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Sample records for alga anabaena cylindrica

  1. Nitrogenase activity in cell-free extracts of the blue-green alga, Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Smith, R V; Evans, M C

    1971-03-01

    Cell-free extracts with high nitrogenase activity were prepared by sonic oscillation and French press treatment from the blue-gree alga Anabaena cylindrica. Extracts were prepared from cells grown on a 95% N(2)-5% CO(2) gas mixture followed by a period of nitrogen starvation under an atmosphere of 95% argon-5% CO(2). No increase in the specific activity of extracts was achieved by breaking heterocysts. Activity (assayed by acetylene reduction) was found to be dependent on adenosine triphosphate (ATP), an ATP-generating system, and a low-potential reductant. Na(2)S(2)O(2) employed as reductant supports higher rates of nitrogenase activity than reduced ferredoxin. The activity is associated with a small-particle fraction that can be sedimented by ultracentrifugation. In contrast to the particulate nitrogenase of Azotobacter, which is stable in air, the A. cylindrica nitrogenase is an oxygen sensitive as nitrogenase prepared from anaerobic bacteria. PMID:4994040

  2. Anaerobic and aerobic hydrogen gas formation by the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Daday, A; Platz, R A; Smith, G D

    1977-11-01

    An investigation was made of certain factors involved in the formation of hydrogen gas, both in an anaerobic environment (argon) and in air, by the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica. The alga had not been previously adapted under hydrogen gas and hence the hydrogen evolution occurred entirely within the nitrogen-fixing heterocyst cells; organisms grown in a fixed nitrogen source, and which were therefore devoid of heterocysts, did not produce hydrogen under these conditions. Use of the inhibitor dichlorophenyl-dimethyl urea showed that hydrogen formation was directly dependent on photosystem I and only indirectly dependent on photosystem II, consistent with heterocysts being the site of hydrogen formation. The uncouplers carbonyl cyanide chlorophenyl hydrazone and dinitrophenol almost completely inhibited hydrogen formation, indicating that the process occurs almost entirely via the adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nitrogenase. Salicylaldoxime also inhibited hydrogen formation, again illustrating the necessity of photophosphorylation. Whereas hydrogen formation could usually only be observed in anaerobic, dinitrogen-free environments, incubation in the presence of the dinitrogen-fixing inhibitor carbon monoxide plus the hydrogenase inhibitor acetylene resulted in significant formation of hydrogen even in air. Hydrogen formation was studied in batch cultures as a function of age of the cultures and also as a function of culture concentration, in both cases the cultures being harvested in logarithmic growth. Hydrogen evolution (and acetylene-reducing activity) exhibited a distinct maximum with respect to the age of the cultures. Finally, the levels of the protective enzyme, superoxide dismutase, were measured in heterocyst and vegetative cell fractions of the organism; the level was twice as high in heterocyst cells (2.3 units/mg of protein) as in vegetative cells (1.1 units/mg of protein). A simple procedure for isolating heterocyst cells is described. PMID

  3. Anaerobic and Aerobic Hydrogen Gas Formation by the Blue-Green Alga Anabaena cylindrica

    PubMed Central

    Daday, Arlene; Platz, Rosalea A.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made of certain factors involved in the formation of hydrogen gas, both in an anaerobic environment (argon) and in air, by the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica. The alga had not been previously adapted under hydrogen gas and hence the hydrogen evolution occurred entirely within the nitrogen-fixing heterocyst cells; organisms grown in a fixed nitrogen source, and which were therefore devoid of heterocysts, did not produce hydrogen under these conditions. Use of the inhibitor dichlorophenyl-dimethyl urea showed that hydrogen formation was directly dependent on photosystem I and only indirectly dependent on photosystem II, consistent with heterocysts being the site of hydrogen formation. The uncouplers carbonyl cyanide chlorophenyl hydrazone and dinitrophenol almost completely inhibited hydrogen formation, indicating that the process occurs almost entirely via the adenosine 5′-triphosphate-dependent nitrogenase. Salicylaldoxime also inhibited hydrogen formation, again illustrating the necessity of photophosphorylation. Whereas hydrogen formation could usually only be observed in anaerobic, dinitrogen-free environments, incubation in the presence of the dinitrogen-fixing inhibitor carbon monoxide plus the hydrogenase inhibitor acetylene resulted in significant formation of hydrogen even in air. Hydrogen formation was studied in batch cultures as a function of age of the cultures and also as a function of culture concentration, in both cases the cultures being harvested in logarithmic growth. Hydrogen evolution (and acetylene-reducing activity) exhibited a distinct maximum with respect to the age of the cultures. Finally, the levels of the protective enzyme, superoxide dismutase, were measured in heterocyst and vegetative cell fractions of the organism; the level was twice as high in heterocyst cells (2.3 units/mg of protein) as in vegetative cells (1.1 units/mg of protein). A simple procedure for isolating heterocyst cells is described. PMID

  4. Hydrogen production by nitrogen-starved cultures of Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, J C; Benemann, J R

    1977-01-01

    Nitrogen-starved cultures of the alga Anabaena cylindrica 629 produced hydrogen and oxygen continuously for 7 to 19 days. Hydrogen production attained a maximum level after 1 to 2 days of starvation and was followed by a slow decline. The maximum rates were 30 ml of H2 evolved per liter of culture per h or 32 mul of H2 per mg of dry weight per h. In 5 to 7 days the rate of H2 evolution by the more productive cultures fell to one-half its maximum value. The addition of 10(-4) to 5 X 10(-4) M ammonium increased the rate of oxygen evolution and the total hydrogen production of the cultures. H2-O2 ratios were 4:1 under conditions of complete nitrogen starvation and about 1.7:1 after the addition of ammonium. Thus, oxygen evolution was affected by the extent of the nitrogen starvation. Thermodynamic efficiencies of converting incident light energy to free energy of hydrogen via algal photosynthesis were 0.4%. Possible factors limiting hydrogen production were decline of reductant supply and filament breakage. Hydrogen production by filamentous, heterocystous blue-green algae could be used for development of a biophotolysis system. PMID:402109

  5. Analysis of proteins involved in the production of MAA׳s in two Cyanobacteria Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Anabaena cylindrica

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Akhlaqur; Sinha, Sukrat; Sachan, Shephali; Kumar, Gaurav; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Sundaram, Shanthy

    2014-01-01

    Mycosporine- like amino acids (MAAs) are small (<400Da), colourless, water soluble compounds composed of cyclohexenone or cyclohexinimine chromophere conjugated with the nitrogen substituent of amino acid or its amino alcohol. These compounds are known for their UV- absorbing role in various organisms and seem to have evolutionary significance. The biosynthesis of MAAs is presumed to occur via the first part of shikimate pathway. In the present work two cyanobacteria Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Anabaena cylindrica were tested for their ability to synthesize MAAs and protein involved in the production of MAAs. It was found that protein sequence 3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyltransferase is involved in producing mycosporine glycine in Synechocystis PCC 6803 and 3-dehydroquinate synthase is involved for producing shinorine in Anabaena cylindrica. Phylogenetic and bioinformatic analysis of Mycosporine like amino acid producing protein sequence of both cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Anabaena cylindrica provide a useful framework to understand the relationship of the different forms and how they have evolved from a common ancestor. These products seem to be conserved but the residues are prone to variation which might be due the fact that different cyanobacteria show different physiological process in response of Ultraviolet stress. PMID:25187686

  6. Time-dependent growth of crystalline Au0-nanoparticles in cyanobacteria as self-reproducing bioreactors: 2. Anabaena cylindrica

    PubMed Central

    Rösken, Liz M; Cappel, Felix; Körsten, Susanne; Fischer, Christian B; Schönleber, Andreas; van Smaalen, Sander; Geimer, Stefan; Beresko, Christian; Ankerhold, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Summary Microbial biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles as needed in catalysis has shown its theoretical ability as an extremely environmentally friendly production method in the last few years, even though the separation of the nanoparticles is challenging. Biosynthesis, summing up biosorption and bioreduction of diluted metal ions to zero valent metals, is especially ecofriendly, when the bioreactor itself is harmless and needs no further harmful reagents. The cyanobacterium Anabaena cylindrica (SAG 1403.2) is able to form crystalline Au0-nanoparticles from Au3+ ions and does not release toxic anatoxin-a. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are applied to monitor the time-dependent development of gold nanoparticles for up to 40 hours. Some vegetative cells (VC) are filled with nanoparticles within minutes, while the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of vegetative cells and the heterocyst polysaccharide layer (HEP) are the regions, where the first nanoparticles are detected on most other cells. The uptake of gold starts immediately after incubation and within four hours the average size remains constant around 10 nm. Analyzing the TEM images with an image processing program reveals a wide distribution for the diameter of the nanoparticles at all times and in all regions of the cyanobacteria. Finally, the nanoparticle concentration in vegetative cells of Anabaena cylindrica is about 50% higher than in heterocysts (HC). These nanoparticles are found to be located along the thylakoid membranes. PMID:27335727

  7. Time-dependent growth of crystalline Au(0)-nanoparticles in cyanobacteria as self-reproducing bioreactors: 2. Anabaena cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Rösken, Liz M; Cappel, Felix; Körsten, Susanne; Fischer, Christian B; Schönleber, Andreas; van Smaalen, Sander; Geimer, Stefan; Beresko, Christian; Ankerhold, Georg; Wehner, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles as needed in catalysis has shown its theoretical ability as an extremely environmentally friendly production method in the last few years, even though the separation of the nanoparticles is challenging. Biosynthesis, summing up biosorption and bioreduction of diluted metal ions to zero valent metals, is especially ecofriendly, when the bioreactor itself is harmless and needs no further harmful reagents. The cyanobacterium Anabaena cylindrica (SAG 1403.2) is able to form crystalline Au(0)-nanoparticles from Au(3+) ions and does not release toxic anatoxin-a. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are applied to monitor the time-dependent development of gold nanoparticles for up to 40 hours. Some vegetative cells (VC) are filled with nanoparticles within minutes, while the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of vegetative cells and the heterocyst polysaccharide layer (HEP) are the regions, where the first nanoparticles are detected on most other cells. The uptake of gold starts immediately after incubation and within four hours the average size remains constant around 10 nm. Analyzing the TEM images with an image processing program reveals a wide distribution for the diameter of the nanoparticles at all times and in all regions of the cyanobacteria. Finally, the nanoparticle concentration in vegetative cells of Anabaena cylindrica is about 50% higher than in heterocysts (HC). These nanoparticles are found to be located along the thylakoid membranes. PMID:27335727

  8. Bentazon triggers the promotion of oxidative damage in the Portuguese ricefield cyanobacterium Anabaena cylindrica: response of the antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Galhano, Victor; Peixoto, Francisco; Gomes-Laranjo, José

    2010-10-01

    Rice fields are frequently exposed to environmental contamination by herbicides and cyanobacteria, as primary producers of these aquatic ecosystems, are adversely affected. Anabaena cylindrica is a cyanobacterium with a significantly widespread occurrence in Portuguese rice fields. This strain was studied throughout 72 h in laboratory conditions for its stress responses to sublethal concentrations (0.75-2 mM) of bentazon, a selective postemergence herbicide recommended for integrated weed management in rice, with special reference to oxidative stress, role of proline and intracellular antioxidant enzymes in herbicide-induced free radicals detoxification. Activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) increased in a time- and herbicide dose-response manner and were higher than those in the control samples after 72 h. A time- and concentration-dependent increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the enhanced cell membrane leakage following bentazon exposure are indicative of lipid peroxidation, free radicals formation, and oxidative damage, while increased amounts of SOD, CAT, APX, GST, and proline indicated their involvement in free radical scavenging mechanisms. The appreciable decline in the reduced glutathione (GSH) pool after 72 h at higher bentazon concentrations could be explained by the reduction of the NADPH-dependent glutathione reductase (GR) activity. The obtained results suggested that the alterations of antioxidant systems in A. cylindrica might be useful biomarkers of bentazon exposure. As the toxic mechanism of bentazon is a complex phenomenon, this study also adds relevant findings to explain the oxidative stress pathways of bentazon promoting oxidative stress in cyanobacteria. PMID:20549627

  9. Hydrogen production by Anabaena cylindrica: effects of varying ammonium and ferric ions, pH, and light.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, T W; Timourian, H; Ward, R L

    1978-04-01

    Anabaena cylindrica sparged with argon gas produced H2 continuously for 30 days under limited light conditions (6.0 W/m2) and for 18 days under elevated light conditions (32 W/m2) in the absence of exogenous nitrogen. The efficiency of converting visible light energy (32 W/m2) into chemical energy that is trapped as H2 ranged between 0.35 and 0.85% (approximately 13 microliter of H2 per mg [drywt] per h). Ammonium additions (0.2 mM NH4+) at various times destabilized the system and eventually suppressed H2 production completely, as compared with the control. Cultures grown with 5.0 mg of Fe3+ per liter produced H2 at a rate about twice that of cultures with 0.5 mg of Fe3+ per liter. Cultures grown at pH 7.4 produced H2 at the same initial rates as cultures that were grown at pH 9.4; however, the latter cultures continued to produce H2 after CO2 deprivation. PMID:25622

  10. The Azolla, Anabaena azollae Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Gerald A.; Mayne, Berger C.

    1974-01-01

    Cultures of Azolla caroliniana Willd. free of the symbiotic blue-green alga, Anabaena azollae, were obtained by treatment of Azolla fronds with a regimen of antibiotics. These symbiontfree plants can be maintained only on medium containing a combined nitrogen source. Morphological aspects of the symbiotic association show the confinement of the Anabaena azollae within the leaf cavity of the Azolla. Procedures were established for the isolation of pure preparations of Anabaena azollae and Azolla chloroplasts. It has not yet been possible to grow the isolated alga in independent culture. Photochemical activities of the isolated alga and fern chloroplasts were measured by spectrophotometric assays for photosystems I and II as well as by P700-content (photosystem I) and delayed light emission (photosystem II). In the algal fraction, both photosystems were repressed when compared to freeliving Anabaena cylindrica, but the relative ratio of photosystem I to photosystem II may be appreciably greater in Anabaena azollae. Azolla chloroplasts were generally comparable to spinach chloroplasts. A comparison of the chlorophyll a and b content of Azolla fronds with and without the symbiotic alga resulted in an estimate that in the symbiotic association, the Anabaena azollae accounts for from 7.5 to 15% of the total chlorophyll. Images PMID:16658796

  11. Polysaccharides from the envelopes of heterocysts and spores of the blue-green algae Anabaena variabilis and Cylindrospermum licheniforme

    SciTech Connect

    Cardemil, L.; Wolk, C.P.

    1981-09-01

    The polysaccharides from the envelopes of heterocysts of Cylindrospermum licheniforme Kutz., and of heterocysts and spores of Anabaena variabilis Kutz., like those from the differentiated cells of Anabaena cylindrica Lemm., have a 1,3-linked backbone consisting of glucosyl and mannosyl residues in a molar ratio of approximately 3:1. As is the case with A. cylindrica the polysaccharides from A. variabilis and from the heterocysts of C. licheniforme have terminal xylosyl and galactosyl residues as side branches. In addition, the polysaccharide from C. licheniforme resembles that from A. cylindrica in having terminal mannosyl residues as side branches (absent from A. variabilis). The polysaccharides from A. variabilis resemble that from A. cylindrica in having glucose-containing side branches (absent from the heterocyst polysaccharide from C. licheniforme), but in contrast to the polysaccharides from the other two species they also have terminal arabinosyl residues as side branches. All of the polysaccharides mentioned appear to be structurally related; we present tentative structures for those not previously investigated. In contrast, the envelope of spores of C. licheniforme contains only a largely 4-linked galactan. The bulk of this envelope is not polysaccharide in nature, and contains aromatic groups.

  12. Photoreduction of mercury(II) in the presence of algae, Anabaena cylindrical.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lin; Wu, Feng; Deng, Nansheng; Zuo, Yuegang

    2008-05-29

    The photochemical and biological reduction of Hg(II) in the presence of algae, anabaena cylindrical, was investigated under the irradiation of metal halide lamps placed in cooling trap for maintaining constant temperature by water circulation (lambda >or=365 nm, 250 W). The photoreduction rate of Hg(II) increased with increasing algae concentration. The addition of Fe(III) and humic substances into the suspensions of algae also enhanced the photoreduction of Hg(II). Alteration of pH value affected the photoreduction of Hg(II) in aqueous solution with or without the addition of algae. The concentration of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM), the reduced product of Hg(II), increased with increasing exposure time and then gradually approached to a steady state. The influence of initial Hg(II) concentration on the photoreduction of Hg(II) with algae was studied by irradiating the suspensions of anabaena cylindrical at pH 7.0 with initial concentrations (C(0)) of Hg(II) at 50, 100, 120, 150 and 180 microg L(-1), respectively, the light-induced reduction of Hg(II) followed the apparent pseudo first-order kinetics. The initial photoreduction rate could be expressed by the equation: r(A)=0.0871+0.00129 C(0), with a correlation coefficient R=0.9994. The overall mercury mass balance study on the photo-reductive process revealed that more than 39.86% of Hg(II) from the algal suspension was reduced to volatile metallic mercury. PMID:18375140

  13. Biosorption of cadmium and lead from aqueous solution by fresh water alga Anabaena sphaerica biomass

    PubMed Central

    Abdel -Aty, Azza M.; Ammar, Nabila S.; Abdel Ghafar, Hany H.; Ali, Rizka K.

    2012-01-01

    The present work represents the biosorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution onto the biomass of the blue green alga Anabaena sphaerica as a function of pH, biosorbent dosage, contact time, and initial metal ion concentrations. Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherm of both metals by A. sphaerica biomass. The biosorption isotherms studies indicated that the biosorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) follows the Langmuir and Freundlish models. The maximum biosorption capacities (qmax) were 111.1 and 121.95 mg/g, respectively, at the optimum conditions for each metal. From the D–R isotherm model, the mean free energy was calculated to be 11.7 and 14.3 kJ/mol indicating that the biosorption mechanism of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by A. sphaerica was chemisorption. The FTIR analysis for surface function group of algal biomass revealed the existence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for the biosorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II). The results suggested that the biomass of A. sphaerica is an extremely efficient biosorbent for the removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions. PMID:25685442

  14. Oxygen-dependent proton efflux in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). [Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Stuerzl, E.; Boeger, P.

    1984-05-01

    The oxygen-dependent proton efflux (in the dark) of intact cells of Anabaena variabilis and four other cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was investigated. In contrast to bacteria and isolated mitochondria, an H/sup +//e ratio (= protons translocated per electron transported) of only 0.23 to 0.35 and a P/e ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 were observed, indicative of respiratory electron transport being localized essentially on the thylakoids, not on the cytoplasmic membrane. Oxygen-induced acidification of the medium was sensitive to cyanide and the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Inhibitors such as 2,6-dinitrophenol and vanadate exhibited a significant decrease in the H/sup +//e ratio. After the oxygen pulse, electron transport started immediately, but proton efflux lagged 40 to 60 s behind, a period also needed before maximum ATP pool levels were attained. The authors suggest that proton efflux in A. variabilis is due to a proton-translocating ATP hydrolase (ATP-consuming ATPase) rather than to respiratory electron transport located on the cytoplasmic membrane.

  15. Combined effect of oil, oil products and dispersants on the blue-green algae Synechocystis aquatilis and Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Gapochka, L.D.; Brodskii, L.I.; Kravchenko, M.E.; Fedorov, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    The study of the combined effect of oil, oil products and dispersants on the growth of the blue-green algae Synechocystis aquatilis and Anabaena variabilis has shown that out of 12 studied oil-dispersant pairs 6 revealed a positive relationship, which provides evidence for a decrease in oil and oil products toxic effect in the presence of a dispersant. The positive interaction between oil and oil products was found. The negative oil and oil products effect on all studied indices of A. variabilis culture increases with time.

  16. Studies on the hormonal relationships of algae in pure culture : I. The effect of indole-3-acetic acid on the growth of blue-green and green algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M R; Winter, A

    1968-09-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) stimulated the growth (increase in dry weight) of the blue-green algae Anacystis nidulans, Chlorogloea fritschii, Phormidium foveolarum, Nostoc muscorum, Anabaena cylindrica, and Tolypothrix tenuis and the green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Ankistrodesmus falcatus and Scenedesmus obliquus growing under as sterile conditions as possible. The optimum concentration varied from species to species; in the blue-green algae it ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-9) M and in the green algae it was 10(-3) M. These results are discussed in the light of present studies in this field. PMID:24522736

  17. Hydrogen peroxide photoproduction by immobilized cells of the blue-green alga Anabaena variabilis: A way to solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, I.; La Rosa, F.F. de )

    1992-07-01

    A photosystem for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction formed by immobilized cells of the blue-green alga, Anabaena variabilis and the redox mediator methyl viologen is described. Hydrogen peroxide is produced in a redox catalyst cycle in which methyl viologen is reduced by electrons from water obtained by the photosynthetic apparatus of the algae using solar energy, and reoxidized by the introduction of oxygen into the solution. Hydrogen peroxide is produced during methyl viologen re-oxidation in two steps by means of the formation of superoxide. Experimental conditions for maximum photoproduction (catalyst charge, chlorophyll, and agar final concentration for cell immobilization) have been investigated using a continuous photosystem with immobilized A. variabilis as photocatalyst. Under the determined optimum conditions, the photosystem with immobilized A. variabilis is photocatalyst. Under the determined optimum conditions, the photosystem produces hydrogen peroxide at a rate of 100 {mu}moles/mg Chl{center dot}h, maintaining the production for several hours, and with an energy conversion efficiency of about 2%. Taking into account the use of hydrogen peroxide as fuel, this photosystem can be a useful tool in the storage of solar energy.

  18. Carbon dioxide assimilation in blue-green algae: initial studies on the structure of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Tabita, F R; Stevens, S E; Gibson, J L

    1976-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase was purified from the blue-green alga Anabaena cylindrica (Lemm) by procedures involving acid precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The enzyme was homogeneous by the criterion of polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and was a multimer of a single-size polypeptide chain of 54,000 daltons. The carboxylases from four species of blue-green algae (Anabaena, Nostoc strain MAC, Agmenellum quadruplicatum strain PR-6, and Anacystis nidulans strain TX20) were closely similar in molecular size, since enzyme activity was eluted at the same volume after sucrose gradient centrifugation. Further analysis by gel filtration indicated that the four blue-green algal carboxylases were nearly identical in molecular weight, ranging from 449 to 453,000. The amino acid composition of the Anabaena carboxylase was determined and was found to resemble closely the composition of the large subunit from eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. Images PMID:812868

  19. The influence of nitrogen on heterocyst production in blue-green algae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogawa, Roann E.; Carr, John F.

    1969-01-01

    A series of experiments on heterocyst production in Anabaena variabilis provides some strong indirect evidence for the role of heterocysts in nitrogen fixation. Of the algae tested (Anabaena variabilis, A. inaequalis, A. cylindrica, A. flos-aquae, Tolypothrix distorta, Gloeotrichia echinulata, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Oscillatoria sp., and Microcystis aeruginosa), only those with heterocysts grew in a nitrate-free medium. Growth in the nitrate-free medium was accompanied by an increase in heterocysts. Heterocyst formation in A. variabilis was evident 24 hr after transfer from a nitrate-containing to a nitrate-free medium. The number of heterocysts was altered by changes in the nitrogen source. Numbers were lowest when NH4-N was used as a nitrogen source and highest when nitrogen (N2-N) was derived from the atmosphere. Heterocyst numbers could also be regulated by controlling the concentration of NO3-N in the medium. Heterocyst production depended on the absence of combined nitrogen and the presence of phosphate. Data are presented on the occurrence of blue-green algae (with heterocysts) in Lake Erie and the environmental conditions apparently necessary for them to become dominant.

  20. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs. PMID:25004359

  1. The Azolla, Anabaena azollae Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Gerald A.; Mayne, Berger C.

    1974-01-01

    Anaerobic (microaerophilic) acetylene reduction by Azolla caroliniana Willd. was dependent on light and saturated at approximately 450 foot candles. Maximum rates of acetylene reduction were 60 nmoles/mg chlorophyll minute. However, rates of 25 to 30 nmoles/mg chlorophyll minute were more common. The growth of Azolla for 35 days with nitrate or urea as a nitrogen source decreased the rate of acetylene reduction approximately 30% compared to controls grown on nitrogen. Prolonged growth on nitrate or urea (6-7 months) resulted in a 90% decrease in the rate of acetylene reduction. The inhibition of acetylene reduction by 3 (3,4-dichlorophenol) 1,1-dimethylurea (12 μM) was not pronounced until the Azolla became depleted of the reserves formed during photosynthesis. The interval required for this depletion was dependent upon pretreatment and varied from 2 to more than 12 hours. Oxygen evolution was inhibited 75% in 10 minutes by the same concentration of 3 (3,4-dichlorophenol) 1,1-dimethylurea. The addition of oxygen, 20% volume per volume, resulted in a 30 to 40% decrease in the rate of acetylene reduction and the onsetof 3(3,4-dichlorophenol) 1,1-dimethylurea inhibition was more rapid then under microaerophilic conditions. The aerobic dark reduction of acetylene was from 10 to 30% of the rate of aerobic reduction in the light. Acetylene reduction activity was absent in fronds freed ofthe symbiotic algae and present in isolated Anabaena azollae. This study shows that the alga is the agent of acetylene reduction and suggests that there is considerable transport of metabolites between the fern and the blue-green alga. PMID:16658797

  2. [Chemical constituents from Imperata cylindrica].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Binfeng; Chou, Guixin; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2012-08-01

    Chemical investigation of Imperata cylindrica led to the isolation of thirteen compounds using various chromatographic techniques. The structure of these compounds were identified as: three phenylpropanoids, 1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,2,3-propanetriol ( 1 ), 1-O-p-coumaroylglycerol (2), 4-methoxy-5-methyl coumarin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3); four organic acids, 4-hydroxybenzene carboxylic acid(4), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (5), vanillic acid (6), 3, 4-dihydroxybutyric acid (7); one phenolic compound, salicin (8); and five triterpenes, namely, arundoin (9), cylindrin (10), fernenol (11), simiarenol (12), glutinone (13) by their physicochemical properties and spectral data analysis. Among them, compounds 1-8 were isolated from the genus Imperata for the first time. PMID:23189737

  3. Effects of acid stress on Scenedesmus quadricauda (chlorophyta) and Anabaena sp. (cyanophyta)

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden-Carter, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of pH in conjunction with light and temperature on growth of Scenedesmus quadricauda (Chlorophyta) and Anabaena sp. (Cyanophyta) were examined in culture. Decreasing pH from 7 to 3 inhibited growth, more so in the blue-green alga. Effects were greatly influenced by light and temperature. Above a critical level (pH4 with the blue-green, pH 3 with the green) both algae recovered when acid stress was removed; post-acidification growth rates varied inversely with pH for the green alga and directly for the blue-green. Two sheathed blue-green algae (Lyngbya and Gleocapsa) grew below pH 6, while two unsheathed blue-green algae (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) did not. Cell dimensions of both S. quadricaude and Anabaena sp. generally increased as pH declined; the green alga was the more plastic of the two. Acid stress significantly decreased photosynthetic rate in S. quadricauda but did not for Anabaena sp. Respiratory rates were not significantly related to pH for either alga. Chlorophyll a per cell was higher than controls (pH 7) at pH 5 and 6 in Anabaena sp. and at pH 4 through 6 for S. quadricauda. Both cell division and total culture biomass declined with pH. When grown in mixed culture, the green alga usually predominated at pH 4 and often at pH 5; the blue-green was favored at lower light intensities and higher temperatures. In no instance did one alga stimulate growth of the other, although mutual inhibition occurred in several instances.

  4. INTEGRATED VEGETATION MANAGEMENT OF COGONGRASS (IMPERATA CYLINDRICA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.] is invading forest lands, especially those growing loblolly pine (Pinus teada L.) plantations. The primary research objective of this project was to investigate IVM options for the establishment or reforestation of loblolly pine into cogongrass-infested ...

  5. Chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite analysis of Aegilops cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Harish T; Vales, M Isabel; Watson, Christy J W; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Mori, Naoki; Rehman, Maqsood; Zemetra, Robert S; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar

    2005-08-01

    Aegilops cylindrica Host (2n = 4x = 28, genome CCDD) is an allotetraploid formed by hybridization between the diploid species Ae. tauschii Coss. (2n = 2x = 14, genome DD) and Ae. markgrafii (Greuter) Hammer (2n = 2x = 14, genome CC). Previous research has shown that Ae. tauschii contributed its cytoplasm to Ae. cylindrica. However, our analysis with chloroplast microsatellite markers showed that 1 of the 36 Ae. cylindrica accessions studied, TK 116 (PI 486249), had a plastome derived from Ae. markgrafii rather than Ae. tauschii. Thus, Ae. markgrafii has also contributed its cytoplasm to Ae. cylindrica. Our analysis of chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite markers also suggests that D-type plastome and the D genome in Ae. cylindrica were closely related to, and were probably derived from, the tauschii gene pool of Ae. tauschii. A determination of the likely source of the C genome and the C-type plastome in Ae. cylindrica was not possible. PMID:15986256

  6. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers.

    PubMed

    Demir, H; Top, A; Balköse, D; Ulkü, S

    2008-05-01

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m(2)/g. PMID:17919814

  7. Four new compounds from Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Bin-Feng; Yang, Li; Chou, Gui-Xin; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2014-04-01

    Four new compounds, impecylone (1), deacetylimpecyloside (2), seguinoside K 4-methylether (3) and impecylenolide (4), were isolated from Imperata cylindrica along with two known compounds, impecyloside (5) and seguinoside K (6). Their structures were elucidated mainly by spectroscopic analyses including 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques, and the absolute configuration of 1 was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. In calcium assay, the result indicated that compounds 1, 2, 4 and 5 cannot obviously inhibit the calcium peak value compared with the negative control, and suggested that the four compounds could not have anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:23872962

  8. Cytological evidence for chromosome elimination in wheat x Imperata cylindrica hybrids.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Norio; Chaudhary, Harinder K; Suzuki, Go; Mukai, Yasuhiko

    2007-06-01

    Haploid induction of wheat by crossing with Imperata cylindrica pollen is an efficient method for doubled haploid breeding. We investigated the process of wheat haploid formation after crossing with I. cylindrica. Our cytological observations of zygotes showed the successful fertilization of parental gametes. Wheat haploids were formed by complete elimination of I. cylindrica chromosomes. Missegregation of I. cylindrica chromosomes was observed in the first cell division of zygote. At metaphase I. cylindrica chromosomes did not congress onto the equatorial plate. The sister chromosomes did not move toward the poles during anaphase, though their cohesion was released normally. I. cylindrica chromosomes were still in the cytoplasm at telophase and eliminated from daughter nuclei. After two-celled stage, we could find no I. cylindrica chromosome in the nuclei but micronuclei containing I. cylindrica chromatin in the cytoplasm. These observations indicate that I. cylindrica chromosomes are completely eliminated from nuclei in the first cell division probably due to lack of functional kinetochores. PMID:17660694

  9. ALGAE-BACTERIA INTERACTION IN A LIGHT-DARK CYCLE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient and population dynamics accompanying algae-bacteria interaction were observed in unialgal, 18-liter batch cultures during a light-dark cycle. The green alga Chlorella vulgaris, and the nitrogen fixing blue-green Anabaena flos-aquae were inoculated with an aquatic communi...

  10. Composition, speciation and distribution of iron minerals in Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Amils, Ricardo; de la Fuente, Vicenta; Rodríguez, Nuria; Zuluaga, Javier; Menéndez, Nieves; Tornero, Jesús

    2007-05-01

    A comparative study of the roots, rhizomes and leaves of an iron hyperaccumulator plant, Imperata cylindrica, isolated from the banks of an extreme acidic environment, using complementary techniques: Mösbauer spectroscopy (MS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has shown that two main biominerals, jarosite and ferrihydrate-ferritin, accumulate in the different tissues. Jarosite accumulates mainly in roots and rhizomes, while ferritin has been detected in all the structures. A model of iron management in I. cylindrica is presented. PMID:17502153

  11. The fate of glyphosate in water hyacinth and its physiological and biochemical influences on growth of algae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Baolong.

    1989-01-01

    Absorption, translocation, distribution, exudation, and guttation of {sup 14}C-glyphosate in water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) were studied. Glyphosphate entered the plant by foliage and solution treatment. Plants were harvested and separated into the following parts: treated leaf blade, treated leaf petiole, young leaf blade, young leaf petiole, old leak blade, old leaf petiole, and root. Each part was extracted with methanol. Treated leaves, which exist only in foliage treatment, were washed with water and chloroform to remove the glyphosate residues. All {sup 14}C counting was made by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Autoradiography was used to locate {sup 14}C-glyphosate after foliage treatment. Results indicated that glyphosate can be absorbed from the leaf surface and translocated rapidly through phloem tissues into the whole plant body. The roots of water hyacinth absorbed glyphosate without vertical transport. Guttation of glyphosate occurred in treated leaf tips. Exudation of glyphosate from roots of water hyacinth occurred within 8 hr after foliage treatment. Chlorella vulgaris, Chlamydomonas reihardii, Anabaena cylindrica, and Chroococcus turgidus were used to explore the physiological and biochemical effects of glyphosate on algae. Spectrophotometric assays were performed for algal growth, chlorophyll, carotenoids, phycobiliprotein, carbohydrate, and protein. TLC procedures and an image analyzer were used to detect the metabolites of glyphosate inside algal cells. The common visible symptom of glyphosate toxicity in all algal cells were bleaching effect and reduction of contents of carbohydrate, protein, and pigments. The results highly suggested that glyphosate injured the algal cells by destruction of photosynthetic pigments and resulted in lowering the contents of carbohydrate and protein in algal cells.

  12. Beneficial changes in biomass and lipid of microalgae Anabaena variabilis facing the ultrasonic stress environment.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Jiang, Liqun; Cheng, Juan; Zhang, Lijie

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the beneficial effects of ultrasonic treatment on the biomass, lipid and protein of the microalgae Anabaena variabilis. The microalgae after 11days cultivation (initial algae) were treated at the powers of 200, 350 and 500W for 10min and then cultured continuously for 3days (day 12-14). The power of 200W induced the highest lipid content 37.8% on day 12. The subsequent experiments tested the ultrasonic treatment times of 5, 10, 20 and 40min at 200W in the initial algae. The significantly improved lipid content 46.9% and productivity 54.2mg/L/d were obtained almost 1.46 and 1.86times more than that of the control algae respectively after 1day of continuous cultivation at 5min. The proper ultrasonic treatment showed the feasibility and high efficiency in promoting lipid accumulation without negatively influencing the biomass, fatty acid profiles and protein content. PMID:26946436

  13. [Hybrids of Aegilops cylindrica Host with Triticum durum Desf. and T. aestivum L].

    PubMed

    Avsenin, V I; Motsnyĭ, A I; Rybalka, A I; Faĭt, V I

    2003-01-01

    The hybrids of durum and bread wheat with Ae. cylindrica have been obtained without using an embryo rescue technique. The hybrid output (of pollinated flower number) in the field conditions scored 1.0, 15.3 and 10.0% in the crosses T. durum x Ae. cylindrica, Ae. cylindrica x T. durum and T. aestivum x Ae. cylindrica, respectively. A high level of meiotic chromosome pairing between homologous D genomes of bread wheat and Aegilops has been revealed (c = 80.0-83.7%). The possibility of homoeological pairing between wheat and Ae. cylindrica chromosomes has been shown. Herewith, the correlation between the levels of homological and homoeological pairing is absent. The possibilities of genetic material interchange, including between the tetraploid species, as well as the using of Ae. cylindrica cytoplasm for durum wheat breeding are discussed. PMID:12741056

  14. Neuroprotective 2-(2-phenylethyl)chromones of Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2006-02-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica afforded a new compound, 5-hydroxy-2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone (1), together with three known compounds, 5-hydroxy-2-[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]chromone (2), flidersiachromone (3), and 5-hydroxy-2-styrylchromone (4). Among these four compounds, 1 and 2 showed significant neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultures of rat cortical cells. PMID:16499335

  15. A new lignan glycoside from the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Young; Han, Kyung-Min; Song, Myoung-Chong; Lee, Do-Gyeong; Rho, Yeong-Deok; Baek, Nam-In

    2008-01-01

    A new lignan glycoside, 6-acetyl-1-[1,3-(4,4'-dihydroxy-3,3'-dimethoxy-beta-truxinyl)-beta-d-fructofuranosyl]-alpha-d-glucopyranoside (1), named impecyloside, was isolated from the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica. The structure of the compound was determined by spectroscopic data including FABMS, UV, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR (DEPT) and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC, HMBC). PMID:18348057

  16. Aprocta cylindrica (Nematoda) infection in a European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) in Britain.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Katie M; Harris, Eileen; Pocknell, Ann M; John, Shinto K; Macgregor, Shaheed K; Cunningham, Andrew A; Lawson, Becki

    2014-10-01

    A European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) found dead in England had marked blepharitis and periocular alopecia associated with Aprocta cylindrica (Nematoda: Aproctidae) and concurrent mixed fungal infections. Aprocta cylindrica should be considered a differential diagnosis in periocular abnormalities of robins and other insectivorous, migratory passerines in Western Europe. PMID:25121405

  17. Effects of cadmium and copper on the ultrastructure ofAnkistrodesmus braunii andAnabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Massalski, A; Laube, V M; Kushner, D J

    1981-06-01

    The effects of brief exposure to, or growth in the presence of, lethal and sublethal concentrations of Cu(NO)2 and Cd(NO3) on the ultrastructure of the blue-green algaAnabaena 7120 and the green algaAnkistrodesmus braunii were studied. Exposure to increasing amount of both metal ions led to the appearance of larger proportions of electron-dense cells whose organelles were less well defined than those of untreated cells. Metal-treated cells ofAnabaena 7120 became distorted. Some had a corrugated appearance. Others lysed, leaving a much larger proportion of heterocysts. Such heterocysts were often empty or had a curious collapsed appearance. Growth ofA. braunii in the presence of 10(-4) M Cu(NO2)2 produced substantial numbers of multinucleate giant cells with thick walls; such cells result from repeated mitotic division without subsequent cytokinesis. The giant cells contained centrioles, structures not as yet found in normal cells of the genusAnkistrodesmus. Some nuclei of giant, but not of normal, cells contained deep indentations that appeared as "holes" in cross section. Some giant cells also contained triple parallel strands of endoplasmic reticulum which extended across much of the cell, connecting to the nuclear envelope. Some ultrastructural changes were also noted in algal cells grown over sediment containing Cu or Cd, but these were generally less severe than those occurring when metal ions were added directly to the algal cultures. PMID:24227427

  18. Regeneration of filaments (colonies) from Anabaena variabilis spheroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Lem, N.W.; Perrin, C.G.; Nemeth, M.A.

    1986-04-01

    A simple method for regeneration of filaments (clones) from spheroplasts of the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga), Anabaena variabilis, was developed and used to quantify cell growth in the presence of two antibiotics. Cells from exponential phase cultures of ATCC 29413 and M3 were harvested and incubated with lysozyme (0.12% in 0.03M K-phosphate, pH 6.8, 0.55M sorbitol; 37 C) to produce spheroplasts. The spheroplasts were washed with buffer, plated onto soft agar and incubated (18 h light: 6 hr dark, 27 C). Colonies became visible at 7 - 9 days and were monitored for times up to 21 days. The concentration of chloramphenicol which inhibited cell growth by 50% was approximately 1.8 mg ml/sup -1/ medium and the concentrations of ampicillin which inhibited cell growth by 50% were approximately 4 and 15 pg ml/sup -1/ medium for ATCC 29413 and M3, respectively. This method may be useful for genetic manipulation of cells from these and other filamentous, N/sub 2/-fixing cyanobacteria.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. 33047

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 (Anabaena CA), a filamentous, nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacterium, which under salt stress conditions accumulates sucrose internally. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the understanding of cyanobacterial diversity. PMID:27516507

  20. Genetic effect of the Aegilops caudata plasmon on the manifestation of the Ae. cylindrica genome.

    PubMed

    Tsunewaki, Koichiro; Mori, Naoki; Takumi, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    In the course of reconstructing Aegilops caudata from its own genome (CC) and its plasmon, which had passed half a century in common wheat (genome AABBDD), we produced alloplasmic Ae. cylindrica (genome CCDD) with the plasmon of Ae. caudata. This line, designated (caudata)-CCDD, was found to express male sterility in its second substitution backcross generation (SB2) of (caudata)-AABBCCDD pollinated three times with the Ae. cylindrica pollen. We repeatedly backcrossed these SB2 plants with the Ae. cylindrica pollen until the SB5 generation, and SB5F2 progeny were produced by self-pollination of the SB5 plants. Thirteen morphological and physiological characters, including pollen and seed fertilities, of the (caudata)-CCDD SB5F2 were compared with those of the euplasmic Ae. cylindrica. The results indicated that the male sterility expressed by (caudata)-CCDD was due to genetic incompatibility between the Ae. cylindrica genome and Ae. caudata plasmon that did not affect any other characters of Ae. cylindrica. Also, we report that the genome integrity functions in keeping the univalent transmission rate high. PMID:25832746

  1. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-03-01

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R2), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  2. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    SciTech Connect

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-03-30

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  3. [New low-copy plasmid in cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis].

    PubMed

    Mardanov, A V; Beletskiĭ, A V; Gumerov, V M; Karbysheva, E A; Mikheeva, L E

    2013-08-01

    Complete genome sequencing was performed for Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 from the collection of the Chair of Genetics, Department of Biology, Moscow State University, Russia. In addition to known plasmids A, B, and C, a new circular low-copy plasmid was detected and named D. It was also sequenced completely and found to have 27051 bp. The plasmid contained the parA and parB genes of the partition system, two genes that encode replication proteins, a gene for site-specific recombinase, atype-I restriction-modification system, and several genes with unknown functions. Analysis by PCR revealed the presence of plasmid D in two epiphytic strains from Vietnam, i.e., Anabaena sp. 182 and Anabaena sp. 281, as well as in Anabaena sp. V5 and A. azollae (Newton's isolate). PMID:25474879

  4. [New low-copy plasmid in cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis].

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    Complete genome sequencing was performed for Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 from the collection of the Chair of Genetics, Department of Biology, Moscow State University, Russia. In addition to known plasmids A, B, and C, a new circular low-copy plasmid was detected and named D. It was also sequenced completely and found to have 27051 bp. The plasmid contained the parA and parB genes of the partition system, two genes that encode replication proteins, a gene for site-specific recombinase, atype-I restriction-modification system, and several genes with unknown functions. Analysis by PCR revealed the presence of plasmid D in two epiphytic strains from Vietnam, i.e., Anabaena sp. 182 and Anabaena sp. 281, as well as in Anabaena sp. V5 and A. azollae (Newton's isolate). PMID:25508658

  5. An ecophysiological study of the Azolla filiculoides- Anabaena azollae association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kempen, Monique; Smolders, Fons; Speelman, Eveline; Reichart, Gert Jan; Barke, Judith; Brinkhuis, Henk; Lotter, Andy; Roelofs, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The long term effects of salinity stress on the growth, nutrient content and amino acid composition of the Azolla filiculoides - Anabaena azollae association was studied in a laboratory experiment. It was demonstrated that the symbiosis could tolerate salt stress up to 90 mM NaCl, even after a 100 day period of preconditioning at salt concentrations that were 30 mM NaCl lower. In the 120 mM NaCl treatment the Azolla filiculoides survived, but hardly any new biomass was produced. It was shown that during the experiment, A. filiculoides became increasingly efficient in excluding salt ions from the plant tissue and was thus able to increase its salt tolerance. The amino acid analysis revealed that the naturally occurring high glutamine concentration in the plants was strongly reduced at salt concentrations of 120 mM NaCl and higher. This was the result of the reduced nitrogenase activity at these salt concentrations, as was demonstrated in an acetylene reduction assay. We suggest that the high glutamine concentration in the plants might play a role in the osmoregulatory response against salt stress, enabling growth of the A. filiculoides -Anabaena azollae association up to 90 mM NaCl. In a mesocosm experiment it furthermore was demonstrated that Azolla might manipulate its own microenvironment when grown at elevated salt concentration (up to ~50 mmol•L-1) by promoting salinity stratification, especially when it has formed a dense cover at the water surface. Beside salt stress, we also studied the growth of Azolla filiculoides in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, in combination with different light intensities and different pH of the nutrient solution. The results demonstrated that as compared to the control (ambient pCO2 concentrations), Azolla filiculoides was able to produce twice as much biomass at carbon dioxide concentrations that were five times as high as the ambient pCO2 concentration. However, it was also shown that this

  6. The Study of Algae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  7. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling reveals novel insights into Luffa cylindrica browning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Tan, Taiming; Xu, Changcheng; Huang, Shuping; Tan, Jie; Zhang, Min; Wang, Chunli; Xie, Conghua

    2015-08-01

    Luffa cylindrica (sponge gourd) is one of the most popular vegetables in China. Production and consumption of L. cylindrica are limited due to postharvest browning; however, little is known about the genetic regulation of the browning process. In the present study, transcriptome profiles of L. cylindrica cultivars, YLB05 (browning resistant) and XTR05 (browning sensitive), were analyzed using next-generation sequencing to clarify the genes and mechanisms associated with browning. A total of 9.1 Gb of valid data including 116,703 unigenes (>200 bp) were obtained and 39,473 sequences were annotated by alignment against five public databases. Of these, there were 27,407 genes assigned to 747 Gene Ontology functional categories; and 12,350 genes were annotated with 25 Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG) categories with 343 KOG functional terms. Additionally, by searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, 8689 unigenes were mapped to 189 pathways. Furthermore, there were 24,556 sequences found to be differentially regulated, including 4344 annotated unigenes. Several genes potentially associated with phenolic oxidation, carbohydrate and hormone metabolism were found differentially regulated between the cultivars of different browning sensitivities. Our results suggest that elements involved in enzymatic processes and other pathways might be responsible for L. cylindrica browning. The present study provides a comprehensive transcriptome sequence resource, which will facilitate further studies on gene discovery and exploiting the fruit browning mechanism of L. cylindrica. PMID:26086104

  8. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, and Antimicrobial Activities of Lichen Umbilicaria cylindrica (L.) Delise (Umbilicariaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, Nedeljko T.; Vasiljevic, Perica J.; Maskovic, Pavle Z.; Juskovic, Marina; Bogdanovic-Dusanovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    The phytochemical analysis of methanol and chloroform extracts of Umbilicaria cylindrica was determined by HPLC-UV method. The predominant phenolic compound in both extracts was depsidone, salazinic acid (1). Besides salazinic acid, the tested extracts of U. cylindrica contain norstictic acid (2), methyl-β-orcinol carboxylate (3), ethyl haematommate (4), atranorin (5), and usnic acid (6), in different amounts and relations. The lichen extracts showed comparable and strong antioxidant activity, exhibited higher DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavengings, chelating activity, and inhibitory activity towards lipid peroxidation. The lichen extracts demonstrated important antimicrobial activity against eight strains with MIC values from 15.62 to 62.50 μg/mL. This is the first report of the detail chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the lichen Umbilicaria cylindrica, and the results suggest that this lichen can be used as a new source of the natural antioxidants and the substances with antimicrobial features. PMID:21915186

  9. Genetic structure of Aegilops cylindrica Host in its native range and in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Harish T; Vales, M Isabel; Mallory-Smith, Carol; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar

    2009-10-01

    Chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite markers were used to study genetic diversity and genetic structure of Aegilops cylindrica Host collected in its native range and in adventive sites in the USA. Our analysis suggests that Ae. cylindrica, an allotetraploid, arose from multiple hybridizations between Ae. markgrafii (Greuter) Hammer. and Ae. tauschii Coss. presumably along the Fertile Crescent, where the geographic distributions of its diploid progenitors overlap. However, the center of genetic diversity of this species now encompasses a larger area including northern Iraq, eastern Turkey, and Transcaucasia. Although the majority of accessions of Ae. cylindrica (87%) had D-type plastomes derived from Ae. tauschii, accessions with C-type plastomes (13%), derived from Ae. markgrafii, were also observed. This corroborates a previous study suggesting the dimaternal origin of Ae. cylindrica. Model-based and genetic distance-based clustering using both chloroplast and nuclear markers indicated that Ae. tauschii ssp. tauschii contributed one of its D-type plastomes and its D genome to Ae. cylindrica. Analysis of genetic structure using nuclear markers suggested that Ae. cylindrica accessions could be grouped into three subpopulations (arbitrarily named N-K1, N-K2, and N-K3). Members of the N-K1 subpopulation were the most numerous in its native range and members of the N-K2 subpopulation were the most common in the USA. Our analysis also indicated that Ae. cylindrica accessions in the USA were derived from a few founder genotypes. The frequency of Ae. cylindrica accessions with the C-type plastome in the USA (approximately 24%) was substantially higher than in its native range of distribution (approximately 3%) and all C-type Ae. cylindrica in the USA except one belonged to subpopulation N-K2. The high frequency of the C-type plastome in the USA may reflect a favorable nucleo-cytoplasmic combination. PMID:19618161

  10. Toxicity of volcanic-ash leachate to a blue-green alga. Results of a preliminary bioassay experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Feder, G.L.; Stiles, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the possible effects of volcanic ash from the May 18,1980, eruption of Mt. St. Helens, Washington, on aquatic ecosystems, we conducted a bioassay experiment with a blue-green alga, Anabaena flos-aquae. Results showed that leachate (obtained by leaching 151 g of ash with 130 mL of simulated freshwater) was lethal to Anabaena flos-aquae cultures when diluted as much as 1:100 with culture medium. Cultures exposed to a 1:500 dilution grew, but a toxic effect was indicated by abnormalities in the Anabaena filaments. This study indicates that ash from the Mt. St. Helens volcano could have an effect on aquatic ecosystems in the areas of significant ashfall. Further study is needed to determine the toxic chemical constituents in the ash and also its possible effects on other aquatic organisms.

  11. Redescription of Tintinnopsis cylindrica Daday, 1887 (Ciliophora: Spirotricha) and Unification of Tintinnid Terminology

    PubMed Central

    AGATHA, Sabine; RIEDEL-LORJÉ, Jeannette Cornelie

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although Tintinnopsis cylindrica Daday, 1887 is apparently widely distributed in the plankton of marine and brackish coastal waters, its ciliary pattern remained unknown. Without detailed knowledge of the cell morphology, however, the proposed synonymies cannot be proved. Hence, the cell and lorica features of T. cylindrica are redescribed from live and protargol-impregnated specimens collected in mixo-polyhaline basins at the German North Sea coast. An improved species diagnosis and a comprehensive unified terminology are provided. The somatic ciliary pattern of T. cylindrica is complex, comprising a ventral, dorsal, and posterior kinety as well as a right, left, and lateral ciliary field. Accordingly, the species differs from its congener T. cylindrata that has merely a right and left ciliary field and ventral organelles. On the other hand, the genera Codonella, Codonellopsis, Cymatocylis, Helicostomella, Leprotintinnus, and Stenosemella share this pattern. The oral primordium of T. cylindrica develops hypoapokinetally posterior to the lateral ciliary field as in Codonella cratera and Cymatocylis convallaria. PMID:20368769

  12. [Molecular cytogenetic identification of Aegilops ventricosa x Aegilops cylindrica amphiploid SDAU18].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu Hai; Bao, Yin Guang; Hao, Yuan Feng; Yuan, Yuan Yuan; Zhao, Chun Hua; Wang, Qing Zhuan; Wang, Hong Gang

    2009-02-01

    SDAU18, an amphiploid of Ae.ventricosa with Ae.cylindrica, was identified by cytological analysis, seed storage protein electrophoresis, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and inoculation assessment. The results are as follows: The chromosome number of root tip cells (RTCs) of SDAU18 plants varied from 52 to 56. 28 bivalents were observed in most PMCs MI of SDAU18 with 56 chromosomes, meanwhile, a few univalents, multivalents also existed in some PMCs MI, and the average chromosome configuration was 2n = 56 = 3.21 I +19.78 II, (Ring)+6.50 II (Rod)+0.01 III +0.04 IV (Ring)R+0.01 IV (Rod). There were both Ae. ventricosa-specific bands and Ae. cylindrica-specific bands in the seed storage protein electrophoretogram of SDAU18, furthermore, SDAU18 had one novel HMW-GS not found in the parents and two novel ones not found in common wheats. By labeling the total genomic DNA of Ae. ventricosa and Ae. cylindrica as probes respectively, and using that of another parent as block, GISH of RTCs spread of SDAU18 was carried out. The green hybridization signal was observed in 14 chromosomes respectively, within 56 ones in RTCs of SDAU18. SDAU18 was immune to powdery mildew and stripe rusts. SDAU18 was an amphiploid of Ae. ventricosa with Ae. cylindrica, and had very important significance in wheat breeding and genetic improvement. PMID:19306684

  13. Molecular analysis, cytogenetics and fertility of introgression lines from transgenic wheat to Aegilops cylindrica host.

    PubMed

    Schoenenberger, Nicola; Guadagnuolo, Roberto; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Küpfer, Philippe; Felber, François

    2006-12-01

    Natural hybridization and backcrossing between Aegilops cylindrica and Triticum aestivum can lead to introgression of wheat DNA into the wild species. Hybrids between Ae. cylindrica and wheat lines bearing herbicide resistance (bar), reporter (gus), fungal disease resistance (kp4), and increased insect tolerance (gna) transgenes were produced by pollination of emasculated Ae. cylindrica plants. F1 hybrids were backcrossed to Ae. cylindrica under open-pollination conditions, and first backcrosses were selfed using pollen bags. Female fertility of F1 ranged from 0.03 to 0.6%. Eighteen percent of the sown BC1s germinated and flowered. Chromosome numbers ranged from 30 to 84 and several of the plants bore wheat-specific sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCARs) and the bar gene. Self fertility in two BC1 plants was 0.16 and 5.21%, and the others were completely self-sterile. Among 19 BC1S1 individuals one plant was transgenic, had 43 chromosomes, contained the bar gene, and survived glufosinate treatments. The other BC1S1 plants had between 28 and 31 chromosomes, and several of them carried SCARs specific to wheat A and D genomes. Fertility of these plants was higher under open-pollination conditions than by selfing and did not necessarily correlate with even or euploid chromosome number. Some individuals having supernumerary wheat chromosomes recovered full fertility. PMID:17028347

  14. Ecotype variability and edaphic characteristics for cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) populations in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) is a highly invasive perennial grass in the southeastern United States and is found on all continents except Antartica. It has been reported from a wide array of habitats; however, soils from cogongrass populations have never been characterized. Live cogongrass pla...

  15. Anabaena sp. mediated bio-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in synthetic arsenic (III) solution: Process optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Jana, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Majumdar, Swachchha; Ghosh, Sourja

    2015-11-01

    Blue green algae Anabaena sp. was cultivated in synthetic arsenite solution to investigate its bio-oxidation potential for arsenic species. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed based on a 3-level full factorial design considering four factors, viz. initial arsenic (III) concentration, algal dose, temperature and time. Bio-oxidation (%) of arsenic (III) was considered as response for the design. The study revealed that about 100% conversion of As (III) to As (V) was obtained for initial As (III) concentration of 2.5-7.5 mg/L at 30 °C for 72 h of exposure using 3 g/L of algal dose signifying a unique bio-oxidation potential of Anabaena sp. The dissolved CO2 (DCO2) and oxygen (DO) concentration in solution was monitored during the process and based on the data, a probable mechanism was proposed wherein algal cell acts like a catalytic membrane surface and expedites the bio-oxidation process. Bioaccumulation of arsenic, as well as, surface adsorption on algal cell was found considerably low. Lipid content of algal biomass grown in arsenite solution was found slightly lower than that of algae grown in synthetic media. Toxicity effects on algal cells due to arsenic exposure were evaluated in terms of comet assay and chlorophyll a content which indicated DNA damage to some extent along with very little decrease in chlorophyll a content. In summary, the present study explored the potential application of Anabaena sp. as an ecofriendly and sustainable option for detoxification of arsenic contaminated natural water with value-added product generation. PMID:26247411

  16. [Identification of cyanobacteria from genus Anabaena isolated from the rhizosphere of cotton-plant].

    PubMed

    Kadyrova, G Kh; Korobkova, E S

    2013-01-01

    Identification of nucleotide sequence of the gene 16S rRNA of cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis str.21 (Uzb1) exhibits that the strain from root sphere of cotton plants is 99% homologous to a known strain of Anabaena variabilis (EF488831.1). This data confirms the phylogenetic relationship of the strain of cyanobacteria A. variabilis Uzb1 to other described representatives of genus Anabaena as addition to morphological characteristics (presence of akinets (spores) and heterocysts). PMID:23516840

  17. Effects of supplements on the bioaccumulation of lead in Anabaena spp

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, J.; Ibeanusi, V.

    1987-08-01

    Heavy metals are known to be insidious toxic pollutants in the natural environment and their presence in aquatic systems is a current major concern. Since the primary producers, green algae and cyanobacteria, are able to accumulate large quantities of metals, these contaminants can be efficiently passed along in the food chain. However, the ability to accumulate metals from solution also indicates their potential use as sequestering agents in metal recovery systems. Previous studies on the mechanisms of metals uptake have demonstrated that the process generally takes place in two distinct stages. The first stage has been described as a passive adsorption of ions and it is likely that a number of different functional groups are involved in this process. The second stage of uptake is slower and involves active transport mechanisms requiring cellular energy. A descriptive model of long-term metal uptake, including experiments in media enrichments, has been lacking in previous research. Understanding the process of metal uptake and its relation to cell growth over longer periods of time is important to both the development of recovery systems and the production of metal transport through the ecosystem. The objectives of this research are to investigate (1) the effects of carbon dioxide and waste water enrichments on the simultaneous culture and lead uptake in Anabaena during a 30-day culture period and (2) the effects of energy supply on the lead uptake.

  18. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol biosynthesis by direct acyl transfer in Anabaena variabilis. [Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Wickrema, A.; Jaworski, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors previously reported the direct acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) by an enzyme in the membranes of the cyanobacterium (Anabaena variabilis. The enzyme requires acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) as substrate, but had no other additional cofactor requirements. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACP were all effective substrates. The A. variabilis membranes also had a hydrolase activity which metabolized the acyl-ACP to yield free fatty acid and ACP. Possible mechanisms for the acylation reaction include either acyl exchange with existing MGDG or direct acyl transfer to a lyso-MGDG, with concomitant release of free ACP. The mechanism of this reaction has been resolved using a double labelled (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/C)ACP substrate prepared with E. coli acyl-ACP synthetase. Following incubation with the enzyme, the unreacted (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/C)ACP was isolated and the (/sup 14/C)acyl/(/sup 14/C)ACP ratio determined. Comparison of this ratio to that of the original substrate indicated no change and eliminated acyl exchange as a possible mechanism. Therefore, the direct acylation of lyso-MGDG is the proposed mechanism for this enzyme. The reaction is apparently specific for MGDG synthesis, as other glycolipids and phospholipids were not labelled during incubations.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S.; Zhong, Jinshun; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Copeland, A; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Ana-baena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40 C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S; Zhong, Jinshun; Goodwin, Lynne; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-06-15

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Anabaena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40(°) C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence. PMID:25197444

  1. Superoxide Dismutase in the Symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb.

    PubMed

    Canini, A; Galiazzo, F; Rotilio, G; Caiola, M G

    1991-09-01

    Superoxide dismutase was investigated in the symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. living in Azolla filiculoides Lam. In vegetative cells, three isoenzymatic forms of superoxide dismutase, containing manganese, iron, and the hybrid iron-manganese, respectively, were present. Hybrid superoxide dismutase, detected for the first time in cyanobacteria, was 7% of the total superoxide dismutase present in vegetative cells. All three superoxide dismutase forms increased in the Anabaena vegetative cells obtained from irradiated plants grown in winter. In heterocysts, only an iron superoxide dismutase was present, which amounted to 25% of total vegetative cell superoxide dismutase activity. Hybrid superoxide dismutase appeared in heterocysts after irradiation. In vegetative cells of Anabaena from plants grown in summer, the basal level of total superoxide dismutase increased by 60% as compared with winter, and was unaffected by irradiation. The levels of superoxide dismutase in heterocysts from control and exposed plants grown in summer were comparable to those observed in heterocysts obtained from the plants grown during winter. No direct correlation was found between nitrogenase activity and superoxide dismutase in heterocysts. The presence of cyanophycin granules, either within the heterocyst pore channel or close to the transversal septum of vegetative cells, suggested a mechanism to stop communications between vegetative cells and heterocysts. PMID:16668392

  2. Superoxide Dismutase in the Symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. 1

    PubMed Central

    Canini, A.; Galiazzo, F.; Rotilio, G.; Caiola, M. Grilli

    1991-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase was investigated in the symbiont Anabaena azollae Strasb. living in Azolla filiculoides Lam. In vegetative cells, three isoenzymatic forms of superoxide dismutase, containing manganese, iron, and the hybrid iron-manganese, respectively, were present. Hybrid superoxide dismutase, detected for the first time in cyanobacteria, was 7% of the total superoxide dismutase present in vegetative cells. All three superoxide dismutase forms increased in the Anabaena vegetative cells obtained from irradiated plants grown in winter. In heterocysts, only an iron superoxide dismutase was present, which amounted to 25% of total vegetative cell superoxide dismutase activity. Hybrid superoxide dismutase appeared in heterocysts after irradiation. In vegetative cells of Anabaena from plants grown in summer, the basal level of total superoxide dismutase increased by 60% as compared with winter, and was unaffected by irradiation. The levels of superoxide dismutase in heterocysts from control and exposed plants grown in summer were comparable to those observed in heterocysts obtained from the plants grown during winter. No direct correlation was found between nitrogenase activity and superoxide dismutase in heterocysts. The presence of cyanophycin granules, either within the heterocyst pore channel or close to the transversal septum of vegetative cells, suggested a mechanism to stop communications between vegetative cells and heterocysts. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668392

  3. Anti-Cancer Effects of Imperata cylindrica Leaf Extract on Human Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cell Line SCC-9 in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Keshava, Rohini; Muniyappa, Nagesh; Gope, Rajalakshmi; Ramaswamaiah, Ananthanarayana Saligrama

    2016-01-01

    Imperata cylindrica, a tall tufted grass which has multiple pharmacological applications is one of the key ingredients in various traditional medicinal formula used in India. Previous reports have shown that I. cylindrica plant extract inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. To our knowledge, no studies have been published on the effect of I. cylindrica leaf extract on human oral cancers. The present study was undertaken in order to evaluate the anticancer properties of the leaf extract of I. cylindrica using an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line SCC-9 as an in vitro model system. A methanol extract from dried leaves of I. cylindrica (ICL) was prepared by standard procedures. Effects of the ICL extract on the morphology of SCC-9 cells was visualized by microscopy. Cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. Effects of the ICL extract on colony forming ability of SCC-9 cells was evaluated using clonogenic assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry and induction of apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation assay. The ICL extract treatment caused cytotoxicity and induced cell death in vitro in SCC-9 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This treatment also significantly reduced the clonogenic potential and inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, DNA fragmentation assays showed that the observed cell death was caused by apoptosis. This is the first report showing the anticancer activity of the methanol extracts from the leaves of I. cylindrica in human oral cancer cell line. Our data indicates that ICL extract could be considered as one of the lead compounds for the formulation of anticancer therapeutic agents to treat/manage human oral cancers. The natural abundance of I. cylindrica and its wide geographic distribution could render it one of the primary resource materials for preparation of anticancer therapeutic agents. PMID:27221872

  4. Regulation of Development and Nitrogen Fixation in Anabaena

    SciTech Connect

    James W Golden

    2004-08-05

    The nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is being used as a simple model of microbial development and pattern formation in a multicellular prokaryotic organism. Anabaena reduces atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia in highly specialized, terminally differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena is an important model system because of the multicellular growth pattern, the suspected antiquity of heterocyst development, and the contribution of fixed nitrogen to the environment. We are especially interested in understanding the molecular signaling pathways and genetic regulation that control heterocyst development. In the presence of an external source of reduced nitrogen, the differentiation of heterocysts is inhibited. When Anabaena is grown on dinitrogen, a one-dimensional developmental pattern of single heterocysts separated by approximately ten vegetative cells is established to form a multicellular organism composed of two interdependent cell types. The goal of this project is to understand the signaling and regulatory pathways that commit a vegetative cell to terminally differentiate into a nitrogen-fixing heterocyst. Several genes identified by us and by others were chosen as entry points into the regulatory network. Our research, which was initially focused on transcriptional regulation by group 2 sigma factors, was expanded to include group 3 sigma factors and their regulators after the complete Anabaena genome sequence became available. Surprisingly, no individual sigma factor is essential for heterocyst development. We have used the isolation of extragenic suppressors to study genetic interactions between key regulatory genes such as patS, hetR, and hetC in signaling and developmental pathways. We identified a hetR R223W mutation as a bypass suppressor of patS overexpression. Strains containing the hetR R223W allele fail to respond to pattern formation signals and overexpression of this allele results in a lethal phenotype

  5. Effects of nitrogen dioxide on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Wodzinski, R.S.; Alexander, M.

    1980-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity of Anabaena flos-aquae in a soil suspension at an initial pH of 4.9 was almost totally eliminated after 3 days of exposure to 5.0 ppm (..mu..l/liter) NO/sub 2/, at which time the pH had fallen to 3.9. In contrast, A. flos-aquae in soil suspensions at an initial pH of 6.0 was not inhibited after 3 days by 5.0 ppm NO/sub 2/, but the activity was reduced by half in the presence of 15.0 ppm NO/sub 2/; the pH was 6.5 and 5.8, respectively, in the NO/sub 2/-treated samples on day 3. Photosynthesis by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ankistrodesmus falcatus in soil suspensions at an initial pH of approx 4.2 was not appreciably affected by 15.0 ppm of NO/sub 2/ after 3 days, at which time the pH had fallen below 4.0. The high levels of NO/sub 2/ and low pH values required for toxicity suggest that blue-green and green algae probably will not be affected directly by NO/sub 2/ in polluted air.

  6. Effects of nitrogen dioxide on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Wodzinski, R.S.; Alexander, M.

    1980-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity of Anabaena flos-aquae in a soil suspension at an initial pH of 4.9 was almost totally eliminated after 3 days of exposure to 5.0 ppM (..mu..l/liter) NO/sub 2/, at which time the pH had fallen to 3.9. In contrast, A. flos-aquae in soil suspensions at an initial pH of 6.0 was not inhibited after 3 days by 5.0 ppM NO/sub 2/, but the activity was reduced by half in the presence of 15.0 ppM NO/sub 2/; the pH was 6.5 and 5.8, respectively, in the NO/sub 2/-treated samples on day 3. Photosynthesis by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ankistrodesmus falcatus in soil suspensions at an initial pH of approx. 4.2 was not appreciably affected by 15.0 ppM of NO/sub 2/ after 3 days, at which time the pH had fallen below 4.0. The high levels of NO/sub 2/ and low pH values required for toxicity suggest that blue-green and green algae probably will not be affected directly by NO/sub 2/ in polluted air.

  7. Biodegradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by the novel identified cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hangjun; Jiang, Xiaojun; Lu, Liping; Xiao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a class of hazardous pollutants, are difficult to dissipate in the natural environment. In this study, a cyanobacterial strain Anabaena PD-1 showed good resistance against PCB congeners. Compared to a control group, chlorophyll a content decreased 3.7% and 11.7% when Anabaena PD-1 was exposed to 2 and 5 mg/L PCBs for 7 d. This cyanobacterial strain was capable of decomposing PCB congeners which was conclusively proved by determination of chloride ion concentrations in chlorine-free medium. After 7 d, the chloride ion concentrations in PCB-treated groups (1, 2, 5 mg/L) were 3.55, 3.05, and 2.25 mg/L, respectively. The genetic information of strain PD-1 was obtained through 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The GenBank accession number of 16S rRNA of Anabaena PD-1 was KF201693.1. Phylogenetic tree analysis clearly indicated that Anabaena PD-1 belonged to the genus Anabaena. The degradation half-life of Aroclor 1254 by Anabaena PD-1 was 11.36 d; the total degradation rate for Aroclor 1254 was 84.4% after 25 d. Less chlorinated PCB congeners were more likely to be degraded by Anabaena PD-1 in comparison with highly chlorinated congeners. Meta- and para-chlorines in trichlorodiphenyls and tetrachlorobiphenyls were more susceptible to dechlorination than ortho-chlorines during the PCB-degradation process by Anabaena PD-1. Furthermore, Anabaena PD-1 can decompose dioxin-like PCBs. The percent biodegradation of 12 dioxin-like PCBs by strain PD-1 ranged from 37.4% to 68.4% after 25 days. Results above demonstrate that Anabaena PD-1 is a PCB-degrader with great potential for the in situ bioremediation of PCB-contaminated paddy soils. PMID:26177203

  8. Regulation of Development and Nitrogen Fixation in Anabaena

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Golden

    2008-10-17

    The regulation of development and cellular differentiation is important for all multicellular organisms. The nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (also Nostoc) sp. PCC 7120 (hereafter Anabaena) provides a model of multicellular microbial development and pattern formation. Anabaena reduces N2 to ammonia in specialized terminally differentiated cells called heterocysts. A one-dimensional developmental pattern of single heterocysts regularly spaced along filaments of photosynthetic vegetative cells is established to form a multicellular organism composed of these two interdependent cell types. This multicellular growth pattern, the distinct phylogeny of cyanobacteria, and the suspected antiquity of heterocyst development make this an important model system. Our long-term goal is to understand the regulatory network required for heterocyst development and nitrogen fixation. This project is focused on two key aspects of heterocyst regulation: one, the mechanism by which HetR controls the initiation of differentiation, and two, the cis and trans acting factors required for expression of the nitrogen-fixation (nif) genes. HetR is thought to be a central regulator of heterocyst development but the partners and mechanisms involved in this regulation are unknown. Our recent results indicate that PatS and other signals that regulate heterocyst pattern cannot interact, directly or indirectly, with a R223W mutant of HetR. We plan to use biochemical and genetic approaches to identify proteins that interact with the HetR protein, which will help reveal the mechanisms underlying its regulation of development. Our second goal is to determine how the nif genes are expressed. It is important to understand the mechanisms controlling nif genes since they represent the culmination of the differentiation process and the essence of heterocyst function. The Anabaena genome lacks the genes required for expression of nif genes present in other organisms such as rpoN (sigma 54

  9. Structure, absolute configuration, and antidiarrheal activity of a thymol derivative from Ageratina cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Brito, Celia; Sánchez-Castellanos, Mariano; Esquivel, Baldomero; Calderón, José S; Calzada, Fernando; Yepez-Mulia, Lilian; Hernández-Barragán, Angelina; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro; Cuevas, Gabriel; Quijano, Leovigildo

    2014-02-28

    The leaves of Ageratina cylindrica afforded a thymol derivative that was characterized by physical and spectroscopical methods as (8S)-8,9-epoxy-6-hydroxy-l0-benzoyloxy-7-oxothymol isobutyrate (1). The absolute configuration of 1 was established as 8S by vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory calculations and by evaluation of the Flack and Hooft X-ray parameters. Compound 1 showed weak antiprotozoal activity against Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia trophozoites and a high inhibitory effect on hyperpropulsive movement of the small intestine in rats. PMID:24502360

  10. Isolation and properties of fungi that lyse blue-green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Redhead, K; Wright, S J

    1978-01-01

    Of 70 pure microbial cultures isolated from aquatic habitats, soil, and air according to the ability to lyse live blue-green algae, 62 were fungi representing the genera Acremonium, Emericellopsis, and Verticillium. Algal-lysing fungi were isolated from all habitat types sampled. The remaining isolates comprised four bacteria and four streptomycetes. All isolates lysed Anabaena flos-aquae and, in most cases, several other filamentous and unicellular blue-green algae. The fungi generally showed greater activity than most other isolates towards a wider range of susceptible algae, including green algae in some cases. Acremonium and Emericellopsis isolates, but not Verticillium, also inhibited the growth of blue-green algae and gram-positive bacteria, but did not lyse the latter. Lysis of blue green algae by Acremonium and Emericellopsis spp. was associated with the formation of diffusible heat-stable extracellular factors which, evidence suggests, could be cephalosporin antibiotic(s). Blue-green algae were also lysed by pure cephalosporin C. The frequent isolation of lytic fungi from algal habitats suggests a possible natural algal-destroying role for such fungi, which might be exploitable for algal bloom control. Images PMID:418740

  11. Bioremoval of heavy metals and nutrients from sewage plant by Anabaena oryzae and Cyanosarcina fontana.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Mustafa A; Issa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the growth of two species of cyanobacteria on wastewater isolated from sewage plant in Aswan, Egypt. We evaluated their efficiency for eliminating nitrogen, phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and heavy metals (Fe(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Mn(2+)). The growth of Cyanosarcina fontana has supported wastewater as a growth medium than Anabaena oryzae compared to standard medium. The nutrients concentration such as COD, NO3-N and PO4-P were decreased by the growth of A. oryzae and C. fontana in the wastewater after primary settling and centrate. However, the reduction of COD was less efficient than the other nutrients. The reduction percentage of COD, NO3-N and PO4-P reached 39.3, 84.1 and 90.7% as well as 54.6, 83.1, and 89.8%, in cultures of A. oryzae and C. fontana grown in the wastewater after primary settling, respectively. The reduction amounted to 10.1, 76.8, and 63.0% by A. oryzae and 43.2, 62.1, and 74.8% by C. fontana, grown in the centrate, respectively. Cyanobacteria species have the ability to accumulate the heavy metals from the wastewater to level far than the exceeding metal level in the water. Whereas, the heavy metals biosorption performance of C. fontana was higher in accumulating Fe(2+) (93.95%), Pb(2+) (81.21%), Cu(2+) (63.9%), and Mn(2+) (48.49%) compared to A. oryzae. The biosorption ability is dependent on the nature of the adsorbent studied and the type of wastewater treated. Therefore, removal of heavy metals and nutrients by the tested algae is strongly recommended as a powerful technique for the removal of pollutants from wastewater. PMID:26457837

  12. Structure of an Inward Proton-Transporting Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin Mutant: Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bamboo; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Luecke, Hartmut

    2016-09-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are light-activated, seven-α-helical, retinylidene transmembrane proteins that have been identified in thousands of organisms across archaea, bacteria, fungi, and algae. Although they share a high degree of sequence identity and thus similarity in structure, many unique functions have been discovered and characterized among them. Some function as outward proton pumps, some as inward chloride pumps, whereas others function as light sensors or ion channels. Unique among the microbial rhodopsins characterized thus far, Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a photochromic sensor that interacts with a soluble 14-kDa cytoplasmic transducer that is encoded on the same operon. The sensor itself stably interconverts between all-trans-15-anti and 13-cis-15-syn retinal forms depending on the wavelength of illumination, although only the former participates in a photocycle with a signaling M intermediate. A mutation in the cytoplasmic half-channel of the protein, replacing Asp217 with Glu (D217E), results in the creation of a light-driven, single-photon, inward proton transporter. We present the 2.3 Å structure of dark-adapted D217E ASR, which reveals significant changes in the water network surrounding Glu217, as well as a shift in the carbon backbone near retinal-binding Lys210, illustrating a possible pathway leading to the protonation of Glu217 in the cytoplasmic half-channel, located 15 Å from the Schiff base. Crystallographic evidence for the protonation of nearby Glu36 is also discussed, which was described previously by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Finally, two histidine residues near the extracellular surface and their possible role in proton uptake are discussed. PMID:27602724

  13. Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is a light-driven unidirectional rotor

    PubMed Central

    Strambi, Angela; Durbeej, Bo; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of multiconfigurational quantum chemistry methods into a quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics protocol has allowed the construction of a realistic computer model for the sensory rhodopsin of the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120. The model, which reproduces the absorption spectra of both the all-trans and 13-cis forms of the protein and their associated K and L intermediates, is employed to investigate the light-driven steps of the photochromic cycle exhibited by the protein. It is found that the photoisomerizations of the all-trans and 13-cis retinal chromophores occur through unidirectional, counterclockwise 180° rotations of the ═C14─C15═ moiety with respect to the Lys210-linked end of the chromophore axis. Thus, the sequential interconversions of the all-trans and 13-cis forms during a single photochromic cycle yield a complete (360°) unidirectional rotation of the ═C14─C15═ moiety. This finding implies that Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is a biological realization of a light-driven molecular rotor. PMID:21098308

  14. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk with your health provider.Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Blue-green algae might slow blood clotting. Taking blue-green algae along with medications that ...

  15. Magnetic separation of algae

    DOEpatents

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  16. [Aprocta cylindrica Linstow, 1883, an oviparous filaria parasite of ploceid birds from Tchad. Larval morphogenesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Quentin, J C; Troncy, P M; Barre, N

    1976-01-01

    Aprocta cylindrica Linstow, 1883, was identified in Africa (Tchad) from Passeriform birds Ploceidae belonging to the species Quelea quelea quelea (L), Ploceus capitalis (Latham), P. cucullatus (Müller) and Euplectes orix (Insert). Its experimental life cycle achieved in Orthoptera Locusta migratoria allows the study of the three first larval stages. PMID:937983

  17. Potential biological control agents for management of cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica 15 (Cyperales: Poaceae)] in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.) Palisot de Beauvois (Cyperales: Poaceae), is a noxious invasive weed in the southeastern USA. Surveys for potential biological control agents of cogongrass were conducted in Asia and East Africa from 2013 to 2016. Several insect herbivores were found that may hav...

  18. Internal iron biomineralization in Imperata cylindrica, a perennial grass: chemical composition, speciation and plant localization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, N; Menéndez, N; Tornero, J; Amils, R; de la Fuente, V

    2005-03-01

    * The analysis of metal distribution in Imperata cylindrica, a perennial grass isolated from the banks of Tinto River (Iberian Pyritic Belt), an extreme acidic environment with high content in metals, has shown a remarkable accumulation of iron. This property has been used to study iron speciation and its distribution among different tissues and structures of the plant. * Mossbauer (MS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to determine the iron species, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to locate iron biominerals among plant tissue structures, and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX), X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-MS) to confirm their elemental composition. * The MS spectral analysis indicated that iron accumulated in this plant mainly as jarosite and ferritin. The presence of jarosite was confirmed by XRD and the distribution of both minerals in structures of different tissues was ascertained by SEM-EDAX analysis. * The convergent results obtained by complementary techniques suggest a complex iron management system in I. cylindrica, probably as a consequence of the environmental conditions of its habitat. PMID:15720689

  19. Formation of biomineral iron oxides compounds in a Fe hyperaccumulator plant: Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv.

    PubMed

    Fuente, V; Rufo, L; Juárez, B H; Menéndez, N; García-Hernández, M; Salas-Colera, E; Espinosa, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed work of composition and location of naturally formed iron biominerals in plant cells tissues grown in iron rich environments as Imperata cylindrica. This perennial grass grows on the Tinto River banks (Iberian Pyritic Belt) in an extreme acidic ecosystem (pH∼2.3) with high concentration of dissolved iron, sulphate and heavy metals. Iron biominerals were found at the cellular level in tissues of root, stem and leaf both in collected and laboratory-cultivated plants. Iron accumulated in this plant as a mix of iron compounds (mainly as jarosite, ferrihydrite, hematite and spinel phases) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), magnetometry (SQUID), electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX; TEM-EDX; HRSTEM). A low fraction of phosphorous was detected in this iron hyperaccumulator plant. Root and rhizomes tissues present a high proportion of ferromagnetic iron oxide compounds. Iron oxides-rich zones are localized in electron dense intra and inter-cellular aggregates that appear as dark deposits covering the inner membrane and organelles of the cell. This study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of accumulation, transport, distribution of iron in Imperata cylindrica. PMID:26592710

  20. Phosphate transport and arsenate resistance in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, T.

    1988-03-01

    Cells of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis starved for phosphate for 3 days took up phosphate at about 100 times the rate of unstarved cells.Kinetic data suggested that a new transport system had been induced by starvation for phosphate. The inducible phosphate transport system was quickly repressed by addition of P/sub i/. Phosphate-starved cells were more sensitive to the toxic effects of arsenate than were unstarved cells, but phosphate could alleviate some of the toxicity. Arsenate was a noncompetitive inhibitor of phosphate transport; however, the apparent K/sub i/ values were high, particularly for phosphate-replete cells. Preincubation of phosphate-starved cells with arsenate caused subsequent inhibition of phosphate transport, suggesting that intracellular arsenate inhibited phosphate transport. This effect was not seen in phosphate-replete cells.

  1. Identification and characterization of five intramembrane metalloproteases in Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kangming; Gu, Liping; Xiang, Xianling; Lynch, Michael; Zhou, Ruanbao

    2012-11-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) involves cleavage of a transmembrane segment of a protein, releasing the active form of a membrane-anchored transcription factor (MTF) or a membrane-tethered signaling protein in response to an extracellular or intracellular signal. RIP is conserved from bacteria to humans and governs many important signaling pathways in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Proteases that carry out these cleavages are named intramembrane cleaving proteases (I-CLips). To date, little is known about I-CLips in cyanobacteria. In this study, five putative site-2 type I-Clips (Ava_1070, Ava_1730, Ava_1797, Ava_3438, and Ava_4785) were identified through a genome-wide survey in Anabaena variabilis. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that these five putative A. variabilis site-2 proteases (S2Ps(Av)) have authentic protease activities toward an artificial substrate pro-σ(K), a Bacillus subtilis MTF, in our reconstituted Escherichia coli system. The enzymatic activities of processing pro-σ(K) differ among these five S2Ps(Av). Substitution of glutamic acid (E) by glutamine (Q) in the conserved HEXXH zinc-coordinated motif caused the loss of protease activities in these five S2Ps(Av), suggesting that they belonged to the metalloprotease family. Further mapping of the cleaved peptides of pro-σ(K) by Ava_4785 and Ava_1797 revealed that Ava_4785 and Ava_1797 recognized the same cleavage site in pro-σ(K) as SpoIVFB, a cognate S2P of pro-σ(K) from B. subtilis. Taking these results together, we report here for the first time the identification of five metallo-intramembrane cleaving proteases in Anabaena variabilis. The experimental system described herein should be applicable to studies of other RIP events and amenable to developing in vitro assays for I-CLips. PMID:22961855

  2. Ecological health monitoring of the Mekong River by using benthic algae in 2003-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunpradid, T.

    2005-05-01

    The monitoring of ecological health of the Mekong River by using benthic algae was carried out from 2003 - 2004. Thirty sampling sites along the Mekong River and its tributaries were selected in Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Veitnam. In this investigation, the distribution of some species of benthic algae in different environments revealed that there was a significant relationship in the presence of them to the water quality, and these species could be used as a potential biomonitor of water quality in the Mekong River. One hundred and eighty six species of benthic diatoms and 46 species of macroalgae were found. Some dominant species of benthic algae could be used as biomonitors to assess water quality. Hydrodictyon recticulatum and Microspora floccosa and indicated clean-moderate water quality; Audouinella cylindrica, Cladophora glomerata, Achnanthes inflate and Cymbella turgidula indicated moderate water quality; Stigeoclonium flagelliforum, Aulacoseira granulata and Cymbella tumida indicated moderate-polluted water quality and Caloglossa leprieurii, Gomphonema parvulum and Nitzschia clausii indicated polluted water quality. The ecological health assessment of the Mekong River by using the species of benthic algae as biomonitors reveled that in the upstream and tributaries revealed moderate water quality. In contrast, some sites in the lower Mekong showed moderate-polluted to polluted water quality.

  3. Introgression of wheat DNA markers from A, B and D genomes in early generation progeny of Aegilops cylindrica Host x Triticum aestivum L. hybrids.

    PubMed

    Schoenenberger, N; Felber, F; Savova-Bianchi, D; Guadagnuolo, R

    2005-11-01

    Introgression from allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD) to allotetraploid jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host, CCDD) can take place in areas where the two species grow in sympatry and hybridize. Wheat and Ae. cylindrica share the D genome, issued from the common diploid ancestor Aegilops tauschii Coss. It has been proposed that the A and B genome of bread wheat are secure places to insert transgenes to avoid their introgression into Ae. cylindrica because during meiosis in pentaploid hybrids, A and B genome chromosomes form univalents and tend to be eliminated whereas recombination takes place only in D genome chromosomes. Wheat random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fragments, detected in intergeneric hybrids and introgressed to the first backcross generation with Ae. cylindrica as the recurrent parent and having a euploid Ae. cylindrica chromosome number or one supernumerary chromosome, were assigned to wheat chromosomes using Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic wheat lines. Introgressed fragments were not limited to the D genome of wheat, but specific fragments of A and B genomes were also present in the BC1. Their presence indicates that DNA from any of the wheat genomes can introgress into Ae. cylindrica. Successfully located RAPD fragments were then converted into highly specific and easy-to-use sequence characterised amplified regions (SCARs) through sequencing and primer design. Subsequently these markers were used to characterise introgression of wheat DNA into a BC1S1 family. Implications for risk assessment of genetically modified wheat are discussed. PMID:16133306

  4. Production of ribosome-inactivating protein from hairy root cultures of Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem.

    PubMed

    di Toppi, L S; Gorini, P; Properzi, G; Barbieri, L; Spanò, L

    1996-09-01

    Transformed root lines of Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem. (Cucurbitaceae) were established by inoculation of in vitro grown plantlets with wild type Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain 1855. Cloned lines of hairy roots were tested for the presence of ribosome-inactivating proteins; crude extracts inhibited protein synthesis in a reaction mixture based on rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Inhibitory activity increased during culture period, reaching a maximum value in the stationary phase. No activity could be detected in the culture medium, nor in extracts from callus and/or suspension cultures. A ribosome-inactivating protein having specific activity of 62,100 U mg protein(-1) and a molecular mass of 26-28,000 Da was purified to homogeneity. The protein showed N-glycosidase activity on rat liver ribosomes. The results demonstrate that hairy root cultures can be successfully utilized for the in vitro production of ribosome-inactivating proteins. PMID:24178273

  5. Luffa cylindrica and phytosterols bioconversion: from shake flask to jar bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Bou Saab, Hamid; Fouchard, Samuel; Boulanger, Anna; Llopiz, Pierre; Neunlist, Serge

    2013-11-01

    Bioconversion of lipophilic compounds poorly soluble in water, such as sterols, required the use of chemicals and solubilizing agents. On the other hand, it was shown that immobilization of Mycobacterium species on the dried fruit of Luffa cylindrica (DFLC) allows a close interaction between immobilized cells and cholesterol particles and increases by then the product's yield. In this work, the use of DFLC in a 5-l jar bioreactor with phytosterols mixture (1 g/l) as substrate was assessed without addition of any chemicals or solubilizing agents. DFLC increased by a factor of four the volumetric productivity of androstenones (0.08 g/l day). Products were accumulated in the aqueous medium while substrates remained on the fibers of DFLC. This observation lets envisage a green semi-continuous process of androstenone production. DFLC has no influence on cell growth, and is moreover natural, inexpensive, non-toxic, and mechanically strong. PMID:23955536

  6. Thermal and mechanical properties of bio-nanocomposites reinforced by Luffa cylindrica cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Gilberto; Bras, Julien; Follain, Nadège; Belbekhouche, Sabrina; Marais, Stéphane; Dufresne, Alain

    2013-01-16

    Cellulose nanocrystals have been prepared by acid hydrolysis of Luffa cylindrica fibers. The acid-resistant residue consisted of rod-like nanoparticles with an average length an diameter around 242 and 5.2nm, respectively (aspect ratio around 46). These cellulose nanocrystals have been used as a reinforcing phase for the processing of bio-nanocomposites using polycaprolactone (PCL) as matrix. To promote interfacial filler/matrix interactions the surface of cellulose nanocrystals was chemically modified with n-octadecyl isocyanate (C(18)H(37)NCO). Evidence of the grafting was supported by infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to confirm the integrity of cellulose nanocrystals after chemical modification. Both unmodified and chemically modified nanocrystals were used to prepare nanocomposites. The thermal properties of these materials were determined from differential scanning calorimetry and their mechanical behavior was evaluated in both the linear and non-linear range. PMID:23121968

  7. Mootrala Karma of Kusha [Imperata cylindrica Beauv.] and Darbha [Desmostachya bipinnata Stapf.] - A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Niti T; Pandya, Tarulata N; Sharma, Parameshwar P; Patel, Bhupesh R; Acharya, Rabinarayan

    2012-07-01

    Kusha (Imperata cylindrica Beauv.) and Darbha (Desmostachya bipinnata Stapf.) are enlisted among Trinapanchamoola, which is a well-known diuretic and are individually enumerated in the Mootravirechaneeya Dashemani. The article deals with the evaluation and comparison of the individual Mootrala (diuretic) action of the two drugs in healthy volunteers. In this study, 29 healthy volunteers were divided into three groups administered with Darbha Moola Churna, Kusha Moola Churna, and placebo in each group for 14 days. The volunteers were subjected to evaluation of diuretic activity by maintaining the daily total input-output charts during the course of the study. The volunteers were advised to consume a minimum 2 l of water daily. Results show that Darbha and Kusha leaded to a percentage increase in urine volume as compared to placebo group, but the result was statistically insignificant. PMID:23723646

  8. Silicon in Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv: content, distribution, and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rufo, Lourdes; Franco, Alejandro; de la Fuente, Vicenta

    2014-07-01

    Silicon concentration, distribution, and ultrastructure of silicon deposits in the Poaceae Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv. have been studied. This grass, known for its medicinal uses and also for Fe hyperaccumulation and biomineralization capacities, showed a concentration of silicon of 13,705 ± 9,607 mg/kg dry weight. Silicon was found as an important constituent of cell walls of the epidermis of the whole plant. Silica deposits were found in silica bodies, endodermis, and different cells with silicon-collapsed lumen as bulliforms, cortical, and sclerenchyma cells. Transmission electron microscope observations of these deposits revealed an amorphous material of an ultrastructure similar to that previously reported in silica bodies of other Poaceae. PMID:24337803

  9. Mootrala Karma of Kusha [Imperata cylindrica Beauv.] and Darbha [Desmostachya bipinnata Stapf.] - A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Niti T.; Pandya, Tarulata N.; Sharma, Parameshwar P.; Patel, Bhupesh R.; Acharya, Rabinarayan

    2012-01-01

    Kusha (Imperata cylindrica Beauv.) and Darbha (Desmostachya bipinnata Stapf.) are enlisted among Trinapanchamoola, which is a well-known diuretic and are individually enumerated in the Mootravirechaneeya Dashemani. The article deals with the evaluation and comparison of the individual Mootrala (diuretic) action of the two drugs in healthy volunteers. In this study, 29 healthy volunteers were divided into three groups administered with Darbha Moola Churna, Kusha Moola Churna, and placebo in each group for 14 days. The volunteers were subjected to evaluation of diuretic activity by maintaining the daily total input–output charts during the course of the study. The volunteers were advised to consume a minimum 2 l of water daily. Results show that Darbha and Kusha leaded to a percentage increase in urine volume as compared to placebo group, but the result was statistically insignificant. PMID:23723646

  10. [Planktonic Algae's Distribution and Correlation with Dissolved Organic Matters' Fluorescence in the End of the Three Gorges Reservoir's Back Water Zone].

    PubMed

    Fan, Lei-lei; Li, Si; Yu, Dan-ni; He, Qiang; Ji, Fang-ying; Jiang, Zhong-yuan; Gao, Zhi-xi; Ao, Ke-hou

    2015-08-01

    For researching the community structure, composition, and distribution of the planktonic algae in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TRG), especially, within TRG water levels' fluctuating, mpacting to water quality with the algae's growing, 6 sampling cites in the end of the TGR's back water zone, from Chaotianmen to Taihonggang Town, are chosen to monitor, at the sensitive stages time of algal bloom between March to May 2012, namely, water levels lowing from the highest impounding. The community's structure, composition, and distribution of the planktonic algae in the TGR, and the correlation of water quality parameters and DOM's fluorescence features with algae density, are obtained. According to the experimental results, blue algae fibre, chlorella, melosira, navicula are the dominated algae in the end of the TGR's back water zone, from Chaotianmen to Taihonggang Town, algae density are 0.40~0.56 × 10(6), 1.9~0.8 × 10(6), 0.36~0.25 × 10(6), 0.42~0.15 × 10(6) cells · L(-1) respectively. Besides, anabaena, phormidium, cladophora, feather, ovate algae are existing in only limited 2 sections. The fitting results reveal obvious linear correlation of the EEM characteristics of DOM with the 4 kinds of dominated algal density, which could be useful conference for the algae bloom monitor, conveniently and effectively. PMID:26672293

  11. The effects of barley straw (Hordeum vulgare) on the growth of freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, M D; Butler, B R; Terlizzi, D E; Lacouture, R V

    2005-11-01

    Bioassays were conducted to determine the efficacy of barley straw liquor in controlling algal growth of 12 freshwater species of algae representing three divisions. Barley straw liquor inhibited the growth of three nuisance algae common in freshwater: Synura petersenii, Dinobyron sp., and Microcystis aeruginosa. However, Selenastrum capricornutum, Spirogyra sp., Oscillatoria lutea var. contorta, and Navicula sp. had significantly increased growth in the presence of straw liquor. The growth of the remainder, Ulothrix fimbriata, Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris, Anabaena flos-aquae, and Synedra sp. showed no significant difference from controls. In a related field study, we treated four of six ponds with barley straw and monitored their chlorophyll a levels for one growing season. While phytoplankton populations in all ponds decreased in midsummer, the phytoplankton biomass in treated ponds did not differ significantly from that of control ponds, suggesting that the application of barley straw had no effect on algal growth in these systems. PMID:16051085

  12. Genetic studies on a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium. [Anabaena; Escherichi coli

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.; Cardemil, L.; Elhai, J.; Flores, E.; Murry, M.; Schmetterer, G.; Schrautemeier, B.

    1987-04-01

    Mutants of Anabaena PCC7120 capable of aerobic growth with NO/sub 3//sup -/ but not N/sub 2/, and capable of microaerobic reduction of C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, were isolated by penicillin enrichment after UV irradiation. Heterocysts of two mutants lack the principal envelope glycolipid, those of EF116 have a non-cohesive envelope polysaccharide, and those of other strains have other defects. A Nm/sup r/ cosmid library of DNA from wild type Anabaena PCC7120 was established in Escherichia coli bearing the Ap helper plasmid pDS4101. A conjugative plasmid was introduced, and the bacteria replicated to lawns of individual mutant strains of Anabaena. After one day of non-selective growth, selection was applied for Nm/sup r/ and nitrogen fixation. Overlapping cosmids complementing EF116 and one complementing another mutant have been mapped. The complementing genes are thought to act early in differentiation. Inclusion, in an E. coli donor of an appropriate methylase gene enhanced, by a factor of 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 3/, transfer to Anabaena PCC7120 of a plasmid containing numerous sites for the Anabaena restriction endonuclease, AvaII.

  13. Modulation of fungicidal potential of Anabaena strains by light and temperature.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Vidhi; Prasanna, Radha; Bhatnagar, A K

    2012-05-01

    The regulation of fungicidal and hydrolytic enzyme activity was investigated in a set of cyanobacterial strains belonging to the genus Anabaena (Anabaena laxa RPAN8, Anabaena iyengarii RPAN9, Anabaena variabilis RPAN59 and Anabaena oscillarioides RPAN69), with A. variabilis RPAN16 serving as negative control. Time course studies undertaken with cultures incubated under different light and temperature conditions revealed enhancement in growth and fungicidal activity under continuous light (CL) and light dark (LD, 16:8) conditions and temperature of 30 °C and 40 °C. A significant increase of 3-18 % in chitosanase activity was recorded in all the 4-week-old cultures under CL condition and at 40 °C. Endoglucanase activity of RPAN8 and 9 was twofolds higher than the other strains under all light/dark conditions and temperature in the 4-week-old cultures, while continuous dark (CD) enhanced CMCase activity in RPAN69. This study provided useful information regarding the most suitable conditions of light and temperature for maximizing hydrolytic enzyme activity and fungicidal activity, as a prelude to their effective use as biocontrol agents. PMID:22457231

  14. Dechlorination of lindane by the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 depends on the function of the nir operon.

    PubMed

    Kuritz, T; Bocanera, L V; Rivera, N S

    1997-05-01

    Nitrate is essential for lindane dechlorination by the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 and Nostoc ellipsosporum, as it is for dechlorination of other organic compounds by heterotrophic microorganisms. Based on analyses of mutants and effects of environmental factors, we conclude that lindane dechlorination by Anabaena sp. requires a functional nir operon that encodes the enzymes for nitrate utilization. PMID:9150239

  15. [Harmful algae and health].

    PubMed

    Kankaanpää, Harri T

    2011-01-01

    Harmful algae are a worldwide problem. Phycotoxins is a general term for toxic compounds produced by harmful species of the phytoplankton. This review deals with the occurrence of harmful algae and phycotoxins in the Baltic Sea and other domestic waters, the ways of getting exposed to them, and their effects. Advice on how to avoid the exposure is provided. PMID:21834336

  16. Immunocytochemical analysis of the subcellular distribution of ferritin in Imperata cylindrica (L.) Raeuschel, an iron hyperaccumulator plant.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Vicenta; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo

    2012-05-01

    Ferritin is of interest at the structural and functional level not only as storage for iron, a critical element, but also as a means to prevent cell damage produced by oxidative stress. The main objective of this work was to confirm by immunocytochemistry the presence and the subcellular distribution of the ferritin detected by Mösbauer spectroscopy in Imperata cylindrica, a plant which accumulates large amounts of iron. The localization of ferritin was performed in epidermal, parenchymal and vascular tissues of shoots and leaves of I. cylindrica. The highest density of immunolabeling in shoots appeared in the intracellular space of cell tissues, near the cell walls and in the cytoplasm. In leaves, ferritin was detected in the proximity of the dense network of the middle lamella of cell walls, following a similar path to that observed in shoots. Immunolabeling was also localized in chloroplasts. The abundance of immunogold labelling in mitochondria for I. cylindrica was rather low, probably because the study dealt with tissues from old plants. These results further expand the localization of ferritin in cell components other than chloroplasts and mitochondria in plants. PMID:21764425

  17. Algae Derived Biofuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, Kauser

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  18. Photoreactions and Structural Changes of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is an archaeal-type rhodopsin found in eubacteria. The gene encoding ASR forms a single operon with ASRT (ASR transducer) which is a 14 kDa soluble protein, suggesting that ASR functions as a photochromic sensor by activating the soluble transducer. This article reviews the detailed photoreaction processes of ASR, which were studied by low-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The former research reveals that the retinal isomerization is similar to bacteriorhodopsin (BR), but the hydrogen-bonding network around the Schiff base and cytoplasmic region is different. The latter study shows the stable photoproduct of the all-trans form is 100% 13-cis, and that of the 13-cis form is 100% all-trans. These results suggest that the structural changes of ASR in the cytoplasmic domain play important roles in the activation of the transducer protein, and photochromic reaction is optimized for its sensor function. PMID:22303148

  19. The effects of SO sub 2 on Azolla - Anabaena symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeseoun Hur; Wellburn, A.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Cultures of Azolla pinnata containing Anabaena were investigated as a sensitive and reproducible bioindicator of air pollution. Three equal doses of SO{sub 2} (week*ppb: 1*100, 2*50, 4*25) were applied to Azolla cultures growing in nitrogen-free medium in a specially-designed exposure system. Exposure to high concentrations of SO{sub 2} showed highly significant reductions in growth of the fern, while nitrogen fixation and heterocyst development were severely damaged. This was associated with a reduction of protein content in the SO{sub 2}-exposed ferns and again more significant at higher SO{sub 2} levels. There was a variation in the absolute amount of the individual pigments between SO{sub 2} doses and/or treatments which was related to the physiological development of the ferns throughout the fumigations. Moreover, the ratio of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin in the 100 ppb SO{sub 2}-treated ferns was significantly higher than that in the clean air-grown ferns. The results clearly demonstrate that SO{sub 2} has adverse effects on the symbiosis and suggest that this fern is a promising bioindicator of air pollution and a very good model to investigate the inter-relationships between photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and air pollution stress.

  20. Hydrogen production in nitrogenase mutants in Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Weyman, Philip D; Pratte, Brenda; Thiel, Teresa

    2010-03-01

    Nitrogenase produces hydrogen as a normal byproduct of the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia. The Nif2 nitrogenase in Anabaena variabilis is an alternative Mo-nitrogenase and is expressed in vegetative cells grown with fructose under strictly anaerobic conditions. We report here that the V75I substitution in the alpha-subunit of Nif2 showed greatly impaired acetylene reduction and reduced levels of (15)N(2) fixation but had similar hydrogen production rates as the wild-type enzyme under argon. Another mutant containing a substitution in the alpha-subunit, V76I, would result in a decrease in the size of the putative gas channel of nitrogenase and, thus, was hypothesized to affect substrate selectivity of nitrogenase. However, this substitution had no effect on the enzyme selectivity, suggesting that access by gases to the active site through this putative gas channel is not limited by the increased size of the amino acid side chain in the alpha-subunit, V76I substitution. PMID:20070369

  1. Studies on mineral phosphate solubilization by cyanobacteria Westiellopsis and Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Yandigeri, Mahesh S; Kashyap, Sudhanshu; Yadav, Arvind K; Srinavasan, Ramakrishnan; Pabbi, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Two diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Westiellopsis prolifica and Anabaena variabilis were evaluated for elucidating the possible mechanism of mineral phosphate solubilization. Phosphate starved cyanobacteria evaluated for the presence of organic acids, extracellular compounds or enzymes that might have been produced and promoted the mineral phosphate solubilization with Mussorie Rock Phosphate and Tricalcium Phosphate as substrates. Both the cultures did not reveal production of organic acids throughout the incubation period when checked for decrease in pH of the media and thin layer chromatography Thin layer chromatography of culture filtrates showed the presence of hydrocarbon like compound. Further analysis of the culture filtrates with gas liquid chromatography, a single peak near to the retention time of 7.6 was observed in all extracts of culture filtrates irrespective of phosphate source. UV-visible spectra of culture filtrates revealed the absorption maxima of 276 nm. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric analysis of culture filtrates showed most intense peak in the electron impact (EI) ionization was at m/z 149 and molecular ion peaks at m/z 207 and 167, inferring the presence of phthalic acid. Among the mechanisms in mineral phosphate solubilization, it was evident that these cyanobacteria used phthalic acid as possible mode of P solubilization. PMID:22073557

  2. Efficient Gene Induction and Endogenous Gene Repression Systems for the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Higo, Akiyoshi; Isu, Atsuko; Fukaya, Yuki; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-02-01

    In the last decade, many studies have been conducted to employ genetically engineered cyanobacteria in the production of various metabolites. However, the lack of a strict gene regulation system in cyanobacteria has hampered these attempts. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 performs both nitrogen and carbon fixation and is, therefore, a good candidate organism for such production. To employ Anabaena cells for this purpose, we intended to develop artificial gene regulation systems to alter the cell metabolic pathways efficiently. We introduced into Anabaena a transcriptional repressor TetR, widely used in diverse organisms, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. We found that anhydrotetracycline (aTc) substantially induced GFP fluorescence in a concentration-dependent manner. By expressing tetR under the nitrate-specific promoter nirA, we successfully reduced the concentration of aTc required for the induction of gfp under nitrogen fixation conditions (to 10% of the concentration needed under nitrate-replete conditions). Further, we succeeded in the overexpression of GFP by depletion of nitrate without the inducer by means of promoter engineering of the nirA promoter. Moreover, we applied these gene regulation systems to a metabolic enzyme in Anabaena and successfully repressed glnA, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase that is essential for nitrogen assimilation in cyanobacteria, by expressing the small antisense RNA for glnA. Consequently, the ammonium production of an ammonium-excreting Anabaena mutant was significantly enhanced. We therefore conclude that the gene regulation systems developed in this study are useful tools for the regulation of metabolic enzymes and will help to increase the production of desired substances in Anabaena. PMID:26684202

  3. Transcription control of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase and adjacent genes in Anabaena species.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L A; Tabita, F R

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activase (rca) was uniformly localized downstream from the genes encoding the large and small subunits of RubisCO (rbcL and rbcS) in three strains of Anabaena species. However, two open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), situated between rbcS and rca in Anabaena sp. strain CA, were not found in the intergenic region of Anabaena variabilis and Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. During autotrophic growth of Anabaena cells, rca and rbc transcripts accumulated in the light and diminished in the dark; light-dependent expression of these genes was not affected by the nitrogen source and the concentration of exogenous CO2 supplied to the cells. When grown on fructose, rca- and rbc-specific transcripts accumulated in A. variabilis regardless of whether the cells were illuminated. Transcript levels, however, were much lower in dark-grown heterotrophic cultures than in photoheterotrophic cultures. In photoheterotrophic cultures, the expression of the rca and rbc genes was similar to that in cultures grown with CO2 as the sole source of carbon. Although the rbcL-rbcS and rca genes are linked and are in the same transcriptional orientation in Anabaena strains, hybridization of rbc and rca to distinct transcripts suggested that these genes are not cotranscribed, consistent with the results of primer extension and secondary structure analysis of the nucleotide sequence. Transcription from ORF1 and ORF2 was not detected under the conditions examined, and the function of these putative genes remains unknown. Images PMID:7961423

  4. [Influence of nutrient sources on Anabaena spiroides growth and odorous compounds production characteristics].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Wei; Chen, Ke-Yun; Su, Ming; Yang, Min; Liu, Dai-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    The occurrence of taste and odors, produced by secondary metabolites of cyanobacteria, has been one of the major water quality problems in drinking water. However, the odorous compounds produced by cyanobacteria usually differ significantly with different species. One cyanobacterium isolated from Yanghe reservoir was identified as Anabaena sp., which can produce high level of geosmin consistently during laboratory culture. By culture expanding experiments, the algal growth and geosmin production characteristics of the Anabaena sp. were studied on different conditions of nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The results indicated that geosmin mainly remained in the intracellular algal cells regardless of the nutrient sources, and the extracellular content was only in th range of 0.2% - 9.6%. Compared with ammonia nitrogen conditions, the growth of Anabaena sp. in nitrate nitrogen conditions was much higher, with a 1.4-fold variation in geosmin production. While ammonia nitrogen concentration was 0.5 mg/L, the algal biomass and geosmin production achieved the highest level of 3.8 x 10(4) cells, mL(-1) and 1.1 x 10(4) ngL(-1), respectively. When the nitrate nitrogen concentration was 2.0 mg/L, the algal biomass and geosmin production achieved the highest level of 6.6 x 10(4) cells x mL(-1) and 1.3 x 10(4) ng x L(-1), respectively. Compared with nitrogen sources, the growth of Anabaena sp. could be promoted significantly until phosphorus level attained 0.12 mg/L, indicating that phosphorus is the main limiting nutrient source for Anabaena sp.. For Yanghe reservoir, the nutrient level has already been enough for the growth of Anabaena sp. Therefore, the nutrient source content, especially phosphorus, should be reduced effectively to control the cyanobacterium bloom and taste and odor problems. PMID:22619946

  5. Biotransformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in Anabaena sp. cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlostathis, S.G.; Jackson, G.H.

    1999-03-01

    The transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was investigated in cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. by conducting a series of batch assays. 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene was added to Anabaena sp. cultures in single and consecutive additions, at various initial concentrations, to determine its transformation kinetics, to identify products formed, to evaluate potential toxicity, and to determine the effect of light deprivation on the TNT transformation process. 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene disappearance occurred only in the presence of Anabaena sp. cultures maintained under a normal 16-h photoperiod. Toxicity leading to culture chlorosis and death was observed in batch systems with an initial TNT concentration greater than 10 mg/L. A low rate and extent of TNT disappearance was observed in light-deprived cultures, which were inhibited even at low TNT concentrations. At pH values between 7.5 and 8.5, azoxy-tetranitrotoluene isomers were detected in both the culture medium and solvent extracts of biomass and accounted for only 20 and 4.4% of the initially added TNT moles, respectively. At a culture pH range between 5.6 and 5.9, achieved by aeration with a 5% CO{sub 2}/air mixture, hydroxylaminodinitrotoluene equimolar to the TNT addition was produced and then depleted from the culture medium with prolonged incubation. Although TNT reduction in Anabaena sp. cultures occurred, yielding low levels of azoxy-tetranitrotoluene isomers or hydroxylaminodinitrotoluene, uptake and other transformation reactions of TNT and/or its transformation products by Anabaena sp. may have taken place. Based on a less than 15% observed increase of biomass concentration over the relatively short incubation periods and by considering the mean biomass concentration constant, the TNT disappearance rate followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The biomass carbon-normalized TNT disappearance rates in Anabaena sp. cultures were about three orders of magnitude higher than previously reported TNT

  6. Application of acid-modified Imperata cylindrica powder for latent fingerprint development.

    PubMed

    Low, Wei Zeng; Khoo, Bee Ee; Aziz, Zalina Binti Abdul; Low, Ling Wei; Teng, Tjoon Tow; bin Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2015-09-01

    A novel powdering material that utilizes acid-modified Imperata cylindrica (IC) powder for the development of fingermarks was studied. Experiments were carried out to determine the suitability, adherence quality and sensitivity of the acid-modified IC powder. Fingermarks of different constituents (eccrine, sebaceous and natural fingermarks) on different types of surfaces were used. Acid-modified IC powder was also used to develop fingermarks of different ages as well as aged fingermarks recovered from the water. From the visual inspection, acid-modified IC powder was able to interact with different fingermark constituents and produced distinct ridge details on the examined surfaces. It was also able to develop aged fingermarks and fingermarks that were submerged in water. A statistical comparison was made against the Sirchie® Hi-Fi black powder in terms of the powders' sensitivity and quality of the developed natural fingermarks. The image quality was analyzed using MITRE's Image Quality of Fingerprint (IQF) software. From the experiments, acid-modified IC powder has the potential as a fingermark development powder, although natural fingermarks developed by Sirchie® black powder showed better quality and sensitivity based on the results of the statistical comparison. PMID:26385718

  7. Antioxidant activities of bark extract from mangroves, Bruguiera cylindrica (L.) Blume and Ceriops decandra Perr

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, M.; Sasikumar, J. M.; Shamna, R.; Pandiarajan, C.; Sofia, P.; Nagarajan, B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The antioxidant activities of two Indian mangrove plants, Bruguiera cylindrica and Ceriops decandra, were investigated. Materials and Methods: Total phenolics and total flavonoid contents of the mangroves were determined using folin-ciocalteu reagent method and aluminium chloride method, respectively. Antioxidant capacity was assessed by the following methods: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydroxyl (DPPH.) quenching assay; 2,2’- azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiozoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS.+) cation decolorization test; scavenging capacity towards hydroxyl ion radicals (.OH); reductive capacity; and antihemolytic activity. Results: The mangroves yielded 233.3 ± 0.062 and 283.31 ± 0.04 mg gallic acid equivalent/g phenolic contents and 11.6 ± 0.12 and 15.1 ± 0.02 mg quercetin equivalent/g flavonoid contents. The methanol extracts of both mangroves exhibited high antiradical activity against DPPH., ABTS.+, and .OH radicals. The reductive capacity of the extracts increased with increasing concentration of samples. The extracts also inhibited H2O2 induced hemolysis in cow blood erythrocytes. The antioxidant activities were found stronger than that of the reference standard, butylated hydroxy toluene (BHT). The antioxidant activity of mangrove plants was correlated with total phenolics and flavonoid contents. Conclusion: Both plants can be considered as good sources of natural antioxidants for medicinal uses. Further studies are necessary to isolate active principles responsible for the overall antioxidant activity of the extracts. PMID:22022000

  8. Isoeugenin, a Novel Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Isolated from the Rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo-Jin; Nugroho, Agung; Song, Byong-Min; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical studies on the constituents of the rhizomes of Imperata cylindrica (Gramineae) were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We also aimed to search for any biologically active substance capable of inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) formation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophage 264.7 cells, by testing four compounds isolated from this plant. Four compounds, including a new chromone, isoeugenin, along with ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and caffeic acid were isolated and identified by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of isoeugenin was determined as 7-hydroxy-5-methoxy-2-methylchromone by the 2D-NMR technique. Among the four compounds, isoeugenin has the lowest IC50 value on the inhibition of NO production in LPS-activated macrophage RAW264.7 cells (IC50, 9.33 μg/mL). In addition, isoeugenin significantly suppressed the LPS-induced expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and proinflammatory cytokines mRNA levels. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of isoeugenin is associated with the down-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW264.7 cells. Accordingly, our results suggest that the new chromone isoegenin should be considered a potential treatment for inflammatory disease. PMID:26633331

  9. Biological and molecular characterization of a putative new sobemovirus infecting Imperata cylindrica and maize in Africa.

    PubMed

    Sérémé, Drissa; Lacombe, Séverine; Konaté, Moumouni; Pinel-Galzi, Agnès; Traoré, Valentin Stanislas Edgar; Hébrard, Eugénie; Traoré, Oumar; Brugidou, Christophe; Fargette, Denis; Konaté, Gnissa

    2008-01-01

    A new virus was isolated from both the grass Imperata cylindrica and maize plants that had yellow mottle symptoms in Burkina Faso, West Africa. The virus has isometric particles ca. 32 nm in diameter. The experimental host range was restricted to Rottboellia exaltata. Virions were isolated from leaves of systemically infected maize plants. Koch's postulates were completed by mechanically inoculating uninfected Imperata or maize with either purified virus or sap from infected Imperata plants. Virion preparations were used to produce a specific polyclonal antiserum, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test was set up. The full genome of the virus was sequenced, and it comprised 4,547 nucleotides. Phylogenetic studies indicated that the virus is closely related to rice yellow mottle virus, a sobemovirus that infects monocotyledons in Africa, and is more distantly related to cocksfoot mottle virus, another sobemovirus that infects monocotyledons. Although the virus can infect R. exaltata experimentally, it differs from Rottboellia yellow mottle virus, a member of a tentative species of the genus Sobemovirus that also infects monocotyledons in Africa. Particle morphology, serological properties, genomic organization, and phylogenetic analysis are all consistent with assignment of the new virus to the genus Sobemovirus. The name Imperata yellow mottle virus is proposed. PMID:18777157

  10. Multiple modes of iron uptake by the filamentous, siderophore-producing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Mareike; Kranzler, Chana; Lis, Hagar; Margulis, Ketty; Stevanovic, Mara; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Iron is a member of a small group of nutrients that limits aquatic primary production. Mechanisms for utilizing iron have to be efficient and adapted according to the ecological niche. In respect to iron acquisition cyanobacteria, prokaryotic oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms can be divided into siderophore- and non-siderophore-producing strains. The results presented in this paper suggest that the situation is far more complex. To understand the bioavailability of different iron substrates and the advantages of various uptake strategies, we examined iron uptake mechanisms in the siderophore-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Comparison of the uptake of iron complexed with exogenous (desferrioxamine B, DFB) or to self-secreted (schizokinen) siderophores by Anabaena sp. revealed that uptake of the endogenous produced siderophore complexed to iron is more efficient. In addition, Anabaena sp. is able to take up dissolved, ferric iron hydroxide species (Fe') via a reductive mechanism. Thus, Anabaena sp. exhibits both, siderophore- and non-siderophore-mediated iron uptake. While assimilation of Fe' and FeDFB are not induced by iron starvation, FeSchizokinen uptake rates increase with increasing iron starvation. Consequently, we suggest that Fe' reduction and uptake is advantageous for low-density cultures, while at higher densities siderophore uptake is preferred. PMID:25943160

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Strain of Cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. 4-3

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. 4-3, an efficient producer of sucrose. It was isolated from salt flats near the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas. The genome may provide insight into the utilization of cyanobacteria as a source for biofuels. PMID:27540066

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Strain of Cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. 4-3.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Sowa, Steven; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. 4-3, an efficient producer of sucrose. It was isolated from salt flats near the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas. The genome may provide insight into the utilization of cyanobacteria as a source for biofuels. PMID:27540066

  13. [The detection of nonallelic to known genes of resistance to Tilletia caries (DC) Tul. in wheat strains from interspecific hybridization (Triticum aestivum x Aegilops cylindrica)].

    PubMed

    Babaiants, L T; Dubinina, L A; Iushchenko, G M

    2000-01-01

    It was established by hybridological analysis that winter bread wheat lines 1/74-91, 3/36-91, 5/55-91 possess single dominant gene of resistance to bunt (Tilletia caries (DC) Tul.), but lines 8/2-91, 5/43-91, 4/11-91 and 8/16-91 have two independent dominant genes for this character. These genes originated from Aegilops cylindrica are not identical to Bt1-Bt17 genes and are unknown to date. The lines were obtained from crosses between winter bread wheat variety Odeskaya polukarlikovaya and Aegilops cylindrica. PMID:11033855

  14. Classification and phylogeny of the cyanobiont Anabaena azollae Strasburger: an answered question?

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana L; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2014-06-01

    The symbiosis Azolla-Anabaena azollae, with a worldwide distribution in pantropical and temperate regions, is one of the most studied, because of its potential application as a biofertilizer, especially in rice fields, but also as an animal food and in phytoremediation. The cyanobiont is a filamentous, heterocystic cyanobacterium that inhabits the foliar cavities of the pteridophyte and the indusium on the megasporocarp (female reproductive structure). The classification and phylogeny of the cyanobiont is very controversial: from its morphology, it has been named Nostoc azollae, Anabaena azollae, Anabaena variabilis status azollae and recently Trichormus azollae, but, from its 16S rRNA gene sequence, it has been assigned to Nostoc and/or Anabaena, and from its phycocyanin gene sequence, it has been assigned as non-Nostoc and non-Anabaena. The literature also points to a possible co-evolution between the cyanobiont and the Azolla host, since dendrograms and phylogenetic trees of fatty acids, short tandemly repeated repetitive (STRR) analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of nif genes and the 16S rRNA gene give a two-cluster association that matches the two-section ranking of the host (Azolla). Another controversy surrounds the possible existence of more than one genus or more than one species strain. The use of freshly isolated or cultured cyanobionts is an additional problem, since their morphology and protein profiles are different. This review gives an overview of how morphological, chemical and genetic analyses influence the classification and phylogeny of the cyanobiont and future research. PMID:24737795

  15. Regulation of fructose transport and its effect on fructose toxicity in Anabaena spp.

    PubMed

    Ungerer, Justin L; Pratte, Brenda S; Thiel, Teresa

    2008-12-01

    Anabaena variabilis grows heterotrophically using fructose, while the close relative Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 does not. Introduction of a cluster of genes encoding a putative ABC transporter, herein named frtRABC, into Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 on a replicating plasmid allowed that strain to grow in the dark using fructose, indicating that these genes are necessary and sufficient for heterotrophic growth. FrtR, a putative LacI-like regulatory protein, was essential for heterotrophic growth of both cyanobacterial strains. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the transport system was induced by fructose and that in the absence of FrtR, frtA was very highly expressed, with or without fructose. In the frtR mutant, fructose uptake was immediate, in contrast to that in the wild-type strain, which required about 40 min for induction of transport. In the frtR mutant, high-level expression of the fructose transporter resulted in cells that were extremely sensitive to fructose. Even in the presence of the inducer, fructose, expression of frtA was low in the wild-type strain compared to that in the frtR mutant, indicating that FrtR repressed the transporter genes even in the presence of fructose. FrtR bound to the upstream region of frtA, but binding was not visibly altered by fructose, further supporting the hypothesis that fructose has only a modest effect in relieving repression of frtA by FrtR. A. variabilis grew better with increasing concentrations of fructose up to 50 mM, showing increased cell size and heterocyst frequency. Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 did not show any of these changes when it was grown with fructose. Thus, although Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 could take up fructose and use it in the dark, fructose did not improve growth in the light. PMID:18931119

  16. Adsorption of Cd(II) Ions from Aqueous Solutions by Lalang (Imperata cylindrica)Leaf Powder: Effect of Physicochemical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megat Hanafiah, M. A. K.; Yahya, M. Z. A.; Zakaria, H.; Ibrahim, S. C.

    The adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution with a plant waste particularly Lalang or Imperata cylindrica (IC) leaf powder was investigated. The effect of various operating variables mainly adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, adsorbent size, temperature and pH was studied. The adsorption of Cd2+ ions increased with increase in pH, temperature, adsorbent dose and decrease in adsorbent size. Adsorption was rapid and occurred within 15 min for cadmium concentration of 1 mg L-1 and 30 min for cadmium concentrations of 2 and 5 mg L-1. The kinetic process of Cd2+ adsorption onto IC leaf powder was found to fit the pseudo-second-order rate equation.

  17. [Effect of an introgression from Aegilops cylindrica host on manifestation of productivity traits in winter common wheat F2 plants].

    PubMed

    Kozub, N A; Sozinov, I A; sozinov, A A

    2004-12-01

    The effect of introgression of a chromosome 1D segment from Aegilops cylindrica to winter common wheat on productivity traits in F2 plants was studied using storage protein loci as genetic markers. An allele of the gliadin-coding Gli-D1 locus served as a marker of the introgression. Using of two- and three-locus interaction models, it was shown that the introgression tagged with Gli-D1 affected the manifestation of productivity traits (productive tillering, grain weight per plant and grain number per plant) through interaction with other marker storage protein loci: Glu-B1, Glu-D1, and Gli-B2. PMID:15648149

  18. [Genetics determination of wheat resistance to Puccinia graminis F. sp. tritici deriving from Aegilops cylindrica, Triticum erebuni and amphidiploid 4].

    PubMed

    Babaiants, O V; Babaiants, L T; Horash, A F; Vasil'ev, A A; Trackovetskaia, V A; Paliasn'iĭĭ, V A

    2012-01-01

    The lines of winter soft wheat developed in the Plant Breeding and Genetics Institute contain new effective introgressive Sr-genes. Line 85/06 possess SrAc1 gene, lines 47/06, 54/06, 82/06, 85/06, 87/06, 238/06, and 367/06 possess SrAc1 and SrAc2 derived from Aegilops cylindrica, line 352/06 - SrTe1 and SrTe2 from Triticum erebuni, line 12/86-04 - SrAd1 and SrAd2 from Amphidiploid 4 (Triticum dicoccoides x Triticum tauschii). PMID:22420215

  19. [Detection of the introgression of genome elements of Aegilops cylindrica Host. into Triticum aestivum L. genome with ISSR-analysis].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Babaiants, L T; Sivolap, Iu M

    2003-01-01

    Comparative analysis of introgressive and parental forms of wheat was carried out to reveal the sites of donor genome with new loci of resistance to fungal diseases. By ISSR-method 124 ISSR-loci were detected in the genomes of 18 individual plants of introgressive line 5/20-91; 17 of them have been related to introgressive fragments of Ae. cylindrica genome in T. aestivum. It was shown that ISSR-method is effective for detection of the variability caused by introgression of alien genetic material to T. aestivum genome. PMID:12945176

  20. Plasmodesmata of brown algae.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10-20 nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD could not be observed in brown algae. In the brown alga, Dictyota dichotoma, PD are produced during cytokinesis through the formation of their precursor structures (pre-plasmodesmata, PPD). Clustering of PD in a structure termed "pit field" was recognized in several species having a complex multicellular thallus structure but not in those having uniseriate filamentous or multiseriate one. The pit fields might control cell-to-cell communication and contribute to the establishment of the complex multicellular thallus. In this review, we discuss fundamental morphological aspects of brown algal PD and present questions that remain open. PMID:25516500

  1. Clocks in algae.

    PubMed

    Noordally, Zeenat B; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-01-20

    As major contributors to global oxygen levels and producers of fatty acids, carotenoids, sterols, and phycocolloids, algae have significant ecological and commercial roles. Early algal models have contributed much to our understanding of circadian clocks at physiological and biochemical levels. The genetic and molecular approaches that identified clock components in other taxa have not been as widely applied to algae. We review results from seven species: the chlorophytes Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Ostreococcus tauri, and Acetabularia spp.; the dinoflagellates Lingulodinium polyedrum and Symbiodinium spp.; the euglenozoa Euglena gracilis; and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The relative simplicity, experimental tractability, and ecological and evolutionary diversity of algal systems may now make them particularly useful in integrating quantitative data from "omic" technologies (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics) with computational and mathematical methods. PMID:25379817

  2. Comparative sensitivity of five species of macrophytes and six species of algae to atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, and metolachlor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Ruessler, D.S.; Carlson, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    This study determined the relative sensitivity of five species of aquatic macrophytes and six species of algae to four commonly used herbicides (atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, and metolachlor). Toxicity tests consisted of 96-h (duckweed and algae) or 14-d (submerged macrophytes) static exposures. The triazine herbicides (atrazine and metribuzin) were significantly more toxic to aquatic plants than were the acetanilide herbicides (alachlor and metolachlor). Toxicity studies ranked metribuzin > atrazine > alachlor > metolachlor in decreasing order of overall toxicity to aquatic plants. Relative sensitivities of macrophytes to these herbicides decreased in the order of Ceratophyllum > Najas > Elodea > Lemna > Myriophyllum. Relative sensitivities of algae to herbicides decreased in the order of Selenastrum > Chlorella > Chlamydomonas > Microcystis > Scenedesmus > Anabaena. Algae and macrophytes were of similar overall sensitivities to herbicides. Data indicated that Selenastrum, a commonly tested green alga, was generally more sensitive compared to other plant species. Lemna minor, a commonly tested floating vascular plant, was of intermediate sensitivity, and was fivefold less sensitive than Ceratophyllum, which was the most sensitive species tested. The results indicated that no species was consistently most sensitive, and that a suite of aquatic plant test species may be needed to perform accurate risk assessments of herbicides.

  3. Upstream factors affecting Tualatin River algae—Tracking the 2008 Anabaena algae bloom to Wapato Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rounds, Stewart A.; Carpenter, Kurt D.; Fesler, Kristel J.; Dorsey, Jessica L.

    2015-01-01

    The results and insights derived from this study can be used to enhance future monitoring and data collection strategies designed to improve water quality and plankton models and better predict dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the lower Tualatin River.

  4. Physiological and proteomic analysis of salinity tolerance of the halotolerant cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ravindra Kumar; Thagela, Preeti; Tripathi, Keshawanand; Abraham, G

    2016-09-01

    The halotolerant cyanobacterium Anabaena sp was grown under NaCl concentration of 0, 170 and 515 mM and physiological and proteomic analysis was performed. At 515 mM NaCl the cyanobacterium showed reduced photosynthetic activities and significant increase in soluble sugar content, proline and SOD activity. On the other hand Anabaena sp grown at 170 mM NaCl showed optimal growth, photosynthetic activities and comparatively low soluble sugar content, proline accumulation and SOD activity. The intracellular Na(+) content of the cells increased both at 170 and 515 mM NaCl. In contrast, the K(+) content of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp remained stable in response to growth at identical concentration of NaCl. While cells grown at 170 mM NaCl showed highest intracellular K(+)/Na(+) ratio, salinity level of 515 mM NaCl resulted in reduced ratio of K(+)/Na(+). Proteomic analysis revealed 50 salt-responsive proteins in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp under salt treatment compared with control. Ten protein spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis and the identified proteins are involved in photosynthesis, protein folding, cell organization and energy metabolism. Differential expression of proteins related to photosynthesis, energy metabolism was observed in Anabaena sp grown at 170 mM NaCl. At 170 mM NaCl increased expression of photosynthesis related proteins and effective osmotic adjustment through increased antioxidant enzymes and modulation of intracellular ions contributed to better salinity tolerance and optimal growth. On the contrary, increased intracellular Na(+) content coupled with down regulation of photosynthetic and energy related proteins resulted in reduced growth at 515 mM NaCl. Therefore reduced growth at 515 mM NaCl could be due to accumulation of Na(+) ions and requirement to maintain higher organic osmolytes and antioxidants which is energy intensive. The results thus show that the basis of salt tolerance is different when the

  5. Exploring origins, invasion history and genetic diversity of Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv. (Cogongrass) in the United States using genotyping by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imperata cylindrica (Cogongrass, Speargrass) is a diploid C4 grass that is a noxious weed in 73 countries and constitutes a significant threat to global biodiversity and sustainable agriculture. We used a cost-effective genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS)approach to identify the reproductive system, gene...

  6. Acrapex azumai Sugi (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) as a possible biological control agent of the invasive weed Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv. (Poaceae) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lepidopteran larvae were discovered boring in the basal stems of Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv. (Poaceae) in Itoshima city, Fukuoka Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan. Adults reared from these larvae were identified as Acrapex azumai Sugi (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Sequencing of the CO1 (cytochrome oxidase 1...

  7. Canopy CO2 exchange of two neotropical tree species exhibiting constitutive and facultative CAM photosynthesis, Clusia rosea and Clusia cylindrica

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Klaus; Garcia, Milton; Holtum, Joseph A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Photon flux density (PFD) and water availability, the daily and seasonal factors that vary most in tropical environments, were examined to see how they influenced expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in 3-year-old Clusia shrubs native to Panama. Instead of the commonly used single-leaf approach, diel CO2 exchange was measured for whole individual canopies of plants in large soil containers inside a naturally illuminated 8.8 m3 chamber. In well-watered C. rosea, a mainly constitutive CAM species, nocturnally fixed CO2 contributed about 50% to 24 h carbon gain on sunny days but the contribution decreased to zero following overcast days. Nonetheless, CO2 fixation in the light responded in such a way that 24 h carbon gain was largely conserved across the range of daily PFDs. The response of C. rosea to drought was similarly buffered. A facultative component of CAM expression led to reversible increases in nocturnal carbon gain that offset drought-induced reductions of CO2 fixation in the light. Clusia cylindrica was a C3 plant when well-watered but exhibited CAM when subjected to water stress. The induction of CAM was fully reversible upon rewatering. C. cylindrica joins C. pratensis as the most unambiguous facultative CAM species reported in the genus Clusia. PMID:19487388

  8. Imperata cylindrica sp as Novel Silica-Based Heterogeneous Catalysts for Transesterification of Palm Oil Mill Sludge.

    PubMed

    Ngaini, Zainab; Shahrom, Farra Diana; Jamil, Nurfarahen; Wahi, Rafeah; Ahmad, Zainal Abiddin

    2016-06-01

    Biodiesel from palm oil mill sludge (POMS) was prepared in the presence of novel silica-based heterogeneous catalysts derived from Imperata cylindrica sp. Imperatacid and Imperatabase are two types of heterogeneous catalysts derived from Imperata cylindrica sp and characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and pore size measurement. Imperatacid has particle size of 43.1-83.9 µm while Imperatabase in the range of 89-193 µm. Imperatacid was conveniently applied in esterification step to afford > 90 wt% oil in 1:3 (oil/methanol) and 10 wt% catalyst, followed by transesterification with 1 wt% Imperatabase and 1:1 (oil/methanol) for 1 h at 65°C to afford 80% biodiesel with higher percentage of methyl palmitate (48.97%) and methyl oleate (34.14%) compare to conventional homogeneous catalyst. Reusability of the catalyst up to three times afforded biodiesel ranging from 78-80% w/w. The biodiesel was demonstrated onto alternative diesel engine (Megatech(®)-Mark III) and showed proportional increased of torque (ɽ) to biodiesel loading. PMID:27181252

  9. Dye-sensitized solar cell using extract from petals of male flowers Luffa cylindrica L. as a natural sensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Ishwar Chandra; Srivastava, Pankaj; Bahadur, Lal

    2016-02-01

    The study reports use of natural dye extracted from petals of male flowers Luffa cylindrica L. as sensitizer for TiO2 based dye-sensitized solar cells. Optical characteristics of the dye extract and photoelectrochemical performance of the cells were studied. The extracts showed the UV-Vis absorptions in the 400-450 nm range with broad maxima at ∼430 nm. FTIR spectra of extract revealed the presence of anchoring groups and coloring constituents. DSSC was fabricated using natural dye loaded TiO2 photoelectrode, electrolyte containing I-/I3- redox mediator and Pt counter electrode by assembling them into a cell module. Conversion of solar light into electricity was successfully accomplished and DSSC based on petals of male flowers Luffa cylindrica L. extract exhibited an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.52 V, short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 0.44 mA cm-2, Pmax 130 μW, fill factor (FF) of 0.60, conversion efficiency of 0.13% and IPCE ∼30% (at λ = 430 nm).

  10. [Effects of water table manipulation on leaf photosynthesis, morphology and growth of Phragmites australis and Imperata cylindrica in the reclaimed tidal wetland at Dongtan of Chongming Island, China].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qi-Cheng; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Zhou, Jian-Hong; Ou, Qiang; Wang, Kai-Yun

    2014-02-01

    During the growing season of 2011, the leaf photosynthesis, morphological and growth traits of Phragmites australis and Imperata cylindrica were investigated along a gradient of water table (low, medium and high) in the reclaimed tidal wetland at the Dongtan of Chongming Island in the Yangtze Estuary of China. A series of soil factors, i. e., soil temperature, moisture, salinity and inorganic nitrogen content, were also measured. During the peak growing season, leaf photosynthetic capacity of P. australis in the wetland with high water table was significantly lower than those in the wetland with low and medium water tables, and no difference was observed in leaf photosynthetic capacity of I. cylindrica at the three water tables. During the entire growing season, at the shoot level, the morphological and growth traits of P. australis got the optimum in the wetland with medium water table, but most of the morphological and growth traits of I. cylindrica had no significant differences at the three water tables. At the population level, the shoot density, leaf area index and aboveground biomass per unit area were the highest in the wetland with high water table for P. australis, but all of the three traits were the highest in the wetland with low water table for I. cylindrica. At the early growing season, the rhizome biomass of P. australis in the 0-20 cm soil layer had no difference at the three water tables, and the rhizome biomass of I. cylindrica in the 0-20 cm soil layer in the wetland with high water table was significantly lower than those in the wetland with low and medium water table. As a native hygrophyte before the reclamation, the variations of performances of P. australis at the three water tables were probably attributed to the differences in the soil factors as well as the intensity of competition from I. cylindrica. To appropriately manipulate water table in the reclaimed tidal wetland may restrict the growth and propagation of the mesophyte I

  11. Characterization of genes for an alternative nitrogenase in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, T

    1993-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium that has been reported to fix nitrogen and reduce acetylene to ethane in the absence of molybdenum. DNA from this strain hybridized well at low stringency to the nitrogenase 2 (vnfDGK) genes of Azotobacter vinelandii. The hybridizing region was cloned from a lambda EMBL3 genomic library of A. variabilis, mapped, and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences of the vnfD and vnfK genes of A. variabilis showed only about 56% similarity to the nifDK genes of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 but were 76 to 86% similar to the anfDK or vnfDK genes of A. vinelandii. The organization of the vnf gene cluster in A. variabilis was similar to that of A. vinelandii. However, in A. variabilis, the vnfG gene was fused to vnfD; hence, this gene is designated vnfDG. A vnfH gene was not contiguous with the vnfDG gene and has not yet been identified. A mutant strain, in which a neomycin resistance cassette was inserted into the vnf cluster, grew well in a medium lacking a source of fixed nitrogen in the presence of molybdenum but grew poorly when vanadium replaced molybdenum. In contrast, the parent strain grew equally well in media containing either molybdenum or vanadium. The vnf genes were transcribed in the absence of molybdenum, with or without vanadium. The vnf gene cluster did not hybridize to chromosomal DNA from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 or from the heterotrophic strains, Nostoc sp. strain Mac and Nostoc sp. strain ATCC 29150. A hybridizing ClaI fragment very similar in size to the A. variabilis ClaI fragment was present in DNA isolated from several independent, cultured isolates of Anabaena sp. from the Azolla symbiosis. Images PMID:8407800

  12. Influence of phosphorus and pH on the fungicidal potential of Anabaena strains.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Vidhi; Prasanna, Radha; Bhatnagar, Ashok Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The genus Anabaena is known to be a rich source of bioactive metabolites, but the biocontrol potential of this genus, mediated through hydrolytic enzymes is less investigated. In our investigation, five Anabaena strains - A. laxa RPAN8, A. iyengarii RPAN9, A. variabilis RPAN59 and A. oscillarioides RPAN69 (with A. variabilis RPAN16 serving as negative control) were evaluated in time course studies involving incubation under three levels of phosphorus and pH conditions. Total chlorophyll, proteins, chitosanase, endoglucanase and CMCase activity were measured and inhibition assayed against phytopathogenic fungi. The four weeks old RPAN69 culture showed significantly higher chlorophyll which was 41% higher than control. This was also linked with an enhancement of 18.26% and 9.18% in chitosanase and CMCase activity respectively over control in the treatment involving half dose of phosphorus. Chlorophyll and CMCase activity showed a high degree of correlation with highest values at pH 9.5. A pH of 5.5 was the most suitable condition for the maximum activity of chitosanase for all the strains except RPAN16. The strains RPAN8 and RPAN9 showed the highest activity of endoglucanase at pH 5.5 while the other strains exhibited maximum activity at pH 7.5. This study provides insight into the role of P and pH in modulating fungicidal activity in different Anabaena strains, which can be valuable for enhancing their efficiency as a biocontrol agent. PMID:22733581

  13. All1371 is a polyphosphate-dependent glucokinase in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Klemke, Friederike; Beyer, Gabriele; Sawade, Linda; Saitov, Ali; Korte, Thomas; Maldener, Iris; Lockau, Wolfgang; Nürnberg, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    The polyphosphate glucokinases can phosphorylate glucose to glucose 6-phosphate using polyphosphate as the substrate. ORF all1371 encodes a putative polyphosphate glucokinase in the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Here, ORF all1371 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and its purified product was characterized. Enzyme activity assays revealed that All1371 is an active polyphosphate glucokinase that can phosphorylate both glucose and mannose in the presence of divalent cations in vitro. Unlike many other polyphosphate glucokinases, for which nucleoside triphosphates (e.g. ATP or GTP) act as phosphoryl group donors, All1371 required polyphosphate to confer its enzymic activity. The enzymic reaction catalysed by All1371 followed classical Michaelis–Menten kinetics, with kcat = 48.2 s−1 at pH 7.5 and 28 °C and KM = 1.76 µM and 0.118 mM for polyphosphate and glucose, respectively. Its reaction mechanism was identified as a particular multi-substrate mechanism called the ‘bi-bi ping-pong mechanism’. Bioinformatic analyses revealed numerous polyphosphate-dependent glucokinases in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. Viability of an Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 mutant strain lacking all1371 was impaired under nitrogen-fixing conditions. GFP promoter studies indicate expression of all1371 under combined nitrogen deprivation. All1371 might play a substantial role in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under these conditions. PMID:25320362

  14. Arsoniumphospholipid in algae*

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Robert V.; Mumma, R. O.; Benson, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    A novel phospholipid containing arsenic was formed by all marine algae cultured in [74As]arsenate. Components of the labeled algal extracts readily separated by two-dimensional paper radiochromatography. Base-catalyzed deacylation of the major lipid yielded a phosphodiester identical to one of the two major water-soluble compounds. Acid or enzymic hydrolysis of the phosphodiester produced a product identified as trimethylarsoniumalactic acid. The structure of the phospholipid therefore is O-phosphatidyltrimethylarsoniumlactic acid. Detoxication of arsenate by marine algae leads to accumulation of the arsoniumphospholipid as a major reservoir for arsenic. Its degradation to trimethylarsoniumbetaine, dimethylarsinic acid, methanearsonic acid, and arsenate in marine food chains and its metabolism in human beings are of considerable interest. Images PMID:16592562

  15. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  16. [Molecular marker mapping of the gene resistant to common bunt transferred from Aegilops cylindrica into bread wheat].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Babaiants, L T; Sivolap, Iu M

    2006-01-01

    Introgression lines 5/55-91 and 378/2000 of bread wheat contain the gene of resistance to Tilletia caries (DC.) Tul. transferred from Aegilops cylindrica Host. Using bulked segregant analysis with ISSR and SSR PCR the lincage of microsatellite locus Xgwm 259 with the gene of common bunt resistance has been identified in F2 population of 378/2000 x Lutestens 23397. DNA mapping made it possible to localize this highly effective gene in the intercalary region of the long arm of wheat chromosome 1B at the distance of 7.6-8.5 cM of the microsatellite Xgwm 259 locus which thus can be used in wheat breeding for selection of genotype resistance to common bunt. PMID:16865982

  17. [Molecular-genetic analysis of wheat (T. aestivum L.) genome with introgression of Ae. cylindrica Host genetic elements].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Sivolap, Iu M

    2005-01-01

    Wheat-aegilops hybrid plants Triticum aestivum L. (2n = 42) x Aegilops cylindrica Host (2n = 28) were investigated with using microsatellite markers. In two BC1F9 lines some genome modifications connected with losing DNA fragments of initial variety or appearing of Aegilops genome elements were detected. In some investigated hybrids new amplicons lacking in parental plants were found. Substitution of wheat chromosomes for aegilops chromosomes was not revealed. Analysis of microsatellite loci in BC2F5 plants showed stable introgression of aegilops genetic elements into wheat; elimination of some transferred aegilops DNA fragments in the course of backcrossing; decreasing size of introgressive elements after backcrossing. Introgressive lines were classified according to genome changes. PMID:16250247

  18. Selection and characterization of Euglena anabaena var. minor as a new candidate Euglena species for industrial application.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kengo; Mitra, Sharbanee; Iwata, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Kato, Sueo; Yamada, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Euglena gracilis is a microalgae used as a model organism. Recently, mass cultivation of this species has been achieved for industrial applications. The genus Euglena includes more than 200 species that share common useful features, but the potential industrial applications of other Euglena species have not been evaluated. Thus, we conducted a pilot screening study to identify other species that proliferate at a sufficiently rapid rate to be used for mass cultivation; we found that Euglena anabaena var. minor had a rapid growth rate. In addition, its cells accumulated more than 40% weight of carbohydrate, most of which is considered to be a euglenoid specific type of beta-1-3-glucan, paramylon. Carbohydrate is stored in E. anabaena var. minor cells during normal culture, whereas E. gracilis requires nitrogen limitation to facilitate paramylon accumulation. These results suggest the potential industrial application of E. anabaena var. minor. PMID:25988946

  19. Genetic variation of jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host.) from Iran using RAPD-PCR and SDS-PAGE of seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Farkhari, M; Naghavi, M R; Pyghambari, S A; Sabokdast

    2007-09-01

    Genetic variation of 28 populations of jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host.), collected from different parts of Iran, were evaluated using both RAPD-PCR and SDS-PAGE of seed proteins. The diversity within and between populations for the three-band High Molecular Weight (HMW) subunits of glutenin pattern were extremely low. Out of 15 screened primers of RAPD, 14 primers generated 133 reproducible fragments which among them 92 fragments were polymorphic (69%). Genetic similarity calculated from the RAPD data ranged from 0.64 to 0.98. A dendrogram was prepared on the basis of a similarity matrix using the UPGMA algorithm and separated the 28 populations into two groups. Confusion can happen between populations with the same origin as well as between populations of very diverse geographical origins. Our results show that compare to seed storage protein, RAPD is suitable for genetic diversity assessment in Ae. cylindrica populations. PMID:19090190

  20. Electrostatic forces involved in orienting Anabaena ferredoxin during binding to Anabaena ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase: site-specific mutagenesis, transient kinetic measurements, and electrostatic surface potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, J. K.; Hazzard, J. T.; Martínez-Júlvez, M.; Medina, M.; Gómez-Moreno, C.; Tollin, G.

    1999-01-01

    Transient absorbance measurements following laser flash photolysis have been used to measure the rate constants for electron transfer (et) from reduced Anabaena ferredoxin (Fd) to wild-type and seven site-specific charge-reversal mutants of Anabaena ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase (FNR). These mutations have been designed to probe the importance of specific positively charged amino acid residues on the surface of the FNR molecule near the exposed edge of the FAD cofactor in the protein-protein interaction during et with Fd. The mutant proteins fall into two groups: overall, the K75E, R16E, and K72E mutants are most severely impaired in et, and the K138E, R264E, K290E, and K294E mutants are impaired to a lesser extent, although the degree of impairment varies with ionic strength. Binding constants for complex formation between the oxidized proteins and for the transient et complexes show that the severity of the alterations in et kinetics for the mutants correlate with decreased stabilities of the protein-protein complexes. Those mutated residues, which show the largest effects, are located in a region of the protein in which positive charge predominates, and charge reversals have large effects on the calculated local surface electrostatic potential. In contrast, K138, R264, K290, and K294 are located within or close to regions of intense negative potential, and therefore the introduction of additional negative charges have considerably smaller effects on the calculated surface potential. We attribute the relative changes in et kinetics and complex binding constants for these mutants to these characteristics of the surface charge distribution in FNR and conclude that the positively charged region of the FNR surface located in the vicinity of K75, R16, and K72 is especially important in the binding and orientation of Fd during electron transfer. PMID:10452605

  1. Miocene Coralline algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bosence, D.W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The coralline algae (Order Corallinales) were sedimentologically and ecologically important during the Miocene, a period when they were particularly abundant. The many poorly described and illustrated species and the lack of quantitative data in coralline thalli make specific determinations particularly difficult, but some species are well known and widespread in the Tethyan area. The sedimentologic importance of the Miocene coralline algae is reflected in the abundance of in-situ coralline buildups, rhodoliths, and coralline debris facies at Malta and Spain; similar sequences are known throughout the Tethyan Miocene. In-situ buildups vary from leafy crustose biostromes to walled reefs with dense coralline crusts and branches. Growth forms are apparently related to hydraulic energy. Rhodoliths vary from leafy, crustose, and open-branched forms in muddy sediments to dense, crustose, and radial-branching forms in coarse grainstones. Rhodolith form and internal structure correlate closely with hydraulic energy. Coralline genera are conservative and, as such, are useful in paleoenvironmental analysis. Of particular interest are the restricted depth ranges of recent coralline genera. More research is needed on the sedimentology, paleoecology, and systematics of the Cenozoic corallines, as they have particular value in paleoenvironmental analysis.

  2. Acyl-acyl carrier protein: Lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol acyl transferase in Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol was produced when membranes isolated from the cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, and washed free of soluble endogenous constituents, were incubated with ({sup 14}C)acyl-acyl carrier protein. This enzymatic synthesis of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol localized in the membranes was not dependent on any added cofactors, such as ATP, coenzyme A, and dithiothreitol. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-acyl carrier proteins were approximately equally active as substrates with Km of 0.37, 0.36, and 0.23 {mu}M, respectively. The ({sup 14}C)acyl group was exclusively transferred to the sn-1 hydroxyl of the glycerol backbone of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol as demonstrated by hydrolysis of all incorporated acyl groups by the lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus delamar. Using a double labelled ({sup 14}C)acyl-({sup 14}C)acyl carrier protein, this enzyme catalyzed the direct transfer of the acyl group from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol to form monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. The transfer reaction mechanism was also confirmed by the increased activity with the addition of the lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol suspension. A specific galactolipid acyl hydrolase activity was released into the soluble protein fraction when the membranes of Anabaena variabilis were treated with 2% Triton X-100. The positional specificity of this acyl hydrolase was demonstrated to be similar to that of Rhizopus lipase, i.e. only the acyl group at the sn-1 position was hydrolyzed. The acyl hydrolase which was also localized in the membrane fraction of Anabaena variabilis was presumably responsible for producing endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol used by the acyltransferase.

  3. Identification, characterization, and regulation of a novel antifungal chitosanase gene (cho) in Anabaena spp.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Prasanna, Radha; Natarajan, Chitra; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Sharma, Jitender

    2010-05-01

    Two contrasting cyanobacterial species (Anabaena fertilissima and Anabaena sphaerica) were selected based on differences in antifungal behavior in order to study the mechanism for production of an antifungal enzyme and the genes responsible for this production. In A. fertilissima, chitosanase and antifungal activities were increased significantly under of growth-limiting conditions (8 of light and 16 h of darkness). The lack of such activities in A. sphaerica was associated with high levels of protein that accumulated during the stationary phase (at 28 days) under the same light conditions. The gene putatively responsible for chitosanase and antifungal activities was amplified using specific primers, and sequence analysis of the amplified products (1.086 and 1.101 kb in A. sphaerica and A. fertilissima, respectively) showed that they belong to the glycoside hydrolase 3 (GH3)-like family of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. Pairwise alignment of the corresponding protein sequences identified a putative signal peptide (amino acids 1 to 23) and some amino acid changes in the sequence of A. fertilissima which may be responsible for functioning of the chitosanase and the observed antifungal activity. Hydrolysis of the chitosan oligosaccharide (GlcN)(5) to (GlcN)(2) and (GlcN)(3) confirmed the presence of chitosanase activity in A. fertilissima. Site-directed mutagenesis of the A. fertilissima chitosanase-encoding gene (cho) led to identification of catalytic residues (Glu-121 and Glu-141) important for the antifungal effect of the cho product. The level of expression of cho was monitored by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR, which indicated that transcription of this gene is significantly enhanced under conditions that retard growth, such as a long dark period. PMID:20228117

  4. Characterization of the response to zinc deficiency in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mauro; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Robinson, Nigel J; Luque, Ignacio

    2012-05-01

    Zur regulators control zinc homeostasis by repressing target genes under zinc-sufficient conditions in a wide variety of bacteria. This paper describes how part of a survey of duplicated genes led to the identification of the open reading frame all2473 as the gene encoding the Zur regulator of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. All2473 binds to DNA in a zinc-dependent manner, and its DNA-binding sequence was characterized, which allowed us to determine the relative contribution of particular nucleotides to Zur binding. A zur mutant was found to be impaired in the regulation of zinc homeostasis, showing sensitivity to elevated concentrations of zinc but not other metals. In an effort to characterize the Zur regulon in Anabaena, 23 genes containing upstream putative Zur-binding sequences were identified and found to be regulated by Zur. These genes are organized in six single transcriptional units and six operons, some of them containing multiple Zur-regulated promoters. The identities of genes of the Zur regulon indicate that Anabaena adapts to conditions of zinc deficiency by replacing zinc metalloproteins with paralogues that fulfill the same function but presumably with a lower zinc demand, and with inducing putative metallochaperones and membrane transport systems likely being involved in the scavenging of extracellular zinc, including plasma membrane ABC transport systems and outer membrane TonB-dependent receptors. Among the Zur-regulated genes, the ones showing the highest induction level encode proteins of the outer membrane, suggesting a primary role for components of this cell compartment in the capture of zinc cations from the extracellular medium. PMID:22389488

  5. H2, N2, and O2 metabolism by isolated heterocysts from Anabaena sp. strain CA.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R L; Kumar, D; Zhang, X K; Tabita, F R; Van Baalen, C

    1985-01-01

    Metabolically active heterocysts isolated from wild-type Anabaena sp. strain CA showed high rates of light-dependent acetylene reduction and hydrogen evolution. These rates were similar to those previously reported in heterocysts isolated from the mutant Anabaena sp. strain CA-V possessing fragile vegetative cell walls. Hydrogen production was observed with isolated heterocysts. The ratio of C2H4 to H2 produced ranged from 0.9 to 1.2, and H2 production exhibited unique biphasic kinetics consisting of a 1 to 2-min burst of hydrogen evolution followed by a lower, steady-state rate of hydrogen production. This burst was found to be dependent upon the length of the dark period immediately preceding illumination and may be related to dark-to-light ATP transients. The presence of 100 nM NiCl2 in the growth medium exerted an effect on both acetylene reduction and hydrogen evolution in the isolated heterocysts from strain CA. H2-stimulated acetylene reduction was increased from 2.0 to 3.2 mumol of C2H4 per mg (dry weight) per h, and net hydrogen production was abolished. A phenotypic Hup- mutant (N9AR) of Anabaena sp. strain CA was isolated which did not respond to nickel. In isolated heterocysts from N9AR, ethylene production rates were the same under both 10% C2H2-90% Ar and 10% C2H2-90% H2 with or without added nickel, and net hydrogen evolution was not affected by the presence of 100 nM Ni2+. Isolated heterocysts from strain CA were shown to have a persistent oxygen uptake of 0.7 mumol of O2 per mg (dry weight) per h, 35% of the rate of whole filaments, at air saturating O2 levels, indicating that O2 impermeability is not a requirement for active heterocysts. PMID:3921524

  6. Isolation and characterization of two sequence-specific endonucleases from Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, K; Hughes, S G; Brown, J S; Bruce, S A

    1976-01-01

    Two endonucleases, AvaI and AvaII, were isolated from Anabaena variabilis on the basis of their ability to make a limited number of breaks at specific points in bacteriophage lambda DNA. Neither enzyme has cofactor requirements beyond Mg2+. Endonuclease AvaI makes eight breaks in the phage lambda chromosome at which the 5'-terminal sequence is pPy-C-G-N. AvaII endonuclease cuts phage lambda DNA more extensively, yielding fragments with the 5'-terminal sequence G-T-C-N or G-A-C-N. Neither enzyme generates cohesive ends. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PLATE 3 PLATE 4 PMID:11780

  7. Purification and partial characterization of a calcium-stimulated protease from the cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Lockau, W; Massalsky, B; Dirmeier, A

    1988-03-01

    A calcium-stimulated protease was purified to apparent homogeneity from the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. As judged from experiments with inhibitors and chromogenic peptide substrates, the enzyme is a serine protease with a substrate specificity like trypsin. Its apparent relative molecular mass is 52,000. Calcium depletion inhibits the enzymic activity by 92%. Half-maximal activity requires about 0.5 microM free Ca2+. The enzyme binds to a hydrophobic column in a calcium-dependent manner, indicating calcium-induced exposure of a hydrophobic domain. The possible role of the protease in heterocyst differentiation is discussed. PMID:3127208

  8. Bacterial Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase: a biocatalyst with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Sarah L; Turner, Nicholas J

    2014-10-15

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PALs) catalyse the regio- and stereoselective hydroamination of cinnamic acid analogues to yield optically enriched α-amino acids. Herein, we demonstrate that a bacterial PAL from Anabaena variabilis (AvPAL) displays significantly higher activity towards a series of non-natural substrates than previously described eukaryotic PALs. Biotransformations performed on a preparative scale led to the synthesis of the 2-chloro- and 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine derivatives in excellent ee, highlighting the enormous potential of bacterial PALs as biocatalysts for the synthesis of high value, non-natural amino acids. PMID:25037641

  9. Cellular Auxin Transport in Algae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Suyun; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is one of the main directors of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxin is generated in apical plant parts and transported from cell-to-cell in a polar fashion. Auxin is present in all plant phyla, and the existence of polar auxin transport (PAT) is well established in land plants. Algae are a group of relatively simple, autotrophic, photosynthetic organisms that share many features with land plants. In particular, Charophyceae (a taxon of green algae) are closest ancestors of land plants. In the study of auxin function, transport and its evolution, the algae form an interesting research target. Recently, proof for polar auxin transport in Chara species was published and auxin related research in algae gained more attention. In this review we discuss auxin transport in algae with respect to land plants and suggest directions for future studies. PMID:27135491

  10. Cellular Auxin Transport in Algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyun; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is one of the main directors of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxin is generated in apical plant parts and transported from cell-to-cell in a polar fashion. Auxin is present in all plant phyla, and the existence of polar auxin transport (PAT) is well established in land plants. Algae are a group of relatively simple, autotrophic, photosynthetic organisms that share many features with land plants. In particular, Charophyceae (a taxon of green algae) are closest ancestors of land plants. In the study of auxin function, transport and its evolution, the algae form an interesting research target. Recently, proof for polar auxin transport in Chara species was published and auxin related research in algae gained more attention. In this review we discuss auxin transport in algae with respect to land plants and suggest directions for future studies. PMID:27135491

  11. Ecology of Harmful Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Daniel L.

    2007-07-01

    Edna Graneli and Jefferson T. Turner, Editors;Ecological Studies Series, Vol. 189; Springer; ISBN 3540322094; 413 pp.; 2006; $195 Harmful algal blooms (HABs) affect commercially and recreationally important species, human health, and ecosystem functioning. Hallmark events are the visually stunning blooms where waters are discolored and filled with ichthyotoxin-producing algae that lead to large fish kills. Of most concern, however, are HABs that pose a threat to human health. For example, some phycotoxins bioaccumulate in the guts and tissues of commercially and recreationally important species that when consumed by humans, may result in nausea, paralysis, memory loss, and even death. In addition to the deleterious impacts of phycotoxins, HABs can be problematic in other ways. For example, the decay of blooms often leads to low dissolved oxygen in subsurface waters. Blooms also reduce light penetration into the water column. Both processes disrupt ecosystems and in some cases have completely destroyed benthic communities.

  12. A PCR-based genotyping method to distinguish between wild-type and ornamental varieties of Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Cseke, Leland J; Talley, Sharon M

    2012-01-01

    Wild-type I. cylindrica (cogongrass) is one of the top ten worst invasive plants in the world, negatively impacting agricultural and natural resources in 73 different countries throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, New Zealand, Oceania and the Americas(1-2). Cogongrass forms rapidly-spreading, monodominant stands that displace a large variety of native plant species and in turn threaten the native animals that depend on the displaced native plant species for forage and shelter. To add to the problem, an ornamental variety [I. cylindrica var. koenigii (Retzius)] is widely marketed under the names of Imperata cylindrica 'Rubra', Red Baron, and Japanese blood grass (JBG). This variety is putatively sterile and noninvasive and is considered a desirable ornamental for its red-colored leaves. However, under the correct conditions, JBG can produce viable seed (Carol Holko, 2009 personal communication) and can revert to a green invasive form that is often indistinguishable from cogongrass as it takes on the distinguishing characteristics of the wild-type invasive variety(4) (Figure 1). This makes identification using morphology a difficult task even for well-trained plant taxonomists. Reversion of JBG to an aggressive green phenotype is also not a rare occurrence. Using sequence comparisons of coding and variable regions in both nuclear and chloroplast DNA, we have confirmed that JBG has reverted to the green invasive within the states of Maryland, South Carolina, and Missouri. JBG has been sold and planted in just about every state in the continental U.S. where there is not an active cogongrass infestation. The extent of the revert problem in not well understood because reverted plants are undocumented and often destroyed. Application of this molecular protocol provides a method to identify JBG reverts and can help keep these varieties from co-occurring and possibly hybridizing. Cogongrass is an obligate outcrosser and, when crossed with a different genotype, can produce

  13. Bioactive phenols in algae: the application of pressurized-liquid and solid-phase extraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Onofrejová, L; Vasícková, J; Klejdus, B; Stratil, P; Misurcová, L; Krácmar, S; Kopecký, J; Vacek, J

    2010-01-20

    A new extraction technique based on the off-line combination of pressurized-liquid with solid-phase extraction (PLE-SPE) is described. The method was used for the extraction of bioactive phenolic acids (protocatechuic, p-hydroxybenzoic, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic, chlorogenic, vanillic, caffeic, p-coumaric, salicylic acid), cinnamic acid and hydroxybenzaldehydes (p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin) from in vitro culture of two freshwater algae (Anabaena doliolum and Spongiochloris spongiosa) and from food products of marine macroalgae Porphyra tenera (nori) and Undaria pinnatifida (wakame). For the identification and quantification of the compounds the molecular ions [M-H](-) and specific fragments were analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry analyzer connected on-line with a reversed-phase HPLC system. Our analysis showed that the freshwater algae and marine algal products contained submicrogram or microgram level of above-mentioned phenols per gram of lyophilized sample. In addition, the total phenol content (Folin-Ciocalteu assay) and antioxidant activity (TEAC assay, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay) of the PLE-SPE extracts were determined and discussed. PMID:19410410

  14. Photo-induced Regulation of the Chromatic Adaptive Gene Expression by Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin*

    PubMed Central

    Irieda, Hiroki; Morita, Teppei; Maki, Kimika; Homma, Michio; Aiba, Hiroji; Sudo, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin molecules are photochemically reactive membrane-embedded proteins, with seven transmembrane α-helices, which bind the chromophore retinal (vitamin A aldehyde). They are roughly divided into two groups according to their basic functions: (i) ion transporters such as proton pumps, chloride pumps, and cation channels; and (ii) photo-sensors such as sensory rhodopsin from microbes and visual pigments from animals. Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), found in 2003 in the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, is categorized as a microbial sensory rhodopsin. To investigate the function of ASR in vivo, ASR and the promoter sequence of the pigment protein phycocyanin were co-introduced into Escherichia coli cells with the reporter gene crp. The result clearly showed that ASR functions as a repressor of the CRP protein expression and that this is fully inhibited by the light activation of ASR, suggesting that ASR would directly regulate the transcription of crp. The repression is also clearly inhibited by the truncation of the C-terminal region of ASR, or mutations on the C-terminal Arg residues, indicating the functional importance of the C-terminal region. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel function of rhodopsin molecules and raise the possibility that the membrane-spanning protein ASR could work as a transcriptional factor. In the future, the ASR activity could be utilized as a tool for arbitrary protein expression in vivo regulated by visible light. PMID:22872645

  15. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Robson F; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2009-01-01

    The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan. PMID:19682383

  16. The Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Exoproteome: Taking a Peek outside the Box

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Paulo; Martins, Nuno M.; Santos, Marina; Couto, Narciso A. S.; Wright, Phillip C.; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The interest in examining the subset of proteins present in the extracellular milieu, the exoproteome, has been growing due to novel insights highlighting their role on extracellular matrix organization and biofilm formation, but also on homeostasis and development. The cyanobacterial exoproteome is poorly studied, and the role of cyanobacterial exoproteins on cell wall biogenesis, morphology and even physiology is largely unknown. Here, we present a comprehensive examination of the Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 exoproteome under various growth conditions. Altogether, 139 proteins belonging to 16 different functional categories have been identified. A large fraction (48%) of the identified proteins is classified as “hypothetical”, falls into the “other categories” set or presents no similarity to other proteins. The evidence presented here shows that Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is capable of outer membrane vesicle formation and that these vesicles are likely to contribute to the exoproteome profile. Furthermore, the activity of selected exoproteins associated with oxidative stress has been assessed, suggesting their involvement in redox homeostasis mechanisms in the extracellular space. Finally, we discuss our results in light of other cyanobacterial exoproteome studies and focus on the potential of exploring cyanobacteria as cell factories to produce and secrete selected proteins. PMID:25782455

  17. Effects of lead accumulation on the Azolla caroliniana-Anabaena association.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Anne E; Boylen, Charles W; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A

    2014-04-01

    The effect of lead accumulation on photopigment production, mineral nutrition, and Anabaena vegetative cell size and heterocyst formation in Azolla caroliniana was investigated. Plants were exposed to 0, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1) lead acetate for ten days. Lead accumulation increased when plants were treated with higher lead concentrations. Results revealed a statistically significant decline in total chlorophyll, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotenoids in 5, 10, and 20 mg Pb L(-1) treatment groups as compared to plants with 0 or 1 mg Pb L(-1) treatments. No statistically significant change in anthocyanin production was observed. Calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations in plants decreased in increasing treatment groups, whereas sodium and potassium concentrations increased. Nitrogen and carbon were also found to decrease in plant tissue. Anabaena vegetative cells decreased in size and heterocyst frequency declined rapidly in a Pb dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that, while A. caroliniana removes lead from aqueous solution, the heavy metal causes physiological and biochemical changes by impairing photosynthesis, changing mineral nutrition, and impeding the growth and formation of heterocysts of the symbiotic cyanobacteria that live within leaf cavities of the fronds. PMID:24509077

  18. Energy transfer in Anabaena variabilis filaments under nitrogen depletion, studied by time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Aya; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Some filamentous cyanobacteria (including Anabaena) differentiate into heterocysts under nitrogen-depleted conditions. During differentiation, the phycobiliproteins and photosystem II in the heterocysts are gradually degraded. Nitrogen depletion induces changes in the pigment composition of both vegetative cells and heterocysts, which affect the excitation energy transfer processes. To investigate the changes in excitation energy transfer processes of Anabaena variabilis filaments grown in standard medium (BG11) and a nitrogen-free medium (BG110), we measured their steady-state absorption spectra, steady-state fluorescence spectra, and time-resolved fluorescence spectra (TRFS) at 77 K. TRFS were measured with a picosecond time-correlated single photon counting system. The pigment compositions of the filaments grown in BG110 changed throughout the growth period; the relative phycocyanin levels monotonically decreased, whereas the relative carotenoid (Car) levels decreased and then recovered to their initial value (at day 0), with formation of lower-energy Cars. Nitrogen starvation also altered the fluorescence kinetics of PSI; the fluorescence maximum of TRFS immediately after excitation occurred at 735, 740, and 730 nm after 4, 8, and 15 days growth in BG110, respectively. Based on these results, we discuss the excitation energy transfer dynamics of A. variabilis filaments under the nitrogen-depleted condition throughout the growth period. PMID:25596847

  19. Transcriptional and Mutational Analysis of the Uptake Hydrogenase of the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    PubMed Central

    Happe, Thomas; Schütz, Kathrin; Böhme, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    A 10-kb DNA region of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 containing the structural genes of the uptake hydrogenase (hupSL) was cloned and sequenced. In contrast to the hupL gene of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which is interrupted by a 10.5-kb DNA fragment in vegetative cells, there is no programmed rearrangement within the hupL gene during the heterocyst differentiation of A. variabilis. The hupSL genes were transcribed as a 2.7-kb operon and were induced only under nitrogen-fixing conditions, as shown by Northern blot experiments and reverse transcriptase PCR. Primer extension experiments with a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide primer confirmed these results and identified the 5′ start of the mRNA transcript 103 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. A consensus sequence in the promoter that is recognized by the fumarate nitrate reductase regulator (Fnr) could be detected. The hupSL operon in A. variabilis was interrupted by an interposon deletion (mutant strain AVM13). Under N2-fixing conditions, the mutant strain exhibited significantly increased rates in H2 accumulation and produced three times more hydrogen than the wild type. These results indicate that the uptake hydrogenase is catalytically active in the wild type and that the enzyme reoxidizes the H2 developed by the nitrogenase. The Nif phenotype of the mutant strain showed a slight decrease of acetylene reduction compared to that of the wild type. PMID:10692368

  20. Glycolipid biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. [Anabaena variabilis; Chlorogloeopsis sp. ; Schizothrix calcicola; Anacystis nidulans; Anacystis marina

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dusen, W.J.; Jaworski, J.G.

    1987-05-01

    The biosynthesis of monogalactosyldiacyl-glycerol (MGDG) was studied in five different cyanobacteria. Previous work has shown Anabaena variabilis to synthesize both MGDG and monoglucosyl-diacylglycerol (MG1cDG) with MG1cDG being the precursor of MGDG. They have examined four other cyanobacteria to determine if a similar relationship exists. The cyanobacteria studied were Anabaena variabilis, Chlorogloeopsis sp., Schizothrix calcicola, Anacystis nidulans, and Anacystis marina. Each were grown in liquid culture and lipids were labeled with /sup 14/C)CO/sub 2/ for 20 min., 1.0 hr, 1.0 hr + 10 hr chase. Glycolipids were analyzed by initial separation of MGDG and MG1cDG by TLC followed by further analysis by HPLC. Complete separation of molecular species was obtained isocratically on an ODS column. All of the cyanobacteria labeled 16-C and 18-C fatty acids except for A. marina which labeled only 14-C and 16-C fatty acids. Desaturation of the fatty acids could be observed in the 1.0 hr and chase experiments. All were capable of labeling both MG1cDG and MGDG with the precursor-product relationship being observed. There does not appear to be a direct relationship between the epimerization of the sugar moiety and fatty acid desaturation.

  1. Nonmetabolizable analogue of 2-oxoglutarate elicits heterocyst differentiation under repressive conditions in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Sophie; Chen, Han; Bédu, Sylvie; Ziarelli, Fabio; Peng, Ling; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2005-01-01

    In response to combined nitrogen starvation in the growth medium, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is able to develop a particular cell type, called a heterocyst, specialized in molecular nitrogen fixation. Heterocysts are regularly intercalated among vegetative cells and represent 5–10% of all cells along each filament. In unicellular cyanobacteria, the key Krebs cycle intermediate, 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG), has been suggested as a nitrogen status signal, but in vivo evidence is still lacking. In this study we show that nitrogen starvation causes 2-OG to accumulate transiently within cells of Anabaena PCC 7120, reaching a maximal intracellular concentration of ≈0.1 mM 1 h after combined nitrogen starvation. A nonmetabolizable fluorinated 2-OG derivative, 2,2-difluoropentanedioic acid (DFPA), was synthesized and used to demonstrate the signaling function of 2-OG in vivo. DFPA is shown to be a structural analogue of 2-OG and the process of its uptake and accumulation in vivo can be followed by 19F magic angle spinning NMR because of the presence of the fluorine atom and its chemical stability. DFPA at a threshold concentration of 0.3 mM triggers heterocyst differentiation under repressing conditions. The multidisciplinary approaches using synthetic fluorinated analogues, magic angle spinning NMR for their analysis in vivo, and techniques of molecular biology provide a powerful means to identify the nature of the signals that remain unknown or poorly defined in many signaling pathways. PMID:15985552

  2. Paired cloning vectors for complementation of mutations in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C. Peter Wolk; Fan, Qing; Zhou, Ruanbao; Huang, Guocun; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Kuritz, Tanya; Wojciuch, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The clones generated in a sequencing project represent a resource for subsequent analysis of the organism whose genome has been sequenced. We describe an interrelated group of cloning vectors that either integrate into the genome or replicate, and that enhance the utility, for developmental and other studies, of the clones used to determine the genomic sequence of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. One integrating vector is a mobilizable BAC vector that was used both to generate bridging clones and to complement transposon mutations. Upon addition of a cassette that permits mobilization and selection, pUC-based sequencing clones can also integrate into the genome and thereupon complement transposon mutations. The replicating vectors are based on cyanobacterial plasmid pDU1, whose sequence we report, and on broad-host-range plasmid RSF1010. The RSF1010- and pDU1-based vectors provide the opportunity to express different genes from either cell-type-specific or -generalist promoters, simultaneously from different plasmids in the same cyanobacterial cells. We show that pDU1 ORF4 and its upstream region play an essential role in the replication and copy number of pDU1, and that ORFs alr2887 and alr3546 (hetF{sub A}) of Anabaena sp. are required specifically for fixation of dinitrogen under oxic conditions.

  3. Flotation of algae for water reuse and biomass production: role of zeta potential and surfactant to separate algal particles.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong-Heui; Kim, Mi-Sug

    2015-01-01

    The effect of chemical coagulation and biological auto-flocculation relative to zeta potential was examined to compare flotation and sedimentation separation processes for algae harvesting. Experiments revealed that microalgae separation is related to auto-flocculation of Anabaena spp. and requires chemical coagulation for the whole period of microalgae cultivation. In addition, microalgae separation characteristics which are associated with surfactants demonstrated optimal microalgae cultivation time and separation efficiency of dissolved CO2 flotation (DCF) as an alternative to dissolved air flotation (DAF). Microalgae were significantly separated in response to anionic surfactant rather than cationic surfactant as a function of bubble size and zeta potential. DAF and DCF both showed slightly efficient flotation; however, application of anionic surfactant was required when using DCF. PMID:26287835

  4. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  5. BIOTRANSFORMATION OF 2,4,6-TRINITROTOLUENE IN A CONTINUOUS-FLOW ANABAENA SP. SYSTEM. (R825513C013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reductive transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was observed in a continuous-flow system of Anabaena sp. operated for 33 d with a 5.7 d hydraulic retention time and a range of influent TNT concentrations of 1–58 mg/l. The TNT removal effici...

  6. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  7. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Pernil, Rafael; Picossi, Silvia; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS) family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter) was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion. PMID:25915115

  8. Isolation and complementation of mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, C.P.; Cai, Y.; Cardemil, L.; Flores, E.; Hohn, B.; Murry, M.; Schmetterer, G.; Schrautemeier, B.; Wilson, R.

    1988-03-01

    Mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 unable to grow aerobically on dinitrogen were isolated by mutagenesis with UV irradiation, followed by a period of incubation in yellow light and then by penicillin enrichment. A cosmid vector, pRL25C, containing replicons functional in Escherichia coli and in Anabaena species was constructed. DNA from wild-type Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was partially digested with Sau3AI, and size-fractionated fragments about 40 kilobases (kb) in length were ligated into the phosphatase-treated unique BamHI site of pRL25C. A library of 1054 cosmid clones was generated in E. coli DH1 bearing helper plasmid pDS4101. A derivative of conjugative plasmid RP-4 was transferred to this library by conjugation, and the library was replicated to lawns of mutant Anabaena strains with defects in the polysaccharide layer of the envelopes of the heterocysts. Mutant EF116 was complemented by five cosmids, three of which were subjected to detailed restriction mapping; a 2.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from one of the cosmids was found to complement EF116. Mutant EF113 was complemented by a single cosmid, which was also restriction mapped, and was shown to be complemented by a 4.8-kb fragment of DNA derived from this cosmid.

  9. [From algae to "functional foods"].

    PubMed

    Vadalà, M; Palmieri, B

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, a growing interest for nutraceutical algae (tablets, capsules, drops) has been developed, due to their effective health benefits, as a potential alternative to the classic drugs. This review explores the use of cyanobacterium Spirulina, the microalgae Chlorella, Dunaliella, Haematococcus, and the macroalgae Klamath, Ascophyllum, Lithothamnion, Chondrus, Hundaria, Glacilaria, Laminaria, Asparagopsis, Eisenia, Sargassum as nutraceuticals and dietary supplements, in terms of production, nutritional components and evidence-based health benefits. Thus, our specific goals are: 1) Overview of the algae species currently used in nutraceuticals; 2) Description of their characteristics, action mechanisms, and possible side effects; 3) Perspective of specific algae clinical investigations development. PMID:26378764

  10. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  11. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN SOURCES ON P-LIMITED GROWTH OF 'ANABAENA FLOS-AQUAE'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dominance of N2-fixing algae has frequently been observed in freshwater environments in late spring or summer when the ratio of available N and P is low. This dominance is apparently due largely to the unique ability of the algae to fix atmospheric N2 while the limitation of comb...

  12. Photosynthesis and photorespiration in algae.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, N D; Canvin, D T; Culver, D A

    1977-05-01

    The CO(2) exchange of several species of fresh water and marine algae was measured in the laboratory to determine whether photorespiration occurs in these organisms. The algae were positioned as thin layers on filter paper and the CO(2) exchange determined in an open gas exchange system. In either 21 or 1% O(2) there was little difference between (14)CO(2) and (12)CO(2) uptake. Apparent photosynthesis was the same in 2, 21, or 50% O(2). The compensation points of all algae were less than 10 mul 1(-1). CO(2) or (14)CO(2) evolution into CO(2)-free air in the light was always less than the corresponding evolution in darkness. These observations are inconsistent with the proposal that photorespiration exists in these algae. PMID:16659972

  13. Algae fuel clean electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, D.

    1993-02-08

    The paper describes plans for a 600-kW pilot generating unit, fueled by diesel and Chlorella, a green alga commonly seen growing on the surface of ponds. The plant contains Biocoil units in which Chlorella are grown using the liquid effluents from sewage treatment plants and dissolved carbon dioxide from exhaust gases from the combustion unit. The algae are partially dried and fed into the combustor where diesel fuel is used to maintain ignition. Diesel fuel is also used for start-up and as a backup fuel for seasonal shifts that affect the algae growing conditions. Since the algae use the carbon dioxide emitted during the combustion process, the process will not contribute to global warming.

  14. Cambrian calcareous algae and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchinina, Veronica A.; Terleev, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Individual calcareous algae were known in Riphean. Their mass distribution is connected to the beginning of Cambrian. Despite of a long history of study, the nature of this group long time remained not clear. The new unique finds of algae from East Sayan region have shown, that primary carbonate thallus disappeared in the process of fossilization, and after it the calcareous cover formed by association of bacteria and cyanobacteria only.

  15. Effect of standardized fruit extract of Luffa cylindrica on oxidative stress markers in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Suchita; Saha, Sudipta; Kaithwas, Gaurav; Saraf, Shubhini A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The ability of Luffa cylindrica Roem fruit extract (LCE) to modulate biochemical parameters was investigated by in vitro studies for its role in hydrogen peroxide induced cataract on isolated goat lenses which were incubated for 72 h at 37°C. Materials and Methods: Test groups contained 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 µg/ml of LCE along with 1 ml of H2O2 (0.5 mM) as cataract inducer. Lenses were examined for morphological variation and transparency periodically during the incubation. Biochemical parameters such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH), total protein content (TPC), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were estimated. Results: SOD, GSH, and TPC levels were found to increase proportionally with the concentration of LCE. However, MDA levels were found to be inversely proportional to the concentration of LCE. Opacity was graded as per “lens opacities classification system III.” Morphological examination suggested that LCE (25 µg/ml) maintained a vision for 44 h. No lens in LCE dose groups developed dense nuclear opacity after 24 h as opposed to 80% in negative control. Conclusion: The results suggest that LCE can delay the onset and/or prevent the progression of cataract which can be attributed to the presence of adequate phenolics, flavonoids, and Vitamin A and its high nutritional value. This preliminary study can be further synergized by testing LCE against other in vivo and in vitro models of cataract. PMID:26729957

  16. The effects of soil flooding on the establishment of cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica), a nonindigenous invader of the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, S.E.; Grace, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica), an invasive perennial introduced from Southeast Asia, is currently spreading throughout the southeastern United States from Florida to Louisiana. In the U.S., cogongrass is generally not considered a wetland species, although it's range is expanding in regions with high wetland abundance. The objective of this study was to determine if excessive soil moisture might prevent cogongrass from establishing in areas with seasonally flooded soils. In one greenhouse experiment, we examined cogongrass germination and seedling growth in soils that were freely drained, saturated, and inundated. We performed a second greenhouse experiment to evaluate growth and survival of cogongrass seedlings of four different size classes in five soil moisture treatments ranging from dry to inundated. Cogongrass germination was lowest when seeds were overtopped with water. There were no differences in germination between saturated and freely drained treatments; however, seedlings grew largest in freely drained soil and were smallest when immersed. In our second experiment, most cogongrass plants survived except when given no water, but growth differed by watering treatment depending on seedling size. Increasing moisture was more detrimental to the growth of small seedlings compared to the growth of larger cogongrass plants. Overall, cogongrass was most sensitive to soil inundation in the earliest stages of establishment; thus, excessive moisture conditions in the spring, during early seedling development, could restrict invasion of cogongrass by seed. Once cogongrass is established, however, its tolerance of flooding appears to increase.

  17. Measurement of photorespiration in algae.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, B C; Coleman, J R; Colman, B

    1982-01-01

    The rates of true and apparent photosynthesis of two unicellular green algae, one diatom and four blue-green algae were measured in buffer at pH 8.0 at subsaturating concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (13-27 micromolar). Initial rates of depletion from the medium of inorganic carbon and (14)C activity caused by the algae in a closed system were measured by gas chromatography and by liquid scintillation counting, respectively. The rate of photorespiration was calculated as the difference between the rates of apparent and true photosynthesis. The three eucaryotic algae and two blue-green algae had photorespiratory rates of 10 to 28% that of true photosynthesis at air levels of O(2). Reduction of the O(2) level to 2% caused a 52 to 91% reduction in photorespiratory rate. Two other blue-green algae displayed low photorespiratory rates, 2.4 to 6.2% that of true photosynthesis at air levels of O(2), and reduction of the O(2) concentration had no effect on these rates. PMID:16662171

  18. Gas Exchange of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Elizabeth C. B.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1965-01-01

    Continuously growing cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Starr 252, operating at constant density and under constant environmental conditions, produced uniform photosynthetic quotient (PQ = CO2/O2) and O2 values during 6 months of observations. The PQ for the entire study was 0.90 ± 0.024. The PQ remained constant over a threefold light-intensity change and a threefold change in O2 production (0.90 ± 0.019). At low light intensities, when the rate of respiration approached the rate of photosynthesis, the PQ became extremely variable. Six lamps of widely different spectral-energy distribution produced no significant change in the PQ (0.90 ± 0.025). Oxygen production was directly related to the number of quanta available, irrespective of spectral-energy distribution. Such dependability in producing uniform PQ and O2 values warrants a consideration of algae to maintain a constant gas environment for submarine or spaceship use. Images Fig. 1 PMID:14339260

  19. Differentiation of free-living Anabaena and Nostoc cyanobacteria on the basis of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Caudales, R; Wells, J M

    1992-04-01

    The cellular fatty acids of free-living, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria belonging to the genera Anabaena and Nostoc were analyzed to differentiate the genera. The fatty acid compositions of 10 Anabaena strains and 10 Nostoc strains that were grown for 12 days on BG-11o medium were determined by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Of the 53 fatty acids detected, 17 were major components; the average level for each of these 17 fatty acids was at least 0.9% of the total fatty acids (in at least one of the genera). These fatty acids included (with mean percentages in the Anabaena and Nostoc strains, respectively) the saturated fatty acids 16:0 (30.55 and 23.23%) and 18:0 (0.77 and 1.27%); several unsaturated fatty acids, including 14:1 cis-7 (2.50 and 0.11%), 14:1 cis-9 (3.10 and 3.41%), a polyunsaturated 16-carbon (sites undetermined) fatty acid with an equivalent chain length of 15.30 (1.20 and 1.03%), 16:4 cis-4 (0.95 and 0.87%), 16:3 cis-6 (2.16 and 1.51%), 16:1 cis-7 (1.44 and 0.36%), 16:1 cis-9 (6.53 and 18.76%), 16:1 trans-9 (4.02 and 1.35%), 16:1 cis-11 (1.62 and 0.42%), 18:2 cis-9 (10.16 and 12.44%), 18:3 cis-9 (18.19 and 17.25%), 18:1 cis-9 (4.01 and 5.10%), and 18:1 trans-9 (0.92 and 1.94%); and the branched-chain fatty acids iso-16:0 (2.50 and 1.14%) and iso-15:1 (0.34 and 2.05%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1581185

  20. Lipopolysaccharide dependence of cyanophage sensitivity and aerobic nitrogen fixation in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Khudyakov, I; Wolk, C P

    1997-05-01

    Fox- mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 are unable to fix dinitrogen in the presence of oxygen. A fragment of the DNA of Anabaena sp. was cloned by complementation of a spontaneous Fox-, cyanophage-resistant mutant, R56, and characterized. Random insertion of transposon Tn5 delimited the complementing DNA to a 0.6-kb portion of the cloned fragment. Sequencing of this region and flanking DNA showed one complete open reading frame (ORF) similar to the gene rfbP (undecaprenyl-phosphate galactosephosphotransferase) and two partial ORFs similar to genes rfbD (GDP-D-mannose dehydratase) and rfbZ (first mannosyl transferase), all of which are active in the synthesis of the O antigen unit of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. In a transposon (Tn5-1087b)-induced, Fox-, cyanophage-resistant mutant, B14, the transposon was found within the same rfbP-like ORF. The three ORFs were insertionally inactivated with the omega cassette (P. Prentki and H. M. Krisch, Gene 29:303-313, 1984) or with Tn5::omega. Only the insertions in the rfbZ- and rfbP-like ORFs led to resistance to cyanophages A-1(L) and A-4(L) and to a Fox- phenotype. Electrophoretic analysis showed that interruption of the rfbZ- and rfbP-like ORFs resulted in a change in or loss of the characteristic pattern of the lengths of the LPS, whereas interruption of the rfbD-like ORF merely changed the distribution of the lengths of the LPS to one with a greater prevalence of low molecular weights. According to electron microscopy, interruption of the rfbP-like ORF may have led to aberrant deposition of the layers of the heterocyst envelope, resulting in increased leakage of oxygen into the heterocyst. The results suggest that modified LPS may prevent cyanophage infection of Anabaena sp. vegetative cells and the formation of a functional heterocyst envelope. PMID:9139904

  1. Extinction of cells of cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis in the presence of humic acid under illumination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing-kun; Tanji, Yasunori; Unno, Hajime

    2006-10-01

    Laboratory experiments targeting the effect of humic acid (HA) on the cell lysis of cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis have been performed. Light irradiation was found to be an important factor for the cell lysis phenomenon, whereas intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) might be a chemical factor for the process. An exogenous H2O2 concentration of 1.0 mg l(-1) was determined as the threshold for cell survival. Our results indicated that HA or its possible product(s) of photochemical reaction can induce damage to intracellular catalase under artificial illumination, which leads intracellular H2O2 to be accumulated to an abnormally high concentration, eventually resulting in cell death. Moreover, H2O2 released into the culture from dead cells can damage other cells, which in turn brings about the population extinction. PMID:16505991

  2. Metabolism of sulfur compounds by whole filaments and heterocysts of Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, T.H. Jr.; Wolk, C.P.; Shomer-Ilan, A.

    1981-06-01

    Filaments of the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis reduced /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, incorporating /sup 35/S into cysteine, methionine, glutathione, sulfolipid, and several unidentified metabolites. The majority of the incorporated label accumulated in reduced glutathione. Heterocysts isolated from labeled filaments contained the same major labeled products. Isolated, metabolically active heterocysts were unable to reduce /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, but were able to incorporate /sup 35/S/sup 2 -/ into cysteine and glutathione. The results suggest that the initial activation of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ occurs in vegetative cells and that some reduced forms, possibly including S/sup 2 -/, are translocated into heterocysts.

  3. Molecular cloning of a recA-like gene from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Owttrim, G.W.; Coleman, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    A recA-like gene isolated from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis was cloned and partially characterized. When introduced into Escherichia coli recA mutants, the 7.5-kilobase-pair plasmid-borne DNA insert restored resistance to methyl methanesulfonate and UV irradiation, as well as recombination proficiency when measured by Hfr-mediated conjugation. The cyanobacterial recA gene restored spontaneous but not mitomycin C-induced prophage production. Restriction analysis and subcloning yielded a 1.5-kilobase-pair Sau3A fragment which also restored methylmethane sulfonate resistance and coded for a 38- to 40-kilodalton polypeptide when expressed in an in vitro transcription-translation system.

  4. [Chromatographic and spectroscopic characterization of phycocyanin and its subunits purified from Anabaena variabilis CCC421].

    PubMed

    Chakdar, N; Sakha, S; Pabbi, S

    2014-01-01

    Phycocyanin, a high value pigment was purified from diazotrophic cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis CCC421 using a strategy involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis and anion exchange chromatography using DEAE-cellulose column. 36% phycocyanin with a purity of 2.75 was recovered finally after anion exchange chromatography. Purified phycocyanin was found to contain 2 subunits of 17 and 18 kDa which were identified as a-and (3 subunits by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOE HPLC method using a C5 column coupled with fluorescence or photodiode-based detection was also developed to separate and detect the A. variabilis CCC421 phycocyanin subunits. The fluorescence method was more sensitive than photodiode one. The purified phycocyanin from A. variabilis CCC421 as well as its subunits was characterized with respect to absorption and IR spectra. Spectral characterization of the subunits revealed that alpha and beta subunits contained one and two phycocyanobilin groups as chromophores, respectively. PMID:25272755

  5. Biochemical and structural analysis of aminoglycoside acetyltransferase Eis from Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Pricer, Rachel E; Houghton, Jacob L; Green, Keith D; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2012-10-30

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhanced intracellular survival (Eis_Mtb) protein is a clinically important aminoglycoside (AG) multi-acetylating enzyme. Eis homologues are found in a variety of mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial species. Variation of the residues lining the AG-binding pocket and positions of the loops bearing these residues in the Eis homologues dictates the substrate specificity and, thus, Eis homologues are Nature-made tools for elucidating principles of AG recognition by Eis. Here, we demonstrate that the Eis from Anabaena variabilis (Eis_Ava), the first non-mycobacterial Eis homologue reported, is a multi-acetylating AG-acetyltransferase. Eis_Ava, Eis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Eis_Mtb), and Eis from Mycobacterium smegmatis (Eis_Msm) have different structures of their AG-binding pockets. We perform comparative analysis of these differences and investigate how they dictate the substrate and cosubstrate recognition and acetylation of AGs by Eis. PMID:23090428

  6. Aerobic hydrogen production by the heterocystous cyanobacteria Anabaena spp. strains CA and 1F.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X K; Haskell, J B; Tabita, F R; Van Baalen, C

    1983-01-01

    Aerobic photoproduction of H2 was demonstrated in Anabaena spp. strains CA and 1F when cells were growing under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The rates of production, measured either by the hydrogen electrode or in a flow system by gas chromatography, were 10 to 15% of the rate of photosynthetic O2 evolution or 50 to 80% of the rates of acetylene reduction. Strains CA and 1F differed in several respects. In strain CA, H2 production was immediately partially sensitive to 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, whereas strain 1F was not immediately affected. Strain CA also showed a consistently higher rate of H2 production than did strain 1F. H2 production in strain CA was also markedly influenced by the light intensity used for growth, although the growth rates indicated that the light intensities used were essentially saturating. PMID:6417109

  7. Expanding the Direct HetR Regulon in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Videau, Patrick; Ni, Shuisong; Rivers, Orion S.; Ushijima, Blake; Feldmann, Erik A.; Cozy, Loralyn M.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    In response to a lack of environmental combined nitrogen, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 differentiates nitrogen-fixing heterocyst cells in a periodic pattern. HetR is a transcription factor that coordinates the regulation of this developmental program. An inverted repeat-containing sequence in the hepA promoter required for proheterocyst-specific transcription was identified based on sequence similarity to a previously characterized binding site for HetR in the promoter of hetP. The binding affinity of HetR for the hepA site is roughly an order of magnitude lower than that for the hetP binding site. A BLAST search of the Anabaena genome identified 166 hepA-like sites that occur as single or tandem sites (two binding sites separated by 13 bp). The vast majority of these sites are present in predicted intergenic regions. HetR bound five representative single binding sites in vitro, and binding was abrogated by transversions in the binding sites that conserved the inverted repeat nature of the sites. Binding to four representative tandem sites was not observed. Transcriptional fusions of the green fluorescent protein gene gfp with putative promoter regions associated with the representative binding sites indicated that HetR could function as either an activator or repressor and that activation was cell-type specific. Taken together, we have expanded the direct HetR regulon and propose a model in which three categories of HetR binding sites, based on binding affinity and nucleotide sequence, contribute to three of the four phases of differentiation. PMID:24375104

  8. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Peroxidase from the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ogola, Henry Joseph Oduor; Kamiike, Takaaki; Hashimoto, Naoya; Ashida, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    The open reading frame alr1585 of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 encodes a heme-dependent peroxidase (Anabaena peroxidase [AnaPX]) belonging to the novel DyP-type peroxidase family (EC 1.11.1.X). We cloned and heterologously expressed the active form of the enzyme in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was a 53-kDa tetrameric protein with a pI of 3.68, a low pH optima (pH 4.0), and an optimum reaction temperature of 35°C. Biochemical characterization revealed an iron protoporphyrin-containing heme peroxidase with a broad specificity for aromatic substrates such as guaiacol, 4-aminoantipyrine and pyrogallol. The enzyme efficiently catalyzed the decolorization of anthraquinone dyes like Reactive Blue 5, Reactive Blue 4, Reactive Blue 114, Reactive Blue 119, and Acid Blue 45 with decolorization rates of 262, 167, 491, 401, and 256 μM·min−1, respectively. The apparent Km and kcat/Km values for Reactive Blue 5 were 3.6 μM and 1.2 × 107 M−1 s−1, respectively, while the apparent Km and kcat/Km values for H2O2 were 5.8 μM and 6.6 × 106 M−1 s−1, respectively. In contrast, the decolorization activity of AnaPX toward azo dyes was relatively low but was significantly enhanced 2- to ∼50-fold in the presence of the natural redox mediator syringaldehyde. The specificity and catalytic efficiency for hydrogen donors and synthetic dyes show the potential application of AnaPX as a useful alternative of horseradish peroxidase or fungal DyPs. To our knowledge, this study represents the only extensive report in which a bacterial DyP has been tested in the biotransformation of synthetic dyes. PMID:19801472

  9. DL-7-azatryptophan and citrulline metabolism in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 1F

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Van Baalen, C.; Tabita, F.R.

    1987-03-01

    An alternative route for the primary assimilation of ammonia proceeds via glutamine synthetase-carbamyl phosphate synthetase and its inherent glutaminase activity in Anabaena sp. strain 1F, a marine filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium. Evidence for the presence of this possible alternative route to glutamate was provided by the use of amino acid analogs as specific enzyme inhibitors, enzymological studies, and radioistopic labeling experiments. The amino acid pool patterns of continuous cultures of Anabaena sp. strain 1F were markedly influenced by the nitrogen source. A relatively high concentration of glutamate was maintained in the amino acid pools of all cultures irrespective of the nitrogen source, reflecting the central role of glutamate in nitrogen metabolism. The addition of 1.0 microM azaserine increased the intracellular pools of glutamate and glutamine. All attempts to detect any enzymatic activity for glutamate synthase by measuring the formation of L-(/sup 14/C)glutamate from 2-keto-(1-/sup 14/C)glutarate and glutamine failed. The addition of 10 microM DL-7-azatryptophan caused a transient accumulation of intracellular citrulline and alanine which was not affected by the presence of chloramphenicol. The in vitro activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase and glutaminase increased severalfold in the presence of azatryptophan. Results from radioisotopic labeling experiments with (/sup 14/C)bicarbonate and L-(1-/sup 14/C)ornithine also indicated that citrulline was formed via carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase. In addition to its effects on nitrogen metabolism, azatryptophan also affected carbon metabolism by inhibiting photosynthetic carbon assimilation and photosynthetic oxygen evolution.

  10. Multiplicity and specificity of siderophore uptake in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Mareike; Stevanovic, Mara; Kranzler, Chana; Pernil, Rafael; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Many cyanobacteria secrete siderophores to sequester iron. Alternatively, mechanisms to utilize xenosiderophores have evolved. The overall uptake systems are comparable to that of other bacteria involving outer membrane transporters energized by TonB as well as plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the function of the bioinformatically-inferred components is largely not established and recent studies showed a high diversity of the complexity of the uptake systems in different cyanobacteria. Thus, we approached the systems of the filamentous Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 as a model of a siderophore-secreting cyanobacterium. Anabaena sp. produces schizokinen and uptake of Fe-schizokinen involves the TonB-dependent transporter, schizokinen transporter (SchT), and the ABC-type transport system FhuBCD. We confirm that this system is also relevant for the uptake of structurally similar Fe-siderophore complexes like Fe-aerobactin. Moreover, we demonstrate a function of the TonB-dependent transporter IutA2 in Fe-schizokinen uptake in addition to SchT. The iutA2 mutant shows growth defects upon iron limitation, alterations in Fe-schizokinen uptake and in the transcription profile of the Fe-schizokinen uptake system. The physiological properties of the mutant confirm the importance of iron uptake for cellular function, e.g. for the Krebs cycle. Based on the relative relation of expression of schT and iutA2 as well as of the iron uptake rate to the degree of starvation, a model for the need of the co-existence of two different outer membrane transporters for the same substrate is discussed. PMID:27325117

  11. Introgression of an imidazolinone-resistance gene from winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) into jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host).

    PubMed

    Perez-Jones, Alejandro; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Hansen, Jennifer L; Zemetra, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    Imidazolinone-resistant winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is being commercialized in the USA. This technology allows wheat growers to selectively control jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host), a weed that is especially problematic because of its close genetic relationship with wheat. However, the potential movement of the imidazolinone-resistance gene from winter wheat to jointed goatgrass is a concern. Winter wheat and jointed goatgrass have the D genome in common and can hybridize and backcross under natural field conditions. Since the imidazolinone-resistance gene (Imi1) is located on the D genome, it is possible for resistance to be transferred to jointed goatgrass via hybridization and backcrossing. To study the potential for gene movement, BC(2)S(2) plants were produced artificially using imidazolinone-resistant winter wheat (cv. FS-4) as the female parent and a native jointed goatgrass collection as the male recurrent parent. FS-4, the jointed goatgrass collection, and 18 randomly selected BC(2)S(2) populations were treated with imazamox. The percentage of survival was 100% for the FS-4, 0% for the jointed goatgrass collection and 6 BC(2)S(2) populations, 40% or less for 2 BC(2)S(2) populations, and 50% or greater for the remaining 10 BC(2)S(2) populations. Chromosome counts in BC(2)S(3) plants showed a restoration of the chromosome number of jointed goatgrass, with four out of four plants examined having 28 chromosomes. Sequencing of AHASL1D in BC(2)S(3) plants derived from BC(2)S(2)-6 revealed the sexual transmission of Imi1 from FS-4 to jointed goatgrass. Imi1 conferred resistance to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox, as shown by the in vitro assay for acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) activity. PMID:17058103

  12. Allelopathic exudates of cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica): implications for the performance of native pine savanna plant species in the southeastern US.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Donald L; Jose, Shibu; Lin, Chung-Ho

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a greenhouse study to assess the effects of cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) rhizochemicals on a suite of plants native to southeastern US pine savanna ecosystems. Our results indicated a possible allelopathic effect, although it varied by species. A ruderal grass (Andropogon arctatus) and ericaceous shrub (Lyonia ferruginea) were unaffected by irrigation with cogongrass soil "leachate" (relative to leachate from mixed native species), while a mid-successional grass (Aristida stricta Michx. var. beyrichiana) and tree (Pinus elliottii) were negatively affected. For A. stricta, we observed a 35.7 % reduction in aboveground biomass, a 21.9 % reduction in total root length, a 24.6 % reduction in specific root length and a 23.5 % reduction in total mycorrhizal root length, relative to the native leachate treatment. For P. elliottii, there was a 19.5 % reduction in percent mycorrhizal colonization and a 20.1 % reduction in total mycorrhizal root length. Comparisons with a DI water control in year two support the possibility that the treatment effects were due to the negative effects of cogongrass leachate, rather than a facilitative effect from the mixed natives. Chemical analyses identified 12 putative allelopathic compounds (mostly phenolics) in cogongrass leachate. The concentrations of most compounds were significantly lower, if they were present at all, in the native leachate. One compound was an alkaloid with a speculated structure of hexadecahydro-1-azachrysen-8-yl ester (C23H33NO4). This compound was not found in the native leachate. We hypothesize that the observed treatment effects may be attributable, at least partially, to these qualitative and quantitative differences in leachate chemistry. PMID:23334457

  13. Microscopic Gardens: A Close Look at Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Mary Ann

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom activities using algae, including demonstration of eutrophication, examination of mating strains, and activities with Euglena. Includes on algal morphology/physiology, types of algae, and field sources for collecting these organisms. (JN)

  14. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  15. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Riego, Ana M.; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, Carla V.; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however, nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (ΔntrC), apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments. PMID:27588019

  16. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Riego, Ana M; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, Carla V; Florencio, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however, nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (ΔntrC), apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments. PMID:27588019

  17. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant Fur (ferric uptake regulator) protein from Anabaena PCC 7119: factors affecting its oligomerization state.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, José A; Bes, M Teresa; Fillat, María F; Neira, José L; Peleato, M Luisa

    2002-01-01

    Fur (ferric uptake regulator) protein is a DNA-binding protein which regulates iron-responsive genes. Recombinant Fur from the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7119 has been purified and characterized, and polyclonal antibodies obtained. The experimental data show that Fur from Anabaena dimerizes in solution with the involvement of disulphide bridges. Cross-linking experiments and MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight) MS also show several oligomerization states of Fur, and the equilibrium of these forms depends on protein concentration and ionic strength. In intact recombinant Fur, four cysteine residues out of five were inert towards DTNB [5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)], and their modification required sodium borohydride. Metal analysis and electrospray ionization MS revealed that neither zinc nor other metals are present in this Fur protein. Purified recombinant Fur bound to its own promoter in gel-shift assays. Fur was shown to be a constitutive protein in Anabaena cells, with no significant difference in its expression in cells grown under iron-sufficient compared with iron-deficient conditions. PMID:12015814

  18. A novel alkyl hydroperoxidase (AhpD) of Anabaena PCC7120 confers abiotic stress tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Singh, Shilpi; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Pandey, Sarita; Rai, L C

    2015-01-01

    In silico analysis together with cloning, molecular characterization and heterologous expression reports that the hypothetical protein All5371 of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 is a novel hydroperoxide scavenging protein similar to AhpD of bacteria. The presence of E(X)11CX HC(X)3H motif in All5371 confers peroxidase activity and closeness to bacterial AhpD which is also reflected by its highest 3D structure homology with Rhodospirillum rubrum AhpD. Heterologous expression of all5371 complimented for ahpC and conferred resistance in MJF178 strain (ahpCF::Km) of Escherichia coli. All5371 reduced the organic peroxide more efficiently than inorganic peroxide and the recombinant E. coli strain following exposure to H2O2, CdCl2, CuCl2, heat, UV-B and carbofuron registered increased growth over wild-type and mutant E. coli transformed with empty vector. Appreciable expression of all5371 in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 as measured by qRT-PCR under selected stresses and their tolerance against H2O2, tBOOH, CuOOH and menadione attested its role in stress tolerance. In view of the above, All5371 of Anabaena PCC7120 emerged as a new hydroperoxide detoxifying protein. PMID:25391500

  19. Assessment of the CO2 fixation capacity of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 outdoor cultures in vertical flat-panel reactors.

    PubMed

    Clares, Marta E; Moreno, José; Guerrero, Miguel G; García-González, Mercedes

    2014-10-10

    The extent of biological CO2 fixation was evaluated for outdoor cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047. Culture conditions were optimized indoors in bubble-column photochemostats operating in continuous mode, subjected to irradiance cycles mimicking the light regime outdoors. Highest values achieved for CO2 fixation rate and biomass productivity were 1 and 0.6 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The comparison among different reactors operating simultaneously - open pond, horizontal tubular reactor and vertical flat-panel - allowed to assess their relative efficiency for the outdoor development of Anabaena cultures. Despite the higher volumetric CO2 fixation capacity (and biomass productivity) exhibited by the tubular photobioreactor, yield of the flat-panel reactor was 50% higher than that of the tubular option on a per area basis, reaching values over 35 g CO2 fixed m(-2) d(-1). The flat-panel reactor actually represents a most suitable system for CO2 capture coupled to the generation of valuable biomass by Anabaena cultures. PMID:25068618

  20. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species Gloiopeltis furcata, Porphyra...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species Analipus japonicus, Eisenia...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  10. [Detection of the introgression of genome elements of the Aegilops cylindrica host. into the Triticum aestivum L. genome by ISSR and SSR analysis].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Babaiants, L T; Sivolap, Iu M

    2004-12-01

    To reveal sites of the donor genome in wheat crossed with Aegilops cylindrica, which acquired conferred resistance to fungal diseases, a comparative analysis of introgressive and parental forms was conducted. Two systems of PCR analysis, ISSR and SSR-PCR, were employed. Upon use of 7 ISSR primers in genotypes of 30 individual plants BC1 F9 belonging to lines 5/55-91 and 5/20-91, 19 ISSR loci were revealed and assigned to introgressive fragments of Aegilops cylindrica genome in Triticum aestivum. The 40 pairs of SSR primers allowed the detection of seven introgressive alleles; three of these alleles were located on common wheat chromosomes in the B genome, while four alleles, in the D genome. Based on data of microsatellite analysis, it was assumed that the telomeric region of the long arm of common wheat chromosome 6A also changed. ISSR and SSR methods were shown to be effective for detecting variability caused by introgression of foreign genetic material into the genome of common wheat. PMID:15648148

  11. Influence of an experimental fish farm on the spatio-temporal dynamic of a Mediterranean maërl algae community.

    PubMed

    Aguado-Giménez, F; Ruiz-Fernández, J M

    2012-03-01

    This work concerns the monitoring of a Mediterranean maërl bed influenced by an experimental fish cage culture for eighteen months. The maërl bed showed an a priori stratified distribution with depth, which led to the selection of a stratified random sampling design that also took into account the gradient of influence by the fish cages. Maërl coverage and total biomass, macroalgae species richness and community structure as determined from semi-quantitative abundance data were assessed. The content of organic matter sediment was also considered. Sampling campaigns (performed by scuba divers) were carried out six months before the start of the culture, twice during the culture, and two months after the end of the experimental culture. Below the fish cages, the maërl community was almost completely buried and dead blackened calcareous algae were seen beneath a thin layer of sediment prior to the end of the study, and only a few specimens of Lithophyllum racemus, Flabellia petiolata, Gracilaria cylindrica and Meredithia microphylla remained alive. The influence of the experimental culture on the maërl algae community structure bed did not extend beyond the facilities, but a regression of the community was also observed close to the fish cages. Sensitivity to aquaculture activity, and the ecological benefits provided by maërl beds suggest that this community warrants further consideration when planning fish farm site selection and management. PMID:22209704

  12. Algae. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    The plants and plantlike organisms informally grouped together as algae show great diversity of form and size and occur in a wide variety of habitats. These extremely important photosynthesizers are also economically significant. For example, some species contaminate water supplies; others provide food for aquatic animals and for man; still others…

  13. Biological importance of marine algae

    PubMed Central

    El Gamal, Ali A.

    2009-01-01

    Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Algae can be classified into two main groups; first one is the microalgae, which includes blue green algae, dinoflagellates, bacillariophyta (diatoms)… etc., and second one is macroalgae (seaweeds) which includes green, brown and red algae. The microalgae phyla have been recognized to provide chemical and pharmacological novelty and diversity. Moreover, microalgae are considered as the actual producers of some highly bioactive compounds found in marine resources. Red algae are considered as the most important source of many biologically active metabolites in comparison to other algal classes. Seaweeds are used for great number of application by man. The principal use of seaweeds as a source of human food and as a source of gums (phycocollides). Phycocolloides like agar agar, alginic acid and carrageenan are primarily constituents of brown and red algal cell walls and are widely used in industry. PMID:23960716

  14. Measurements of photorespiration in some microscopic algae.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K H; Colman, B

    1974-09-01

    The rate of photorespiration in three green algae and four blue-green algae was determined by the measurement of the rate of loss of photosynthetically fixed (14)CO2 in light in CO2-free air at 25°. In all algae studied, CO2 evolution in light was considerably less than that in the dark, except for Chlamydomonas reinhardii which released slightly more CO2 in the light. Raising the temperature to 35° had little effect on the ratio of light to dark (14)CO2 release. Blue-green algae showed the lowest photorespiration rate of the algae studied. PMID:24458883

  15. Treatment with NaHSO3 greatly enhances photobiological H2 production in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weimin; Chen, Ming; Wang, Lianjun; Wei, Lanzhen; Wang, Quanxi

    2011-09-01

    Treatment with NaHSO3 induces a 10-fold increase in H2 photoproduction in the filamentous N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. However, it is unclear whether this treatment also increases H2 photoproduction in green alga. In this study, treatment with 13 mM NaHSO3 resulted in about a 200-fold increase in H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and this increase was most probably the result of reduced O2 content and enhanced hydrogenase activity. Compared to the conventional strategy of sulfur deprivation, NaHSO3 treatment results in a higher maximum rate of H2 photoproduction, greater efficiency of conversion of light energy into H2, shorter half-time to produce the maximum accumulated H2 levels, and reduced costs because no centrifugation is involved. We therefore conclude that NaHSO3 treatment is an efficient, rapid, and economic strategy for improving photobiological H2 production in the green alga C. reinhardtii. PMID:21489780

  16. Functional Dependence between Septal Protein SepJ from Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 and an Amino Acid ABC-Type Uptake Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Leticia; Mariscal, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the diazotrophic filaments of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, two different cell types, the CO2-fixing vegetative cells and the N2-fixing heterocysts, exchange nutrients, including some amino acids. In the model organism Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the SepJ protein, composed of periplasmic and integral membrane (permease) sections, is located at the intercellular septa joining adjacent cells in the filament. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 bears a gene, Synpcc7942_1024 (here designated dmeA), encoding a permease homologous to the SepJ permease domain. Synechococcus strains lacking dmeA or lacking dmeA and expressing Anabaena sepJ were constructed. The Synechococcus dmeA mutant showed a significant 22 to 32% decrease in the uptake of aspartate, glutamate, and glutamine, a phenotype that could be partially complemented by Anabaena sepJ. Synechococcus mutants of an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC)-type transporter for polar amino acids showed >98% decreased uptake of glutamate irrespective of the presence of dmeA or Anabaena sepJ in the same strain. Thus, Synechococcus DmeA or Anabaena SepJ is needed to observe full (or close to full) activity of the ABC transporter. An Anabaena sepJ deletion mutant was significantly impaired in glutamate and aspartate uptake, which also in this cyanobacterium requires the activity of an ABC-type transporter for polar amino acids. SepJ appears therefore to generally stimulate the activity of cyanobacterial ABC-type transporters for polar amino acids. Conversely, an Anabaena mutant of three ABC-type transporters for amino acids was impaired in the intercellular transfer of 5-carboxyfluorescein, a SepJ-related property. Our results unravel possible functional interactions in transport elements important for diazotrophic growth. IMPORTANCE Membrane transporters are essential for many aspects of cellular life, from uptake and export of substances in unicellular organisms to intercellular

  17. LexA protein of cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 exhibits in vitro pH-dependent and RecA-independent autoproteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Kirti, Anurag; Rajaram, Hema

    2015-02-01

    The LexA protein of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 exhibits a RecA-independent and alkaline pH-dependent autoproteolytic cleavage. The autoproteolytic cleavage of Anabaena LexA occurs at pH 8.5 and above, stimulated by the addition of Ca(2+) and in the temperature range of 30-57°C. Mutational analysis of Anabaena LexA protein indicated that the cleavage occurred at the peptide bond between Ala-84 and Gly-85, and optimal cleavage required the presence of Ser-118 and Lys-159, as also observed for LexA protein of Escherichia coli. Cleavage of Anabaena LexA was affected upon deletion of three amino acids, (86)GLI. These three amino acids are unique to all cyanobacterial LexA proteins predicted to be cleavable. The absence of RecA-dependent cleavage at physiological pH, which has not been reported for other bacterial LexA proteins, is possibly due to the absence of RecA interacting sites on Anabaena LexA protein, corresponding to the residues identified in E. coli LexA, and low cellular levels of RecA in Anabaena. Exposure to SOS-response inducing stresses, such as UV-B and mitomycin C neither affected the expression of LexA in Anabaena nor induced cleavage of LexA in either Anabaena 7120 or E. coli overexpressing Anabaena LexA protein. Though the LexA may be acting as a repressor by binding to the LexA box in the vicinity of the promoter region of specific gene, their derepression may not be via proteolytic cleavage during SOS-inducing stresses, unless the stress induces increase in cytoplasmic pH. This could account for the regulation of several carbon metabolism genes rather than DNA-repair genes under the regulation of LexA in cyanobacteria especially during high light induced oxidative stress. PMID:25523083

  18. Luffa cylindrica suppresses development of Dermatophagoides farinae-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in Nc/Nga mice

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hyekyung; Lim, Hye-Sun; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Jeon, Woo Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context The fruit pulp of Luffa cylindrica Roemer (Cucurbitaceae) (LC) has been used to induce hemostasis, resolve phlegm and clear fever in traditional Korean medicine. However, the efficacy of LC has not been examined in atopic dermatitis (AD). Objective A 70% ethanol extract of LC was evaluated to determine anti-inflammation and anti-AD effects in vitro and in vivo. Materials and methods The inhibitory effects of LC on the production of PGE2 and histamine were respectively measured in lipopolysaccharide-treated (1 μg/mL) RAW264.7 macrophages and phorbol-12 myristate 13-acetate (50 nM) and A23187 (1 µM)-stimulated HMC-1 mast cells. The production of AD-related chemokines (RANTES, TARC, and MDC) were evaluated in IFN-γ and TNF-α-stimulated (10 ng/mL, each) HaCaT keratinocytes. LC (10 mg/mouse/d) was topically applied to the dorsal skin and ears of Dermatophagoides farina (Pyroglyphidae)-sensitized Nc/Nga mice for 4 weeks. Results The IC50 values of LC on PGE2 and histamine production were 16.89 and 139.9 μg/mL, individually. The production of TARC and RANTES were inhibited 20% and 12% by LC (50 μg/mL) in HaCaT cells, respectively (p < 0.05). In sensitized-NC/Nga mice, the plasma levels of IgE and histamine were suppressed 36% and 41% by LC, respectively (p < 0.05). LC also reduced hemorrhage, hypertrophy, and hyperkeratosis of the epidermis and infiltration of mast cells in the dorsal skin and ear. Discussion and conclusion LC can inhibit AD-like skin lesions and reduce the generation of IgE via inhibition of the inflammatory responses. LC has potential as a therapeutic agent to treat allergic diseases, including AD. PMID:25327534

  19. The oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 (OEE) of photosystem II in green algae exhibits thioredoxin activity.

    PubMed

    Heide, Heinrich; Kalisz, Henryk M; Follmann, Hartmut

    2004-02-01

    A thioredoxin-like chloroplast protein of the fructosebisphosphatase-stimulating f-type, but with an unusually high molecular mass of 28 kDa has previously been identified and purified to homogeneity in a fractionation scheme for resolution of the acid- and heat-stable, regular-size (12kDa) thioredoxins of the unicellular green algae, Scenedesmus obliquus. An apparently analogous protein of 26 kDa was described in a cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp., but no such large thioredoxin species f exists in the thioredoxin profiles of higher plants. The structure of the 28 kDa protein, which had been envisaged to represent a precursor, or fusion product of the two more specialized, common chloroplast thioredoxins f and m has now been determined by amino acid sequencing. Although it exhibits virtually all the properties and enzyme-modulating activities of a thioredoxin proper this algal protein, surprisingly, does not belong to the thioredoxin family of small redox proteins but is identical with OEE (oxygen evolving enhancer) protein 1, an auxiliary component of the photosystem II manganese cluster. Extracts of Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii also contain heat-stable protein fractions of 23-26 kDa capable of specifically stimulating chloroplast fructosebisphosphatase in vitro. In contrast, OEE protein 1 from spinach is not able to modulate FbPase or NADP malate dehydrogenase from spinach chloroplasts. A dual function of the OEE protein in algal photosynthesis is envisaged. PMID:15022827

  20. Oxygen-dependent proton efflux in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae).

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, S; Stürzl, E; Böger, P

    1984-01-01

    The oxygen-dependent proton efflux (in the dark) of intact cells of Anabaena variabilis and four other cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was investigated. In contrast to bacteria and isolated mitochondria, an H+/e ratio (= protons translocated per electron transported) of only 0.23 to 0.35 and a P/e ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 were observed, indicative of respiratory electron transport being localized essentially on the thylakoids, not on the cytoplasmic membrane. Oxygen-induced acidification of the medium was sensitive to cyanide and the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Inhibitors such as 2,6-dinitrophenol and vanadate exhibited a significant decrease in the H+/e ratio. After the oxygen pulse, electron transport started immediately, but proton efflux lagged 40 to 60 s behind, a period also needed before maximum ATP pool levels were attained. We suggest that proton efflux in A. variabilis is due to a proton-translocating ATP hydrolase (ATP-consuming ATPase) rather than to respiratory electron transport located on the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:6327614

  1. Main chain and side chain dynamics of oxidized flavodoxin from Cyanobacterium anabaena.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Flynn, P F; Fuentes, E J; Kranz, J K; McCormick, M; Wand, A J

    2001-12-11

    Oxidized flavodoxin from Cyanobacterium anabaena PCC 7119 is used as a model system to investigate the fast internal dynamics of a flavin-bearing protein. Virtually complete backbone and side chain resonance NMR assignments of an oxidized flavodoxin point mutant (C55A) have been determined. Backbone and side chain dynamics in flavodoxin (C55A) were investigated using (15)N amide and deuterium methyl NMR relaxation methods. The squared generalized order parameters (S(NH)(2)) for backbone amide N-H bonds are found to be uniformly high ( approximately 0.923 over 109 residues in regular secondary structure), indicating considerable restriction of motion in the backbone of the protein. In contrast, methyl-bearing side chains are considerably heterogeneous in their amplitude of motion, as indicated by obtained symmetry axis squared generalized order parameters (S(axis)(2)). However, in comparison to nonprosthetic group-bearing proteins studied with these NMR relaxation methods, the side chains of oxidized flavodoxin are unusually rigid. PMID:11732893

  2. Regulation of nitrogenase gene expression in anaerobic cultures of Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Helber, J T; Johnson, T R; Yarbrough, L R; Hirschberg, R

    1988-01-01

    Derepression of nitrogenase gene expression was studied at the mRNA and enzyme activity levels in anaerobic cultures of Anabaena variabilis 29413. Cells, previously grown with ammonium chloride, were incubated in the absence of fixed nitrogen compounds under an Ar atmosphere with dichlorophenyldimethyl-urea present to inhibit oxygen evolution. The appearance of nitrogenase mRNA (measured by dot blot hybridization analysis) and nitrogenase activity (measured as acetylene-reducing activity) was followed, and the cells were also observed by phase-contrast microscopy. Nitrogenase mRNA could be detected after 1.5 to 2.0 h of nitrogen starvation; enzyme activity appeared about 1 h later. Although enzyme activity increased for many hours, mRNA levels reached a steady state rapidly. Neither heterocysts nor proheterocysts formed under these conditions; however, the cells were observed to shrink and become chlorotic. When anaerobic, derepressed cultures were exposed to oxygen, nitrogenase mRNA levels decreased very rapidly. Images PMID:3123456

  3. Dynamic, mechanistic, molecular-level modelling of cyanobacteria: Anabaena and nitrogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Hellweger, Ferdi L; Fredrick, Neil D; McCarthy, Mark J; Gardner, Wayne S; Wilhelm, Steven W; Paerl, Hans W

    2016-09-01

    Phytoplankton (eutrophication, biogeochemical) models are important tools for ecosystem research and management, but they generally have not been updated to include modern biology. Here, we present a dynamic, mechanistic, molecular-level (i.e. gene, transcript, protein, metabolite) model of Anabaena - nitrogen interaction. The model was developed using the pattern-oriented approach to model definition and parameterization of complex agent-based models. It simulates individual filaments, each with individual cells, each with genes that are expressed to yield transcripts and proteins. Cells metabolize various forms of N, grow and divide, and differentiate heterocysts when fixed N is depleted. The model is informed by observations from 269 laboratory experiments from 55 papers published from 1942 to 2014. Within this database, we identified 331 emerging patterns, and, excluding inconsistencies in observations, the model reproduces 94% of them. To explore a practical application, we used the model to simulate nutrient reduction scenarios for a hypothetical lake. For a 50% N only loading reduction, the model predicts that N fixation increases, but this fixed N does not compensate for the loading reduction, and the chlorophyll a concentration decreases substantially (by 33%). When N is reduced along with P, the model predicts an additional 8% reduction (compared to P only). PMID:27059435

  4. Azolla-Anabaena's behaviour in urban wastewater and artificial media--influence of combined nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Costa, M L; Santos, M C R; Carrapiço, F; Pereira, A L

    2009-08-01

    The results of using the nitrogen fixing symbiotic system Azolla-Anabaena to improve the quality of treated urban wastewater, particularly on what concerns phosphorus removal efficiencies (40-65%), obtained in continuous assays performed during the past few years and presented earlier, were very promising. Nevertheless, the presence of combined nitrogen in some wastewaters can compromise the treatment efficiency. The main goal of this work was to compare plants behaviour in wastewater and in mineral media with and without added nitrogen. Azolla filiculoides's specific growth rates in wastewater and in mineral media without added nitrogen or with low nitrate concentration were very similar (0.122 d(-1)-0.126 d(-1)), but decreased in the presence of ammonium (0.100 d(-1)). The orthophosphate removal rate coefficients were similar in all the growth media (0.210 d(-1)-0.232 d(-1)), but ammonium removal rate coefficient in wastewater was higher (0.117 d(-1)) than in mineral medium using that source of nitrogen (0.077 d(-1)). The ammonium present in wastewater, despite its high concentration (34 mg NL(-1)), didn't seem to inhibit growth and nitrogen fixation, however, in mineral media, ammonium (40 mg NL(-1)) was found to induce, respectively, 18% and 46% of inhibition. PMID:19559459

  5. Dynamic transcriptional changes in response to rehydration in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Higo, Akiyoshi; Suzuki, Takayuki; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2007-11-01

    Global transcriptional responses to dehydration and rehydration were determined in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Nearly 300 genes were up- or downregulated during both dehydration and rehydration. While as many as 133 genes showed dehydration-specific downregulation, only 29 genes showed dehydration-specific upregulation. In contrast, while only 13 genes showed rehydration-specific downregulation, as many as 259 genes showed rehydration-specific upregulation. The genes upregulated during rehydration responded rapidly and transiently, whereas those upregulated during dehydration did so gradually and persistently. The expression of various genes involved in DNA repair, protein folding and NAD synthesis, as well as genes responding to nitrogen depletion and CO2 limitation, was upregulated during rehydration. Although no genes for transcriptional regulators showed dehydration-specific upregulation, eight showed rehydration-specific upregulation. Among them, two genes, ancrpB and alr0618, encode putative transcriptional activators of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) family. DNA microarray analysis using gene disruptants revealed that AnCrpB and Alr0618 regulate the genes induced by nitrogen depletion and by CO2 limitation, respectively. We conclude that rehydration is a complex process in which the expression of certain genes, particularly those for metabolism, is dramatically induced. PMID:17975076

  6. Pathway of assembly of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anabaena 7210 expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevitz, M.; Somerville, C.R.; McIntosh, L.

    1985-10-01

    The authors have placed the genes encoding ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the Anabaena 7120 operon under transcriptional control of the lac promoter carried on the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19. The genes encoding both the large and small subunit polypeptides (rbcL and rbcS) are transcribed and translated so that approx. = 0.6% of the soluble protein in E. coli extracts is a fully functional holoenzyme with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 18S, which contains stoichiometric amounts of the two subunits. However, expression of the large subunit polypeptide vastly exceeds that of the small subunit because the majority of transcripts terminate in the intergenic region between the rbcL and rbcS genes. As a result, excess large subunit is synthesized and accumulates in E. coli as an insoluble and catalytically inactive form. Because small subunit is found only in the high molecular weight soluble form of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the authors propose that the small subunit promotes assembly of the hexadecameric form of the enzyme via heterodimers of large and small subunits.

  7. Cryo-imaging of photosystems and phycobilisomes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Gábor; Schubert, Félix; Kaňa, Radek

    2015-11-01

    Primary photosynthetic reactions take place inside thylakoid membrane where light-to-chemical energy conversion is catalyzed by two pigment-protein complexes, photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). Light absorption in cyanobacteria is increased by pigment-protein supercomplexes--phycobilisomes (PBSs) situated on thylakoid membrane surfaces that transfer excitation energy into both photosystems. We have explored the localization of PSI, PSII and PBSs in thylakoid membrane of native cyanobacteria cell Anabaena sp. 7120 by means of cryogenic confocal microscopy. We have adapted a conventional temperature controlling stage to an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope. The presence of red shifted emission of chlorophylls from PSI has been confirmed by spectral measurements. Confocal fluorescence images of PSI (in a spectral range 710-750 nm), PSII (in a spectral range 690-705 nm) and PBSs (in a spectral range 650-680 nm) were recorded at low temperature. Co-localization of images showed spatial heterogeneity of PSI, PSII and PBSs over the thylakoid membrane, and three dominant areas were identified: PSI-PSII-PBS supercomplex area, PSII-PBS supercomplex area and PSI area. The observed results were discussed with regard to light-harvesting regulation in cyanobacteria. PMID:26498711

  8. Modification of dinitrogenase reductase in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis due to C starvation and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Ernst, A; Reich, S; Böger, P

    1990-02-01

    In the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, a change in nitrogenase activity and concomitant modification of dinitrogenase reductase (the Fe protein of nitrogenase) was induced either by NH4Cl at pH 10 (S. Reich and P. Böger, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 58:81-86, 1989) or by cessation of C supply resulting from darkness, CO2 limitation, or inhibition of photosystem II activity. Modification induced by both C limitation and NH4Cl was efficiently prevented by anaerobic conditions. Under air, endogenously stored glycogen and added fructose protected against modification triggered by C limitation but not by NH4Cl. With stored glycogen present, dark modification took place after inhibition of respiration by KCN. Reactivation of inactivated nitrogenase and concomitant demodification of dinitrogenase reductase occurred after restoration of diazotrophic growth conditions. In previously C-limited cultures, reactivation was also observed in the dark after addition of fructose (heterotrophic growth) and under anaerobiosis upon reillumination in the presence of a photosynthesis inhibitor. The results indicate that modification of dinitrogenase reductase develops as a result of decreased carbohydrate-supported reductant supply of the heterocysts caused by C limitation or by increased diversion of carbohydrates towards ammonia assimilation. Apparently, a product of N assimilation such as glutamine is not necessary for modification. The increase of oxygen concentration in the heterocysts is a plausible consequence of all treatments causing Fe protein modification. PMID:2105302

  9. Calcium impacts carbon and nitrogen balance in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Julia; Lynch, Fiona; Battchikova, Natalia; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Calcium is integral to the perception, communication and adjustment of cellular responses to environmental changes. However, the role of Ca2+ in fine-tuning cellular responses of wild-type cyanobacteria under favourable growth conditions has not been examined. In this study, extracellular Ca2+ has been altered, and changes in the whole transcriptome of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 have been evaluated under conditions replete of carbon and combined nitrogen. Ca2+ induced differential expression of many genes driving primary cellular metabolism, with transcriptional regulation of carbon- and nitrogen-related processes responding with opposing trends. However, physiological effects of these transcriptional responses on biomass accumulation, biomass composition, and photosynthetic activity over the 24h period following Ca2+ adjustment were found to be minor. It is well known that intracellular carbon:nitrogen balance is integral to optimal cell growth and that Ca2+ plays an important role in the response of heterocystous cyanobacteria to combined-nitrogen deprivation. This work adds to the current knowledge by demonstrating a signalling role of Ca2+ for making sensitive transcriptional adjustments required for optimal growth under non-limiting conditions. PMID:27012282

  10. Impact of titanium dioxide nanomaterials on nitrogen fixation rate and intracellular nitrogen storage in Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, Carla; Gu, April Z

    2010-11-01

    This study comprehensively investigated the impact of titanium dioxide nanomaterials (nTiO(2)) exposure on cell growth, nitrogen fixation activity, and nitrogen storage dynamics in the primary producer cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis at various dose concentrations and exposure time lengths. The results indicated that both growth rate (EC(50)-96 h of 0.62 mgTiO(2)/L) and nitrogen fixation activity (EC(50)-96 h of 0.4 mgTiO(2)/L) were inhibited by nTiO(2) exposure. The Hom's law (C(n)T(m)) was used as inactivation model to predict the concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of growth and nitrogen fixation activity. The kinetic parameters determined suggested that the time of exposure has a greater influence than the nTiO(2) concentration in toxicity. We observed, for the first time, that nTiO(2) induced a dose (concentration and time)-dependent increase in both the occurrence and intracellular levels of the nitrogen-rich cyanophycin grana proteins (CGPs). The results implied that CGPs may play an important role in the stress response mechanisms of nTiO(2) exposure and can serve as a toxicity assessment endpoint indicator. This study demonstrated that nitrogen-fixing activity could be hampered by the release of nTiO(2) in aquatic environments; therefore it potentially impacts important biogeochemical processes, such as carbon and nitrogen cycling. PMID:20853867

  11. Exogenous osmolytes suppresses the toxic effects of malathion on Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Ningthoujam, Manikar; Habib, Khalid; Bano, Fareha; Zutshi, Sunaina; Fatma, Tasneem

    2013-08-01

    Role of osmolytes is though well established for salt, drought and chilling stress, but their role in pesticide stress is yet to be explored thoroughly. The sporadic information covers our previous studies on proline with respect to endosulfan and carbaryl pesticides in cyanobacteria. Therefore, during the present investigation importance of osmolytes (exogenous and endogenous) is studied in cyanobacterial biofertilizer Anabaena variabilis in the presence of 25, 50, 75 and 100 μg mL(-1) malathion pesticide. Present investigation has two parts. In the first part we showed that malathion exert its toxic effect on growth (biomass) via. malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This was associated with quantitative enhancement of endogenous osmolytes (proline, sucrose, mannitol, trehalose and glycogen). In the second part effort was made to corelate effect of exogenous addition of osmolytes (which were detected in the first part of this study) on growth and antioxidant enzymes [like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)] of A. variabilis in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) malathion. Surprisingly it was observed that exogenous osmolytes gave additional protection to the organism. The order of protection provided by osmolytes was as trehalose>glycogen>sucrose>mannitol>proline in A. variabilis. PMID:23706601

  12. The cultivation of Anabaena variabilis in a bubble column operating under bubbly and slug flows.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyun; Choi, Shin Sik; Park, Tai Hyun

    2012-04-01

    In a bubble column reactor with an inner diameter of 6cm and a height of 63cm for the culture of cyanobacteria two different shapes of bubbles can be generated, resulting in bubbly flow or slug flow. Growth of Anabaena variabilis under slug flow (1.9g/l/day) was 1.73 times higher than that under bubbly flow (1.1g/l/day) when the specific irradiation rate was maintained above 10μmol/s/g dry cell. Although a stepwise increase in superficial gas velocity enhanced the average cell growth rate under bubbly flow by 1.57 times, the average cell growth rate during the deceleration phase under bubbly flow (1.98g/l/day) was 0.61 times smaller than that under slug flow (3.22g/l/day). These results demonstrate that the bubble shape in the slug flow was advantageous in regards to the radial circulation of cells. PMID:22326115

  13. Occurrence and localization of two distinct hydrogenases in the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7120.

    PubMed Central

    Houchins, J P; Burris, R H

    1981-01-01

    Two distinct types of hydrogenase occur in Anabaena 7120 and are distinguishable in whole filaments by the application of selective assay methods. A reversible hydrogenase occurs both in heterocysts and vegetative cells and can be selectively assayed by measuring H2 evolution from reduced methyl viologen. Activities in aerobically grown filaments were low but could be increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude by growing cells microaerobically. The presence of the reversible hydrogenase was independent of the N2-fixing properties of the organism, and activity did not respond to added H2 in the culture. Illumination was necessary during derepression of the reversible hydrogenase, and addition of 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea increased the amount of enzyme that was synthesized. An uptake hydrogenase occurred only in heterocysts of aerobically grown filaments, but a small amount of activity also was present in the vegetative cells of filaments grown microaerobically with 20% H2. It was assayed selectively by measuring an oxyhydrogen reaction at atmospheric levels of O2. Additional uptake hydrogenase could be elicited by including H2 or by removing O2 from the sparging gas of a culture. PMID:6783614

  14. Three fur homologues from Anabaena sp. PCC7120: exploring reciprocal protein-promoter recognition.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José A; López-Gomollón, Sara; Bes, M Teresa; Fillat, María F; Peleato, M Luisa

    2004-07-15

    DNA sequence analysis of the Anabaena sp. PCC7120 genome confirmed the presence of three open reading frames (all1691, all2473 and alr0957) containing the histidine-rich region characteristic of the Fur family. The genes coding for the three Fur proteins were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The overexpression products, called FurA, FurB and FurC are only distantly related. The ability of the three recombinant proteins to bind iron-boxes identified in the three fur promoter regions was tested by electrophoretical mobility shift assays. FurA binds the three fur promoters with increased affinity in presence of metal. FurB also binds the three fur promoters, and its affinity is increased with DTT. FurC does not bind to furA or furB promoter regions or to its own promoter. However, FurC affects the ability of FurB and FurA to bind their target promoters. PMID:15251208

  15. In Situ Structural Studies of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin in the E. coli Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Wang, Shenlin; Munro, Rachel; Ritz, Emily; Hung, Ivan; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Jiang, Yunjiang; Liang, Hongjun; Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance is well suited for the study of membrane proteins in the nativelike lipid environment. However, the natural cellular membrane is invariably more complex than the proteoliposomes most often used for solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies, and differences may affect the structure and dynamics of the proteins under examination. In this work we use SSNMR and other biochemical and biophysical methods to probe the structure of a seven-transmembrane helical photoreceptor, Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), prepared in the Escherichia coli inner membrane, and compare it to that in a bilayer formed by DMPC/DMPA lipids. We find that ASR is organized into trimers in both environments but forms two-dimensional crystal lattices of different symmetries. It favors hexagonal packing in liposomes, but may form a square lattice in the E. coli membrane. To examine possible changes in structure site-specifically, we perform two- and three-dimensional SSNMR experiments and analyze the differences in chemical shifts and peak intensities. Overall, this analysis reveals that the structure of ASR is largely conserved in the inner membrane of E. coli, with many of the important structural features of rhodopsins previously observed in ASR in proteoliposomes being preserved. Small, site-specific perturbations in protein structure that occur as a result of the membrane changes indicate that the protein can subtly adapt to its environment without large structural rearrangement. PMID:25863060

  16. Optimized Condition for Enhanced Soluble-Expression of Recombinant Mutant Anabaena Variabilis Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase

    PubMed Central

    Zarei Jaliani, Hossein; Farajnia, Safar; Safdari, Yaghoub; Mohammadi, Seyyed Abolghasem; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Talebi, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Recently discovered Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase (AvPAL) proved to be a good candidate for enzyme replacement therapy of phenylketonuria. Outstanding stability properties of a mutant version of this enzyme, produced already in our laboratory, have led us to the idea of culture conditions optimization for soluble expression of this therapeutically valuable enzyme in E. coli. Methods: In the present study, the gene encoding mutant version of AvPAL was cloned into the pET28a expression vector. Different concentrations of IPTG, induction period, growth temperature, shaking speed, as well as different types of culture media were examined with respect to the amount of recombinant protein produced and specific activity of the enzyme. Results: Based upon our findings, maximum amount of active mutant enzyme was attained by addition of 0.5 mM IPTG at 150 rpm to the TB culture media. The yield of active enzyme at cluture tempreature of 25 °C and induction period of 18 hour was the highest. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that the yield of mutant AvPAL production in E. coli can be affected mainly by culture temperature and inducer concentration. PMID:24754010

  17. The remote sensing of algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    State agencies need rapid, synoptic and inexpensive methods for lake assessment to comply with the 1972 Amendments to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. Low altitude aerial photography may be useful in providing information on algal type and quantity. Photography must be calibrated properly to remove sources of error including airlight, surface reflectance and scene-to-scene illumination differences. A 550-nm narrow wavelength band black and white photographic exposure provided a better correlation to algal biomass than either red or infrared photographic exposure. Of all the biomass parameters tested, depth-integrated chlorophyll a concentration correlated best to remote sensing data. Laboratory-measured reflectance of selected algae indicate that different taxonomic classes of algae may be discriminated on the basis of their reflectance spectra.

  18. Synthetic polyester from algae oil.

    PubMed

    Roesle, Philipp; Stempfle, Florian; Hess, Sandra K; Zimmerer, Julia; Río Bártulos, Carolina; Lepetit, Bernard; Eckert, Angelika; Kroth, Peter G; Mecking, Stefan

    2014-06-23

    Current efforts to technically use microalgae focus on the generation of fuels with a molecular structure identical to crude oil based products. Here we suggest a different approach for the utilization of algae by translating the unique molecular structures of algae oil fatty acids into higher value chemical intermediates and materials. A crude extract from a microalga, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was obtained as a multicomponent mixture containing amongst others unsaturated fatty acid (16:1, 18:1, and 20:5) phosphocholine triglycerides. Exposure of this crude algae oil to CO and methanol with the known catalyst precursor [{1,2-(tBu2 PCH2)2C6H4}Pd(OTf)](OTf) resulted in isomerization/methoxycarbonylation of the unsaturated fatty acids into a mixture of linear 1,17- and 1,19-diesters in high purity (>99 %). Polycondensation with a mixture of the corresponding diols yielded a novel mixed polyester-17/19.17/19 with an advantageously high melting and crystallization temperature. PMID:24845347

  19. Parasites in algae mass culture

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Laura T.; Lane, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential for parasites to have a devastating effect on commercial scale monoculture. As commercial algal production continues to expand with a widening variety of applications, including biofuel, food and pharmaceuticals, the parasites associated with algae will become of greater interest and potential economic impact. A number of important algal parasites have been identified in algal mass culture systems in the last few years and this number is sure to grow as the number of commercial algae ventures increases. Here, we review the research that has identified and characterized parasites infecting mass cultivated algae, the techniques being proposed and or developed to control them, and the potential impact of parasites on the future of the algal biomass industry. PMID:24936200

  20. Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.K.; Wood, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    Six strains of algae and one Euglena sp. were tested for their ability to bioaccumulate nickel. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni was used together with a microplate technique to determine the conditions for nickel removal by axenic cultures of cyanobacteria, green algae, and one euglenoid. The cyanobacteria tested were found to be more sensitive to nickel toxicity than the green algae or the Euglena sp. The concentration factor (CF) for nickel was determined under a variety of conditions and found to be in the range from 0 to 3.0 x 10/sup 3/. The effect of environmental variables on nickel uptake was examined, and a striking pH effect for biaccumulation was observed, with most of the algal strains accumulating nickel optimally at approximately pH 8.0. Competition experiments for binding sites between nickel and other cations as well as with other complexing anions, showed that /sup 63/Ni uptake was affected only by cobalt and by humic acids.

  1. The patA gene product, which contains a region similar to CheY of Escherichia coli, controls heterocyst pattern formation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J; Scappino, L; Haselkorn, R

    1992-01-01

    In Anabaena 7120, heterocysts (cells specialized for nitrogen fixation) develop at the ends of filaments and at intervals within each filament. We have isolated a mutant Anabaena strain that develops heterocysts mostly at the ends of filaments. This mutant, PAT-1, grows poorly under nitrogen-fixing conditions. The wild-type gene that complements the mutation in PAT-1, called patA, was cloned and sequenced. The predicted PatA protein contains 379 amino acids distributed among three "domains" based on predictions of hydropathy and flexibility. The carboxyl-terminal domain is very similar to that of CheY and other response regulators in two-component regulatory systems in eubacteria. The patA mutation suppresses the multiheterocyst phenotype produced by extra copies of the wild-type hetR gene described previously, suggesting that PatA and HetR are components of the same environment-sensing regulatory circuit in Anabaena. Images PMID:1608976

  2. Cadmium toxicity in diazotrophic Anabaena spp. adjudged by hasty up-accumulation of transporter and signaling and severe down-accumulation of nitrogen metabolism proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Chatterjee, Antra; Pandey, Sarita; Rai, Snigdha; Singh, Shilpi; Rai, L C

    2015-09-01

    Present study demonstrates interspecies variation in proteome and survival strategy of three Anabaena species i.e., Anabaena L31, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Anabaena doliolum subjected to respective LC50 doses of Cd at 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7day intervals. The proteome coverage with 452 differentially accumulated proteins unveiled species and time specific expression and interaction network of proteins involved in important cellular functions. Statistical analysis of protein abundance across Cd-treated proteomes clustered their co-expression pattern into four groups viz., (i) early (days 1 and 3) accumulated proteins, (ii) proteins up-accumulated for longer duration, (iii) late (days 5 and 7) accumulated proteins, and (iv) mostly down-accumulated proteins. Appreciable growth of Cd treated A L31 over other two species may be ascribed to proteins contained in the first and second groups (belonging to energy and carbohydrate metabolism (TK, G6-PI, PGD, FBA, PPA, ATP synthase)), sulfur metabolism (GR, GST, PGDH, PAPS reductase, GDC-P, and SAM synthetase), fatty acid metabolism (AspD, PspA, SQD-1), phosphorous metabolism (PhoD, PstB and SQD1), molecular chaperones (Gro-EL, FKBP-type peptidylprolyl isomerase), and antioxidative defense enzymes (SOD-A, catalase). Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 harboring proteins largely from the third group qualified as a late accumulator and A. doliolum housing majority of proteins from the fourth group emerged as the most sensitive species. Thus early up-accumulation of transporter and signaling category proteins and drastic reduction of nitrogen assimilation proteins could be taken as a vital indicator of cadmium toxicity in Anabaena spp. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:26021478

  3. Red algae and their use in papermaking.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yung-Bum; Lee, Youn-Woo; Lee, Chun-Han; You, Hack-Chul

    2010-04-01

    Gelidialian red algae, that contain rhizoidal filaments, except the family Gelidiellaceae were processed to make bleached pulps, which can be used as raw materials for papermaking. Red algae consist of rhizoidal filaments, cortical cells usually reddish in color, and medullary cells filled with mucilaginous carbohydrates. Red algae pulp consists of mostly rhizoidal filaments. Red algae pulp of high brightness can be produced by extracting mucilaginous carbohydrates after heating the algae in an aqueous medium and subsequently treating the extracted with bleaching chemicals. In this study, we prepared paper samples from bleached pulps obtained from two red algae species (Gelidium amansii and Gelidium corneum) and compared their properties to those of bleached wood chemical pulps. PMID:20022488

  4. Establishment of quantitative PCR methods for the quantification of geosmin-producing potential and Anabaena sp. in freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming; Gaget, Virginie; Giglio, Steven; Burch, Michael; An, Wei; Yang, Min

    2013-06-15

    Geosmin has often been associated with off-flavor problems in drinking water with Anabaena sp. as the major producer. Rapid on-site detection of geosmin-producers as well as geosmin is important for a timely management response to potential off-flavor events. In this study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods were developed to detect the levels of Anabaena sp. and geosmin, respectively, by designing two PCR primer sets to quantify the rpoC1 gene (ARG) and geosmin synthase one (GSG) in Anabaena sp. in freshwater systems. The ARG density determined by qPCR assay is highly related to microscopic cell count (r(2) = 0.726, p < 0.001), and the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the qPCR method were 0.02 pg and 0.2 pg of DNA, respectively. At the same time, the relationship between geosmin concentrations measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GSG copies was also established (r(2) = 0.742, p < 0.001) with similar LOD and LOQ values. Using the two qPCR protocols, we succeeded in measuring different levels of ARG and GSG copies in different freshwater systems with high incidence environmental substrata and diverse ecological conditions, showing that the methods developed could be applied for environmental monitoring. Moreover, comparing to the microscopic count and GC-MS analytical methods, the qPCR methods can reduce the time-to-results from several days to a few hours and require considerably less traditional algal identification and taxonomic expertise. PMID:23622984

  5. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  6. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Profiling of Anabaena sp. Strain 90 under Inorganic Phosphorus Stress

    PubMed Central

    Teikari, Jonna; Österholm, Julia; Kopf, Matthias; Battchikova, Natalia; Wahlsten, Matti; Aro, Eva-Mari; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is one of the main growth-limiting factors of diazotrophic cyanobacteria. Due to human activity, the availability of Pi has increased in water bodies, resulting in eutrophication and the formation of massive cyanobacterial blooms. In this study, we examined the molecular responses of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90 to phosphorus deprivation, aiming at the identification of candidate genes to monitor the Pi status in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, this study increased the basic understanding of how phosphorus affects diazotrophic and bloom-forming cyanobacteria as a major growth-limiting factor. Based on RNA sequencing data, we identified 246 differentially expressed genes after phosphorus starvation and 823 differentially expressed genes after prolonged Pi limitation, most of them related to central metabolism and cellular growth. The transcripts of the genes related to phosphorus transport and assimilation (pho regulon) were most upregulated during phosphorus depletion. One of the most increased transcripts encodes a giant protein of 1,869 amino acid residues, which contains, among others, a phytase-like domain. Our findings predict its crucial role in phosphorus starvation, but future studies are still needed. Using two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we found 43 proteins that were differentially expressed after prolonged phosphorus stress. However, correlation analysis unraveled an association only to some extent between the transcriptomic and proteomic abundances. Based on the present results, we suggest that the method used for monitoring the Pi status in cyanobacterial bloom should contain wider combinations of pho regulon genes (e.g., PstABCS transport systems) in addition to the commonly used alkaline phosphatase gene alone. PMID:26025890

  7. Regulation of Nitrogenase Gene Expression by Transcript Stability in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    PubMed Central

    Pratte, Brenda S.

    2014-01-01

    The nitrogenase gene cluster in cyanobacteria has been thought to comprise multiple operons; however, in Anabaena variabilis, the promoter for the first gene in the cluster, nifB1, appeared to be the primary promoter for the entire nif cluster. The structural genes nifHDK1 were the most abundant transcripts; however, their abundance was not controlled by an independent nifH1 promoter, but rather, by RNA processing, which produced a very stable nifH1 transcript and a moderately stable nifD1 transcript. There was also no separate promoter for nifEN1. In addition to the nifB1 promoter, there were weak promoters inside the nifU1 gene and inside the nifE1 gene, and both promoters were heterocyst specific. In an xisA mutant, which effectively separated promoters upstream of an 11-kb excision element in nifD1 from the downstream genes, the internal nifE1 promoter was functional. Transcription of the nif1 genes downstream of the 11-kb element, including the most distant genes, hesAB1 and fdxH1, was reduced in the xisA mutant, indicating that the nifB1 promoter contributed to their expression. However, with the exception of nifK1 and nifE1, which had no expression, the downstream genes showed low to moderate levels of transcription in the xisA mutant. The hesA1 gene also had a promoter, but the fdxH gene had a processing site just upstream of the gene. The processing of transcripts at sites upstream of nifH1 and fdxH1 correlated with increased stability of these transcripts, resulting in greater amounts than transcripts that were not close to processing sites. PMID:25092030

  8. Regulation of Three Nitrogenase Gene Clusters in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S.

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 fixes nitrogen under aerobic conditions in specialized cells called heterocysts that form in response to an environmental deficiency in combined nitrogen. Nitrogen fixation is mediated by the enzyme nitrogenase, which is very sensitive to oxygen. Heterocysts are microxic cells that allow nitrogenase to function in a filament comprised primarily of vegetative cells that produce oxygen by photosynthesis. A. variabilis is unique among well-characterized cyanobacteria in that it has three nitrogenase gene clusters that encode different nitrogenases, which function under different environmental conditions. The nif1 genes encode a Mo-nitrogenase that functions only in heterocysts, even in filaments grown anaerobically. The nif2 genes encode a different Mo-nitrogenase that functions in vegetative cells, but only in filaments grown under anoxic conditions. An alternative V-nitrogenase is encoded by vnf genes that are expressed only in heterocysts in an environment that is deficient in Mo. Thus, these three nitrogenases are expressed differentially in response to environmental conditions. The entire nif1 gene cluster, comprising at least 15 genes, is primarily under the control of the promoter for the first gene, nifB1. Transcriptional control of many of the downstream nif1 genes occurs by a combination of weak promoters within the coding regions of some downstream genes and by RNA processing, which is associated with increased transcript stability. The vnf genes show a similar pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of expression suggesting that the complex pattern of regulation of the nif1 cluster is conserved in other cyanobacterial nitrogenase gene clusters. PMID:25513762

  9. Impact of nano titanium dioxide exposure on cellular structure of Anabaena variabilis and evidence of internalization.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, Carla; Chernenko, Tatyana; Diem, Max; Gu, April Z

    2011-04-01

    The present study investigated the impact of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO(2) ) exposure on the cellular structures of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis. Results of the present study showed that nTiO(2) exposure led to observable alteration in various intracellular structures and induced a series of recognized stress responses, including production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), appearance and increase in the abundance of membrane crystalline inclusions, membrane mucilage layer formation, opening of intrathylakoidal spaces, and internal plasma membrane disruption. The production of total ROS in A. variabilis cells increased with increasing nTiO(2) doses and exposure time, and the intracellular ROS contributed to only a small fraction (<10%) of the total ROS measured. The percentage of cells with loss of thylakoids and growth of membrane crystalline inclusions increased as the nTiO(2) dose and exposure time increased compared with controls, suggesting their possible roles in stress response to nTiO(2) , as previously shown for metals. Algal cell surface morphology and mechanical properties were modified by nTiO(2) exposure, as indicated by the increase in cell surface roughness and shifts in cell spring constant determined by atomic force microscopy analysis. The change in cell surface structure and increase in the cellular turgor pressure likely resulted from the structural membrane damage mediated by the ROS production. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of nTiO(2) aggregates size distribution seems to suggest possible disaggregation of nTiO(2) aggregates when in close contact with microbial cells, potentially as a result of biomolecules such as DNA excreted by organisms that may serve as a biodispersant. The present study also showed, for the first time, with both TEM and Raman imaging that internalization of nTiO(2) particles through multilayered membranes in algal cells is possible. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2011; 30:861-869.

  10. Regulation of Three Nitrogenase Gene Clusters in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda S

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 fixes nitrogen under aerobic conditions in specialized cells called heterocysts that form in response to an environmental deficiency in combined nitrogen. Nitrogen fixation is mediated by the enzyme nitrogenase, which is very sensitive to oxygen. Heterocysts are microxic cells that allow nitrogenase to function in a filament comprised primarily of vegetative cells that produce oxygen by photosynthesis. A. variabilis is unique among well-characterized cyanobacteria in that it has three nitrogenase gene clusters that encode different nitrogenases, which function under different environmental conditions. The nif1 genes encode a Mo-nitrogenase that functions only in heterocysts, even in filaments grown anaerobically. The nif2 genes encode a different Mo-nitrogenase that functions in vegetative cells, but only in filaments grown under anoxic conditions. An alternative V-nitrogenase is encoded by vnf genes that are expressed only in heterocysts in an environment that is deficient in Mo. Thus, these three nitrogenases are expressed differentially in response to environmental conditions. The entire nif1 gene cluster, comprising at least 15 genes, is primarily under the control of the promoter for the first gene, nifB1. Transcriptional control of many of the downstream nif1 genes occurs by a combination of weak promoters within the coding regions of some downstream genes and by RNA processing, which is associated with increased transcript stability. The vnf genes show a similar pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of expression suggesting that the complex pattern of regulation of the nif1 cluster is conserved in other cyanobacterial nitrogenase gene clusters. PMID:25513762

  11. Regulation of V-nitrogenase genes in Anabaena variabilis by RNA processing and by dual repressors.

    PubMed

    Pratte, Brenda S; Sheridan, Ryan; James, Jessie A; Thiel, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 fixes nitrogen in specialized cells called heterocysts using either a Mo-nitrogenase or a V-nitrogenase. V-nitrogenase structural genes, vnfDGK, as well as vnfEN form an operon with ava4025, located upstream of vnfDG that is repressed by fixed nitrogen and by Mo. The ava4025-vnfDGKEN operon is under the control of a Mo-repressible promoter located nearly 600 bp upstream of ava4025. Levels of vnfDG transcript were about 500-fold higher than ava4025, the first gene of the operon. This may be the result of RNA processing at a site 87 bp upstream of vnfDG that was initially identified as the transcription start site. A strain with a deletion in the coding region of ava4025 grew diazotrophically with Mo or with V. Two similar proteins, VnfR1 and VnfR2, whose genes are located some distance from the ava4025-vnfDGKEN operon, each repressed transcription from the ava4025-vnfDGKEN promoter and a mutant lacking both VnfR1 and VnfR2 made the V-nitrogenase in the presence of Mo. Overexpression of the V-nitrogenase in the double vnfR1 vnfR2 mutant resulted in decreased activity of the Mo-nitrogenase. VnfR1 bound specifically, in vitro, to a region upstream of the ava4025 promoter. PMID:23517490

  12. Regulation of nitrogenase gene expression by transcript stability in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Pratte, Brenda S; Thiel, Teresa

    2014-10-01

    The nitrogenase gene cluster in cyanobacteria has been thought to comprise multiple operons; however, in Anabaena variabilis, the promoter for the first gene in the cluster, nifB1, appeared to be the primary promoter for the entire nif cluster. The structural genes nifHDK1 were the most abundant transcripts; however, their abundance was not controlled by an independent nifH1 promoter, but rather, by RNA processing, which produced a very stable nifH1 transcript and a moderately stable nifD1 transcript. There was also no separate promoter for nifEN1. In addition to the nifB1 promoter, there were weak promoters inside the nifU1 gene and inside the nifE1 gene, and both promoters were heterocyst specific. In an xisA mutant, which effectively separated promoters upstream of an 11-kb excision element in nifD1 from the downstream genes, the internal nifE1 promoter was functional. Transcription of the nif1 genes downstream of the 11-kb element, including the most distant genes, hesAB1 and fdxH1, was reduced in the xisA mutant, indicating that the nifB1 promoter contributed to their expression. However, with the exception of nifK1 and nifE1, which had no expression, the downstream genes showed low to moderate levels of transcription in the xisA mutant. The hesA1 gene also had a promoter, but the fdxH gene had a processing site just upstream of the gene. The processing of transcripts at sites upstream of nifH1 and fdxH1 correlated with increased stability of these transcripts, resulting in greater amounts than transcripts that were not close to processing sites. PMID:25092030

  13. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae

    SciTech Connect

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

  14. On-water remote monitoring robotic system for estimating the patch coverage of Anabaena sp. filaments in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Romero-Vivas, E; Von Borstel, F D; Pérez-Estrada, C J; Torres-Ariño, D; Villa-Medina, J F; Gutiérrez, J

    2015-06-01

    An on-water remote monitoring robotic system was developed for indirectly estimating the relative density of marine cyanobacteria blooms at the subtidal sandy-rocky beach in Balandra Cove, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The system is based on an unmanned surface vehicle to gather underwater videos of the seafloor for avoiding physical damage on Anabaena sp. cyanobacteria colonies, which grow in tufts of filaments weakly attached to rocks, seagrass, and macroalgae. An on-axis image stabilization mechanism was developed to support a camcorder and minimize wave perturbation while recording underwater digital images of the seafloor. Color image processing algorithms were applied to estimate the patch coverage area and density, since Anabaena sp. filaments exhibit a characteristic green tone. Results of field tests showed the feasibility of the robotic system to estimate the relative density, distribution, and coverage area of cyanobacteria blooms, preventing the possible impact of direct observation. The robotic system could also be used in surveys of other benthos in the sublittoral zone. PMID:25965101

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of KatB, a manganese catalase from Anabaena PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Subhash Chandra; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2013-11-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play an important role in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in aerobic organisms. Among catalases, haem-containing catalases are ubiquitously distributed and their enzymatic mechanism is very well understood. On the other hand, manganese catalases that contain a bimanganese core in the active site have been less well characterized and their mode of action is not fully understood. The genome of Anabaena PCC 7120 does not show the presence of a haem catalase-like gene; instead, two ORFs encoding manganese catalases (Mn-catalases) are present. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of KatB, one of the two Mn-catalases from Anabaena, are reported. KatB was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as a precipitant and calcium acetate as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house on an Agilent SuperNova system using a microfocus sealed-tube X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K. The tetragonal crystal belonged to space group P4(1)2(1)2 (or enantiomer), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.87, c = 138.86 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis using the Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function suggests the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24192374

  16. Genome-Wide and Heterocyst-Specific Circadian Gene Expression in the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Kushige, Hiroko; Kugenuma, Hideyuki; Matsuoka, Masaki; Ehira, Shigeki; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is one of the simplest multicellular organisms that show both morphological pattern formation with cell differentiation (heterocyst formation) and circadian rhythms. Therefore, it potentially provides an excellent model in which to analyze the relationship between circadian functions and multicellularity. However, detailed cyanobacterial circadian regulation has been intensively analyzed only in the unicellular species Synechococcus elongatus. In contrast to the highest-amplitude cycle in Synechococcus, we found that none of the kai genes in Anabaena showed high-amplitude expression rhythms. Nevertheless, ∼80 clock-controlled genes were identified. We constructed luciferase reporter strains to monitor the expression of some high-amplitude genes. The bioluminescence rhythms satisfied the three criteria for circadian oscillations and were nullified by genetic disruption of the kai gene cluster. In heterocysts, in which photosystem II is turned off, the metabolic and redox states are different from those in vegetative cells, although these conditions are thought to be important for circadian entrainment and timekeeping processes. Here, we demonstrate that circadian regulation is active in heterocysts, as shown by the finding that heterocyst-specific genes, such as all1427 and hesAB, are expressed in a robust circadian fashion exclusively without combined nitrogen. PMID:23316037

  17. Sequence of the nifD gene coding for the α subunit of dinitrogenase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Peter J.; Haselkorn, Robert

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of nifD, the structural gene for the α subunit of dinitrogenase from Anabaena 7120, has been determined. The coding sequence contains 1,440 nucleotides, which predict an amino acid sequence of 480 residues and Mr of 54,283. The predicted sequence contains eight cysteines, of which five are conserved with respect to adjoining sequences and position relative to the α subunits of dinitrogenase from Azotobacter, Clostridium, and Klebsiella. Because there are also five conserved cysteines in the β subunit of Anabaena dinitrogenase [Mazur, B. J. & Chiu, C.-F. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 6782-6786], the number of cysteine residues participating as ligands to FeS clusters is likely to be 20 per α2β2 tetramer. This number is sufficient to accommodate the known four Fe4S4 clusters, leaving at least four cysteines to be shared among the two FeMo cofactors and the more poorly characterized two-iron center. Although the α- and β-subunit gene sequences are not recognizably homologous, their secondary structures, predicted from the sequences, indicate similar domains around three of the conserved cysteine residues. PMID:16593347

  18. Divisome-dependent subcellular localization of cell-cell joining protein SepJ in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Ramos-León, Félix; Mariscal, Vicente; Frías, José E; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria are multicellular organisms that grow as filaments that can be hundreds of cells long. Septal junction complexes, of which SepJ is a possible component, appear to join the cells in the filament. SepJ is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that contains a long predicted periplasmic section and localizes not only to the cell poles in the intercellular septa but also to a position similar to a Z ring when cell division starts suggesting a relation with the divisome. Here, we created a mutant of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 in which the essential divisome gene ftsZ is expressed from a synthetic NtcA-dependent promoter, whose activity depends on the nitrogen source. In the presence of ammonium, low levels of FtsZ were produced, and the subcellular localization of SepJ, which was investigated by immunofluorescence, was impaired. Possible interactions of SepJ with itself and with divisome proteins FtsZ, FtsQ and FtsW were investigated using the bacterial two-hybrid system. We found SepJ self-interaction and a specific interaction with FtsQ, confirmed by co-purification and involving parts of the SepJ and FtsQ periplasmic sections. Therefore, SepJ can form multimers, and in Anabaena, the divisome has a role beyond cell division, localizing a septal protein essential for multicellularity. PMID:25644579

  19. The LysR-type transcription factor PacR is a global regulator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Picossi, Silvia; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    Cyanobacteria perform water-splitting photosynthesis and are important primary producers impacting the carbon and nitrogen cycles at global scale. They fix CO2 through ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCo) and have evolved a distinct CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) that builds high CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCo favouring its carboxylase activity. Filamentous cyanobacteria such as Anabaena fix CO2 in photosynthetic vegetative cells, which donate photosynthate to heterocysts that rely on a heterotrophic metabolism to fix N2 . CCM elements are induced in response to inorganic carbon limitation, a cue that exposes the photosynthetic apparatus to photodamage by over-reduction. An Anabaena mutant lacking the LysR-type transcription factor All3953 grew poorly and dies under high light. The rbcL operon encoding RuBisCo was induced upon carbon limitation in the wild type but not in the mutant. ChIP-Seq analysis was used to globally identify All3953 targets under carbon limitation. Targets include, besides rbcL, genes encoding CCM elements, photorespiratory pathway- photosystem- and electron transport-related components, and factors, including flavodiiron proteins, with a demonstrated or putative function in photoprotection. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of selected All3953 targets showed regulation in the wild type but not in the mutant. All3953 (PacR) is a global regulator of carbon assimilation in an oxygenic photoautotroph. PMID:25684321

  20. Expression of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Genes in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Katrin; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Cornish, Adam J.; Wolk, C. Peter

    2012-01-01

    H2 generated from renewable resources holds promise as an environmentally innocuous fuel that releases only energy and water when consumed. In biotechnology, photoautotrophic oxygenic diazotrophs could produce H2 from water and sunlight using the cells' endogenous nitrogenases. However, nitrogenases have low turnover numbers and require large amounts of ATP. [FeFe]-hydrogenases found in other organisms can have 1,000-fold higher turnover numbers and no specific requirement for ATP but are very O2 sensitive. Certain filamentous cyanobacteria protect nitrogenase from O2 by sequestering the enzyme within internally micro-oxic, differentiated cells called heterocysts. We heterologously expressed the [FeFe]-hydrogenase operon from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 using the heterocyst-specific promoter PhetN. Active [FeFe]-hydrogenase was detected in and could be purified from aerobically grown Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, but only when the organism was grown under nitrate-depleted conditions that elicited heterocyst formation. These results suggest that the heterocysts protected the [FeFe]-hydrogenase against inactivation by O2. PMID:23023750

  1. Take a Dip! Culturing Algae Is Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory activities using algae as the organisms of choice. These include examination of typical algal cells, demonstration of alternation of generations, sexual reproduction in Oedogonium, demonstration of phototaxis, effect of nitrate concentration on Ankistrodesmus, and study of competition between two algae in the same environment.…

  2. SSMILes: Measuring the Nutrient Tolerance of Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedgepeth, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity integrating mathematics and science intended to introduce students to the use of metric measurement of mass as a way to increase the meaningfulness of observations about variables in life sciences. Involves measuring the nutrient tolerance of algae. Contains a reproducible algae nutrient graph. (Author/MKR)

  3. Nutritional And Taste Characteristics Of Algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Nakhost, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of chemical composition of blue-green algae Synechococcus 6311, as well as preparation of protein isolate from green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and incorporation into variety of food products evaluated for taste. Part of program to investigate growth of microalgae aboard spacecraft for use as food.

  4. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  5. Hydrogen metabolism of photosynthetic bacteria and algae

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism, metabolic pathways and biochemistry of hydrogen in photosynthetic bacteria and algae are reviewed. Detailed information on the occurrence and measurement of hydrogenase activity is presented. Hydrogen production rates for different species of algae and bacteria are presented. 173 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

  6. Characterization and Optimization of Bioflocculant Exopolysaccharide Production by Cyanobacteria Nostoc sp. BTA97 and Anabaena sp. BTA990 in Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Onkar Nath; Khangembam, Romi; Shamjetshabam, Minerva; Sharma, Aribam Subhalaxmi; Oinam, Gunapati; Brand, Jerry J

    2015-08-01

    Bioflocculant exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by 40 cyanobacterial strains during their photoautotrophic growth was investigated. Highest levels of EPS were produced by Nostoc sp. BTA97 and Anabaena sp. BTA990. EPS production was maximum during stationary growth phase, when nitrogenase activity was very low. Maximum EPS production occurred at pH 8.0 in the absence of any combined nitrogen source. The cyanobacterial EPS consisted of soluble protein and polysaccharide that included substantial amounts of neutral sugars and uronic acid. The EPS isolated from Anabaena sp. BTA990 and Nostoc sp. BTA97 demonstrated high flocculation capacity. There was a positive correlation between uronic acid content and flocculation activity. The flocculant bound a cationic dye, Alcian Blue, indicating it to be polyanionic. The 16S rRNA gene sequences for Nostoc sp. BTA97 and Anabaena sp. BTA990 were deposited at NCBI GenBank, and accession numbers were obtained as KJ830951 and KJ830948, respectively. The results of these experiments indicate that strains Anabaena sp. BTA990 and Nostoc sp. BTA97 are good candidates for the commercial production of EPS and might be utilized in industrial applications as an alternative to synthetic and abiotic flocculants. PMID:26041059

  7. Group 3 sigma factor gene, sigJ, a key regulator of desiccation tolerance, regulates the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide in cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Hidehisa; Okamoto, Shinobu; Tsumuraya, Yoichi; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The changes in the expression of sigma factor genes during dehydration in terrestrial Nostoc HK-01 and aquatic Anabaena PCC 7120 were determined. The expression of the sigJ gene in terrestrial Nostoc HK-01, which is homologous to sigJ (alr0277) in aquatic Anabaena PCC 7120, was significantly induced in the mid-stage of dehydration. We constructed a higher-expressing transformant of the sigJ gene (HE0277) in Anabaena PCC 7120, and the transformant acquired desiccation tolerance. The results of Anabaena oligonucleotide microarray experiments showed that a comparatively large number of genes relating to polysaccharide biosynthesis were upregulated in the HE0277 cells. The extracellular polysaccharide released into the culture medium of the HE0277 cells was as much as 3.2-fold more than that released by the control cells. This strongly suggests that the group 3 sigma factor gene sigJ is fundamental and conducive to desiccation tolerance in these cyanobacteria. PMID:17376888

  8. GroEL of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain L-31 exhibits GroES and ATP-independent refolding activity.

    PubMed

    Potnis, Akhilesh A; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree K

    2016-03-01

    The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena L-31 has two Hsp60 proteins, 59 kDa GroEL coded by the second gene of groESL operon and 61 kDa Cpn60 coded by cpn60 gene. Anabaena GroEL formed stable higher oligomer (>12-mer) in the presence of K(+) and prevented thermal aggregation of malate dehydrogenase (MDH). Using three protein substrates (MDH, All1541 and green fluorescent protein), it was found that the refolding activity of Anabaena GroEL was lower than that of Escherichia coli GroEL, but independent of both GroES and ATP. This correlated with in vivo data. GroEL exhibited ATPase activity which was enhanced in the presence of GroES and absence of a denatured protein, contrary to that observed for bacterial GroEL. However, a significant role for ATP could not be ascertained during in vitro folding assays. The monomeric Cpn60 exhibited much lower refolding activity than GroEL, unaffected by GroES and ATP. In vitro studies revealed inhibition of the refolding activity of Anabaena GroEL by Cpn60, which could be due to their different oligomeric status. The role of GroES and ATP may have been added during the course of evolution from the ancient cyanobacteria to modern day bacteria enhancing the refolding ability and ensuring wider scope of substrates for GroEL. PMID:26449235

  9. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  10. Composting of waste algae: a review.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Clarke, William; Pratt, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Although composting has been successfully used at pilot scale to manage waste algae removed from eutrophied water environments and the compost product applied as a fertiliser, clear guidelines are not available for full scale algae composting. The review reports on the application of composting to stabilize waste algae, which to date has mainly been macro-algae, and identifies the peculiarities of algae as a composting feedstock, these being: relatively low carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio, which can result in nitrogen loss as NH3 and even N2O; high moisture content and low porosity, which together make aeration challenging; potentially high salinity, which can have adverse consequence for composting; and potentially have high metals and toxin content, which can affect application of the product as a fertiliser. To overcome the challenges that these peculiarities impose co-compost materials can be employed. PMID:24602833

  11. Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Burkhard; Marin, Birger

    2009-01-01

    Background Land plants (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte green algae, a small group of freshwater algae ranging from scaly, unicellular flagellates (Mesostigma) to complex, filamentous thalli with branching, cell differentiation and apical growth (Charales). Streptophyte algae and embryophytes form the division Streptophyta, whereas the remaining green algae are classified as Chlorophyta. The Charales (stoneworts) are often considered to be sister to land plants, suggesting progressive evolution towards cellular complexity within streptophyte green algae. Many cellular (e.g. phragmoplast, plasmodesmata, hexameric cellulose synthase, structure of flagellated cells, oogamous sexual reproduction with zygote retention) and physiological characters (e.g. type of photorespiration, phytochrome system) originated within streptophyte algae. Recent Progress Phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that Mesostigma (flagellate) and Chlorokybus (sarcinoid) form the earliest divergence within streptophytes, as sister to all other Streptophyta including embryophytes. The question whether Charales, Coleochaetales or Zygnematales are the sister to embryophytes is still (or, again) hotly debated. Projects to study genome evolution within streptophytes including protein families and polyadenylation signals have been initiated. In agreement with morphological and physiological features, many molecular traits believed to be specific for embryophytes have been shown to predate the Chlorophyta/Streptophyta split, or to have originated within streptophyte algae. Molecular phylogenies and the fossil record allow a detailed reconstruction of the early evolutionary events that led to the origin of true land plants, and shaped the current diversity and ecology of streptophyte green algae and their embryophyte descendants. Conclusions The Streptophyta/Chlorophyta divergence correlates with a remarkably conservative preference for freshwater/marine habitats, and the early freshwater

  12. Inactivation of agmatinase expressed in vegetative cells alters arginine catabolism and prevents diazotrophic growth in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena

    PubMed Central

    Burnat, Mireia; Flores, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Arginine decarboxylase produces agmatine, and arginase and agmatinase are ureohydrolases that catalyze the production of ornithine and putrescine from arginine and agmatine, respectively, releasing urea. In the genome of the filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, ORF alr2310 putatively encodes an ureohydrolase. Cells of Anabaena supplemented with [14C]arginine took up and catabolized this amino acid generating a set of labeled amino acids that included ornithine, proline, and glutamate. In an alr2310 deletion mutant, an agmatine spot appeared and labeled glutamate increased with respect to the wild type, suggesting that Alr2310 is an agmatinase rather than an arginase. As determined in cell-free extracts, agmatinase activity could be detected in the wild type but not in the mutant. Thus, alr2310 is the Anabaena speB gene encoding agmatinase. The Δalr2310 mutant accumulated large amounts of cyanophycin granule polypeptide, lacked nitrogenase activity, and did not grow diazotrophically. Growth tests in solid media showed that agmatine is inhibitory for Anabaena, especially under diazotrophic conditions, suggesting that growth of the mutant is inhibited by non-metabolized agmatine. Measurements of incorporation of radioactivity from [14C]leucine into macromolecules showed, however, a limited inhibition of protein synthesis in the Δalr2310 mutant. Analysis of an Anabaena strain producing an Alr2310-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion showed expression in vegetative cells but much less in heterocysts, implying compartmentalization of the arginine decarboxylation pathway in the diazotrophic filaments of this heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium. PMID:25209059

  13. Inactivation of agmatinase expressed in vegetative cells alters arginine catabolism and prevents diazotrophic growth in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Burnat, Mireia; Flores, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Arginine decarboxylase produces agmatine, and arginase and agmatinase are ureohydrolases that catalyze the production of ornithine and putrescine from arginine and agmatine, respectively, releasing urea. In the genome of the filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, ORF alr2310 putatively encodes an ureohydrolase. Cells of Anabaena supplemented with [(14) C]arginine took up and catabolized this amino acid generating a set of labeled amino acids that included ornithine, proline, and glutamate. In an alr2310 deletion mutant, an agmatine spot appeared and labeled glutamate increased with respect to the wild type, suggesting that Alr2310 is an agmatinase rather than an arginase. As determined in cell-free extracts, agmatinase activity could be detected in the wild type but not in the mutant. Thus, alr2310 is the Anabaena speB gene encoding agmatinase. The ∆alr2310 mutant accumulated large amounts of cyanophycin granule polypeptide, lacked nitrogenase activity, and did not grow diazotrophically. Growth tests in solid media showed that agmatine is inhibitory for Anabaena, especially under diazotrophic conditions, suggesting that growth of the mutant is inhibited by non-metabolized agmatine. Measurements of incorporation of radioactivity from [(14) C]leucine into macromolecules showed, however, a limited inhibition of protein synthesis in the ∆alr2310 mutant. Analysis of an Anabaena strain producing an Alr2310-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion showed expression in vegetative cells but much less in heterocysts, implying compartmentalization of the arginine decarboxylation pathway in the diazotrophic filaments of this heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium. PMID:25209059

  14. Use of a conditionally lethal gene in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to select for double recombinants and to entrap insertion sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yuping; Wolk, C.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Use of the sacB gene provides a simple, effective, positive selection for double recombinants in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, a filamentous cyanobacterium. This gene, which encodes the secretory levansucrase of Bacillus subtilis, was inserted into the vector portion of a suicide plasmid bearing a mutant version of a chromosomal gene. Cells of colonies in which such a plasmid had integrated into the Anabaena chromosome through single recombination were plated on solid medium containing 5% sucrose. Under this condition, the presence of the sacB gene is lethal. A small fraction of the cells from initially sucrose-sensitive colonies became sucrose resistant; the majority of these sucrose-resistant derivatives had undergone a second recombinational event in which the sacB-containing vector had been lost and the wild-type form of the chromosomal gene had been replaced by the mutant form. By the use of this technique, they mutated two selected genes in the chromosome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The conditionally lethal nature of the sacB gene was also used to detect insertion sequences from this Anabaena strain. Sucrose-resistant colonies derived from cells bearing a sacB-containing autonomously replicating plasmid were analyzed. Five different, presumed insertion sequences were found to have inserted into the sacB gene of the plasmids in these colonies. One of them, denoted IS892, was characterized by physical mapping. It is 1.7 kilobases in size and is present in at least five copies in the genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

  15. Spatial fluctuations in expression of the heterocyst differentiation regulatory gene hetR in Anabaena filaments.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Mariscal, Vicente; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Stavans, Joel

    2015-04-01

    Under nitrogen deprivation, filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena undergo a process of development, resulting in a one-dimensional pattern of nitrogen-fixing heterocysts separated by about ten photosynthetic vegetative cells. Many aspects of gene expression before nitrogen deprivation and during the developmental process remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, the coupling of gene expression fluctuations between cells along a multicellular filament is unknown. We studied the statistics of fluctuations of gene expression of HetR, a transcription factor essential for heterocyst differentiation, both under steady-state growth in nitrogen-rich conditions and at different times following nitrogen deprivation, using a chromosomally-encoded translational hetR-gfp fusion. Statistical analysis of fluorescence at the individual cell level in wild-type and mutant filaments demonstrates that expression fluctuations of hetR in nearby cells are coupled, with a characteristic spatial range of circa two to three cells, setting the scale for cellular interactions along a filament. Correlations between cells predominantly arise from intercellular molecular transfer and less from cell division. Fluctuations after nitrogen step-down can build up on those under nitrogen-replete conditions. We found that under nitrogen-rich conditions, basal, steady-state expression of the HetR inhibitor PatS, cell-cell communication influenced by the septal protein SepJ and positive HetR auto-regulation are essential determinants of fluctuations in hetR expression and its distribution along filaments. A comparison between the expression of hetR-gfp under nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor conditions highlights the differences between the two HetR inhibitors PatS and HetN, as well as the differences in specificity between the septal proteins SepJ and FraC/FraD. Activation, inhibition and cell-cell communication lie at the heart of developmental processes. Our results show that proteins involved in these

  16. Spatial Fluctuations in Expression of the Heterocyst Differentiation Regulatory Gene hetR in Anabaena Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Mariscal, Vicente; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Stavans, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Under nitrogen deprivation, filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena undergo a process of development, resulting in a one-dimensional pattern of nitrogen-fixing heterocysts separated by about ten photosynthetic vegetative cells. Many aspects of gene expression before nitrogen deprivation and during the developmental process remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, the coupling of gene expression fluctuations between cells along a multicellular filament is unknown. We studied the statistics of fluctuations of gene expression of HetR, a transcription factor essential for heterocyst differentiation, both under steady-state growth in nitrogen-rich conditions and at different times following nitrogen deprivation, using a chromosomally-encoded translational hetR-gfp fusion. Statistical analysis of fluorescence at the individual cell level in wild-type and mutant filaments demonstrates that expression fluctuations of hetR in nearby cells are coupled, with a characteristic spatial range of circa two to three cells, setting the scale for cellular interactions along a filament. Correlations between cells predominantly arise from intercellular molecular transfer and less from cell division. Fluctuations after nitrogen step-down can build up on those under nitrogen-replete conditions. We found that under nitrogen-rich conditions, basal, steady-state expression of the HetR inhibitor PatS, cell-cell communication influenced by the septal protein SepJ and positive HetR auto-regulation are essential determinants of fluctuations in hetR expression and its distribution along filaments. A comparison between the expression of hetR-gfp under nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor conditions highlights the differences between the two HetR inhibitors PatS and HetN, as well as the differences in specificity between the septal proteins SepJ and FraC/FraD. Activation, inhibition and cell-cell communication lie at the heart of developmental processes. Our results show that proteins involved in these

  17. Structural and biochemical characterization of the therapeutic Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Gamez, Alejandra; Archer, Holly; Abola, Enrique E; Sarkissian, Christineh N; Fitzpatrick, Paul; Wendt, Dan; Zhang, Yanhong; Vellard, Michel; Bliesath, Joshua; Bell, Sean M; Lemontt, Jeffrey F; Scriver, Charles R; Stevens, Raymond C

    2008-07-18

    We have recently observed promising success in a mouse model for treating the metabolic disorder phenylketonuria with phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) from Rhodosporidium toruloides and Anabaena variabilis. Both molecules, however, required further optimization in order to overcome problems with protease susceptibility, thermal stability, and aggregation. Previously, we optimized PAL from R. toruloides, and in this case we reduced aggregation of the A. variabilis PAL by mutating two surface cysteine residues (C503 and C565) to serines. Additionally, we report the structural and biochemical characterization of the A. variabilis PAL C503S/C565S double mutant and carefully compare this molecule with the R. toruloides engineered PAL molecule. Unlike previously published PAL structures, significant electron density is observed for the two active-site loops in the A. variabilis C503S/C565S double mutant, yielding a complete view of the active site. Docking studies and N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin binding studies support a proposed mechanism in which the amino group of the phenylalanine substrate is attacked directly by the 4-methylidene-imidazole-5-one prosthetic group. We propose a helix-to-loop conformational switch in the helices flanking the inner active-site loop that regulates accessibility of the active site. Differences in loop stability among PAL homologs may explain the observed variation in enzyme efficiency, despite the highly conserved structure of the active site. A. variabilis C503S/C565S PAL is shown to be both more thermally stable and more resistant to proteolytic cleavage than R. toruloides PAL. Additional increases in thermal stability and protease resistance upon ligand binding may be due to enhanced interactions among the residues of the active site, possibly locking the active-site structure in place and stabilizing the tetramer. Examination of the A. variabilis C503S/C565S PAL structure, combined with analysis of its physical properties, provides

  18. Temporal dynamics of ROS biogenesis under simulated solar radiation in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra P; Rastogi, Rajesh P; Häder, Donat-P; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2014-09-01

    We studied the temporal generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937 under simulated solar radiation using WG 280, WG 295, WG 305, WG 320, WG 335, WG 345, and GG 400 nm cut-off filters to find out the minimum exposure time and most effective region of the solar spectrum inducing highest level of ROS. There was no significant generation of ROS in all treatments in comparison to the samples kept in the dark during the first 8 h of exposure; however, after 12 h of exposure, ROS were significantly generated in samples covered with 305, 295, or 280 nm cut-off filters. In contrast with ROS, the fragmentation of filaments was predominantly seen in 280 nm cut-off filter covered samples after 12 h of exposure. After 24 h of exposure, ROS levels were significantly higher in all samples than in the dark; however, the ROS signals were more pronounced in 320, 305, 295, or 280 nm cut-off filter covered samples. In contrast, the length of filaments was reduced in 305, 295, or 280 nm cut-off filter covered samples after 24 h of exposure. Thus, fragmentation of the filament was induced by all wavelengths of the UV-B region contrary to the UV-A region where only shorter wavelengths were able to induce the fragmentation. In contrast, ROS were generated by all wavelengths of the solar spectrum after 24 h of exposure; however, shorter wavelengths of both the UV-A and the UV-B regions were more effective in generating ROS in comparison to their higher wavelengths and photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Moreover, lower wavelengths of UV-B were more efficient than the lower wavelengths of the UV-A radiation. Findings from this study suggest that certain threshold levels of ROS are required to induce the fragmentation of filaments. PMID:24633292

  19. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Results Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Conclusions Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model. PMID:22540986

  20. Algae Biofuel in the Nigerian Energy Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elegbede, Isa; Guerrero, Cinthya

    2016-05-01

    The issue of energy consumption is one of the issues that have significantly become recognized as an important topic of global discourse. Fossil fuels production reportedly experiencing a gradual depletion in the oil-producing nations of the world. Most studies have relatively focused on biofuel development and adoption, however, the awareness of a prospect in the commercial cultivation of algae having potential to create economic boost in Nigeria, inspired this research. This study aims at exploring the potential of the commercialization of a different but commonly found organism, algae, in Nigeria. Here, parameters such as; water quality, light, carbon, average temperature required for the growth of algae, and additional beneficial nutrients found in algae were analysed. A comparative cum qualitative review of analysis was used as the study made use of empirical findings on the work as well as the author's deductions. The research explored the cultivation of algae with the two major seasonal differences (i.e. rainy and dry) in Nigeria as a backdrop. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in the contribution of algae and other sources of biofuels as a necessity for bioenergy in Nigeria. However, for an effective sustainability of this prospect, adequate measures need to be put in place in form of funding, provision of an economically-enabling environment for the cultivation process as well as proper healthcare service in the face of possible health hazard from technological processes. Further studies can seek to expand on the potential of cultivating algae in the Harmattan season.

  1. Method and apparatus for processing algae

    DOEpatents

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2012-07-03

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells. The lysate separates into at least two layers including a lipid-containing hydrophobic layer and an ionic liquid-containing hydrophilic layer. A salt or salt solution may be used to remove water from the ionic liquid-containing layer before the ionic liquid is reused. The used salt may also be dried and/or concentrated and reused. The method can operate at relatively low lysis, processing, and recycling temperatures, which minimizes the environmental impact of algae processing while providing reusable biofuels and other useful products.

  2. Errors When Extracting Oil from Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, E.; Treat, R.; Ichiuji, T.

    2014-12-01

    Oil is in popular demand, but the worldwide amount of oil is decreasing and prices for it are steadily increasing. Leading scientists have been working to find a solution of attaining oil in an economically and environmentally friendly way. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have determined that "a small mixture of algae and water can be turned into crude oil in less than an hour" (Sheehan, Duhahay, Benemann, Poessler). There are various ways of growing the algae, such as closed loop and open loop methods, as well as processes of extracting oil, such as hydrothermal liquefaction and the hexane-solvent method. Our objective was to grow the algae (C. reinhardtii) and extract oil from it using NaOH and HCl, because we had easy access to those specific chemicals. After two trials of attempted algae growth, we discovered that a bacteria was killing off the algae. This led us to further contemplation on how this dead algae and bacteria are affecting our environment, and the organisms within it. Eutrophication occurs when excess nutrients stimulate rapid growth of algae in an aquatic environment. This can clog waterways and create algal blooms in blue-green algae, as well as neurotoxic red tide phytoplankton. These microscopic algae die upon consumption of the nutrients in water and are degraded by bacteria. The bacteria respires and creates an acidic environment with the spontaneous conversion of carbon dioxide to carbonic acid in water. This process of degradation is exactly what occurred in our 250 mL flask. When the phytoplankton attacked our algae, it created a hypoxic environment, which eliminated any remaining amounts of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nutrients in the water, resulting in a miniature dead zone. These dead zones can occur almost anywhere where there are algae and bacteria, such as the ocean, and make it extremely difficult for any organism to survive. This experiment helped us realize the

  3. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  4. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  5. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  6. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  7. Collection, Isolation and Culture of Marine Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of collecting, isolating, and culturing microscopic and macroscopic marine algae are described. Three different culture media list of chemicals needed and procedures for preparing Erdschreiber's and Provasoli's E. S. media. (BC)

  8. Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis Caused by Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Fluke, Erin C; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2016-07-01

    Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is an orthopedic emergency most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci and occasionally, when associated with water exposure, Mycobacterium marinum. Shewanella algae, a gram-negative bacillus found in warm saltwater environments, has infrequently been reported to cause serious soft tissue infections and necrosis. In this case, S. algae caused complicated flexor tenosynovitis requiring open surgical irrigation and debridement. Flexor tenosynovitis caused by S. algae rapidly presented with all 4 Kanavel cardinal signs as well as subcutaneous purulence, ischemia, and necrosis, thus meeting the requirements for Pang et al group III classification of worst prognosis. Because of its rarity and virulence, S. algae should always be considered in cases of flexor tenosynovitis associated with traumatic water exposure to treat and minimize morbidity appropriately. PMID:27206398

  9. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joyce

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Algae Platform Review meeting.

  10. Steady state emission of the fluorescent intermediate of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin as a function of light adaptation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheminal, A.; Léonard, J.; Kim, S. Y.; Jung, K.-H.; Kandori, H.; Haacke, S.

    2013-11-01

    Steady-state fluorescence measurements of the first excited state of the anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), and Bacteriorhodopsin are reported for different light stabilization conditions, including the dark-adapted state. We determine the fluorescence spectra of both all-trans (AT), and 13-cis (13C) protonated Schiff base of retinal, and compare the effect of the proteins. Referenced against the fluorescence quantum yield of AT-bR (2.5 × 10-4) we find for AT-ASR, 13C-ASR, and 13C-bR the values of 3.3 × 10-4, 0.8 × 10-4, and 1.7 × 10-4, respectively. Using reported excited state lifetimes, the radiative rates are deduced, and their differences discussed on the basis of a configuration-dependent oscillator strength.

  11. H2 production by Anabaena variabilis mutant in computer controlled two-stage air-lift tubular photobioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hall, D. O.; Rao, K. K.; Tsygankov, A. A.; Sveshnikov, D. A.

    2000-06-01

    A 4.34 liter two-stage air-lift photobioreactor incorporating Anabaena variabilis ATCC29413 mutant PK84 was used to study H2 production. Results showed that H2 production increased with increasing light intensity from 47 μE/(m2·s) up to 190 μE/(m2·s), but that further increase of light intensity decreased the H2 production because of the inhibition due to the high pO2. The data also indicated that longer argon gas charge resulted in more H2 produced due to the increase of nitrogenase activities and heterocyst frequency, and that more than 1.3 L net H2 was produced from this computer controlled photobioreactor.

  12. MUST: a system for identification of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements and applications to Anabaena variabilis and Haloquadratum walsbyi.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Zhou, Fengfeng; Li, Guojun; Xu, Ying

    2009-05-01

    Transposable elements (TE) are functionally important genetic elements that can move within a genome. Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) constitute a class of transposable elements that are usually small in size and have high numbers of conserved copies. Identifying all the MITEs in a genome could provide new insights about gene evolution and genome dynamics of the organism. We present a web-based MITE Uncovering SysTem (MUST) for prediction and analyses of MITEs at a genome level. MUST reliably found both the previously known and novel MITEs in the two bacterial genomes, Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 and Haloquadratum walsbyi DSM 16790. MUST is available at http://csbl1.bmb.uga.edu/ffzhou/MUST/ (the standalone version is available upon request). Supplementary data associated with this article are available in the online version or at: http://csbl1.bmb.uga.edu/ffzhou/MUST/supp/. PMID:19393167

  13. Direct measurement of excitation transfer dynamics between two trimers in C-phycocyanin hexamer from cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingmin; Zhao, Fuli; Zheng, Xiguang; Wang, Hezhou

    1999-05-01

    We provide the first experimental evidence for the excitation transfers between two trimers of an isolated C-phycocyanin hexamer (αβ) 6PCL RC27, at the end of the rod proximal to the core of PBS in cyanobacterium of Anabaena variabilis, with picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results strongly suggest that the observed fluorescence decay constants around 20 and 10 ps time scales, shown in anisotropy decay, not in isotropic decay experiments arose from the excitation transfers between two trimers via two types of transfer pathways such as 1β 155↔6β 155 (2β 155↔5β 155 and 3β 155↔4β 155) and 2α 84↔5α 84 (3α 84↔6α 84 and 1α 84↔4α 84) channels and these could be described by Föster dipole-dipole resonance mechanism.

  14. Factors affecting the photoproduction of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.L.; Guerrero, M.G.; Losada, M.

    1987-04-01

    Synthesis of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by suspensions of Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047 treated with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine-D,L-sulfoximine is strictly dependent on light. Under otherwise optimal conditions, the yield of ammonia production is influenced by irradiance, as well as by the density, depth, and turbulence of the cell suspension. The interaction among these factors seems to determine the actual amount of light available to each single cell or filament in the suspension for the photoproduction process. Under convenient illumination, the limiting factor in the synthesis of ammonia seems to be the cellular nitrogenase activity level, but under limiting light conditions the limiting factor could, however, be the assimilatory power required for nitrogen fixation. Photosynthetic ammonia production from atmospheric nitrogen and water can operate with an efficiency of ca. 10% of its theoretical maximum, representing a remarkable process for the conversion of light energy into chemical energy.

  15. Control of nitrogenase recovery from oxygen inactivation by ammonia in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain CA (ATCC 33047).

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R L; Van Baalen, C; Tabita, F R

    1990-01-01

    The control of nitrogenase recovery from inactivation by oxygen was studied in Anabaena sp. strain CA (ATCC 33047). Nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction) in cultures grown in 1% CO2 in air was inhibited by exposure to 1% CO2-99% O2 and allowed to recover in the presence of high oxygen tensions. Cultures exposed to hyperbaric levels of oxygen in the presence of 10 mM NH4NO3 were incapable of regaining nitrogenase activity, whereas control cultures returned to 65 to 80% of their original activity within about 3 h after exposure to high oxygen tension. In contrast to the regulation of heterocyst differentiation and nitrogenase synthesis, recovery from oxygen inactivation in this organism was shown to be under the control of NH4+ rather than NO3-. PMID:2110151

  16. The Alga Ochromonas danica Produces Bromosulfolipids.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander R; Duggan, Brendan M; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Vanderwal, Christopher D

    2016-03-01

    Many halogenases interchangeably incorporate chlorine and bromine into organic molecules. On the basis of an unsubstantiated report that the alga Ochromonas danica, a prodigious producer of chlorosulfolipids, was able to produce bromosulfolipids, we have investigated the promiscuity of its halogenases toward bromine incorporation. We have found that bromosulfolipids are produced with the exact positional and stereochemical selectivity as in the chlorosulfolipid danicalipin A when this alga is grown under modified conditions containing excess bromide ion. PMID:26889956

  17. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-03

    We consider a general framework to predict the development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a lake driven by uncertain parameters. To quantify the concentration uncertainty of those algae groups via their joint probabilistic density function (PDF), we explore an approach based on the Fokker-Planck equation. Our result is presented in an example where abundant nutrients contribute to the proliferation of cyanobacteria and other minor algae groups.

  18. Proteomic Strategy for the Analysis of the Polychlorobiphenyl-Degrading Cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1 Exposed to Aroclor 1254

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hangjun; Jiang, Xiaojun; Xiao, Wenfeng; Lu, Liping

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1, which was originally isolated from polychlorobiphenyl (PCB)-contaminated paddy soils, has capabilities for dechlorinatin and for degrading the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254. In this study, 25 upregulated proteins were identified using 2D electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). These proteins were involved in (i) PCB degradation (i.e., 3-chlorobenzoate-3,4-dioxygenase); (ii) transport processes [e.g., ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate-binding protein, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, peptide ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, putrescine-binding protein, periplasmic solute-binding protein, branched-chain amino acid uptake periplasmic solute-binding protein, periplasmic phosphate-binding protein, phosphonate ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, and xylose ABC transporter substrate-binding protein]; (iii) energetic metabolism (e.g., methanol/ethanol family pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent dehydrogenase, malate-CoA ligase subunit beta, enolase, ATP synthase β subunit, FOF1 ATP synthase subunit beta, ATP synthase α subunit, and IMP cyclohydrolase); (iv) electron transport (cytochrome b6f complex Fe-S protein); (v) general stress response (e.g., molecular chaperone DnaK, elongation factor G, and translation elongation factor thermostable); (vi) carbon metabolism (methanol dehydrogenase and malate-CoA ligase subunit beta); and (vii) nitrogen reductase (nitrous oxide reductase). The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the genes encoding for dioxygenase, ABC transporters, transmembrane proteins, electron transporter, and energetic metabolism proteins were significantly upregulated during PCB degradation. These genes upregulated by 1.26- to 8.98-fold. These findings reveal the resistance and adaptation of cyanobacterium to the presence of PCBs, shedding light on the

  19. Synergistic Effects of Nano-Sized Titanium Dioxide and Zinc on the Photosynthetic Capacity and Survival of Anabaena sp.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yulin; Li, Shuyan; Qiao, Junlian; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Anabaena sp. was used to examine the toxicity of exposure to a nano-TiO2 suspension, Zn2+ solution, and mixtures of nano-TiO2 and Zn2+ suspensions. Typical chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including effective quantum yield, photosynthetic efficiency and maximal electron transport rate, were measured by a pulse-amplitude modulated fluorometer. Nano-TiO2 particles exhibited no significant toxicity at concentrations lower than 10.0 mg/L. The 96 h concentration for the 50% maximal effect (EC50) of Zn2+ alone to Anabaena sp. was 0.38 ± 0.004 mg/L. The presence of nano-TiO2 at low concentrations (<1.0 mg/L) significantly enhanced the toxicity of Zn2+ and consequently reduced the EC50 value to 0.29 ± 0.003 mg/L. However, the toxicity of the Zn2+/TiO2 system decreased with increasing nano-TiO2 concentration because of the substantial adsorption of Zn2+ by nano-TiO2. The toxicity curve of the Zn2+/TiO2 system as a function of incremental nano-TiO2 concentrations was parabolic. The toxicity significantly increased at the initial stage, reached its maximum, and then decreased with increasing nano-TiO2 concentration. Hydrodynamic sizes, concentration of nano-TiO2 and Zn2+ loaded nano-TiO2 were the main parameters for synergistic toxicity. PMID:23852017

  20. Genome-derived insights into the biology of the hepatotoxic bloom-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria can form massive toxic blooms in fresh and brackish bodies of water and are frequently responsible for the poisoning of animals and pose a health risk for humans. Anabaena is a genus of filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria commonly implicated as a toxin producer in blooms in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world. The biology of bloom-forming cyanobacteria is poorly understood at the genome level. Results Here, we report the complete sequence and comprehensive annotation of the bloom-forming Anabaena sp. strain 90 genome. It comprises two circular chromosomes and three plasmids with a total size of 5.3 Mb, encoding a total of 4,738 genes. The genome is replete with mobile genetic elements. Detailed manual annotation demonstrated that almost 5% of the gene repertoire consists of pseudogenes. A further 5% of the genome is dedicated to the synthesis of small peptides that are the products of both ribosomal and nonribosomal biosynthetic pathways. Inactivation of the hassallidin (an antifungal cyclic peptide) biosynthetic gene cluster through a deletion event and a natural mutation of the buoyancy-permitting gvpG gas vesicle gene were documented. The genome contains a large number of genes encoding restriction-modification systems. Two novel excision elements were found in the nifH gene that is required for nitrogen fixation. Conclusions Genome analysis demonstrated that this strain invests heavily in the production of bioactive compounds and restriction-modification systems. This well-annotated genome provides a platform for future studies on the ecology and biology of these important bloom-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:23148582

  1. Induction and differential expression of certain novel proteins in Anabaena L31 under UV-B radiation stress

    PubMed Central

    Babele, Piyoosh K.; Singh, Garvita; Kumar, Ashok; Tyagi, Madhu B.

    2015-01-01

    For examining how UV-B radiation alters the proteome of the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena L31, we extracted proteins from cultures irradiated with UV-B + white light and controls (white light irradiated) and analyzed the proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Twenty one proteins, including two hypothetical proteins (HPs) were identified and placed in eight functional categories. However several of the proteins were housekeeping proteins involved in key metabolic processes such as carbon, amino acid biosynthesis and energy metabolism, certain proteins seem to have a role in stress (antioxidative enzymes), translation, cellular processes and reductases. Two novel HPs (all3797 and all4050) were characterized in detail. These two were over-expressed after UV-B irradiation and characterized as FAS 1 (all3797) and PRC barrel-like (all4050) proteins. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the genes of both the HPs have promoter regions as well as transcription binding sites in their upstream region (UTR). Promoters present in all3797 genes suggest their crucial role against UV-B and certain other abiotic stresses. To our knowledge these novel proteins have not been previously reported in any Anabaena strains subjected to UV-B stress. Although we have focused our study on a limited number of proteins, results obtained shed light on the highly complicated but poorly studied aspect of UV-B radiation-mediated changes in the proteome and expression of proteins in cyanobacteria. PMID:25759687

  2. Characterisation of the paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis gene clusters in Anabaena circinalis AWQC131C and Aphanizomenon sp. NH-5

    PubMed Central

    Mihali, Troco K; Kellmann, Ralf; Neilan, Brett A

    2009-01-01

    Background Saxitoxin and its analogues collectively known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are neurotoxic alkaloids and are the cause of the syndrome named paralytic shellfish poisoning. PSTs are produced by a unique biosynthetic pathway, which involves reactions that are rare in microbial metabolic pathways. Nevertheless, distantly related organisms such as dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria appear to produce these toxins using the same pathway. Hypothesised explanations for such an unusual phylogenetic distribution of this shared uncommon metabolic pathway, include a polyphyletic origin, an involvement of symbiotic bacteria, and horizontal gene transfer. Results We describe the identification, annotation and bioinformatic characterisation of the putative paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis clusters in an Australian isolate of Anabaena circinalis and an American isolate of Aphanizomenon sp., both members of the Nostocales. These putative PST gene clusters span approximately 28 kb and contain genes coding for the biosynthesis and export of the toxin. A putative insertion/excision site in the Australian Anabaena circinalis AWQC131C was identified, and the organization and evolution of the gene clusters are discussed. A biosynthetic pathway leading to the formation of saxitoxin and its analogues in these organisms is proposed. Conclusion The PST biosynthesis gene cluster presents a mosaic structure, whereby genes have apparently transposed in segments of varying size, resulting in different gene arrangements in all three sxt clusters sequenced so far. The gene cluster organizational structure and sequence similarity seems to reflect the phylogeny of the producer organisms, indicating that the gene clusters have an ancient origin, or that their lateral transfer was also an ancient event. The knowledge we gain from the characterisation of the PST biosynthesis gene clusters, including the identity and sequence of the genes involved in the biosynthesis, may

  3. Effect of Interactions Among Algae on Nitrogen Fixation by Blue-Green Algae (Cyanobacteria) in Flooded Soils

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John T.; Greene, Sarah; Alexander, Martin

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) by algae in flooded soil was limited by interactions within the algal community. Nitrogen fixation by either indigenous algae or Tolypothrix tenuis was reduced severalfold by a dense suspension of the green alga Nephrocytium sp. Similarly, interactions between the nitrogen-fixing alga (cyanobacterium) Aulosira 68 and natural densities of indigenous algae limited nitrogen-fixing activity in one of two soils examined. This was demonstrated by developing a variant of Aulosira 68 that was resistant to the herbicide simetryne at concentrations that prevented development of indigenous algae. More nitrogen was fixed by the resistant variant in flooded soil containing herbicide than was fixed in herbicide-free soil by either the indigenous algae or indigenous algae plus the parent strain of Aulosira. Interference from indigenous algae may hamper the development of nitrogen-fixing algae introduced into rice fields in attempts to increase biological nitrogen fixation. PMID:16345463

  4. Ethanol fermentation of sugarcane molasses by Zymomonas mobilis MTCC 92 immobilized in Luffa cylindrica L. sponge discs and Ca-alginate matrices.

    PubMed

    Behera, Shuvashish; Mohanty, Rama C; Ray, Ramesh C

    2012-10-01

    Bio-ethanol production from cane molasses (diluted to 15 % sugar w/v) was studied using the bacterium, Zymomonas mobilis MTCC 92 entrapped in luffa (Luffa cylindrica L.) sponge discs and Ca-alginate gel beads as the immobilizing matrices. At the end of 96 h fermentation, the final ethanol concentrations were 58.7 ± 0.09 and 59.1 ± 0.08 g/l molasses with luffa and Ca-alginate entrapped Z. mobilis cells, respectively exhibiting 83.25 ± 0.03 and 84.6 ± 0.02 % sugar conversion. There was no statistical significant difference (Fischer's LSD) in sugar utilization (t = 0.254, p<0.801) and ethanol production (t =-0.663, p<0.513) between the two immobilization matrices used. Further, the immobilized cells in both the matrices were physiologically active for three more cycles of operation with less than 15 % decrease in ethanol yield in the 4(th) cycle, which was due to some leakage of cells. In conclusion, luffa sponge was found to be equally good as Ca-alginate as a carrier material for bacterial (Z. mobilis) cell immobilization for ethanol production. Further, it has added advantages such as it is cheap, non-corrosive and has no environmental hazard. PMID:24031981

  5. Ethanol fermentation of sugarcane molasses by Zymomonas mobilis MTCC 92 immobilized in Luffa cylindrica L. sponge discs and Ca-alginate matrices

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Shuvashish; Mohanty, Rama C.; Ray, Ramesh C.

    2012-01-01

    Bio-ethanol production from cane molasses (diluted to 15 % sugar w/v) was studied using the bacterium, Zymomonas mobilis MTCC 92 entrapped in luffa (Luffa cylindrica L.) sponge discs and Ca-alginate gel beads as the immobilizing matrices. At the end of 96 h fermentation, the final ethanol concentrations were 58.7 ± 0.09 and 59.1 ± 0.08 g/l molasses with luffa and Ca-alginate entrapped Z. mobilis cells, respectively exhibiting 83.25 ± 0.03 and 84.6 ± 0.02 % sugar conversion. There was no statistical significant difference (Fischer’s LSD) in sugar utilization (t = 0.254, p<0.801) and ethanol production (t =-0.663, p<0.513) between the two immobilization matrices used. Further, the immobilized cells in both the matrices were physiologically active for three more cycles of operation with less than 15 % decrease in ethanol yield in the 4th cycle, which was due to some leakage of cells. In conclusion, luffa sponge was found to be equally good as Ca-alginate as a carrier material for bacterial (Z. mobilis) cell immobilization for ethanol production. Further, it has added advantages such as it is cheap, non-corrosive and has no environmental hazard. PMID:24031981

  6. Exploring origins, invasion history and genetic diversity of Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv. (Cogongrass) in the United States using genotyping by sequencing.

    PubMed

    Burrell, A Millie; Pepper, Alan E; Hodnett, George; Goolsby, John A; Overholt, William A; Racelis, Alexis E; Diaz, Rodrigo; Klein, Patricia E

    2015-05-01

    Imperata cylindrica (Cogongrass, Speargrass) is a diploid C4 grass that is a noxious weed in 73 countries and constitutes a significant threat to global biodiversity and sustainable agriculture. We used a cost-effective genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach to identify the reproductive system, genetic diversity and geographic origins of invasions in the south-eastern United States. In this work, we demonstrated the advantage of employing the closely related, fully sequenced crop species Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench as a proxy reference genome to identify a set of 2320 informative single nucleotide and insertion-deletion polymorphisms. Genetic analyses identified four clonal lineages of cogongrass and one clonal lineage of Imperata brasiliensis Trin. in the United States. Each lineage was highly homogeneous, and we found no evidence of hybridization among the different lineages, despite geographical overlap. We found evidence that at least three of these lineages showed clonal reproduction prior to introduction to the United States. These results indicate that cogongrass has limited evolutionary potential to adapt to novel environments and further suggest that upon arrival to its invaded range, this species did not require local adaptation through hybridization/introgression or selection of favourable alleles from a broad genetic base. Thus, cogongrass presents a clear case of broad invasive success, across a diversity of environments, in a clonal organism with limited genetic diversity. PMID:25864837

  7. Visualization of A- and B-genome chromosomes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) x jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host) backcross progenies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z N; Hang, A; Hansen, J; Burton, C; Mallory-Smith, C A; Zemetra, R S

    2000-12-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica) can cross with each other, and their self-fertile backcross progenies frequently have extra chromosomes and chromosome segments, presumably retained from wheat, raising the possibility that a herbicide resistance gene might transfer from wheat to jointed goatgrass. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to clarify the origin of these extra chromosomes. By using T. durum DNA (AABB genome) as a probe and jointed goatgrass DNA (CCDD genome) as blocking DNA, one, two, and three A- or B-genome chromosomes were identified in three BC2S2 individuals where 2n = 29, 30, and 31 chromosomes, respectively. A translocation between wheat and jointed goatgrass chromosomes was also detected in an individual with 30 chromosomes. In pollen mother cells with meiotic configuration of 14 II + 2 I, the two univalents were identified as being retained from the A or B genome of wheat. By using Ae. markgrafii DNA (CC genome) as a probe and wheat DNA (AABBDD genome) as blocking DNA. 14 C-genome chromosomes were visualized in all BC2S2 individuals. The GISH procedure provides a powerful tool to detect the A or B-genome chromatin in a jointed goatgrass background, making it possible to assess the risk of transfer of herbicide resistance genes located on the A or B genome of wheat to jointed goatgrass. PMID:11195336

  8. Complete characterization of wheat-alien metaphase I pairing in interspecific hybrids between durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.) and jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host).

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Marta; Benavente, Elena

    2009-05-01

    The pattern of homoeologous metaphase I (MI) pairing has been fully characterized in durum wheat x Aegilops cylindrica hybrids (2n = 4x = 28, ABC(c)D(c)) by an in situ hybridization procedure that has permitted individual discrimination of every wheat and wild constituent genome. One of the three hybrid genotypes examined carried the ph1c mutation. In all cases, MI associations between chromosomes of both species represented around two-third of total. Main results from the analysis are as follows (a) the A genome chromosomes are involved in wheat-wild MI pairing more frequently than the B genome partners, irrespective of the alien genome considered; (b) both durum wheat genomes pair preferentially with the D(c) genome of jointed goatgrass. These findings are discussed in relation to the potential of genetic transference between wheat crops and this weedy relative. It can also be highlighted that inactivation of Ph1 provoked a relatively higher promotion of MI associations involving B genome. PMID:19319503

  9. Inducing rye 1R chromosome structural changes in common wheat cv. Chinese spring by the gametocidal chromosome 2C of Aegilops cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Liu, Kun-Fan; Endo, Takashi R; Wang, Dao-Wen

    2005-05-01

    To generate 1 R deletion and translocation lines, we introduced a 2C chromosome,which was derived from Aegilops cylindrica and was known to have a gametocidal function when added monosomically into common wheat cv. Chinese Spring (CS) and its derivative, into a wheat-rye 1R chromosome disomic addition line (CS-1R"). When the individuals with chromosome constitution 21" + 1R" + 2C' (2n = 45) were selfed, the 1R chromosome structural changes were found to be induced with high frequency (24.1%) among the progenies. By using C-banding and GISH analysis, we analyzed 1R structural changes in 46 F3 individuals, which came from 23 F2 plants. The rearranged 1R chromosomes could be characterized in about 85% of the F3 individuals. This included telosome 1RL (39.1%), iso-chromosome 1 RL (2.2%), whole arm translocation involving 1RL (32.6%), telosome 1RS (4.3%), iso-chromosome 1RS (4.3%), and 1R deletion mutant with break point in the long arm (2.2%). The mutant 1R lines obtained in this study will potentially be useful in mapping the chromosome locations of agronomically important genes located in 1R. This study also demonstrated that molecular markers might be used to identify wheat chromosome arm involved in translocation with 1R. PMID:16018259

  10. Biogas production experimental research using algae.

    PubMed

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Misevičius, Antonas

    2015-01-01

    The current study is on the the use of macro-algae as feedstock for biogas production. Three types of macro-algae, Cladophora glomerata (CG), Chara fragilis (CF), and Spirogyra neglecta (SN), were chosen for this research. The experimental studies on biogas production were carried out with these algae in a batch bioreactor. In the bioreactor was maintained 35 ± 1°C temperature. The results showed that the most appropriate macro-algae for biogas production are Spirogyra neglecta (SN) and Cladophora glomerata (CG). The average amount of biogas obtained from the processing of SN - 0.23 m(3)/m(3)d, CG - 0.20 m(3)/m(3)d, and CF - 0.12 m(3)/m(3)d. Considering the concentration of methane obtained during the processing of SN and CG, which after eight days and until the end of the experiment exceeded 60%, it can be claimed that biogas produced using these algae is valuable. When processing CF, the concentration of methane reached the level of 50% only by the final day of the experiment, which indicates that this alga is less suitable for biogas production. PMID:25859392

  11. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kelman, Dovi; Posner, Ellen Kromkowski; McDermid, Karla J.; Tabandera, Nicole K.; Wright, Patrick R.; Wright, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer. PMID:22412808

  12. Inhibition of mast cells by algae.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph A; Sanny, Charles; Shevlin, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    There is a history of use of algae as foods and as food additives, or nutraceuticals. Although algae are a safe component of human foods and animal feeds, the effects of the algae other than as a source of protein are not clear. We examined the prevalence of an antiinflammatory activity in selected algae using, as an assay system, the inhibition of histamine release from mast cells. Methanolic extracts of eleven algae were examined for activity to inhibit the release of histamine from mast cells in vitro. This activity was found widely among the samples tested. The activities of these extracts were not uniformly stable in acid methanol. Selected extracts studied further did not separate with the use of size-exclusion filtration filters. LH-20 chromatography suggested at least two main elution areas of activity of the Chlorella extract. In summary, we saw wide phylogenetic dispersion of mast cell inhibition activity, suggesting that this antiinflammatory property is common in algae. This effect was apparently due to multiple activities within the algal extracts. PMID:12639395

  13. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-09-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal objects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charophyte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorption spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance between 400-550nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this high absorbance was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did hardly change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400-500nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. PMID:27442511

  14. Impact of diatomite on the slightly polluted algae-containing raw water treatment process using ozone oxidation coupled with polyaluminum chloride coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenchao; Wu, Chunde; Jia, Aiyin; Zhang, Zhilin; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    The impact of adding diatomite on the treatment performance of slightly polluted algae-containing raw water using ozone pre-oxidation and polyaluminum chloride (PAC) coagulation was investigated. Results demonstrated that the addition of diatomite is advantageous due to reduction of the PAC dose (58.33%) and improvement of the removal efficiency of algae, turbidity, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in raw water. When the ozone concentration was 1.0 mg L⁻¹ and the PAC dosage was 2.5 mg L⁻¹, the removal rates of algae, turbidity, UV254, and TOC were improved by 6.39%, 7.06%, 6.76%, and 4.03%, respectively, with the addition of 0.4 g L⁻¹ diatomite. It has been found that the DOM presented in the Pearl River raw water mainly consisted of small molecules (<1 kDa) and large ones (> 50 kDa). After adding diatomite (0.4 g L⁻¹), the additional removal of 5.77% TOC and 14.82% UV254 for small molecules (<1 kDa) of DOM, and 8.62% TOC and 7.33% UV254 for large ones (>50 kDa) could be achieved, respectively, at an ozone concentration of 1.0 mg L⁻¹ and a PAC dose of 2.5 mg L⁻¹. The growth of anabaena flos-aquae (A.F.) was observed by an atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after adding diatomite. AFM images demonstrate that diatomite may have a certain adsorption on A.F. PMID:25176300

  15. Detection of Anatoxin-a and Three Analogs in Anabaena spp. Cultures: New Fluorescence Polarization Assay and Toxin Profile by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Jon A.; Otero, Paz; Alfonso, Amparo; Ramos, Vitor; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a (ATX) is a potent neurotoxin produced by several species of Anabaena spp. Cyanobacteria blooms around the world have been increasing in recent years; therefore, it is urgent to develop sensitive techniques that unequivocally confirm the presence of these toxins in fresh water and cyanobacterial samples. In addition, the identification of different ATX analogues is essential to later determine its toxicity. In this paper we designed a fluorescent polarization (FP) method to detect ATXs in water samples. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) labeled with a fluorescein derivative was used to develop this assay. Data showed a direct relationship between the amount of toxin in a sample and the changes in the polarization degree of the emitted light by the labeled nAChR, indicating an interaction between the two molecules. This method was used to measure the amount of ATX in three Anabaena spp. cultures. Results indicate that it is a good method to show ATXs presence in algal samples. In order to check the toxin profile of Anabaena cultures a LC-MS/MS method was also developed. Within this new method, ATX-a, retention time (RT) 5 min, and three other molecules with a mass m/z 180.1 eluting at 4.14 min, 5.90 min and 7.14 min with MS/MS spectra characteristic of ATX toxin group not previously identified were detected in the Anabaena spp. cultures. These ATX analogues may have an important role in the toxicity of the sample. PMID:24469431

  16. Detection of anatoxin-a and three analogs in Anabaena spp. cultures: new fluorescence polarization assay and toxin profile by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jon A; Otero, Paz; Alfonso, Amparo; Ramos, Vitor; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2014-02-01

    Anatoxin-a (ATX) is a potent neurotoxin produced by several species of Anabaena spp. Cyanobacteria blooms around the world have been increasing in recent years; therefore, it is urgent to develop sensitive techniques that unequivocally confirm the presence of these toxins in fresh water and cyanobacterial samples. In addition, the identification of different ATX analogues is essential to later determine its toxicity. In this paper we designed a fluorescent polarization (FP) method to detect ATXs in water samples. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) labeled with a fluorescein derivative was used to develop this assay. Data showed a direct relationship between the amount of toxin in a sample and the changes in the polarization degree of the emitted light by the labeled nAChR, indicating an interaction between the two molecules. This method was used to measure the amount of ATX in three Anabaena spp. cultures. Results indicate that it is a good method to show ATXs presence in algal samples. In order to check the toxin profile of Anabaena cultures a LC-MS/MS method was also developed. Within this new method, ATX-a, retention time (RT) 5 min, and three other molecules with a mass m/z 180.1 eluting at 4.14 min, 5.90 min and 7.14 min with MS/MS spectra characteristic of ATX toxin group not previously identified were detected in the Anabaena spp. cultures. These ATX analogues may have an important role in the toxicity of the sample. PMID:24469431

  17. PPR proteins of green algae

    PubMed Central

    Tourasse, Nicolas J; Choquet, Yves; Vallon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Using the repeat finding algorithm FT-Rep, we have identified 154 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins in nine fully sequenced genomes from green algae (with a total of 1201 repeats) and grouped them in 47 orthologous groups. All data are available in a database, PPRdb, accessible online at http://giavap-genomes.ibpc.fr/ppr. Based on phylogenetic trees generated from the repeats, we propose evolutionary scenarios for PPR proteins. Two PPRs are clearly conserved in the entire green lineage: MRL1 is a stabilization factor for the rbcL mRNA, while HCF152 binds in plants to the psbH-petB intergenic region. MCA1 (the stabilization factor for petA) and PPR7 (a short PPR also acting on chloroplast mRNAs) are conserved across the entire Chlorophyta. The other PPRs are clade-specific, with evidence for gene losses, duplications, and horizontal transfer. In some PPR proteins, an additional domain found at the C terminus provides clues as to possible functions. PPR19 and PPR26 possess a methyltransferase_4 domain suggesting involvement in RNA guanosine methylation. PPR18 contains a C-terminal CBS domain, similar to the CBSPPR1 protein found in nucleoids. PPR16, PPR29, PPR37, and PPR38 harbor a SmR (MutS-related) domain similar to that found in land plants pTAC2, GUN1, and SVR7. The PPR-cyclins PPR3, PPR4, and PPR6, in addition, contain a cyclin domain C-terminal to their SmR domain. PPR31 is an unusual PPR-cyclin containing at its N terminus an OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) and a RAP domain. We consider the possibility that PPR proteins with a SmR domain can introduce single-stranded nicks in the plastid chromosome. PMID:24021981

  18. Expression, nucleotide sequence and mutational analysis of two open reading frames in the nif gene region of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Borthakur, D; Basche, M; Buikema, W J; Borthakur, P B; Haselkorn, R

    1990-04-01

    A 1.8 kb transcript corresponding to a region of the Anabaena 7120 chromosome 4 kb downstream of the nifHDK operon appears 12-18 h after heterocyst induction. The DNA corresponding to this transcript was sequenced and found to contain two open reading frames, designated ORF 1 and ORF 2. Two polypeptides, of 30 kDa and 13 kDa, encoded by these ORFs were expressed in Escherichia coli. An apparent start site for the transcript, detected by S1 nuclease protection, was located 42 bp upstream of the ATG start codon of ORF 1. ORF 2 shows strong sequence similarity to ORF 6 in the nif gene region of Azotobacter vinelandii. ORF 1 was interrupted using a 1.4 kb neomycin resistance cassette and the resulting mutant grew very slowly on medium lacking combined nitrogen. The mutant had 45% of wild-type acetylene reduction activity, which could be complemented by a 2.8 kb EcoRI fragment of wild-type Anabaena DNA containing only ORF 1 and ORF 2. Thus, one or both of these ORFs is required for efficient nitrogen fixation in Anabaena. PMID:2115111

  19. Zur (FurB) is a key factor in the control of the oxidative stress response in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Sein-Echaluce, Violeta C; González, Andrés; Napolitano, Mauro; Luque, Ignacio; Barja, Francisco; Peleato, M Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2015-06-01

    Iron and zinc are necessary nutrients whose homeostasis is tightly controlled by members of the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) superfamily in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Although the link between iron metabolism and oxidative stress management is well documented, little is known about the connection between zinc homeostasis and the oxidative stress response in cyanobacteria. Zinc homeostasis in Anabaena is controlled by Zur, also named FurB. When overexpressed in Escherichia coli, Zur (FurB) improved cell survival during oxidative stress. In order to investigate the possible correlation between Zur and the oxidative stress response in Anabaena, zur deletion and zur-overexpressing strains have been constructed, and the consequences of Zur imbalance evaluated. The lack of Zur increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), whereas an excess of Zur enhanced oxidative stress resistance. Both mutants displayed pleiotropic phenotypes, including alterations on the filament surfaces observable by scanning electron microscopy, reduced content of endogenous H2 O2 and altered expression of sodA, catalases and several peroxiredoxins. Transcriptional and biochemical analyses unveiled that the appropriate level of Zur is required for proper control of the oxidative stress response and allowed us to identify major antioxidant enzymes as novel members of the Zur regulon. PMID:25244409

  20. The heterocyst differentiation transcriptional regulator HetR of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena forms tetramers and can be regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria respond to the external cue of nitrogen scarcity by the differentiation of heterocysts, cells specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. Heterocysts follow a spatial pattern along the filament of two heterocysts separated by ca. 10-15 vegetative cells performing oxygenic photosynthesis. HetR is a transcriptional regulator that directs heterocyst differentiation. In the model strain Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the HetR protein was observed in various oligomeric forms in vivo, including a tetramer that peaked with maximal hetR expression during differentiation. Tetramers were not detected in a hetR point mutant incapable of differentiation, but were conspicuous in an over-differentiating strain lacking the PatS inhibitor. In differentiated filaments the HetR tetramer was restricted to heterocysts, being undetectable in vegetative cells. HetR co-purified with RNA polymerase from Anabaena mainly as a tetramer. In vitro, purified recombinant HetR was distributed between monomers, dimers, trimers and tetramers, and it was phosphorylated when incubated with (γ-(32)P)ATP. Phosphorylation and PatS hampered the accumulation of HetR tetramers and impaired HetR binding to DNA. In summary, tetrameric HetR appears to represent a functionally relevant form of HetR, whose abundance in the Anabaena filament could be negatively regulated by phosphorylation and by PatS. PMID:26552991

  1. Different Functions of the Paralogs to the N-Terminal Domain of the Orange Carotenoid Protein in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 71201[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    López-Igual, Rocío; Wilson, Adjélé; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Sutter, Markus; Turmo, Aiko

    2016-01-01

    The photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) is involved in cyanobacterial photoprotection. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) is responsible for interaction with the antenna and induction of excitation energy quenching, while the C-terminal domain is the regulatory domain that senses light and induces photoactivation. In most nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial strains, there are one to four paralogous genes coding for homologs to the NTD of the OCP. The functions of these proteins are unknown. Here, we study the expression, localization, and function of these genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that the four genes present in the genome are expressed in both vegetative cells and heterocysts but do not seem to have an essential role in heterocyst formation. This study establishes that all four Anabaena NTD-like proteins can bind a carotenoid and the different paralogs have distinct functions. Surprisingly, only one paralog (All4941) was able to interact with the antenna and to induce permanent thermal energy dissipation. Two of the other Anabaena paralogs (All3221 and Alr4783) were shown to be very good singlet oxygen quenchers. The fourth paralog (All1123) does not seem to be involved in photoprotection. Structural homology modeling allowed us to propose specific features responsible for the different functions of these soluble carotenoid-binding proteins. PMID:27208286

  2. Different Functions of the Paralogs to the N-Terminal Domain of the Orange Carotenoid Protein in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    López-Igual, Rocío; Wilson, Adjélé; Leverenz, Ryan L; Melnicki, Matthew R; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Sutter, Markus; Turmo, Aiko; Perreau, François; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2016-07-01

    The photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) is involved in cyanobacterial photoprotection. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) is responsible for interaction with the antenna and induction of excitation energy quenching, while the C-terminal domain is the regulatory domain that senses light and induces photoactivation. In most nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial strains, there are one to four paralogous genes coding for homologs to the NTD of the OCP. The functions of these proteins are unknown. Here, we study the expression, localization, and function of these genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that the four genes present in the genome are expressed in both vegetative cells and heterocysts but do not seem to have an essential role in heterocyst formation. This study establishes that all four Anabaena NTD-like proteins can bind a carotenoid and the different paralogs have distinct functions. Surprisingly, only one paralog (All4941) was able to interact with the antenna and to induce permanent thermal energy dissipation. Two of the other Anabaena paralogs (All3221 and Alr4783) were shown to be very good singlet oxygen quenchers. The fourth paralog (All1123) does not seem to be involved in photoprotection. Structural homology modeling allowed us to propose specific features responsible for the different functions of these soluble carotenoid-binding proteins. PMID:27208286

  3. Evolutionary relationships among eubacteria, cyanobacteria, and chloroplasts: evidence from the rpoC1 gene of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed Central

    Bergsland, K J; Haselkorn, R

    1991-01-01

    RNA polymerases of cyanobacteria contain a novel core subunit, gamma, which is absent from the RNA polymerases of other eubacteria. The genes encoding the three largest subunits of RNA polymerase, including gamma, have been isolated from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The genes are linked in the order rpoB, rpoC1, rpoC2 and encode the beta, gamma, and beta' subunits, respectively. These genes are analogous to the rpoBC operon of Escherichia coli, but the functions of rpoC have been split in Anabaena between two genes, rpoC1 and rpoC2. The DNA sequence of the rpoC1 gene was determined and shows that the gamma subunit corresponds to the amino-terminal half of the E. coli beta' subunit. The gamma protein contains several conserved domains found in the largest subunits of all bacterial and eukaryotic RNA polymerases, including a potential zinc finger motif. The spliced rpoC1 gene from spinach chloroplast DNA was expressed in E. coli and shown to encode a protein immunologically related to Anabaena gamma. The similarities in the RNA polymerase gene products and gene organizations between cyanobacteria and chloroplasts support the cyanobacterial origin of chloroplasts and a divergent evolutionary pathway among eubacteria. Images PMID:1904436

  4. Estimation of alga growth stage and lipid content growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embaye, Tsegereda N. (Inventor); Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Method and system for estimating a growth stage of an alga in an ambient fluid. Measured light beam absorption or reflection values through or from the alga and through an ambient fluid, in each of two or more wavelength sub-ranges, are compared with reference light beam absorption values for corresponding wavelength sub-ranges for in each alga growth stage to determine (1) which alga growth stage, if any, is more likely and (2) whether estimated lipid content of the alga is increasing or has peaked. Alga growth is preferably terminated when lipid content has approximately reached a maximum value.

  5. Studies on marine algae for haemagglutinic activity.

    PubMed

    Alam, M T; Usmanghani, K

    1994-07-01

    Lectins (agglutinins) are important in medical and immunological applications. Phytohaemagglutinins have been found useful in blood banking. Keeping in view of these facts, the marine algae found at Karachi coastal region have been screened for agglutinic activity by using human erythrocytes of A, B, AB and 0 group. Altogether 53 algal samples were collected and subjected to extraction, fractionation serial dilution and titre determinations. The total marine algae screened for haemagglutinic activity were 44 out of these 14, 13 and 17 belonged to Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta, and Rhodophyta respectively. Among these three groups the Rhodophyta showed the highest number of lytic activity. The green marine alga Valoniopsis pachynema showed a titre value between 2(2) and 2(3), which is statistically significant. In case of brown marine algae Colpomenia sinuosa was found to be active (titre 2(3)), while Dictyota dichotoma, D. indica and Iyengaria stellata, furnished week titre value as 2(2). The red marine algae screened were 17, out of these 4 spp. showed significant activity (titre 2(3)), and these are Gelidium usmanghani, Gracilaria foliifera Hypnea pannosa and Hynea valentiae. While Scinaia fascicularis, Scinaia indica and Champia parvula were found to be weak in their onset on human erythrocytes. The results obtained were quite in agreement with those reported in the literature. PMID:16414751

  6. Controlled regular locomotion of algae cell microrobots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuangxi; Jiao, Niandong; Tung, Steve; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-06-01

    Algae cells can be considered as microrobots from the perspective of engineering. These organisms not only have a strong reproductive ability but can also sense the environment, harvest energy from the surroundings, and swim very efficiently, accommodating all these functions in a body of size on the order of dozens of micrometers. An interesting topic with respect to random swimming motions of algae cells in a liquid is how to precisely control them as microrobots such that they swim according to manually set routes. This study developed an ingenious method to steer swimming cells based on the phototaxis. The method used a varying light signal to direct the motion of the cells. The swimming trajectory, speed, and force of algae cells were analyzed in detail. Then the algae cell could be controlled to swim back and forth, and traverse a crossroad as a microrobot obeying specific traffic rules. Furthermore, their motions along arbitrarily set trajectories such as zigzag, and triangle were realized successfully under optical control. Robotize algae cells can be used to precisely transport and deliver cargo such as drug particles in microfluidic chip for biomedical treatment and pharmacodynamic analysis. The study findings are expected to bring significant breakthrough in biological drives and new biomedical applications. PMID:27206511

  7. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    PubMed

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements. PMID:20547408

  8. Biotransformation of benzo[a]pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic analogs by several green algae and other algal species under gold and white light.

    PubMed

    Warshawsky, D; Cody, T; Radike, M; Reilman, R; Schumann, B; LaDow, K; Schneider, J

    1995-07-14

    metabolized BaP to dihydrodiols. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the yellow alga Ochromonas malhamensis, the blue green algae Anabaena flosaquae and euglenoid Euglena gracilis did not metabolize BaP to any extent. The data indicate that algae are important in their ability to degrade PAHs but the degradation is dependent on the dose of light energy emitted and absorbed, the dose of PAHs to which the algae are exposed, the phototoxicity of PAHs and their metabolite(s) and the species and strain of algae involved. All of these factors will be important in assessing the degradation and detoxification pathways of recalcitrant PAHs by algae. PMID:7606812

  9. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  10. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2014-06-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  11. Genome of the red alga Porphyridium purpureum.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debashish; Price, Dana C; Chan, Cheong Xin; Qiu, Huan; Rose, Nicholas; Ball, Steven; Weber, Andreas P M; Arias, Maria Cecilia; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Krishnan, Anagha; Zäuner, Simone; Morath, Shannon; Hilliou, Frédérique; Egizi, Andrea; Perrineau, Marie-Mathilde; Yoon, Hwan Su

    2013-01-01

    The limited knowledge we have about red algal genomes comes from the highly specialized extremophiles, Cyanidiophyceae. Here, we describe the first genome sequence from a mesophilic, unicellular red alga, Porphyridium purpureum. The 8,355 predicted genes in P. purpureum, hundreds of which are likely to be implicated in a history of horizontal gene transfer, reside in a genome of 19.7 Mbp with 235 spliceosomal introns. Analysis of light-harvesting complex proteins reveals a nuclear-encoded phycobiliprotein in the alga. We uncover a complex set of carbohydrate-active enzymes, identify the genes required for the methylerythritol phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, and find evidence of sexual reproduction. Analysis of the compact, function-rich genome of P. purpureum suggests that ancestral lineages of red algae acted as mediators of horizontal gene transfer between prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes, thereby significantly enriching genomes across the tree of photosynthetic life. PMID:23770768

  12. Algae control problems and practices workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pryfogle, P.A.; Ghio, G.

    1996-09-01

    Western water resources are continuously facing increased demand from industry and the public. Consequently, many of these resources are required to perform multiple tasks as they cycle through the ecosystem. Many plants and animals depend upon these resources for growth. Algae are one group of plants associated with nutrient and energy cycles in many aquatic ecosystems. Although most freshwater algae are microscopic in size, they are capable of dominating and proliferating to the extent that the value of the water resource for both industrial and domestic needs is compromised. There is a great diversity of aquatic environments and systems in which algae may be found, and there are many varieties of treatment and control techniques available to reduce the impacts of excessive growth. This workshop was organized to exchange information about these control problems and practices.

  13. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-03-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores ( <10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation.

  14. Study of mechanical and morphological properties of bio-based polyethylene (HDPE) and sponge-gourds (Luffa-cylindrica) agroresidue composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escocio, Viviane A.; Visconte, Leila L. Y.; Cavalcante, Andre de P.; Furtado, Ana Maria S.; Pacheco, Elen B. A. V.

    2015-05-01

    Brazil has a remarkable position in the use of renewable energy. The potential of natural resources in Brazil has motivated the use of these renewable resources to make technologies more sustainable. From the large variety of commercially available High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) from different sources, two were chosen for investigation: one produced from sugarcane ethanol, and the other one, a conventional polyethylene, produced from fossil resources. In the preparation of the composites, sponge-gourds also called Luffa cylindrica were selectec. The main application of this product is as bath sponge, whose production generates scraps that are generally burnt. In this work, the composites were prepared by blending the sponge scrap at different proportions (10, 20, 30 and 40% wt/wt) with high density polyethylene (HDPE) from renewable source by extrusion. The melt flow index analysis of the composites was determined and specimens were obtained by injection molding for the assessment of mechanical properties such as tensile (elasticity modulus), flexural and Izod impact strengths. The microstructure of the impact fractured surface of the specimen also was determined. The results showed that the addition of sponge scrap affects positively all the properties studied as compared to HDPE. The results of tensile strength, elasticity modulus and flexural strength were similar to those observed in the literature for composites of HDPE from fossil source. The microstructure corroborates the results of mechanical properties. It was shown that the sponge scrap has potential to be applied as cellulosic filler for renewable polyethylene, providing a totally renewable material with good mechanical properties.

  15. Flow sorting of C-genome chromosomes from wild relatives of wheat Aegilops markgrafii, Ae. triuncialis and Ae. cylindrica, and their molecular organization

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, István; Vrána, Jan; Farkas, András; Kubaláková, Marie; Cseh, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Aegilops markgrafii (CC) and its natural hybrids Ae. triuncialis (UtUtCtCt) and Ae. cylindrica (DcDcCcCc) represent a rich reservoir of useful genes for improvement of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), but the limited information available on their genome structure and the shortage of molecular (cyto-) genetic tools hamper the utilization of the extant genetic diversity. This study provides the complete karyotypes in the three species obtained after fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with repetitive DNA probes, and evaluates the potential of flow cytometric chromosome sorting. Methods The flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained chromosomes were characterized and the chromosome content of the peaks on the flow karyotypes was determined by FISH. Twenty-nine conserved orthologous set (COS) markers covering all seven wheat homoeologous chromosome groups were used for PCR with DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA. Key Results FISH with repetitive DNA probes revealed that chromosomes 4C, 5C, 7Ct, T6UtS.6UtL-5CtL, 1Cc and 5Dc could be sorted with purities ranging from 66 to 91 %, while the remaining chromosomes could be sorted in groups of 2–5. This identified a partial wheat–C-genome homology for group 4 and 5 chromosomes. In addition, 1C chromosomes were homologous with group 1 of wheat; a small segment from group 2 indicated 1C–2C rearrangement. An extensively rearranged structure of chromosome 7C relative to wheat was also detected. Conclusions The possibility of purifying Aegilops chromosomes provides an attractive opportunity to investigate the structure and evolution of the Aegilops C genome and to develop molecular tools to facilitate the identification of alien chromatin and support alien introgression breeding in bread wheat. PMID:26043745

  16. Lr41, Lr39, and a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops cylindrica may be allelic and are located on wheat chromosome 2DS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Franks, C D; Huang, L; Brown-Guedira, G L; Marshall, D S; Gill, B S; Fritz, A

    2004-02-01

    The leaf rust resistance gene Lr41 in wheat germplasm KS90WGRC10 and a resistance gene in wheat breeding line WX93D246-R-1 were transferred to Triticum aestivum from Aegilops tauschii and Ae. cylindrica, respectively. The leaf rust resistance gene in WX93D246-R-1 was located on wheat chromosome 2D by monosomic analysis. Molecular marker analysis of F(2) plants from non-critical crosses determined that this gene is 11.2 cM distal to marker Xgwm210 on the short arm of 2D. No susceptible plants were detected in a population of 300 F(2) plants from a cross between WX93D246-R-1 and TA 4186 ( Lr39), suggesting that the gene in WX93D246-R-1 is the same as, or closely linked to, Lr39. In addition, no susceptible plants were detected in a population of 180 F(2) plants from the cross between KS90WGRC10 and WX93D246-R-1. The resistance gene in KS90WGRC10, Lr41, was previously reported to be located on wheat chromosome 1D. In this study, no genetic association was found between Lr41 and 51 markers located on chromosome 1D. A population of 110 F(3 )lines from a cross between KS90WGRC10 and TAM 107 was evaluated with polymorphic SSR markers from chromosome 2D and marker Xgdm35 was found to be 1.9 cM proximal to Lr41. When evaluated with diverse isolates of Puccinia triticina, similar reactions were observed on WX93D246-R-1, KS90WGRC10, and TA 4186. The results of mapping, allelism, and race specificity test indicate that these germplasms likely have the same gene for resistance to leaf rust. PMID:14534751

  17. Harvesting of algae by froth flotation.

    PubMed

    LEVIN, G V; CLENDENNING, J R; GIBOR, A; BOGAR, F D

    1962-03-01

    A highly efficient froth flotation procedure has been developed for harvesting algae from dilute suspensions. The method does not depend upon the addition of flotants. Harvesting is carried out in a long column containing the feed solution which is aerated from below. A stable column of foam is produced and harvested from a side arm near the top of the column. The cell concentration of the harvest is a function of pH, aeration rate, aerator porosity, feed concentration, and height of foam in the harvesting column. The economic aspects of this process seem favorable for mass harvesting of algae for food or other purposes. PMID:14464557

  18. Use of Brown Algae to Demonstrate Natural Products Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Lee A.

    1985-01-01

    Background information is provided on the natural products found in marine organisms in general and the brown algae in particular. Also provided are the procedures needed to isolate D-mannitol (a primary metabolite) and cholesterol from brown algae. (JN)

  19. Photodegradation of Norfloxacin in aqueous solution containing algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junwei; Fu, Dafang; Wu, Jilong

    2012-01-01

    Photodegradation of Norfloxacin in aqueous solution containing algae under a medium pressure mercury lamp (15 W, lambda(max) = 365 nm) was investigated. Results indicated that the photodegradation of Norfloxacin could be induced by the algae in the heterogeneous algae-water systems. The photodegradation rate of Norfloxacin increased with increasing algae concentration, and was greatly influenced by the temperature and pH of solution. Meanwhile, the cooperation action of algae and Fe(III), and the ultrasound were beneficial to photodegradation of Norfloxacin. The degradation kinetics of Norfloxacin was found to follow the pseudo zero-order reaction in the suspension of algae. In addition, we discussed the photodegradation mechanism of Norfloxacin in the suspension of algae. This work will be helpful for understanding the photochemical degradation of antibiotics in aqueous environment in the presence of algae, for providing a new method to deal with antibiotics pollution. PMID:22894111

  20. An Overview of Algae Biofuel Production and Potential Environmental Impact

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algae are among the most potentially significant sources of sustainable biofuels in the future of renewable energy. A feedstock with virtually unlimited applicability, algae can metabolize various waste streams (e.g., municipal wastewater, carbon dioxide from industrial flue gas)...

  1. [Accumulation of polycyclic arenes in Baltic Sea algae].

    PubMed

    Veldre, I A; Itra, A R; Paal'me, L P; Kukk, Kh A

    1985-01-01

    The paper presents data on the level of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and some other polycyclic arenes in alga and phanerogam specimens from different gulfs of the Baltic Sea. Algae were shown to absorb BP from sea water. The mean concentration of BP in sea water was under 0.004 microgram/1, while in algae it ranged 0.1-21.2 micrograms/kg dry weight. Algae accumulate BP to a higher degree than phanerogams. The highest concentrations of BP were found in algae Enteromorpha while the lowest ones in Furcellaria. In annual green algae, BP level was higher in autumn, i. e. at the end of vegetation period, than in spring. Brown algae Fucus vesiculosus is recommended for monitoring polycyclic arene pollution in the area from Vormsi Island to Käsmu and green algae Cladophora or Enteromorpha in the eastern part of the Finnish Gulf. PMID:4060672

  2. ALGAE BLOOMS AND PHOSPHORUS LOADING IN LAKE LOWELL, IDAHO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algae blooms limit recreational use of Lake Lowell, ID (17050114) by reducing water clarity and esthetic qualities. Under bloom conditions, algae have a negative impact on the reservoir fishery because of periodic oxygen depletion associated with respiration and decomposition. ...

  3. WASP7 BENTHIC ALGAE - MODEL THEORY AND USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard WASP7 eutrophication module includes nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, dissolved oxygen-organic matter interactions, and phytoplankton kinetics. In many shallow streams and rivers, however, the attached algae (benthic algae, or periphyton, attached to submerged substr...

  4. Stimulatory effect of procaine on the growth of several microalgae and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ezure, T; Yamaguchi, T; Domen, H; Ishida, M; Schmidt, W

    2000-02-01

    Procaine has been used to stimulate plant growth and it has been noted that it also promotes growth of microorganisms. The effect of procaine hydrochloride concentration on the growth rates of several species of microalgae and cyanobacteria was studied under both photoautotropic and heterotrophic growth conditions. Procaine hydrochloride was added to cultures at concentrations over the range 0.01-1000 mg L(-1). A stimulating effect of procaine hydrochloride on photoautotrophic growth was observed for the cyanobacteria Anabaena cylindrica and Anabaena variabilis, and for the salt-tolerant green algae Dunaliella primolecta and Dunaliella parva. During active growth in batch culture an increase in growth rate (compared with control culture without procaine hydrochloride) of about 25% was observed at 0.1 mgL(-1) of procaine hydrochloride for A. cylindrica. However, procaine hydrochloride was toxic at concentrations of > 10 mgL(-1). Simultaneous administration of hydrolysis products of procaine, p-aminobenzoic acid and diethyl aminoethanol, in lieu of procaine hydrochloride, was as effective as procaine in stimulating growth of A. cylindrica. Heterotrophic growth of Chlorella ellipsoidea and Prototheca zopfii was not stimulated by procaine hydrochloride over the concentration range studied (0.1-10 mg L(-1)). The combined effects of procaine hydrochloride concentration and four other environmental factors (temperature, light intensity, CO2 concentration in the flushing gas and NaCl concentration) on growth rate of D. primolecta was modelled using both a neural network approach and a response surface method. These results indicate that procaine hydrochloride exerts different effects on the growth of microalgal and cyanobacterial cells as functions of dosage, species and culture conditions. PMID:10714957

  5. The all0458/lti46.2 gene encodes a low temperature-induced Dps protein homologue in the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Anabaena variabilis M3.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Moriyama, Takashi; Toyoshima, Masakazu; Mizusawa, Mika; Tajima, Naoyuki

    2012-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins from starved cells (Dps), which are encoded by many bacterial genomes, protect genomic DNA via non-specific DNA binding, as well as inhibition of free radical formation by chelating Fe(II). In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena, the second gene (lti46.2) in the low temperature-induced gene operon lti46 in strain M3 was found to encode a homologue of Dps, but for a long time this gene remained poorly characterized. A gene cluster, all0459-all0458-all0457, was found later to be 100% identical to the lti46 gene cluster in a closely related strain, PCC 7120. In the present study, we detected ferroxidase activity of the Lti46.2/All0458 protein, which formed a dodecamer, as found in other Dps proteins. In addition, three homologues of all0458 were found in strain PCC 7120, namely, all1173, alr3808 and all4145. We analysed expression of the lti46 or all0459-8-7 gene cluster in both strains, M3 and PCC 7120, and confirmed its induction by low temperature. We found that the All0458-GFP fusion protein and the All1173-GFP fusion protein were localized to the nucleoids. In the all0458 null mutant, the transcript of the alr3808 gene accumulated. These results suggest that there might be complex cooperation of various members of the dps family in protecting the genome from environmental stresses such as changing temperature. PMID:22837304

  6. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  7. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  8. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  9. How to Identify and Control Water Weeds and Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Biochemists, Inc., Mequon, WI.

    Included in this guide to water management are general descriptions of algae, toxic algae, weed problems in lakes, ponds, and canals, and general discussions of mechanical, biological and chemical control methods. In addition, pictures, descriptions, and recommended control methods are given for algae, 6 types of floating weeds, 18 types of…

  10. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  11. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  12. Fucoidans — sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, Anatolii I.; Bilan, M. I.

    2009-08-01

    The methods of isolation of fucoidans and determination of their chemical structures are reviewed. The fucoidans represent sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae, the composition of which varies from simple fucan sulfates to complex heteropolysaccharides. The currently known structures of such biopolymers are presented. A variety of the biological activities of fucoidans is briefly summarised.

  13. Potential of mass algae production in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, A.; Fekri, M.

    1984-11-01

    The rationale for efficient light absorption by algae at a production unit is given and design details of an intensive thin-layer technology outdoor (2.11m/sup 2/) unit are presented. Data on productivity under extreme conditions were collected. Maximum productivity data are close to those reported in the literature for similar geographic areas.

  14. Laser-fluorescence measurement of marine algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in remote sensing of algae by laser-induced fluorescence is subject of comprehensive report. Existing single-wavelength and four-wavelength systems are reviewed, and new expression for power received by airborne sensor is derived. Result differs by as much as factor of 10 from those previously reported. Detailed error analysis evluates factors affecting accuracy of laser-fluorosensor systems.

  15. OPTIMAL COST CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ATTACHED ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a cost-benefit analysis for alternative programs intended for the control of the nuisance growth of an attached alga (Cladophora). Such analyses require that changes in water quality be quantitatively related to the cost of implementation for specific manageme...

  16. Spirulina: The Alga That Can End Malnutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Ripley D.

    1985-01-01

    One approach to eliminating malnutrition worldwide is to grow spirulina in recycled village wastes. Spirulina is a blue-green alga and a natural concentrated food. Spirulina can give poor villages a nutritional food supplement they can grow themselves and can reduce infectious disease at the same time. (Author/RM)

  17. The FurA regulon in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120: in silico prediction and experimental validation of novel target genes

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrés; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Sancho, Javier; Fillat, María F.

    2014-01-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the ferric uptake regulator FurA functions as a global transcriptional regulator. Despite several analyses have focused on elucidating the FurA-regulatory network, the number of target genes described for this essential transcription factor is limited to a handful of examples. In this article, we combine an in silico genome-wide predictive approach with experimental determinations to better define the FurA regulon. Predicted FurA-binding sites were identified upstream of 215 genes belonging to diverse functional categories including iron homeostasis, photosynthesis and respiration, heterocyst differentiation, oxidative stress defence and light-dependent signal transduction mechanisms, among others. The probabilistic model proved to be effective at discerning FurA boxes from non-cognate sequences, while subsequent electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments confirmed the in vitro specific binding of FurA to at least 20 selected predicted targets. Gene-expression analyses further supported the dual role of FurA as transcriptional modulator that can act both as repressor and as activator. In either role, the in vitro affinity of the protein to its target sequences is strongly dependent on metal co-regulator and reducing conditions, suggesting that FurA couples in vivo iron homeostasis and the response to oxidative stress to major physiological processes in cyanobacteria. PMID:24503250

  18. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Rajendran, Abinaya; Anand, Ganesh Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP) metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain). In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins. PMID:25922789

  19. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  20. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: Application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors.

  1. Heterocyst-Specific Expression of patB, a Gene Required for Nitrogen Fixation in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn M.; Buikema, William J.; Haselkorn, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The patB gene product is required for growth and survival of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 in the absence of combined nitrogen. A patB::gfp fusion demonstrated that this gene is expressed exclusively in heterocysts. patB mutants have a normal initial pattern of heterocyst spacing along the filament but differentiate excess heterocysts after several days in the absence of combined nitrogen. Expression of hetR and patS, two critical regulators of the heterocyst development cascade, are normal for patB mutants, indicating that patB acts downstream of them in the differentiation pathway. A patB deletion mutant suffers an almost complete cessation of growth and nitrogen fixation within 24 h of combined nitrogen removal. In contrast, a new PatB mutant that is defective in its N-terminal ferredoxin domain, or a previously described mutant that has a frameshift removing its C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain, grows very slowly and differentiates multiple contiguous heterocysts under nitrogen-deficient conditions. PMID:12644502

  2. Heterocyst-specific flavodiiron protein Flv3B enables oxic diazotrophic growth of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Maria; Battchikova, Natalia; Richaud, Pierre; Leino, Hannu; Kosourov, Sergey; Isojärvi, Janne; Peltier, Gilles; Flores, Enrique; Cournac, Laurent; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-01-01

    Flavodiiron proteins are known to have crucial and specific roles in photoprotection of photosystems I and II in cyanobacteria. The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 contains, besides the four flavodiiron proteins Flv1A, Flv2, Flv3A, and Flv4 present in vegetative cells, two heterocyst-specific flavodiiron proteins, Flv1B and Flv3B. Here, we demonstrate that Flv3B is responsible for light-induced O2 uptake in heterocysts, and that the absence of the Flv3B protein severely compromises the growth of filaments in oxic, but not in microoxic, conditions. It is further demonstrated that Flv3B-mediated photosynthetic O2 uptake has a distinct role in heterocysts which cannot be substituted by respiratory O2 uptake in the protection of nitrogenase from oxidative damage and, thus, in an efficient provision of nitrogen to filaments. In line with this conclusion, the Δflv3B strain has reduced amounts of nitrogenase NifHDK subunits and shows multiple symptoms of nitrogen deficiency in the filaments. The apparent imbalance of cytosolic redox state in Δflv3B heterocysts also has a pronounced influence on the amounts of different transcripts and proteins. Therefore, an O2-related mechanism for control of gene expression is suggested to take place in heterocysts. PMID:25002499

  3. Heterocyst-specific flavodiiron protein Flv3B enables oxic diazotrophic growth of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Ermakova, Maria; Battchikova, Natalia; Richaud, Pierre; Leino, Hannu; Kosourov, Sergey; Isojärvi, Janne; Peltier, Gilles; Flores, Enrique; Cournac, Laurent; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-07-29

    Flavodiiron proteins are known to have crucial and specific roles in photoprotection of photosystems I and II in cyanobacteria. The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 contains, besides the four flavodiiron proteins Flv1A, Flv2, Flv3A, and Flv4 present in vegetative cells, two heterocyst-specific flavodiiron proteins, Flv1B and Flv3B. Here, we demonstrate that Flv3B is responsible for light-induced O2 uptake in heterocysts, and that the absence of the Flv3B protein severely compromises the growth of filaments in oxic, but not in microoxic, conditions. It is further demonstrated that Flv3B-mediated photosynthetic O2 uptake has a distinct role in heterocysts which cannot be substituted by respiratory O2 uptake in the protection of nitrogenase from oxidative damage and, thus, in an efficient provision of nitrogen to filaments. In line with this conclusion, the Δflv3B strain has reduced amounts of nitrogenase NifHDK subunits and shows multiple symptoms of nitrogen deficiency in the filaments. The apparent imbalance of cytosolic redox state in Δflv3B heterocysts also has a pronounced influence on the amounts of different transcripts and proteins. Therefore, an O2-related mechanism for control of gene expression is suggested to take place in heterocysts. PMID:25002499

  4. Requirement of Fra proteins for communication channels between cells in the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Mariscal, Vicente; Austin, Jotham R; Haselkorn, Robert

    2015-08-11

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 differentiates specialized cells, heterocysts, that fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer the fixed nitrogen to adjacent vegetative cells. Reciprocally, vegetative cells transfer fixed carbon to heterocysts. Several routes have been described for metabolite exchange within the filament, one of which involves communicating channels that penetrate the septum between adjacent cells. Several fra gene mutants were isolated 25 y ago on the basis of their phenotypes: inability to fix nitrogen and fragmentation of filaments upon transfer from N+ to N- media. Cryopreservation combined with electron tomography were used to investigate the role of three fra gene products in channel formation. FraC and FraG are clearly involved in channel formation, whereas FraD has a minor part. Additionally, FraG was located close to the cytoplasmic membrane and in the heterocyst neck, using immunogold labeling with antibody raised to the N-terminal domain of the FraG protein. PMID:26216997

  5. Requirement of Fra proteins for communication channels between cells in the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Mariscal, Vicente; Austin, Jotham R.; Haselkorn, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 differentiates specialized cells, heterocysts, that fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer the fixed nitrogen to adjacent vegetative cells. Reciprocally, vegetative cells transfer fixed carbon to heterocysts. Several routes have been described for metabolite exchange within the filament, one of which involves communicating channels that penetrate the septum between adjacent cells. Several fra gene mutants were isolated 25 y ago on the basis of their phenotypes: inability to fix nitrogen and fragmentation of filaments upon transfer from N+ to N− media. Cryopreservation combined with electron tomography were used to investigate the role of three fra gene products in channel formation. FraC and FraG are clearly involved in channel formation, whereas FraD has a minor part. Additionally, FraG was located close to the cytoplasmic membrane and in the heterocyst neck, using immunogold labeling with antibody raised to the N-terminal domain of the FraG protein. PMID:26216997

  6. Comparative proteomics reveals that a saxitoxin-producing and a nontoxic strain of Anabaena circinalis are two different ecotypes.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Paul M; Song, Xiaomin; Neilan, Brett A; Moffitt, Michelle C

    2014-03-01

    In Australia, saxitoxin production is restricted to the cyanobacterial species Anabaena circinalis and is strain-dependent. We aimed to characterize a saxitoxin-producing and nontoxic strain of A. circinalis at the proteomic level using iTRAQ. Seven proteins putatively involved in saxitoxin biosynthesis were identified within our iTRAQ experiment for the first time. The proteomic profile of the toxic A. circinalis was significantly different from the nontoxic strain, indicating that each is likely to inhabit a unique ecological niche. Under control growth conditions, the saxitoxin-producing A. circinalis displayed a higher abundance of photosynthetic, carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolic proteins. Differential abundance of these proteins suggests a higher intracellular C:N ratio and a higher concentration of intracellular 2-oxoglutarate in our toxic strain compared with the nontoxic strain. This may be a novel site for posttranslational regulation because saxitoxin biosynthesis putatively requires a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase. The nontoxic A. circinalis was more abundant in proteins, indicating cellular stress. Overall, our study has provided the first insight into fundamental differences between a toxic and nontoxic strain of A. circinalis, indicating that they are distinct ecotypes. PMID:24460188

  7. A short-filament mutant of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 that fragments in nitrogen-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, C C; Buikema, W J; Black, K; Haselkorn, R

    1995-01-01

    Strain 129 is a fragmentation mutant of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Growing with fixed nitrogen, this mutant forms filaments that are much shorter than wild-type filaments. Following starvation for fixed nitrogen, strain 129 becomes nearly unicellular and forms few heterocysts, although electron microscopy suggests that proheterocysts form while fragmentation occurs. Starvation for sulfate, phosphate, iron, and calcium does not cause this fragmentation. The affected gene in strain 129, fraC, was cloned by complementation and characterized. It encodes a unique 179-amino-acid protein rich in phenylalanine. Insertional inactivation of the chromosomal copy of fraC results in a phenotype identical to that of strain 129, while complementation using a truncated version of FraC results in only partial complementation of the original mutant. Heterocysts could be induced to form in N-replete cultures of strain 129, as in wild-type cells, by supplying extra copies of the hetR gene on a plasmid. Thus, FraC is required for the integrity of cell junctions in general but is apparently not directly involved in normal differentiation and nitrogen fixation. PMID:7883709

  8. Effect of mineral phosphates on growth and nitrogen fixation of diazotrophic cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Westiellopsis prolifica.

    PubMed

    Yandigeri, Mahesh S; Yadav, Arvind K; Meena, Kamlesh Kumar; Pabbi, Sunil

    2010-03-01

    The nitrogen fixing cyanobacterial strains namely Anabaena variabilis (Nostocales, Nostocaceae) and Westiellopsis prolifica (Nostocales, Hapalosiphonaceae) were evaluated for their nitrogen fixation and growth potential in response to different concentrations (10, 20 and 30 mg P) of the alternate insoluble P-sources Mussorie Rock Phosphate and Tricalcium Phosphate. Distinct and significant intergeneric differences were observed with respect to nitrogen fixation measured as Acetylene Reduction Activity (ARA) and growth potential as soluble proteins, total carbohydrate content, dry weight and total chlorophyll content in response to different concentrations of Mussorie Rock Phosphate and Tricalcium Phosphate. Both the strains showed higher soluble protein content at 20 mg P (Mussorie Rock Phosphate) that increased with time of incubation in A. variabilis. Both cyanobacteria recorded maximum Acetylene Reduction Activity at 20 mg P (Tricalcium Phosphate) followed by activity in presence of soluble phosphate (K2HPO4). The mean activity at all concentrations of insoluble phosphate (Mussorie Rock Phosphate and Tricalcium Phosphate) was more than in the presence of soluble phosphate. PMID:20069361

  9. Integrated membrane systems incorporating coagulation, activated carbon and ultrafiltration for the removal of toxic cyanobacterial metabolites from Anabaena circinalis.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M B; Richard, Y; Ho, L; Chow, C W K; O'Neill, B K; Newcombe, G

    2011-01-01

    The use of integrated membrane systems (a train of treatment processes incorporating one or more membranes) is increasing globally as the technology is very effective for the production of high quality drinking water. In this investigation a laboratory scale integrated membrane system (IMS) featuring coagulation, powdered activated carbon (PAC) and ultrafiltration (UF) was investigated for the removal of an Australian strain of the cyanobacteria Anabaena circinalis and the cyanotoxin it produced. Three coagulants were compared, aluminium chlorohydrate (ACH), aluminium sulphate (alum) and an engineered aluminium coagulant referred to as high performance aluminium chlorohydrate (HPAC). PAC (Acticarb PS1000) was tested to determine adsorption of extracellular saxitoxin. Removal of A. circinalis cells was 100% by UF alone and the removal of cells prior to the membrane by coagulation reduced fouling attributed to algogenic organic material. Alum was the least efficient coagulant for removal of cells while ACH and HPAC were similar. Saxitoxin removal reached a maximum of 80% using ACH and PAC. The UF-IMS was challenged using a natural bloom of A. circinalis that occurred in the Myponga Reservoir in South Australia. PMID:21508543

  10. Sustained photoproduction of ammonia from dinitrogen and water by the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC33047

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, J.L.; Guerrero, M.G.; Losada, M.

    1984-07-01

    Conditions have been developed that lengthen the time during which photosynthetic dinitrogen fixation by filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain ATCC 33047 proceeds freely, whereas the subsequent conversion of ammonia into organic nitrogen remains blocked, with the resulting ammonia released to the outer medium. When L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine was added every 20 h, maximal rates of ammonia production (25 to 30 ..mu..mol/mg of chlorophyll per h) were maintained for about 50 h. After this time, ammonia production ceased due to a deficiency of glutamine and other nitrogenous compounds in the filaments, conditions which finally led to cell lysis. The effective ammonia production period could be further extended to about 7 days by adding a small amount of glutamine at the end of a 40-h production period or by allowing the cells to recover for 8 h in the absence of L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine after every 40-h period in the presence of the inhibitor. A more prolonged steady production of ammonia, lasting for longer than 2 weeks, was achieved by alternating treatments with the glutamine synthetase inhibitors L-methionine-DL-sulfoximine and phosphinothricin, provided that 8-h recovery periods in the absence of either compound were also alternated throughout. The biochemically manipulated cyanobacterial filaments thus represent a system that is relatively stable with time for the conversion of light energy into chemical energy, with the net generation of a valuable fuel and fertilizer through the photoreduction of dinitrogen to ammonia.

  11. In silico analysis and experimental validation of lipoprotein and novel Tat signal peptides processing in Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sonika; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Signal peptide (SP) plays a pivotal role in protein translocation. Lipoprotein- and twin arginine translocase (Tat) dependent signal peptides were studied in All3087, a homolog of competence protein of Synechocystis PCC6803 and in two putative alkaline phosphatases (ALPs, Alr2234 and Alr4976), respectively. In silico analysis of All3087 is shown to possess the characteristics feature of competence proteins such as helix-hairpin-helix, N and C-terminal HKD endonuclease domain, calcium binding domain and N-terminal lipoprotein signal peptide. The SP recognition-cleavage site in All3087 was predicted (AIA-AC) using SignalP while further in-depth analysis using Pred-Lipo and WebLogo analysis for consensus sequence showed it as IAA-C. Activities of putative ALPs were confirmed by heterologous overexpression, activity assessment and zymogram analysis. ALP activity in Anabaena remains cell bound in log-phase, but during late log/stationary phase, an enhanced ALP activity was detected in extracellular milieu. The enhancement of ALP activity during stationary phase was not only due to inorganic phosphate limitation but also contributed by the presence of novel bipartite Tat-SP. The Tat signal transported the folded active ALPs to the membrane, followed by anchoring into the membrane and successive cleavage enabling transportation of the ALPs to the extracellular milieu, because of bipartite architecture and processing of transit Tat-SP. PMID:26626354

  12. Unraveling of cross talk between Ca(2+) and ROS regulating enzymes in Anabaena 7120 and ntcA mutant.

    PubMed

    Singh, Savita; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    In order to understand a cross talk between Ca(2+) and ROS regulating enzymes and the possible involvement of ntcA gene, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its derivative ntcA mutant grown in varied levels of calcium chloride (0, 1, 10, and 100 mM) have been investigated. Scanning Electron Microscopy showed abnormal structure formation at high calcium concentration (100 mM) both in wild type and mutant. Fv /Fm values suggested that 100 mM calcium concentration was detrimental for photosynthetic apparatus. SOD, catalase, APX, GR, and peroxidase activity were found to be maximum for 100 mM and minimum for 1 mM of exogenously supplied calcium salt. NADPH contents were higher for wild type than mutant. RAPD-PCR and SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a difference in DNA as well as proteome pattern with changes in calcium chloride regime. Prominent bands of approximately 70, 33, 21, and 14 kDa expressed in the wild type served as the marker polypeptide bands under calcium supplementation. Results suggest that higher levels of calcium ion disturb the cellular homeostasis generating ROS, thereby inducing enhanced levels of antioxidative enzymes. Further, data also suggests possible involvement of ntcA gene in cross talk between calcium ion and ROS regulating enzymes. PMID:26374944

  13. AhpC (alkyl hydroperoxide reductase) from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 protects Escherichia coli from multiple abiotic stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Yogesh; Chaurasia, Neha; Rai, Lal Chand

    2009-04-17

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) is known to detoxify peroxides and reactive sulfur species (RSS). However, the relationship between its expression and combating of abiotic stresses is still not clear. To investigate this relationship, the genes encoding the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (ahpC) from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 were introduced into E. coli using pGEX-5X-2 vector and their possible functions against heat, salt, carbofuron, cadmium, copper and UV-B were analyzed. The transformed E. coli cells registered significantly increase in growth than the control cells under temperature (47 {sup o}C), NaCl (6% w/v), carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), and UV-B (10 min) exposure. Enhanced expression of ahpC gene as measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR under aforementioned stresses at different time points demonstrated its role in offering tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses.

  14. Homologous regulators, CnfR1 and CnfR2, activate expression of two distinct nitrogenase gene clusters in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413.

    PubMed

    Pratte, Brenda S; Thiel, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis has two Mo-nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions in different cell types. The heterocyst-specific nitrogenase encoded by the large nif1 gene cluster and the similar nif2 gene cluster that functions under anaerobic conditions in vegetative cells are under the control of the promoter for the first gene of each cluster, nifB1 or nifB2 respectively. Associated with each of these clusters is a putative regulatory gene called cnfR (patB) whose product has a C-terminal HTH domain and an N-terminal ferredoxin-like domain. CnfR1 activates nifB1 expression in heterocysts, while CnfR2 activates nifB2 expression. A cnfR1 mutant was unable to make nitrogenase under aerobic conditions in heterocysts while the cnfR2 mutant was unable to make nitrogenase under anaerobic conditions. Mutations in cnfR1 and cnfR2 reduced transcripts for the nif1 and nif2 genes respectively. The closely related cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 has the nif1 system but lacks nif2. Expression of nifB2:lacZ from A. variabilis in anaerobic vegetative cells of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 depended on the presence of cnfR2. This suggests that CnfR2 is necessary and sufficient for activation of the nifB2 promoter and that the CnfR1/CnfR2 family of proteins are the primary activators of nitrogenase gene expression in cyanobacteria. PMID:26950042

  15. Structurally Distinct Cation Channelrhodopsins from Cryptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2016-06-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are remarkable for the diversity of their functional mechanisms based on the same protein scaffold. A class of rhodopsins from cryptophyte algae show close sequence homology with haloarchaeal rhodopsin proton pumps rather than with previously known channelrhodopsins from chlorophyte (green) algae. In particular, both aspartate residues that occupy the positions of the chromophore Schiff base proton acceptor and donor, a hallmark of rhodopsin proton pumps, are conserved in these cryptophyte proteins. We expressed the corresponding polynucleotides in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and studied electrogenic properties of the encoded proteins with whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Despite their lack of residues characteristic of the chlorophyte cation channels, these proteins are cation-conducting channelrhodopsins that carry out light-gated passive transport of Na(+) and H(+). These findings show that channel function in rhodopsins has evolved via multiple routes. PMID:27233115

  16. Phycobilisomes in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Ruth B.; Bowen, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen species of freshwater blue-green algae, including unicellular, filamentous, and colonial forms, were subjected to a variety of fixatives, fixation conditions, and stains for comparison of the preservation of phycobilisomes. Absorption spectra of the corresponding in vivo and released photosynthetic pigments, in 10 of the species that were maintained in culture, demonstrated the presence of phycocyanin in all 10 species and phycoerythrin in only 2 of them. Spectroscope and electron microscope evidence was obtained for localization of phycobiliproteins in phycobilisomes of Nostoc muscorum. Phycobilisomes were observed in all species examined in situ, strenghening the hypothesis that phycobilisomes are common to all phycobiliprotein-containing photosynthetic blue-green algae. Images PMID:4204443

  17. Toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Yu, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Sun, Han-Zhang

    1997-12-01

    Growth of Chlorella marine, Nannochloropsis oculata, Pyramidomonas sp., Platymonas subcordiformis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum exposed to monochlorobenzene (MCB), 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB), 1, 2, 3, 4-tetrachlorobenzene (1, 2, 3, 4-TeCB) and pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) was tested. Tests of 72 h- EC 50 values showed that the toxicity ranged in the order: MCB<1,2-DCB<1,2,3,4-TeCBalgae was almost in the order: Pyramidomonas sp. < Platymonas subcordiformis < Nannochloropsis oculata < Chlorella marine < Phaeodactylum tricomutum. Study of the QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) between K OW and toxicity of CBs to marine algae showed good relationships between -log EC 50 and log K OW.

  18. Bioconcentration of tetrachlorobenzene in marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Lin; Ma, Yan-Jun; Cheng, Gang; Yu, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun

    1997-09-01

    Bioconcentration of tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB) in Chlorella marine, Nannochloropsis oculata, Pyramidomonas sp., Platymonas subcordiformis, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum; and toxicity of TeCB to the marine algae were tested. Values of bioconcentration potential parameters, including uptake rate constant k 1, elimination rate constant k 2 and bioconcentration factor BCF, were obtained not only from the time course of TeCB uptake by the marine algae by using a bioconcentration model, but also from the acute toxicity test data for percent inhibition PI(%)˜exposure concentration of TeCB-time by using a combined bioconcentration and probability model. The results showed good relationship between k 1(TOXIC) and k 1(UPTAKE) and k 2(TOXIC), k 2(UPTAKE), and BCF D(IOXIC) and BCF D(UPTAKE). Especially, the values of BCF D(TOXIC) were well consistent with those of BCF D(UPTAKE).

  19. Biofuels from algae: challenges and potential

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Michael; Gimpel, Javier; Tran, Miller; Rasala, Beth; Mayfield, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Algae biofuels may provide a viable alternative to fossil fuels; however, this technology must overcome a number of hurdles before it can compete in the fuel market and be broadly deployed. These challenges include strain identification and improvement, both in terms of oil productivity and crop protection, nutrient and resource allocation and use, and the production of co-products to improve the economics of the entire system. Although there is much excitement about the potential of algae biofuels, much work is still required in the field. In this article, we attempt to elucidate the major challenges to economic algal biofuels at scale, and improve the focus of the scientific community to address these challenges and move algal biofuels from promise to reality. PMID:21833344

  20. Characterization of thylakoid membrane in a heterocystous cyanobacterium and green alga with dual-detector fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with a systematic change of incident laser power.

    PubMed

    Nozue, Shuho; Mukuno, Akira; Tsuda, Yumi; Shiina, Takashi; Terazima, Masahide; Kumazaki, Shigeichi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been applied to plants, algae and cyanobacteria, in which excitation laser conditions affect the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime due to several mechanisms. However, the dependence of FLIM data on input laser power has not been quantitatively explained by absolute excitation probabilities under actual imaging conditions. In an effort to distinguish between photosystem I and photosystem II (PSI and PSII) in microscopic images, we have obtained dependence of FLIM data on input laser power from a filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis and single cellular green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Nitrogen-fixing cells in A. variabilis, heterocysts, are mostly visualized as cells in which short-lived fluorescence (≤0.1 ns) characteristic of PSI is predominant. The other cells in A. variabilis (vegetative cells) and P. kessleri cells show a transition in the status of PSII from an open state with the maximal charge separation rate at a weak excitation limit to a closed state in which charge separation is temporarily prohibited by previous excitation(s) at a relatively high laser power. This transition is successfully reproduced by a computer simulation with a high fidelity to the actual imaging conditions. More details in the fluorescence from heterocysts were examined to assess possible functions of PSII in the anaerobic environment inside the heterocysts for the nitrogen-fixing enzyme, nitrogenase. Photochemically active PSII:PSI ratio in heterocysts is tentatively estimated to be typically below our detection limit or at most about 5% in limited heterocysts in comparison with that in vegetative cells. PMID:26474523

  1. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  2. Algae-Derived Dietary Ingredients Nourish Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    In the 1980s, Columbia, Maryland-based Martek Biosciences Corporation worked with Ames Research Center to pioneer the use of microalgae as a source of essential omega-3 fatty acids, work that led the company to develop its highly successful Formulaid product. Now the Nutritional Products Division of Royal DSM, the company also manufactures DHAgold, a nutritional supplement for pets, livestock and farm-raised fish that uses algae to deliver docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

  3. Algae as Reservoirs for Coral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Michael J.; Bythell, John C.; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2013-01-01

    Benthic algae are associated with coral death in the form of stress and disease. It's been proposed that they release exudates, which facilitate invasion of potentially pathogenic microbes at the coral-algal interface, resulting in coral disease. However, the original source of these pathogens remains unknown. This study examined the ability of benthic algae to act as reservoirs of coral pathogens by characterizing surface associated microbes associated with major Caribbean and Indo-Pacific algal species/types and by comparing them to potential pathogens of two dominant coral diseases: White Syndrome (WS) in the Indo-Pacific and Yellow Band Disease (YBD) in the Caribbean. Coral and algal sampling was conducted simultaneously at the same sites to avoid spatial effects. Potential pathogens were defined as those absent or rare in healthy corals, increasing in abundance in healthy tissues adjacent to a disease lesion, and dominant in disease lesions. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected in both WS and YBD and were also present within the majority of algal species/types (54 and 100% for WS and YBD respectively). Pathogenic ciliates were associated only with WS and not YBD lesions and these were also present in 36% of the Indo-Pacific algal species. Although potential pathogens were associated with many algal species, their presence was inconsistent among replicate algal samples and detection rates were relatively low, suggestive of low density and occurrence. At the community level, coral-associated microbes irrespective of the health of their host differed from algal-associated microbes, supporting that algae and corals have distinctive microbial communities associated with their tissue. We conclude that benthic algae are common reservoirs for a variety of different potential coral pathogens. However, algal-associated microbes alone are unlikely to cause coral death. Initial damage or stress to the coral via other competitive mechanisms is most likely a

  4. Prokaryotic algae associated with Australian proterozoic stromatolites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licari, G. R.; Cloud, P.

    1972-01-01

    The most favorable sites in which to study the associations between stromatolites and the algae responsible for them are places where a variety of stromatolites of possibly early diagenetic or primary silica occupy a layer of substantial thickness of little metamorphosed ancient sediments. One such place is in northwestern Queensland, Australia. Five cases of association between stromatolites and blue-green algal nannofossils were observed within a 100-m sequence of carbonate rocks in that area.

  5. Sequestration of CO2 by halotolerant algae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The potential of halotolerant algae isolated from natural resources was used to study CO2 fixation and algal lipid production. Biological fixation of CO2 in photobioreactor in presence of salinity is exploited. The CO2 concentration 1060 ppm gave the highest biomass yield (700 mg dry wt/l), the highest total lipid content (10.33%) with 80% of CO2 removal. PMID:24847439

  6. Dermatitis from purified sea algae toxin (debromoaplysiatoxin).

    PubMed

    Solomon, A E; Stoughton, R B

    1978-09-01

    Cutaneous inflammation was induced by debromoaplysiatoxin, a purified toxin extracted from Lyngbya majuscula Gomont. This alga causes a seaweed dermatitis that occurs in persons who have swum off the coast of Oahu in Hawaii. By topical application, the toxin was found to produce an irritant pustular folliculitis in humans and to cause a severe cutaneous inflammatory reaction in the rabbit and in hairless mice. PMID:686747

  7. Environmental life cycle comparison of algae to other bioenergy feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Clarens, Andres F; Resurreccion, Eleazer P; White, Mark A; Colosi, Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    Algae are an attractive source of biomass energy since they do not compete with food crops and have higher energy yields per area than terrestrial crops. In spite of these advantages, algae cultivation has not yet been compared with conventional crops from a life cycle perspective. In this work, the impacts associated with algae production were determined using a stochastic life cycle model and compared with switchgrass, canola, and corn farming. The results indicate that these conventional crops have lower environmental impacts than algae in energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and water regardless of cultivation location. Only in total land use and eutrophication potential do algae perform favorably. The large environmental footprint of algae cultivation is driven predominantly by upstream impacts, such as the demand for CO(2) and fertilizer. To reduce these impacts, flue gas and, to a greater extent, wastewater could be used to offset most of the environmental burdens associated with algae. To demonstrate the benefits of algae production coupled with wastewater treatment, the model was expanded to include three different municipal wastewater effluents as sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Each provided a significant reduction in the burdens of algae cultivation, and the use of source-separated urine was found to make algae more environmentally beneficial than the terrestrial crops. PMID:20085253

  8. Electro-coagulation-flotation process for algae removal.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shanshan; Yang, Jixian; Tian, Jiayu; Ma, Fang; Tu, Gang; Du, Maoan

    2010-05-15

    Algae in surface water have been a long-term issue all over the world, due to their adverse influence on drinking water treatment process as well as drinking water quality. The algae removal by electro-coagulation-flotation (ECF) technology was investigated in this paper. The results indicated that aluminum was an excellent electrode material for algae removal as compared with iron. The optimal parameters determined were: current density=1 mA/cm(2), pH=4-7, water temperature=18-36 degrees C, algae density=0.55 x 10(9)-1.55 x 10(9) cells/L. Under the optimal conditions, 100% of algae removal was achieved with the energy consumption as low as 0.4 kWh/m(3). The ECF performed well in acid and neutral conditions. At low initial pH of 4-7, the cell density of algae was effectively removed in the ECF, mainly through the charge neutralization mechanism; while the algae removal worsened when the pH increased (7-10), and the main mechanism shifted to sweeping flocculation and enmeshment. The mechanisms for algae removal at different pH were also confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. Furthermore, initial cell density and water temperature could also influence the algae removal. Overall, the results indicated that the ECF technology was effective for algae removal, from both the technical and economical points of view. PMID:20042280

  9. Influence of Various Levels of Iron and Other Abiotic Factors on Siderophorogenesis in Paddy Field Cyanobacterium Anabaena oryzae.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Siderophore production in Anabaena oryzae was investigated under the influence of various levels of iron and other abiotic factors such as pH, temperature, light and different nitrogen sources. Optimization of culture conditions under controlled mechanisms of these abiotic factors lead to the siderophore production in significant amount. Under iron-starved condition, A. oryzae extracellularly releases 89.17% hydroxymate-type siderophore. Slightly alkaline pH and 30 °C temperature was found stimulatory for the cyanobacterial growth and siderophorogenesis (88.52% SU and 83.87% SU, respectively). Excess iron loading had a negative impact on siderophore production along with the alterations in the morphology and growth. Further, scanning electron microphotographs signified that higher concentrations of iron lead to complete damage of the cells and alterations in membrane proteins possibly transporters responsible for exchange of siderophore complex from environment to the cell. SDS-PAGE analysis of whole cell proteins showed overexpression of low molecular weight proteins ranges between 20.1 to 29.0 kDa up to 100-μM iron concentrations. These polypeptides/proteins might be involved in maintaining iron homeostasis by regulating siderophore production. Results suggest that lower concentrations of iron ≤ 50 μM along with other abiotic factors are stimulatory, whereas higher concentrations (>50 μM) are toxic. Data further suggested that cyanobacterium A. oryzae can serve as a potential biofertilizer especially in iron-rich soil through sequestration by the power of natural Fe(III)-siderophore complex formation. PMID:25805017

  10. Cell Envelope Components Influencing Filament Length in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Burnat, Mireia; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells (known as trichomes or filaments) that can be hundreds of cells long. The filament consists of individual cells surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layers. The cells, however, share a continuous outer membrane, and septal proteins, such as SepJ, are important for cell-cell contact and filament formation. Here, we addressed a possible role of cell envelope components in filamentation, the process of producing and maintaining filaments, in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We studied filament length and the response of the filaments to mechanical fragmentation in a number of strains with mutations in genes encoding cell envelope components. Previously published peptidoglycan- and outer membrane-related gene mutants and strains with mutations in two genes (all5045 and alr0718) encoding class B penicillin-binding proteins isolated in this work were used. Our results show that filament length is affected in most cell envelope mutants, but the filaments of alr5045 and alr2270 gene mutants were particularly fragmented. All5045 is a dd-transpeptidase involved in peptidoglycan elongation during cell growth, and Alr2270 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of lipid A, a key component of lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that both components of the cell envelope, the murein sacculus and the outer membrane, influence filamentation. As deduced from the filament fragmentation phenotypes of their mutants, however, none of these elements is as important for filamentation as the septal protein SepJ. PMID:25201945

  11. Cell envelope components influencing filament length in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Burnat, Mireia; Schleiff, Enrico; Flores, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells (known as trichomes or filaments) that can be hundreds of cells long. The filament consists of individual cells surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layers. The cells, however, share a continuous outer membrane, and septal proteins, such as SepJ, are important for cell-cell contact and filament formation. Here, we addressed a possible role of cell envelope components in filamentation, the process of producing and maintaining filaments, in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We studied filament length and the response of the filaments to mechanical fragmentation in a number of strains with mutations in genes encoding cell envelope components. Previously published peptidoglycan- and outer membrane-related gene mutants and strains with mutations in two genes (all5045 and alr0718) encoding class B penicillin-binding proteins isolated in this work were used. Our results show that filament length is affected in most cell envelope mutants, but the filaments of alr5045 and alr2270 gene mutants were particularly fragmented. All5045 is a dd-transpeptidase involved in peptidoglycan elongation during cell growth, and Alr2270 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of lipid A, a key component of lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that both components of the cell envelope, the murein sacculus and the outer membrane, influence filamentation. As deduced from the filament fragmentation phenotypes of their mutants, however, none of these elements is as important for filamentation as the septal protein SepJ. PMID:25201945

  12. Ammonium Excretion by an l-Methionine-dl-Sulfoximine-Resistant Mutant of the Rice Field Cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Selwin P.; Zaritsky, Arieh; Boussiba, Sammy

    1990-01-01

    An ammonium-excreting mutant (SS1) of the rice field nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis was isolated after ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis by selection on 500 μM l-methionine-dl-sulfoximine. SS1 grew in the presence and absence of l-methionine-dl-sulfoximine at a rate comparable to that of the wild-type strain, with a doubling time of 5.6 h. The rate of ammonium release by SS1 depended on cell density; it peaked at the 12th hour of growth with 8.7 μmol mg of chlorophyll−1 h−1 (at a chlorophyll concentration of 5 μg ml−1) and slowed down to almost nil at the fourth day of growth. A similar pattern of release by immobilized SS1 was observed between 12 to 20 h after loading alginate beads in packed-bed reactors at the rate of 11.6 μmol mg of chlorophyll−1 h−1. The rate was later reduced significantly due to the fast growth of SS1 on the substrate. Prolonged release of ammonium at the peak level was achieved only by maintaining SS1 under continuous cultivation at low chlorophyll levels (5 to 7 μg ml−1). Under these conditions, nitrogen fixation in the mutant was 30% higher than that in its parent and glutamine synthetase activity was less by 50%. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SS1 and its parent have similar quantities of glutamine synthetase protein under ammonium excretion conditions. In addition, a protein with a molecular weight of about 30,000 seems to have been lost, as seen by electrophoretic separation of total proteins from SS1. Images PMID:16348353

  13. Conformational dynamics of a seven transmembrane helical protein Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin probed by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Good, Daryl B; Wang, Shenlin; Ward, Meaghan E; Struppe, Jochem; Brown, Leonid S; Lewandowski, Józef R; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2014-02-19

    The ability to detect and characterize molecular motions represents one of the unique strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this study, we report solid-state NMR site-specific measurements of the dipolar order parameters and (15)N rotating frame spin-lattice (R1ρ) relaxation rates in a seven transmembrane helical protein Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin reconstituted in lipids. The magnitudes of the observed order parameters indicate that both the well-defined transmembrane regions and the less structured intramembrane loops undergo restricted submicrosecond time scale motions. In contrast, the R1ρ rates, which were measured under fast magic angle spinning conditions, vary by an order of magnitude between the TM and exposed regions and suggest the presence of intermediate time scale motions. Using a simple model, which assumes a single exponential autocorrelation function, we estimated the time scales of dominant stochastic motions to be on the order of low tens of nanoseconds for most residues within the TM helices and tens to hundreds of nanoseconds for the extracellular B-C and F-G loops. These relatively slow time scales could be attributed to collective anisotropic motions. We used the 3D Gaussian axial fluctuations model to estimate amplitudes, directions, and time scales of overall motions for helices and the extracellular B-C and F-G loops. Within this model, the TM helices A,B,C,D,E,F undergo rigid body motions on a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, while the time scale for the seventh helix G approaches 100 ns. Similar time scales of roughly 100-200 ns are estimated for the B-C and F-G loops. PMID:24467417

  14. Effect on Heterocyst Differentiation of Nitrogen Fixation in Vegetative Cells of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Teresa; Pratte, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Heterocysts are terminally differentiated cells of some filamentous cyanobacteria that fix nitrogen for the entire filament under oxic growth conditions. Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is unusual in that it has two Mo-dependent nitrogenases; one, called Nif1, functions in heterocysts, while the second, Nif2, functions under anoxic conditions in vegetative cells. Both nitrogenases depended on expression of the global regulatory protein NtcA. It has long been thought that a product of nitrogen fixation in heterocysts plays a role in maintenance of the spaced pattern of heterocyst differentiation. This model assumes that each cell in a filament senses its own environment in terms of nitrogen sufficiency and responds accordingly in terms of differentiation. Expression of the Nif2 nitrogenase under anoxic conditions in vegetative cells was sufficient to support long-term growth of a nif1 mutant; however, that expression did not prevent differentiation of heterocysts and expression of the nif1 nitrogenase in either the nif1 mutant or the wild-type strain. This suggested that the nitrogen sufficiency of individual cells in the filament did not affect the signal that induces heterocyst differentiation. Perhaps there is a global mechanism by which the filament senses nitrogen sufficiency or insufficiency based on the external availability of fixed nitrogen. The filament would then respond by producing heterocyst differentiation signals that affect the entire filament. This does not preclude cell-to-cell signaling in the maintenance of heterocyst pattern but suggests that overall control of the process is not controlled by nitrogen insufficiency of individual cells. PMID:11114927

  15. New records of marine algae in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hau, Nhu; Ly, Bui Minh; Van Huynh, Tran; Trung, Vo Thanh

    2015-06-01

    In May, 2013, a scientific expedition was organized by the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST) and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEBRAS) through the frame of the VAST-FEBRAS International Collaboration Program. The expedition went along the coast of Vietnam from Quang Ninh to Kien Giang. The objective was to collect natural resources to investigate the biological and biochemical diversity of the territorial waters of Vietnam. Among the collected algae, six taxa are new records for the Vietnam algal flora. They are the red algae Titanophora pikeana (Dickie) Feldmann from Cu Lao Xanh Island, Laurencia natalensis Kylin from Tho Chu Island, Coelothrix irregularis (Harvey) Børgesen from Con Dao Island, the green algae Caulerpa oligophylla Montagne, Caulerpa andamanensis (W.R. Taylor) Draisma, Prudhomme et Sauvage from Phu Quy Island, and Caulerpa falcifolia Harvey & Bailey from Ly Son Island. The seaweed flora of Vietnam now counts 833 marine algal taxa, including 415 Rhodophyta, 147 Phaeophyceae, 183 Chlorophyta, and 88 Cyanobacteria.

  16. Antibody Production in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2016-04-29

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a wide range of modern applications, including research, diagnostic, therapeutic, and industrial uses. Market demand for mAbs is high and continues to grow. Although mammalian systems, which currently dominate the biomanufacturing industry, produce effective and safe recombinant mAbs, they have a limited manufacturing capacity and high costs. Bacteria, yeast, and insect cell systems are highly scalable and cost effective but vary in their ability to produce appropriate posttranslationally modified mAbs. Plants and green algae are emerging as promising production platforms because of their time and cost efficiencies, scalability, lack of mammalian pathogens, and eukaryotic posttranslational protein modification machinery. So far, plant- and algae-derived mAbs have been produced predominantly as candidate therapeutics for infectious diseases and cancer. These candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models, and some have shown efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we review ongoing efforts to advance the production of mAbs in plants and algae. PMID:26905655

  17. [Pharmacology and toxicology of Spirulina alga].

    PubMed

    Chamorro, G; Salazar, M; Favila, L; Bourges, H

    1996-01-01

    Spirulina, a unicellular filamentous blue-green alga has been consumed by man since ancient times in Mexico and central Africa. It is currently grown in many countries by synthetic methods. Initially the interest in Spirulina was on its nutritive value: it was found almost equal to other plant proteins. More recently, some preclinical testing suggests it has several therapeutic properties such as hypocholesterolemic, immunological, antiviral and antimutagenic. This has led to more detailed evaluations such as nucleic acid content and presence of toxic metals, biogenic toxins and organic chemicals: they have shown absence or presence at tolerable levels according to the recommendations of international regulatory agencies. In animal experiments for acute, subchronic and chronic toxicity, reproduction, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity the algae did not cause body or organ toxicity. In all instances, the Spirulina administered to the animals were at much higher amounts than those expected for human consumption. On the other hand there is scant information of the effects of the algae in humans. This area needs more research. PMID:9005517

  18. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1–1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:24614119

  19. Hydrogenases in green algae: do they save the algae's life and solve our energy problems?

    PubMed

    Happe, Thomas; Hemschemeier, Anja; Winkler, Martin; Kaminski, Annette

    2002-06-01

    Green algae are the only known eukaryotes with both oxygenic photosynthesis and a hydrogen metabolism. Recent physiological and genetic discoveries indicate a close connection between these metabolic pathways. The anaerobically inducible hydA genes of algae encode a special type of highly active [Fe]-hydrogenase. Electrons from reducing equivalents generated during fermentation enter the photosynthetic electron transport chain via the plastoquinone pool. They are transferred to the hydrogenase by photosystem I and ferredoxin. Thus, the [Fe]-hydrogenase is an electron 'valve' that enables the algae to survive under anaerobic conditions. During sulfur deprivation, illuminated algal cultures evolve large quantities of hydrogen gas, and this promises to be an alternative future energy source. PMID:12049920

  20. Removal of Pb(2+) by biomass of marine algae.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, A A

    2000-10-01

    New biosorbent material derived from ubiquitous marine algae has been examined in packed-bed flow for Pb(2+) removal through sorption columns. Mixed biomass of marine algae has been used, consisting of representative species of the following algae: Ulva lactuca (green algae), Jania rubens (red algae), and Sargassum asperifolium (brown algae). A mixture of these three species showed a promising removal capacity for Pb(2+) from aqueous solution. Lead uptake up to 281.8 mg/g dry algal mixture was observed. Equilibrium was achieved after 120 min. No significant effect of changing the flow rate on the removal capacity was noticed. It was found that Langmuir model expresses the system at pH 4. Mineral acids exhibited good elution properties (a mean of 93%) for recovery of sorbed biomass ions as compared with the tested alkalies (about 60%). PMID:10977889

  1. Exploring the potential of algae/bacteria interactions.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-06-01

    Algae are primary producers in aquatic ecosystems, where heterotrophic bacteria grow on organics produced by algae and recycle nutrients. Ecological studies have identified the co-occurrence of particular species of algae and bacteria, suggesting the presence of their specific interactions. Algae/bacteria interactions are categorized into nutrient exchange, signal transduction and gene transfer. Studies have examined how these interactions shape aquatic communities and influence geochemical cycles in the natural environment. In parallel, efforts have been made to exploit algae for biotechnology processes, such as water treatment and bioenergy production, where bacteria influence algal activities in various ways. We suggest that better understanding of mechanisms underlying algae/bacteria interactions will facilitate the development of more efficient and/or as-yet-unexploited biotechnology processes. PMID:25744715

  2. All0809/8/7 is a DevBCA-like ABC-type efflux pump required for diazotrophic growth in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Staron, Peter; Maldener, Iris

    2012-10-01

    Efflux pumps export a wide variety of proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous substrates across the Gram-negative cell wall. For the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the ATP-driven glycolipid efflux pump DevBCA-TolC has been shown to be crucial for the differentiation of N(2)-fixing heterocysts from photosynthetically active vegetative cells. In this study, a homologous system was described. All0809/8/7-TolC form a typical ATP-driven efflux pump as shown by surface plasmon resonance. This putative exporter is also involved in diazotrophic growth of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. A mutant in all0809 encoding the periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the pump was not able to grow without combined nitrogen. Although heterocysts of this mutant were not distinguishable from those of the wild-type in light and electron micrographs, they were impaired in providing the microoxic environment necessary for N(2) fixation. RT-PCR of all0809 transcripts and localization studies on All0807-GFP revealed that All0809/8/7 was initially downregulated during heterocyst maturation and upregulated at later stages of heterocyst formation in all cells of the filament. A substrate of the efflux pump could not be identified in ATP hydrolysis assays. We discuss a role for All0809/8/7-TolC in maintaining the continuous periplasm and how this would be of special importance for heterocyst differentiation. PMID:22859614

  3. Newly Identified Cytochrome c Oxidase Operon in the Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 Specifically Induced in Heterocysts

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn M.; Haselkorn, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Two operons have been cloned from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 DNA, each of which encodes the three core subunits of distinct mitochondrial-type cytochrome c oxidases. The two operons are only 72 to 85% similar to one another at the nucleotide level in the most conserved subunit. One of these, coxBACII, is induced >20-fold in the middle to late stages of heterocyst differentiation. Analysis of green fluorescent protein reporters indicates that this operon is expressed specifically in proheterocysts and heterocysts. The other operon, coxBACI, is induced only 2.5-fold following nitrogen step-down and is expressed in all cells. Surprisingly, a disruption mutant of coxAII, the gene encoding subunit I of the heterocyst-specific oxidase, grows normally in the absence of combined nitrogen. It is likely that coxBACI and/or two other putative terminal oxidases present in the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 genome are able to compensate for the loss of the heterocyst-specific oxidase in providing ATP for nitrogen fixation and maintaining a low oxygen level in heterocysts. PMID:11948164

  4. Elevated Na(+) and pH influence the production and transport of saxitoxin in the cyanobacteria Anabaena circinalis AWQC131C and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii T3.

    PubMed

    Ongley, Sarah E; Pengelly, Jasper J L; Neilan, Brett A

    2016-02-01

    Saxitoxins (STX), neurotoxic alkaloids, fall under the umbrella of paralytic shellfish toxins produced by marine dinoflagellates and freshwater cyanobacteria. The genes responsible for the production of STX have been proposed, but factors that influence their expression and induce toxin efflux remain unclear. Here we characterize the putative STX NorM-like MATE transporters SxtF and SxtM. Complementation of the antibiotic-sensitive strain Escherichia coli KAM32 with these transporters decreased fluoroquinolone sensitivity, indicating that while becoming evolutionary specialized for STX transport these transporters retain relaxed specificity typical of this class. The transcriptional response of STX biosynthesis (sxtA) along with that of the STX transporters (sxtM and sxtF from Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii T3, and sxtM from Anabaena circinalis AWQC131C) were assessed in response to ionic stress. These data, coupled with a measure of toxin intracellular to extracellular ratios, provide an insight into the physiology of STX export. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Anabaena circinalis exhibited opposing responses under conditions of ionic stress. High Na(+) (10 mM) induced moderate alterations of transcription and STX localization, whereas high pH (pH 9) stimulated the greatest physiological response. Saxitoxin production and cellular localization are responsive to ionic strength, indicating a role of this molecule in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:26347118

  5. Regulation of pepc gene expression in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its effects on cyclic electron flow around photosystem I and tolerances to environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Peng-Peng; Shi, Ding-Ji; Mi, Hua-Ling; Zhu, Jia-Cheng; Huang, Xi-Wen; He, Pei-Min

    2015-05-01

    Since pepc gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) has been cloned from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and other cyanobacteria, the effects of pepc gene expression on photosynthesis have not been reported yet. In this study, we constructed mutants containing either upregulated (forward) or downregulated (reverse) pepc gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Results from real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Western blot and enzymatic analysis showed that PEPCase activity was significantly reduced in the reverse mutant compared with the wild type, and that of the forward mutant was obviously increased. Interestingly, the net photosynthesis in both the reverse mutant and the forward mutant were higher than that of the wild type, but dark respiration was decreased only in the reverse mutant. The absorbance changes of P700 upon saturation pulse showed the photosystem I (PSI) activity was inhibited, as reflected by Y(I), and Y(NA) was elevated, and dark reduction of P700(+) was stimulated, indicating enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI in the reverse mutant. Additionally, the reverse mutant photosynthesis was higher than that of the wild type in low temperature, low and high pH, and high salinity, and this implies increased tolerance in the reverse mutant through downregulated pepc gene. PMID:25040477

  6. Polychromatic action spectrum for the induction of a mycosporine-like amino acid in a rice-field cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp.

    PubMed

    Sinha, R P; Sinha, J P; Gröniger, A; Häder, D-P

    2002-02-01

    A polychromatic action spectrum for the induction of an ultraviolet-absorbing/screening mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA) has been determined in a filamentous and heterocystous nitrogen-fixing rice-field cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) studies revealed the presence of only one type of MAA, which was identified as shinorine, a bisubstituted MAA containing both glycine and serine groups having a retention time at 2.8 min and an absorption maximum at 334 nm. Exposure of cultures to simulated solar radiation in combination with various cut-off filters (WG 280, 295, 305, 320, 335, 345, GG 400, 420, 455, 475, OG 515, 530, 570, RG 645, 665 and a broad-band filter, UG 11) clearly revealed that the induction of the MAA takes place only in the UV range. Photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) had no significant impact on MAA induction. The ratio of the absorption at 334 nm (shinorine) to 665 nm (chlorophyll a) and the action spectrum also showed the induction of MAA to be UV dependent peaking in the UV-B range at around 290 nm. The results indicate that the studied cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. may protect itself from deleterious short wavelength solar radiation by its ability to synthesize a mycosporine-like amino acid in response to UV-B radiation and thereby screen the negative effects of UV-B. PMID:11849982

  7. Transcription Activation by NtcA and 2-Oxoglutarate of Three Genes Involved in Heterocyst Differentiation in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2008-01-01

    In Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, differentiation of heterocysts takes place in response to the external cue of combined nitrogen deprivation, allowing the organism to fix atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. NtcA, a global transcriptional regulator of cyanobacteria, is required for activation of the expression of multiple genes involved in heterocyst differentiation, including key regulators that are specific to the process. We have set up a fully defined in vitro system, which includes the purified Anabaena RNA polymerase, and have studied the effects of NtcA and its signaling effector 2-oxoglutarate on RNA polymerase binding, open complex formation, and transcript production from promoters of the hetC, nrrA, and devB genes that are activated by NtcA at different stages of heterocyst differentiation. Both RNA polymerase and NtcA could specifically bind to the target DNA in the absence of any effector. 2-Oxoglutarate had a moderate positive effect on NtcA binding, and NtcA had a limited positive effect on RNA polymerase recruitment at the promoters. However, a stringent requirement of both NtcA and 2-oxoglutarate was observed for the detection of open complexes and transcript production at the three investigated promoters. These results support a key role for 2-oxoglutarate in transcription activation in the developing heterocyst. PMID:18658268

  8. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1984-01-01

    Efficiency of process for producing H.sub.2 by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  9. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-06-16

    Efficiency of process for producing H/sub 2/ by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  10. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    ScienceCinema

    Elliott, Doug

    2014-06-02

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  11. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Doug

    2013-12-17

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  12. Bromophenols from marine algae with potential anti-diabetic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiukun; Liu, Ming

    2012-12-01

    Marine algae contain various bromophenols with a variety of biological activities, including antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-diabetic effects. Here, we briefly review the recent progress in researches on the biomaterials from marine algae, emphasizing the relationship between the structure and the potential anti-diabetic applications. Bromophenols from marine algae display their hyperglycemic effects by inhibiting the activities of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, α-glucosidase, as well as other mechanisms.

  13. Method and apparatus for iterative lysis and extraction of algae

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Geoffrey; Boggs, Tabitha; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Doherty, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    A method and system for processing algae involves the use of an ionic liquid-containing clarified cell lysate to lyse algae cells. The resulting crude cell lysate may be clarified and subsequently used to lyse algae cells. The process may be repeated a number of times before a clarified lysate is separated into lipid and aqueous phases for further processing and/or purification of desired products.

  14. Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

    2011-01-01

    The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in

  15. Exploring the potential of using algae in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min David; Chen, Ching-Chun; Huynh, Pauline; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    The applications of microalgae in cosmetic products have recently received more attention in the treatment of skin problems, such as aging, tanning and pigment disorders. There are also potential uses in the areas of anti-aging, skin-whitening, and pigmentation reduction products. While algae species have already been used in some cosmetic formulations, such as moisturizing and thickening agents, algae remain largely untapped as an asset in this industry due to an apparent lack of utility as a primary active ingredient. This review article focuses on integrating studies on algae pertinent to skin health and beauty, with the purpose of identifying serviceable algae functions in practical cosmetic uses. PMID:25537136

  16. Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae

    DOEpatents

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2013-03-05

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

  17. Algae Bioreactor Using Submerged Enclosures with Semi-Permeable Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D (Inventor); Gormly, Sherwin J (Inventor); Embaye, Tsegereda N (Inventor); Delzeit, Lance D (Inventor); Flynn, Michael T (Inventor); Liggett, Travis A (Inventor); Buckwalter, Patrick W (Inventor); Baertsch, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for producing hydrocarbons, including oil, by processing algae and/or other micro-organisms in an aquatic environment. Flexible bags (e.g., plastic) with CO.sub.2/O.sub.2 exchange membranes, suspended at a controllable depth in a first liquid (e.g., seawater), receive a second liquid (e.g., liquid effluent from a "dead zone") containing seeds for algae growth. The algae are cultivated and harvested in the bags, after most of the second liquid is removed by forward osmosis through liquid exchange membranes. The algae are removed and processed, and the bags are cleaned and reused.

  18. Inorganic carbon acquisition in some synurophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Shabana; Colman, Brian

    2008-05-01

    Some characteristics of photosynthesis of three synurophyte algae, Synura petersenii, Synura uvella and Tessellaria volvocina were investigated to determine the mechanism of inorganic carbon (C(i)) uptake. All three species were found to have no external carbonic anhydrase, no capacity for direct bicarbonate uptake and a low whole-cell affinity for C(i). The internal pH of S. petersenii determined using (14)C-benzoic acid and [2-(14)C]-5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione was pH 7.0-7.5, over an external pH range of 5.0-7.5. Thus, the pH difference between the cell interior of S. petersenii and the external medium was large enough, over the alga's growth range, to allow the accumulation of C(i) by the diffusive uptake of CO(2). Monitoring O(2) evolution and CO(2) uptake by suspensions of S. petersenii at pH 7.0 by mass spectrometry did not indicate a rapid uptake of CO(2), and the final CO(2) compensation concentration reached was 24 +/- 0.7 microM. Furthermore, when the cells were darkened, a brief burst of CO(2) occurred before a steady rate of dark respiration was established, suggesting a loss of CO(2) by photorespiration. An examination of the kinetics of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in homogenates of cells of S. petersenii, S. uvella and Mallomonas papillosa showed that values of the K(m) (CO(2)) were 28.4, 41.8 and 18.2 microM, respectively. These species lack the characteristics of cells with a CO(2)-concentrating mechanism because the cell affinity for C(i) appears to be determined by the relatively high CO(2) affinity of the Rubisco of these algae. PMID:18298411

  19. A technical evaluation of biodiesel from vegetable oils vs. algae. Will algae-derived biodiesel perform?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel, one of the most prominent renewable alternative fuels, can be derived from a variety of sources including vegetable oils, animal fats and used cooking oils as well as alternative sources such as algae. While issues such as land-use change, food vs. fuel, feedstock availability, and produc...

  20. Pheromones in marine algae: A technical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, G.; Müller, D. G.; Fritz, P.

    1995-03-01

    It is now well known that many marine organisms use low-molecular volatile substances as signals, in order to coordinate activities between different individuals. The study of such pheromones requires the isolation and enrichment of the secretions from undisturbed living cells or organisms over extended periods of time. The Grob-Hersch extraction device, which we describe here, avoids adverse factors for the biological materials such as strong water currents, rising gas bubbles or chemical solvents. Furthermore, the formation of sea-water spray is greatly reduced. The application of this technique for the isolation of pheromones of marine algae and animals is described.

  1. Effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, S. ); Sengar, R.M.S. ); Mittal, S.; Bhattacharjee, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Algal species (65) were isolated from oil refinery effluent. Twenty-five of these species were cultured in Benecke's medium in a growth chamber, along with controls. Retardation in algal growth, inhibition in algal photosynthesis, and discoloration was observed in petroleum enriched medium. Few forms, viz. Cyclotella sp., Cosmarium sp., and Merismopedia sp. could not survive. The lag phase lengthened by several days and slope of exponential phase was also depressed. Chlamydomonas sp., Scenedesmus sp., Ankistrodesmus sp., Nitzschia sp. and Navicula sp. were comparatively susceptible to petroleum. Depression in carbon fixation, cell numbers, and total dry algal mass was noticeable, showing toxicity to both diatoms and green algae.

  2. Factors affecting spore germination in algae - review.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S C

    2009-01-01

    This review surveys whatever little is known on the influence of different environmental factors like light, temperature, nutrients, chemicals (such as plant hormones, vitamins, etc.), pH of the medium, biotic factors (such as algal extracellular substances, algal concentration, bacterial extracellular products, animal grazing and animal extracellular products), water movement, water stress, antibiotics, UV light, X-rays, gamma-rays, and pollution on the spore germination in algae. The work done on the dormancy of algal spores and on the role of vegetative cells in tolerating environmental stress is also incorporated. PMID:19826917

  3. Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cogongrass is a non-native, aggressive, perennial grass that is considered the World’s seventh worst weed. Over the past decade, this invasive grass has moved north and is now recorded from at least one site in 75% of the counties in Mississippi. The most recent discoveries and results from resear...

  4. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool

    2013-09-18

    ABCLAT was built to help any model user with spatially explicit Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon Dioxide nutrient flux information, and solar resource information evaluate algal cultivation potential. Initial applications of this modeling framework include Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool Canada and Australia. The Canadian application was copyrighted November 29th 2011 as the Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada. This copyright assertion is for the general framework from which any country or region with themore » requisite data could create a regionally specific application. The ABCLAT model framework developed by SNL looks at the growth potential in a given region as a function of available nutrients from wastewater and other sources, carbon dioxide from power plants, available solar potential, and if available, land cover and use information. The model framework evaluates the biomass potential, fixed carbon dioxide, potential algal biocrude and required land area for nutrient sources. ABCLAT is built with an object-oriented software program that can provide an easy to use interface for exploring questions related to aigal biomass production.« less

  5. Respiratory Chain of Colorless Algae II. Cyanophyta

    PubMed Central

    Webster, D. A.; Hackett, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Whole cell difference spectra of the blue-green algae, Saprospira grandis, Leucothrix mucor, and Vitreoscilla sp. have one, or at the most 2, broad α-bands near 560 mμ. At −190° these bands split to give 4 peaks in the α-region for b and c-type cytochromes, but no α-band for a-type cytochromes is visible. The NADH oxidase activity of these organisms was shown to be associated with particulate fractions of cell homogenates. The response of this activity to inhibitors differed from the responses of the NADH oxidase activities of particulate preparations from the green algae and higher plants to the same inhibitors, but is more typical of certain bacteria. No cytochrome oxidase activity was present in these preparations. The respiration of Saprospira and Vitreoscilla can be light-reversibly inhibited by CO, and all 3 organisms have a CO-binding pigment whose CO complex absorbs near 570, 535, and 417 mμ. The action spectrum for the light reversal of CO-inhibited Vitreoscilla respiration shows maxima at 568, 534, and 416 mμ. The results suggest that the terminal oxidase in these blue-greens is an o-type cytochrome. Images PMID:5932404

  6. Viruses and viruslike particles of eukaryotic algae.

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, J L; Lane, L C; Meints, R H

    1991-01-01

    Until recently there was little interest or information on viruses and viruslike particles of eukaryotic algae. However, this situation is changing. In the past decade many large double-stranded DNA-containing viruses that infect two culturable, unicellular, eukaryotic green algae have been discovered. These viruses can be produced in large quantities, assayed by plaque formation, and analyzed by standard bacteriophage techniques. The viruses are structurally similar to animal iridoviruses, their genomes are similar to but larger (greater than 300 kbp) than that of poxviruses, and their infection process resembles that of bacteriophages. Some of the viruses have DNAs with low levels of methylated bases, whereas others have DNAs with high concentrations of 5-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine. Virus-encoded DNA methyltransferases are associated with the methylation and are accompanied by virus-encoded DNA site-specific (restriction) endonucleases. Some of these enzymes have sequence specificities identical to those of known bacterial enzymes, and others have previously unrecognized specificities. A separate rod-shaped RNA-containing algal virus has structural and nucleotide sequence affinities to higher plant viruses. Quite recently, viruses have been associated with rapid changes in marine algal populations. In the next decade we envision the discovery of new algal viruses, clarification of their role in various ecosystems, discovery of commercially useful genes in these viruses, and exploitation of algal virus genetic elements in plant and algal biotechnology. Images PMID:1779928

  7. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-18

    ABCLAT was built to help any model user with spatially explicit Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon Dioxide nutrient flux information, and solar resource information evaluate algal cultivation potential. Initial applications of this modeling framework include Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool Canada and Australia. The Canadian application was copyrighted November 29th 2011 as the Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada. This copyright assertion is for the general framework from which any country or region with the requisite data could create a regionally specific application. The ABCLAT model framework developed by SNL looks at the growth potential in a given region as a function of available nutrients from wastewater and other sources, carbon dioxide from power plants, available solar potential, and if available, land cover and use information. The model framework evaluates the biomass potential, fixed carbon dioxide, potential algal biocrude and required land area for nutrient sources. ABCLAT is built with an object-oriented software program that can provide an easy to use interface for exploring questions related to aigal biomass production.

  8. Video micrography of algae photomovement and vectorial method of biomonitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posudin, Yuri I.; Massjuk, N. P.; Lilitskaya, G. G.

    1996-01-01

    The simultaneous recording of several photomovement parameters of algae as test-functions during biomonitoring is proposed. Green alga Dunaliella viridis Teod. was used as the test- object for the estimation of different heavy metals. The quantitative changes of photomovement parameters as a criterion of toxicity were determined by means of the vectorial method of biomonitoring.

  9. Comments on the Manuscript, "Biodiesel Production from Freshwater Algae"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent publication (Vijayaragahavan, K.; Hemanathan, K., Biodiesel from freshwater algae, Energy Fuels, 2009, 23(11):5448-5453) on fuel production from algae is evaluated. It is discussed herein that the fuel discussed in that paper is not biodiesel, rather it probably consists of hydrocarbons. ...

  10. Algae Farming in Low Earth Orbit: Past Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, N.

    Algal strains used as a production engine represent a novel example of living mechanical systems with tremendous potential for applications in space. Algae use photosynthesis to create lipids, glycerin, and biomass, with different strains of algae producing different oils. Algae can be grown to produce many types of oils, with low, medium or long hydrocarbon chain lengths. This article examines the history of algae research, as well as its value to astronauts as both a food supplement and as an oxygen production and carbon sequester engine. Consideration is given to ways algae is currently being used and tested in space, followed by a look forward envisioning dynamic living technological systems that can help to sustain our race as we travel the void between stars.

  11. Cryoalgotox: Use of cryopreserved alga in a semistatic microplate test

    SciTech Connect

    Benhra, A.; Radetski, C.M.; Ferard, J.F.

    1997-03-01

    Use of cryopreserved alga Selenastrum capricornutum has been evaluated as a simple and cost-efficient procedure in a new semistatic algal ecotoxicity test. Experiments have been conducted to compare performance criteria of this method, named Cryoalgotox, versus the classic microplate test using fresh algae. Cryoalgotox 72-h 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) determined with Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 6+}, and atrazine were more sensitive, repeatable (low coefficients of variation), and reproducible (low time effect) than the results obtained with the classical microplate tests. The effect of storage time at {minus}80 C on the sensitivity of the algae was assessed using cadmium as a toxic reference; it was shown that algae stored at {minus}80 C over a 3-month period gave comparable toxicity results to those found with fresh algae.

  12. Comparative Studies on Plastoquinones. IV. Plastoquinones in Algae

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Elena; Barr, Rita; Crane, F. L.

    1968-01-01

    Plastoquinones A and C have been found in all classes of algae, including representatives of greens, yellow-greens, blue-greens, reds, browns and the flagellate, Euglena. Plastoquinone C from red and brown algae can be separated into 6 different types. An additional plastoquinone C has been found in Gigartina and Rhydomela. From chromatographic evidence this may be equivalent to plastoquinone Co, a C type with a hydroxyl group on the first isoprene unit of the terpenoid sidechain of this substituted benzo-quinone. The ubiquinone, vitamin K and α-tocopherylquinone content of several algae is also reported. The presence of plastoquinone A in all green plants and many algae indicates that it may be a functional element in photosynthesis. Our study shows that plastoquinone C is more regularly present in algae than has been previously shown. PMID:16656993

  13. [Marine algae of Baja California Sur, Mexico: nutritional value].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Domínguez, Silvia; Casas Valdez, Margarita; Ramos Ramos, Felipe; Pérez-Gil, Fernando; Sánchez Rodríguez, Ignacio

    2002-12-01

    The Baja California Peninsula is one of the richest regions of seaweed resources in México. The objective of this study was to determine the chemical composition of some marine algae species of Baja California Sur, with an economical potential due to their abundance and distribution, and to promote their use as food for human consumption and animal feeding. The algae studied were Green (Ulva spp., Enteromorpha intestinalis, Caulerpa sertularoides, Bryopsis hypnoides), Red (Laurencia johnstonii, Spyridia filamentosa, Hypnea valentiae) and Brown (Sargassum herporizum, S. sinicola, Padina durvillaei, Hydroclathrus clathrathus, Colpomenia sinuosa). The algae were dried and ground before analysis. In general, the results showed that algae had a protein level less than 11%, except L. johnstonii with 18% and low energy content. The ether extract content was lower than 1%. However, the algae were a good source of carbohydrates and inorganic matter. PMID:12868282

  14. Mitigating ammonia nitrogen deficiency in dairy wastewaters for algae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Ma, Xiaochen; Ma, Yiwei; Chen, Paul; Zheng, Hongli; Doan, Yen T T; Liu, Hui; Chen, Chi; Urriola, Pedro E; Shurson, Gerald C; Ruan, Roger

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrated that the limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewater was the ammonia nitrogen deficiency. Dairy wastewaters were mixed with a slaughterhouse wastewater that has much higher ammonia nitrogen content. The results showed the mixing wastewaters improved the nutrient profiles and biomass yield at low cost. Algae grown on mixed wastewaters contained high protein (55.98-66.91%) and oil content (19.10-20.81%) and can be exploited to produce animal feed and biofuel. Furthermore, algae grown on mixed wastewater significantly reduced nutrient contents remained in the wastewater after treatment. By mitigating limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewaters, the key issue of low biomass yield of algae grown on dairy wastewaters was resolved and the wastewater nutrient removal efficiency was significantly improved by this study. PMID:26623940

  15. In Vitro Fatty Acid Synthesis and Complex Lipid Metabolism in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: I. Some Characteristics of Fatty Acid Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lem, N W; Stumpf, P K

    1984-01-01

    In vitro fatty acid synthesis was examined in crude cell extracts, soluble fractions, and 80% (NH(4))(2)SO(4) fractions from Anabaena variabilis M3. Fatty acid synthesis was absolutely dependent upon acyl carrier protein and required NADPH and NADH. Moreover, fatty acid synthesis and elongation occurred in the cytoplasm of the cell. The major fatty acid products were palmitic acid (16:0) and stearic acid (18:0). Of considerable interest, both stearoyl-acyl carrier protein and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturases were not detected in any of the fractions from A. variabilis. The similarities and differences in fatty acid synthesis between A. variabilis and higher plant tissues are discussed with respect to the endosymbiotic theory of chloroplast evolution. PMID:16663367

  16. Effects of abiotic stressors on synthesis of the mycosporine-like amino acid shinorine in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra P; Klisch, Manfred; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Häder, Donat-P

    2008-01-01

    In the present investigation we show that the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937 produces a single mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA), shinorine (retention time = 2.3 min and absorption maximum at 334 nm) when isolated and purified by HPLC. Although there was significant induction of MAA synthesis from its initial value under 395 or 320 nm cutoff filters, MAA induction was significantly more pronounced in samples covered with 295 nm cutoff filters after 72 h of exposure. Heat as a stress factor had no effect on MAA induction with or without UV radiation. In contrast, salt and ammonium treatment had synergistic effects with UV stress. MAA synthesis was also induced by salt and ammonium in a concentration-dependent manner without UV stress in samples covered with 395 nm cutoff filters. The results indicate that MAAs may have other functions in addition to photoprotection in this organism. PMID:18557824

  17. O-Methyltransferase is shared between the pentose phosphate and shikimate pathways and is essential for mycosporine-like amino acid biosynthesis in Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413.

    PubMed

    Pope, Matthew A; Spence, Edward; Seralvo, Valentina; Gacesa, Ranko; Heidelberger, Sibylle; Weston, Andrew J; Dunlap, Walter C; Shick, J Malcolm; Long, Paul F

    2015-01-19

    The parent core structure of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) is 4-deoxygadusol, which, in cyanobacteria, is derived from conversion of the pentose phosphate pathway intermediate sedoheptulose 7-phosphate by the enzymes 2-epi-5-epivaliolone synthase (EVS) and O-methyltransferase (OMT). Yet, deletion of the EVS gene from Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 was shown to have little effect on MAA production, thus suggesting that its biosynthesis is not exclusive to the pentose phosphate pathway. Herein, we report how, using pathway-specific inhibitors, we demonstrated unequivocally that MAA biosynthesis occurs also via the shikimate pathway. In addition, complete in-frame gene deletion of the OMT gene from A. variabilis ATCC 29413 reveals that, although biochemically distinct, the pentose phosphate and shikimate pathways are inextricably linked to MAA biosynthesis in this cyanobacterium. Furthermore, proteomic data reveal that the shikimate pathway is the predominate route for UV-induced MAA biosynthesis. PMID:25487723

  18. Subcellular Localization and Clues for the Function of the HetN Factor Influencing Heterocyst Distribution in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J.; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Flores, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide. PMID:25049089

  19. Subcellular localization and clues for the function of the HetN factor influencing heterocyst distribution in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide. PMID:25049089

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lysine{sup 382}, the activator-binding site, of ADP-Glucose pyrophosphorylase from Anabaena PCC 6120

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Jun; Charng, Yee-yung; Preiss, J.

    1996-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that a highly conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 419}) near the C-terminus of Anabaena ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate, the allosteric activator. Phosphopyridoxylation of the K419R mutant enzyme modified another conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 382}), suggesting that this residue might be also located within the activator-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lys{sup 382} of the Anabaena enzyme was performed to determine the role of this residue. Replacing Lys{sup 382} with either arginine, alanine, or glutamine produced mutant enzymes with apparent affinities for 3-P-glycerate 10-160-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme. The glutamic acid mutant enzyme was inhibited by 3-P-glycerate. These mutations had lesser impact on the kinetic constants for the substrates and inhibitor, P{sub i}, and on the thermal stability. These results indicate that both the charge and size of the residue at position 382 influence the binding of 3-P-glycerate. Site-directed mutagenesis was also performed to obtain a K382R-K419R double mutant. The apparent affinity for 3-P-glycerate of this double-mutant enzyme was 104-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme, and the specificity for activator of this mutant enzyme was altered. The K382R-K419R enzyme could not be phosphopyridoxylated, suggesting that other lysine residues are not involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Chloroplast Phylogenomic Inference of Green Algae Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linhua; Fang, Ling; Zhang, Zhenhua; Chang, Xin; Penny, David; Zhong, Bojian

    2016-01-01

    The green algal phylum Chlorophyta has six diverse classes, but the phylogenetic relationship of the classes within Chlorophyta remains uncertain. In order to better understand the ancient Chlorophyta evolution, we have applied a site pattern sorting method to study compositional heterogeneity and the model fit in the green algal chloroplast genomic data. We show that the fastest-evolving sites are significantly correlated with among-site compositional heterogeneity, and these sites have a much poorer fit to the evolutionary model. Our phylogenomic analyses suggest that the class Chlorophyceae is a monophyletic group, and the classes Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Prasinophyceae are non-monophyletic groups. Our proposed phylogenetic tree of Chlorophyta will offer new insights to investigate ancient green algae evolution, and our analytical framework will provide a useful approach for evaluating and mitigating the potential errors of phylogenomic inferences. PMID:26846729

  2. An algae-covered alligator rests warily

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An algae-covered alligator keeps a wary eye open as it rests in one of the ponds at Kennedy Space Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  3. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  4. Random flow induced by swimming algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Rushkin, Ilia; Goldstein, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    In this work we studied the random flow induced in a fluid by the motion of a dilute suspension of the swimming algae Volvox carteri. The fluid velocity in the suspension is a superposition of the flow fields set up by the individual organisms, which in turn have multipole contributions that decay as inverse powers of distance from the organism. Here we show that the conditions under which the central limit theorem guarantees a Gaussian probability distribution function of velocity fluctuations are satisfied when the leading force singularity is a Stokeslet. Deviations from Gaussianity are shown to arise from near-field effects. Comparison is made with the statistical properties of abiotic sedimenting suspensions. The experimental results are supplemented by extensive numerical studies.

  5. High-fidelity phototaxis in biflagellate algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptos, Kyriacos; Chioccioli, Maurizio; Furlan, Silvano; Pesci, Adriana; Goldstein, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    The single-cell alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a motile biflagellate that can swim towards light for its photosynthetic requirements, a behavior referred to as phototaxis. The cell responds upon light stimulation through its rudimentary eye - the eyespot - by changing the beating amplitude of its two flagella accordingly - a process called the photoresponse. All this occurs in a coordinated fashion as Chlamydomonas spins about its body axis while swimming, thus experiencing oscillating intensities of light. We use high-speed video microscopy to measure the flagellar dynamics of the photoresponse on immobilized cells and interpret the results with a mathematical model of adaptation similar to that used previously for Volvox. These results are incorporated into a model of phototactic steering to yield trajectories that are compared to those obtained by three-dimensional tracking. Implications of these results for the evolution of multicellularity in the Volvocales are discussed.

  6. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  7. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  8. Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lizotte, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 {mu}g C {center dot} {mu}g chl{sup {minus}1} {center dot} h{sup {minus}1} higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and {sup 14}C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and {sup 14}C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities.

  9. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution. PMID:23011851

  10. Exposure of phototrophs to 548 days in low Earth orbit: microbial selection pressures in outer space and on early earth.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S; Rettberg, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Olsson-Francis, Karen

    2011-10-01

    An epilithic microbial community was launched into low Earth orbit, and exposed to conditions in outer space for 548 days on the European Space Agency EXPOSE-E facility outside the International Space Station. The natural phototroph biofilm was augmented with akinetes of Anabaena cylindrica and vegetative cells of Nostoc commune and Chroococcidiopsis. In space-exposed dark controls, two algae (Chlorella and Rosenvingiella spp.), a cyanobacterium (Gloeocapsa sp.) and two bacteria associated with the natural community survived. Of the augmented organisms, cells of A. cylindrica and Chroococcidiopsis survived, but no cells of N. commune. Only cells of Chroococcidiopsis were cultured from samples exposed to the unattenuated extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) spectrum (>110 nm or 200 nm). Raman spectroscopy and bright-field microscopy showed that under these conditions the surface cells were bleached and their carotenoids were destroyed, although cell morphology was preserved. These experiments demonstrate that outer space can act as a selection pressure on the composition of microbial communities. The results obtained from samples exposed to >200 nm UV (simulating the putative worst-case UV exposure on the early Earth) demonstrate the potential for epilithic colonization of land masses during that time, but that UV radiation on anoxic planets can act as a strong selection pressure on surface-dwelling organisms. Finally, these experiments have yielded new phototrophic organisms of potential use in biomass and oxygen production in space exploration. PMID:21593797

  11. Exposure of phototrophs to 548 days in low Earth orbit: microbial selection pressures in outer space and on early earth

    PubMed Central

    Cockell, Charles S; Rettberg, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Olsson-Francis, Karen

    2011-01-01

    An epilithic microbial community was launched into low Earth orbit, and exposed to conditions in outer space for 548 days on the European Space Agency EXPOSE-E facility outside the International Space Station. The natural phototroph biofilm was augmented with akinetes of Anabaena cylindrica and vegetative cells of Nostoc commune and Chroococcidiopsis. In space-exposed dark controls, two algae (Chlorella and Rosenvingiella spp.), a cyanobacterium (Gloeocapsa sp.) and two bacteria associated with the natural community survived. Of the augmented organisms, cells of A. cylindrica and Chroococcidiopsis survived, but no cells of N. commune. Only cells of Chroococcidiopsis were cultured from samples exposed to the unattenuated extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) spectrum (>110 nm or 200 nm). Raman spectroscopy and bright-field microscopy showed that under these conditions the surface cells were bleached and their carotenoids were destroyed, although cell morphology was preserved. These experiments demonstrate that outer space can act as a selection pressure on the composition of microbial communities. The results obtained from samples exposed to >200 nm UV (simulating the putative worst-case UV exposure on the early Earth) demonstrate the potential for epilithic colonization of land masses during that time, but that UV radiation on anoxic planets can act as a strong selection pressure on surface-dwelling organisms. Finally, these experiments have yielded new phototrophic organisms of potential use in biomass and oxygen production in space exploration. PMID:21593797

  12. Nanoparticles in the fight against mosquito-borne diseases: bioactivity of Bruguiera cylindrica-synthesized nanoparticles against dengue virus DEN-2 (in vitro) and its mosquito vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Dinesh, Devakumar; Paulpandi, Manickam; Althbyani, Abdulaziz Dakhellah Meqbel; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Wang, Lan; Suresh, Udaiyan; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Mohan, Jagathish; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Wei, Hui; Kalimuthu, Kandasamy; Parajulee, Megha N; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Mosquitoes are blood-feeding insects serving as the most important vectors for spreading human pathogens and parasites. Dengue is a viral disease mainly vectored through the bite of Aedes mosquitoes. Its transmission has recently increased in urban and semi-urban areas of tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, becoming a major international public health concern. There is no specific treatment for dengue. Its prevention and control solely depend on effective vector control measures. Mangrove plants have been used in Indian traditional medicine for a wide array of purposes. In this research, we proposed a method for biosynthesis of antiviral and mosquitocidal silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using the aqueous extract of Bruguiera cylindrica leaves. AgNP were characterized using a variety of biophysical analyses, including UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Bruguiera cilyndrica aqueous extract and green-synthesized AgNP were tested against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti. AgNP were the most effective. LC50 values ranged from 8.93 ppm (larva I) to 30.69 ppm (pupa). In vitro experiments showed that 30 μg/ml of AgNP significantly inhibited the production of dengue viral envelope (E) protein in vero cells and downregulated the expression of dengue viral E gene. Concerning nontarget effects, we observed that the predation efficiency of Carassius auratus against A. aegypti was not affected by exposure at sublethal doses of AgNP. Predation in the control was 71.81 % (larva II) and 50.43 % (larva III), while in an AgNP-treated environment, predation was boosted to 90.25 and 76.81 %, respectively. Overall, this study highlights the concrete potential of green-synthesized AgNP in the fight against dengue virus. Furthermore, B. cylindrica-synthesized AgNP can be employed at low doses to reduce larval and pupal population of A. aegypti, without detrimental

  13. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  14. Mutations in Genes patA and patL of Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 Result in Similar Phenotypes, and the Proteins Encoded by Those Genes May Interact ▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinjie; Wolk, C. Peter

    2011-01-01

    PatA resembles a response regulator protein with a defective DNA-binding domain, and PatL (All3305) is a pentapeptide repeat protein. A yeast two-hybrid library identified PatL as a protein with which PatA may interact. Heterocysts of patA and patL Anabaena sp. form nearly exclusively terminally in long filaments, further linking the genes. PMID:21890704

  15. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Uses and restrictions. The color additive dried algae meal may be safely used in chicken feed in... color of chicken skin and eggs. (2) The quantity of the color additive incorporated in the feed is...

  16. The plastid genome of the red alga Laurencia.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Heroen; Costa, Joana F

    2015-06-01

    We present the 174,935 nt long plastid genome of the red alga Laurencia sp. JFC0032. It is the third plastid genome characterized for the largest order of red algae (Ceramiales). The circular-mapping plastid genome is small compared to most florideophyte red algae, and our comparisons show a trend toward smaller plastid genome sizes in the family Rhodomelaceae, independent from a similar trend in Cyanidiophyceae. The Laurencia genome is densely packed with 200 annotated protein-coding genes (188 widely conserved, 3 open reading frames shared with other red algae and 9 hypothetical coding regions). It has 29 tRNAs, a single-copy ribosomal RNA cistron, a tmRNA, and the RNase P RNA. PMID:26986672

  17. Harmful algae blooms removal from fresh water with modified vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunguang; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Zhengyan; Wang, Xiangqin

    2014-01-01

    Vermiculite and vermiculite modified with hydrochloric acid were investigated to evaluate their flocculation efficiencies in freshwater containing harmful algae blooms (HABs) (Microcystis aeruginosa). Scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, converted fluorescence microscope, plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, and Zetasizer were used to study the flocculation mechanism of modified vermiculite. It was found that the vermiculite modified with hydrochloric acid could coagulate algae cells through charge neutralization, chemical bridging, and netting effect. The experimental results show that the efficiency of flocculation can be notably improved by modified vermiculite. Ninety-eight per cent of algae cells in algae solution could be removed within 10 min after the addition ofmodified vermiculite clay. The method that removal of HABs with modified vermiculite is economical with high efficiency, and more research is needed to assess their ecological impacts before using in practical application. PMID:24600873

  18. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY EXTRACTION OF MERCURY FROM GROUNDWATER IMMOBILIZED ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bio-Recovery Systems, Inc. conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to adsorb mercury from contamina...

  19. EXTRACTION OF SUGARS FROM ALGAE FOR DIRECT CONVERSION TO BUTANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We will have a complete full scale design at the end of this project including algae growth and butanol production. Further, the group will have a working prototype for display at the National Mall.

  20. Colourful Cultures: Classroom Experiments with the Unicellular Alga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delpech, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Describes an investigation into the photosynthetic potential of the different developmental stages of the green unicellular alga Haematococcus pluvialis. Reviews the biotechnological applications of astaxanthin, the red pigment which can be extracted from Haematococcus pluvialis. (Author/MM)

  1. [Parameter determination of algae growth based on ecological tank experiment].

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Ding, Ling; Gao, Guang

    2005-05-01

    A dynamic simulation experiment of algae in an ecological tank was performed at the Taihu Laboratory for Lake Ecosystem Research. During the experiment, water from Taihu Lake was infused into the ecological tank and samples were taken continually to observe algae growth under varying conditions, such as temperature, sunlight and nutrients. Based on the experiment, an algae growth model, considering nitrogen and phosphorus cycle, was developed by using the advanced PHREEQC model. After that, a detailed calibration and validation of parameters in the model were done on the basis of experimental results. The least square method was used to determine the optimal set of parameters. The calculated values of algae and nutrient concentrations show fairly satisfying fittness with measured data. PMID:16124474

  2. ENDOTOXINS, ALGAE AND 'LIMULUS' AMOEBOCYTE LYSATE TEST IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the distribution of algae and bacteria, and investigate sources of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides) in drinking water. The field survey was performed on five drinking water systems located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania ...

  3. Application of synthetic biology in cyanobacteria and algae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Weiwen; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria and algae are becoming increasingly attractive cell factories for producing renewable biofuels and chemicals due to their ability to capture solar energy and CO2 and their relatively simple genetic background for genetic manipulation. Increasing research efforts from the synthetic biology approach have been made in recent years to modify cyanobacteria and algae for various biotechnological applications. In this article, we critically review recent progresses in developing genetic tools for characterizing or manipulating cyanobacteria and algae, the applications of genetically modified strains for synthesizing renewable products such as biofuels and chemicals. In addition, the emergent challenges in the development and application of synthetic biology for cyanobacteria and algae are also discussed. PMID:23049529

  4. ALGAE AND CRUSTACEANS AS INDICATORS OF BIOACTIVITY OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater (Selenastrum capricornutum) and estuarine (Skeketonema costatum) algae were exposed to liquid wastes from 10 industrial sites in laboratory bioassays. All wastes affected algal growth either by stimulation or by stimulation at low concentrations and inhibition at high ...

  5. Algae Reefs in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Numerous algae reefs are seen in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia (26.0S, 113.5E) especially in the southern portions of the bay. The south end is more saline because tidal flow in and out of the bay is restricted by sediment deposited at the north and central end of the bay opposite the mouth of the Wooramel River. This extremely arid region produces little sediment runoff so that the waters are very clear, saline and rich in algae.

  6. Photobiological hydrogen production in green algae and photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1986-01-01

    We have shown that, under appropriate physiological conditions, certain freshwater and marine green algae are capable of splitting water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen in a sustained steady-state reaction. In these algae, the gaseous-fuel-producing reaction can be driven by light throughout the visible portion of the solar emission spectrum, including the long wavelength (red) 700-nm region. No external energy sources are required.

  7. Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

    1980-05-16

    The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

  8. Viability of dried vegetative trichomes, formation of akinetes and heterocysts and akinete germination in some blue-green algae under water stress.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S C; Singh, V

    1999-01-01

    Almost all dried vegetative trichomes ofAnabaena iyengarii, Westiellopsis prolifica andNostochopsis lobatus died within 1 h, while those ofOscillatoria acuminata retained viability to some extent for 1 d under similar storage conditions. The viability of dried vegetative trichomes ofO. acuminata decreased about equally on storage at 20 degrees C in the light or in the dark, but dropped rapidly at 12 and 0 degrees C in the dark. Vegetative trichomes ofA. iyengarii, N. lobatus andW. prolifica were more sensitive to frost than those ofO. acuminata, and this correlated with their low resistance to desiccation because both types of exposure involved osmotic stress. Both dried and wet akinetes ofA. iyengarii, W. prolifica andN. lobatus were about equally viable when stored at 20 degrees C in the light or the dark or at 12 and 0 degrees C in the dark, but their germination ability decreased on storage at 0 degrees C. The water stress imposed on growing vegetative trichomes either in high-agar media or in NaCl-supplemented liquid media reduced the survival ofO. acuminata trichomes, decreased or totally suppressed akinete and heterocyst formation and akinete germination inA. iyengarii, W. prolifica andN. lobatus. The sensitivity decreased in the sequenceA. iyengarii algae was more sensitive to physiological water stress than their formation. In all of them, akinetes formed under water stress were equally viable as those formed under normal conditions. Trichomes ofO. acuminata became broader when grown in 0.5-0.8 mol/L NaCl-supplemented media, probably due to polyol accumulation, and they also developed a thin sheath-like structure. PMID:18461490

  9. Study on algae removal by immobilized biosystem on sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong

    2006-10-01

    In this study, sponges were used to immobilize domesticated sludge microbes in a limited space, forming an immobilized biosystem capable of algae and microcystins removal. The removal effects on algae, microcystins and UV260 of this biosystem and the mechanism of algae removal were studied. The results showed that active sludge from sewage treatment plants was able to remove algae from a eutrophic lake’s water after 7 d of domestication. The removal efficiency for algae, organic matter and microcystins increased when the domesticated sludge was immobilized on sponges. When the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 5h, the removal rates of algae, microcystins and UV260 were 90%, 94.17% and 84%, respectively. The immobilized biosystem consisted mostly of bacteria, the Ciliata and Sarcodina protozoans and the Rotifer metazoans. Algal decomposition by zoogloea bacteria and preying by microcreatures were the two main modes of algal removal, which occurred in two steps: first, absorption by the zoogloea; second, decomposition by the zoogloea bacteria and the predacity of the microcreatures.

  10. Feeding preferences of mesograzers on aquacultured Gracilaria and sympatric algae.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Rivera, Edwin; Friedlander, Michael

    2011-12-21

    While large grazers can often be excluded effectively from algal aquaculture operations, smaller herbivores such as small crustaceans and gastropods may be more difficult to control. The susceptibility of three Gracilaria species to herbivores was evaluated in multiple-choice experiments with the amphipod Ampithoe ramondi and the crab Acanthonyx lunulatus. Both mesograzers are common along the Mediterranean coast of Israel. When given a choice, the amphipod preferred to consume Gracilaria lemaneiformis significantly more than either G. conferta or G. cornea. The crab, however, consumed equivalent amounts of G. lemaneiformis and G. conferta, but did not consume G. cornea. Organic content of these algae, an important feeding cue for some mesograzers, could not account for these differences. We further assessed the susceptibility of a candidate species for aquaculture, G. lemaneiformis, against local algae, including common epiphytes. When given a choice of four algae, amphipods preferred the green alga Ulva lactuca over Jania rubens. However, consumption of U. lactuca was equivalent to those of G. lemaneiformis and Padina pavonica. In contrast, the crab showed a marked and significant preference for G. lemaneiformis above any of the other three algae offered. Our results suggest that G. cornea is more resistant to herbivory from common mesograzers and that, contrary to expectations, mixed cultures or epiphyte growth on G. lemaneiformis cannot reduce damage to this commercially appealing alga if small herbivores are capable of recruiting into culture ponds. Mixed cultures may be beneficial when culturing other Gracilaria species. PMID:22711945

  11. Feeding preferences of mesograzers on aquacultured Gracilaria and sympatric algae

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Rivera, Edwin; Friedlander, Michael

    2011-01-01

    While large grazers can often be excluded effectively from algal aquaculture operations, smaller herbivores such as small crustaceans and gastropods may be more difficult to control. The susceptibility of three Gracilaria species to herbivores was evaluated in multiple-choice experiments with the amphipod Ampithoe ramondi and the crab Acanthonyx lunulatus. Both mesograzers are common along the Mediterranean coast of Israel. When given a choice, the amphipod preferred to consume Gracilaria lemaneiformis significantly more than either G. conferta or G. cornea. The crab, however, consumed equivalent amounts of G. lemaneiformis and G. conferta, but did not consume G. cornea. Organic content of these algae, an important feeding cue for some mesograzers, could not account for these differences. We further assessed the susceptibility of a candidate species for aquaculture, G. lemaneiformis, against local algae, including common epiphytes. When given a choice of four algae, amphipods preferred the green alga Ulva lactuca over Jania rubens. However, consumption of U. lactuca was equivalent to those of G. lemaneiformis and Padina pavonica. In contrast, the crab showed a marked and significant preference for G. lemaneiformis above any of the other three algae offered. Our results suggest that G. cornea is more resistant to herbivory from common mesograzers and that, contrary to expectations, mixed cultures or epiphyte growth on G. lemaneiformis cannot reduce damage to this commercially appealing alga if small herbivores are capable of recruiting into culture ponds. Mixed cultures may be beneficial when culturing other Gracilaria species. PMID:22711945

  12. An overview of algae biofuel production and potential environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Menetrez, Marc Y

    2012-07-01

    Algae are among the most potentially significant sources of sustainable biofuels in the future of renewable energy. A feedstock with virtually unlimited applicability, algae can metabolize various waste streams (e.g., municipal wastewater, carbon dioxide from industrial flue gas) and produce products with a wide variety of compositions and uses. These products include lipids, which can be processed into biodiesel; carbohydrates, which can be processed into ethanol; and proteins, which can be used for human and animal consumption. Algae are commonly genetically engineered to allow for advantageous process modification or optimization. However, issues remain regarding human exposure to algae-derived toxins, allergens, and carcinogens from both existing and genetically modified organisms (GMOs), as well as the overall environmental impact of GMOs. A literature review was performed to highlight issues related to the growth and use of algal products for generating biofuels. Human exposure and environmental impact issues are identified and discussed, as well as current research and development activities of academic, commercial, and governmental groups. It is hoped that the ideas contained in this paper will increase environmental awareness of issues surrounding the production of algae and will help the algae industry develop to its full potential. PMID:22681590

  13. Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Coutu, Sylvain; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Herbicide concentrations fluctuate widely in watercourses after crop applications and rain events. The level of concentrations in pulses can exceed the water chronic quality criteria. In the present study, we proposed modelling the effects of successive pulse exposure on algae. The deterministic model proposed is based on two parameters: (i) the typical growth rate of the algae, obtained by monitoring growth rates of several successive batch cultures in growth media, characterizing both the growth of the control and during the recovery periods; (ii) the growth rate of the algae exposed to pulses, determined from a dose-response curve obtained with a standard toxicity test. We focused on the herbicide isoproturon and on the freshwater alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus, and we validated the model prediction based on effect measured during five sequential pulse exposures in laboratory. The comparison between the laboratory and the modelled effects illustrated that the results yielded were consistent, making the model suitable for effect prediction of the herbicide photosystem II inhibitor isoproturon on the alga S. vacuolatus. More generally, modelling showed that both pulse duration and level of concentration play a crucial role. The application of the model to a real case demonstrated that both the highest peaks and the low peaks with a long duration affect principally the cell density inhibition of the alga S. vacuolatus. It is therefore essential to detect these characteristic pulses when monitoring of herbicide concentrations are conducted in rivers. PMID:25499055

  14. Extraction of mercury from ground-water using immobilized algae

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, N.P.

    1991-01-01

    Bio-recovery Systems Inc., conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to absorb mercury from contaminated groundwater in laboratory studies and pilot-scale field tests. Algae biomass was incorporated in a permeable polymeric matrix. The product, AlgaSORB, packed into absorption columns, exhibited excellent flow characteristics, and functioned as a 'biological' ion exchange resin. A sequence of eleven laboratory tests demonstrated the ability of the product to absorb mercury from groundwater that contained high levels of total dissolved solids and hard water components. However, use of a single AlgaSORB preparation yielded non-repeatable results with samples collected at different times of the year. The strategy of extracting the groundwater through two columns containing different times of the year. The strategy of extracting the groundwater through two columns containing different preparations of AlgaSORB was developed and proved successful in laboratory and pilot-scale field tests. Field test results indicate that AlgaSORB could be economically competitive with ion exchange resins for removal of mercury, with the advantage that hardness and other dissolved solids do not appear to compete with heavy metals for binding capacity. (Copyright (c) 1991--Air and Waste Management Association.)

  15. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    SciTech Connect

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on green fuels which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI's have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  16. Phosphorus-limited growth of a green alga and a blue-green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, D.S.; Brown, E.J.

    1981-12-01

    The phosphorus-limited growth kinetics of the chlorophyte Scenedesmus quadricauda and the cyanophyte Synechococcus Nageli were studied by using batch and continuous culturing techniques. The steady-state phosphate transport capability and the phosphorus storage capacity is higher in S. Nageli than in S. quadricauda. Synechococcus Nageli can also deplete phosphate to much lower levels than can S. quadricauda. These results, along with their morphological characteristics, were used to construct partial physiological profiles for each organism. The profiles indicate that this unicellular cyanophyte (cyanobacterium) is better suited for growth in phosphorus-limited oligotrophic niches than is this chlorophyte (green alga). (Refs. 44).

  17. Microfluidic one-way streets for algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jorn; Kantsler, Vasily; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-02-01

    Controlling locomotion and transport of microorganisms is a key challenge in the development of future biotechnological applications. Here, we demonstrate the use of optimized microfluidic ratchets to rectify the mean swimming direction in suspensions of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is a promising candidate for the photosynthetic production of hydrogen. To assess the potential of microfluidic barriers for the manipulation of algal swimming, we studied first the scattering of individual C. reinhardtii from solid boundaries. High-speed imaging reveals the surprising result that these quasi-spherical ``puller''-type microswimmers primarily interact with surfaces via direct flagellar contact, whereas hydrodynamic effects play a subordinate role. A minimal theoretical model, based on run-and-turn motion and the experimentally measured surface-scattering law, predicts the existence of optimal wedge-shaped ratchets that maximize rectification of initially uniform suspensions. We confirm this prediction in experimental measurements with different geometries. Since the mechano-elastic properties of eukaryotic flagella are conserved across many genera, we expect that our results and methods are applicable to a broad class of biflagellate microorganisms.

  18. Comparative transcriptome analysis of four prymnesiophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Koid, Amy E; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C; Caron, David A; Heidelberg, Karla B

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists. PMID:24926657

  19. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Four Prymnesiophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Koid, Amy E.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C.; Caron, David A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists. PMID:24926657

  20. Is the Future Really in Algae?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Having just emerged from the warmest decade on record and watching as the oceans acidify, global resources peak, the world's population continues to climb, and nearly half of all known species face extinction by the end of the century. We stand on the threshold of one of the most important transition in human history-the transition from hunting-and-gathering our energy to cultivating sustainable, carbon-neutral, environmentally-friendly energy supplies. Can we "cultivate" enerm without competing with agriculture for land, freshwater, or fertilizer? Can we develop an "ecology of technology" that optimizes our use of limited resources? Is human activity compatible with improved conditions in the world's oceans? Will our ingenuity prevail in time to make a difference for our children and the children of all species? With support from NASA ARMD and the California Energy Commission, a group of dedicated scientists and engineers are working on a project called OMEGA (Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae), to provide practical answers to these critical questions and to leave a legacy of hope for the oceans and for the future.

  1. Toxicity of haloacetic acids to freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jayne F; van Egmond, Roger; Price, Oliver R

    2010-01-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAA), such as trichloroacetic acid (TCA), are commonly occurring by-products from disinfection and bleaching processes using sodium hypochlorite. Currently, the lowest no observed effect concentration (NOEC) for TCA is reported to be 8.7microgL(-1), which was derived from a toxicity study conducted in 1981 on Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The purity of the test material was not documented and it is unknown if other halogenated impurities or co-formulants were present. However, this NOEC is used to derive a predicted no effect concentration, which is used in various regulatory risk assessments. We present a range of algal toxicity studies conducted on five different algal species and two HAAs and observed no toxicity of TCA to C. pyrenoidosa at 115mgL(-1). The most sensitive species to TCA (NOEC, 3mgL(-1)) were Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Scenedesmus subspicatus, demonstrating that the toxicity of TCA to algae is over two orders of magnitude less sensitive than previously reported. PMID:19828197

  2. Two-step evolution of endosymbiosis between hydra and algae.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Nozawa, Masafumi; Ikeo, Kazuho; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    In the Hydra vulgaris group, only 2 of the 25 strains in the collection of the National Institute of Genetics in Japan currently show endosymbiosis with green algae. However, whether the other non-symbiotic strains also have the potential to harbor algae remains unknown. The endosymbiotic potential of non-symbiotic strains that can harbor algae may have been acquired before or during divergence of the strains. With the aim of understanding the evolutionary process of endosymbiosis in the H. vulgaris group, we examined the endosymbiotic potential of non-symbiotic strains of the H. vulgaris group by artificially introducing endosymbiotic algae. We found that 12 of the 23 non-symbiotic strains were able to harbor the algae until reaching the grand-offspring through the asexual reproduction by budding. Moreover, a phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial genome sequences showed that all the strains with endosymbiotic potential grouped into a single cluster (cluster γ). This cluster contained two strains (J7 and J10) that currently harbor algae; however, these strains were not the closest relatives. These results suggest that evolution of endosymbiosis occurred in two steps; first, endosymbiotic potential was gained once in the ancestor of the cluster γ lineage; second, strains J7 and J10 obtained algae independently after the divergence of the strains. By demonstrating the evolution of the endosymbiotic potential in non-symbiotic H. vulgaris group strains, we have clearly distinguished two evolutionary steps. The step-by-step evolutionary process provides significant insight into the evolution of endosymbiosis in cnidarians. PMID:27404042

  3. [Toxicity of Coptis chinensis Rhizome Extracts to Green Algae].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-nan; Yuan, Ling

    2015-05-01

    Coptis chinensis contains antiseptic alkaloids and thus its rhizomes and preparations are widely used for the treatment of.fish diseases. In order to realize the risk of water ecosystems produced by this medical herb and preparations used in aquaculture, the present experiment was carried out to study the toxicity of Coptis chinensis rhizome extract (CRE) to Scenedesmus oblique and Chlorella pyrenoidosa grown in culture solution with 0.00 (CK), 0.088 (Tl), 0.44 (T2) and 1.76 mg · L(-1) (T3) of CRE, respectively. The results show that low concentration of CRE (T1) inhibited the growth rate of the alga and high CRE (T2 and T3) ceased growth and reproductions. CRE also decreased the chlorophyll and proteins in alga cells, indicating the inhibition of photosynthesis and protein biosynthesis, which could be direct reasons for the low growth rate and death of green alga. The efflux of protons and substances from alga cells led to pH reduction and conductivity increment in culture solution with CRE. Furthermore, the activity of superoxide dismutase in alga increased at the beginning of CRE in T1 and T2 treatments but decreased as time prolonged which was in contrast to high CRE treatment. And the long exposure to low CRE treatment behaved otherwise. This suggests that the low concentration of CRE could induce the resistant reactions in alga at initial time but high CRE concentration or long exposure even at low CRE concentration could inhibit the enzyme synthesis. Similarly, malondialdehyde in alga increased as CRE concentrations increased in culture solutions, implying the damage and high permeability of cell membrane. In general, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more sensitive to CRE. The abuse of rhizomes and preparations in aquaculture and intensive cultivation of Coptis chinensis plants in a large scale might produce ecological risks to primary productivity of water ecosystems. PMID:26314112

  4. [Comparison of histone-like proteins from blue-green algae with ribosomal basic proteins of alga and wheat germ histones].

    PubMed

    Gofshteĭn, L V; Iurina, N P; Romashkin, V I; Oparin, A I

    1975-01-01

    Histone-like proteins was found in blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans, which has no nucleus. F2b2, F2a2, F2a1 fractions were found in histone-like algae proteins and no fraction F1. Content of basic amino acids (arginine being prevailing in algae protein) is quite identical in histone-like algae proteins and in wheat germs histones, while the content of acid amino acids is considerably higher in algae. The presence in procaryotic cells of basic proteins similar in a number of properties to histones of higher organisms suggests that these proteins are evolutionary precursors of eucaryotic histones. PMID:813782

  5. Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

  6. Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Edra; Dorta, Fernando; Medina, Cristian; Ramírez, Alberto; Ramírez, Ingrid; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens. PMID:21673886

  7. Sustainability of algae derived biodiesel: a mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Pfromm, Peter H; Amanor-Boadu, Vincent; Nelson, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous chemical engineering mass balance/unit operations approach is applied here to bio-diesel from algae mass culture. An equivalent of 50,000,000 gallons per year (0.006002 m3/s) of petroleum-based Number 2 fuel oil (US, diesel for compression-ignition engines, about 0.1% of annual US consumption) from oleaginous algae is the target. Methyl algaeate and ethyl algaeate diesel can according to this analysis conceptually be produced largely in a technologically sustainable way albeit at a lower available diesel yield. About 11 square miles of algae ponds would be needed with optimistic assumptions of 50 g biomass yield per day and m2 pond area. CO2 to foster algae growth should be supplied from a sustainable source such as a biomass-based ethanol production. Reliance on fossil-based CO2 from power plants or fertilizer production renders algae diesel non-sustainable in the long term. PMID:20933402

  8. Boron uptake, localization, and speciation in marine brown algae.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric P; Wu, Youxian; Carrano, Carl J

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to the generally boron-poor terrestrial environment, the concentration of boron in the marine environment is relatively high (0.4 mM) and while there has been extensive interest in its use as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the relatively depth independent, and the generally non-nutrient-like concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the ocean. Among the marine plant-like organisms the brown algae (Phaeophyta) are one of only five lineages of photosynthetic eukaryotes to have evolved complex multicellularity. Many of unusual and often unique features of brown algae are attributable to this singular evolutionary history. These adaptations are a reflection of the marine coastal environment which brown algae dominate in terms of biomass. Consequently, brown algae are of fundamental importance to oceanic ecology, geochemistry, and coastal industry. Our results indicate that boron is taken up by a facilitated diffusion mechanism against a considerable concentration gradient. Furthermore, in both Ectocarpus and Macrocystis some boron is most likely bound to cell wall constituent alginate and the photoassimilate mannitol located in sieve cells. Herein, we describe boron uptake, speciation, localization and possible biological function in two species of brown algae, Macrocystis pyrifera and Ectocarpus siliculosus. PMID:26679972

  9. Anti-phytopathogenic activities of macro-algae extracts.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Edra; Dorta, Fernando; Medina, Cristian; Ramírez, Alberto; Ramírez, Ingrid; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens. PMID:21673886

  10. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Dunahay, Terri Goodman; Roessler, Paul G.; Jarvis, Eric E.

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae which includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae.

  11. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Jarvis, E.E.

    1997-08-26

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae. The method includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further, specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae. 2 figs.

  12. Influence of algae on photolysis rates of chemicals in water

    SciTech Connect

    Zepp, R.G.; Schlotzhauer, P.F.

    1983-08-01

    Sunlight-induced algal transformations of 22 nonionic organic chemicals were studied in order to provide kinetic results and equations concerning the influence of algae on the behavior of pollutants in freshwater environments. Screening studies indicated that green and blue-green algae, at concentrations of 1-10 mg of chlorophyll a/L, accelerate photoreaction of certain polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compounds, and anilines in water. The rate of change in aniline concentration, (P), in the aniline-Chlamydomonas photoreaction can be described by the following expression: rate = A(1 + B/(P))-1. At low substrate concentrations, the reaction rate is first order with respect to both algae and substrate concentration. Methyl parathion and parathion photoreacted 390 times more rapidly when sorbed by algae than in distilled water, and aniline and m-toluidine reacted over 12000 times faster, indicating that light-induced algal transformations of certain pollutants may be significant. Other results indicated that reaction rates are unaffected by heat-killing the algae. 27 references

  13. Application of algae-biosensor for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Umar, Lazuardi; Alexander, Frank A; Wiest, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    Environmental problems including water and air pollution, over fertilization, insufficient wastewater treatment and even ecological disaster are receiving greater attention in the technical and scientific area. In this paper, a method for water quality monitoring using living green algae (Chlorella Kessleri) with the help of the intelligent mobile lab (IMOLA) is presented. This measurement used two IMOLA systems for measurement and reference simultaneously to verify changes due to pollution inside the measurement system. The IMOLA includes light emitting diodes to stimulate photosynthesis of the living algae immobilized on a biochip containing a dissolved oxygen microsensor. A fluid system is used to transport algae culture medium in a stop and go mode; 600s ON, 300s OFF, while the oxygen concentration of the water probe is measured. When the pump stops, the increase in dissolved oxygen concentration due to photosynthesis is detected. In case of a pollutant being transported toward the algae, this can be detected by monitoring the photosynthetic activity. Monitoring pollution is shown by adding emulsion of 0,5mL of Indonesian crude palm oil and 10mL algae medium to the water probe in the biosensor. PMID:26737928

  14. Algae-bacteria interactions: Evolution, ecology and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Rishiram; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Algae and bacteria have coexisted ever since the early stages of evolution. This coevolution has revolutionized life on earth in many aspects. Algae and bacteria together influence ecosystems as varied as deep seas to lichens and represent all conceivable modes of interactions - from mutualism to parasitism. Several studies have shown that algae and bacteria synergistically affect each other's physiology and metabolism, a classic case being algae-roseobacter interaction. These interactions are ubiquitous and define the primary productivity in most ecosystems. In recent years, algae have received much attention for industrial exploitation but their interaction with bacteria is often considered a contamination during commercialization. A few recent studies have shown that bacteria not only enhance algal growth but also help in flocculation, both essential processes in algal biotechnology. Hence, there is a need to understand these interactions from an evolutionary and ecological standpoint, and integrate this understanding for industrial use. Here we reflect on the diversity of such relationships and their associated mechanisms, as well as the habitats that they mutually influence. This review also outlines the role of these interactions in key evolutionary events such as endosymbiosis, besides their ecological role in biogeochemical cycles. Finally, we focus on extending such studies on algal-bacterial interactions to various environmental and bio-technological applications. PMID:26657897

  15. Mg-lattice associations in red coralline algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenos, N. A.; Cusack, M.; Huthwelker, T.; Lagarde, P.; Scheibling, R. E.

    2009-04-01

    Recent investigations have shown red coralline algae to record ambient temperature in their calcite skeletons. Temperature recorded by variation in Mg concentrations within algal growth bands has sub-annual resolution and high accuracy. The conversion of Mg concentration to temperature is based on the assumption of Ca replacement by Mg within the algal calcite skeleton at higher temperatures. While Mg-temperature relationships in coralline algae have been calibrated for some species, the location of Mg within the calcite lattice remains unknown. Critically, if Mg is not a lattice component but associated with organic components this could lead to erroneous temperature records. Before coralline algae are used in large scale climate reconstructions it is therefore important to determine the location of Mg. Synchrotron Mg-X-ray absorbance near edge structure (XANES) indicates that Mg is associated with the calcite lattice in Lithothamnion glaciale (contemporary free-living, contemporary encrusting and sub-fossil free-living) and Phymatolithon calcareum (contemporary free-living) coralline algae. Mg is deposited within the calcite lattice in all seasons ( L. glaciale & P. calcareum) and thallus areas ( P. calcareum). These results suggest L. glaciale and P. calcareum are robust Mg-palaeotemperature proxies. We suggest that similar confirmation be obtained for Mg associations in other species of red coralline algae aiding our understanding of their role in climate reconstruction at large spatial scales.

  16. Mg-lattice associations in red coralline algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenos, N. A.; Cusack, M.,; Huthwelker, T.; Lagarde, P.; Scheibling, R. E.

    2009-04-01

    Recent investigations have shown red coralline algae to record ambient temperature in their calcite skeletons. Temperature recorded by variation in Mg concentrations within algal growth bands has sub-annual resolution and high accuracy. The conversion of Mg concentration to temperature is based on the assumption of Ca replacement by Mg within the algal calcite skeleton at higher temperatures. While Mg-temperature relationships in coralline algae have been calibrated for some species, the location of Mg within the calcite lattice remains unknown. Critically, if Mg is not a lattice component but associated with organic components this could lead to erroneous temperature records. Before coralline algae are used in large scale climate reconstructions it is therefore important to determine the location of Mg. Synchrotron Mg-X-ray absorbance near edge structure (XANES) indicates that Mg is associated with the calcite lattice in Lithothamnion glaciale (contemporary free-living, contemporary encrusting and sub-fossil free-living) and Phymatolithon calcareum (contemporary free-living) coralline algae. Mg is deposited within the calcite lattice in all seasons (L. glaciale & P. calcareum) and thallus areas (P. calcareum). These results suggest L. glaciale and P. calcareum are robust Mg-palaeotemperature proxies. We suggest that similar confirmation be obtained for Mg associations in other species of red coralline algae aiding our understanding of their role in climate reconstruction at large spatial scales.

  17. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells. PMID:26431054

  18. Flavodoxin-mediated electron transfer from photosystem I to ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase in Anabaena: role of flavodoxin hydrophobic residues in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina; Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Hervás, Manuel; Peregrina, José Ramón; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Navarro, José A; Medina, Milagros

    2008-01-29

    Three surface hydrophobic residues located at the Anabaena flavodoxin (Fld) putative complex interface with its redox partners were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these replacements on Fld interaction with both its physiological electron donor, photosystem I (PSI), and its electron acceptor, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR), were analyzed. Trp57, Ile59, and Ile92 contributed to the optimal orientation and tightening of the FNR:Fld and PSI:Fld complexes. However, these side chains did not appear to be involved in crucial specific interactions, but rather contributed to the obtainment of the optimal orientation and distance of the redox centers required for efficient electron transfer. This supports the idea that the interaction of Fld with its partners is less specific than that of ferredoxin and that more than one orientation is efficient for electron transfer in these transient complexes. Additionally, for some of the analyzed processes, WT Fld seems not to be the most optimized molecular species. Therefore, subtle changes at the isoalloxazine environment not only influence the Fld binding abilities, but also modulate the electron exchange processes by producing different orientations and distances between the redox centers. Finally, the weaker apoflavodoxin interaction with FNR suggests that the solvent-accessible region of FMN plays a role either in complex formation with FNR or in providing the adequate conformation of the FNR binding region in Fld. PMID:18177021

  19. Sucrose Synthesis in the Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 Is Controlled by the Two-Component Response Regulator OrrA

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Shogo; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 accumulates sucrose as a compatible solute against salt stress. Sucrose-phosphate synthase activity, which is responsible for the sucrose synthesis, is increased by salt stress, but the mechanism underlying the regulation of sucrose synthesis remains unknown. In the present study, a response regulator, OrrA, was shown to control sucrose synthesis. Expression of spsA, which encodes a sucrose-phosphate synthase, and susA and susB, which encode sucrose synthases, was induced by salt stress. In the orrA disruptant, salt induction of these genes was completely abolished. The cellular sucrose level of the orrA disruptant was reduced to 40% of that in the wild type under salt stress conditions. Moreover, overexpression of orrA resulted in enhanced expression of spsA, susA, and susB, followed by accumulation of sucrose, without the addition of NaCl. We also found that SigB2, a group 2 sigma factor of RNA polymerase, regulated the early response to salt stress under the control of OrrA. It is concluded that OrrA controls sucrose synthesis in collaboration with SigB2. PMID:25002430

  20. Different functions of HetR, a master regulator of heterocyst differentiation in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, can be separated by mutation

    PubMed Central

    Khudyakov, Ivan Y.; Golden, James W.

    2004-01-01

    The HetR protein has long been recognized as a key player in the regulation of heterocyst development. HetR is known to possess autoproteolytic and DNA-binding activities. During a search for mutants of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 that can overcome heterocyst suppression caused by overexpression of the patS gene, which encodes a negative regulator of differentiation, a bypass mutant strain, S2-45, was isolated that produced a defective pattern (Pat phenotype) of irregularly spaced single and multiple contiguous heterocysts (Mch phenotype) in combined nitrogen-free medium. Analysis of the S2-45 mutant revealed a R223W mutation in HetR, and reconstruction in the wild-type background showed that this mutation was responsible for the Mch phenotype and resistance not only to overexpressed patS, but also to overexpressed hetN, another negative regulator of differentiation. Ectopic overexpression of the hetRR223W allele in the hetRR223W background resulted in a conditionally lethal (complete differentiation) phenotype. Analysis of the heterocyst pattern in the hetRR223W mutant revealed that heterocysts differentiate essentially randomly along filaments, indicating that this mutation results in an active protein that is insensitive to the major signals governing heterocyst pattern formation. These data provide genetic evidence that, apart from being an essential activator of differentiation, HetR plays a central role in the signaling pathway that controls the heterocyst pattern. PMID:15520378