is shown that the minimum beam velocity needed for excitation increases as the charge density carried by dust increases. Temperature of electrons and ions, charge and mass of dust grains, external static magnetic field and finite boundary of dusty plasma significantly modify the dispersion properties of these waves and play a crucial role in the growth of resonant ion cyclotron instability. The ion cyclotron modes with phase velocity comparable to the beam velocity possess a large growth rate. The maximum value of growth rate increases with the beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in slow cyclotron interaction.

  11. Electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion plasma waves in a symmetric pair-ion plasma cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kono, M; Vranjes, J; Batool, N

    2014-03-14

    Complicated wave behavior observed in the cylindrical pair-ion (fullerene) experiments by Oohara and co-workers are now identified to be low harmonic ion cyclotron waves combined with ion plasma oscillations inherent to kinetic theory. The electrostatic dispersion equation derived is based on an approximation for the current from the exact solutions of the characteristic cylindrical geometry form of the Vlasov plasma equation in a uniform magnetized plasma cylinder surrounded by a larger metal boundary outside a vacuum gap, which thus differs from that in unbounded plasmas. Positive and negative ions, differing only in the sign of their charge, respond to a potential in the same time scale and cooperate to reflect the enhanced kinetic orbital behaviors to the macroscopic propagation characteristics. In addition, the experimental value of the Larmor radius (comparable to the discharge radius but small enough to make the analytic approximation useful) makes higher harmonic ion cyclotron effects both observable and calculable with the appropriate approximation for the kinetic theory. PMID:24679299

  12. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: a primer.

    PubMed

    Marshall, A G; Hendrickson, C L; Jackson, G S

    1998-01-01

    This review offers an introduction to the principles and generic applications of FT-ICR mass spectrometry, directed to readers with no prior experience with the technique. We are able to explain the fundamental FT-ICR phenomena from a simplified theoretical treatment of ion behavior in idealized magnetic and electric fields. The effects of trapping voltage, trap size and shape, and other nonidealities are manifested mainly as perturbations that preserve the idealized ion behavior modified by appropriate numerical correction factors. Topics include: effect of ion mass, charge, magnetic field, and trapping voltage on ion cyclotron frequency; excitation and detection of ICR signals; mass calibration; mass resolving power and mass accuracy; upper mass limit(s); dynamic range; detection limit, strategies for mass and energy selection for MSn; ion axialization, cooling, and remeasurement; and means for guiding externally formed ions into the ion trap. The relation of FT-ICR MS to other types of Fourier transform spectroscopy and to the Paul (quadrupole) ion trap is described. The article concludes with selected applications, an appendix listing accurate fundamental constants needed for ultrahigh-precision analysis, and an annotated list of selected reviews and primary source publications that describe in further detail various FT-ICR MS techniques and applications.

  13. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    SciTech Connect

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Jöst, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B. H.

    1996-03-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states.

  15. Simulations of heavy ion heating by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves driven by proton temperature anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, M.

    1985-01-01

    Heating of heavy ions by the electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, which are driven by proton temperature anisotropies, is studied by means of hybrid particle simulations. Initially, relaxation of the temperature anisotropies in the proton distribution and isotropic heating of the heavy ions are observed (phase I), followed by substantial perpendicular heating of the heavy ions (phase II). The heavy ions are distinctly gyrophase modulated by the EMIC waves. The isotropic heating in phase I is due to magnetic trapping by the excited proton cyclotron waves. The perpendicular heating in phase II is attributed to cyclotron resonance with the EMIC waves, which becomes possible by means of the preceding heating in phase I. Saturation of the EMIC instability is instead attributed to magnetic trapping of the majority ions: protons. When the proton anisotropy is very large, frequency shift (decrease) of the proton cyclotron waves to less than 1/2 Ohm(p) is observed. The present mechanism is not only relevant to He(+) heating in the dayside equator of the magnetosphere, but it also predicts hot He2(+) ions behind the earth's bow shock.

  16. Modeling fast-ion transport during toroidal Alfven eigenmode avalanches in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, R. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Medley, S. S.; White, R. B.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; Levinton, F. M.; Yuh, H.; Liu, D.; Podesta, M.; Tritz, K.

    2009-12-15

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] found strong bursts of toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) activity correlated with abrupt drops in the neutron rate. A fairly complete data set offers the opportunity to benchmark the NOVA[C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Rep. 211, 1 (1992)] and ORBIT[R. B. White and M. S. Chance, Phys. Fluids 27, 2455 (1984)] codes in the low aspect ratio tokamak (ST) geometry. The internal structure of TAE was modeled with NOVA and good agreement is found with measurements made with an array of five fixed-frequency reflectometers. The fast-ion transport resulting from these bursts of multiple TAE was then modeled with the ORBIT code. The simulations are reasonably consistent with the observed drop in neutron rate, however, further refinements in both the simulation of the TAE structure and in the modeling of the fast-ion transport are needed. Benchmarking stability codes against present experiments is an important step in developing the predictive capability needed to plan future experiments.

  17. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low-frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  18. Multi-Species Test of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating at High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Peterson, W. K.; Andre, M.; Chang, T.; Gurnett, D. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Crew, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Observations of ion distributions and plasma waves obtained by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite in the high-altitude, nightside auroral zone are used to study ion energization for three ion species. A number of theoretical models have been proposed to account for the transverse heating of these ion populations. One of these, the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) mechanism, explains ion conic formation through ion cyclotron resonance with broadband electromagnetic wave turbulence in the vicinity of the characteristic ion cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron resonant heating of the ions by low- frequency electromagnetic waves is an important energy source for the transport of ions from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. In this paper we test the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to three simultaneously heated and accelerated ion species by modelling the ion conic formation in terms of a resonant wave-particle interaction in which the ions extract energy from the portion of the broadband electromagnetic wave spectrum which includes the ion cyclotron frequency. Using a Monte Carlo technique we evaluate the ion heating produced by the electromagnetic turbulence at low frequencies and find that the wave amplitudes near the ion cyclotron frequencies are sufficient to explain the observed ion energies.

  19. Collisional electrostatic ion cyclotron waves as a possible source of energetic heavy ions in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Providakes, Jason; Seyler, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed for the source of energetic heavy ions (NO/+/, O2/+/, and O/+/) found in the magnetosphere. Simulations using a multispecies particle simulation code for resistive current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves show transverse and parallel bulk heating of bottomside ionospheric heavy ion populations. The dominant mechanism for the transverse bulk heating is resonant ion heating by wave-particle ion trapping. Using a linear kinetic dispersion relation for a magnetized, collisional, homogenous, and multiion plasma, it is found that collisional electrostatic ion cyclotron waves near the NO(+), O2(+), and O(+) gyrofrequencies are unstable to field-aligned currents of 50 microA/sq m for a typical bottomside ionosphere.

  20. An ion cyclotron resonance study of reactions of some atomic and simple polyatomic ions with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpas, Z.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Reactions of various positive ions with water vapor were studied by ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric techniques. Rate constants and product distributions were determined for reactions of the ions: Ar(+), Co(+), N2(+), and CO2(+), CH2(+), and CH4(+), CH2Cl(+), HCO(+), H2CO(+), H2COH(+), H2S(+) and HS(+). The results obtained in this work are compared with earlier reported data where available.

  1. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  2. Robust Matching System for the ITER Ion Cyclotron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, D.; Goulding, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Vervier, M.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.

    2008-11-01

    The ITER ion cyclotron system is required to deliver 20 MW to the ITER plasma under a number of different operating scenarios. The EU will fabricate the antenna, the US will supply the matching system and transmission lines, and India will deliver the rf sources and high-voltage power supplies. A brief description of the complete ion cyclotron system will be presented, and different design options for the matching system will be discussed. Emphasis will be on analyzing the ability of the system to operate effectively during sudden changes caused by plasma perturbations (e. g., ELMs), and on the robustness of matching algorithms. Particular challenges are: the possibility of relatively low loading of the antenna by the plasma because of a large plasma-antenna distance; the resulting high voltages in the matching system (which must be minimized by good system design); the need to install a number of large matching components in the tight space available near the tokamak; and the requirement for operation and maintenance in a radiation environment.

  3. Design of the ion cyclotron system for TPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, D.; Shipley, S.; Yugo, J.; Goulding, R.; Batchelor, D.; Stallings, D.; Fredd, E.

    The TPX experiment will operate for very long pulse times (greater than or equal to 1000 s) and will require current drive of several different types to explore the advanced physics operating modes as one of its main missions. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) using ion cyclotron waves in the 40-80 MHz range will be used as one of the main current-drive mechanisms. For initial operation, 8 MW of RF will be supplied, along with 8 MW of neutral beams and 1.5 MW of lower hybrid power. The ion cyclotron (IC) system is a major part of the TPX heating and current drive system. The IC system must: supply 8 MW of power through two main horizontal ports; be upgradable to provide up to 12 MW of RF power through two ports; operate, for 1000-s pulses every 75 min; drive current using FWCD with high reliability; be bakeable to 350(degree)C for cleaning; and incorporate shielding to attenuate the neutron and gamma flux from DD operation so that hands-on maintenance can be performed exterior to the vacuum vessel. The system will consist of four modified FMIT power units that will be upgraded to deliver 2 MW each to the plasma. Two antennas, each with six current straps, will be located in adjacent ports. A sophisticated matching system is needed to provide experimental flexibility and reliability.

  4. Influence of the ion/neutral atom mass ratio on the damping of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Cartier, S. L.; D'Angelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The damping of electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves by ion-neutral collisions was studied in a single-ended Q machine. The amplitudes of K(+) and Cs(+) electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves were measured as a function of neutral pressure in helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. For each ion/neutral atom combination, the electrostatic ion-cyclotron wave amplitude maximizes at a neutral pressure that scales monotonically with the m(+)/m(n) mass ratio. This result is interpreted by considering the dynamics of elastic collisions between the ions and the neutral atoms.

  5. Dispersive Alfven waves and Ion-acoustic Turbulence: M-I coupling at the Smallest Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, J. L.; Zettergren, M. D.; Diaz, M.; Stromme, A.; Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Auroral displays exhibit coherence across multiple scales, beginning with the global auroral oval and extending down to packets of discrete arcs of <100-m width related to dispersive Alfven waves. The latter have been found to be magnetically conjugate to regions of non-thermal backscatter from the ionospheric F-region recorded by incoherent scatter radar (ISR). The phenomenological relationship between auroral morphology and ISR spectral distortions has been well established, at least in a static sense, but the theory connecting these disparate observational domains is incomplete. It is argued that considerable insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling is obtained by understanding auroral physics at these elemental scales. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide observational evidence that not all arc-related ISR distortions fit neatly into a single category (e.g., the “Naturally Enhanced Ion-Acoustic Line” or NEIAL), and (2) to provide a critical review of candidate theoretical models to simultaneously account for the time-dependent optical and radar measurements. Evidentiary support focuses on observations of a substorm onset on 23 March 2007 (11:20 UT) by a narrow-field video-rate camera and the electronically steerable Poker Flat ISR (PFISR). Examples of ISR spectra as a function of altitude. 1: thermal backscatter, 2 and 3: enhanced backscatter conjugate to discrete aurora.

  6. Ion and relativistic electron acceleration by Alfven and whistler turbulence in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Ramaty, Reuven

    1987-01-01

    A model is proposed in which turbulent Alfven and whistler waves simultaneously produce the proton and electron spectra implied by the gamma-ray observations noted during the impulsive phase of the June 3, 1982 flare. The results demonstrate that protons can be accelerated to several GeV in less than about 10 sec by Alfven turbulence whose energy density is greater than a few erg/cu cm. It is also found that electrons may be accelerated to tens of MeV on similar time scales by whistler and Alfven turbulence. A lower limit on the energy density of the Alfven turbulence is obtained which is small compared to the total magnetic energy density.

  7. Dynamic regimes of cyclotron instability in the afterglow mode of minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, D.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the dynamic regimes of cyclotron instabilities in non-equilibrium plasma of a minimum-B electron cyclotron resonance ion source operated in pulsed mode. The instability appears in decaying ion source plasma shortly (1-10 ms) after switching off the microwave radiation of the klystron, and manifests itself in the form of powerful pulses of electromagnetic emission associated with precipitation of high-energy electrons along the magnetic field lines. Recently it was shown that this plasma instability causes perturbations of the extracted ion current, which limits the performance of the ion source and generates strong bursts of bremsstrahlung emission. In this article we present time-resolved diagnostics of electromagnetic emission bursts related to cyclotron instability in the decaying plasma. The temporal resolution is sufficient to study the fine structure of the dynamic spectra of the electromagnetic emission at different operating regimes of the ion source. It was found that at different values of magnetic field and heating power the dynamic spectra demonstrate common features: Decreasing frequency from burst to burst and an always falling tone during a single burst of instability. The analysis has shown that the instability is driven by the resonant interaction of hot electrons, distributed between the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) zone and the trap center, with slow extraordinary wave propagation quasi-parallel with respect to the external magnetic field.

  8. Measurements and modeling of Alfven eigenmode induced fast ion transport and loss in DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, M. A.; Fisher, R. K.; Hyatt, A. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pace, D. C.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B.; Garcia Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Maraschek, M.; Suttrop, W.; Tardini, G.; Kramer, G. J.; White, R. B.; Gorelenkova, M.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Nazikian, R.; Aekaeslompolo, S.; Austin, M. E.; Boom, J. E.

    2011-05-15

    Neutral beam injection into reversed magnetic shear DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas produces a variety of Alfvenic activity including toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs). These modes are studied during the discharge current ramp phase when incomplete current penetration results in a high central safety factor and increased drive due to multiple higher order resonances. Scans of injected 80 keV neutral beam power on DIII-D showed a transition from classical to AE dominated fast ion transport and, as previously found, discharges with strong AE activity exhibit a deficit in neutron emission relative to classical predictions. By keeping beam power constant and delaying injection during the current ramp, AE activity was reduced or eliminated and a significant improvement in fast ion confinement observed. Similarly, experiments in ASDEX Upgrade using early 60 keV neutral beam injection drove multiple unstable RSAEs. Periods of strong RSAE activity are accompanied by a large (peak {delta}S{sub n}/S{sub n{approx_equal}}60%) neutron deficit. Losses of beam ions modulated at AE frequencies were observed using large bandwidth energy and pitch resolving fast ion loss scintillator detectors and clearly identify their role in the process. Modeling of DIII-D loss measurements using guiding center following codes to track particles in the presence of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculated AE structures (validated by comparison to experiment) is able to reproduce the dominant energy, pitch, and temporal evolution of these losses. While loss of both co and counter current fast ions occurs, simulations show that the dominant loss mechanism observed is the mode induced transition of counter-passing fast ions to lost trapped orbits. Modeling also reproduces a coherent signature of AE induced losses and it was found that these coherent losses scale proportionally with the amplitude; an additional incoherent contribution scales

  9. Production of C58 and C56 Ions by Using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kiyokatsu; Uchida, Takashi; Minezaki, Hidekazu; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Biri, Sandor; Asaji, Toyohisa; Shima, Kazushi; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been developed for a synthesis of endohedral metallofullerenes. The ECRIS has a traditional minimum-B magnetic field and an 8-10 GHz traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier as a microwave source. C60 plasmas have been generated at the first experiment. Many broken fullerenes C58 and C56 are observed in fullerene ion beams. We investigated the fullerene ion beams against pressures in the ion source. From the results, these fullerene ion currents increase as the decrease of the pressure and the maximum current is 0.81 μA of C602+.

  10. Research and development of ion surfing RF carpets for the cyclotron gas stopper at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, A. E.; Brodeur, M.; Bollen, G.; Morrissey, D. J.; Schwarz, S.

    2016-06-01

    A model device to transport thermal ions in the cyclotron gas stopper, a next-generation beam thermalization device under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, is presented. Radioactive ions produced by projectile fragmentation will come to rest at distances as large as 45 cm from the extraction orifice of the cyclotron gas stopper. The thermalized ions will be transported to the exit by RF carpets employing the recently developed "ion surfing" method. A quarter-circle prototype RF carpet was tested with potassium ions, and ion transport velocities as high as 60 m/s were observed over distances greater than 10 cm at a helium buffer gas pressure of 80 mbar. The transport of rubidium ions from an RF carpet to an electrode below was also demonstrated. The results of this study formed the basis of the design of the RF carpets for use in the cyclotron gas stopper.

  11. Ray tracing of lower hybrid and ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Marco

    1986-08-01

    We review the use of ray tracing codes for the investigation of wave propagation and plasma heating in toroidal axisymmetric geometry, with particular emphasis to the lower hybrid and ion cyclotron frequency ranges. After a summary of the approximations involved, we point out that, at these low frequencies, a full-wave treatment of the launching structure on the one hand, and of singular layers (wave and particle resonances) on the other hand, are an essential part of any ray tracing code. The spectral approach to ray tracing, which makes explicit use of the decomposition of the hf fields in toroidal modes allowed by axisymmetry, is instrumental to cope with electrically short antennas whose radiation pattern is dominated by diffraction, and to allow a plausible evaluation of Landau and cyclotron damping, and of wave behaviour near conversion layers. Numerical methods and structure of ray tracing briefly discussed, and a few examples are presented, obtained with the RAYLH and RAYIC codes developed by the author. The rapidly growing number of applications of ray tracing in the literature is also briefly summarised; it is the best proof that this approximate method, if its possibilities and limits are properly understood, can give precious insight into the physics of hf heating of tokamak plasmas.

  12. Parallel Spectral Acquisition with an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell Array.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Anderson, Gordon A; Navare, Arti T; Bruce, James E

    2016-01-19

    Mass measurement accuracy is a critical analytical figure-of-merit in most areas of mass spectrometry application. However, the time required for acquisition of high-resolution, high mass accuracy data limits many applications and is an aspect under continual pressure for development. Current efforts target implementation of higher electrostatic and magnetic fields because ion oscillatory frequencies increase linearly with field strength. As such, the time required for spectral acquisition of a given resolving power and mass accuracy decreases linearly with increasing fields. Mass spectrometer developments to include multiple high-resolution detectors that can be operated in parallel could further decrease the acquisition time by a factor of n, the number of detectors. Efforts described here resulted in development of an instrument with a set of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cells as detectors that constitute the first MS array capable of parallel high-resolution spectral acquisition. ICR cell array systems consisting of three or five cells were constructed with printed circuit boards and installed within a single superconducting magnet and vacuum system. Independent ion populations were injected and trapped within each cell in the array. Upon filling the array, all ions in all cells were simultaneously excited and ICR signals from each cell were independently amplified and recorded in parallel. Presented here are the initial results of successful parallel spectral acquisition, parallel mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS measurements, and parallel high-resolution acquisition with the MS array system.

  13. Parallel Spectral Acquisition with an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell Array.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Gun; Anderson, Gordon A; Navare, Arti T; Bruce, James E

    2016-01-19

    Mass measurement accuracy is a critical analytical figure-of-merit in most areas of mass spectrometry application. However, the time required for acquisition of high-resolution, high mass accuracy data limits many applications and is an aspect under continual pressure for development. Current efforts target implementation of higher electrostatic and magnetic fields because ion oscillatory frequencies increase linearly with field strength. As such, the time required for spectral acquisition of a given resolving power and mass accuracy decreases linearly with increasing fields. Mass spectrometer developments to include multiple high-resolution detectors that can be operated in parallel could further decrease the acquisition time by a factor of n, the number of detectors. Efforts described here resulted in development of an instrument with a set of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cells as detectors that constitute the first MS array capable of parallel high-resolution spectral acquisition. ICR cell array systems consisting of three or five cells were constructed with printed circuit boards and installed within a single superconducting magnet and vacuum system. Independent ion populations were injected and trapped within each cell in the array. Upon filling the array, all ions in all cells were simultaneously excited and ICR signals from each cell were independently amplified and recorded in parallel. Presented here are the initial results of successful parallel spectral acquisition, parallel mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS measurements, and parallel high-resolution acquisition with the MS array system. PMID:26669509

  14. A new mechanism for excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves and associated perpendicular ion heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Lee, Y. C.; Palmadesso, P.

    1985-01-01

    A new mechanism for exciting the kinetic ion cyclotron waves in the presence of a nonuniform electric field perpendicular to the external magnetic field is given. Application of this instability to various space plasmas is discussed. The new instability mechanism may provide a more efficient agent for perpendicular ion heating than other EIC generation processes, since the linear growth rate is insensitive to the temperature ratio.

  15. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore » of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  16. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  17. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Murr, D.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1 - 4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F(H+) 1.0 or less and a slot in spectral power at F/F(H+) = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy is about 0.6 but it is about 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  18. Observation of the backward electrostatic ion cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1984-12-01

    The backward branch of the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave has been observed, we believe, for the first time. The wave, which was driven by a phased antenna structure inserted in a neon plasma, exists in the parameter ranges 2T/sub i//m/sub i/ << (..omega../k/sub parallel/)/sup 2/ << 2T/sub e//m/sub e/, n..cap omega../sub i/ < ..omega.. < (n+1)..cap omega../sub i/, T/sub e/ greater than or equal to T/sub i/, and ..omega../sub pi/ > ..cap omega../sub i/. Double-tip probe interferomety data agree with the theoretical dispersion relation.

  19. Data processing in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; O'Connor, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    The Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer intricately couples advanced physics, instrumentation, and electronics with chemical and particularly biochemical research. However, general understanding of the data processing methodologies used lags instrumentation, and most data processing algorithms we are familiar with in FT-ICR are not well studied; thus, professional skill and training in FT-ICR operation and data analysis is still the key to achieve high performance in FT-ICR. This review article is focused on FT-ICR data processing, and explains the procedures step-by-step for users with the goal of maximizing spectral features, such as mass accuracy, resolving power, dynamic range, and detection limits.

  20. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  1. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T.; Noda, K.

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C4+ ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C4+, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  2. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source. PMID:24593538

  3. Highly charged ion X-rays from Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indelicato, P.; Boucard, S.; Covita, D. S.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Fuhrmann, H.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Schlesser, S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Simons, L. M.; Stingelin, L.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J.; Wasser, A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2007-09-01

    Radiation from the highly charged ions contained in the plasma of Electron-Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) constitutes a very bright source of X-rays. Because the ions have a relatively low kinetic energy (≈1 eV) transitions can be very narrow, containing only a small Doppler broadening. We describe preliminary accurate measurements of two and three-electron ions with Z=16-18. We show how these measurement can test sensitively many-body relativistic calculations or can be used as X-ray standards for precise measurements of X-ray transitions in exotic atoms.

  4. Production of a highly charged uranium ion beam with RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y.; Ohnishi, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Haba, H.; Fujimaki, M.; Komiyama, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tamura, M.; Aihara, T.; Uchiyama, A.

    2012-02-15

    A highly charged uranium (U) ion beam is produced from the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using 18 and 28 GHz microwaves. The sputtering method is used to produce this U ion beam. The beam intensity is strongly dependent on the rod position and sputtering voltage. We observe that the emittance of U{sup 35+} for 28 GHz microwaves is almost the same as that for 18 GHz microwaves. It seems that the beam intensity of U ions produced using 28 GHz microwaves is higher than that produced using 18 GHz microwaves at the same Radio Frequency (RF) power.

  5. Non-linear modulation of short wavelength compressional Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Podesta, M.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B.; Bortolon, A.; Crocker, N. A.; Levinton, F. M.; Yuh, H.

    2013-04-15

    Most Alfvenic activity in the frequency range between toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and roughly one half of the ion cyclotron frequency on National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)], that is, approximately 0.3 MHz up to Almost-Equal-To 1.2 MHz, are modes propagating counter to the neutral beam ions. These have been modeled as Compressional and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE and GAE) and are excited through a Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with the beam ions. There is also a class of co-propagating modes at higher frequency than the counter-propagating CAE and GAE. These modes have been identified as CAE, and are seen mostly in the company of a low frequency, n = 1 kink-like mode. In this paper, we present measurements of the spectrum of these high frequency CAE (hfCAE) and their mode structure. We compare those measurements to a simple model of CAE and present a predator-prey type model of the curious non-linear coupling of the hfCAE and the low frequency kink-like mode.

  6. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well.

  7. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well. PMID:18315101

  8. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting in nearly lossless transmission.

  9. Hybrid Simulations of Pickup Ions and Ion Cyclotron Waves at Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowee, M.; Wei, H.; Tokar, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus releases tens of kilograms per second of water-group neutrals from its southern plumes. These neutrals are ionized and accelerated by the background co-rotation electric field, producing a local population of pickup ions with a ring distribution in velocity space. This velocity space distribution is highly unstable to the growth of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves whose amplitudes are generally related to the pickup ion production rate, the mass of the pickup ion, the pickup velocity, and the degree of damping by the background plasma. Observations from the Cassini spacecraft show the amplitudes of the waves generally increase with distance within 2 Enceladus radii of the Moon, consistent with an increasing density of pickup ion source, but then decrease right at the Moon, consistent with zero pickup velocity in the stagnating plasma flow. In order to interpret the observed wave amplitudes in terms of ion production rates at Enceladus, we carry out self-consistent hybrid simulations of the growth of ion cyclotron waves from pickup ions to determine the relationship between wave amplitude and background plasma and ion pickup conditions.

  10. Experimental studies on fast-ion transport by Alfven wave avalanches on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Ruskov, E.; Bell, R. E.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Medley, S. S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; Yuh, H.

    2009-05-15

    Fast-ion transport induced by Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) is studied in beam-heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] through space, time, and energy resolved measurements of the fast-ion population. Fast-ion losses associated with multiple toroidicity-induced AEs (TAEs), which interact nonlinearly and terminate in avalanches, are characterized. A depletion of the energy range >20 keV, leading to sudden drops of up to 40% in the neutron rate over 1 ms, is observed over a broad spatial range. It is shown that avalanches lead to a relaxation of the fast-ion profile, which in turn reduces the drive for the instabilities. The measured radial eigenmode structure and frequency of TAEs are compared with the predictions from a linear magnetohydrodynamics stability code. The partial disagreement suggests that nonlinearities may compromise a direct comparison between experiment and linear theory.

  11. Means for obtaining a metal ion beam from a heavy-ion cyclotron source

    DOEpatents

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1975-08-01

    A description is given of a modification to a cyclotron ion source used in producing a high intensity metal ion beam. A small amount of an inert support gas maintains the usual plasma arc, except that it is necessary for the support gas to have a heavy mass, e.g., xenon or krypton as opposed to neon. A plate, fabricated from the metal (or anything that can be sputtered) to be ionized, is mounted on the back wall of the ion source arc chamber and is bombarded by returning energetic low-charged gas ions that fail to cross the initial accelerating gap between the ion source and the accelerating electrode. Some of the atoms that are dislodged from the plate by the returning gas ions become ionized and are extracted as a useful beam of heavy ions. (auth)

  12. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E; Kaiser, Nathan K; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Norheim, Randolph V; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Marshall, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Enhancements to the ion source and transfer optics of our 9.4 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometer have resulted in improved ion transmission efficiency for more sensitive mass measurement of complex mixtures at the MS and MS/MS levels. The tube lens/skimmer has been replaced by a dual ion funnel and the following octopole by a quadrupole for reduced ion cloud radial expansion before transmission into a mass-selective quadrupole. The number of ions that reach the ICR cell is increased by an order of magnitude for the funnel/quadrupole relative to the tube lens/skimmer/octopole.

  13. Proton Heating by Cyclotron Waves in the Presence of a Finite Source and a Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Yoon, P. H.; Choe, G.

    2012-12-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the study of solar wind is the acceleration of protons and heavy ions. The preferential heating of these ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field is interpreted as the resonant heating by cyclotron waves. The present paper investigates the resonant cyclotron heating of the solar wind ions by quasilinear theoretical formalism. The major focus is on the role of source and sink terms associated with the Alfven-cyclotron waves. If one considers low-frequency Alfvenic waves as the wave source, then the resulting cyclotron heating is extremely small [Yoon & Fang 2009, Rha et al., 2011, Moya et al., 2011]. However, with a finite source term an appreciable heating can result [Yoon & Fang 2009]. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the problem of Alfvenic turbulent heating by cyclotron resonance with a continuous source of Alfvenic turbulence as well as a sink term. We also discuss the role of nonlinear mode coupling as well as the effects of spatial inhomogeneity.

  14. On Alfvenic Waves and Stochastic Ion Heating with 1Re Observations of Strong Field-aligned Currents, Electric Fields, and O+ ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria; Chandler, Michael; Singh, Nagendra

    2008-01-01

    The role that the cleft/cusp has in ionosphere/magnetosphere coupling makes it a very dynamic region having similar fundamental processes to those within the auroral regions. With Polar passing through the cusp at 1 Re in the Spring of 1996, we observe a strong correlation between ion heating and broadband ELF (BBELF) emissions. This commonly observed relationship led to the study of the coupling of large field-aligned currents, burst electric fields, and the thermal O+ ions. We demonstrate the role of these measurements to Alfvenic waves and stochastic ion heating. Finally we will show the properties of the resulting density cavities.

  15. Plasma spectroscopy of metal ions for hyper-electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the optical line spectra of metal ions from ECR plasma were observed using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for the beam tuning process, because it allows to conduct the extraction of the desired metal ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research provides a new approach for its simplification. In this paper the grating monochromator method for metal ion beam tuning such as (40)Ca(12+), (56)Fe(15+), and (85)Rb(20+) of hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron is described.

  16. ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed in the last few years into a reliable source of high charge-state heavy ions. The availability of heavy ions with relatively large charge-to-mass ratios (0.1--0.5) has made it possible to contemplate essentially new classes of heavy-ion linear accelerators. In this talk, I shall review the state-of-the-art in ECR source performance and describe some of the implications this performance level has for heavy-ion linear accelerator design. The present linear accelerator projects using ECR ion sources will be noted and the performance requirements of the ECR source for these projects will be reviewed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Ion cyclotron resonance as a tool in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Antonella; Ledda, Mario; de Carlo, Flavia; Pozzi, Deleana; Messina, Elisa; Gaetani, Roberto; Chimenti, Isotta; Barile, Lucio; Giacomello, Alessandro; D'Emilia, Enrico; Giuliani, Livio; Foletti, Alberto; Patti, Annamaria; Vulcano, Antonella; Grimaldi, Settimio

    2008-01-01

    The identification of suitable stem cell cultures and differentiating conditions that are free of xenogenic growth supplements is an important step in finding the clinical applicability of cell therapy in two important fields of human medicine: heart failure and bone remodeling, growth and repair. We recently demonstrated the possibility of obtaining cardiac stem cells (CSCs) from human endomyocardial biopsy specimens. CSCs self-assemble into multi-cellular clusters known as cardiospheres (CSps) that engraft and partially regenerate infarcted myocardium. CSps and cardiosphere-derived-cells (CDCs) were exposed for five days in an incubator regulated for temperature, humidity, and CO(2) inside a solenoid system. This system was placed in a magnetically shielded room. The cells were exposed simultaneously to a static magnetic field (MF) and a parallel low-alternating frequency MF, close to the cyclotron frequency corresponding to the charge/mass ratio of the Ca(++) ion. In this exposure condition, CSps and CDCs modulate their differentiation turning on cardiogenesis and turning off vasculogenesis. Cardiac markers such as troponin I (TnI) and myosin heavy chain (MHC) were up-regulated. Conversely, angiogenic markers such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and kinase domain receptor (KDR) were down-regulated as evidenced by immunocytochemistry. Exposure to the 7 Hz calcium ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) frequency can modulate the cardiogenic vs. angiogenic differentiation process of ex vivo expanded CSCs. This may pave the way for novel approaches in tissue engineering and cell therapy. With regard to bone remodeling, it has been suggested that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may be considered as a potential therapeutic tool. Using the Ca(++)-dependent specific differentiation potential of the ELF-MF 7 Hz ICR, we show here that exposure of human MSC to these same MF conditions enhanced the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers such

  18. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves.

  19. Interaction between whistler waves and ion-cyclotron waves in magnetospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, Y.N.; Chmyrev, V.M.

    1986-11-01

    The authors have analyzed accurate solutions of a system of abbreviated equations which describe the decay interaction of whistler waves with ion-cyclotron waves in magnetospheric plasma. The equations allow for longitudinal and transverse drift of wave packets. As a result of this analysis, they show that the modulation period of a whistle which is received near the earth's surface is determined by the velocity of the ion-cyclotron waves and by the magnitude of the initial signal amplitude.

  20. Ring Current-Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, generated by ion temperature anisotropy in Earth s ring current (RC), is the best known example of wave- particle interaction in the magnetosphere. Also, there is much controversy over the importance of EMIC waves on RC depletion. Under certain conditions, relativistic electrons, with energies 21 MeV, can be removed from the outer radiation belt (RB) by EMIC wave scattering during a magnetic storm. That is why the calculation of EMIC waves must be a very critical part of the space weather studies. The new RC model that we have developed and present for the first time has several new features that we have combine together in a one single model: (a) several lower frequency cold plasma wave modes are taken into account; (b) wave tracing of these wave has been incorporated in the energy EMIC wave equation; (c) no assumptions regarding wave shape spectra have been made; (d) no assumptions regarding the shape of particle distribution have been made to calculate the growth rate; (e) pitch-angle, energy, and mix diffusions are taken into account together for the first time; (f) the exact loss-cone RC analytical solution has been found and coupled with bounce-averaged numerical solution of kinetic equation; (g) the EMIC waves saturation due to their modulation instability and LHW generation are included as an additional factor that contributes to this process; and (h) the hot ions were included in the real part of dielectric permittivity tensor. We compare our theoretical results with the different EMIC waves models as well as RC experimental data.

  1. Comments on finite Larmor radius models for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Smithe, D.N.

    1994-06-01

    The accuracy of standard finite Larmor radius (FLR) models for wave propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is compared against full hot plasma models. For multiple ion species plasmas, the FLR model is shown to predict the presence of a spurious second harmonic ion-ion type resonance between the second harmonic cyclotron layers of two ion species. It is shown explicitly here that the spurious resonance is an artifact of the FLR models and that no absorption occurs in the plasma as a result of this ``resonance.``

  2. Predictive ion source control using artificial neural network for RFT-30 cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Young Bae; Hur, Min Goo; Lee, Eun Je; Park, Jeong Hoon; Park, Yong Dae; Yang, Seung Dae

    2016-01-01

    An RFT-30 cyclotron is a 30 MeV proton accelerator for radioisotope production and fundamental research. The ion source of the RFT-30 cyclotron creates plasma from hydrogen gas and transports an ion beam into the center region of the cyclotron. Ion source control is used to search source parameters for best quality of the ion beam. Ion source control in a real system is a difficult and time consuming task, and the operator should search the source parameters by manipulating the cyclotron directly. In this paper, we propose an artificial neural network based predictive control approach for the RFT-30 ion source. The proposed approach constructs the ion source model by using an artificial neural network and finds the optimized parameters with the simulated annealing algorithm. To analyze the performance of the proposed approach, we evaluated the simulations with the experimental data of the ion source. The performance results show that the proposed approach can provide an efficient way to analyze and control the ion source of the RFT-30 cyclotron.

  3. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2011-03-15

    The ion loss distribution in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) was investigated to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) charge breeder. The radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions (typical nonvolatile and volatile elements, respectively) were injected into the ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex to breed their charge states. Their respective residual activities on the sidewall of the cylindrical plasma chamber of the source were measured after charge breeding as functions of the azimuthal angle and longitudinal position and two-dimensional distributions of ions lost during charge breeding in the ECRIS were obtained. These distributions had different azimuthal symmetries. The origins of these different azimuthal symmetries are qualitatively discussed by analyzing the differences and similarities in the observed wall-loss patterns. The implications for improving the charge breeding efficiencies of nonvolatile elements in ECR charge breeders are described. The similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  4. Mechanisms for the Dissipation of Alfven Waves in Near-Earth Space Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Davis, John M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Alfven waves are a major mechanism for the transport of electromagnetic energy from the distant part of the magnetosphere to the near-Earth space. This is especially true for the auroral and polar regions of the Earth. However, the mechanisms for their dissipation have remained illusive. One of the mechanisms is the formation of double layers when the current associated with Alfven waves in the inertial regime interact with density cavities, which either are generated nonlinearly by the waves themselves or are a part of the ambient plasma turbulence. Depending on the strength of the cavities, weak and strong double layers could form. Such double layers are transient; their lifetimes depend on that of the cavities. Thus they impulsively accelerate ions and electrons. Another mechanism is the resonant absorption of broadband Alfven- wave noise by the ions at the ion cyclotron frequencies. But this resonant absorption may not be possible for the very low frequency waves, and it may be more suited for electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. A third mechanism is the excitation of secondary waves by the drifts of electrons and ions in the Alfven wave fields. It is found that under suitable conditions, the relative drifts between different ion species and/or between electrons and ions are large enough to drive lower hybrid waves, which could cause transverse accelerations of ions and parallel accelerations of electrons. This mechanism is being further studied by means of kinetic simulations using 2.5- and 3-D particle-in-cell codes. The ongoing modeling efforts on space weather require quantitative estimates of energy inputs of various kinds, including the electromagnetic energy. Our studies described here contribute to the methods of determining the estimates of the input from ubiquitous Alfven waves.

  5. High current DC negative ion source for cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Etoh, H; Onai, M; Aoki, Y; Mitsubori, H; Arakawa, Y; Sakuraba, J; Kato, T; Mitsumoto, T; Hiasa, T; Yajima, S; Shibata, T; Hatayama, A; Okumura, Y

    2016-02-01

    A filament driven multi-cusp negative ion source has been developed for proton cyclotrons in medical applications. In Cs-free operation, continuous H(-) beam of 10 mA and D(-) beam of 3.3 mA were obtained stably at an arc-discharge power of 3 kW and 2.4 kW, respectively. In Cs-seeded operation, H(-) beam current reached 22 mA at a lower arc power of 2.6 kW with less co-extracted electron current. The optimum gas flow rate, which gives the highest H(-) current, was 15 sccm in the Cs-free operation, while it decreased to 4 sccm in the Cs-seeded operation. The relationship between H(-) production and the design/operating parameters has been also investigated by a numerical study with KEIO-MARC code, which gives a reasonable explanation to the experimental results of the H(-) current dependence on the arc power. PMID:26932017

  6. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  7. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred. PMID:26931928

  8. Review of highly charged heavy ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-15

    The electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plays an important role in the advancement of heavy ion accelerators and other ion beam applications worldwide, thanks to its remarkable ability to produce a great variety of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. Great efforts over the past decade have led to significant ECRIS performance improvements in both the beam intensity and quality. A number of high-performance ECRISs have been built and are in daily operation or are under construction to meet the continuously increasing demand. In addition, comprehension of the detailed and complex physical processes in high-charge-state ECR plasmas has been enhanced experimentally and theoretically. This review covers and discusses the key components, leading-edge developments, and enhanced ECRIS performance in the production of highly charged heavy ion beams.

  9. Photoionization and ion cyclotron resonance studies of the ion chemistry of ethylene oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corderman, R. R.; Williamson, A. D.; Lebreton, P. R.; Buttrill, S. E., Jr.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of the ethylene oxide molecular ion and its subsequent ion-molecule reactions leading to the products C2H5O(+) and C3H5O(+) have been studied using time-resolved photoionization mass spectroscopy, ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy, and photoelectron spectroscopy. An examination of the effects of internal energy on reactivity shows that the ratio of C3H5O(+) to C2H5O(+) increases by an order of magnitude with a single quantum of vibrational energy. The formation of (C2H4O/+/)-asterisk in a collision-induced isomerization is found which yields a ring-opened structure by C-C bond cleavage. The relaxed ring-opened C2H4O(+) ion reacts with neutral ethylene oxide by CH2(+) transfer to yield an intermediate product ion C3H6O(+) which gives C3H5O(+) by loss of H.

  10. Solar cycle dependence of ion cyclotron wave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, Marc R.; Lindgren, Erik A.; Engebretson, Mark J.; Weaver, Carol

    2015-06-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been studied for decades, though remain a fundamentally important topic in heliospheric physics. The connection of EMIC waves to the scattering of energetic particles from Earth's radiation belts is one of many topics that motivate the need for a deeper understanding of characteristics and occurrence distributions of the waves. In this study, we show that EMIC wave frequencies, as observed at Halley Station in Antarctica from 2008 through 2012, increase by approximately 60% from a minimum in 2009 to the end of 2012. Assuming that these waves are excited in the vicinity of the plasmapause, the change in Kp in going from solar minimum to near solar maximum would drive increased plasmapause erosion, potentially shifting the generation region of the EMIC to lower L and resulting in the higher frequencies. A numerical estimate of the change in plasmapause location, however, implies that it is not enough to account for the shift in EMIC frequencies that are observed at Halley Station. Another possible explanation for the frequency shift, however, is that the relative density of heavier ions in the magnetosphere (that would be associated with increased solar activity) could account for the change in frequencies. In terms of effects on radiation belt dynamics, the shift to higher frequencies tends to mean that these waves will interact with less energetic electrons, although the details involved in this process are complex and depend on the specific plasma and gyrofrequencies of all populations, including electrons. In addition, the change in location of the generation region to lower L shells means that the waves will have access to higher number fluxes of resonant electrons. Finally, we show that a sunlit ionosphere can inhibit ground observations of EMIC waves with frequencies higher than ˜0.5 Hz and note that the effect likely has resulted in an underestimate of the solar-cycle-driven frequency changes described here.

  11. Dispersion relation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-component magneto-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Vibhooti Ahirwar, G.

    2015-07-31

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi component plasma composed of electrons (denoted by e{sup −}), hydrogen ions (denoted by H{sup +}), helium ions (denoted by He{sup +}) and positively charged oxygen ions (denoted by O{sup +})in magnetized cold plasma. The wave is assumed to propagate perpendicular to the static magnetic field. It is found that the addition of heavy ions in the plasma dispersion modified the lower hybrid mode and also allowed an ion-ion mode. The frequencies of the lower hybrid and ion- ion hybrid modes are derived using cold plasma theory. It is observed that the effect of multi-ionfor different plasma densities on electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is to enhance the wave frequencies. The results are interpreted for the magnetosphere has been applied parameters by auroral acceleration region.

  12. Simulation of electron behavior in PIG ion source for 9 MeV cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J. Mu, X.; Ghergherehchi, M.; H. Yeon, Y.; W. Kim, J.; S. Chai, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we focus on a PIG source for producing intense H-ions inside a 9 MeV cyclotron. The properties of the PIG ion source were simulated for a variety of electric field distributions and magnetic field strengths using a CST particle studio. After analyzing the secondary electron emission (SEE) as a function of both magnetic and electric field strengths, we found that for the modeled PIG geometry, a magnetic field strength of 0.2 T provided the best results in terms of the number of secondary electrons. Furthermore, at 0.2 T, the number of secondary electrons proved to be greatest regardless of the cathode potential. Also, the modified PIG ion source with quartz insulation tubes was tested in a KIRAMS-13 cyclotron by varying the gas flow rate and arc current, respectively. The capacity of the designed ion source was also demonstrated by producing plasma inside the constructed 9 MeV cyclotron. As a result, the ion source is verified as being capable of producing an intense H- beam and high ion beam current for the desired 9 MeV cyclotron. The simulation results provide experimental constraints for optimizing the strength of the plasma and final ion beam current at a target inside a cyclotron.

  13. Beta-induced Alfven-acoustic eigenmodes in National Spherical Torus Experiment and DIII-D driven by beam ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.-Y.; Menard, J.; Nazikian, R.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Berk, H. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2009-05-15

    Kinetic theory and experimental observations of a special class of energetic particle driven instabilities called here beta-induced Alfven-acoustic eigenmodes (BAAEs) are reported confirming, previous results [N. N. Gorelenkov et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, B371 (2007)]. The kinetic theory is based on the ballooning dispersion relation where the drift frequency effects are retained. BAAE gaps are recovered in kinetic theory. It is shown that the observed certain low-frequency instabilities on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are consistent with their identification as BAAEs. BAAEs deteriorate the fast ion confinement in DIII-D and can have a similar effect in next-step fusion plasmas, especially if excited together with multiple global toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmode instabilities. BAAEs can also be used to diagnose safety factor profiles, a technique known as magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy.

  14. Alfven Eigenmode Stability and Fast Ion Transport in High qmin Steady State Discharges on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. J.; Grierson, B.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Nazikian, R.; Solomon, W.; Holcomb, C. T.; Ferron, J. R.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Collins, C.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2015-11-01

    A wide range of Alfven eigenmode (AE) activity and beam ion loss is observed in high qmin steady state target plasmas on DIII-D. Modeling the losses with the NOVA-k code and the Critical Gradient Model indicates that the observed reduction in the neutron signal, usually up to 20 % , can be attributed to the AEs. In those high qmin reversed shear discharges both normal shear and reversed shear AEs are excited. The normal shear AEs can be suppressed by increasing the pressure gradient or increasing the q(0). However, the reversed shear AEs emerge from the Alfven continuum above a critical pressure gradient. It will be shown that both the normal and reversed shear AEs can be suppressed or their effects strongly mitigated by raising q(0) and moving qmin to larger radius. This prediction is consistent with observations in DIII-D EAST SS plasmas. Supported by US DOE No. DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FG02-97ER54415, DE-FC02-04ER54698, SC-G903402.

  15. Beta-induced Alfven-acousti Eigenmodes in NSTX and DIII-D Driven by Beam Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Berk, H. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G. Y.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Menard, J.; Nazikian, R.

    2009-03-06

    Kinetic theory and experimental observations of a special class of energetic particle driven instabilities called here Beta-induced Alfven-Acoustic Eigenmodes (BAAE) are reported confirming previous results [N.N. Gorelenkov H.L. Berk, N.A. Crocker et. al. Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49 B371 (2007)] The kinetic theory is based on the ballooning dispersion relation where the drift frequency effects are retained. BAAE gaps are recovered in kinetic theory. It is shown that the observed certain low-frequency instabilities on DIII-D [J.L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, S.M. Kaye, Y.-K M. Peng et. al., Nucl. Fusion 40 3Y 557 (2000)] are consistent with their identification as BAAEs. BAAEs deteriorated the fast ion confinement in DIII-D and can have a similar effect in next-step fusion plasmas, especially if excited together with multiple global Toroidicity-induced shear Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) instabilities. BAAEs can also be used to diagnose safety factor profiles, a technique known as magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy.

  16. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Robinson, Errol W.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has seen increased application for high spatial chemical imaging of complex biological surfaces. The advent and commercial availability of cluster and polyatomic primary ion sources (e.g. Au and Bi cluster and buckminsterfullerene (C60)) provide improved secondary ion yield and decreased fragmentation of surface species, thus accessibility to intact molecular ions. Despite developments in primary ion sources, development of mass spectrometers to fully exploit their advantages has been limited. Tandem mass spectrometry for identification of secondary ions is highly desirable, but implementation has proven to be difficult. Similarly, high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy would greatly improve the chemical specificity of SIMS. Here we combine, for the first time, the advantages of a C60 primary ion source with the ultra-high mass resolving power and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Mass resolving power in excess of 100,000 (m/Δm50%) is demonstrated, with mass measurement accuracies below 3 parts-per-million. Imaging of mouse brain tissue at 40 μm pixel size is shown. Tandem mass spectrometry of ions from biological tissue is demonstrated and molecular formulae can be assigned to fragment ions.

  17. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, N.C.; Limbach, P.A.; Shomo, R.E. II; Marshall, A.G. ); Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E. )

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF{sup {minus}}{sub 6} fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H){sup +} ions) of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with {ital tetra}-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol{sup ( )} sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon{sup ( )}. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  18. Fast neutral beam ion source coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas C.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Shomo, Ronald E., II; Marshall, Alan G.; Appelhans, Anthony D.; Delmore, James E.

    1991-11-01

    The coupling of an autoneutralizing SF-6 fast ion-beam gun to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The fast neutral beam provides for secondary-ion-type FT/ICR mass analysis [e.g., production of abundant pseudomolecular (M+H)+ ions] of involatile samples without the need for external ion injection, since ions are formed at the entrance to the ICR ion trap. The design, construction, and testing of the hybrid instrument are described. The feasibility of the experiment (for both broadband and high-resolution FT/ICR positive-ion mass spectra) is demonstrated with tetra-butylammonium bromide and a Tylenol■ sample. The ability to analyze high molecular weight polymers with high mass resolution is demonstrated for Teflon■. All of the advantages of the fast neutral beam ion source previously demonstrated with quadrupole mass analysis are preserved, and the additional advantages of FT/ICR mass analysis (e.g., high mass resolving power, ion trapping) are retained.

  19. Heating of ions to superthermal energies in the topside ionosphere by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungstrup, E.; Klumpar, D. M.; Heikkila, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The soft particle spectrometer on the Isis 2 spacecraft occasionally observes fluxes of ions moving upward out of the ionosphere in the vicinity of the auroral oval. These ion fluxes are characterized by a sharp pitch angle distribution usually peaked at an angle somewhat greater than 90 deg, indicative of particles heated to a large transverse temperature in a narrow range below the spacecraft. The observations are interpreted in terms of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves, which heat the ions to superthermal energies transverse to the earth's magnetic field. When the transverse energy increases, the repulsive force of the earth's magnetic field, proportional to the particle magnetic moment, repels the particles away from the earth.

  20. Nonlinear Alfven waves in high-speed solar wind streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Feldman, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A nonlinear proton distribution function that is an exact stationary solution of the nonlinear Vlasov equation and Maxwell's equations and which supports a single nonlinear transverse Alfven (ion cyclotron) wave that is circularly polarized and nondispersive is proposed for most of the observations during high-speed solar wind streams. This nonlinear distribution removes the strong Alfven wave instability, inconsistent with the persistence of the observed proton distribution functions in high-speed streams, found by the linear stability analysis. Model temperature anisotropies and drift velocities of the two spatially inhomogeneous bi-Maxwellian components are consistent with typical proton velocity distributions measured in high-speed streams at 1 AU. Two derived relations for each of the wave number and the phase velocity of the wave are obeyed within experimental uncertainties by two typical proton measurements. Our model also predicts that the alpha particle bulk flow velocity exceeds the proton particle bulk flow velocity, as is observed.

  1. High power Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.

    1988-01-01

    Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) powers of up to 17 MW have been coupled to JET limiter plasmas. The plasma stored energy has reached 7 MJ with 13 MW of RF in 5 MA discharges with Z/sub eff/ = 2. When I/sub p//B/sub /phi// = 1 MA/T the stored energy can be 50% greater than the Goldston L mode scaling. This is due to transient stabilisation of sawteeth (up to 3 s) and to a significant energy content in the minority particles accelerated by RF (up to 30% of the total stored energy). Central temperatures of T/sub e/ - 11 keV and T/sub i/ = 8 keV have been reached with RF alone. (He/sup 3/)D fusion experiments have given a 60 kW fusion yield (fusion rate of 2 /times/ 10/sup 16/ s/sup /minus/1/ in the form of energetic fast particles (14.7 MeV(H), 3.6 MeV(He/sup 4/)) in agreement with modelling. When transposing the same calculation to a (D)T scenario, Q is predicted to be between 0.l2 and 0.8 using plasma parameters already achieved. For the first time, a peaked density profile generated by pellet injection could be reheated and sustained by ICRF for 1.2 s. Electron heat transport in the central region is reduced by a factor 2 to 3. The fusion product n/sub io//tau//sub E/T/sub io/ reaches 2.2 /times/ 10/sup 20/ m/sup /minus/3//center dot/s/center dot/kev in 3 MA discharges which is a factor of 2.3 times larger than with normal density profile. 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm2. The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  3. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research.

  4. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yun Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-15

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam was got when work gas was CH{sub 4} while about 262 eμA of C{sup 5+} ion beam was obtained when work gas was C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  5. Nitrogen ion implantation into various materials using 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Seouk; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Lee, Seung Wook; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The installation of the 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) ion implantation beamline was recently completed at the Korea Basic Science Institute. The apparatus contains a beam monitoring system and a sample holder for the ion implantation process. The new implantation system can function as a multipurpose tool since it can implant a variety of ions, ranging hydrogen to uranium, into different materials with precise control and with implantation areas as large as 1-10 mm(2). The implantation chamber was designed to measure the beam properties with a diagnostic system as well as to perform ion implantation with an in situ system including a mass spectrometer. This advanced implantation system can be employed in novel applications, including the production of a variety of new materials such as metals, polymers, and ceramics and the irradiation testing and fabrication of structural and functional materials to be used in future nuclear fusion reactors. In this investigation, the first nitrogen ion implantation experiments were conducted using the new system. The 28 GHz ECRIS implanted low-energy, multi-charged nitrogen ions into copper, zinc, and cobalt substrates, and the ion implantation depth profiles were obtained. SRIM 2013 code was used to calculate the profiles under identical conditions, and the experimental and simulation results are presented and compared in this report. The depths and ranges of the ion distributions in the experimental and simulation results agree closely and demonstrate that the new system will enable the treatment of various substrates for advanced materials research. PMID:26931931

  6. Comparison of Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Absorption on Energetic Ions in NSTX and DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burby, J.; Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.

    2009-11-01

    Strong absorption of fast waves (FWs) on injected deuterons at ion cyclotron harmonic numbers in the 4-10 range is observed on both DIII-D and NSTX. The results from fast ion Dα spectroscopic measurements from the two devices differ significantly: deposition on fast ions peaks near the cyclotron harmonic layer closest to the magnetic axis in the conventional-aspect-ratio DIII-D, while results from the low-aspect-ratio NSTX show a broader deposition profile [1]. One root of the difference stems from the absorbing fast ions sampling more harmonic layers in NSTX than in DIII-D. We investigate cyclotron absorption in cases with multiple harmonic layers within a single ion gyroradius and related phenomena numerically and analytically by examining the response of individual charged particles to rf fields in various field configurations. 8pt [1] M. Podesta et al., RF Power in Plasmas (Proc.18th Top. Conf., Gent, Belgium, 2009), to be published.

  7. Alfven Continuum and Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fesenyuk, O. P.; Kolesnichenko, Ya. I.; Lutsenko, V. V.; White, R. B.; Yakovenko, Yu. V.

    2004-09-17

    The Alfven continuum (AC) in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is investigated with the AC code COBRA. The resonant interaction of Alfven eigenmodes and the fast ions produced by neutral beam injection is analyzed. Alfven eigenmodes residing in one of the widest gaps of the NCSX AC, the ellipticity-induced gap, are studied with the code BOA-E.

  8. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, S. Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Noda, K.; Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T.

    2014-02-15

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C{sup 4+} ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8–10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C{sup 4+}, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  9. Impact of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    Effect of the ring current ions in the real part of electromagnetic ion Cyclotron wave dispersion relation is studied on global scale. Recent Cluster observations by Engebretson et al. showed that although the temperature anisotropy of is energetic (> 10 keV) ring current protons was high during the entire 22 November 2003 perigee pass, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves were observed only in conjunction with intensification of the ion fluxes below 1 keV by over an order of magnitude. To study the effect of the ring current ions on the wave dispersive properties and the corresponding global wave redistribution, we use a self-consistent model of interacting ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows: First, the plasma density enhancement in the night MLT sector during the main and recovery storm phases is mostly caused by injection of suprathermal plasma sheet H + (approximately < 1 keV), which dominate the thermal plasma density. Second, during the recovery storm phases, the ring current modification of the wave dispersion relation leads to a qualitative change of the wave patterns in the postmidnight-dawn sector for L > 4.75. This "new" wave activity is well organized by outward edges of dense suprathermal ring current spots, and the waves are not observed if the ring current ions are not included in the real part of dispersion relation. Third, the most intense wave-induced ring current precipitation is located in the night MLT sector and caused by modification of the wave dispersion relation. The strongest precipitating fluxes of about 8 X 10(exp 6)/ (cm(exp 2) - s X st) are found near L=5.75, MLT=2 during the early recovery phase on 4 May. Finally, the nightside precipitation is more intense than the dayside fluxes, even if there are less intense waves, because the convection field moves ring current ions into the loss cone on the nightside, but drives

  10. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-19

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting inmore » nearly lossless transmission.« less

  11. Field structure and electron life times in the MEFISTO electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, M.; Altwegg, K.; Shea, H.; Wurz, P.

    2008-03-01

    The complex magnetic field of the permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source MEFISTO located at the University of Berne has been numerically simulated. For the first time the magnetized volume qualified for electron cyclotron resonance at 2.45 GHz and 87.5 mT has been analyzed in highly detailed 3D simulations with unprecedented resolution. New results were obtained from the numerical simulation of 25,211 electron trajectories. The evident characteristic ion sputtering trident of hexapole confined ECR ion sources has been identified with the field and electron trajectory distribution. Furthermore, unexpected long electron trajectory lifetimes were found.

  12. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Spaedtke, P.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Tinschert, K.; Maimone, F.

    2012-02-15

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  13. Investigations on the structure of the extracted ion beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Spädtke, P; Lang, R; Mäder, J; Maimone, F; Rossbach, J; Tinschert, K

    2012-02-01

    Using improved beam diagnostic tools, the structure of an ion beam extracted from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) becomes visible. Especially viewing targets to display the beam profile and pepper pot devices for emittance measurements turned out to be very useful. On the contrary, diagnostic tools integrating over one space coordinate like wire harps for profile measurements or slit-slit devices, respectively slit-grid devices to measure the emittance might be applicable for beam transport investigations in a quadrupole channel, but are not very meaningful for investigations regarding the given ECRIS symmetry. Here we try to reproduce the experimentally found structure on the ion beam by simulation. For the simulation, a certain model has to be used to reproduce the experimental results. The model is also described in this paper.

  14. Multiaperture ion beam extraction from gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance source of multicharged ions.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, A; Dorf, M; Zorin, V; Bokhanov, A; Izotov, I; Razin, S; Skalyga, V; Rossbach, J; Spädtke, P; Balabaev, A

    2008-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source with quasi-gas-dynamic regime of plasma confinement (ReGIS), constructed at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia, provides opportunities for extracting intense and high-brightness multicharged ion beams. Despite the short plasma lifetime in a magnetic trap of a ReGIS, the degree of multiple ionization may be significantly enhanced by the increase in power and frequency of the applied microwave radiation. The present work is focused on studying the intense beam quality of this source by the pepper-pot method. A single beamlet emittance measured by the pepper-pot method was found to be approximately 70 pi mm mrad, and the total extracted beam current obtained at 14 kV extraction voltage was approximately 25 mA. The results of the numerical simulations of ion beam extraction are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Multiaperture ion beam extraction from gas-dynamic electron cyclotron resonance source of multicharged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorov, A.; Dorf, M.; Zorin, V.; Bokhanov, A.; Izotov, I.; Razin, S.; Skalyga, V.; Rossbach, J.; Spaedtke, P.; Balabaev, A.

    2008-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source with quasi-gas-dynamic regime of plasma confinement (ReGIS), constructed at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia, provides opportunities for extracting intense and high-brightness multicharged ion beams. Despite the short plasma lifetime in a magnetic trap of a ReGIS, the degree of multiple ionization may be significantly enhanced by the increase in power and frequency of the applied microwave radiation. The present work is focused on studying the intense beam quality of this source by the pepper-pot method. A single beamlet emittance measured by the pepper-pot method was found to be {approx}70 {pi} mm mrad, and the total extracted beam current obtained at 14 kV extraction voltage was {approx}25 mA. The results of the numerical simulations of ion beam extraction are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Anisotropic distribution function of minority tail ions generated by strong ion-cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S.; Colestock, P.

    1989-05-01

    The highly anisotropic particle distribution function of minority tail ions driven by ion-cyclotron resonance heating at the fundamental harmonic is calculated in a two-dimensional velocity space. It is assumed that the heating is strong enough to drive most of the resonant ions above the in-electron critical slowing-down energy. Simple analytic expressions for the tail distribution are obtained fro the case when the Doppler effect is sufficiently large to flatten the sharp pitch angle dependence in the bounce averaged qualilinear heating coefficient, D/sub b/, and for the case when D/sub b/ is assumed to be constant in pitch angle and energy. It is found that a simple constant-D/sub b/ solution can be used instead of the more complicated sharp-D/sub b/ solution for many analytic purposes. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Effect of pulse-modulated microwaves on fullerene ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Asaji, T; Uchida, T; Minezaki, H; Oshima, K; Racz, R; Muramatsu, M; Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Kato, Y; Yoshida, Y

    2012-02-01

    Fullerene plasmas generated by pulse-modulated microwaves have been investigated under typical conditions at the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The effect of the pulse modulation is distinct from that of simply structured gases, and then the density of the fullerene plasmas increased as decreasing the duty ratio. The density for a pulse width of 10 μs at the period of 100 μs is 1.34 times higher than that for CW mode. We have studied the responses of fullerene and argon plasmas to pulsed microwaves. After the turnoff of microwave power, fullerene plasmas lasted ∼30 times longer than argon plasmas.

  18. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric study of gas-phase ion-molecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Winnie Weixin.

    1993-01-01

    Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions of rare earth (include Sc, Y, and all the lanthanide series) metal ion (except Pm[sup +]) reactions with benzene and alkyl benzene ligands were systematically studied by FT/ICR mass spectrometry. An electronic configuration d[sup 1]s[sup 1] was found to be necessary for the ions to insert into C-C and/or C-H bonds of alkyl groups of the ligands. When the promotion energy for the transition groups of the ligands. When the promotion energy for the transition f[sup n]s[sup 1] [yields] f[sup n[minus]1]d[sup 1]s[sup 1] was large, no reaction resulting from activation was observed. Some of the rare earth metal ions do not activate C-C or C-H bond of saturated hydrocarbons, but are rather reactive with alkyl groups of aromatic ligands. Most of the rare earth ions only from intact complex ions with benzene, while Sc[sup +], Y[sup +], La[sup +] and Ce[sup +] form metal-benzyne ions. Rare earth metal ions are quite oxophilic and readily react with background oxygen containing species when the reactions with organic ligand(s). A hyperbolic ion trap for ET/ICR mass spectrometry was evaluated experimentally and compared with the most commonly used cubic ion trap. The hyperbolic trap offers several advantages over the cubic ion trap. The hyperbolic trap offers several advantages over the cubic trap: improved mass resolving power, improved mass accuracy for wide-range mass spectra, and elimination of frequency shift due to different ion cyclotron radius. But z-ejection is more pronounced in the hyperbolic than in the cubic trap.

  19. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass resolution and dynamic range limits calculated by computer modeling of ion cloud motion.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Gleb; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Blakney, Greg T; Marshall, Alan G; Heeren, Ron M A; Nikolaev, Eugene N

    2012-02-01

    Particle-in-Cell (PIC) ion trajectory calculations provide the most realistic simulation of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) experiments by efficient and accurate calculation of the forces acting on each ion in an ensemble (cloud), including Coulomb interactions (space charge), the electric field of the ICR trap electrodes, image charges on the trap electrodes, the magnetic field, and collisions with neutral gas molecules. It has been shown recently that ion cloud collective behavior is required to generate an FT-ICR signal and that two main phenomena influence mass resolution and dynamic range. The first is formation of an ellipsoidal ion cloud (termed "condensation") at a critical ion number (density), which facilitates signal generation in an FT-ICR cell of arbitrary geometry because the condensed cloud behaves as a quasi-ion. The second phenomenon is peak coalescence. Ion resonances that are closely spaced in m/z coalesce into one resonance if the ion number (density) exceeds a threshold that depends on magnetic field strength, ion cyclotron radius, ion masses and mass difference, and ion initial spatial distribution. These two phenomena decrease dynamic range by rapid cloud dephasing at small ion density and by cloud coalescence at high ion density. Here, we use PIC simulations to quantitate the dependence of coalescence on each critical parameter. Transitions between independent and coalesced motion were observed in a series of the experiments that systematically varied ion number, magnetic field strength, ion radius, ion m/z, ion m/z difference, and ion initial spatial distribution (the present simulations begin from elliptically-shaped ion clouds with constant ion density distribution). Our simulations show that mass resolution is constant at a given magnetic field strength with increasing ion number until a critical value (N) is reached. N dependence on magnetic field strength, cyclotron radius, ion mass, and difference between ion masses

  20. Numerical study of ion-cyclotron resonant interaction via hybrid-Vlasov simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Francesco; Iazzolino, Antonio; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2010-05-15

    Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical simulations are used to investigate the collisionless resonant interaction of ions with ion-cyclotron waves in parallel propagation with respect to a background magnetic field. In linear regime, analytical results on wave damping, obtained by integrating the linearized Vlasov equation through the well-known characteristics method, are compared with the numerical results. Then, the ion heating process and the consequent generation of temperature anisotropy in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field are investigated numerically in detail. In nonlinear regime, the numerical results show that the distribution of particle velocities is strongly distorted due to the resonant ion-cyclotron interaction with the formation of diffusive plateaus in the longitudinal direction (with respect to the ambient field) and significantly departs from the Maxwellian equilibrium. These results are relevant in many plasma physics environments, such as the solar wind, where the process of ion-cyclotron heating and the generation of temperature anisotropy and non-Maxwellian velocity distributions are routinely recovered in many in situ measurements, or the laboratory plasmas, where the resonant interaction of ions with ion-cyclotron waves is the primary source of auxiliary heating in the confining apparatus.

  1. Stimulated scattering of a whistler wave off ion-cyclotron and ion-acoustic modes in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Annou, R.; Tripathi, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    A whistler wave propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma undergoes stimulated Brillioun scattering off ion-cyclotron and ion-acoustic modes. The dust has little effect on nonlinear coupling. However, it reduces the growth rate by introducing linear damping on the low-frequency modes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  3. The Flux Control of Cyclotron Ions Incident upon the Substrate by Employing the Ponderomotive Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Naoyuki; Nakamori, Hidetaka; Ikehata, Takashi; Mase, Hiroshi

    2000-10-01

    The plasma-assisted deposition is desirable processing technique to grow the epitaxial film such as oxide-metal compound semiconductor on the lower temperature substrate. To control its stoichiometry ratio and orientation more precisely, handling the flux of oxygen and metallic ions incident upon the substrate is required. Here, we propose to employ the ponderomotive potential acting independently on each species of cyclotron ions in order to govern a new method for the flux control of ions selected before the substrate. Our idea is to form the potential structure decelerating the ions before the substrate, resulting in the enhancement of the ponderomotive force on their ions. The preliminary experiment is carried out using the magnetized plasma column terminated by the floating substrate where the localized rotating electrostatic field yielding the ponderomotive potential is impressed. It is found that the ion flux decreases when rf frequency approaches to the cyclotron frequency of helium ion. However, Q-value is small because the ions would not make the cyclotron motion many times until arriving at the substrate. In order to decelerate ions, we try to form the potential hump and/or to reconstruct the ion sheath to the effective electron sheath by the ponderomotive potential.

  4. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  5. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Fang, X.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Cao, Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-08-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  6. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented. PMID:25173256

  7. Kinetic instabilities in pulsed operation mode of a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Komppula, J; Kronholm, R; Laulainen, J; Izotov, I; Mansfeld, D; Skalyga, V

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of kinetic plasma instabilities is studied in pulsed operation mode of a 14 GHz A-electron cyclotron resonance type electron cyclotron resonance ion source. It is shown that the temporal delay between the plasma breakdown and the appearance of the instabilities is on the order of 10-100 ms. The most important parameters affecting the delay are magnetic field strength and neutral gas pressure. It is demonstrated that kinetic instabilities limit the high charge state ion beam production in the unstable operating regime. PMID:26931919

  8. Simulation of parameter scaling in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas using the GEM code

    SciTech Connect

    Cluggish, B.; Zhao, L.; Kim, J. S.

    2010-02-15

    Although heating power and gas pressure are two of the two of primary experimental ''knobs'' available to users of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources, there is still no clear understanding of how they interact in order to provide optimal plasma conditions. FAR-TECH, Inc. has performed a series of simulations with its generalized electron cyclotron resonance ion source model in which the power and pressure were varied over a wide range. Analysis of the numerical data produces scaling laws that predict the plasma parameters as a function of the power and pressure. These scaling laws are in general agreement with experimental data.

  9. Laser desorption studies of high mass biomolecules in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Solouki, T; Russell, D H

    1992-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization is used to obtain Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra of model peptides (e.g., gramicidin S, angiotensin I, renin substrate, melittin, and bovine insulin). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization yields ions having appreciable kinetic energies. Two methods for trapping the high kinetic energy ions are described: (i) the ion signal for [M+H]+ ions is shown to increase with increasing trapping voltages, and (ii) collisional relaxation is used for the detection of [M+H]+ ions of bovine insulin. Images PMID:1378614

  10. Phenomenology of Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; N.N. Gorelenkov; J. Menard

    2004-05-13

    Coherent oscillations with frequency 0.3 {le} {omega}/{omega}{sub ci} {le} 1, are seen in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, S.M. Kaye, Y-K.M. Peng, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. This paper presents new data and analysis comparing characteristics of the observed modes to the model of compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAE). The toroidal mode number has been measured and is typically between 7 < n < 9. The polarization of the modes, measured using an array of four Mirnov coils, is found to be compressional. The frequency scaling of the modes agrees with the predictions of a numerical 2-D code, but the detailed structure of the spectrum is not captured with the simple model. The fast ion distribution function, as calculated with the beam deposition code in TRANSP [R.V. Budny, Nucl. Fusion 34, 1247 (1994)], is shown to be qualitatively consistent with the constraints of the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance drive model. This model also predicts the observed scaling of the low frequency limit for CAE.

  11. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Hattori, T; Sugimoto, S; Sasai, K

    2014-02-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz. PMID:24593537

  12. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T. Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K.; Hattori, T.

    2014-02-15

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  13. Observation of increased ion cyclotron resonance signal duration through electric field perturbations.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Bruce, James E

    2005-09-15

    Ion motion in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is complex and the subject of ongoing theoretical and experimental studies. Two predominant pathways for the loss of ICR signals are thought to include damping of cyclotron motion, in which ions lose kinetic energy and radially damp toward the center of the ICR cell, and dephasing of ion coherence, in which ions of like cyclotron frequency become distributed out of phase at similar cyclotron radii. Both mechanisms result in the loss of induced ion image current in FTICR-MS measurements and are normally inseparable during time-domain signal analysis. For conventional ICR measurements which take advantage of ion ensembles, maximization of the ion population size and density can produce the desired effect of increasing phase coherence of ions during cyclotron motion. However, this approach also presents the risk of coalescence of ion packets of similar frequencies. In general, ICR researchers in the past have lacked the tools necessary to distinguish or independently control dephasing and damping mechanisms for ICR signal loss. Nonetheless, the ability to impart greater phase coherence of ions in ICR measurements will allow significant advances in FTICR-MS research by improving the current understanding of ICR signal loss contributions of dephasing and damping of ion ensembles, increasing overall time-domain signal length, and possibly, resulting in more routine ultrahigh resolution measurements. The results presented here demonstrate the ability to employ a high density electron beam to perturb electric fields within the ICR cell during detection of cyclotron motion, in an approach we call electron-promoted ion coherence (EPIC). As such, EPIC reduces ICR signal degradation through loss of phase coherence, and much longer time-domain signals can be obtained. Our results demonstrate that time-domain signals can be extended by more than a factor of 4 with the implementation of EPIC, as

  14. Double-peaked electrostatic ion cyclotron harmonic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardsen, S. A.; Gurnett, D. A.; Peterson, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic H(+) cyclotron harmonic waves are often observed along the auroral field lines at altitudes of 1-3.5 R(E) by the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite. A small fraction of these waves are found to have two peaks associated with each harmonic instead of one peak. The waves occur below the lower hybrid frequency and are usually relatively weak, about a factor of 4 smaller than typical electric field amplitudes of other H(+) cyclotron harmonic wave events. The double-peaked spectral signature is believed to be produced by Doppler shifts arising from the satellite velocity relative to the plasma rest frame. The waves were found to have wavelengths of the order of 300 m and phase velocities of the order of 150 km/s.

  15. Integrated modeling of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources and charge breeders with GEM, MCBC, and IonEx

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. S.; Zhao, L.; Cluggish, B. P.; Galkin, S. A.; Grubert, J. E.; Pardo, R. C.; Vondrasek, R. C.

    2010-02-15

    A numerical toolset to help in understanding physical processes in the electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder (ECRCB) and further to help optimization and design of current and future machines is presented. The toolset consists of three modules (Monte Carlo charge breeding code, generalized electron cyclotron resonance ion source modeling, and ion extraction), each modeling different processes occurring in the ECRCB from beam injection to extraction. The toolset provides qualitative study, such as parameter studies, and scaling of the operation, and physical understanding in the ECRCB. The methodology and a sample integrated modeling are presented.

  16. Simulating Negative Pickup Ions and Ion Cyclotron Wave Generation at Europa (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, R. T.; Cowee, M.; Gary, S. P.; Wei, H.; Coates, A. J.; Kataria, D. O.; Fu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The mass loading of space environments through the ionisation of planetary atmospheres is a fundamental process governing the plasma interactions and long term evolution of celestial bodies across the solar system. Regions containing significant pickup ion populations have been observed to exhibit a rich variety of electromagnetic plasma wave phenomena, the characteristics and properties of which can be used to infer the ion species present, their spatial and temporal distributions, and the global ionisation rates of the neutral material. In this study we present hybrid (kinetic ion, massless fluid electron) simulations of ion pickup and Ion Cyclotron (IC) waves observed in the Jovian magnetosphere and draw comparisons to sub-alfvénic pickup observed by Cassini in the Saturnian system, and also to supra-alfvénic pickup at planetary bodies immersed directly in the solar wind. At Jupiter, Europa has been identified as the secondary mass loader in the magnetosphere, orbiting within a neutral gas torus at ~9.38 Rj. Near Europa, Galileo magnetometer observations displayed bursty IC wave characteristics at the gyrofrequency of a number of species including SO2, K, Cl, O2, and Na, suggesting a complex mass loading environment. A particular deduction from the dataset was the presence of both positively and negatively charged pickup ions, inferred from the left and right hand polarisations of the transverse waves. Using hybrid simulations for both positively and negatively charged Cl pickup ions we are able to self-consistently reproduce the growth of both right and left hand near-circularly polarised waves in agreement with linear theory and, using the observed wave amplitudes, estimate Cl pickup ion densities at Europa.

  17. Ion cyclotron waves at Io: Implications for torus composition and variations of Io atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2003-04-01

    When the flowing torus plasma encounters the upper atmosphere of Io, newly created ions are accelerated by the motional electric field. Many of these ions are reneutralized and form a spray of fast neutrals that travel far away from Io before being reionized and picked up into the torus. These ions have ring distributions able to provide free energy for wave growth via cyclotron resonance. Galileo data showed the existence of ion cyclotron waves in the Io torus, with frequencies near the gyrofrequencies of SO2+, SO+, and S+ ions. Wave characteristics change along each flyby, and from one orbit to another. The observed wave variability indicates that the Io torus is not uniform, and that ion pickup composition changes with time and space. As pickup ions originate from Io atmosphere, the wave variation suggests that the moon´s atmosphere is changing spatially as well as temporarily. We use kinetic dispersion analysis to estimate the densities in the torus for the three ring distributions that are needed to have either SO2+ (orbits I0 and I32) or SO+ (orbits I24, I25, and I27) waves as the dominant component, and S+ ion cyclotron instability above threshold. We infer from wave properties that the atmosphere of Io varies temporally throughout the mission but that it also has a spatial variation in composition at any instant of time.

  18. Ion-cyclotron instability in plasmas described by product-bi-kappa distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, M. S. dos; Ziebell, L. F. Gaelzer, R.

    2015-12-15

    The dispersion relation for parallel propagating waves in the ion-cyclotron branch is investigated numerically by considering that the velocity distribution of the ion population is a function of type product-bi-kappa. We investigate the effects of the non-thermal features and of the anisotropy associated with this type of distribution on the ion-cyclotron instability, as well as the influence of different forms of the electron distribution, by considering Maxwellian distributions, bi-kappa distributions, and product-bi-kappa distributions. The cases of ions described by either Maxwellian or bi-kappa distributions are also considered, for comparison. The results of the numerical analysis show that the increase in the non-thermal character associated with the anisotropic kappa distributions for ions contributes to enhance the instability as compared to that obtained in the Maxwellian case, in magnitude and in wave number range, with more significant enhancement for the case of ion product-bi-kappa distributions than for the case of ion bi-kappa distributions. It is also shown that the ion-cyclotron instability is decreased if the electrons are described by product-bi-kappa distributions, while electrons described by bi-kappa distributions lead to growth rates which are very similar to those obtained considering a Maxwellian distribution for the electron population.

  19. A CW radiofrequency ion source for production of negative hydrogen ion beams for cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J.; Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. P.

    2015-04-01

    A CW 13.56 MHz radiofrequency-driven ion source RADIS for production of H- and D- beams is under development for replacing the filament-driven ion source of the MCC30/15 cyclotron. The RF ion source has a 16-pole multicusp plasma chamber, an electromagnet-based magnetic filter and an external planar spiral RF antenna behind an AlN window. The extraction is a 5-electrode system with an adjustable puller electrode voltage for optimizing the beam formation, a water-cooled electron dump electrode and an accelerating einzel lens. At 2650 W of RF power, the source produces 1 mA of H- (2.6 mA/cm2), which is the intensity needed at injection for production of 200 µA H+ with the filament-driven ion source. A simple pepperpot device has been developed for characterizing the beam emittance. Plans for improving the power efficiency with the use of a new permanent magnet front plate is discussed.

  20. A CW radiofrequency ion source for production of negative hydrogen ion beams for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J.; Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. P.

    2015-04-08

    A CW 13.56 MHz radiofrequency-driven ion source RADIS for production of H{sup −} and D{sup −} beams is under development for replacing the filament-driven ion source of the MCC30/15 cyclotron. The RF ion source has a 16-pole multicusp plasma chamber, an electromagnet-based magnetic filter and an external planar spiral RF antenna behind an AlN window. The extraction is a 5-electrode system with an adjustable puller electrode voltage for optimizing the beam formation, a water-cooled electron dump electrode and an accelerating einzel lens. At 2650 W of RF power, the source produces 1 mA of H{sup −} (2.6 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is the intensity needed at injection for production of 200 µA H{sup +} with the filament-driven ion source. A simple pepperpot device has been developed for characterizing the beam emittance. Plans for improving the power efficiency with the use of a new permanent magnet front plate is discussed.

  1. Latitudinal dependence of nonlinear interaction between electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave and terrestrial ring current ions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhenpeng Zhu, Hui; Zheng, Huinan; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhang, Min; Liu, Y. C.-M.; Shen, Chao; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2014-05-15

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can lead to the rapid decay (on a timescale of hours) of the terrestrial ring current. Such decay process is usually investigated in the framework of quasi-linear theory. Here, both theoretical analysis and test-particle simulation are performed to understand the nonlinear interaction between ring current ions and EMIC waves. In particular, the dependence of the nonlinear wave-particle interaction processes on the ion initial latitude is investigated in detail. These nonlinear processes are classified into the phase trapping and phase bunching, and the phase bunching is further divided into the channel and cluster effects. Compared to the prediction of the quasi-linear theory, the ring current decay rate can be reduced by the phase trapping, increased by the channel effect phase bunching, but non-deterministically influenced by the cluster effect phase bunching. The ion initial latitude changes the occurrence of the phase trapping, modulates the transport direction and strength of the cluster effect phase bunching, and only slightly affects the channel effect phase bunching. The current results suggest that the latitudinal dependence of these nonlinear processes should be considered in the evaluation of the ring current decay induced by EMIC waves.

  2. Oscillating two stream instability of electromagnetic pump in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Nafis; Tripathi, V. K.; Rafat, M.; Husain, Mudassir M.

    2009-06-15

    An analytical formalism of oscillating two stream instability of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a plasma is developed. The instability produces electrostatic ion cyclotron sidebands and a driven low frequency mode. The nonlinear coupling arises primarily due to the motion of ions and is strong when the pump frequency is close to ion cyclotron frequency and the oscillatory ion velocity is a significant fraction of acoustic speed. For propagation perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, the X-mode pump wave produces flute type perturbation with maximum growth rate at some specific wavelengths, which are three to four times larger than the ion Larmor radius. For propagation at oblique angles to ambient magnetic field, the ion cyclotron O-mode, the growth rate increases with the wave number of the low frequency mode.

  3. Scaling of Kinetic Instability Induced Fast Ion Losses in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; D. Darrow; S. Medley; J. Menard; H. Park; L. Roquemore; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; S. Kubota; K.C. Lee

    2005-06-24

    During neutral beam injection (NBI) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), a wide variety of fast ion driven instabilities is excited by the large ratio of fast ion velocity to Alfven velocity, together with the relatively high fast ion beta, beta(sub)f. The fast ion instabilities have frequencies ranging from a few kilohertz to the ion cyclotron frequency. The modes can be divided roughly into three categories, starting with Energetic Particle Modes (EPM) in the lowest frequency range (0 to 120 kHz), the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) in the intermediate frequency range (50 to 200 kHz) and the Compressional and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE and GAE, respectively) from approximately equal to 300 kHz up to the ion cyclotron frequency. Each of these categories of modes exhibits a wide range of behavior, including quasi-continuous oscillation, bursting, chirping and, except for the lower frequency range, turbulence.

  4. On the cyclotron resonance mechanism for magnetic field effects on transmembrane ion conductivity.

    PubMed

    Halle, B

    1988-01-01

    The cyclotron resonance model, recently proposed to account for physiological response to weak environmental magnetic fields, is shown to violate the laws of classical mechanics. Further, it is argued that the ubiquitous presence of dynamic friction in fluid media precludes significant magnetic effects on membrane ion transport. PMID:2461205

  5. Effect of a RF Wave on Ion Cyclotron Instability in Size Distributed Impurities Containing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K.; Annou, R.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of a large amplitude lower hybrid wave on current driven ion cyclotron waves in a dusty plasma where dust grains are size distributed is examined. The influence of the lower hybrid wave on the stabilization of the instability is studied. The efficacy of rf is dust density dependent.

  6. Ion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Wisconsin Tokapole II

    SciTech Connect

    Biddle, A. P.

    1980-06-01

    Ion temperatures of 75 eV, a doubling of the ohmic heating temperature in a normal discharge, have been achieved using the fast magnetosonic wave heating at the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the cyclotron frequency in a single component hydrogen plasma. The wave launching structure is a single turn, shielded, insulated loop which constitutes the inductor of the rf source tank circuit. Power levels of 800 kW have been applied to the plasma for periods of up to 1.1 milliseconds. Good agreement has been found between theory and experiment for loading and wave propagation in the plasma for m = 0 and m = +1 modes. Eigenmodes have been observed by peaking of both the rf wave amplitude and the loading of the oscillator, as well as by oscillator frequency shifts imposed by their passage.

  7. Lower Hybrid Oscillations in Multicomponent Space Plasmas Subjected to Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Moore, T. E.; Liemohn, M. W.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    It is found that in multicomponent plasmas subjected to Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves, such as are observed in regions of the outer plasmasphere and ring current-plasmapause overlap, lower hybrid oscillations are generated. The addition of a minor heavy ion component to a proton-electron plasma significantly lowers the low-frequency electric wave amplitude needed for lower hybrid wave excitation. It is found that the lower hybrid wave energy density level is determined by the nonlinear process of induced scattering by ions and electrons; hydrogen ions in the region of resonant velocities are accelerated; and nonresonant particles are weakly heated due to the induced scattering. For a given example, the light resonant ions have an energy gain factor of 20, leading to the development of a high-energy tail in the H(+) distribution function due to low-frequency waves.

  8. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  9. Gas Feeding System Supplying the U-400M Cyclotron Ion Source with Hydrogen Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Angilopov, V.V.; Apasov, V.A.

    2005-07-15

    Automated system feeding into ion source hydrogen isotopes as molecules with preset ratio of the fluxes is described. The control system automatically maintained the working parameters and provided graphic and digital representation of the controlled processes. The radiofrequency (RF) ion source installed at the axial injection line of the cyclotron produced ion beams of HD{sup +}, HT{sup +}, DT{sup +}, D{sub 2}H{sup +}, etc. At a several months DT{sup +} beam acceleration the tritium consumption was less than 108 Bq/hr. The intensity of a 58.2 MeV triton beam (T{sup +} ions) extracted from the cyclotron chamber was about 10 nA.

  10. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) Mass Spectrometry: Revisited.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jared B; Robinson, Errol W; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-03-15

    We revisited the implementation of 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) within the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. UVPD performance characteristics were examined in the context of recent developments in the understanding of UVPD and in-cell tandem mass spectrometry. Efficient UVPD and photo-ECD of a model peptide and proteins within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer are accomplished through appropriate modulation of laser pulse timing, relative to ion magnetron motion and the potential applied to an ion optical element upon which photons impinge. It is shown that UVPD yields efficient and extensive fragmentation, resulting in excellent sequence coverage for model peptide and protein cations.

  11. A comprehensive analysis of ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Zachary; Simon, Sven; Kabanovic, Slawa

    2016-09-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of ion cyclotron waves in the equatorial magnetosphere of Saturn, considering all magnetic field data collected during the Cassini era (totaling to over 4 years of data from the equatorial plane). This dataset includes eight targeted flybys of Enceladus, three targeted flybys of Dione, and three targeted flybys of Rhea. Because all remaining orbits of Cassini are high-inclination, our study provides the complete map of ion cyclotron waves in Saturn's equatorial magnetosphere during the Cassini era. We provide catalogs of the radial and longitudinal dependencies of the occurrence rate and amplitude of the ion cyclotron fundamental and first harmonic wave modes. The fundamental wave mode is omnipresent between the orbits of Enceladus and Dione and evenly distributed across all Local Times. The occurrence rate of the fundamental mode displays a Fermi-Dirac-like profile with respect to radial distance from Saturn. Detection of the first harmonic mode is a rare event occurring in only 0.49% of measurements taken and always in conjunction with the fundamental mode. We also search for a dependency of the ion cyclotron wave field on the orbital positions of the icy moons Enceladus, Dione, and Rhea. On magnetospheric length scales, the wave field is independent of the moons' orbital positions. For Enceladus, we analyze wave amplitude profiles of seven close flybys (E9, E12, E13, E14, E17, E18, and E19), which occurred during the studied trajectory segments, to look for any local effects of Enceladan plume variability on the wave field. We find that even in the close vicinity of Enceladus, the wave amplitudes display no discernible dependency on Enceladus' angular distance to its orbital apocenter. Thus, the correlation between plume activity and angular distance to apocenter proposed by Hedman et al. (2013) does not leave a clearly distinguishable imprint in the ion cyclotron wave field.

  12. On cyclotron wave heating and acceleration of solar wind ions in the outer corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, C.-Y.; Marsch, E.

    2001-05-01

    The preferential heating and acceleration of O+5 ions, as observed by Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) [Kohl et al., 1998] in the solar coronal holes have been interpreted and modeled by invoking wave-particle cyclotron resonance [Cranmer et al., 1999a, 1999b]. However, in the model of Cranmer et al. [1999a, 1999b] and in other subsequent models the assumption of a rigid slope of the wave spectrum was made in calculating the wave energy absortion by the different ion species. In the present paper it is shown that a self-consistent treatment of the wave damping and absorption is necessary and leads to substantially different results. On the basis of quasi-linear theory, the interaction between the ions and the ion-cyclotron waves [Marsch et al., 1982a; Marsch, 1998] is studied. The total energy conservation equation, including the kinetic energy of the resonant particles and the wave energy, is derived and discussed in detail. The spectral evolution equation for cyclotron waves, when being controlled by the wave growth/damping rate and WKB effects, is solved self-consistently together with the full set of anisotropic multifluid equations for the ions including the cyclotron-resonance wave heating and acceleration rates. From the numerical results we reach the following conclusions: (1) It is physically questionable to use a spectrum with a fixed spectral slope near the cyclotron resonance when one calculates the partition of wave energy among the different ionic species and the kinetic degrees of freedom parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. This assumption neglects the important effects of wave absorption and the concurrent reshaping of the wave spectrum, and thus leads in the dissipation domain to extremely low amplitudes of the waves and to difficulties in supplying enough energy to balance the wave absorption at the cyclotron resonances. (2) If the spectrum is allowed to evolve self

  13. Parametric coupling of low frequency whistler to Alfven wave in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Nafis; Tripathi, V. K.; Rafat, M.; Husain, Mudassir M.

    2009-12-15

    The parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequency into a compressional Alfven wave and an electromagnetic sideband wave in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The pump wave propagates in the direction of ambient magnetic field whereas the decay waves propagate at oblique angles. When the pump wave is left circularly polarized the decay is not permitted kinematically as the momentum of pump photon always exceeds the sum of momenta of the decay wave photons. For the right circularly polarized whistler mode pump the decay is permitted with sideband nearly right circularly polarized. The density perturbation associated with the Alfven wave couples with the pump driven oscillatory velocities of ions and electrons to produce a current driving the sideband. The sideband and the pump exert pondermotive force on ions and electrons that drive the Alfven wave. The frequency and growth rate of the Alfven wave increase with the normalized pump frequency. The threshold power density, determined by the collisional damping rates of the decay waves is rather modest.

  14. Comparative study of ion cyclotron waves at Mars, Venus and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Zhang, T. L.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2011-08-01

    Ion cyclotron waves are generated in the solar wind when it picks up freshly ionized planetary exospheric ions. These waves grow from the free energy of the highly anisotropic distribution of fresh pickup ions, and are observed in the spacecraft frame with left-handed polarization and a wave frequency near the ion's gyrofrequency. At Mars and Venus and in the Earth's polar cusp, the solar wind directly interacts with the planetary exospheres. Ion cyclotron waves with many similar properties are observed in these diverse plasma environments. The ion cyclotron waves at Mars indicate its hydrogen exosphere to be extensive and asymmetric in the direction of the interplanetary electric field. The production of fast neutrals plays an important role in forming an extended exosphere in the shape and size observed. At Venus, the region of exospheric proton cyclotron wave production may be restricted to the magnetosheath. The waves observed in the solar wind at Venus appear to be largely produced by the solar-wind-Venus interaction, with some waves at higher frequencies formed near the Sun and carried outward by the solar wind to Venus. These waves have some similarity to the expected properties of exospherically produced proton pickup waves but are characterized by magnetic connection to the bow shock or by a lack of correlation with local solar wind properties respectively. Any confusion of solar derived waves with exospherically derived ion pickup waves is not an issue at Mars because the solar-produced waves are generally at much higher frequencies than the local pickup waves and the solar waves should be mostly absorbed when convected to Mars distance as the proton cyclotron frequency in the plasma frame approaches the frequency of the solar-produced waves. In the Earth's polar cusp, the wave properties of ion cyclotron waves are quite variable. Spatial gradients in the magnetic field may cause this variation as the background field changes between the regions in which

  15. Status of the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Toyo University

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Drentje, A. G.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.; Asaji, T.; Kato, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

    2014-02-15

    In the paper, the material science experiments, carried out recently using the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at Toyo University, are reported. We have investigated several methods to synthesize endohedral C{sub 60} using ion-ion and ion-molecule collision reaction in the ECRIS. Because of the simplicity of the configuration, we can install a large choice of additional equipment in the ECRIS. The Bio-Nano ECRIS is suitable not only to test the materials production but also to test technical developments to improve or understand the performance of an ECRIS.

  16. Simulation and beamline experiments for the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Damon S.; Leitner, Daniela; Lyneis, Claude M.; Grote, David P.

    2008-02-15

    The particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to incorporate both two- and three-dimensional sheath extraction models giving WARP the capability of simulating entire ion beam transport systems including the extraction of beams from plasma sources. In this article, we describe a method of producing initial ion distributions for plasma extraction simulations in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources based on experimentally measured sputtering on the source biased disk. Using this initialization method, we present preliminary results for extraction and transport simulations of an oxygen beam and compare them with experimental beam imaging on a quartz viewing plate for the superconducting ECR ion source VENUS.

  17. First operation of the charge-breeder electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source at the Texas A and M Cyclotron Institute

    SciTech Connect

    May, D. P.; Tabacaru, G.; Abegglen, F. P.; Cornelius, W. D.

    2010-02-15

    The 14.5 GHz electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) designed and fabricated specifically for charge breeding has been installed at the Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute for use in the institute's ongoing radioactive-ion-beam upgrade. The initial testing of the source has just begun with magnetic analysis of the ECRIS beam. The source has only been conditioning for a brief time at low microwave power, and it is continuing to improve. After the source has been conditioned and characterized, charge-breeding trials with stable beams from a singly ionizing source will begin.

  18. Effects of end cell ion cyclotron fluctuations on central-cell ion confinement in the tandem mirror experiment (TMX)

    SciTech Connect

    Grubb, D.P.; Casper, T.A.; Clauser, J.F.

    1980-04-07

    The tandem mirror device (TMX) exhibits gross stability to both MHD and microinstability modes. The end-cell plasmas provide the tandem with average minimum-B stability, while the efflux of plasma from the central cell maintains the end cells (plugs) at marginal stability to loss cone modes. For some operating conditions, a residual level of plug ion cyclotron fluctuations is detected. These oscillations dominate the fluctuation frequency spectra in both the plugs and the central cell. The presence of plug ion cyclotron fluctuations in the central cell leads to resonance heating of some of the central cell ions. This heating degrades the confinement of the central cell ions; thereby increasing the amount of warm plasma stream flowing through the plugs.

  19. Ion beam extraction from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources and the subsequent low energy beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winklehner, Daniel

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are capable of delivering high currents of Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) to heavy ion accelerators (e.g.: to the future FRIB). The use of a sextupole magnet for confinement of the plasma inside the source imposes a unique triangular structure on the beam. This, together with the multitude of ion species that are extracted at the same time and the high axial magnetic field at the plasma aperture, resulting from additional confining solenoids, make the simulation and design of ECRIS extraction systems particularly challenging. The first objective of this thesis was to refine and test a semi-empirical simulation model of the formation and extraction of HCIs from ECR ion sources as well as their transport through the subsequent Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) system. To this end, a set of utility functions was written to simplify performing the simulations. In the LEBT system, another interesting, yet so far unanswered, question arises: The influence of space-charge effects on the beam and the level of space-charge compensation in the ECRIS beam line. This interesting topic quickly became the second main objective of the thesis. A Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) was built and systematic measurements of the neutralization level in ECRIS LEBT systems were done for the first time as part of this thesis (this intensity and pressure regime was previously not well explored). The measured neutralization levels for typical ECRIS beams were found to be between 0% and 50% and agreed reasonably well with a simple formula developed by Gabovich et al. for highly neutralized proton and H- beams after it was re-derived and extended in this thesis for low neutralization and multiple species. Preliminary tests of the refined and integrated simulation model for the ECR ion sources VENUS and SuSI and their respective low energy beam transport systems include comparisons of measured beam currents, cross sections and emittances with the

  20. Space charge effects on relative peak heights in fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Uechi, G T; Dunbar, R C

    1992-10-01

    Ion trajectory calculations have confirmed that space charge interactions can be a source for mass discrimination seen in Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectra. As compared with the previously recognized mechanism of z-axis excitation, ion-ion repulsion is a mechanism which specifically affects relative peak heights of ions close in mass, and is most severe for low excitation radiofrequency (rf) amplitudes. In this mechanism, Coulomb repulsion significantly perturbs the motion of the ion clouds during excitation and alters the final cyclotron orbital radii. Under these conditions peak heights do not accurately reflect the true ion abundances in the FT-ICR spectrometer. Mass discrimination can be minimized by using low numbers of ions, low ion densities, and a short, high amplitude rf excitation waveform. Experimental observation of the relative peak heights of the m/z 91, 92, and 134 ions in n-butylbenzene gives quantitative confirmation of the results of the trajectory calculations. Chirp, SWIFT, and impulse excitation were modeled: impulse excitation was found to be most effective in minimizing the effects of space charge interactions.

  1. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  2. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power. PMID:22380155

  3. Numerical Simulation of a Multi-Cusp Ion Source for High Current H- Cyclotron at RISP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.

    The rare isotope science project (RISP) has been launched in 2011 to support a wide range science program in nuclear, material, and bio-medical sciences as well as interdisciplinary programs. The production of rare isotope beams at RISP is currently configured to include facilities for both an In-flight Fragmentation (IF) system and an Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) system, which will utilize a 70 MeV H- cyclotron. The cyclotron will deliver 70 kW proton beam power to ISOL targets, where rare isotopes are generated and re-accelerated by a linear accelerator. A multi-cusp ion source used widely in H- cyclotrons is designed to have cusp geometries of magnetic field inside the ion source chamber, where ions are confined and enhanced plasma densities. Therefore the magnetic confinement fields produced by a number of permanent magnetic poles help to increase H- beam currents. In this work a numerical simulation is performed to understand the effect of multi-cusp magnetic fields when the number of magnetic poles is varied from 6 to 14. It is found that the larger number of magnetic poles provides a stronger ion confinement yielding higher extracted H- ion currents while the extracted electron current becomes lower.

  4. Ion cyclotron instability at Io: Hybrid simulation results compared to in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šebek, Ondřej; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Walker, Raymond J.; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-08-01

    We present analysis of global three-dimensional hybrid simulations of Io's interaction with Jovian magnetospheric plasma. We apply a single-species model with simplified neutral-plasma chemistry and downscale Io in order to resolve the ion kinetic scales. We consider charge exchange, electron impact ionization, and photoionization by using variable rates of these processes to investigate their impact. Our results are in a good qualitative agreement with the in situ magnetic field measurements for five Galileo flybys around Io. The hybrid model describes ion kinetics self-consistently. This allows us to assess the distribution of temperature anisotropies around Io and thereby determine the possible triggering mechanism for waves observed near Io. We compare simulated dynamic spectra of magnetic fluctuations with in situ observations made by Galileo. Our results are consistent with both the spatial distribution and local amplitude of magnetic fluctuations found in the observations. Cyclotron waves, triggered probably by the growth of ion cyclotron instability, are observed mainly downstream of Io and on the flanks in regions farther from Io where the ion pickup rate is relatively low. Growth of the ion cyclotron instability is governed mainly by the charge exchange rate.

  5. Parametric coupling of lower hybrid wave with gyrating ion beam driven ion cyclotron instability in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rohtash; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-07-01

    A lower hybrid wave, launched into a tokamak for supplementary heating in the presence of neutral beam turned gyrating ion beam, is seen to excite some prominent channels of parametric decay. The beam driven deuterium cyclotron mode is further destabilized by the lower hybrid pump through the nonlinear 4-wave coupling, involving higher and lower frequency lower hybrid sidebands, when ω0/k0zv0z=(1-ωLH2/ω02) , where ωLH is the lower hybrid frequency, ω0 and k0z are the frequency and parallel wave number of the pump wave, and v0z is the velocity of ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. The growth rate increases with parallel wave number of the ion-cyclotron mode. The pump is also susceptible to parametric upconversion into an upper sideband shifted by the frequency of the negative energy deuterium cyclotron mode. For typical parameters, the growth rate of this channel is around one fiftieth of deuterium cyclotron frequency and falls off with the transverse wave number of the mode.

  6. Parametric coupling of lower hybrid wave with gyrating ion beam driven ion cyclotron instability in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohtash; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-07-15

    A lower hybrid wave, launched into a tokamak for supplementary heating in the presence of neutral beam turned gyrating ion beam, is seen to excite some prominent channels of parametric decay. The beam driven deuterium cyclotron mode is further destabilized by the lower hybrid pump through the nonlinear 4-wave coupling, involving higher and lower frequency lower hybrid sidebands, when ω{sub 0}/k{sub 0z}v{sub 0z}=(1−ω{sub LH}{sup 2}/ω{sub 0}{sup 2}) , where ω{sub LH} is the lower hybrid frequency, ω{sub 0} and k{sub 0z} are the frequency and parallel wave number of the pump wave, and v{sub 0z} is the velocity of ion beam parallel to the magnetic field. The growth rate increases with parallel wave number of the ion-cyclotron mode. The pump is also susceptible to parametric upconversion into an upper sideband shifted by the frequency of the negative energy deuterium cyclotron mode. For typical parameters, the growth rate of this channel is around one fiftieth of deuterium cyclotron frequency and falls off with the transverse wave number of the mode.

  7. Theory of peak coalescence in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boldin, Ivan A; Nikolaev, Eugene N

    2009-10-01

    Peak coalescence, i.e. the merging of two close peaks in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrum at a high number of ions, plays an important role in various FTICR experiments. In order to describe the coalescence phenomenon we would like to propose a new theory of motion for ion clouds with close mass-to-charge ratios, driven by a uniform magnetic field and Coulomb interactions between the clouds. We describe the motion of the ion clouds in terms of their averaged drift motion in crossed magnetic and electric fields. The ion clouds are considered to be of constant size and their motion is studied in two dimensions. The theory deals with the first-order approximation of the equations of motion in relation to dm/m, where dm is the mass difference and m is the mass of a single ion. The analysis was done for an arbitrary inter-cloud interaction potential, which makes it possible to analyze finite-size ion clouds of any shape. The final analytical expression for the condition of the onset of coalescence is found for the case of uniformly charged spheres. An algorithm for finding this condition for an arbitrary interaction potential is proposed. The critical number of ions for the peak coalescence to take place is shown to depend quadratically on the magnetic field strength and to be proportional to the cyclotron radius and inversely proportional to the ion masses.

  8. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  9. Fast damping of poloidal Alfven waves by bounce-resonant ions: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Rankin, R.; Sydorenko, D.; Zong, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Interplanetary shocks and solar wind dynamic pressure variations can excite intense ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves in the inner magnetosphere. An analysis of two interplanetary shocks observed by Cluster on 7 November 2004 and 30 August 2001 shows that the poloidal waves excited in these events are damped away rapidly in tens of minutes. This damping is the result of wave-particle interactions involving H+ and O+ ions with energies in the range of several to a few tens of keV [Wang et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2015]. Damping is found to be more effective in the plasmasphere boundary layer due to the relatively higher proportion of Landau resonant ions that exists in that region. In the November 2004 shock event it has been suggested that energy-dispersed ions observed travelling parallel and anti-parallel direction to the geomagnetic field immediately after the shockare locally accelerated rather than originating from Earth's ionosphere. We use test-particle simulations to show that adiabatic advection of the particle differential flux caused bydrift-bounce-resonance with ULF waves is responsible for the energy-dispersed ions observed in these events. In the simulations,Liouville's theorem is used to reconstruct the iondistribution function and differential flux in a model dipole magnetosphere.It is shown that flux modulations of H and O ions can be reproduced when test-particle ions are advanced in the electric fields of the 3D ULF wave model we have developed.

  10. Zeptomole-sensitivity electrospray ionization--Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of proteins.

    PubMed

    Belov, M E; Gorshkov, M V; Udseth, H R; Anderson, G A; Smith, R D

    2000-05-15

    Methods are being developed for ultrasensitive protein characterization based upon electrospray ionization (ESI) with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). The sensitivity of a FTICR mass spectrometer equipped with an ESI source depends on the overall ion transmission, which combines the probability of ionization, transmission efficiency, and ion trapping in the FTICR cell. Our developments implemented in a 3.5 tesla FTICR mass spectrometer include introduction and optimization of a newly designed electrodynamic ion funnel in the ESI interface, improving the ion beam characteristics in a quadrupole-electrostatic ion guide interface, and modification of the electrostatic ion guide. These developments provide a detection limit of approximately 30 zmol (approximately 18,000 molecules) for proteins with molecular weights ranging from 8 to 20 kDa.

  11. Characterization of proton beam emission from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. K.; Tayyab, M.; Bagchi, S.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.

    2013-04-01

    We report here characterization of the ions produced in the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) at RRCAT, which operates at 2.45 GHz and is aimed to produce a 50 keV, 30 mA proton beam. The plasma in the source was created using microwave power in the range of 150-1200 W. An efficient, single hole, three-electrode ion extraction system was employed to extract the ion beam from the ECRIS, and the extracted ion beam was characterized using a Thomson Parabola Ion Spectrograph, which provides complete information of all the differently charged species present in the plasma. The extracted ion beam current measured up to 8 mA beam current for 25 keV accelerating field and followed the Child-Langmuir law.

  12. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  13. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  14. Ion cyclotron waves near comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.; Dols, V. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    On October 19, 2014, comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) passed approximately 135,000 km from Mars. Previously,we predicted the amplitude of ion cyclotron waves which might be observed during the Siding Spring encounter. Ioncyclotron waves have been observed both in the vicinity of comets and of Mars. These waves are generated by theionization of neutrals in the flowing solar wind, which produces an unstable ring-beam velocity distribution. We estimated that, for a production rate of 2x1028 s-1, ion cyclotron wave with amplitudes over 0.1 nT would be present within ‡5 hours (1.2 million km) of closest approach. We will compare the actual observations made by the MAVEN spacecraft with these predictions. The spacecraft was close to or downstream of the martian bow shock, which complicates the interpretation of the data. Taking thisinto account, we will describe the observations and their implications for wave activity and cometary neutral production. We also present updated hybrid simulations of ion cyclotron wave generation. The simulations use our best estimate of solar wind conditions at the time of the encounter and a variable injection of 18 AMU pickup ions, at a rates consistent a model of the cometary neutrals.

  15. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T {perpendicular} {ne} T{parallel}and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single ``dressed`` test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between ``kinetic or causal instabilities`` and ``hydrodynamic instabilities`` are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k{parallel} = 0 for k{parallel} {ne} 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an ``inverted`` population of states.

  16. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T [perpendicular] [ne] T[parallel]and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single dressed'' test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between kinetic or causal instabilities'' and hydrodynamic instabilities'' are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k[parallel] = 0 for k[parallel] [ne] 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an inverted'' population of states.

  17. Conductance Control Iris for the K150 Cyclotron H- Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldanado, Armando; Clark, Henry; Tabacaru, Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    A multi-cusp H- ion source has been installed on the K150 cyclotron for the production of high intensity proton beams. These beams will be used to create secondary radioactive ions for the Upgrade Project [1]. One of the limiting factors in creating an intense beam comes from poor vacuum along the injection line caused by the ion source itself. A large flow of hydrogen gas is required to make the Hydrogen negative (H-) ions in the ion source. As a result, many of the hydrogen molecules exit the ion source and migrate into the injection line and deteriorate the vacuum. To reduce the flow of these molecules into the injection line, a computer controlled iris will be installed between the ion source and the injection line. With the iris set at the correct diameter, the vacuum in the injection line should improve the transport efficiency of the H- ions to the cyclotron inflector should increase. For the project we used an 8" OD Conflat DVM brand iris with an MDrive 17 Plus motor which will be controlled by a Labview software interface.

  18. Conductance Control Iris for the K150 Cyclotron H- Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Armando; Clark, Henry; Tabacaru, Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    A multi-cusp H- ion source has been installed on the K150 cyclotron for the production of high intensity proton beams. These beams will be used to create secondary radioactive ions for the Upgrade Project [1]. One of the limiting factors in creating an intense beam comes from poor vacuum along the injection line caused by the ion source itself. A large flow of hydrogen gas is required to make the Hydrogen negative (H-) ions in the ion source. As a result, many of the hydrogen molecules exit the ion source and migrate into the injection line and deteriorate the vacuum. To reduce the flow of these molecules into the injection line, a computer controlled iris will be installed between the ion source and the injection line. With the iris set at the correct diameter, the vacuum in the injection line should improve the transport efficiency of the H- ions to the cyclotron inflector should increase. For the project we used an 8'' OD Conflat DVM brand iris with an MDrive 17 Plus motor which will be controlled by a Labview software interface. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  19. Plasma Measurement of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for New Materials Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kiyokatsu; Uchida, Takashi; Minezaki, Hidekazu; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Asaji, Toyohisa; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been designed and developed for a synthesis of new materials such as endohedral metallofullerenes. The plasma chamber diameter is 140 mm in order to produce large m/q ions, like singly charged C60 ions effectively. In this study, we examined the performance of our ECRIS by plasma measurements using a Langmuir probe. The plasma density increased with increasing Ar pressure and reached to 6.1×1017 m-3 at a pressure of 5.0×10-3 Pa. The plasma was produced over a large volume compared with conventional ECRISs.

  20. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  1. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  2. The third generation superconducting 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Taylor, C.; Abbott, S.

    2010-02-15

    VENUS is a third generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, which incorporates a high field superconducting NbTi magnet structure, a 28 GHz gryotron microwave source and a state of the art closed cycle cryosystem. During the decade from initial concept to regular operation, it has demonstrated both the feasibility and the performance levels of this new generation of ECR ion sources and required innovation on magnet construction, plasma chamber design, and beam transport. In this paper, the development, performance, and major innovations are described as well as a look to the potential to construct a fourth generation ECR ion source.

  3. Calculating method for confinement time and charge distribution of ions in electron cyclotron resonance sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D.; Umnov, A.M.; Kutner, V.B.

    1996-03-01

    It is common knowledge that the electrostatic pit in a core plasma of electron cyclotron resonance sources exerts strict control over generation of ions in high charge states. This work is aimed at finding a dependence of the lifetime of ions on their charge states in the core region and to elaborate a numerical model of ion charge dispersion not only for the core plasmas but for extracted beams as well. The calculated data are in good agreement with the experimental results on charge distributions and magnitudes for currents of beams extracted from the 14 GHz DECRIS source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Bio-Nano ECRIS: An electron cyclotron resonance ion source for new materials production

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Minezaki, H.; Tanaka, K.; Asaji, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    We developed an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for new materials production on nanoscale. Our main target is the endohedral fullerenes, which have potential in medical care, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. In particular, iron-encapsulated fullerene can be applied as a contrast material for magnetic resonance imaging or microwave heat therapy. Thus, our new ECRIS is named the Bio-Nano ECRIS. In this article, the recent progress of the development of the Bio-Nano ECRIS is reported: (i) iron ion beam production using induction heating oven and (ii) optimization of singly charged C{sub 60} ion beam production.

  5. Strong Pitch-Angle Diffusion of the Ring Current Ions Induced by Electromagnetic ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2005-12-01

    Deep and intense circulation of the magnetospheric plasma during geomagnetic storm is building up an energy content of the terrestrial ring current (RC) to an unusually high level, and the RC intensity strongly influence the storm-time space weather. The recovery of Dst index takes place hours or days after Dst minimum, and is caused by the decay of magnetopause and magnetotail current systems, and removal of the RC ions due to charge exchange, convection through the dayside magnetopause, Coulomb scattering, RC interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, and scattering by field-line curvature. During the early recovery phase, the RC loss rate is about one hour or less, and it is more rapid than charge exchange can support. Ion scattering into the loss cone by EMIC waves is believed to be responsible for such fast RC decay during this storm stage. However, most RC-EMIC wave interaction models do not predict the strong pitch-angle diffusion that is theoretically discussed and observed in the Earth magnetosphere (particularly by SEPS detectors on board of the POLAR satellite). In present work, we employ our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model in order to study systematically the occurrence of the RC strong pitch-angle diffusion caused by interaction with waves during the May 1998 storm. Most of cases of the strong diffusion and of the intense EMIC waves are located in the afternoon-premidnight MLT sector at 3 < L < 6, and exhibit significant linear correlation. During the early recovery phase (at about 08 UT on May 4), the entire RC energy range (less than 450 keV) is subject to strong pitch-angle diffusion. Although the flux transitions between trapped zone and loss cone are steeper for higher energy RC protons than for main body of the distribution function, the pitch-angle distributions are highly isotropic for all energies both inside and outside of the loss cone.

  6. On the excitation of cyclotron harmonic waves by newborn heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinca, Armando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1989-01-01

    Wave measurements in planetary foreshocks and cometary environments show the sporadic occurrence of magnetic spectra with harmonic structure related to ion-cyclotron frequencies. Dilute populations of anisotropic and/or drifting charged particles can excite obliquely propagating modes with spacecraft frequencies close to the observed harmonics. Previous analyses of this generation mechanism are extended to drifting and nondrifting loss-cone-type distributions of heavy ions in a dense hydrogen magnetoplasma, characterizing the complex (real frequency and growth rate) dispersion, polarization, and compressibility of the unstable cyclotron harmonic waves. Solution of the full kinetic dispersion equation shows that it is possible to attain harmonic excitation, both in the drifting and nondrifting regimes. However, the bandwidth inherent to frequency Doppler shifts of obliquely propagating waves might preclude the observation of spectral structure in the spacecraft frame. The Giotto observations in the upstream region of comet Halley provide a reference to discuss the results.

  7. Formation of a conical distribution and intense ion heating in the presence of hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1981-07-01

    In the considered investigation, it is assumed that the field aligned currents are responsible for producing electrostatic harmonic cyclotron waves (EHC). Using a one-dimensional simulation model in which the electron velocity distribution is maintained by a constant injection of the initial distribution, it is shown that, in contrast to earlier initial value simulations, EHC waves grow to a large amplitude, resulting in the formation of an anisotropic ion velocity distribution. Both the heating rate and the anisotropy are in reasonable agreement with the quasi-linear theory, taking into account the cyclotron resonance. The results show that the saturation is due to the combined effects of wave induced diffusion in an electron velocity space and the heating of ions perpendicularly. Both these effects reduce the growth rate.

  8. Design of an ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yugo, J.J.; Goranson, P.L.; Swain, D.W.; Baity, F.W.; Vesey, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires 10-20 MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to raise the plasma temperature to ignition. The initial ICRH system will provide 10 MW of power to the plasma, utilizing a total of six rf power units feeding six current straps in three ports. The systems may be expanded to 20 MW with additional rf power units, antennas, and ports. Plasma heating will be achieved through coupling to the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance of a /sup 3/He minority species (also the second harmonic of tritium). The proposed antenna is a resonant double loop (RDL) structure with vacuum, shorted stubs at each end for tuning and impedance matching. The antennas are of modular, compact construction for installation and removal through the midplane port. Remote maintainability and the reactorlike operating environment have a major impact on the design of the launcher for this machine. 6 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Origin of ion-cyclotron turbulence in the downward Birkeland current region

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, B.; Jasperse, J. R.; Lund, E. J.; Grossbard, N.

    2011-02-15

    Linear stability analysis of the electron velocity distributions, which are observed in the FAST satellite measurements in the downward Birkeland current region of the magnetosphere, is presented. The satellite-measured particle (electrons and protons) velocity distributions are fitted with analytic functions and the dispersion relation is derived in terms of the plasma dispersion functions associated with those distribution functions. Numerical solutions of the dispersion relation show that the bump-on-tail structure of the electron velocity distribution can excite electrostatic ion-cyclotron instabilities by the Landau resonance mechanism. Nonlinear evolution of these instabilities may explain the observed electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in the Birkeland current region. Excitation of other types of instabilities by the fitted electron velocity distributions and their relevance are also discussed.

  10. Impact of ion cloud densities on the measurement of relative ion abundances in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: experimental observations of coulombically induced cyclotron radius perturbations and ion cloud dephasing rates.

    PubMed

    Gordon, E F; Muddiman, D C

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental research into the quantitative properties of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) has yielded interesting observations, especially in terms of factors affecting the accuracy of relative ion abundances. However, most of the previous discussions have focused on theoretical systems, or systems of limited scope. In this paper, we document ion motion attributes of a 30 spectra (six samples, five replicates each) system previously established as linear over two orders of magnitude. Observed behaviors include the perturbation of one charged species (cyclosporin A, CsA) of low ion density to a cyclotron orbit of greater radius than that of an almost identical, but slightly mass-separated species (CsG) with a higher ion density. This radial perturbation is attributed to the coulombic repulsion between the two ion clouds as they interact during the excitation process, as previously proposed by Uechi and Dunbar. Magnitudes of the perturbation were confirmed by making cyclotron radii determinations utilizing the ratio of the third-to-first harmonics for the charged species of interest. It was found that these radial differences can account for as much as a 55% signal bias in favor of CsA for a single sample and a >20% positive bias in the slope of the regressed data set. A second behavior noted that also contributes to the potential inaccuracy of relative ion abundance measurements is the difference in signal decay rates for CsA and CsG. Damping constants and initial time domain signal amplitudes were evaluated using segmented Fourier transforms. Discrepancies in decay rates were not expected from two species that have essentially identical collisional cross-sections. However, it has been observed that the faster decay rates are observed by the species of lower ion cloud density. We have attributed this differential signal decay phenomenon to the rates of loss of phase coherence for the two ion clouds. Previously, others have

  11. Use of a krypton isotope for rapid ion changeover at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-inch cyclotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soli, George A.; Nichols, Donald K.

    1989-01-01

    An isotope of krypton, Kr86, has been combined with a mix of Ar, Ne, and N ions at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory cyclotron, to provide rapid ion changeover in Single Event Phenomena (SEP) testing. The new technique has been proved out successfully by a recent Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) test in which it was found that there was no measurable contamination from other isotopes.

  12. Design study of a 17.3 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source at Louvain-la-Neuve

    SciTech Connect

    Standaert, L. Davin, F.; Loiselet, M.

    2014-02-15

    The Cyclotron Resources Center of the Louvain-la-Neuve University is developing a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source to increase the energy of the accelerated beam by injection of higher charge state ions into the cyclotron. The design of the source is based on a 17.3 GHz frequency and classical coils to produce the axial field. The field reaches 2 T at the injection side and 1.2 T at extraction. The total power consumption for the coils is limited to 80 kW. The design features of the source are presented.

  13. Note: Production of a mercury beam with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Pardo, R.; Scott, R.

    2013-11-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been utilized to produce mercury beams with intensities of 4.5 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 29+} and 3.0 eμA of {sup 202}Hg{sup 31+} from natural abundance mercury metal. The production technique relies on the evaporation of liquid mercury into the source plasma vacuum region and utilizes elemental mercury instead of a volatile organic compound as the neutral feed material.

  14. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Delahaye, P.; Kutsaev, Sergey; Maunoury, L.

    2012-11-01

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a 252Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species 143Ba27+. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for 23Na7+ and 17.9% for 39K10+ were obtained injecting stable Na+ and K+ beams from a surface ionization source.

  15. Improved charge breeding efficiency of light ions with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kutsaev, Sergey; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.

    2012-11-15

    The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade is a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). The facility utilizes a {sup 252}Cf fission source coupled with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to provide radioactive beam species for the ATLAS experimental program. The californium fission fragment distribution provides nuclei in the mid-mass range which are difficult to extract from production targets using the isotope separation on line technique and are not well populated by low-energy fission of uranium. To date the charge breeding program has focused on optimizing these mid-mass beams, achieving high charge breeding efficiencies of both gaseous and solid species including 14.7% for the radioactive species {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. In an effort to better understand the charge breeding mechanism, we have recently focused on the low-mass species sodium and potassium which up to present have been difficult to charge breed efficiently. Unprecedented charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for {sup 23}Na{sup 7+} and 17.9% for {sup 39}K{sup 10+} were obtained injecting stable Na{sup +} and K{sup +} beams from a surface ionization source.

  16. Anomalous impurity ion heating from Alfvenic cascade in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Tangri, Varun; Terry, P. W.; Fiksel, Gennady

    2008-11-15

    Anomalous ion and impurity heating in reversed field pinch plasmas is addressed. Previous work [N. Mattor et al., Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 15, 65 (1992)], which calculated the heating of bulk ions by gyro and Landau resonances with turbulent fluctuations cascading from unstable tearing modes, is extended to impurity species measured in Madison symmetric torus (MST). The heavier mass of impurities allows gyro-resonant heating at lower frequencies where more energy is present in the fluctuations. A 0D transport model is used to examine heating rates under various time-dependent, experimental heating scenarios, such as a sawtooth crash. Impurity heating rates calculated for impurities found in MST are comparable to observed rates inferred in the impurity temperature rise during sawtooth events.

  17. Ion cyclotron diffusion of velocity distributions in the extended solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2001-11-01

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory has revealed strong kinetic anisotropies and extremely large perpendicular temperatures of heavy ions in the extended solar corona. These observations have revived interest in the idea that the high-speed solar wind is heated and accelerated by the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This process naturally produces departures from Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Here it is argued that these departures must be taken into account in order to understand the resonant velocity space diffusion, the wave damping, and the formation of ultraviolet emission lines. Time-dependent ion velocity distributions are computed for a fixed spectrum of waves in a homogeneous plasma, and the moments of the distributions are compared with simple bi-Maxwellian models. The existence of a boundary, in parallel velocity space, between resonance and nonresonance produces an effective saturation of the velocity space diffusion that bi-Maxwellian models could not predict. The damping of an input wave spectrum is computed for a coronal population of 1000 ion species with the above saturation effect included. For realistic levels of fluctuation power, it is concluded that waves propagating solely from the coronal base would not be able to heat and accelerate the ions that have been observed to exhibit strong energization and that local wave generation is required. Ultraviolet emission line profiles are computed for the derived non-Maxwellian distributions, and possible unique identifiers of the ion cyclotron resonance mechanism are noted.

  18. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Baity, F. W.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Murakami, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2005-09-01

    The absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from fourth to eighth is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on Maxwellian ion species is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the eighth harmonic if the fast ion beta and the background plasma density are both high enough. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  19. Absorption of fast waves at moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Choi, M.; Schaffner, D. A.; Baity, F. W.; Fredd, E.; Hosea, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Murakami, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    The absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron harmonic damping in the range of harmonics from 4th to 8th is studied theoretically and with experiments in the DIII-D tokamak. A formula for linear ion cyclotron absorption on ions with an arbitrary distribution function which is symmetric about the magnetic field is used to estimate the single-pass damping for various cases of experimental interest. It is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the 8th harmonic if the fast ion beta, the beam injection energy and the background plasma density are high enough and the beam injection geometry is appropriate. The predictions are tested in several L-mode experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. It is found that 4th and 5th harmonic absorption of the 60 MHz power on the beam ions can be quite strong, but 8th harmonic absorption of the 116 MHz power appears to be weaker than expected. The linear modelling predicts a strong dependence of the 8th harmonic absorption on the initial pitch-angle of the injected beam, which is not observed in the experiment. Possible explanations of the discrepancy are discussed.

  20. Ion-cyclotron instability in current-carrying Lorentzian (kappa) and Maxwellian plasmas with anisotropic temperatures: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, B.; Grossbard, N. J.

    2011-09-15

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability has so far been studied for Maxwellian plasma with isotropic and anisotropic temperatures. Since satellite-measured particle velocity distributions in space are often better modeled by the generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distributions and since temperature anisotropy is quite common in space plasmas, theoretical analysis of the current-driven, electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability is carried out in this paper for electron-proton plasma with anisotropic temperatures, where the particle parallel velocity distributions are modeled by kappa distributions and the perpendicular velocity distributions are modeled by Maxwellian distributions. Stability properties of the excited ion cyclotron modes and, in particular, their dependence on electron to ion temperature ratio and ion temperature anisotropy are presented in more detail. For comparison, the corresponding results for bi-Maxwellian plasma are also presented. Although the stability properties of the ion cyclotron modes in the two types of plasmas are qualitatively similar, significant quantitative differences can arise depending on the values of {kappa}{sub e} and {kappa}{sub i}. The comparative study is based on the numerical solutions of the respective linear dispersion relations. Quasilinear estimates of the resonant ion heating rates due to ion-cyclotron turbulence in the two types of plasma are also presented for comparison.

  1. Formation of multi-charged ion beams by focusing effect of mid-electrode on electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Youta Kimura, Daiju; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) and a beam line for extracting ion beams. The ion beam is extracted from the second stage by an accel-decel extraction system with a single-hole and the ion beam current on each electrode is measured. The total ion beam current is measured by a faraday cup downstream the extraction electrodes. We measure these currents as a function of the mid-electrode potential. We also change the gap length between electrodes and perform similar measurement. The behaviors of these currents obtained experimentally against the mid-electrode potential show qualitatively good agreement with a simple theoretical consideration including sheath potential effects. The effect of mid-electrode potential is very useful for decreasing the beam loss for enhancing ion beam current extracted from ECRIS.

  2. New tandem type ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance for universal source of synthesized ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Yano, Keisuke; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Nishiokada, Takuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    A new tandem type source has been constructed on the basis of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for producing synthesized ion beams. We investigate feasibility and hope to realize the device which has wide range operation window in a single device to produce many kinds of ion beams based on ECR ion source (ECRIS). It is considered that ECR plasmas are necessary to be available to individual operations with different plasma parameters. Both of analysis of ion beams and investigation of plasma parameters are conducted on produced plasmas. We describe construction of the new tandem type ion source based on ECRIS with wide operation window for aiming at producing synthesized ion beams as this new source can be a universal source.

  3. Production of Highly Charged Ga Ions from Organic Metal Comppound Using the Liquid-He-Free Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source at RIKEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higurashi, Yoshihide; Nakagawa, Takahide; Kidera, Masanori; Kageyama, Tadashi; Kase, Masayuki; Yano, Yasushige

    2002-08-01

    We successfully produced the multi-charged Ga ions using metal ions from volatile compounds (MIVOC) method from liquid-He-free super conducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RIKEN (RAMSES). The beam intensities of Ga15+ and Ga16+ ions were 5 and 4 eμA at the injected microwave power of 200 W, respectively.

  4. Toward a System-Based Approach to Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Rassoul, H.

    2015-12-01

    We consider a nonlinear wave energy cascade from the low frequency range into the higher frequency domain of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generation as a possible source of seed fluctuations for EMIC wave growth due to the ion cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosphere. The theoretical analysis shows that energy cascade from the Pc 4-5 frequency range (2-22 mHz) into the range of Pc 1-2 pulsations (0.1-5 Hz) is able to supply the level of seed fluctuations that guarantees growth of EMIC waves up to an observable level during one pass through the near equatorial region where the ion cyclotron instability takes place. We also analyze magnetic field data from the Polar and Van Allen Probes spacecraft to test this nonlinear mechanism. We restrict our analysis to magnetic spectra only. We do not analyze the third-order moment for total energy of the magnetic and velocity fluctuations, but judge whether a nonlinear energy cascade is present or whether it is not by only analyzing the appearance of power-law distributions in the low frequency part of the magnetic field spectra. While the power-law spectrum alone does not guarantee that a nonlinear cascade is present, the power-law distribution is a strong indication of the possible development of a nonlinear cascade. Our data analysis shows that a nonlinear energy cascade is indeed observed in both the outer and inner magnetosphere, and EMIC waves are growing from this nonthermal background. All the analyzed data are in good agreement with the theoretical model presented in this study. Overall, the results of this study support a nonlinear energy cascade in Earth's magnetosphere as a mechanism which is responsible for supplying seed fluctuating energy in the higher frequency domain where EMIC waves grow due to the ion cyclotron instability. Keywords: nonlinear energy cascade, ultra low frequency waves, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, seed fluctuationsAcknowledgments: This paper is based upon work

  5. Development of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for Synthesis of Endohedral Metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Uchida, T.; Hanajiri, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Kato, Y.

    2008-11-03

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been constructed for synthesis of endohedral metallofullerenes. The main purpose of the ion source is to produce new biological and medical materials. The design is based on ECRIS for production of multicharged ion beams with a traditional minimum-B magnetic field. An 8-10 GHz traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier and a 2.45 GHz magnetron have been applied as microwave sources. Fullerene and metal vapor are introduced with a filament heating micro-oven and an induction heating oven, respectively. In preliminary ion-extraction test, Ar{sup +} is 54 {mu}A. Many broken fullerenes such as C{sub 58} and C{sub 56} are observed in fullerene ion beams.

  6. Development of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for Synthesis of Endohedral Metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Uchida, T.; Biri, S.; Asaji, T.; Shima, K.; Hanajiri, T.; Kitagawa, A.; Kato, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

    2008-11-01

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been constructed for synthesis of endohedral metallofullerenes. The main purpose of the ion source is to produce new biological and medical materials. The design is based on ECRIS for production of multicharged ion beams with a traditional minimum-B magnetic field. An 8-10 GHz traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier and a 2.45 GHz magnetron have been applied as microwave sources. Fullerene and metal vapor are introduced with a filament heating micro-oven and an induction heating oven, respectively. In preliminary ion-extraction test, Ar+ is 54 μA. Many broken fullerenes such as C58 and C56 are observed in fullerene ion beams.

  7. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girardo, J.-B.; Hellsten, T.; Khilkevitch, E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Nocente, M.; Salewski, M.; Sharapov, S. E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-11-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast ion diagnostics, showing an overall good agreement. Finally, a sawtooth activity for these experiments has been observed and interpreted using SPOT/RFOF simulations in the framework of Porcelli’s theoretical model, where NBI+ICRH accelerated ions are found to have a strong stabilizing effect, leading to monster sawteeth.

  8. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) mass spectrometry: Theory and simulations.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Eugene N; Kostyukevich, Yury I; Vladimirov, Gleb N

    2016-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) mass spectrometer offers highest resolving power and mass accuracy among all types of mass spectrometers. Its unique analytical characteristics made FT ICR important tool for proteomics, metabolomics, petroleomics, and investigation of complex mixtures. Signal acquisition in FT ICR MS takes long time (up to minutes). During this time ion-ion interaction considerably affects ion motion and result in decreasing of the resolving power. Understanding of those effects required complicated theory and supercomputer simulations but culminated in the invention of the ion trap with dynamic harmonization which demonstrated the highest resolving power ever achieved. In this review we summarize latest achievements in theory and simulation of FT ICR mass spectrometers.

  9. Status of the pulsed magnetic field electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Bleuel, W.; Jöst, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B. H.

    1994-04-01

    Synchrotrons like the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS at GSI need an efficient low duty cycle injector (typical 1-pulse/s and 200-μs pulse length). To improve the peak current, an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been designed using a pulsed magnetic field (PuMa) to force ion extraction. We replaced the hexapole of a 10-GHz Minimafios ECR ion source by a vacuum chamber containing a water-cooled bilayered solenoid coil and a decapole permanent magnetic structure. A pulse line feeds the solenoid with a 250-μs pulse which increases the magnetic field in the minimum B region by 0.3 T. This process opens the magnetic bottle along the beam axis resulting in an extracted ion pulse. First tests of the PuMa ECR configuration in cw and pulsed operation are presented and analyzed.

  10. Development of DRAGON electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Xie, D Z; Zhang, X Z; Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Sha, S; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Lin, S H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Guo, X H; Li, X X; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Wu, Q; Zhao, H Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Li, J Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W

    2012-02-01

    A new room temperature electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, DRAGON, is under construction at IMP. DRAGON is designed to operate at microwaves of frequencies of 14.5-18 GHz. Its axial solenoid coils are cooled with evaporative medium to provide an axial magnetic mirror field of 2.5 T at the injection and 1.4 T at the extraction, respectively. In comparison to other conventional room temperature ECR ion sources, DRAGON has so far the largest bore plasma chamber of inner diameter of 126 mm with maximum radial fields of 1.4-1.5 T produced by a non-Halbach permanent sextupole magnet.

  11. Development of DRAGON electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.; Lin, S. H.; Xie, D. Z.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sha, S.; Zhang, W. H.; Cao, Y.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Guo, X. H.; Li, X. X.; Ma, H. Y.; Wu, Q.; Zhao, H. Y.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Zhu, Y. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, J. Y.; Li, J. Q.; and others

    2012-02-15

    A new room temperature electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, DRAGON, is under construction at IMP. DRAGON is designed to operate at microwaves of frequencies of 14.5-18 GHz. Its axial solenoid coils are cooled with evaporative medium to provide an axial magnetic mirror field of 2.5 T at the injection and 1.4 T at the extraction, respectively. In comparison to other conventional room temperature ECR ion sources, DRAGON has so far the largest bore plasma chamber of inner diameter of 126 mm with maximum radial fields of 1.4-1.5 T produced by a non-Halbach permanent sextupole magnet.

  12. The Spontaneous Loss of Coherence Catastrophe in Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Mathur, Raman; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous loss of coherence catastrophe (SLCC) is a frequently observed, yet poorly studied, space-charge related effect in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). This manuscript presents an application of the filter diagonalization method (FDM) in the analysis of this phenomenon. The temporal frequency behavior reproduced by frequency shift analysis using the FDM shows the complex nature of the SLCC, which can be explained by a combination of factors occurring concurrently, governed by electrostatics and ion packet trajectories inside the ICR cell. PMID:19013078

  13. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  14. Design of a new electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Oshima National College of Maritime Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Hirabara, N.; Izumihara, T.; Nakamizu, T.; Ohba, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion/plasma source has been designed and will be built at Oshima National College of Maritime Technology by early 2014. We have developed an ion source that allows the control of the plasma parameters over a wide range of electron temperatures for material research. A minimum-B magnetic field composed of axial mirror fields and radial cusp fields was designed using mainly Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. The axial magnetic field can be varied by three solenoid coils. The apparatus has 2.45 GHz magnetron and 2.5–6.0 GHz solid-state microwave sources.

  15. Magnetic mirror trap with electron-cyclotron plasma heating as a source of multiply charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents the physical operating principles of sources of multiply charged ions using electron cyclotron resonance. It is shown that the conditions that must be satisfied for multiple ionization are well matched to the conditions of effective plasma confinement in a magnetic mirror trap when a collision mode of confinement is provided. Plasma stability with hot electrons in the mirror magnetic trap and the mechanisms of plasma heating by highfrequency fields are analyzed. Two sources of multiply charged ions with ECR plasma heating are examined. Evaluations of the future of this area are given.

  16. Effects of ion abundances on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave growth rate in the vicinity of the plasmapause

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, F. D. Mace, R. L.

    2014-04-15

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in multi-ion species plasmas propagate in branches. Except for the branch corresponding to the heaviest ion species, which has only a resonance at its gyrofrequency, these branches are bounded below by a cutoff frequency and above by a resonant gyrofrequency. The condition for wave growth is determined by the thermal anisotropies of each ion species, j, which sets an upper bound, ω{sub j}{sup ∗}, on the wave frequency below which that ion species contributes positively to the growth rate. It follows that the relative positions of the cutoffs and the critical frequencies ω{sub j}{sup ∗} play a crucial role in determining whether a particular wave branch will be unstable. The effect of the magnetospheric ion abundances on the growth rate of each branch of the EMIC instability in a model where all the ion species have kappa velocity distributions is investigated by appealing to the above ideas. Using the variation of the cutoff frequencies predicted by cold plasma theory as a guide, optimal ion abundances that maximise the EMIC instability growth rate are sought. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of H{sup +} ions, all branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the proton branch having the maximum growth rate. When the O{sup +} ion abundance in the ring current is increased, a decrease in the growth rate of the proton branch and cyclotron damping of the helium branch are observed. The oxygen branch, on the other hand, experiences an increase in the maximum growth rate with an increase in the O{sup +} ion abundance. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of He{sup +} ions, only the helium and oxygen branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the helium branch having the maximum growth rate.

  17. Diagnostics of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source helium plasma with the injection of 23Na1+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Galatà, A.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Thuillier, T.; Delahaye, P.; Maunoury, L.; Mascali, D.; Neri, L.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the utilization of an injected 23Na1+ ion beam as a diagnostics of the helium plasma of a charge breeder electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The obtained data allows estimating the upper limit for the ion-ion collision mean-free path of the incident sodium ions, the lower limit of ion-ion collision frequencies for all charge states of the sodium ions and the lower limit of the helium plasma density. The ion-ion collision frequencies of high charge state ions are shown to be at least on the order of 1-10 MHz and the plasma density is estimated to be on the order of 1011 cm-3 or higher. The experimental results are compared to simulations of the 23Na1+ capture into the helium plasma. The results indicate that the lower breeding efficiency of light ions in comparison to heavier elements is probably due to different capture efficiencies in which the in-flight ionization of the incident 1 + ions plays a vital role.

  18. Ion-cyclotron waves at Jupiter - Possibility of detection by Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, YI; Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    Recent thermal plasma data and a computer code by Horne (1989) are employed to evaluate the linear-path-integrated gain of waves propagating through the Io to predict the Jovian plasma-wave environment. Estimates of the nonlinear saturation amplitudes are utilized with the thermal plasma data from two frequency bands to study the convective growth of the ion-cyclotron (IC) waves. Strong cyclotron resonant damping is theorized to prevent wave propagation to the lower latitudes, and the thermal plasma and cyclotron resonant energetic ions are expected to further confine the IC waves. L-mode waves below the O(+) gyrofrequency in the equatorial region of the torus are shown to inhabit an unstable region. The IC waves probably achieve nonlinear amplitudes regardless of plasma properties due to the rapid amplification in this region. It is suggested that the Ulysses data complicate the identification of the waves because the magnetometer is not adequately sensitive and because of the low frequency of the plasma-wave detector.

  19. Cyclotron mode frequencies and resonant absorption in multi-species ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2015-05-15

    Cyclotron mode frequencies are studied on trapped rigid-rotor multi-species ion plasmas. Collective effects and radial electric fields shift the mode frequencies away from the “bare” cyclotron frequencies 2πF{sub c}{sup (s)}≡(q{sub s}B/M{sub s}c) for each species s. These frequency shifts are measured on the distinct cyclotron modes (m=0,1, and 2) with cos(mθ) azimuthal dependence. We find that for radially uniform plasmas the frequency shifts corroborate a simple theory expression, in which collective effects enter only through the E × B rotation frequency f{sub E} and the species fraction δ{sub s}. The m = 1 center-of-mass mode is in agreement with a simple “clump” model. Additionally, ultra-cold ion plasmas exhibit centrifugal separation by mass, and additional frequency shifts are observed, in agreement with a more general theory.

  20. Ion cyclotron waves at Io: implications for the temporal variation of Io's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Wang, Y. L.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2003-12-01

    When the flowing torus plasma encounters the upper atmosphere of Jupiter's moon, Io, newly created ions are rapidly accelerated by the motional electric field. Many of these ions are reneutralized and form a spray of fast neutrals that travel far away from Io before being reionized by photoionization and impact. These ions, now far from Io, are unstable to the generation of ion cyclotron waves. These waves in turn act as a mass spectrometer allowing Galileo magnetic measurements to be used to probe the composition of the atmosphere of Io and how it varies in time and in space. We now have six Galileo passes by Io on which we have measurements with sufficient cadence to examine the ion cyclotron waves. One of these passes, on Galileo's 32nd orbit has not been discussed previously. These passes provide sufficient observations to begin to distinguish the sources of variability. We find that while the atmosphere of Io varies temporally throughout the mission, it also has a spatial variation in composition at any instant of time.

  1. Wave Heating in Ion Cyclotron Ranges of Frequencies in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Mushiake, T.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma device RT-1 has been developed for the studies on magnetosphere and advanced fusion plasmas. A levitated superconducting coil produces magnetic dipole fields that realize a high confinement state. The electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with 8.2 GHz and 50 kW produces the plasmas with hot electrons in a few ten keV range. We reported that the local electron beta exceeded 1 in RT-1 plasmas. In such situation, the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Heating ions is expected to access high ion beta state and to improve the plasma confinement theoretically. Therefore the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 2-4 MHz and 10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. Based on the results of the TASK-WF2 code, the ∩ shape loop antenna was designed for a slow wave excitation, and was implemented in the RT-1. In the ICRF heating experiments, a base plasma was sustained by ECRH. We observed the clear increase in diamagnetic signals and impurity ion temperature (CIII) in helium plasmas at the neutral gas pressure of 3 mPa, if the ICRF power of 10 kW is comparable to the ECRH one. This result is the first time in a magnetosphere plasma device. The results related to the ICRF heating will be presented in detail. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Nos 23224014 and 24360384.

  2. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating of plasma with small impurity production

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1987-01-01

    Plasma including plasma ions is magnetically confined by a magnetic field. The plasma has a defined outer surface and is intersected by resonance surfaces of respective common ion cyclotron frequency of a predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the magnetic field. A radio frequency source provides radio frequency power at a radio frequency corresponding to the ion cyclotron frequency of the predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the field at a respective said resonance surface. RF launchers coupled to the radio frequency source radiate radio frequency energy at the resonance frequency onto the respective resonance surface within the plasma from a plurality of locations located outside the plasma at such respective distances from the intersections of the respective resonance surface and the defined outer surface and at such relative phases that the resulting interference pattern provides substantially null net radio frequency energy over regions near and including substantial portions of the intersections relative to the radio frequency energy provided thereby at other portions of the respective resonance surface within the plasma.

  3. Transverse acceleration of oxygen ions by electromagnetic ion cyclotron resonance with broad band left-hand polarized waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T.; Crew, G. B.; Hershkowitz, N.; Jasperse, J. R.; Retterer, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Central plasma sheet (CPS) ion conics are oxygen-dominated, with peak energies ranging from tens to hundreds of eV centered around pitch-angles between 115 and 130 degrees. Because of the lack of correlation between the CPS conics and the observed currents and/or electron beam-like structures, it is not likely that all of these conics are generated by interactions with electrostatic ion cyclotron waves or lower hybrid waves. Instead, it is suggested that the observed intense broad band electric field fluctuations in the frequency range between 0 and 100 Hz can be responsible for the transverse energization of the ions through cyclotron resonance heating with the left-hand polarized electromagnetic waves. This process is much more efficient for heating the oxygen ions than hydrogen ions, thus providing a plausible explanation of the oxygen dominance in CPS conics. Simple algebraic expressions are given from which estimates of conic energy and pitch angle can be easily calculated. This suggested mechanism can also provide some preheating of the oxygen ions in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS) where discrete aurorae form.

  4. Development of steady-state operation using ion cyclotron heating in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, H.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Seki, R.; Kumazawa, R.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Ueda, Y.; Tokitani, M.; Ashikawa, N.; Shoji, M.; Wakatsuki, T.; Kamio, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yoshimura, S.; Tamura, N.; Suzuki, C.; Yamada, H.; Mutoh, T.

    2014-06-01

    Using a handshake shape (HAS) antenna phasing dipole for ion cyclotron heating (ICH), the heating efficiency was higher than that using a previous poloidal array antenna in the Large Helical Device. In order to sustain the dipole operation, real-time feedback for impedance matching and maintaining the same phase and power was adopted during long-pulse discharge. The HAS antenna was designed to reduce parasitic losses associated with energetic particle and radio-frequency (RF) sheath effects by field-aligned current concentration on the midplane. Local hot spots and the inhomogeneity of the diverter heat profile in the toroidal direction were reduced. The long-pulse discharge with an electron density (ne0) of 1 × 1019 m-3, center electron temperature (Te0) of 2.5 keV, a plasma duration time (td) of 19 min, and RF heating power (PRF) of 1 MW was achieved by ICH and electron cyclotron heating.

  5. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics.

    PubMed

    Lu, W; Sun, L T; Qian, C; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Feng, Y C; Yang, Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Ma, B H; Xiong, B; Guo, S Q; Ruan, L; Zhao, H W

    2015-04-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months' commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O(6+), 1.7 emA of Ar(8+), 1.07 emA of Ar(9+), and 118 euA of Bi(28+). The source has also successfully delivered O(5+) and Ar(8+) ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  6. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W. Sun, L. T.; Qian, C.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Yang, Y.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Ruan, L.

    2015-04-15

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months’ commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O{sup 6+}, 1.7 emA of Ar{sup 8+}, 1.07 emA of Ar{sup 9+}, and 118 euA of Bi{sup 28+}. The source has also successfully delivered O{sup 5+} and Ar{sup 8+} ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  7. A Self-Consistent Model of the Interacting Ring Current Ions and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves, Initial Results: Waves and Precipitating Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.; Krivorutsky, E. N.

    2002-01-01

    Initial results from a newly developed model of the interacting ring current ions and ion cyclotron waves are presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes wave evolution. The system gives a self-consistent description of the ring current ions and ion cyclotron waves in a quasilinear approach. These equations for the ion phase space distribution function and for the wave power spectral density were solved on aglobal magnetospheric scale undernonsteady state conditions during the 2-5 May 1998 storm. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions and the ion cyclotron wave-active zones during extreme geomagnetic disturbances on 4 May 1998 are presented and discussed in detail.

  8. A second-order theory for transverse ion heating and momentum coupling due to electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald H.; Winske, Dan; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A second-order theory for electrostatic instabilities driven by counterstreaming ion beams is developed which describes momentum coupling and heating of the plasma via wave-particle interactions. Exchange rates between the waves and particles are derived, which are suitable for the fluid equations simulating microscopic effects on macroscopic scales. Using a fully kinetic simulation, the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability due to counterstreaming H(+) beams has been simulated. A power spectrum from the kinetic simulation is used to evaluate second-order exchange rates. The calculated heating and momentum loss from second-order theory is compared to the numerical simulation.

  9. The preliminary tests of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-SC2.

    PubMed

    Efremov, A; Bekhterev, V; Bogomolov, S; Drobin, V; Loginov, V; Lebedev, A; Yazvitsky, N; Yakovlev, B

    2012-02-01

    A new compact version of the "liquid He-free" superconducting ECR ion source, to be used as an injector of highly charged heavy ions for the MC-400 cyclotron, is designed and built at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in collaboration with the Laboratory of High Energy Physics of JINR. The axial magnetic field of the source is created by the superconducting magnet and the NdFeB hexapole is used for the radial plasma confinement. The microwave frequency of 14 GHz is used for ECR plasma heating. During the first tests, the source shows a good enough performance for the production of medium charge state ions. In this paper, we will present the design parameters and the preliminary results with gaseous ions.

  10. The preliminary tests of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source DECRIS-SC2.

    PubMed

    Efremov, A; Bekhterev, V; Bogomolov, S; Drobin, V; Loginov, V; Lebedev, A; Yazvitsky, N; Yakovlev, B

    2012-02-01

    A new compact version of the "liquid He-free" superconducting ECR ion source, to be used as an injector of highly charged heavy ions for the MC-400 cyclotron, is designed and built at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in collaboration with the Laboratory of High Energy Physics of JINR. The axial magnetic field of the source is created by the superconducting magnet and the NdFeB hexapole is used for the radial plasma confinement. The microwave frequency of 14 GHz is used for ECR plasma heating. During the first tests, the source shows a good enough performance for the production of medium charge state ions. In this paper, we will present the design parameters and the preliminary results with gaseous ions. PMID:22380181

  11. Production of beam of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions from source with electron cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dzhayamanna, K.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.D.

    1988-09-01

    The GELIOS-H/sup /minus// ion source is described; it has electron cyclotron resonance and is designed for generation of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions. The source consumes up to 100 W of microwave power at a frequency of 2.4 GHz and provides a stationary beam of H/sup /minus// ions of up to 1.5 mA and D/sup /minus// ions of up to 1.0 mA for an exit-aperture diameter of 6.2 mm and an extraction voltage of 4.5 kV. The life of the source is limited only by the life of the microwave generator.

  12. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, A.; Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  13. Progress in the development of an H{sup −} ion source for cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Etoh, H. Aoki, Y.; Mitsubori, H.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, T.; Sakuraba, J.; Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Okumura, Y.

    2015-04-08

    A multi-cusp DC H{sup −} ion source has been developed for cyclotrons in medical use. Beam optics of the H{sup −} ion beam is studied using a 2D beam trajectory code. The simulation results are compared with the experimental results obtained in the Mark I source, which has produced up to 16 mA H{sup −} ion beams. The optimum extraction voltages show good agreement between the calculation and the experimental results. A new ion source, Mark II source, is designed to achieve the next goal of producing an H{sup −} beam of 20 mA. The magnetic field configurations and the plasma electrode design are optimized for Cs-seeded operation. Primary electron trajectory simulation shows that primary electrons are confined well and the magnetic filter prevents the primary electrons from entering into the extraction region.

  14. Superconducting magnets for the RAON electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Kim, Y; Hong, I S; Jeon, D

    2014-02-01

    The RAON linear accelerator of Rare Isotope Science Project has been developed since 2011, and the superconducting magnet for ECRIS was designed. The RAON ECR ion source was considered as a 3rd generation source. The fully superconducting magnet has been designed for operating using 28 GHz radio frequency. The RAON ECRIS operates in a minimum B field configuration which means that a magnetic sextupole field for radial confinement is superimposed with a magnetic mirror field for axial confinement. The highest field strength reaches 3.5 T on axis and 2 T at the plasma chamber wall for operating frequency up to 28 GHz. In this paper, the design results are presented of optimized superconducting magnet consisting of four solenoids and sextupole. The prototype magnet for ECRIS was fabricated and tested to verify the feasibility of the design. On the basis of test results, a fully superconducting magnet will be fabricated and tested. PMID:24593485

  15. The toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode structure in DIII-D: Implications of soft x-ray and beam-ion loss data

    SciTech Connect

    Carolipio, E. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chu, M. S.; Fu, G. Y.; Jaun, A.; Spong, D. A.; Turnbull, A. D.; White, R. B.

    2001-07-01

    The internal structure of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) is studied by comparing soft x-ray profile and beam ion loss data taken during TAE activity in the DIII-D tokamak [W. W. Heidbrink , Nucl. Fusion 37, 1411 (1997)] with predictions from theories based on ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), gyrofluid, and gyrokinetic models. The soft x-ray measurements indicate a centrally peaked eigenfunction, a feature which is closest to the gyrokinetic model's prediction. The beam ion losses are simulated using a guiding center code. In the simulations, the TAE eigenfunction calculated using the ideal MHD model acts as a perturbation to the equilibrium field. The predicted beam ion losses are an order of magnitude less than the observed {approx}6%--8% losses at the peak experimental amplitude of {delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}{approx_equal}2--5 x 10{sup -4}.

  16. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4-5.2 eV and 2 × 1016-4.8 × 1017 m-3, respectively.

  17. The Io mass-loading disk: Constraints provided by ion cyclotron wave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wang, Y. L.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2001-11-01

    Galileo measurements on the first two encounters with Io have revealed that ion cyclotron waves associated with SO2+ and SO+ can extend to at least 20 Io radii (RIo) on the anti-Jupiter side of Io but to only ~7 RIo on the Jupiter facing side. In the flow direction the waves extend downstream at least 10 RIo, but not upstream of Io. Earlier Voyager observations, 11 RIo below Io, also show no evidence for the generation of ion cyclotron waves. Quite unlike expectations from growth rate calculations in a uniform infinite plasma, the waves are frequently found to be propagating at an oblique angle to the magnetic field. The absence of waves upstream of Io and the wide dispersal of the ions creating the waves inward and outward from Io are consistent with a mass-loading disk created by a short period of acceleration of the ions by the Jovian corotation electric field followed by reneutralization, producing a spray of SO, SO2, S, and possibly H2S across the magnetic field similar to the spray proposed for the neutral sodium cloud by Wilson and Schneider [1999]. When these fast neutrals are reionized farther from Io, they lead to wave growth.

  18. Development of a miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma ion thruster for exospheric micro-propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2015-12-15

    A miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source [(discharge diameter)/(microwave cutoff diameter) < 0.3] has been developed at Kyushu University to be used as an ion thruster in micro-propulsion applications in the exosphere. The discharge source uses both radial and axial magnetostatic field confinement to facilitate electron cyclotron resonance and increase the electron dwell time in the volume, thereby enhancing plasma production efficiency. Performance of the ion thruster is studied at 3 microwave frequencies (1.2 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 2.45 GHz), for low input powers (<15 W) and small xenon mass flow rates (<40 μg/s), by experimentally measuring the extracted ion beam current through a potential difference of ≅1200 V. The discharge geometry is found to operate most efficiently at an input microwave frequency of 1.6 GHz. At this frequency, for an input power of 8 W, and propellant (xenon) mass flow rate of 21 μg/s, 13.7 mA of ion beam current is obtained, equivalent to an calculated thrust of 0.74 mN.

  19. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4–5.2 eV and 2 × 10{sup 16}–4.8 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}, respectively.

  20. Theory and observations of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution Voyager 1 magnetic field observations of Saturn's inner magnetosphere are examined for the presence of ULF waves. Quasi-circular left-hand polarized transverse oscillations are found in the near-equatorial region of 5-7 Rs with a wave period about 10 s and peak amplitude of about 2 nT. The wave is identified as the electromagnetic oxygen cyclotron mode occurring at a frequency just below the O(+) ion cyclotron frequency. A theoretical model of wave excitation based on gyroresonant coupling through a temperature anisotropy of O(+) pickup ions is developed which accounts for the principal features of the wave spectrum. It is hypothesized that wave-particle interactions provide a level of scattering commensurate with the weak pitch angle diffusion regime but nonetheless one that regulates and maintains a constant thermal anisotropy of ions along the magnetic field. Arguments are also presented that O(+) was the dominant thermal ion of the Dione-Tethys plasma torus at the time of the Pioneer 11 encounter the year previous to the Voyager 1 measurements.

  1. Theory and observations of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1993-06-01

    High-resolution Voyager 1 magnetic field observations of Saturn's inner magnetosphere are examined for the presence of ULF waves. Quasi-circular left-hand polarized transverse oscillations are found in the near-equatorial region of 5-7 Rs with a wave period about 10 s and peak amplitude of about 2 nT. The wave is identified as the electromagnetic oxygen cyclotron mode occurring at a frequency just below the O(+) ion cyclotron frequency. A theoretical model of wave excitation based on gyroresonant coupling through a temperature anisotropy of O(+) pickup ions is developed which accounts for the principal features of the wave spectrum. It is hypothesized that wave-particle interactions provide a level of scattering commensurate with the weak pitch angle diffusion regime but nonetheless one that regulates and maintains a constant thermal anisotropy of ions along the magnetic field. Arguments are also presented that O(+) was the dominant thermal ion of the Dione-Tethys plasma torus at the time of the Pioneer 11 encounter the year previous to the Voyager 1 measurements.

  2. Liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometric characterization of protein kinase C phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Michael J; Quinn, John P; Blakney, Greg T; Emmett, Mark R; Mischak, Harold; Gaskell, Simon J; Marshall, Alan G

    2003-01-01

    A vented column, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) microelectrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR (9.4 T)) mass spectrometry (MS) approach to phosphopeptide identification is described. A dual-ESI source capable of rapid (approximately 200 ms) switching between two independently controlled ESI emitters was constructed. The dual-ESI source, combined with external ion accumulation in a linear octopole ion trap, allowed for internal calibration of every mass spectrum during LC. LC ESI FT-ICR positive-ion MS of protein kinase C (PKC) revealed four previously unidentified phosphorylated peptides (one within PKC(alpha), one within PKC(delta), and two within PKC(zeta)). Internal calibration improved the mass accuracy for LC MS spectra from an absolute mean (47 peptide ions) of 11.5 ppm to 1.5 ppm. Five additional (out of eight known) activating sites of PKC phosphorylation, not detected in positive-ion experiments, were observed by subsequent negative-ion direct infusion nanoelectrospray. Extension of the method to enable infrared multiphoton dissociation of all ions in the ICR cell prior to every other mass measurement revealed the diagnostic neutral loss of H3PO4 from phosphorylated peptide ions. The combination of accurate-mass MS and MS/MS offers a powerful new tool for identifying the presence and site(s) of phosphorylation in peptides, without the need for additional wet chemical derivatization.

  3. Preferential perpendicular acceleration of heavy ionospheric ions by interactions with electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1983-05-01

    Observations in recent years indicate the presence of energetic ions of ionospheric origin in various parts of the magnetosphere. These energetic ions have been found at all latitudes. Observations from the S3-3 satellite have made a great contribution toward an understanding of the energization of ionospheric ions. One of the most interesting observations is related to the finding that ion beams and electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves are highly correlated and that they show an abrupt increase in their occurrence rate at an altitude of about 5000 km. A statistical survey of upward flowing ion (UFI) events occurring between 6000 and 8000 km has shown that the average energy of O(+) has a strong correlation with that of the H(+) ions. The present investigation has the objective to examine critically the energetics of UFI events in view of the theory of the interaction of a single coherent EHC wave with O(+), He(+), and H(+) ions. It is found that preferential acceleration of heavy ions occurs when such ions interact with an EHC wave.

  4. Preferential perpendicular acceleration of heavy ionospheric ions by interactions with electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations in recent years indicate the presence of energetic ions of ionospheric origin in various parts of the magnetosphere. These energetic ions have been found at all latitudes. Observations from the S3-3 satellite have made a great contribution toward an understanding of the energization of ionospheric ions. One of the most interesting observations is related to the finding that ion beams and electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves are highly correlated and that they show an abrupt increase in their occurrence rate at an altitude of about 5000 km. A statistical survey of upward flowing ion (UFI) events occurring between 6000 and 8000 km has shown that the average energy of O(+) has a strong correlation with that of the H(+) ions. The present investigation has the objective to examine critically the energetics of UFI events in view of the theory of the interaction of a single coherent EHC wave with O(+), He(+), and H(+) ions. It is found that preferential acceleration of heavy ions occurs when such ions interact with an EHC wave.

  5. Effect of dust charge fluctuations on current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability in a collisional magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Kavita; Gahlot, Ajay

    2013-05-15

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron (EIC) instability is studied in a collisional magnetized dusty plasma. The growth rate and unstable mode frequencies were evaluated based on existing physical parameters relevant to ion cyclotron waves in dusty plasmas. It is found that the unstable mode frequency and growth rate of current-driven EIC instability increase with δ (ion-to-electron density ratio). Moreover, the increase in electron neutral collisional frequency (ν{sub e}) has no effect on the unstable mode frequency while the normalized growth rate has linear dependence on ν{sub e}.

  6. Emission of radiation induced by pervading Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Wu, C. S.

    2013-03-15

    It is shown that under certain conditions, propagating Alfven waves can energize electrons so that consequently a new cyclotron maser instability is born. The necessary condition is that the plasma frequency is lower than electron gyrofrequency. This condition implies high Alfven speed, which can pitch-angle scatter electrons effectively and therefore the electrons are able to acquire free energy which are needed for the instability.

  7. Nonlinear Landau damping and Alfven wave dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Miller, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear Landau damping has been often suggested to be the cause of the dissipation of Alfven waves in the solar wind as well as the mechanism for ion heating and selective preacceleration in solar flares. We discuss the viability of these processes in light of our theoretical and numerical results. We present one-dimensional hybrid plasma simulations of the nonlinear Landau damping of parallel Alfven waves. In this scenario, two Alfven waves nonresonantly combine to create second-order magnetic field pressure gradients, which then drive density fluctuations, which in turn drive a second-order longitudinal electric field. Under certain conditions, this electric field strongly interacts with the ambient ions via the Landau resonance which leads to a rapid dissipation of the Alfven wave energy. While there is a net flux of energy from the waves to the ions, one of the Alfven waves will grow if both have the same polarization. We compare damping and growth rates from plasma simulations with those predicted by Lee and Volk (1973), and also discuss the evolution of the ambient ion distribution. We then consider this nonlinear interaction in the presence of a spectrum of Alfven waves, and discuss the spectrum's influence on the growth or damping of a single wave. We also discuss the implications for wave dissipation and ion heating in the solar wind.

  8. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    PubMed

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  9. Particle and fluid simulations of resistive current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seyler, Charles E.; Providakes, Jason

    1987-01-01

    The results from 1-D numerical simulations of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves (EIC) are presented for a model in which the electrons are a resistive (collisional) fluid. Simulations of both the kinetic and fluid descriptions are performed and compared in order to assess the fundamental limitations of fluid theory for EIC waves. The effect of ion-neutral collisions is also included using a simple Monte Carlo technique. It is found that a small ion-neutral collision frequency destroys the frequency harmonic coupling of kinetic EIC waves and tends to validate the fluid description. The saturation amplitude of the current-driven EIC instability is in agreement with recent laboratory experiments. The coherent nature (extremely narrow spectral width) and phase velocity agree with ground based (coherent backscatter radars) and in situ observations of current-driven EIC waves in the high latitude ionosphere.

  10. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    PubMed

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented. PMID:26931949

  11. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomae, R.; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F.; Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.

  12. Roadmap for the design of a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for Spiral2

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Peaucelle, C.

    2012-02-15

    A review of today achieved A/Q = 3 heavy ions beams is proposed. The daily operation A/Q = 3 ion beam intensities expected at Spiral2 are at the limit or above best record 3rd generation electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) intensities. The necessity to build a new fully superconducting to fulfill these requirements is outlined. A discussion on the volume of the future source is proposed and the minimum value of 12 liters is derived. An analysis of the x-ray absorption superconducting ECRIS is presented based on VENUS experimental data and geometry. This study underlines the necessity to include a complete x-ray study at the time of source conception. The specifications foreseen for the new ECRIS are presented, followed with the roadmap for the design.

  13. Absorption of Fast Waves at Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Harmonics: Experimental Results and Theoretical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Luo, Y.; Baity, F. W.; Murakami, M.; Porkolab, M.

    2006-10-01

    Strong absorption of fast Alfvén waves (FW) by ion cyclotron damping has been observed in DIII-D at the 4th and 5th harmonic of an injected beam while only weak absorption is observed at the 8th harmonic. The experimental results are compared with three different theoretical models; differences between the predictions of the models suggest the possible importance of finite-width orbit effects at high harmonics. In a linear model, it is found that damping on fast ions from neutral beam injection can be significant even at the 8th harmonic under experimentally relevant conditions. This is tested in experiments in DIII-D with FW power at 60 MHz and at 116 MHz. A novel Dα charge exchange recombination diagnostic is used to observe interaction of the FW power with beam ions. The results are compared with modeling with quasilinear and with orbit-following codes.

  14. Electron energy distribution function by using probe method in electron cyclotron resonance multicharged ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, Sho Kurisu, Yosuke; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). High-energy electrons in ECRIS plasma affect electron energy distribution and generate multicharged ion. In this study, we measure electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of low energy region (≦100 eV) in ECRIS plasma at extremely low pressures (10{sup −3}–10{sup −5} Pa) by using cylindrical Langmuir probe. From the result, it is found that the EEDF correlates with the electron density and the temperature from the conventional probe analysis. In addition, we confirm that the tail of EEDF spreads to high energy region as the pressure rises and that there are electrons with high energy in ECR multicharged ion source plasma. The effective temperature estimated from the experimentally obtained EEDF is larger than the electron temperature obtained from the conventional method.

  15. Electron energy distribution function by using probe method in electron cyclotron resonance multicharged ion source.

    PubMed

    Kumakura, Sho; Kurisu, Yosuke; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). High-energy electrons in ECRIS plasma affect electron energy distribution and generate multicharged ion. In this study, we measure electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of low energy region (≦100 eV) in ECRIS plasma at extremely low pressures (10(-3)-10(-5) Pa) by using cylindrical Langmuir probe. From the result, it is found that the EEDF correlates with the electron density and the temperature from the conventional probe analysis. In addition, we confirm that the tail of EEDF spreads to high energy region as the pressure rises and that there are electrons with high energy in ECR multicharged ion source plasma. The effective temperature estimated from the experimentally obtained EEDF is larger than the electron temperature obtained from the conventional method.

  16. Improvement of trace element analysis system using RIKEN electron cyclotron resonance ion source and linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Takahashi, K.; Enomoto, S.; Igarashi, K.; Fujimaki, M.; Ikezawa, E.; Kamigaito, O.; Kase, M.; Goto, A.; Yano, Y.

    2006-03-15

    We have developed a new analytical system that consists of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS) and a RIKEN heavy ion linear accelerator (RILAC). This system is called trace element analysis using electron cyclotron resonance ion source and RILAC (ECRIS-RILAC-TEA). ECRIS-RILAC-TEA has several advantages as described in the work of Kidera et al. [AIP Conf. Proc. 749, 85 (2005)]. However, many experimental results during the last several years revealed a few problems: (1) large background contamination in the ECRIS, particularly at the surface of the plasma chamber wall, (2) high counting of the ionization chamber and the data taking system that is monitored by the direct beam from the accelerator, and (3) difficulty in the selection of the pilot sample and pilot beam production from the ECRIS for the purpose of normalization. In order to overcome these problems, we conducted several test experiments over the past year. In this article, we report the experimental results in detail and future plans for improving this system.

  17. Frequency shifts and modulation effects due to solenoidal magnetic field inhomogeneities in ion cyclotron mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Dale W.; Rockwood, Alan L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1995-02-01

    Solenoidal (i.e. axially symmetric) magnetic field inhomogeneities, which in addition have symmetry under the operation z --> -z are the most important to Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry since they introduce frequency shifts at first-order in perturbation theory. Frequency shifts for all three fundamental modes are derived for the leading second-order and fourth-order solenoidal inhomogeneities without any restrictions on the initial conditions. The analytical frequency shifts agree very well with frequency shifts obtained from numerical trajectory calculations using the exact classical equations of motion. The effect of the inhomogeneity on the ion trajectory is solved analytically. For a strong magnetic bottle field, the cyclotron motion is frequency modulated at twice the z-oscillation frequency resulting in sidebands. However, the amplitude of these sidebands is negligibly small for typical inhomogeneity strengths. The effect of a magnetized ICR trap on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is studied by analytical methods. We find that the leading magnetic bottle field decreases as d-3, where d is the cylindrical ion trap diameter.

  18. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  19. Decay of electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves into ion acoustic modes in auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, R.; Hudson, M. K.

    1987-03-01

    The coherent three-wave decay of a linearly unstable electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) wave into stable EHC and ion acoustic modes is considered. The general problem of the three weakly interacting electrostatic normal modes in a Maxwellian plasma is discussed. EHC is examined in a fluid description, and the results are used to guide a similar study in a Vlasov plasma system intended to model the aurora acceleration region parameters. The time dependence of the decay in a simple three-wave interaction is presented in order to show how wave saturation can arise.

  20. Decay of electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves into ion acoustic modes in auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, R.; Hudson, M. K.

    1987-01-01

    The coherent three-wave decay of a linearly unstable electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) wave into stable EHC and ion acoustic modes is considered. The general problem of the three weakly interacting electrostatic normal modes in a Maxwellian plasma is discussed. EHC is examined in a fluid description, and the results are used to guide a similar study in a Vlasov plasma system intended to model the aurora acceleration region parameters. The time dependence of the decay in a simple three-wave interaction is presented in order to show how wave saturation can arise.

  1. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  2. High Throughput Proteomics Using Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-06-01

    The advent of high throughput proteomics technology for global detection and quantitation of proteins creates new opportunities and challenges for those seeking to gain greater understanding of cellular machinery. Here, we review recent advances in high-resolution capillary liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry along with its potential application to high throughput proteomics. These technological advances combined with quantitative stable isotope labeling methodologies provide powerful tools for expanding our understanding of biology at the system-level.

  3. Progress in high-temperature oven development for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, J; Higurashi, Y; Nakagawa, T

    2016-02-01

    We have been developing a high-temperature oven using UO2 in the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RIKEN since 2013. A total of eleven on-line tests were performed. The longest operation time in a single test was 411 h, and the consumption rate of UO2 was approximately 2.4 mg/h. In these tests, we experienced several problems: the ejection hole of a crucible was blocked with UO2 and a crucible was damaged because of the reduction of tungsten strength at high temperature. In order to solve these problems, improvements to the crucible shape were made by simulations using ANSYS.

  4. Stability study of all-permanent-magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Nara, T; Saitoh, Y; Yokota, W

    2010-02-01

    Beam intensity fluctuation was investigated using an electron cyclotron resonance ion source of an all-permanent-magnet type under development for highly stable beam intensity. While the source achieved a stability of better than 3.2% by strict regulation of the coolant temperature change within +/-0.1 degrees C, the intensity varies strongly with intentional changes in the temperature of the plasma chamber coolant. The influence of the temperature on chamber expansion, magnetic field strength, and vacuum was measured or estimated in detail. The result shows that a slight change in vacuum and magnetic field strength has considerable influence on the intensity fluctuation.

  5. High-throughput proteomics using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2004-06-01

    The advent of high-throughput proteomic technologies for global detection and quantitation of proteins creates new opportunities and challenges for those seeking to gain greater understanding of the cellular machinery. Here, recent advances in high-resolution capillary liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry are reviewed along with its potential application to high-throughput proteomics. These technological advances combined with quantitative stable isotope labeling methodologies provide powerful tools for expanding our understanding of biology at the system level.

  6. Investigation of electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in L-4 and ACT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1993-05-01

    Electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were studied in the Princeton L-4 and ACT-1 devices for approximately ten years, from 1975 to 1985. The investigation began in the L-4 linear device, looking for the parametric excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion-species plasmas. In addition, this investigation verified multi-ion-species effects on the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave dispersion religion including the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Finite-Larmor-radius modification of the wave dispersion relation was also observed, even for ion temperatures of T[sub i] [approx] 1/40 eV. Taking advantage of the relatively high field and long device length of L-4, the existence of the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CES ICW) was verified. With the arrival of the ACT-1 toroidal device, finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) waves were studied in a relatively collisionless warm-ion hydrogen plasma. Detailed investigations of ion Bernstein waves (IBW) included the verification of mode-transformation in their launching, their wave propagation characteristics, their absorption, and the resulting ion heating. This basic physics activity played a crucial role in developing a new reactor heating concept termed ion Bernstein wave heating. Experimental research in the lower hybrid frequency range confirmed the existence of FLR effects near the lower hybrid resonance, predicted by Stix in 1965. In a neon plasma with a carefully placed phased wave exciter, the neutralized ion Bernstein wave was observed for the first time. Using a fastwave ICRF antenna, two parasitic excitation processes for IBW -- parametric instability and density-gradient-driven excitation -- were also discovered. In the concluding section of this paper, a possible application of externally launched electrostatic waves is suggested for helium ash removal from fusion reactor plasmas.

  7. Investigation of electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in L-4 and ACT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki

    1993-05-01

    Electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were studied in the Princeton L-4 and ACT-1 devices for approximately ten years, from 1975 to 1985. The investigation began in the L-4 linear device, looking for the parametric excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion-species plasmas. In addition, this investigation verified multi-ion-species effects on the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave dispersion religion including the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Finite-Larmor-radius modification of the wave dispersion relation was also observed, even for ion temperatures of T{sub i} {approx} 1/40 eV. Taking advantage of the relatively high field and long device length of L-4, the existence of the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CES ICW) was verified. With the arrival of the ACT-1 toroidal device, finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) waves were studied in a relatively collisionless warm-ion hydrogen plasma. Detailed investigations of ion Bernstein waves (IBW) included the verification of mode-transformation in their launching, their wave propagation characteristics, their absorption, and the resulting ion heating. This basic physics activity played a crucial role in developing a new reactor heating concept termed ion Bernstein wave heating. Experimental research in the lower hybrid frequency range confirmed the existence of FLR effects near the lower hybrid resonance, predicted by Stix in 1965. In a neon plasma with a carefully placed phased wave exciter, the neutralized ion Bernstein wave was observed for the first time. Using a fastwave ICRF antenna, two parasitic excitation processes for IBW -- parametric instability and density-gradient-driven excitation -- were also discovered. In the concluding section of this paper, a possible application of externally launched electrostatic waves is suggested for helium ash removal from fusion reactor plasmas.

  8. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  9. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  10. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project. PMID:26931935

  11. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves suggesting minor ion existence in the inner magnetosphere observed by the Akebono satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, S.; Kasahara, Y.; Goto, Y.

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves exhibit characteristic frequencies on the basis of dispersion relations in multiple-component plasma. We present a case of EMIC waves exhibiting a sudden decrease in intensity (characteristic lower cutoff) to just above half of the proton cyclotron frequency observed in the vicinity of the geomagnetic equator by the Akebono satellite along its trajectory during a magnetic storm in April 1989. It was found that the waves propagate with a large wave normal angle with respect to the geomagnetic field line and that they had a crossover frequency above the characteristic lower cutoff. Because of stormy conditions, ion constituents were expected to fluctuate, suggesting that the characteristic frequencies of EMIC waves should have been fluctuating as well. However, the characteristic frequencies of each event did not vary despite disturbances in the inner magnetosphere, represented by a sudden decrease in the Dst index and electron density fluctuation. In addition, the waves were repeatedly observed within a half day after sudden decreases in Dst; however, they disappeared when the recovery of the Dst index became moderate. Wave generation appears to be closely correlated to fresh energetic particle injection. We study the dispersion relations of EMIC waves under the condition of multiple ion species and suggest the existence of a few percent of alpha particles (He++) or deuterons (D+), which can explain the lower cutoff of EMIC waves in the inner magnetosphere.

  12. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V. G.

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay and Cité Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number kz is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the kz spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge-Kutta method. The influence of ion-ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B0, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer.

  13. Results with the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyneis, C. M.; Leitner, D.; Abbott, S. R.; Dwinell, R. D.; Leitner, M.; Silver, C. S.; Taylor, C.

    2004-05-01

    During the last year, the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source was commissioned at 18 GHz and preparations for 28 GHz operation, which is set to begin early in 2004, are now underway. The goal of the VENUS ECR ion source project as the RIA research and development injector is the production of 240 eμA of U30+, a high current medium charge state beam. On the other hand, as an injector ion source for the 88-Inch Cyclotron the design objective is the production of 5 eμA of U48+, a low current, very high charge state beam. During the commissioning phase with 18 GHz, tests with various gases and recently metals have been performed with up to 2000 W rf power and the performance is very promising. For example, 1100 eμA of O6+, 180 eμA of Ar12+, 150 eμA of Xe20+, and 100 eμA of Bi24+ were produced in the early commissioning phase, ranking VENUS among the currently highest performance 18 GHz ECR ion sources. The emittance of the beams produced at 18 GHz was measured with a two axis emittance scanner. In FY04 a 10 kW, 28 GHz gyrotron system will be added, which will enable VENUS to reach full performance. The performance of the VENUS ion source, low energy beam transport and its closed loop cryogenic system are described in the article. Recently, a high temperature axial oven has been installed in the source and the first results on metal beams such as bismuth are given. The design of the 28 GHz, 10 kW gyrotron system will also be described.

  14. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Compant La Fontaine, A.

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, {ital Proceedings} {ital of} {ital the} 2{ital nd} {ital Workshop} {ital on} {ital Separation} {ital Phenomena} {ital in} {ital Liquids} {ital and} {ital Gases}, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay and Cite Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii {ital et} {ital al}., Plasma Phys. Rep. {bold 19}, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number {ital k}{sub {ital z}} is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the {ital k}{sub {ital z}} spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge--Kutta method. The influence of ion--ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field {ital B}{sub 0}, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope {sup 44}Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. Development of microwave ion source and low energy beam transport system for high current cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, V. S.; Sing Babu, P.; Goswami, A.; Srivastava, S.; Misra, A.; Chatterjee, Mou; Nabhiraj, P. Y.; Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Roy, S.; Nandi, C.; Pal, G.; Thakur, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source and a low energy beam transport system have been developed to study the high intensity proton beam injection into a 10 MeV, 5 mA compact cyclotron. We have extracted proton beam more than 10 mA at 80 kV as measured by the DCCT after the extraction and a well collimated beam of 7 mA (through 1 cm × 1 cm slit) at the faraday cup 1.5 m away from the source. The transport of protons from the ion source in the presence of H2+, H3+ species has been studied using PIC simulations through our transport line which consists of two solenoids. We have also installed a small dipole magnet with similar field as that of the cyclotron along with vacuum chamber, spiral inflector and few diagnostic elements at the end of the beam line. In the preliminary testing of inflection, we achieved 1 mA beam on the faraday cup at the exit of inflector with ∼60% transmission efficiency.

  16. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, O; Laulainen, J; Komppula, J; Kronholm, R; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Izotov, I; Mansfeld, D; Skalyga, V

    2015-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum Bmin-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8BECR, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface. PMID:25725830

  17. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, O. Laulainen, J.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2015-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  18. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Laulainen, J.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.

    2015-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum Bmin-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8BECR, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  19. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  20. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, Z M; Yuan, P; Song, M T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, T; Shang, Y; Zhan, W L; Wei, B W; Xie, D Z

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28 GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28 GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6 T at injection, 2.2 T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0 T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18 GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5 kW by two 18 GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810 e microA of O(7+), 505 e microA of Xe(20+), 306 e microA of Xe(27+), and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007. PMID:18315105

  1. Intense beam production of highly charged heavy ions by the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Guo, X. H.; Cao, Y.; Lu, W.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, P.; Song, M. T.; Zhao, H. Y.; Jin, T.; Shang, Y.; Zhan, W. L.; Wei, B. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2008-02-01

    There has been increasing demand to provide higher beam intensity and high enough beam energy for heavy ion accelerator and some other applications, which has driven electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source to produce higher charge state ions with higher beam intensity. One of development trends for highly charged ECR ion source is to build new generation ECR sources by utilization of superconducting magnet technology. SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) was successfully built to produce intense beams of highly charged ion for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The ion source has been optimized to be operated at 28GHz for its maximum performance. The superconducting magnet confinement configuration of the ion source consists of three axial solenoid coils and six sextupole coils with a cold iron structure as field booster and clamping. An innovative design of SECRAL is that the three axial solenoid coils are located inside of the sextupole bore in order to reduce the interaction forces between the sextupole coils and the solenoid coils. For 28GHz operation, the magnet assembly can produce peak mirror fields on axis of 3.6T at injection, 2.2T at extraction, and a radial sextupole field of 2.0T at plasma chamber wall. During the commissioning phase at 18GHz with a stainless steel chamber, tests with various gases and some metals have been conducted with microwave power less than 3.5kW by two 18GHz rf generators. It demonstrates the performance is very promising. Some record ion beam intensities have been produced, for instance, 810eμA of O7+, 505eμA of Xe20+, 306eμA of Xe27+, and so on. The effect of the magnetic field configuration on the ion source performance has been studied experimentally. SECRAL has been put into operation to provide highly charged ion beams for HIRFL facility since May 2007.

  2. Development of Compact Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source with Permanent Magnets for High-Energy Carbon-Ion Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Iwata, Y.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sato, S.; Ogawa, Hirotsugu; Yamada, S.; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Y.; Ueda, T.; Miyazaki, H.; Drentje, A. G.

    2008-11-03

    Heavy-ion cancer treatment is being carried out at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) with 140 to 400 MeV/n carbon ions at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) since 1994. At NIRS, more than 4,000 patients have been treated, and the clinical efficiency of carbon ion radiotherapy has been demonstrated for many diseases. A more compact accelerator facility for cancer therapy is now being constricted at the Gunma University. In order to reduce the size of the injector (consists of ion source, low-energy beam transport and post-accelerator Linac include these power supply and cooling system), an ion source requires production of highly charged carbon ions, lower electric power for easy installation of the source on a high-voltage platform, long lifetime and easy operation. A compact Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) with all permanent magnets is one of the best types for this purpose. An ECRIS has advantage for production of highly charged ions. A permanent magnet is suitable for reduce the electric power and cooling system. For this, a 10 GHz compact ECRIS with all permanent magnets (Kei2-source) was developed. The maximum mirror magnetic fields on the beam axis are 0.59 T at the extraction side and 0.87 T at the gas-injection side, while the minimum B strength is 0.25 T. These parameters have been optimized for the production of C{sup 4+} based on experience at the 10 GHz NIRS-ECR ion source. The Kei2-source has a diameter of 320 mm and a length of 295 mm. The beam intensity of C{sup 4+} was obtained to be 618 e{mu}A under an extraction voltage of 30 kV. Outline of the heavy ion therapy and development of the compact ion source for new facility are described in this paper.

  3. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2013-07-01

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10-4-10-3 mbar and 400-1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 1010 cm-3 to 3.8 × 1011 cm-3 and 4-14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  4. Plasma studies of the permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Peking University

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X. Xu, Y.; Zhao, J.; Lu, P. N.; Chen, J.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, T.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2014-02-15

    At Peking University (PKU) we have developed several 2.45 GHz Permanent Magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources for PKUNIFTY, SFRFQ, Coupled RFQ and SFRFQ, and Dielectric-Wall Accelerator (DWA) projects (respectively, 50 mA of D{sup +}, 10 mA of O{sup +}, 10 mA of He{sup +}, and 50 mA of H{sup +}). In order to improve performance of these ion sources, it is necessary to better understand the principal factors that influence the plasma density and the atomic ion fraction. Theoretical analysis about microwave transmission and cut-off inside the discharge chamber were carried out to study the influence of the discharge chamber diameters. As a consequence, experimental studies on plasma density and ion fraction with different discharge chamber sizes have been carried out. Due to the difficulties in measuring plasma density inside the discharge chamber, the output beam current was measured to reflect the plasma density. Experimental results show that the plasma density increases to the maximum and then decreases significantly as the diameter changed from 64 mm to 30 mm, and the atomic ion fraction has the same tendency. The maximum beam intensity was obtained with the diameter of 35 mm, but the maximum atomic ion fraction with a diameter of 40 mm. The experimental results are basically accordant with the theoretical calculation. Details are presented in this paper.

  5. Plasma studies of the permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X.; Xu, Y.; Zhao, J.; Lu, P. N.; Chen, J.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, T.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2014-02-01

    At Peking University (PKU) we have developed several 2.45 GHz Permanent Magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources for PKUNIFTY, SFRFQ, Coupled RFQ&SFRFQ, and Dielectric-Wall Accelerator (DWA) projects (respectively, 50 mA of D+, 10 mA of O+, 10 mA of He+, and 50 mA of H+). In order to improve performance of these ion sources, it is necessary to better understand the principal factors that influence the plasma density and the atomic ion fraction. Theoretical analysis about microwave transmission and cut-off inside the discharge chamber were carried out to study the influence of the discharge chamber diameters. As a consequence, experimental studies on plasma density and ion fraction with different discharge chamber sizes have been carried out. Due to the difficulties in measuring plasma density inside the discharge chamber, the output beam current was measured to reflect the plasma density. Experimental results show that the plasma density increases to the maximum and then decreases significantly as the diameter changed from 64 mm to 30 mm, and the atomic ion fraction has the same tendency. The maximum beam intensity was obtained with the diameter of 35 mm, but the maximum atomic ion fraction with a diameter of 40 mm. The experimental results are basically accordant with the theoretical calculation. Details are presented in this paper.

  6. First results from the new RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Aihara, T; Tamura, M; Uchiyama, A; Okuno, H; Kusaka, K; Kidera, M; Ikezawa, E; Fujimaki, M; Sato, Y; Watanabe, Y; Komiyama, M; Kase, M; Goto, A; Kamigaito, O; Yano, Y

    2010-02-01

    The next generation heavy ion accelerator facility, such as the RIKEN radio isotope (RI) beam factory, requires an intense beam of high charged heavy ions. In the past decade, performance of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources has been dramatically improved with increasing the magnetic field and rf frequency to enhance the density and confinement time of plasma. Furthermore, the effects of the key parameters (magnetic field configuration, gas pressure, etc.) on the ECR plasma have been revealed. Such basic studies give us how to optimize the ion source structure. Based on these studies and modern superconducting (SC) technology, we successfully constructed the new 28 GHz SC-ECRIS, which has a flexible magnetic field configuration to enlarge the ECR zone and to optimize the field gradient at ECR point. Using it, we investigated the effect of ECR zone size, magnetic field configuration, and biased disk on the beam intensity of the highly charged heavy ions with 18 GHz microwaves. In this article, we present the structure of the ion source and first experimental results with 18 GHz microwave in detail.

  7. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  8. The electron cyclotron resonance ion source with arc-shaped coils concept (invited).

    PubMed

    Koivisto, H; Suominen, P; Tarvainen, O; Spädtke, P

    2012-02-01

    The main limitation to further improve the performance of ECR ion sources is set by the magnet technology related to the multipole magnet field used for the closed minimum-B structure. The JYFL ion source group has sought different approaches to improve the strength of the minimum-B structure required for the production of highly charged ion beams. It was found out that such a configuration can be realized with arc shaped coils. The first prototype, electron cyclotron resonance ion source with arc-shaped coils (ARC-ECRIS), was constructed and tested at JYFL in 2006. It was confirmed that such an ion source can be used for the production of highly charged ion beams. Regardless of several cost-driven compromises such as extraction mirror ratio of 1.05-1.2, microwave frequency of 6.4 GHz, and beam line with limited capacity, Ar(4+) beam intensity of up to 2 μA was measured. Subsequent design study has shown that the ARC-ECRIS operating at the microwave frequency above 40 GHz could be constructed. This specific design would be based on NbTi-wires and it fulfills the experimental magnetic field scaling laws. In this article, the ARC-ECRIS concept and its potential applications will be described. PMID:22380159

  9. The electron cyclotron resonance ion source with arc-shaped coils concept (invited).

    PubMed

    Koivisto, H; Suominen, P; Tarvainen, O; Spädtke, P

    2012-02-01

    The main limitation to further improve the performance of ECR ion sources is set by the magnet technology related to the multipole magnet field used for the closed minimum-B structure. The JYFL ion source group has sought different approaches to improve the strength of the minimum-B structure required for the production of highly charged ion beams. It was found out that such a configuration can be realized with arc shaped coils. The first prototype, electron cyclotron resonance ion source with arc-shaped coils (ARC-ECRIS), was constructed and tested at JYFL in 2006. It was confirmed that such an ion source can be used for the production of highly charged ion beams. Regardless of several cost-driven compromises such as extraction mirror ratio of 1.05-1.2, microwave frequency of 6.4 GHz, and beam line with limited capacity, Ar(4+) beam intensity of up to 2 μA was measured. Subsequent design study has shown that the ARC-ECRIS operating at the microwave frequency above 40 GHz could be constructed. This specific design would be based on NbTi-wires and it fulfills the experimental magnetic field scaling laws. In this article, the ARC-ECRIS concept and its potential applications will be described.

  10. First results from the new RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (invited).

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Aihara, T; Tamura, M; Uchiyama, A; Okuno, H; Kusaka, K; Kidera, M; Ikezawa, E; Fujimaki, M; Sato, Y; Watanabe, Y; Komiyama, M; Kase, M; Goto, A; Kamigaito, O; Yano, Y

    2010-02-01

    The next generation heavy ion accelerator facility, such as the RIKEN radio isotope (RI) beam factory, requires an intense beam of high charged heavy ions. In the past decade, performance of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources has been dramatically improved with increasing the magnetic field and rf frequency to enhance the density and confinement time of plasma. Furthermore, the effects of the key parameters (magnetic field configuration, gas pressure, etc.) on the ECR plasma have been revealed. Such basic studies give us how to optimize the ion source structure. Based on these studies and modern superconducting (SC) technology, we successfully constructed the new 28 GHz SC-ECRIS, which has a flexible magnetic field configuration to enlarge the ECR zone and to optimize the field gradient at ECR point. Using it, we investigated the effect of ECR zone size, magnetic field configuration, and biased disk on the beam intensity of the highly charged heavy ions with 18 GHz microwaves. In this article, we present the structure of the ion source and first experimental results with 18 GHz microwave in detail. PMID:20192341

  11. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Kewlani, H; Mishra, L; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2013-07-01

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10(-4)-10(-3) mbar and 400-1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10(10) cm(-3) to 3.8 × 10(11) cm(-3) and 4-14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  12. Two-chamber configuration of Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source for fullerene modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, A.; Biri, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the modification of fullerenes with iron and chlorine using two individually controllable plasmas in the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). One of the plasmas is composed of fullerene and the other one is composed of iron and chlorine. The online ion beam analysis allows one to investigate the rate of the vapor-phase collisional modification process in the ECRIS, while the offline analyses (e.g., liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the materials deposited on the plasma chamber can give information on the surface-type process. Both analytical methods show the presence of modified fullerenes such as fullerene-chlorine, fullerene-iron, and fullerene-chlorine-iron.

  13. Emittance and proton fraction measurement in High current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Gharat, S.; Rajawat, R. K.

    2015-09-01

    The beam characterization studies in terms of emittance and proton fraction have been carried out in the high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source developed for Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA). The beam emittance was measured using two slit emittance measurement units (EMU). The emittance was measured at three locations (1) after beam extraction at ion source end, (2) after focusing the beam using solenoid magnet and (3) after focusing and separating H+ using solenoid magnet and analyzing magnet. The beam emittance measured in all three cases was found to be less than 0.2π mm-mrad (rms-normalized). The proton fraction in the beam measured using analyzing magnet was found to be more than 90%. The variations of beam emittance and proton fraction have been studied as a function of microwave power and neutral gas pressure.

  14. Nonlocal effects on the convective properties of the electrostatic current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-01-01

    The convective behavior of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability (CDICI) in the presence of nonlocal magnetic-shear and current-channel-width effects is investigated theoretically using the analytical approach of Bakshi et al. (1983). The results are presented in graphs and discussed. Three different CDICI regimes defined by the ratio of the channel width to the shear length are obtained: a purely nonlocal regime with reduced temporal growth rate and group velocity in the z direction going to zero (ratios greater than about 0.1); a regime corresponding to the results of local theory (ratios less than 0.01); and a regime characterized by decreasing temporal growth rate and by z and y group velocities which become negative when the channel width becomes less than the mean ion Larmor radius (ratios 0.001 or less).

  15. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  16. Performance of an ion-cyclotron-wave plasma apparatus operated in the radiofrequency sustained mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swett, C. C.; Woollett, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of an ion-cyclotron-wave apparatus operated in the RF-sustained mode, that is, a mode in which the Stix RF coil both propagates the waves and maintains the plasma. Problems associated with this method of operation are presented. Some factors that are important to the coupling of RF power are noted. In general, the wave propagation and wave damping data agree with theory. Some irregularities in wave fields are observed. Maximum ion temperature is 870 eV at a density of five times 10 to the 12th power cu cm and RF power of 90 kW. Coupling efficiency is 70 percent.

  17. A simulation of X-ray shielding for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-15

    It is generally assumed that large amounts of x-rays are emitted from the ion source of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) instrument. The total amount of x-rays should be strictly limited to avoid the extra heat load to the cryostat of the superconducting ECR ion source, since they are partly absorbed by the cold mass into the cryostat. A simulation of x-ray shielding was carried out to determine the effective thickness of the x-ray shield needed via the use of Geant4. X-ray spectra of the 10 GHz Nanogan ECR ion source were measured as a function of the thickness variation in the x-ray shield. The experimental results were compared with Geant4 results to verify the effectiveness of the x-ray shield. Based on the validity in the case of the 10 GHz ECR ion source, the x-ray shielding results are presented by assuming the spectral temperature of the 28 GHz ECR ion source.

  18. Scattering of relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons by obliquely propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzbekov, Bogdan; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Orlova, Ksenia

    2016-10-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are transverse plasma waves that are generated in the Earth magnetosphere by ring current protons with temperature anisotropy in three different bands: below the H+, He+ and O+ ion gyrofrequencies. EMIC events are enhanced during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm when intensifications in the electric field result in enhanced injections of ions and are usually confined to high-density regions just inside the plasmapause or within drainage plumes. EMIC waves are capable of scattering radiation belt electrons and thus provide an important link between the intensification of the electric field, ion populations, and radiation belt electrons. Bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients computed with the assumption of parallel wave propagation are compared to the results of the code that uses the full cold plasma dispersion relation taking into account oblique propagation of waves and higher-order resonances. We study the sensitivity of the scattering rates to a number of included higher-order resonances, wave spectral distribution parameters, wave normal angle distribution parameters, ambient plasma density, and ion composition. Inaccuracies associated with the neglect of higher-order resonances and oblique propagation of waves are compared to potential errors introduced by uncertainties in the model input parameters.

  19. Time evolution of endpoint energy of Bremsstrahlung spectra and ion production from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie; Ropponen, Tommi; Jones, Peter; Kalvas, Taneli

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) are used to produce high charge state heavy ion beams for the use of nuclear and materials science, for instance. The most powerful ECR ion sources today are superconducting. One of the problems with superconducting ECR ion sources is the use of high radio frequency (RF) power which results in bremsstrahlung radiation adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. In order to understand the electron heating process and timescales in the ECR plasma, time evolution measurement of ECR bremsstrahlung was carried out. In the measurements JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS was operated in a pulsed mode and bremsstrahlung data from several hundred RF pulses was recorded. Time evolution of ion production was also studied and compared to one of the electron heating theories. To analyze the measurement data at C++ program was developed. Endpoint energies of the bremsstrahlung spectra as a function of axial magnetic field strength, pressure and RF power are presented and ion production timescales obtained from the measurements are compared to bremsstrahlung emission timescales and one of the stochastic heating theories.

  20. Effects of heavy ions on the quasi-linear diffusion coefficients from resonant interactions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Kozyra, J. U.; Nagy, A. F.

    1996-09-01

    Ion composition measurements provided by recent satellite missions have confirmed the presence of heavy ions in the terrestrial magnetosphere. In order to describe the resonance of energetic ring current particles with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in a more realistic terrestrial environment, general expressions are derived that provide quasi-linear diffusion coefficients in a cold plasma containing heavy ions. Cold plasma theory is used as a first approximation. In such plasma, EMIC waves do not propagate in the frequency range between the ion gyrofrequency and the cutoff frequency for each ion component but form multiple stop bands. No interactions occur within the stop bands and the diffusion coefficients are zero over the corresponding frequency intervals. For most of the wave frequencies of interest, the particles in a multicomponent plasma resonate at lower parallel energies than particles in an electron-proton plasma for a given harmonic value. Therefore resonance with a fixed frequency wave occurs at larger pitch angles (lower parallel energies) in a multi-ion than in a proton-electron plasma. As a direct consequence, pitch angle diffusion coefficients for a given energy decrease at small pitch angles and increase at large pitch angles as heavy ions are added to the plasma. The energy and mixed diffusion coefficients change correspondingly. Also, higher harmonics need to be included in the calculations for resonances at higher energies. The pitch angle diffusion lifetimes are calculated for given plasmaspheric and wave parameters corresponding to conditions at a radial distance L=4. The values of the diffusion lifetimes decrease at low energies and increase at high energies in a multi-ion as compared to an electron-proton plasma. As a result, the resonances at lower energies (~ approximately tens of keV) will contribute to the ion precipitation losses from the ring current during geomagnetic storms.

  1. Chirped dissipative ion-cyclotron solitons in the Earth's low-altitude ionospheric plasma with two ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, I. Kh.

    2013-03-15

    Conditions for the excitation of small-scale nonlinear ion-cyclotron gradient-drift dissipative structures in cold ionospheric plasma are considered. The solution for the wave electric field in this structure in the form of a chirped soliton satisfying the equation of the Ginzburg-Landau type is derived in the electrostatic approach. The dissipative structure as a whole represents the chirped soliton accompanied by the comoving quasineutral plasma hump. The possibility of the excitation of two modes of this type (the high- and low-frequency ones) in plasma containing light and heavy ion impurities is considered. The role of electromagnetic corrections and the possible contribution introduced by these structures to the transport processes in the ionosphere are discussed.

  2. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: Waves in Multi-Ion Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2006-01-01

    The further development of a self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (Khazanov et al., 2003) is presented In order to adequately take into account wave propagation and refraction in a multi-ion magnetosphere, we explicitly include the ray tracing equations in our previous self-consistent model and use the general form of the wave kinetic equation. This is a major new feature of the present model and, to the best of our knowledge, the ray tracing equations for the first time are explicitly employed on a global magnetospheric scale in order to self-consistently simulate the spatial, temporal, and spectral evolution of the ring current and of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves To demonstrate the effects of EMIC wave propagation and refraction on the wave energy distribution and evolution, we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows. First, owing to the density gradient at the plasmapause, the net wave refraction is suppressed, and He+-mode grows preferably at the plasmapause. This result is in total agreement with previous ray tracing studies and is very clearly found in presented B field spectrograms. Second, comparison of global wave distributions with the results from another ring current model (Kozyra et al., 1997) reveals that this new model provides more intense and more highly plasmapause-organized wave distributions during the May 1998 storm period Finally, it is found that He(+)-mode energy distributions are not Gaussian distributions and most important that wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i.e., the region of small wave normal angles, but all wave normal angles, including those to near 90 . The latter is extremely crucial for energy transfer to thermal plasmaspheric electrons by resonant Landau damping and subsequent downward heat transport and excitation of stable auroral red arcs.

  3. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves. 1; Waves in Multi Ion Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gumayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2006-01-01

    The further development of a self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves [Khazanov et al., 2003] is presented. In order to adequately take into account the wave propagation and refraction in a multi-ion plasmasphere, we explicitly include the ray tracing equations in our previous self-consistent model and use the general form of the wave kinetic equation. This is a major new feature of the present model and, to the best of our knowledge, the ray tracing equations for the first time are explicitly employed on a global magnetospheric scale in order to self-consistently simulate spatial, temporal, and spectral evolutions of the ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. To demonstrate the effects of EMIC wave propagation and refraction on the EMIC wave energy distributions and evolution we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows. First, due to the density gradient at the plasmapause, the net wave refraction is suppressed, and He(+)-mode grows preferably at plasmapause. This result is in a total agreement with the previous ray tracing studies, and very clear observed in presented B-field spectrograms. Second, comparison the global wave distributions with the results from other ring current model [Kozyra et al., 1997] reveals that our model provides more intense and higher plasmapause organized distributions during the May, 1998 storm period. Finally, the found He(+)-mode energy distributions are not Gaussian distributions, and most important that wave energy can occupy not only the region of generation, i. e. the region of small wave normal angles, but the entire wave normal angle region and even only the region near 90 degrees. The latter is extremely crucial for energy transfer to thermal plasmaspheric electrons by resonant Landau damping, and subsequent downward heat transport and excitation of stable auroral red arcs.

  4. Status report of the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Loew, T.; Todd, D. S.; Virostek, S.; Tarvainen, O.

    2006-03-01

    The superconducting versatile electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for nuclear science (VENUS) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source designed to produce high-current, high-charge-state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the rare isotope accelerator (RIA) front end, where the goal is to produce intense beams of medium-charge-state ions. Example beams for the RIA accelerator are 15 p μA of Kr17+(260 e μA), 12 p μA of Xe20+ (240 e μA of Xe20+), and 8 p μA of U28+(230 e μA). To achieve these high currents, VENUS has been optimized for operation at 28 GHz, reaching maximal confinement fields of 4 and 3 T axially and over 2.2 T on the plasma chamber wall radially. After a commissioning phase at 18 GHz, the source started the 28 GHz operation in the summer of 2004. During that ongoing 28 GHz commissioning process, record ion-beam intensities have been extracted. For instance, measured extracted currents for the low to medium charge states were 270 e μA of Xe27+ and 245 e μA of Bi29+, while for the higher charge states 15 e μA of Xe34+, 15 e μA of Bi41+, and 0.5 e μA of Bi50+ could be produced. Results from the ongoing 28 GHz commissioning as well as results using double-frequency heating with 18 and 28 GHz for oxygen and xenon are presented. The effect of the minimum B field on the ion source performance has been systematically measured for 18 and 28 GHz. In both cases the performance peaked at a minimum B field of about 80% of the resonance field. In addition, a strong dependence of the x-ray flux and energy on the minimum B field value was found.

  5. Status report of the 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Loew, T.; Todd, D.S.; Virostek, S.; Tarvainen, O.

    2006-03-15

    The superconducting versatile electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source for nuclear science (VENUS) is a next generation superconducting ECR ion source designed to produce high-current, high-charge-state ions for the 88-Inch Cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. VENUS also serves as the prototype ion source for the rare isotope accelerator (RIA) front end, where the goal is to produce intense beams of medium-charge-state ions. Example beams for the RIA accelerator are 15 p {mu}A of Kr{sup 17+}(260 e {mu}A), 12 p {mu}A of Xe{sup 20+} (240 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 20+}), and 8 p {mu}A of U{sup 28+}(230 e {mu}A). To achieve these high currents, VENUS has been optimized for operation at 28 GHz, reaching maximal confinement fields of 4 and 3 T axially and over 2.2 T on the plasma chamber wall radially. After a commissioning phase at 18 GHz, the source started the 28 GHz operation in the summer of 2004. During that ongoing 28 GHz commissioning process, record ion-beam intensities have been extracted. For instance, measured extracted currents for the low to medium charge states were 270 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 27+} and 245 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 29+}, while for the higher charge states 15 e {mu}A of Xe{sup 34+}, 15 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 41+}, and 0.5 e {mu}A of Bi{sup 50+} could be produced. Results from the ongoing 28 GHz commissioning as well as results using double-frequency heating with 18 and 28 GHz for oxygen and xenon are presented. The effect of the minimum B field on the ion source performance has been systematically measured for 18 and 28 GHz. In both cases the performance peaked at a minimum B field of about 80% of the resonance field. In addition, a strong dependence of the x-ray flux and energy on the minimum B field value was found.

  6. A new technique for unbiased external ion accumulation in a quadrupole two-dimensional ion trap for electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Belov, M E; Nikolaev, E N; Alving, K; Smith, R D

    2001-01-01

    External ion accumulation in a two-dimensional (2D) multipole trap has been shown to increase the sensitivity, dynamic range and duty cycle of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. However, it is important that trapped ions be detected without significant bias at longer accumulation times in the external 2D multipole trap. With increasing ion accumulation time pronounced m/z discrimination was observed when trapping ions in an accumulation quadrupole. In this work we show that superimposing lower rf-amplitude dipolar excitation over the main rf-field in the accumulation quadrupole results in disruption of the m/z discrimination and can potentially be used to achieve unbiased external ion accumulation with FTICR.

  7. Spectral features of lightning-induced ion cyclotron waves at low latitudes: DEMETER observations and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyar, D. R.; Storey, L. R. O.; Chum, J.; JiříčEk, F.; NěMec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolik, O.; Titova, E. E.

    2012-12-01

    We use a comprehensive analysis of 6-component ELF wave data from the DEMETER satellite to study proton whistlers, placing emphasis on low-latitude events originating from lightning strokes in the hemisphere opposite to the hemisphere of observation. In this case, the formation of proton whistlers does not involve mode conversion caused by a strong mode coupling at a crossover frequency, although a polarization reversal remains an important element in formation of the phenomenon. DEMETER measurements of the six electromagnetic field components in the frequency band below 1000 Hz make it possible to determine not only the dynamic spectrum, but also the wave polarization, the wave normal angle, and the normalized parallel component of the Poynting vector. This permits us to address fine features of proton whistlers, in particular, we show that the deviation of the upper cutoff frequency from the equatorial cyclotron frequency is related to the Doppler shift. Experimental study of proton whistlers is supplemented by an investigation of ion cyclotron wave propagation in a multicomponent magnetoplasma and by numerical modeling of spectrograms, both in the frame of geometrical optics.

  8. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  9. An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron as metal vapor supply for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weichsel, T. Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Silze, A.

    2014-05-15

    An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron device has been developed. The magnetron is acting as a metal vapor supply for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. FEM simulation of magnetic flux density was used to ensure that there is no critical interaction between both magnetic fields of magnetron and ECR ion source. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy measurements show an increase in electron density by one order of magnitude from 1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}, when the magnetron plasma is exposed to the magnetic mirror field of the ECR ion source. Electron density enhancement is also indicated by magnetron plasma emission photography with a CCD camera. Furthermore, photographs visualize the formation of a localized loss-cone - area, when the magnetron is operated at magnetic mirror field conditions. The inverted cylindrical magnetron supplies a metal atom load rate of R > 1 × 10{sup 18} atoms/s for aluminum, which meets the demand for the production of a milliampere Al{sup +} ion beam.

  10. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Chalykh, B. B.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kropachev, G. N.; Ziiatdinova, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  11. Fourier Transfrom Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at High Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-03-01

    At high magnetic field (9.4 tesla at NHMFL), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry performance improves dramatically: mass resolving power, axialization efficiency, and scan speed (each proportional to B), maximum ion mass, dynamic range, ion trapping period, kinetic energy, and electron self-cooling rate for sympathetic cooling (each proportional to B^2), and ion coalescence tendency (proportional 1/B^2). These advantages may apply singly (e.g., unit mass resolution for proteins of >100,000 Da), or compound (e.g., 10-fold improvement in S/N ratio for 9.4 T vs. 6 T at the same resolving power). Examples range from direct determination of molecular formulas of diesel fuel components by accurate mass measurement (=B10.1 ppm) to protein structure and dynamics probed by H/D exchange. This work was supported by N.S.F. (CHE-93-22824; CHE-94-13008), N.I.H. (GM-31683), Florida State University, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL.

  12. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Drentje, A. G. Kitagawa, A.; Uchida, T.; Rácz, R.; Biri, S.

    2014-02-15

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses. One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions – i.e., radial directions – that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six “side” electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable, off-axis side electrode was applied in technically two versions. The measurements show indeed a decrease of ionic losses but different effectivities as compared to the biased disk.

  13. The Nonlinear Coupling of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Waves in the Ring Current Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2004-01-01

    The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space, and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. In this paper we present the morphology, dynamics, and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7, 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on a newly developed self-consistent model (Khazanov et. al., 2002, 2003) that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic, and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  14. ION HEATING IN INHOMOGENEOUS EXPANDING SOLAR WIND PLASMA: THE ROLE OF PARALLEL AND OBLIQUE ION-CYCLOTRON WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ozak, N.; Ofman, L.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-01-20

    Remote sensing observations of coronal holes show that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic. In-situ observations of fast solar wind streams provide direct evidence for turbulent Alfvén wave spectrum, left-hand polarized ion-cyclotron waves, and He{sup ++} - proton drift in the solar wind plasma, which can produce temperature anisotropies by resonant absorption and perpendicular heating of the ions. Furthermore, the solar wind is expected to be inhomogeneous on decreasing scales approaching the Sun. We study the heating of solar wind ions in inhomogeneous plasma with a 2.5D hybrid code. We include the expansion of the solar wind in an inhomogeneous plasma background, combined with the effects of a turbulent wave spectrum of Alfvénic fluctuations and initial ion-proton drifts. We study the influence of these effects on the perpendicular ion heating and cooling and on the spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations in the inhomogeneous background wind. We find that inhomogeneities in the plasma lead to enhanced heating compared to the homogenous solar wind, and the generation of significant power of oblique waves in the solar wind plasma. The cooling effect due to the expansion is not significant for super-Alfvénic drifts, and is diminished further when we include an inhomogeneous background density. We reproduce the ion temperature anisotropy seen in observations and previous models, which is present regardless of the perpendicular cooling due to solar wind expansion. We conclude that small scale inhomogeneities in the inner heliosphere can significantly affect resonant wave ion heating.

  15. Numerical Study of Instabilities Driven by Energetic Neutral Beam Ions in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Belova; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.Z. Cheng; E.D. Fredrickson

    2003-07-07

    Recent experimental observations from NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] suggest that many modes in a subcyclotron frequency range are excited during neutral-beam injection (NBI). These modes have been identified as Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAEs) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAEs), which are driven unstable through the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with the beam ions. The injection velocities of the NBI ions in NSTX are large compared to Alfven velocity, V(sub)0 > 3V(sub)A, and a strong anisotropy in the fast-ion pitch-angle distribution provides the energy source for the instabilities. Recent interest in the excitation of Alfven Eigenmodes in the frequency range omega less than or approximately equal to omega(sub)ci, where omega(sub)ci is the ion cyclotron frequency, is related to the possibility that these modes can provide a mechanism for direct energy transfer from super-Alfvenic beam ions to thermal ions. Numerical simulations are required in order to find a self-consistent mode structure, and to include the effects of finite-Larmor radius (FLR), the nonlinear effects, and the thermal plasma kinetic effects.

  16. Calcium ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) transfers information to living systems: effects on human epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Antonella; Ledda, Mario; De Carlo, Flavia; Foletti, Alberto; Giuliani, Livio; D'Emilia, Enrico; Grimaldi, Settimio

    2008-01-01

    The specific aim of the present work concerns the effectiveness of low-frequency electromagnetic fields treatment to modify biochemical properties of human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Cells exposed to a 7 Hz electromagnetic field, tuned to calcium ion cyclotron resonance (ICR), showed modifications in the cytoskeleton. These modifications were related to different actin distributions as revealed by phalloidin fluorescence analysis. Indirect immunofluorescence with fluorescent antibodies against involucrin and beta catenin, both differentiation and adhesion markers, revealed an increase in involucrin and beta-catenin expression, indicating that exposure to electromagnetic field carries keratinocytes to an upper differentiation level. This study confirms our previous observation and supports the hypothesis that a 7 Hz calcium ICR electromagnetic field may modify cell biochemistry and interfere in the differentiation and cellular adhesion of normal keratinocytes, suggesting the possibility to use ICR electromagnetic therapy for the treatment of undifferentiated diseases.

  17. Experimental evidence for the acceleration of thermal electrons by ion cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, A. J.; Sojka, J. J.; Wrenn, G. L.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Perraut, S.; Roux, A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the acceleration of thermal electrons by large amplitude ion cyclotron waves (ICWs). The wave power in the ULF range near the helium gyrofrequency is compared with the distribution function of low energy electrons measured by GEOS satellite instruments. This comparison shows that electrons are accelerated near the geomagnetic equator along field lines, at times when the ICW energy is large and the cold plasma density is below a threshold value. It is suggested that these accelerated electrons can account for the ELF emissions, modulated at the ICW frequency, observed by Wehrlin (1981). A very efficient acceleration of thermal electrons along field lines results from other ULF events having frequencies close to the proton gyrofrequency. Evidence for this lies in the fact that medium energy protons having large temperature anisotropies in the 100-500 eV range are responsible for the ICW wave generation.

  18. The plasma wave environment of an auroral arc - Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in the diffuse aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    Electric field plasma wave observations were made with a sounding rocket payload in and near a quiet auroral arc. This payload was launched on March 9, 1978 from Poker Flat, Alaska. The payload trajectory was close to the magnetic meridian and passed over a 40 kR auroral arc. The present investigation is concerned with ac electric field observations in the ELF and lower VLF covering a frequency range from 2.5 Hz to 8 kHz. Attention is given to aspects of instrumentation, the general situation, a data analysis, and the obtained results. Waves were observed at low altitude in a region of downward parallel current and diffuse aurora. These waves had properties consistent with those expected for hydrogen and oxygen electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves.

  19. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance versus time of flight for precision mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, R.T.

    1993-02-01

    Both Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and ICR Time-of-Flight mass spectroscopy (FTICR-MS and ICR-TOF-MS, respectively) have been applied to precision atomic mass measurements. This paper reviews the status of these approaches and compares their limitations. Comparisons are made of FTICR-MS and ICR-TOF-MS for application to precision atomic mass measurements of stable and unstable nuclei, where the relevant scale is an accuracy of 1 keV and where halflives are longer than 10 milliseconds (optimistically). The atomic mass table is built up from mass chains, and ICR-MS brings a method of producing new types of mass chains to the mass measurement arena.

  20. Ion Cyclotron Waves Observed in the Comet Halley: A New Look to Giotto Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, M. R.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Haro-Corzo, S. S. A. R., Sr.; Arriaga-Contreras, V. V. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron Waves (ICW) were observed with Giotto spacecraft. Magnetic field data have been analyzed in the past to determine the nature of ICW and compared with other comets, as Giacobini-Zinner and Grigg-Skjellerup. It is important to develop tools that allow re-analyze these data in order to know better the characteristics of these waves. In this work we have applied a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis in which we define the transverse and compressive powers for a better contrast and characterization of ICW. The information obtained will be presented through dynamic spectra in several time intervals. This tool will allow to explore the possibility to check the existence of Harmonic Mode Waves (HMW) of these waves. Finally, we use linear kinetic theory, using WHAMP code, in order to determine conditions for wave growth in a plasma resembling the regions where these waves were observed.

  1. Low-distortion detection system for frequency-swept ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Freiser, B.S.

    1986-07-01

    A high-performance frequency-swept capacitance bridge detector for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometry has been constructed in our laboratory. Although the basic design of the system is similar to that of previously reported bridge circuits, careful design, layout, construction, and component selection have resulted in excellent frequency-swept performance over a bandwidth of 15 kHz to 1 MHz. At a magnetic field strength of 1.0 T, this corresponds to a mass range of 15--1000 Daltons. Problems with base-line drift and frequency-dependent signal distortion common to many other designs have been significantly reduced. Circuit diagrams are included for all parts of the detector and frequency response curves have been included where appropriate. In addition, several simple circuit diagrams for support devices have also been included.

  2. Ion cyclotron and lower hybrid arrays applicable to current drive in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosia, G.; Helou, W.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ragona, R.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Current Drive arrays applicable to fusion reactors and based on periodically loaded line power division. It is shown that, in large arrays, such as the ones proposed for fusion reactor applications, these schemes can offer, in principle, a number of practical advantages, compared with currently adopted ones, such as in-blanket operation at significantly reduced power density, lay out suitable for water cooling, single ended or balanced power feed, simple and load independent impedance matching In addition, a remote and accurate real time measurement of the complex impedance of all array elements as well as detection, location, and measurement of the complex admittance of a single arc occurring anywhere in the structure is possible.

  3. Nitrogen removal from plasma-facing components by ion cyclotron wall conditioning in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, A. G.; Wauters, T.; Petersson, P.; Drenik, A.; Rubel, M.; Crombé, K.; Douai, D.; Fortuna, E.; Kogut, D.; Kreter, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Möller, S.; Pisarek, M.; Vervier, M.

    2015-08-01

    The efficiency of ion cyclotron wall conditioning (ICWC) in the removal of nitrogen from plasma-facing components in TEXTOR was assessed. In two experiments the wall was loaded with nitrogen and subsequently cleaned by ICWC in deuterium and helium. The retention and removal of nitrogen was studied in-situ by means of mass spectrometry, and ex-situ by surface analysis of a set of graphite, tungsten and TZM plates installed on test limiter systems. 15N rare isotope was used as a marker. The results from the gas balance showed that about 25% of the retained nitrogen was removed after ICWC cleaning, whereas surface analysis of the plates based on ToF-HIERDA showed an increase of the deposited species after the cleaning. This indicates that during ICWC operation on carbon devices, nitrogen is not only pumped out but also transported to other locations on the wall. Additionally, deuterium surface content was studied before and after ICWC cleaning.

  4. An explanation for experimental observations of harmonic cyclotron emission induced by fast ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.; Horton, W.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1993-09-01

    An explanation, supported by numerical simulations and analytical theory, is given for the harmonic cyclotron emission induced by fast ions in tokamak plasmas - particular, for the emission observed at low harmonics in deuterium-deuterium md deuterium-tritium experiments in the Joint European Tokamak. We show that the first proton harmonic is one of the highest spectral peaks whereas the first alpha is weak. We also compare the relative spectral amplitudes of different harmonics. Our results axe consistent with the experimental observations. The simulations verify that the instabilities are caused by a weak relativistic mass effect. Simulation that a nonuniform magnetic field leads to no appreciable change in the growth and saturation amplitude of the waves.

  5. Computational study of ion cyclotron frequency stabilization of the m = 1 interchange mode in mirror geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Francis, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    A cylindrical plasma model is used to study the stabilizing effect of electromagnetic ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF) waves on the m = 1 magnetohydrodynamic interchange mode. The fast wave eigenmodes of the column and the near-field antenna pattern are calculated numerically for a diffuse plasma profile when ..omega..>..cap omega../sub i/. The resulting ponderomotive force and sideband contributions to global interchange stability are then determined using a rigid shift trial function. For far-field stabilization it is verified that the direct ponderomotive and sideband contributions cancel exactly as the conducting wall supporting the fast wave eigenmode moves out to infinity. The near-field stabilization effect is related numerically to the driven k/sub parallel/ spectrum of the waves and their radial profiles. The numerical model is employed to calculate threshold ICRF wave amplitudes for the stabilization experiments in the Phaedrus tandem mirror (Phys. Rev. Lett. 51, 1955 (1983)).

  6. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Ban, G.; Celona, L.; Lunney, D.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O.; Kalvas, T.; and others

    2012-02-15

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  7. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves near the Plasmapause: A CLUSTER Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Liu, Y.; Menk, F. W.

    2011-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the Pc1 ultra-low frequency wave band (0.2-5Hz) observed in the plasmasphere and magnetosphere are generated by micro-scale instabilities associated with keV energetic protons of ring current origin. This case study presents a typical EMIC wave event with frequency 1.8-3.5 Hz observed by the four Cluster spacecraft when passing through perigee (L ~ 4:2) and moving northward on 2 November 2001 around 08 MLT. The event occurred around the magnetic equatorial plane within magnetic latitude range ±18 degrees with a short duration of 50 minutes. The associated cold electron density data show the wave power was confined within the narrow shell of the plasmapause where the electron density gradient decreased from 30-80 cm-3 to 20 cm-3. The radial scale size of the wave region is estimated at ~ 0:77 Re. The wave polarization was dominantly left-handed around the equatorial region and inner side of source region, but appeared right-handed close to the outer edge of the plasmapause and at higher latitudes. The Poynting flux and minimum variance analysis indicate that the wave energy was mainly transported towards high latitudes though oblique propagation was seen around the equatorial region. Enhanced H+, He+ and O+ particle energy fluxes were seen during the wave event over energy range ~25eV-40keV. Unfortunately the lower energy cold plasma composition data were not available. These observations suggest the waves originated around the equatorial region in the high density outer plasmasphere-plasmapause which overlaps the ring current; ideal conditions for wave generation by the ion cyclotron instability.

  8. Ion and electron cyclotron wall conditioning in stellarator and tokamak magnetic field configuration on WEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Wauters, T.; Louche, F.; Urlings, P.

    2014-02-12

    Discharge wall conditioning is an effective tool to improve plasma performance in tokamaks and stellarators. RF Discharge Conditioning (RFDC) techniques are envisaged for use during operational campaigns on superconducting devices like the ITER tokamak and W7-X stellarator, as alternative to DC Glow Discharge Conditioning which is inefficient in presence of magnetic fields. This contribution investigates RFDC in both the ion and electron cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF and ECRF) on the WEGA device (Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald, Germany) as preparation for W7-X operation. ECRF discharges produced by localised absorption of RF power at EC resonance layers suffer from poor radial discharge homogeneity in the tokamak vacuum magnetic field configuration, severely limiting the plasma wetted wall areas and consequently the conditioning efficiency. The non-localised production of ICRF discharges by collisional RF power absorption features much improved discharge homogeneity making Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) the favoured RFDC technique for superconducting tokamaks. RFDC with the stellarator vacuum magnetic field needs to aim at sufficient plasma densities at and outside the last closed flux surface (LCFS), maximising the convective plasma flux along the open field lines to the wall. Whereas for ICRF discharges this condition is easily fulfilled, on WEGA for He-ECRF discharges this could be achieved as well by off axis heating close to the LCFS. In stellarator magnetic field configuration it is found that He-ICWC for wall desaturation is at least one order of magnitude more efficient than He-ECWC. Novel ECWC methods are proposed that can decrease this efficiency gap with ICWC to a factor 2-3. The efficiency difference is less pronounced in case of H{sub 2}-ICWC and ECWC for isotopic exchange.

  9. Weak effect of ion cyclotron acceleration on rapidly chirping beam-driven instabilities in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W. W.; Ruskov, E.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N.; Medley, S. S.; Berk, H. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2006-09-01

    The fast-ion distribution function in the National Spherical Torus Experiment is modified from shot to shot while keeping the total injected power at ~2 MW. Deuterium beams of different energy and tangency radius are injected into helium L-mode plasmas, producing a rich set of instabilities, including compressional Alfven eigenmodes, toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE), 50–100 kHz instabilities with rapid frequency sweeps or chirps, and strong, low frequency (10–20 kHz) fishbones. The experiment was motivated by a theory that attributes frequency chirping to the formation of holes and clumps in phase-space. In the theory, increasing the effective collision frequency of the fast ions that drive the instability can suppress frequency chirping. In the experiment, high-power (≤3MW) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating accelerates the fast ions in an attempt to alter the nonlinear dynamics. Steady-frequency TAE modes diminish during the HHFW heating but there is little evidence that frequency chirping is suppressed.

  10. Molecular and negative ion production by a standard electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Juhasz, Z.; Sulik, B.

    2012-02-15

    Molecular and negative ion beams, usually produced in special ion sources, play an increasingly important role in fundamental and applied atomic physics. The ATOMKI-ECRIS is a standard ECR ion source, designed to provide highly charged ion (HCI) plasmas and beams. In the present work, H{sup -}, O{sup -}, OH{sup -}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, C{sup -}, C{sub 60}{sup -} negative ions and H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +} positive molecular ions were generated in this HCI-ECRIS. Without any major modification in the source and without any commonly applied tricks (such as usage of cesium or magnetic filter), negative ion beams of several {mu}A and positive molecular ion beams in the mA range were successfully obtained.

  11. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, P; Caspi, S; Felice, H; Leitner, D; Lyneis, C M; Prestemon, S; Sabbi, G L; Todd, D S

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb(3)Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb(3)Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb(3)Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb(3)Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb(3)Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell pretensioned with water

  12. Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2010-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  13. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Todd, D. S.

    2009-05-04

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb{sub 3}Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb{sub 3}Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb{sub 3}Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn- , particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell

  14. Nb3Sn superconducting magnets for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, P; Caspi, S; Felice, H; Leitner, D; Lyneis, C M; Prestemon, S; Sabbi, G L; Todd, D S

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources are an essential component of heavy-ion accelerators. Over the past few decades advances in magnet technology and an improved understanding of the ECR ion source plasma physics have led to remarkable performance improvements of ECR ion sources. Currently third generation high field superconducting ECR ion sources operating at frequencies around 28 GHz are the state of the art ion injectors and several devices are either under commissioning or under design around the world. At the same time, the demand for increased intensities of highly charged heavy ions continues to grow, which makes the development of even higher performance ECR ion sources a necessity. To extend ECR ion sources to frequencies well above 28 GHz, new magnet technology will be needed in order to operate at higher field and force levels. The superconducting magnet program at LBNL has been developing high field superconducting magnets for particle accelerators based on Nb(3)Sn superconducting technology for several years. At the moment, Nb(3)Sn is the only practical conductor capable of operating at the 15 T field level in the relevant configurations. Recent design studies have been focused on the possibility of using Nb(3)Sn in the next generation of ECR ion sources. In the past, LBNL has worked on the VENUS ECR, a 28 GHz source with solenoids and a sextupole made with NbTi operating at fields of 6-7 T. VENUS has now been operating since 2004. We present in this paper the design of a Nb(3)Sn ECR ion source optimized to operate at an rf frequency of 56 GHz with conductor peak fields of 13-15 T. Because of the brittleness and strain sensitivity of Nb(3)Sn, particular care is required in the design of the magnet support structure, which must be capable of providing support to the coils without overstressing the conductor. In this paper, we present the main features of the support structure, featuring an external aluminum shell pretensioned with water

  15. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20-40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, -2 to -4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30-40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600-1000 W of microwave power, 800-1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2-3.9) × 10-3 mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  16. Beam extraction and high stability operation of high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P. Mishra, L.; Kewlani, H.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2014-03-15

    A high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source is designed and developed for the low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The plasma discharge in the ion source is stabilized by minimizing the reflected microwave power using four stub auto tuner and magnetic field. The optimization of extraction geometry is performed using PBGUNS code by varying the aperture, shape, accelerating gap, and the potential on the electrodes. While operating the source, it was found that the two layered microwave window (6 mm quartz plate and 2 mm boron nitride plate) was damaged (a fine hole was drilled) by the back-streaming electrons after continuous operation of the source for 3 h at beam current of 20–40 mA. The microwave window was then shifted from the line of sight of the back-streaming electrons and located after the water-cooled H-plane bend. In this configuration the stable operation of the high current ion source for several hours is achieved. The ion beam is extracted from the source by biasing plasma electrode, puller electrode, and ground electrode to +10 to +50 kV, −2 to −4 kV, and 0 kV, respectively. The total ion beam current of 30–40 mA is recorded on Faraday cup at 40 keV of beam energy at 600–1000 W of microwave power, 800–1000 G axial magnetic field and (1.2–3.9) × 10{sup −3} mbar of neutral hydrogen gas pressure in the plasma chamber. The dependence of beam current on extraction voltage, microwave power, and gas pressure is investigated in the range of operation of the ion source.

  17. Production of charged (singly and multiply) phosphorous beams with electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Maunoury, L.; Kantas, S.; Leroy, R.; Pacquet, J.Y.

    2006-03-15

    Within the framework of biological application linked to ion irradiation, the fabrication of radioactive stents by ion implantation provides a significant improvement of the recovery of arteries after a treatment of stenosed coronary arteries [P. Fehsenfeld et al., Semin Interv Cardiol. 3, 157 (1998); E. Huttel et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 825 (2002); M.-A. Golombeck et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 206, 495 (2003)]. For this appliance, the suitable radioactive ion is {sup 32}P. Obviously, in order to have a minimum loss of these radioactive ions through the ionization process, it is imperative to have high ionization efficiency. In this article, the production of such singly and multiply charged phosphorous beams is investigated using two different electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: MONO1000/1001 [P. Jardin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 789 (2002)] and SUPERSHyPIE [J. Y. Pacquet et al., EP Patent No. 97 401294 (pending); R. Leroy et al., 14th International Workshop on ECR Ion Sources, May 1999 (unpublished)]. Spectra and above all efficiencies [J. Y. Pacquet et al., GANIL R 02 07; GANIL R 03 08] (31% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms and compound with MONO1000/1001 and 43% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms with SUPERSHyPIE) of these beams will be presented as well as the intensities (227 e{mu}A for P{sup +} with MONO1000/1001 and 145 e{mu}A for P{sup 7+} with SUPERSHyPIE) of such beams.

  18. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  19. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results.

    PubMed

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A; Dearden, David V

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27220844

  20. Resonant wave-particle interactions modified by intrinsic Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Lee, K. H.; Wang, C. B.; Wu, D. J.

    2012-08-15

    The concept of wave-particle interactions via resonance is well discussed in plasma physics. This paper shows that intrinsic Alfven waves can qualitatively modify the physics discussed in conventional linear plasma kinetic theories. It turns out that preexisting Alfven waves can affect particle motion along the ambient magnetic field and, moreover, the ensuing force field is periodic in time. As a result, the meaning of the usual Landau and cyclotron resonance conditions becomes questionable. It turns out that this effect leads us to find a new electromagnetic instability. In such a process intrinsic Alfven waves not only modify the unperturbed distribution function but also result in a different type of cyclotron resonance which is affected by the level of turbulence. This instability might enable us to better our understanding of the observed radio emission processes in the solar atmosphere.

  1. Electrostatic ion (hydrogen) cyclotron and ion acoustic wave instabilities in regions of upward field-aligned current and upward ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, R.

    1984-02-01

    An investigation is made into the stability of electrostatic hydrogen ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in a model plasma where an ion beam, population 2, and oppositely directed drifting electrons pass through a stationary ion background, population 1. The excited wave properties are then compared with the characteristics of the unstable modes observed on the S3-3 satellite. Three temperature regimes are studied: (1) Te greater than Ti2 much greater than Ti1, (2) Ti2 greater than Te not less than Ti1, and (3) Te approximately equal to Ti1 greater than Ti2. It is found that the ion beam acts as a free energy source only in regime 1. This regime is also highly unstable to the electrons as a free energy source. Unstable modes in regimes 2 and 3 seem to best satisfy the electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron wave (EHC) properties at 1 earth radius. For these cases the electrons are the free energy source, the beam supplies damping.

  2. Electrostatic ion (hydrogen) cyclotron and ion acoustic wave instabilities in regions of upward field-aligned current and upward ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, R.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is made into the stability of electrostatic hydrogen ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in a model plasma where an ion beam, population 2, and oppositely directed drifting electrons pass through a stationary ion background, population 1. The excited wave properties are then compared with the characteristics of the unstable modes observed on the S3-3 satellite. Three temperature regimes are studied: (1) Te greater than Ti2 much greater than Ti1, (2) Ti2 greater than Te not less than Ti1, and (3) Te approximately equal to Ti1 greater than Ti2. It is found that the ion beam acts as a free energy source only in regime 1. This regime is also highly unstable to the electrons as a free energy source. Unstable modes in regimes 2 and 3 seem to best satisfy the electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron wave (EHC) properties at 1 earth radius. For these cases the electrons are the free energy source, the beam supplies damping.

  3. Selective nonresonant acceleration of He-3(2+) and heavy ions by H(+) cyclotron waves. [in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varvoglis, H.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1983-01-01

    The model advanced by Fisk (1978) to explain the anomalous enhancements in the abundance of some ionic species in energetic solar particle flux measurements at about 1 AU is revised by including the proper nonlinear physics of particle energization by electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves. The revised model contains two basic concepts by Fisk: the energization by EIC waves and the need for a second stage acceleration. There is no need for exciting He-4(2+) cyclotron waves, since the dominant process is nonresonant and can be accomplished by hydrogen cyclotron waves. The A/Q selectivity in the flux available for energization in the second stage process enters through the nonlinear saturation level, which in conventional theories depends on the current that drives the instabilities.

  4. Recent development of RIKEN 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Higurashi, Y. Ohnishi, J.; Ozeki, K.; Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-15

    Over the past two years, we have tried to improve the performance of the RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source using several methods. For the production of U vapor, we chose the sputtering method because it is possible to install a large amount of material inside the plasma chamber and thus achieve long-term operation without a break, although it is assumed that the beam intensity is weaker than in the oven technique. We also used an aluminum chamber instead of a stainless steel one. Using these methods, we successfully produced ∼180 eμA of U{sup 35+} and ∼230 eμA of U{sup 33+} at the injected radio frequency (RF) power of ∼4 kW (28 GHz). Very recently, to further increase the beam intensity of U{sup 35+}, we have started to develop a high temperature oven and have successfully produced a highly charged U ion beam. In this contribution, we report on the beam intensity of highly charged U ions as a function of various parameters (RF power and sputtering voltage) and discuss the effects of these parameters on the beam stability in detail.

  5. Matrix-assisted ionization vacuum for high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beixi; Tisdale, Evgenia; Trimpin, Sarah; Wilkins, Charles L

    2014-07-15

    Matrix-assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) produces charge states similar to electrospray ionization (ESI) from the solid state without requiring high voltage or added heat. MAIV differs from matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in that no laser is needed and abundant multiply charged ions are produced from molecules having multiple basic sites such as proteins. Here we introduce simple modifications to the commercial vacuum MALDI and ESI sources of a 9.4 T Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer to perform MAIV from both intermediate and atmospheric pressure. The multiply charged ions are shown for the proteins bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and lysozyme using 3-nitrobenzonitrile as matrix. These are the first examples of MAIV operating at pressures as low as 10(-6) mbar in an FT-ICR mass spectrometer source, and the expected mass resolving power of 100000 to 400000 is achieved. Identical protein charge states are observed with and without laser ablation indicating minimal, if any, role of photochemical ionization for the compounds studied.

  6. Recondensation performance of liquid helium cryostat for a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-01

    Cryostat performance is essential for the stable operation of a superconducting magnet. A closed-cycle liquid helium cryostat was adopted for use for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source by recondensing liquid helium vapor. The goal was to maintain the liquid helium filled reservoir at a constant level without transferring any liquid helium during the normal operation of the ECR ion source. To accomplish this, Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerators, which have two cold heads, were installed on the top of the cryostat. The cooling power of the GM cryocooler is 1.5 W at the second stage and 50 W at the first stage. Each stage was connected to the liquid helium reservoir, a radiation shield including high-Tc current lead, and related items. Before commissioning the ECR ion source, a preliminary evaluation of the recondensation performance was carried out with the magnet in partial operation. The design of the cryostat, its fabrication, and the experimental results are reported.

  7. Recondensation performance of liquid helium cryostat for a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seyong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-01

    Cryostat performance is essential for the stable operation of a superconducting magnet. A closed-cycle liquid helium cryostat was adopted for use for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source by recondensing liquid helium vapor. The goal was to maintain the liquid helium filled reservoir at a constant level without transferring any liquid helium during the normal operation of the ECR ion source. To accomplish this, Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerators, which have two cold heads, were installed on the top of the cryostat. The cooling power of the GM cryocooler is 1.5 W at the second stage and 50 W at the first stage. Each stage was connected to the liquid helium reservoir, a radiation shield including high-Tc current lead, and related items. Before commissioning the ECR ion source, a preliminary evaluation of the recondensation performance was carried out with the magnet in partial operation. The design of the cryostat, its fabrication, and the experimental results are reported.

  8. Helicon Plasma Injector and Ion Cyclotron Acceleration Development in the VASIMR Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang, Franklin R.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; McCaskill, Greg E.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) radio frequency (rf) waves both produce the plasma and then accelerate the ions. The plasma production is done by action of helicon waves. These waves are circular polarized waves in the direction of the electron gyromotion. The ion acceleration is performed by ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) acceleration. The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) is actively developing efficient helicon plasma production and ICRF acceleration. The VASIMR experimental device at the ASPL is called VX-10. It is configured to demonstrate the plasma production and acceleration at the 10kW level to support a space flight demonstration design. The VX-10 consists of three electromagnets integrated into a vacuum chamber that produce magnetic fields up to 0.5 Tesla. Magnetic field shaping is achieved by independent magnet current control and placement of the magnets. We have generated both helium and hydrogen high density (>10(exp 18) cu m) discharges with the helicon source. ICRF experiments are underway. This paper describes the VX-10 device, presents recent results and discusses future plans.

  9. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Young; Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y S

    2016-02-01

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H(-) ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ∼4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H(-) ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources. PMID:26931999

  10. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Young; Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y S

    2016-02-01

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H(-) ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ∼4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H(-) ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  11. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves: The May 2-7, 1998, Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    Complete description of a self-consistent model for magnetospheric ring current interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations; one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes the wave evolution. The effects on ring current ions interacting with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and back on waves, are considered self-consistently by solving both equations on a global magnetospheric scale under non steady-state conditions. In the paper by Khazanov et al. [2002] this self-consistent model has only been shortly outlined, and discussions of many the model related details have been omitted. For example, in present study for the first time a new algorithm for numerical finding of the resonant numbers for quasilinear wave-particle interaction is described, or it is demonstrated that in order to describe quasilinear interaction in a multi-ion thermal plasma correctly, both e and He(+) modes of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves should be employed. The developed model is used to simulate the entire May 2-7, 1998 storm period. Trapped number fluxes of the ring current protons are calculated and presented along with their comparison with the data measured by the 3D hot plasma instrument Polar/HYDRA. Examining of the wave (MLT, L shell) distributions produced during the storm progress reveals an essential intensification of the wave emissions in about two days after main phase of storm. This result is well consistent with the earlier ground-based observations. Also the theoretical shapes and the occurrence rates for power spectral densities of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves are studied. It is found that in about 2 days after the storm main phase on May 4, mainly non Gaussian shapes of power spectral densities are produced.

  12. A status report of the multipurpose superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Ciavola, G; Gammino, S; Barbarino, S; Celona, L; Consoli, F; Gallo, G; Maimone, F; Mascali, D; Passarello, S; Galatà, A; Tinschert, K; Spaedtke, P; Lang, R; Maeder, J; Rossbach, J; Koivisto, H; Savonen, M; Koponen, T; Suominen, P; Ropponen, T; Baruè, C; Lechartier, M; Beijers, J P M; Brandenburg, S; Kremers, H R; Vanrooyen, D; Kuchler, D; Scrivens, R; Schachter, L; Dobrescu, S; Stiebing, K

    2008-02-01

    Intense heavy ion beam production with electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources is a common requirement for many of the accelerators under construction in Europe and elsewhere. An average increase of about one order of magnitude per decade in the performance of ECR ion sources was obtained up to now since the time of pioneering experiment of R. Geller at CEA, Grenoble, and this trend is not deemed to get the saturation at least in the next decade, according to the increased availability of powerful magnets and microwave generators. Electron density above 10(13) cm(-3) and very high current of multiply charged ions are expected with the use of 28 GHz microwave heating and of an adequate plasma trap, with a B-minimum shape, according to the high B mode concept [S. Gammino and G. Ciavola, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 5, 19 (1996)]. The MS-ECRIS ion source has been designed following this concept and its construction is underway at GSI, Darmstadt. The project is the result of the cooperation of nine European institutions with the partial funding of EU through the sixth Framework Programme. The contribution of different institutions has permitted to build in 2006-2007 each component at high level of expertise. The description of the major components will be given in the following with a view on the planning of the assembly and commissioning phase to be carried out in fall 2007. An outline of the experiments to be done with the MS-ECRIS source in the next two years will be presented.

  13. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S.

    1988-05-11

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  15. A proposal for a novel H ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance heating and surface ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie A; Kurennoy, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    A design for a novel H{sup -} ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE{sub 111} eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H{sup -} ion beam is further 'self-extracted' through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H{sup -} ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  16. A Proposal for a Novel H- Ion Source Based on Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Heating and Surface Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Kurennoy, S.

    2009-03-01

    A design for a novel H- ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE111 eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H- ion beam is further "self-extracted" through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H- ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  17. Tailored noise waveform/collision-induced dissociation of ions stored in a linear ion trap combined with liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vilkov, Andrey N; Bogdanov, Bogdan; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Prior, Dave C; Anderson, Gordon A; Masselon, Christophe D; Moore, Ronald J; Smith, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    A new collision-induced dissociation (CID) technique based on broadband tailored noise waveform (TNW) excitation of ions stored in a linear ion trap has been developed. In comparison with the conventional sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI) CID method commonly used in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS), this MS/MS technique increases throughput by eliminating the long pump-down delay associated with gas introduction into the high vacuum ICR cell region. In addition, the TNW-CID method speeds spectrum acquisition since it does not require Fourier transformation, calculation of resonant frequencies and generation of the excitation waveforms. We demonstrate TNW-CID coupled with on-line capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography separations for the identification of peptides. The experimental results are compared with data obtained using conventional quadrupole ion trap MS/MS and SORI-CID MS/MS in an ICR cell.

  18. A double-layer based model of ion confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D. Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Sorbello, G.

    2014-02-15

    The paper proposes a new model of ion confinement in ECRIS, which can be easily generalized to any magnetic configuration characterized by closed magnetic surfaces. Traditionally, ion confinement in B-min configurations is ascribed to a negative potential dip due to superhot electrons, adiabatically confined by the magneto-static field. However, kinetic simulations including RF heating affected by cavity modes structures indicate that high energy electrons populate just a thin slab overlapping the ECR layer, while their density drops down of more than one order of magnitude outside. Ions, instead, diffuse across the electron layer due to their high collisionality. This is the proper physical condition to establish a double-layer (DL) configuration which self-consistently originates a potential barrier; this “barrier” confines the ions inside the plasma core surrounded by the ECR surface. The paper will describe a simplified ion confinement model based on plasma density non-homogeneity and DL formation.

  19. Probing the spatial and temporal variability of Enceladus mass-loading from ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H.; Russell, C. T.; Powell, R. L.; Cowee, M.; Leisner, J. S.; Jia, Y.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    Enceladus plays a critical role in the Saturnian system by loading a significant amount of neutrals, ions and dust into the inner magnetosphere. Enceladus is also considered as the ultimate source for the dusty E-ring and the extended neutral cloud from 3.5 to 6.5 Saturn radii. When the freshly-added neutrals are ionized and accelerated by the electric and magnetic fields, left-handed electromagnetic waves, called ion cyclotron waves (ICW), grow from the free energy of the highly anisotropic distribution of these ions. The ICWs have been widely used to probe the rate of mass loading in different plasma environments in the solar system, because the wave power is proportional to the density and energy of the pickup ions. At Enceladus, ICWs are detected by Cassini not only near the moon but throughout the extended neutral cloud in all local times. However, the wave power is largely enhanced near the moon's longitude rather than far away from it. This indicates that on top of the relatively azimuthally-symmetric mass-loading source of the neutral cloud, there is a much denser cloud of neutrals centered on the moon and rotating with it. The latter source is the instantaneous mass-loading from plume of Enceladus, and it leads to asymmetry and dynamics in the magnetosphere. We investigate all available Cassini Enceladus flyby data to obtain a 3D spatial profile of the ICW power near the moon. By comparing with waves at longitudes far away from the moon, we investigate how significant is the plume mass-loading with respect to the neutral cloud mass-loading. We also compare the waves along several groups of identical trajectories to examine the temporal variability of the plume.

  20. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the inner magnetosphere with a losscone proton distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satyavir; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2016-07-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are studied in the inner magnetospheric plasma. The plasma is assumed to have five components, i.e., electrons, cold and hot protons, singly charged helium and oxygen ions. The hot protons are assumed to have an anisotropic losscone distribution particle distribution. The numerical results are obtained using KUPDAP (Kyoto University Plasma Dispersion Analysis Package), a full dispersion solver developed at Kyoto University. The hot plasma dispersion relation and polarizations of EMIC waves in oblique propagation are very complex. Although we find that nonlinear wave growth process is dominant near the equatorial region generating EMIC rising tone emissions, the propagation characteristics of the emissions such as linear growth/damping rates, variation of polarizations, and Poynting vectors in the presence of energetic protons have not been studied quantitatively.The growth/damping of oxygen, helium, and proton bands and higher harmonics of the EMIC waves are studied. The findings from our model are applied to EMIC wave observations in the inner magnetosphere by the Cluster spacecraft.

  1. Excitation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves under different geomagnetic activities: THEMIS observation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Xiao, Fuliang; Shi, Jiankui; Yang, Chang; He, Yihua; Tang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Understanding excitation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves remains a considerable scientific challenge in the magnetospheric physics. Here we adopt correlated data from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) spacecraft under low (Kp = 1+) and medium (Kp = 4) geomagnetic activities to investigate the favorable conditions for the excitation of EMIC waves. We utilize a sum of bi-Maxwellian components and kappa components to fit the observed ion (6-25 keV) distributions collected by the electrostatic analyzer (ESA) onboard the THEMIS spacecraft. We show that the kappa distribution models better and more smoothly with the observations. Then we evaluate the local growth rate and path-integrated gain of EMIC waves by bi-Maxwellian and kappa distributions, respectively. We demonstrate that the path-integrated wave gain simulated from the kappa distribution is consistent with observations, with intensities 24 dB in H+ band and 33 dB in He+ band. However, bi-Maxwellian distribution tends to overestimate the wave growth rate and path-integrated gain, with intensities 49 dB in H+ band and 48 dB in He+ band. Moreover, compared to the He+ band, a higher proton anisotropy is needed to excite the H+ band waves. The current study presents a further observational support for the understanding of EMIC wave instability under different geomagnetic conditions and suggests that the kappa-type distributions representative of the power law spectra are probably ubiquitous in space plasmas.

  2. He-like argon, chlorine and sulfur spectra measurement from an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trassinelli, M.; Boucard, S.; Covita, D. S.; Gotta, D.; Hirtl, A.; Indelicato, P.; LeBigot, É.-O.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Simons, L. M.; Stingelin, L.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Wasser, A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new measurement on X-ray spectroscopy of multicharged argon, chlorine and sulfur obtained with the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Trap installed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (Villigen, Switzerland). For this purpose, we used a crystal spectrometer with a spherically bent crystal having an energy resolution of about 0.4 eV. High intensity Kα X-ray spectra were obtained from ions with one 1s hole ranging from almost neutral to heliumlike charge states. In particular we observed the 1s2s 3S1 → 1s2 1S0 M1 and 1s2p 3P2 → 1s2 1S0 M2 transitions in He-like argon, chlorine and sulfur with unprecedented statistics and resolution. The preliminary analysis presented here describes a new technique to measure precisely energy differences between transitions using a Johann-type Bragg spectrometer. A recent characterization of the spectrometer will allow for a drastic reduction of the systematic errors.

  3. A gain and bandwidth enhanced transimpedance preamplifier for Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Yung; Green, Roger J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the ion signal from a 12-T Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the electronic noise were studied to further understand the electronic detection limit. At minimal cost, a new transimpedance preamplifier was designed, computer simulated, built, and tested. The preamplifier design pushes the electronic signal-to-noise performance at room temperature to the limit, because of its enhanced tolerance of the capacitance of the detection device, lower intrinsic noise, and larger flat mid-band gain (input current noise spectral density of around 1 pA/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal}\\begin{document}$\\sqrt{\\mbox{Hz}}$\\end{document}Hz when the transimpedance is about 85 dBΩ). The designed preamplifier has a bandwidth of ∼3 kHz to 10 MHz, which corresponds to the mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of approximately 18 to 61 k at 12 T. The transimpedance and the bandwidth can be easily adjusted by changing the value of passive components. The feedback limitation of the circuit is discussed. With the maximum possible transimpedance of 5.3 MΩ when using an 0402 surface mount resistor, the preamplifier was estimated to be able to detect ∼110 charges in a single scan. PMID:22225232

  4. Are type III radio aurorae directly excited by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    McDiarmid, D.R.; Watermann, J.; McNamara, A.G. ); Koehler, J.A.; Sofko, G.J. )

    1989-10-01

    In 1981, a network of three 50-MHz radar transmitters and two receivers were operated in the CW mode on the Canadian prairies. The echoes obtained from coherent ionospheric backscatter were divided into segments of 205 ms such that their FFT spectra yielded frequency resolution of 4.9 Hz. The spectra were subsequently averaged over 10 s. Type III spectra (narrow spectra with sub ion-acoustic Doppler shifts) were observed (often simultaneously) on radar links whose wave vector components perpendicular to the geomagnetic field were almost identical while their components parallel to the field were significantly different. From a statistical analysis of more than 300 type III spectra it is inferred that these are in general unlikely to arise from electrostatic ion cyclotron waves directly excited by an essentially linear process. Doppler shifts around 55 Hz were much more frequently observed than around 30 Hz, the occurrence of type III spectra increased with increasing magnetic aspect angle (deviation of the scatter wave vector from perpendicular to the geomagnetic field), and the mean Doppler shifts of type III spectra simultaneously on different radar links went through a minimum for aspect angles between 4{degree} and 7{degree} (depending on the assumed backscatter height). These three results disagree with theoretical expectations. The spectral width the type III echoes decreased linearly with magnetic aspect by about 2 Hz/deg.

  5. First Signal on the Cryogenic Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng; Mathur, Raman; Aizikov, Kostantin; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The construction and achievement of the first signal on a cryogenic Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) are reported here, demonstrating proof-of-concept of this new instrument design. Building the FTICR cell into the cold bore of a superconducting magnet provided advantages over conventional warm bore design. At 4.2 K, the vacuum system cryopumps itself, thus removing the requirement for a large bore to achieve the desired pumping speed for maintaining base pressure. Furthermore, because the bore diameter has been reduced, the amount of magnet wire needed to achieve high field and homogeneity was also reduced, greatly decreasing the cost/Tesla of the magnet. The current instrument implements an actively shielded 14-Tesla magnet of vertical design with an external matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source. The first signal was obtained by detecting the laser desorbed/ionized (LDI) C60+• ions, with the magnet at 7 Tesla, unshimmed, and the preamplifier mounted outside of the vacuum chamber at room temperature. A subsequent experiment done with the magnet at 14 Tesla and properly shimmed produced a C60 spectrum showing ∼350,000 resolving power at m/z ∼720. Increased magnetic field strength improves many FTMS performance parameters simultaneously, particularly mass resolving power and accuracy. PMID:17931882

  6. High-Power Arctic Lidar for observations of Sodium layer and Calcium Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuerker, R. F.; Foley, J.; Kidd, P.; Wong, A. Y.

    1998-11-01

    The UCLA HIPAS Observatory is located at 64o 54' 22"N, 146o 50' 33" W. It passes under the auroral oval, has a 2.7 m diameter liquid mirror collector (LMT), and two bistatic laser illuminators; a Doubled YAG pumped dye laser and a Doubled (tunable) Alexandrite laser. The first emits 0.1 J - 10 ns pulses at 590nm (Na) at 20 Hz. The second laser emits 0.15 J -10 ns pulses at 393 nm (Ca+) and 391.4 nm (N2) at 10 Hz. New sporadic sodium layers have been observed during the passage of the electrojet and auroras in periods of 20-30 seconds, indicating that sodium is liberated from micrometeors during auroral precipitations. The Laser Induced Fluorescence techniques will be used to observe the acceleration of the Ca+ ions when they are driven by the 80 MW (ERP) 2.85MHz RF array, modulated at the Ca+ ion Cyclotron Frequency. 1. Ionospheric Modifaction and Enviromental Research in the Auroral Region in Plasma Science and the Environment. Publisher: AIP Press, Woodbury, NY. Editors: W. Manheimer, L. Sugiyama, T. Stix; Chapter 3, pgs. 41-75, 1997. Research supported by ONR N00014-96-C-0040

  7. A gain and bandwidth enhanced transimpedance preamplifier for Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzu-Yung; Green, Roger J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-12-15

    The nature of the ion signal from a 12-T Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the electronic noise were studied to further understand the electronic detection limit. At minimal cost, a new transimpedance preamplifier was designed, computer simulated, built, and tested. The preamplifier design pushes the electronic signal-to-noise performance at room temperature to the limit, because of its enhanced tolerance of the capacitance of the detection device, lower intrinsic noise, and larger flat mid-band gain (input current noise spectral density of around 1 pA/{radical}(Hz) when the transimpedance is about 85 dB{Omega}). The designed preamplifier has a bandwidth of {approx}3 kHz to 10 MHz, which corresponds to the mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of approximately 18 to 61 k at 12 T. The transimpedance and the bandwidth can be easily adjusted by changing the value of passive components. The feedback limitation of the circuit is discussed. With the maximum possible transimpedance of 5.3 M{Omega} when using an 0402 surface mount resistor, the preamplifier was estimated to be able to detect {approx}110 charges in a single scan.

  8. Microgan electron cyclotron resonance ion source in a Van de Graaff accelerator terminala)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubert, G.; Bieth, C.; Bougy, W.; Brionne, N.; Donzel, X.; Sineau, A.; Vallerand, C.; Villari, A. C. C.; Chaves, C.; Gamboni, T.; Geerts, W.; Giorginis, G.; Lövestam, G.; Mondelaers, W.

    2012-02-01

    The Van de Graaff accelerator at IRMM works since many years providing proton, deuteron, and helium beams for nuclear data measurements. The original ion source was of RF type with quartz bottle. This kind of source, as well known, needs regular maintenance for which the accelerator tank must be completely opened. The heavy usage at high currents of the IRMM accelerator necessitated an opening about once every month. In 2010, the full permanent magnet Microgan electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source from PANTECHNIK was installed into a new terminal platform together with a solid state amplifier of 50 W, a dedicated dosing system for 4 gases (with respective gas bottles H2, D2, He, and Ar), and a set of dedicated power supplies and electronic devices for the remote tuning of the source. The new system shows a very stable behaviour of the produced beam allowing running the Van de Graaf without maintenance for several months. This contribution will describe the full installed system in details (working at high pressure in the terminal, spark effects, and optic of the extraction), as well as beam results in dc or pulsed mode.

  9. First signal on the cryogenic Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Mathur, Raman; Aizikov, Kostantin; O'Connor, Peter B

    2007-12-01

    The construction and achievement of the first signal on a cryogenic Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS) are reported here, demonstrating proof-of-concept of this new instrument design. Building the FTICR cell into the cold bore of a superconducting magnet provided advantages over conventional warm bore design. At 4.2 K, the vacuum system cryopumps itself, thus removing the requirement for a large bore to achieve the desired pumping speed for maintaining base pressure. Furthermore, because the bore diameter has been reduced, the amount of magnet wire needed to achieve high field and homogeneity was also reduced, greatly decreasing the cost/Tesla of the magnet. The current instrument implements an actively shielded 14-Tesla magnet of vertical design with an external matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source. The first signal was obtained by detecting the laser desorbed/ionized (LDI) C(60)(+*) ions, with the magnet at 7 Tesla, unshimmed, and the preamplifier mounted outside of the vacuum chamber at room temperature. A subsequent experiment done with the magnet at 14 Tesla and properly shimmed produced a C(60) spectrum showing approximately 350,000 resolving power at m/z approximately 720. Increased magnetic field strength improves many FTMS performance parameters simultaneously, particularly mass resolving power and accuracy.

  10. Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a plasma with an ion beam and counterstreaming bulk electrons - Waves in the zero-frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-12-01

    A common feature of the auroral plasma in the region above field-aligned (parallel) potential drops are electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves. The present paper has the objective to show that wave excitation in the zero-frequency band can occur when the ion beams and the current-carrying bulk electrons counterstream. The instability mechanism involves the Landau interaction of the slow (negative energy) ion-beam-cyclotron waves with the drifting electrons and also with the target (background) ions. Only the latter resonant interaction between the beam and the target ions was considered by Okuda and Nishikawa (1984). In this study, it is shown that an electron drift makes an additional unstable contribution to the waves in the zero-frequency band, including those discussed by Okuda and Nishikawa.

  11. Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a plasma with an ion beam and counterstreaming bulk electrons - Waves in the zero-frequency band. [in aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    A common feature of the auroral plasma in the region above field-aligned (parallel) potential drops are electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves. The present paper has the objective to show that wave excitation in the zero-frequency band can occur when the ion beams and the current-carrying bulk electrons counterstream. The instability mechanism involves the Landau interaction of the slow (negative energy) ion-beam-cyclotron waves with the drifting electrons and also with the target (background) ions. Only the latter resonant interaction between the beam and the target ions was considered by Okuda and Nishikawa (1984). In this study, it is shown that an electron drift makes an additional unstable contribution to the waves in the zero-frequency band, including those discussed by Okuda and Nishikawa.

  12. Development of a pepper-pot device to determine the emittance of an ion beam generated by electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmeier, M.; Benitez, J. Y.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Bantel, M.

    2010-02-15

    This paper describes the recent development and commissioning of a pepper-pot emittance meter at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). It is based on a potassium bromide (KBr) scintillator screen in combination with a charged coupled device camera. Pepper-pot scanners record the full four-dimensional transverse phase space emittances which are particularly interesting for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources. The strengths and limitations of evaluating emittances using optical pepper-pot scanners are described and systematic errors induced by the optical data acquisition system will be presented. Light yield tests of KBr exposed to different ion species and first emittance measurement data using ion beams extracted from the 6.4 GHz LBNL electron cyclotron resonance ion source are presented and discussed.

  13. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully.

  14. Production of highly charged heavy ions by 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance at Research Center for Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2010-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been installed as a subject of the azimuthally varying field cyclotron upgrade project (K. Hatanaka et al., in Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications, Tokyo, Japan, 18-22 October 2004, pp. 115-117), in order to increase beam currents and to extend the variety of ions. The production development of several ions has been performed since 2006 and some of them have already been used for user experiments [T. Yorita et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 02A311 (2008)]. Further optimizations for each component such as the material of plasma electrode, material, and shape of bias probe and mirror field have been continued and more intense ion beams have been obtained for O, N, and Ar. For the purpose of obtaining highly charged Xe with several microamperes, the optimization of position and shape of plasma electrode and bias disk has also been done and highly charged Xe(32+) beam has been obtained successfully. PMID:20192353

  15. Development status of the 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at National Fusion Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, H. J.; Jang, S. O.; Choo, W. I.; Jung, Y. H.; Lho, T. H.; Yoo, S. J.

    2014-02-01

    A new superconducting 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source is being developed at the National Fusion Research Institute in South Korea. This source will be dedicated for future application of highly charged ions in the area of matter interaction, diagnostic imaging, and probing. In this paper, we describe the status of the source development consisting of a double electrode biased disk, sputtering systems for metal ion production, diagnostic ports for the extraction region, a variable gap extraction-Einzel lens system, and a low energy beam transport system.

  16. Development status of the 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at National Fusion Research Institute.

    PubMed

    You, H J; Jang, S O; Choo, W I; Jung, Y H; Lho, T H; Yoo, S J

    2014-02-01

    A new superconducting 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source is being developed at the National Fusion Research Institute in South Korea. This source will be dedicated for future application of highly charged ions in the area of matter interaction, diagnostic imaging, and probing. In this paper, we describe the status of the source development consisting of a double electrode biased disk, sputtering systems for metal ion production, diagnostic ports for the extraction region, a variable gap extraction-Einzel lens system, and a low energy beam transport system.

  17. Ultracompact/ultralow power electron cyclotron resonance ion source for multipurpose applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sortais, P.; Lamy, T.; Medard, J.; Angot, J.; Latrasse, L.; Thuillier, T.

    2010-02-15

    In order to drastically reduce the power consumption of a microwave ion source, we have studied some specific discharge cavity geometries in order to reduce the operating point below 1 W of microwave power (at 2.45 GHz). We show that it is possible to drive an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with a transmitter technology similar to those used for cellular phones. By the reduction in the size and of the required microwave power, we have developed a new type of ultralow cost ion sources. This microwave discharge system (called COMIC, for COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial) can be used as a source of light, plasma or ions. We will show geometries of conductive cavities where it is possible, in a 20 mm diameter chamber, to reduce the ignition of the plasma below 100 mW and define typical operating points around 5 W. Inside a simple vacuum chamber it is easy to place the source and its extraction system anywhere and fully under vacuum. In that case, current densities from 0.1 to 10 mA/cm{sup 2} (Ar, extraction 4 mm, 1 mAe, 20 kV) have been observed. Preliminary measurements and calculations show the possibility, with a two electrodes system, to extract beams within a low emittance. The first application for these ion sources is the ion injection for charge breeding, surface analyzing system and surface treatment. For this purpose, a very small extraction hole is used (typically 3/10 mm for a 3 {mu}A extracted current with 2 W of HF power). Mass spectrum and emittance measurements will be presented. In these conditions, values down to 1 {pi} mm mrad at 15 kV (1{sigma}) are observed, thus very close to the ones currently observed for a surface ionization source. A major interest of this approach is the possibility to connect together several COMIC devices. We will introduce some new on-going developments such as sources for high voltage implantation platforms, fully quartz radioactive ion source at ISOLDE or large plasma generators for plasma immersion, broad or ribbon

  18. Fast particle-driven ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in tokamak plasmas and the case for an ICE diagnostic in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClements, K. G.; D'Inca, R.; Dendy, R. O.; Carbajal, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Cook, J. W. S.; Harvey, R. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pinches, S. D.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of fast particle-driven waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ion cyclotron emission or ICE) could provide a passive, non-invasive diagnostic of confined and escaping fast particles (fusion α-particles and beam ions) in ITER, and would be compatible with the high radiation environment of deuterium-tritium plasmas in that device. Recent experimental results from ASDEX Upgrade and DIII-D demonstrate the efficacy of ICE as a diagnostic of different fast ion species and of fast ion losses, while recent particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid simulations provide a more exact comparison with measured ICE spectra and open the prospect of exploiting ICE more fully as a fast ion diagnostic in future experiments. In particular the PIC/hybrid approach should soon make it possible to simulate the nonlinear physics of ICE in full toroidal geometry. Emission has been observed previously at a wide range of poloidal angles, so there is flexibility in the location of ICE detectors. Such a detector could be implemented in ITER by installing a small toroidally orientated loop near the plasma edge or by adding a detection capability to the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae. In the latter case, the antenna could be used simultaneously to heat the plasma and detect ICE, provided that frequencies close to those of the ICRH source are strongly attenuated in the detection system using a suitable filter. Wavenumber information, providing additional constraints on the fast ion distribution exciting the emission, could be obtained by measuring ICE using a toroidally distributed array of detectors or different straps of the ICRH antenna.

  19. Formation of a conical distribution and intense ion heating in the presence of hydrogen cyclotron waves. [in earth ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the considered investigation, it is assumed that the field aligned currents are responsible for producing electrostatic harmonic cyclotron waves (EHC). Using a one-dimensional simulation model in which the electron velocity distribution is maintained by a constant injection of the initial distribution, it is shown that, in contrast to earlier initial value simulations, EHC waves grow to a large amplitude, resulting in the formation of an anisotropic ion velocity distribution. Both the heating rate and the anisotropy are in reasonable agreement with the quasi-linear theory, taking into account the cyclotron resonance. The results show that the saturation is due to the combined effects of wave induced diffusion in an electron velocity space and the heating of ions perpendicularly. Both these effects reduce the growth rate.

  20. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci 252Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 106 ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for 23Na8+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 13.7% for 85Rb19+ with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of 143Ba27+ accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  1. Charge breeding results and future prospects with electron cyclotron resonance ion source and electron beam ion source (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2012-02-15

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility will provide low-energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams for the nuclear physics program. A 70 mCi {sup 252}Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The final CARIBU configuration will utilize a 1 Ci {sup 252}Cf source to produce radioactive beams with intensities up to 10{sup 6} ions/s for use in the ATLAS facility. The ECR charge breeder has been tested with stable beam injection and has achieved charge breeding efficiencies of 3.6% for {sup 23}Na{sup 8+}, 15.6% for {sup 84}Kr{sup 17+}, and 13.7% for {sup 85}Rb{sup 19+} with typical breeding times of 10 ms/charge state. For the first radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+} and 14.7% for {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+}. The project has been commissioned with a radioactive beam of {sup 143}Ba{sup 27+} accelerated to 6.1 MeV/u. In order to take advantage of its lower residual contamination, an EBIS charge breeder will replace the ECR charge breeder in the next two years. The advantages and disadvantages of the two techniques are compared taking into account the requirements of the next generation radioactive beam facilities.

  2. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-15

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  3. Initial velocity distribution of MALDI/LDI ions measured by internal MALDI source Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chagovets, Vitaliy; Frankevich, Vladimir; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-11-01

    A new method for measuring the ion velocity distribution using an internal matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer is described. The method provides the possibility of studying ion velocities without any influence of electric fields in the direction of the instrument axis until the ions reach the ICR cell. It also allows to simultaneously account for and to estimate not only the velocity distribution but the angular distribution as well. The method was demonstrated using several types of compounds in laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mode.

  4. Dissipative ion-cyclotron oscillitons in a form of solitons with chirp in Earth's low-altitude ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, I. Kh.

    2012-10-15

    In this paper, we consider theoretically nonlinear ion-cyclotron gradient-drift dissipative structures (oscillitons) in low ionospheric plasmas. Similar to Nonlinear Optics and Condensed Matter Physics, the Ginzburg-Landau equation for the envelope of electric wave fields is derived, and solutions for oscillitons in the form of solitons with chirp are examined. The whole dissipative structure constitutes a soliton with a moving charge-neutral density hump. Conditions for excitation and properties of the structures are considered.

  5. Characterization of the onset of ion cyclotron parametric decay instability of lower hybrid waves in a diverted tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, S. G. Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Brunner, D.; Faust, I. C.; Hubbard, A. E.; LaBombard, B.; Lau, C.; Takase, Y.

    2014-06-15

    The goal of the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) program on Alcator C-Mod is to develop and optimize reactor-relevant steady-state plasmas by controlling current density profile. However, current drive efficiency precipitously decreases as the line averaged density (n{sup ¯}{sub e}) increases above ∼1 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −3}. Previous simulations show that the observed loss of current drive efficiency in high density plasmas stems from the interactions of LH waves with edge/scrape-off layer plasmas [Wallace et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 062505 (2012)]. A recent observation [Baek et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 55, 052001 (2013)] shows that the configuration dependent ion cyclotron parametric decay instability (PDI) is excited in the density range where the discrepancy between the experiments and simulations remains. Comparing the observed spectra with the homogeneous growth rate spectra indicates that the observed ion cyclotron PDI can be excited not only at the low-field-side but also at the high-field-side (HFS) edge of the tokamak. The model analysis shows that a relevant PDI process to Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments is decay into ion cyclotron quasi-mode driven by parallel coupling. The underlying cause of the observed onset of ion cyclotron PDI is likely due to the weaker radial penetration of the LH wave in high density plasmas, which can lead to enhanced convective growth. Configuration-dependent PDIs are found to be correlated with different edge density profiles in different magnetic configurations. While the HFS edge of the tokamak can be potentially susceptible to PDI, as evidenced by experimental observations and ray-tracing analyses, enhancing single-pass absorption is expected to help recover the LHCD efficiency at reactor-relevant densities because it could suppress several parasitic loss mechanisms that are exacerbated in multi-pass regimes.

  6. Characterization of the onset of ion cyclotron parametric decay instability of lower hybrid waves in a diverted tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S. G.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Takase, Y.; Brunner, D.; Faust, I. C.; Hubbard, A. E.; LaBombard, B.; Lau, C.

    2014-06-01

    The goal of the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) program on Alcator C-Mod is to develop and optimize reactor-relevant steady-state plasmas by controlling current density profile. However, current drive efficiency precipitously decreases as the line averaged density (n¯e) increases above ˜1 × 1020 m-3. Previous simulations show that the observed loss of current drive efficiency in high density plasmas stems from the interactions of LH waves with edge/scrape-off layer plasmas [Wallace et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 062505 (2012)]. A recent observation [Baek et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 55, 052001 (2013)] shows that the configuration dependent ion cyclotron parametric decay instability (PDI) is excited in the density range where the discrepancy between the experiments and simulations remains. Comparing the observed spectra with the homogeneous growth rate spectra indicates that the observed ion cyclotron PDI can be excited not only at the low-field-side but also at the high-field-side (HFS) edge of the tokamak. The model analysis shows that a relevant PDI process to Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments is decay into ion cyclotron quasi-mode driven by parallel coupling. The underlying cause of the observed onset of ion cyclotron PDI is likely due to the weaker radial penetration of the LH wave in high density plasmas, which can lead to enhanced convective growth. Configuration-dependent PDIs are found to be correlated with different edge density profiles in different magnetic configurations. While the HFS edge of the tokamak can be potentially susceptible to PDI, as evidenced by experimental observations and ray-tracing analyses, enhancing single-pass absorption is expected to help recover the LHCD efficiency at reactor-relevant densities because it could suppress several parasitic loss mechanisms that are exacerbated in multi-pass regimes.

  7. Studies of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves using AMPTE/CCE and Dynamics Explorer. Semiannual report, 1 June-1 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, R. E.

    1993-12-31

    The principal activity during the past six months has involved the analysis of ion cyclotron waves recorded from DE-2 using the magnetic field experiment and electric field experiment. The results of this study have been published in the Geophysical Research Letters (GRL). The primary finding of this paper is that ion cyclotron waves were found to heat electrons, as observed in the DE-2 Langmuir probe data, through a Landau damping process. A second activity, which was started during the last six months, involves the study of large amplitude approximately one Hz electric and magnetic field oscillations recorded in the nightside auroral zone at substorm onset. Work is under way to determine the properties of these waves and investigate any association these waves may have with the substorm initiation process. A third activity under way involves a comprehensive study of ion cyclotron waves recorded at ionospheric altitudes by DE-2. This study will be an extension of the work reported in the GRL paper and will involve a larger sampling of wave events. This paper will focus on wave properties at ionospheric altitudes. A fourth activity involves a more in-depth analysis of the acceleration mechanisms and the resulting electron distributions based on the observations presented in the GRL paper.

  8. Realistic modeling of ion cloud motion in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance cell by use of a particle-in-cell approach.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Eugene N; Heeren, Ron M A; Popov, Alexander M; Pozdneev, Alexander V; Chingin, Konstantin S

    2007-01-01

    Using a 'Particle-In-Cell' approach taken from plasma physics we have developed a new three-dimensional (3D) parallel computer code that today yields the highest possible accuracy of ion trajectory calculations in electromagnetic fields. This approach incorporates coulombic ion-ion and ion-image charge interactions into the calculation. The accuracy is achieved through the implementation of an improved algorithm (the so-called Boris algorithm) that mathematically eliminates cyclotron motion in a magnetic field from digital equations for ion motion dynamics. It facilitates the calculation of the cyclotron motion without numerical errors. At every time-step in the simulation the electric potential inside the cell is calculated by direct solution of Poisson's equation. Calculations are performed on a computational grid with up to 128 x 128 x 128 nodes using a fast Fourier transform algorithm. The ion populations in these simulations ranged from 1000 up to 1,000,000 ions. A maximum of 3,000,000 time-steps were employed in the ion trajectory calculations. This corresponds to an experimental detection time-scale of seconds. In addition to the ion trajectories integral time-domain signals and mass spectra were calculated. The phenomena observed include phase locking of particular m/z ions (high-resolution regime) inside larger ion clouds. A focus was placed on behavior of a cloud of ions of a single m/z value to understand the nature of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) resolution and mass accuracy in selected ion mode detection. The behavior of two and three ion clouds of different but close m/z was investigated as well. Peak coalescence effects were observed in both cases. Very complicated ion cloud dynamics in the case of three ion clouds was demonstrated. It was found that magnetic field does not influence phase locking for a cloud of ions of a single m/z. The ion cloud evolution time-scale is inversely proportional to magnetic field. The number of

  9. Ion cyclotron resonance heating systems upgrade toward high power and CW operations in WEST

    SciTech Connect

    Hillairet, Julien Mollard, Patrick; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Argouarch, Arnaud; Berger-By, Gilles; Charabot, Nicolas; Colas, Laurent; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc; Ekedahl, Annika; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Ferlay, Fabien; Goniche, Marc; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Helou, Walid; Jacquot, Jonathan; Joffrin, Emmanuel; Litaudon, Xavier; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Patterlini, Jean-Claude; and others

    2015-12-10

    The design of the WEST (Tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) Ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas is based on a previously tested conjugate-T Resonant Double Loops prototype equipped with internal vacuum matching capacitors. The design and construction of three new WEST ICRH antennas are being carried out in close collaboration with ASIPP, within the framework of the Associated Laboratory in the fusion field between IRFM and ASIPP. The coupling performance to the plasma and the load-tolerance have been improved, while adding Continuous Wave operation capability by introducing water cooling in the entire antenna. On the generator side, the operation class of the high power tetrodes is changed from AB to B in order to allow high power operation (up to 3 MW per antenna) under higher VSWR (up to 2:1). Reliability of the generators is also improved by increasing the cavity breakdown voltage. The control and data acquisition system is also upgraded in order to resolve and react on fast events, such as ELMs. A new optical arc detection system comes in reinforcement of the V{sub r}/V{sub f} and SHAD systems.

  10. Characterization of Rainwater Dissolved Organic Matter by Ultrahigh Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, R. N.; Podgorski, D. C.; Mullaugh, K. M.; Avery, B.; Kieber, R. J.; Willey, J. D.; Cooper, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Rainwater is a complex, heterogeneous mixture of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that remains largely uncharacterized at the molecular level. Rainwater with dissolved organic carbon values ranging from 3 to 450 μM was collected during 40 separate rain events from 2007-2011 that included coastal and terrestrial storms based upon 36 hour back trajectories. Individual rain samples were lypholized and solvent added in preparation for analysis by negative electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). This data set is unique in that each rain event was analyzed individually and not combined allowing for unprecedented insight into rainwater DOM at the molecular level on an episodic basis. Unique elemental compositions were assigned for compounds belonging to CHO, CHOS and CHON classes. Data visualization by van Krevelen diagrams showed clear differences in coastal and terrestrial storm events with a majority of coastal storms having high H/C (1.5-2.0) relative to terrestrial storms. Further inspection of the data revealed that rainwater has relatively high O/C (1.4) and low H/C (<0.5) which suggests rainwater DOM is compositionally different than fog water, water soluble organic carbon isolated from aerosols and surface waters.

  11. Ultrahigh resolution simulations of mode converted ion cyclotron waves and lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; D'Azevedo, E.; Brambilla, M.

    2004-12-01

    Full wave studies of mode conversion (MC) processes in toroidal plasmas have required prohibitive amount of computer resources in the past because of the disparate spatial scales involved. The TORIC code [Brambilla, Nucl. Fusion 38 (1998) 1805] solves the linear sixth order reduced wave equation for the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), in toroidal geometry using a Fourier representation for the poloidal dimension and finite elements in the flux dimension. The range of problems that TORIC can do has been extended through both new serial algorithms and parallelization of memory and processing. The implementation of out-of-core memory management, FFT convolutions, and improved memory management brought MC studies just into range of the serial version of the code running on a NERSC Cray SV1. Some simple tests and arguments show that more resolution than is possible on a single processor system is needed to fully resolve these scenarios. By distributing the large linear system across many processors in conjunction with the out-of-core technique, the resolution limitations are effectively removed. ScaLAPACK is used to do the linear algebra operations and message passing interface (MPI) is used to distribute the significant amount of post-processing. The new parallel version of the code can easily do the most difficult MC problems on present day tokamaks (Alcator C-Mod and Asdex-Upgrade), with only 32 pc from a local Beowulf cluster. Using 48 or more processors admits us to problems in the lower hybrid range of frequencies.

  12. Understanding ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave heating losses in the scrape off layer of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, N; Jaeger, E F; Hosea, J C; Phillips, C K; Berry, L; Bonoli, P T; Gerhardt, S P; Green, D; LeBlanc, B; Perkins, R J; Ryan, P M; Taylor, G; Valeo, E J; Wilso, J R; Wright, J C

    2014-07-01

    Fast waves at harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency, which have been used successfully on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), will also play an important role in ITER and are a promising candidate for the Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) designs based on spherical torus (ST). Experimental studies of high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) heating on the NSTX have demonstrated that substantial HHFW power loss occurs along the open field lines in the scrape-off layer (SOL), but the mechanism behind the loss is not yet understood. The full wave RF code AORSA, in which the edge plasma beyond the last closed flux surface (LCFS) is included in the solution domain, is applied to specific NSTX discharges in order to predict the effects and possible causes of this power loss. In the studies discussed here, a collisional damping parameter has been implemented in AORSA as a proxy to represent the real, and most likely nonlinear, damping processes. A prediction for the NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) experiment, that will begin operation next year, is also presented, indicating a favorable condition for the experiment due to a wider evanescent region in edge density.*Research supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 with Princeton University.

  13. Ion cyclotron resonance heating systems upgrade toward high power and CW operations in WEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, Julien; Mollard, Patrick; Zhao, Yanping; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Song, Yuntao; Argouarch, Arnaud; Berger-By, Gilles; Charabot, Nicolas; Chen, Gen; Chen, Zhaoxi; Colas, Laurent; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc; Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric; Ekedahl, Annika; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Ferlay, Fabien; Goniche, Marc; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Helou, Walid; Jacquot, Jonathan; Joffrin, Emmanuel; Litaudon, Xavier; Lombard, Gilles; Maggiora, Riccardo; Magne, Roland; Milanesio, Daniele; Patterlini, Jean-Claude; Prou, Marc; Verger, Jean-Marc; Volpe, Robert; Vulliez, Karl; Wang, Yongsheng; Winkler, Konstantin; Yang, Qingxi; Yuan, Shuai

    2015-12-01

    The design of the WEST (Tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) Ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas is based on a previously tested conjugate-T Resonant Double Loops prototype equipped with internal vacuum matching capacitors. The design and construction of three new WEST ICRH antennas are being carried out in close collaboration with ASIPP, within the framework of the Associated Laboratory in the fusion field between IRFM and ASIPP. The coupling performance to the plasma and the load-tolerance have been improved, while adding Continuous Wave operation capability by introducing water cooling in the entire antenna. On the generator side, the operation class of the high power tetrodes is changed from AB to B in order to allow high power operation (up to 3 MW per antenna) under higher VSWR (up to 2:1). Reliability of the generators is also improved by increasing the cavity breakdown voltage. The control and data acquisition system is also upgraded in order to resolve and react on fast events, such as ELMs. A new optical arc detection system comes in reinforcement of the Vr/Vf and SHAD systems.

  14. Inert gas purgebox for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of air-sensitive solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael A.; Marshall, Alan G.

    1994-03-01

    A sealed rigid ``purgebox'' makes it possible to load air- and/or moisture-sensitive solids into the solids probe inlet of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer. A pelletized sample is transferred (in a sealed canister) from a commercial drybox to a Lucite(R) purgebox. After the box is purged with inert gas, an attached glove manipulator is used to transfer the sample from the canister to the solids probe of the mass spectrometer. Once sealed inside the inlet, the sample is pre-evacuated and then passed into the high vacuum region of the instrument at ˜10-7 Torr. The purgebox is transparent, portable, and readily assembled/disassembled. Laser desorption FT/ICR mass spectra of the air- and moisture-sensitive solids, NbCl5. NbCl2(C5H5)2, and Zr(CH3)2(C5H5)2 are obtained without significant oxidation. The residual water vapor concentration inside the purgebox was measured as 100±20 ppm after a 90-min purge with dry nitrogen gas. High-resolution laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of air-sensitive solids becomes feasible with the present purgebox interface. With minor modification of the purgebox geometry, the present method could be adapted to any mass spectrometer equipped with a solid sample inlet.

  15. High-harmonic ion cyclotron heating and current drive in ultra-small aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.

    1996-11-01

    Ultra-small aspect ratio tokamaks present a totally new plasma environment for heating and current drive experiments and involve a number of physics issues that have not previously been explored. These devices operate at low magnetic field and relatively high density so that the effective dielectric constant of the plasma to high harmonic fast waves (HHFW), is quite high, and perpendicular wavelength of fast waves is very short. {lambda} {approximately} 2.0 cm compared with {lambda} - 10-20 cm. This makes possible strong electron absorption at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency, {Omega}{sub i}, and at fairly high phase velocity in relation to electron thermal velocity. If the antenna system can control the parallel wave spectrum, this offers the promise of high efficiency off-axis current drive and the possibility for current drive radial profile control. Antenna phasing is ineffective for profile control in conventional tokamaks because of central absorption. There are also challenges for antenna design in this regime because of the high dielectric constant and the large angle of the magnetic field with respect to the equatorial plane ({approximately}45{degrees}), which varies greatly during current ramp. Preliminary experiments in this HHFW regime are being carried out in CDX-U.

  16. Theoretical and numerical modelling of chaotic electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) oscillations by Jerk equation

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, A. M. Kumar Shaw, Pankaj; Janaki, M. S.; Sekar Iyengar, A. N.

    2014-02-15

    In the last few years, third order explicit autonomous differential equations, known as jerk equations, have generated great interest as they show features of regular and chaotic motion. In this paper, we have modelled chaotic electrostatic ion cyclotron oscillations using a third order nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) and investigated its nonlinear dynamical properties. The nonlinear ODE has been derived for a plasma system from a two fluid model in the presence of a source term, under the influence of an external magnetic field, which is perpendicular to the direction of the wave vector. It is seen that the equation does not require an external forcing term to obtain chaotic behaviour. The stability of the solutions of the equation has been investigated analytically as well as numerically, and the bifurcation diagram obtained shows a number of interesting phenomena for various regimes of parameters. The coexisting attractors as well as their corresponding basins are shown and the phase space portraits at different conditions are obtained numerically and shown here. The results obtained here are in agreement with preliminary experiments conducted for a similar configuration of a plasma system.

  17. RF Sources for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Brunkhorst, C.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R. H.; Goulding, R. H.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Wilson, J. R.

    2005-10-04

    The RF source requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive system are very challenging ? 20 MW CW power into an antenna load with a VSWR of up to 2 over the frequency range of 35-65 MHz. For the two present antenna designs under consideration, 8 sources providing 2.5 MW each are to be employed. For these sources, the outputs of two final power amplifiers (FPAs), using the high power CPI 4CM2500KG tube, are combined with a 180? hybrid combiner to easily meet the ITER IC source requirements ? 2.5 MW is supplied at a VSWR of 2 at ? 70% of the maximum tube power available in class B operation. The cylindrical cavity configuration for the FPAs is quite compact so that the 8 combined sources fit into the space allocated at the ITER site with room to spare. The source configuration is described in detail and its projected operating power curves are presented. Although the CPI tube has been shown to be stable under high power operating conditions on many facilities, a test of the combined FPA source arrangement is in preparation using existing high power 30 MHz amplifiers to assure that this configuration can be made robustly stable for all phases at a VSWR up to 2. The possibility of using 12 sources to feed a suitably modified antenna design is also discussed in the context of providing flexibility for specifying the final IC antenna design.

  18. Status of the ITER ion cyclotron heating and current drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamalle, P.; Beaumont, B.; Kazarian, F.; Gassmann, T.; Agarici, G.; Montemayor, T. Alonzo; Bamber, R.; Bernard, J.-M.; Boilson, D.; Cadinot, A.; Calarco, F.; Colas, L.; Courtois, X.; Deibele, C.; Durodié, F.; Fano, J.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R.; Greenough, N.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A. S.; Kočan, M.; Labidi, H.; Leichtle, D.; Loarte, A.; McCarthy, M.; Messiaen, A.; Meunier, L.; Mukherjee, A.; Oberlin-Harris, C.; Patel, A. M.; Peters, B.; Rajnish, K.; Rasmussen, D.; Sanabria, R.; Sartori, R.; Singh, R.; Swain, D.; Trivedi, R. G.; Turner, A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on latest developments for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive system: imminent acceptance tests of a prototype power supply at full power; successful factory acceptance of candidate RF amplifier tubes which will be tested on dedicated facilities; further design integration and experimental validation of transmission line components under 6MW hour-long pulses. The antenna Faraday shield thermal design has been validated above requirements by cyclic high heat flux tests. R&D on ceramic brazing is under way for the RF vacuum windows. The antenna port plug RF design is stable but major evolution of the mechanical design is in preparation to achieve compliance with the load specification, warrant manufacturability and incorporate late interface change requests. The antenna power coupling capability predictions have been strengthened by showing that, if the plasma scrape-off layer turns out to be steep and the edge density low, the reference burning plasma can realistically be displaced to improve the coupling.

  19. Triggering Process of Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Rising Tone Emissions in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Omura, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Spacecraft observations and simulations show generation of coherent electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions with rising-tone frequencies. In the inner magnetosphere, the spontaneously triggered EMIC waves are generated by the energetic protons with large temperature anisotropy. We reproduced EMIC triggered emissions in the Earth's magnetosphere by real scale hybrid simulations with cylindrical magnetic geometry. We obtained spontaneously triggered nonlinear EMIC waves with rising frequencies in the H+ band of the EMIC dispersion relation. The proton holes in the phase space are formed. We have also derived the theoretical optimum wave amplitude for triggering process of the EMIC nonlinear wave growth. The optimum wave amplitude and the nonlinear transition time show a good agreement with the present simulation result. The nonlinear wave growth over a limited time forms a sub-packet structure of a rising tone emission. The formation process of a sub-packet is repeated because of a new triggering wave generated by the phase-organized protons, which are released from the previous sub-packet. Then the EMIC triggered emission is formed as a train of sub-packets generated at different rising frequencies.

  20. Triggering process of electromagnetic ion cyclotron rising tone emissions in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Masafumi; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2013-09-01

    Spacecraft observations and simulations show generation of coherent electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) triggered emissions with rising tone frequencies. In the inner magnetosphere, the spontaneously triggered EMIC waves are generated by the energetic protons with large temperature anisotropy. We reproduced EMIC triggered emissions in the Earth's magnetosphere by real scale hybrid simulations with cylindrical magnetic geometry. We obtained spontaneously triggered nonlinear EMIC waves with rising frequencies in the H+band of the EMIC dispersion relation. The proton holes in the phase space are formed. We have also derived the theoretical optimum wave amplitude for triggering process of the EMIC nonlinear wave growth. The optimum wave amplitude and the nonlinear transition time show a good agreement with the present simulation result. The nonlinear wave growth over a limited time forms a subpacket structure of a rising tone emission. The formation process of a subpacket is repeated because of a new triggering wave generated by the phase-organized protons, which are released from the previous subpacket. Then, the EMIC triggered emission is formed as a train of subpackets generated at different rising frequencies.