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Sample records for alga nannochloropsis sp

  1. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S E; Niyogi, Krishna K; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-12-27

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  2. High-efficiency homologous recombination in the oil-producing alga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Oliver; Benemann, Christina S. E.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Vick, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Algae have reemerged as potential next-generation feedstocks for biofuels, but strain improvement and progress in algal biology research have been limited by the lack of advanced molecular tools for most eukaryotic microalgae. Here we describe the development of an efficient transformation method for Nannochloropsis sp., a fast-growing, unicellular alga capable of accumulating large amounts of oil. Moreover, we provide additional evidence that Nannochloropsis is haploid, and we demonstrate that insertion of transformation constructs into the nuclear genome can occur by high-efficiency homologous recombination. As examples, we generated knockouts of the genes encoding nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, resulting in strains that were unable to grow on nitrate and nitrate/nitrite, respectively. The application of homologous recombination in this industrially relevant alga has the potential to rapidly advance algal functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:22123974

  3. Total lipid production of the green alga Nannochloropsis sp. QII under different nitrogen regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, Yu.; Hubbard, J.S.; Holzer, G.; Tornabene, T.G.

    1987-06-01

    The green alga Nannochloropsis sp. QII was cultivated in media with sufficient and growth-limiting levels of nitrogen (nitrate). Nitrogen deficiency promoted lipid synthesis yielding cells with lipids comprising 55% of the biomass. The major lipids were triacylglycerols (79%), polar lipids (9%) and hydrocarbons (2.5%). The polar lipids consisted of a broad range of phospholipids, glycolipids and sulfolipids. Other lipids identified were pigments, free fatty acids, saponifiable and unsaponifiable sterol derivatives, various glycerides, a family of alkyl-1, 4-dioxane derivatives and a series of alkyl- and hydroxy-alkyl-dimethyl-acetals. Experiments in which /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was provided at different times in the growth cycle demonstrated that enhanced lipid biosynthesis at low nitrogen levels resulted principally from de novo CO/sub 2/ fixation.

  4. Genomic insights from the oleaginous model alga Nannochloropsis gaditana.

    PubMed

    Jinkerson, Robert E; Radakovits, Randor; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2013-01-01

    Nannochloropsis species have emerged as leading phototrophic microorganisms for the production of biofuels. Several isolates produce large quantities of triacylglycerols, grow rapidly, and can be cultivated at industrial scales. Recently, the mitochondrial, plastid and nuclear genomes of Nannochloropsis gaditana were sequenced. Genomic interrogation revealed several key features that likely facilitate the oleaginous phenotype observed in Nannochloropsis, including an over-representation of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis. Here we present additional analyses on gene orientation, vitamin B12 requiring enzymes, the acetyl-CoA metabolic node, and codon usage in N. gaditana. Nuclear genome transformation methods are established with exogenous DNA integration occurring via either random incorporation or by homologous recombination, making Nannochloropsis amenable to both forward and reverse genetic engineering. Completion of a draft genomic sequence, establishment of transformation techniques, and robust outdoor growth properties have positioned Nannochloropsis as a new model alga with significant potential for further development into an integrated photons-to-fuel production platform. PMID:22922732

  5. Genomic insights from the oleaginous model alga Nannochloropsis gaditana

    PubMed Central

    Jinkerson, Robert E.; Radakovits, Randor; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Nannochloropsis species have emerged as leading phototrophic microorganisms for the production of biofuels. Several isolates produce large quantities of triacylglycerols, grow rapidly, and can be cultivated at industrial scales. Recently, the mitochondrial, plastid and nuclear genomes of Nannochloropsis gaditana were sequenced. Genomic interrogation revealed several key features that likely facilitate the oleaginous phenotype observed in Nannochloropsis, including an over-representation of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis. Here we present additional analyses on gene orientation, vitamin B12 requiring enzymes, the acetyl-CoA metabolic node, and codon usage in N. gaditana. Nuclear genome transformation methods are established with exogenous DNA integration occurring via either random incorporation or by homologous recombination, making Nannochloropsis amenable to both forward and reverse genetic engineering. Completion of a draft genomic sequence, establishment of transformation techniques, and robust outdoor growth properties have positioned Nannochloropsis as a new model alga with significant potential for further development into an integrated photons-to-fuel production platform. PMID:22922732

  6. Lipid Profile Remodeling in Response to Nitrogen Deprivation in the Microalgae Chlorella sp. (Trebouxiophyceae) and Nannochloropsis sp. (Eustigmatophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Ian L. D.; Bergamin, Amanda; Shears, Melanie J.; Dias, Daniel A.; Kentish, Sandra E.; Scales, Peter J.; Botté, Cyrille Y.; Callahan, Damien L.

    2014-01-01

    Many species of microalgae produce greatly enhanced amounts of triacylglycerides (TAGs), the key product for biodiesel production, in response to specific environmental stresses. Improvement of TAG production by microalgae through optimization of growth regimes is of great interest. This relies on understanding microalgal lipid metabolism in relation to stress response in particular the deprivation of nutrients that can induce enhanced TAG synthesis. In this study, a detailed investigation of changes in lipid composition in Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. in response to nitrogen deprivation (N-deprivation) was performed to provide novel mechanistic insights into the lipidome during stress. As expected, an increase in TAGs and an overall decrease in polar lipids were observed. However, while most membrane lipid classes (phosphoglycerolipids and glycolipids) were found to decrease, the non-nitrogen containing phosphatidylglycerol levels increased considerably in both algae from initially low levels. Of particular significance, it was observed that the acyl composition of TAGs in Nannochloropsis sp. remain relatively constant, whereas Chlorella sp. showed greater variability following N-deprivation. In both algae the overall fatty acid profiles of the polar lipid classes were largely unaffected by N-deprivation, suggesting a specific FA profile for each compartment is maintained to enable continued function despite considerable reductions in the amount of these lipids. The changes observed in the overall fatty acid profile were due primarily to the decrease in proportion of polar lipids to TAGs. This study provides the most detailed lipidomic information on two different microalgae with utility in biodiesel production and nutraceutical industries and proposes the mechanisms for this rearrangement. This research also highlights the usefulness of the latest MS-based approaches for microalgae lipid research. PMID:25171084

  7. Using nano-chitosan for harvesting microalga Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Farid, Mohammad Sadegh; Shariati, Ahmad; Badakhshan, Amir; Anvaripour, Bagher

    2013-03-01

    In this study, chitosan and nano-chitosan were used as flocculants agents for harvesting microalga Nannochloropsis sp. chitosan was modified to nano-chitosan by crosslinking with sodium tripolyphosphate. The effects of type and dosage of flocculants and the pH of the culture were investigated on biomass recovery. Optimum dosages for both bio-flocculants were found. The results showed that the dosage of flocculant consumption decreases by 40% and biomass recovery increases by 9% when nano-chitosan instead of chitosan is used as flocculant agent. Also, the recycled water from the harvesting process was reused which increases the growth of microalgae by about 7%. Finally, the cost analysis of harvesting process showed the feasibility of using nano-chitosan as flocculation agent. PMID:23415940

  8. Genome, Functional Gene Annotation, and Nuclear Transformation of the Heterokont Oleaginous Alga Nannochloropsis oceanica CCMP1779

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chia-Hong; Bullard, Blair; Cornish, Adam J.; Harvey, Christopher; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Thornburg, Chelsea; Achawanantakun, Rujira; Buehl, Christopher J.; Campbell, Michael S.; Cavalier, David; Childs, Kevin L.; Clark, Teresa J.; Deshpande, Rahul; Erickson, Erika; Armenia Ferguson, Ann; Handee, Witawas; Kong, Que; Li, Xiaobo; Liu, Bensheng; Lundback, Steven; Peng, Cheng; Roston, Rebecca L.; Sanjaya; Simpson, Jeffrey P.; TerBush, Allan; Warakanont, Jaruswan; Zäuner, Simone; Farre, Eva M.; Hegg, Eric L.; Jiang, Ning; Kuo, Min-Hao; Lu, Yan; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Ohlrogge, John; Osteryoung, Katherine W.; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Sears, Barbara B.; Sun, Yanni; Takahashi, Hideki; Yandell, Mark; Shiu, Shin-Han; Benning, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Unicellular marine algae have promise for providing sustainable and scalable biofuel feedstocks, although no single species has emerged as a preferred organism. Moreover, adequate molecular and genetic resources prerequisite for the rational engineering of marine algal feedstocks are lacking for most candidate species. Heterokonts of the genus Nannochloropsis naturally have high cellular oil content and are already in use for industrial production of high-value lipid products. First success in applying reverse genetics by targeted gene replacement makes Nannochloropsis oceanica an attractive model to investigate the cell and molecular biology and biochemistry of this fascinating organism group. Here we present the assembly of the 28.7 Mb genome of N. oceanica CCMP1779. RNA sequencing data from nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted growth conditions support a total of 11,973 genes, of which in addition to automatic annotation some were manually inspected to predict the biochemical repertoire for this organism. Among others, more than 100 genes putatively related to lipid metabolism, 114 predicted transcription factors, and 109 transcriptional regulators were annotated. Comparison of the N. oceanica CCMP1779 gene repertoire with the recently published N. gaditana genome identified 2,649 genes likely specific to N. oceanica CCMP1779. Many of these N. oceanica–specific genes have putative orthologs in other species or are supported by transcriptional evidence. However, because similarity-based annotations are limited, functions of most of these species-specific genes remain unknown. Aside from the genome sequence and its analysis, protocols for the transformation of N. oceanica CCMP1779 are provided. The availability of genomic and transcriptomic data for Nannochloropsis oceanica CCMP1779, along with efficient transformation protocols, provides a blueprint for future detailed gene functional analysis and genetic engineering of Nannochloropsis species by a growing

  9. Amelioration of arsenic toxicity in rice: Comparative effect of inoculation of Chlorella vulgaris and Nannochloropsis sp. on growth, biochemical changes and arsenic uptake.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, A K; Singh, N K; Singh, R; Rai, U N

    2016-02-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the responses of rice (Oryza sativa L. var. Triguna) by inoculating alga; Chlorella vulgaris and Nannochlropsis sp. supplemented with As(III) (50µM) under hydroponics condition. Results showed that reduced growth variables and protein content in rice plant caused by As toxicity were restored in the algae inoculated plants after 7d of treatment. The rice plant inoculated with Nannochloropsis sp. exhibited a better response in terms of increased root, shoot length and biomass than C. vulgaris under As(III) treatment. A significant reduction in cellular toxicity (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and antioxidant enzyme (SOD, APX and GR) activities were observed in algae inoculated rice plant under As(III) treatment in comparison to uninoculated rice. In addition, rice treated with As(III), accumulated 35.05mgkg(-1)dw arsenic in the root and 29.96mgkg(-1)dw in the shoot. However, lower accumulation was observed in As(III) treated rice inoculated with C. vulgaris (24.09mg kg(-1)dw) and Nannochloropsis sp. (20.66mgkg(-1)dw) in the roots, while in shoot, it was 20.10mgkg(-1)dw and 11.67mgkg(-1)dw, respectively. Results demonstrated that application of these algal inoculum ameliorates toxicity and improved tolerance in rice through reduced As uptake and modulating antioxidant enzymes. Thus, application of algae could provide a low-cost and eco-friendly mitigation approach to reduce accumulation of arsenic in edible part of rice as well as higher yield in the As contaminated agricultural field. PMID:26473328

  10. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  11. Nannochloropsis algae pyrolysis with ceria-based catalysts for production of high-quality bio-oils.

    PubMed

    Aysu, Tevfik; Sanna, Aimaro

    2015-10-01

    Pyrolysis of Nannochloropsis was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor with newly prepared ceria based catalysts. The effects of pyrolysis parameters such as temperature and catalysts on product yields were investigated. The amount of bio-char, bio-oil and gas products, as well as the compositions of the resulting bio-oils was determined. The results showed that both temperature and catalyst had significant effects on conversion of Nannochloropsis into solid, liquid and gas products. The highest bio-oil yield (23.28 wt%) and deoxygenation effect was obtained in the presence of Ni-Ce/Al2O3 as catalyst at 500°C. Ni-Ce/Al2O3 was able to retain 59% of the alga starting energy in the bio-oil, compared to only 41% in absence of catalyst. Lower content of acids and oxygen in the bio-oil, higher aliphatics (62%), combined with HHV show promise for production of high-quality bio-oil from Nannochloropsis via Ni-Ce/Al2O3 catalytic pyrolysis. PMID:26188553

  12. Process optimization and modeling for the cultivation of Nannochloropsis sp. and Tetraselmis striata via response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Imamoglu, Esra; Demirel, Zeliha; Conk Dalay, Meltem

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal physical process conditions for the cultivation of locally isolated strains of Nannochloropsis sp. and Tetraselmis striata to achieve maximum growth rate. It was essential to evaluate biomass production at different agitation rates, light intensities, and temperature levels. Central composite design and response surface methodology were applied to design the experiments and optimize the cultivation process for Nannochloropsis sp. and T. striata. The specific growth rate of 0.250 d(-1) was obtained for Nannochloropsis sp. cells under the light intensity of 54 μmol photons · m(-2) · s(-1) , at the agitation rate of 151 rpm in 24.5°C. The optimal physical process conditions for T. striata were obtained under the light intensity of 56 μmol photons · m(-2) · s(-1) in 25.5°C at the agitation rate of 151 rpm in 25.5°C, resulting in a specific growth rate of 0.226 d(-1) . The predicted values were justified by the verification tests. Good agreement between the predicted values and the experimental values confirmed the validity of the models for the cultivation of microalgal strains. In this article, the noteworthy result was that temperature was a dominant factor in obtaining high chl-a content for Nannochloropsis sp., whereas the growth of T. striata strongly depended on light exposure. PMID:26986661

  13. Combination pulsed electric field with ethanol solvent for Nannochloropsis sp. extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafis, Ghazy Ammar; Mumpuni, Perwitasari Yekti; Indarto, Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, energy is one of human basic needs. As the human population increased, energy consumption also increased. This condition causes energy depletion. In case of the situation, alternative energy is needed to replace existing energy. Microalgae is chosen to become one of renewable energy resource, especially biodiesel, because it contains high amount of lipid instead of other feedstock which usually used. Fortunately, Indonesia has large area of water and high intensity of sunlight so microalgae cultivation becomes easier. Nannochloropsis sp., one of microalgae species, becomes the main focus because of its high lipid content. Many ways to break the cell wall of microalgae so the lipid content inside the microalgae will be released, for example conventional extraction, ultrasonic wave extraction, pressing, and electrical method. The most effective way for extraction is electrical method such as pulsed electric field method (PEF). The principal work of this method is by draining the electrical current into parallel plate. Parallel plate will generate the electrical field to break microalgae cell wall and the lipid will be released. The aim of this work is to evaluate two-stage procedure for extraction of useful components from microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. The first stage of this procedure includes pre-treatment of microalgae by ethanol solvent extraction and the second stage applies the PEF extraction using a binary mixture of water and ethanol solvent. Ethanol is chosen as solvent because it's safer to be used and easier to be handled than other solvent. Some variables that used to study the most effective operation conditions are frequency and duty cycle for microalgae. The optimum condition based on this research are at frequency 1 Hz and duty cycle 13%.

  14. The influence of light intensity and photoperiod on the growth and lipid content of microalgae Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Wahidin, Suzana; Idris, Ani; Shaleh, Sitti Raehanah Muhamad

    2013-02-01

    Illumination factors such as length of photoperiod and intensity can affect growth of microalgae and lipid content. In order to optimize microalgal growth in mass culture system and lipid content, the effects of light intensity and photoperiod cycle on the growth of the marine microalgae, Nannochloropsis sp. were studied in batch culture. Nannochloropsis sp. was grown aseptically for 9 days at three different light intensities (50, 100 and 200 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) and three different photoperiod cycles (24:0, 18:06 and 12:12 h light:dark) at 23 °C cultivation temperature. Under the light intensity of 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and photoperiod of 18 h light: 6 h dark cycle, Nannochloropsis sp. was found to grow favorably with a maximum cell concentration of 6.5×10(7) cells mL(-1), which corresponds to the growth rate of 0.339 d(-1) after 8 day cultivation and the lipid content was found to be 31.3%. PMID:23232218

  15. Integrated process of two stage cultivation of Nannochloropsis sp. for nutraceutically valuable eicosapentaenoic acid along with biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Madhusree; Patidar, Shailesh Kumar; Mishra, Sandhya

    2015-10-01

    The marine eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis is one of the potential producers of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a valued nutraceutical. Nannochloropsis sp. was cultivated under photoautotrophic condition utilizing CO2 in a two phase cultivation process in order to enhance the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) productivity. It was cultivated in a photobioreactor up to late log phase for cell growth (phase I). Then, the culture was harvested and confronted to relatively low temperature (10 °C) and low light (30 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) in both photobioreactor and Erlenmeyer flask (phase II), thus augmenting EPA% by 3.4 fold. Lower temperature with low light favored the synthesis of EPA although, biomass productivity, lipid content and lipid productivity were slightly decreased relative to phase I. The total lipids extracted from Nannochloropsis sp. fractionated into neutral lipids (NLs), glycolipids (GLs) and phospholipids (PLs) and a major proportion of EPA was found in phospholipids. Results suggested that low temperature and low light may ameliorate partitioning towards EPA in phospholipids. PMID:26143004

  16. Selective extraction from microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. using different methods of cell disruption.

    PubMed

    Grimi, N; Dubois, A; Marchal, L; Jubeau, S; Lebovka, N I; Vorobiev, E

    2014-02-01

    This work studies the extraction of intracellular components from microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. with application of different cell disruption techniques, including pulsed electric field (PEF) (20kV/cm, 1-4ms, 13.3-53.1kJ/kg), high voltage electrical discharge (HVED) (40kV/cm, 1-4ms, 13.3-53.1kJ/kg), ultrasonication (USN) (200W, 1-8min, 12-96kJ/kg), and high pressure homogenization (HPH) (150MPa, 1-10 passes, 150-1500kJ/kg). The data evidence that electrically based disruption techniques (PEF and HVED) allowed selective extraction of water soluble ionic components and microelements, small molecular weight organic compounds and water soluble proteins. Microscopic and sedimentation stability analyses have shown that microalgae cells in HVED-treated suspension were noticeably agglomerated and could be easily settled in centrifuge. The electrically based disruption techniques were ineffective for delivery of pigments (e.g., chlorophylls or carotenoids) and their extraction required subsequent application of more potent disruption techniques. The obtained data have shown that HPH disruption technique was the most effective; however, this mode required the highest power consumption. PMID:24368274

  17. Subcritical co-solvents extraction of lipid from wet microalgae pastes of Nannochloropsis sp

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Liu, Tianzhong; Chen, Xiaolin; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Gao, Lili; Chen, Yu; Peng, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    In this paper subcritical co-solvents extraction (SCE) of algal lipid from wet pastes of Nannochloropsis sp. is examined. The influences of five operating parameters including the ratio between ethanol to hexane, the ratio of mixed solvents to algal biomass (dry weight), extraction temperature, pressure, and time were investigated. The determined optimum extraction conditions were 3:1 (hexane to ethanol ratio), 10:1 ratio (co-solvents to microalgae (dry weight) ratio), 90°C, 1.4 MPa, and 50 min, which could produce 88% recovery rate of the total lipids. In addition, electron micrographs of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were conducted to show that the algal cell presented shrunken, collapsed with some wrinkles and microholes after SCE extraction. The main composition of total lipids extracted under the optimum conditions was TAG which represented more than 80%. And the fatty acid profile of triglycerides revealed that C16:0 (35.67 ± 0.2%), C18:1 (26.84 ± 0.044%) and C16:1 (25.96 ± 0.011%) were dominant. Practical applications: The reported method could save energy consumption significantly through avoiding deep dewatering (for example drying). The composition of the extracted lipid is suitable for the production of high quality biodiesel. PMID:22745570

  18. Microstructures and functional groups of Nannochloropsis sp. cells with arsenic adsorption and lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Cheng, Jun; Yang, Zongbo; Li, Ke; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-01

    The pore structures and surface morphological characteristics of Nannochloropsis sp. cells with arsenic adsorption were initially investigated by N2-adsorption analysis and scanning electronic microscopy. Functional groups of cells were analysed by Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Total surface area of microalgal cells increased from 0.54 m(2)/g to 1.80 m(2)/g upon arsenic adsorption. The external cell surface area increased. More wrinkles and measles-like granules formed on the surfaces as a result of arsenic toxicity. Arsenic ions blocked cell pores and decreased the average pore diameter and total pore volume. Ether cross-linked structures in the algaenan layer of cell walls were disrupted as the percentage of C-O functional groups decreased. These functional groups underwent complexation reactions with arsenic ions. Accumulation of polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased because of oxidative stresses induced by arsenic. The increase in generation of short-chain saturated fatty acids was favourable for the production of quality biodiesel. PMID:26210144

  19. Nannochloropsis sp. biomass recovery by Electro-Coagulation for biodiesel and pigment production.

    PubMed

    Matos, C T; Santos, M; Nobre, B P; Gouveia, L

    2013-04-01

    Biofuel production from microalgal biomass could be an alternative solution to conventional biofuels typically dependent on food and high land/water demanding crops. However, the economic and energetic viability of microalgal biofuels is limited by their harvesting processes. The finding of innovative, low cost and efficient harvesting method(s) is imperative. In this study, the Electro-Coagulation (EC) was studied as a process to harvest the marine Nannochloropsis sp. microalga. Several EC operational conditions were studied and the best EC recovery efficiency (>97%) was achieved using a current density of 8.3 mA cm(-2) for 10 min. The quality of the recovered microalgal biomass was evaluated in terms of total lipids, fatty acid and pigment profile where no significant differences were observed after EC treatment. The energy requirements of the harvesting process were estimated and the combination of EC and centrifugation processes proved to decrease significantly the energy demand when compared with the individual process. PMID:23500578

  20. Cultivating and harvesting of marine alga Nannochloropsis oculata in local municipal wastewater for biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Şirin, Sema; Sillanpää, Mika

    2015-09-01

    The feasibility of using the mixture of seawater and municipal wastewater; (1) the wastewater before activated sludge tank, just after primary settling (BAS) and (2) the wastewater after activated sludge tank, just before addition of polymer flocculants (AAS); as culture medium for the cultivation of marine microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated. 10% BAS, 20% BAS and 10% AAS, 20% AAS, 50% AAS, 70% AAS, 100% AAS effluent loadings were well adapted to used wastewater. Sufficient dry weights obtained (345-406 mg L(-1)) with growth rates 0.37-0.45 for aerated cultures. High TN and TP removals (∼74-90%) were achieved. Harvesting technique for grown cultures was also studied with natural sedimentation and pH induced flocculation. By alkalinity induced flocculation, at pH values of 10.50, high recovery of the cells (∼80%) achieved with high sedimentation rates in 10 min. The flocculation efficiencies decreased, sedimentation rates increased with the increase of the cell concentration. PMID:25983226

  1. Enrichment of poultry products with omega3 fatty acids by dietary supplementation with the alga Nannochloropsis and mantur oil.

    PubMed

    Nitsan, Z; Mokady, S; Sukenik, A

    1999-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the microalga Nannochloropsis sp. (Nanno.), as a supplement to laying hens' diet, for the production of enriched eggs and meat with omega3 fatty acids (FA). Nanno. has a unique FA composition, namely, the occurrence of a high concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 omega3) and the absence of other omega3 FA. The effect of supplementing diets with Nanno. on omega3 FA levels in eggs, plasma, liver, and thigh muscle was compared to that of mantur oil, high in alpha-linolenic acid (LNA; 18:3 omega3). Nanno. is rich also in carotenoids, which may be useful for egg yolk pigmentation. The observed effect of Nanno. supplementation on yolk pigmentation was dose responsive, in both the rate of coloration and the color intensity. Addition of enzyme preparations (glucanase plus cellulase or glucanase plus pectinase) slightly elevated the yolk color score. The most prominent changes in the level of omega3 FA in egg yolk were evident when the diets were supplemented with 1% Nanno. or mantur lipid extracts. Levels of dietary algal meal (0.1-1.0%) had low and inconsistent effects on the level of yolk omega3 FA. Algal EPA is not accumulated in the liver or in the egg yolk; it is apparently converted and deposited as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). LNA from mantur oil was partially converted to DHA, and both DHA and LNA were deposited in egg yolks and livers. It is suggested that the absence of DHA and EPA from thigh muscle is due to the small amount of dietary omega3 FA used in this work, compared to other studies, and to the possibility that in laying hens the egg yolk has a priority on dietary FA over that of muscles. PMID:10606584

  2. Femtosecond dynamics of carotenoid-to-chlorophyll energy transfer in thylakoid membrane preparations from Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Nannochloropsis sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautman, J. K.; Shreve, A. P.; Owens, T. G.; Albrecht, A. C.

    1990-03-01

    The rates of carotenoid-to-chlorophyll a singlet energy transfer in thylakoid membrane preparations from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis sp. (clone GSB Sticho) have been determined by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The transfer time in the eustigmatophyte is 0.24±0.04 ps; in the diatom, the transfer is found to be double exponential with transfer times of 0.5±0.1 and 2.0±0.5 ps and relative amplitudes of 1.7±0.7:1. These results are used to determine that the carotenoid-chlorophyll electronic coupling matrix element is approximately 100 cm -1 for these species.

  3. Cultivation of Monoraphidium sp., Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. algae in Batch culture using Nile tilapia effluent.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Cabrera, Luis; Rueda, José A; García-Lozano, Hiram; Navarro, A Karin

    2014-06-01

    Monoraphidium sp., Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. algae were cultured in three volumes of Tilapia Effluent Medium (TEM) in comparison with the Bold Basal Medium (BBM) (Nichols and Bold, 1965). Specific growth rate (μ'), biomass dry productivity (Q), volumetric productivity (Qv) as well as lipid and protein content were measured. Then, volumetric productivities for both lipids and proteins were calculated (QVL and QVP). In Scenedesmus sp., BBM produced higher μ' and Qv than TEM in 1.5L volume. Chlorella sp. showed a higher QVL for BBM than TEM. Any observed difference in protein or lipid productivities among volumes was in favor of a greater productivity for 1.5L volume. Even when TEM had a larger protein content in Chlorella sp. than BBM, QVP was not different. Current results imply that TEM can be used as an alternative growth medium for algae when using Batch cultures, yet productivity is reduced. PMID:24736090

  4. The use of Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology to optimize biomass and lipid production by the oleaginous marine green alga, Nannochloropsis gaditana in response to light intensity, inoculum size and CO2.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, Patrick C; Grogger, Melanie; Mraz, Megan; Veverka, Donald

    2015-05-01

    Biodiesel produced from microalgal lipids is being considered as a potential source of renewable energy. However, a number of hurdles will have to be overcome if such a process is to become practical. One important factor is the volumetric production of biomass and lipid that can be achieved. The marine alga Nannochloropsis gaditana is under study since it is known to be highly oleaginous and has a number of other attractive properties. Factors that might be important in biomass and lipid production by this alga are light intensity, inoculum size and CO2. Here we have carried out for the first time a RSM-DOE study of the influence of these important culture variables and define conditions that maximize biomass production, lipid content (BODIPY® fluorescence) and total lipid production. Moreover, flow cytometry allowed the examination on a cellular level of changes that occur in cellular populations as they age and accumulate lipids. PMID:25304731

  5. Toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Yu, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Sun, Han-Zhang

    1997-12-01

    Growth of Chlorella marine, Nannochloropsis oculata, Pyramidomonas sp., Platymonas subcordiformis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum exposed to monochlorobenzene (MCB), 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB), 1, 2, 3, 4-tetrachlorobenzene (1, 2, 3, 4-TeCB) and pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) was tested. Tests of 72 h- EC 50 values showed that the toxicity ranged in the order: MCB<1,2-DCB<1,2,3,4-TeCBalgae was almost in the order: Pyramidomonas sp. < Platymonas subcordiformis < Nannochloropsis oculata < Chlorella marine < Phaeodactylum tricomutum. Study of the QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) between K OW and toxicity of CBs to marine algae showed good relationships between -log EC 50 and log K OW.

  6. Valorization of Rhizoclonium sp. algae via pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Casoni, Andrés I; Zunino, Josefina; Piccolo, María C; Volpe, María A

    2016-09-01

    The valorization of Rhizoclonium sp. algae through pyrolysis for obtaining bio-oils is studied in this work. The reaction is carried out at 400°C, at high contact time. The bio-oil has a practical yield of 35% and is rich in phytol. Besides, it is simpler than the corresponding to lignocellulosic biomass due to the absence of phenolic compounds. This property leads to a bio-oil relatively stable to storage. In addition, heterogeneous catalysts (Al-Fe/MCM-41, SBA-15 and Cu/SBA-15), in contact with algae during pyrolysis, are analyzed. The general trend is that the catalysts decrease the concentration of fatty alcohols and other high molecular weight products, since their mild acidity sites promote degradation reactions. Thus, the amount of light products increases upon the use of the catalysts. Particularly, acetol concentration in the bio-oils obtained from the catalytic pyrolysis with SBA-15 and Cu/SBA-15 is notably high. PMID:27253478

  7. Synergistic effect of optimizing light-emitting diode illumination quality and intensity to manipulate composition of fatty acid methyl esters from Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Teo, Chee Loong; Idris, Ani; Zain, Nor Azimah Mohd; Taisir, Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    In the study, the relationship between the quality and intensity of LED illumination with FAMEs produced were investigated. Nannochloropsis sp. was cultivated for 14 days under different intensities of 100, 150 and 200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) of red, blue and mixed red blue LED. The findings revealed that suitable combination of LED wavelengths and intensity; (red LED: 150, blue: 100 and mixed red blue: 200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) produced maximum biomass growth and lipid content. It was observed that the quality and intensity of LED significantly influenced the composition of FAMEs. FAMEs produced under blue LED has high degree of unsaturation (DU) and low cetane number while those under red LED has low DU but higher CN. The combination of red blue LED has produced FAMEs with high ignition and lubricating property and also good oxidation stability indicated by the DU and CN values which lies midway between the red and blue. PMID:25310864

  8. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:27023568

  9. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:27023568

  10. Microbiota Influences Morphology and Reproduction of the Brown Alga Ectocarpus sp.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Javier E; González, Bernardo; Goulitquer, Sophie; Potin, Philippe; Correa, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    Associated microbiota play crucial roles in health and disease of higher organisms. For macroalgae, some associated bacteria exert beneficial effects on nutrition, morphogenesis and growth. However, current knowledge on macroalgae-microbiota interactions is mostly based on studies on green and red seaweeds. In this study, we report that when cultured under axenic conditions, the filamentous brown algal model Ectocarpus sp. loses its branched morphology and grows with a small ball-like appearance. Nine strains of periphytic bacteria isolated from Ectocarpus sp. unialgal cultures were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing, and assessed for their effect on morphology, reproduction and the metabolites secreted by axenic Ectocarpus sp. Six of these isolates restored morphology and reproduction features of axenic Ectocarpus sp. Bacteria-algae co-culture supernatants, but not the supernatant of the corresponding bacterium growing alone, also recovered morphology and reproduction of the alga. Furthermore, colonization of axenic Ectocarpus sp. with a single bacterial isolate impacted significantly the metabolites released by the alga. These results show that the branched typical morphology and the individuals produced by Ectocarpus sp. are strongly dependent on the presence of bacteria, while the bacterial effect on the algal exometabolome profile reflects the impact of bacteria on the whole physiology of this alga. PMID:26941722

  11. Microbiota Influences Morphology and Reproduction of the Brown Alga Ectocarpus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Javier E.; González, Bernardo; Goulitquer, Sophie; Potin, Philippe; Correa, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Associated microbiota play crucial roles in health and disease of higher organisms. For macroalgae, some associated bacteria exert beneficial effects on nutrition, morphogenesis and growth. However, current knowledge on macroalgae–microbiota interactions is mostly based on studies on green and red seaweeds. In this study, we report that when cultured under axenic conditions, the filamentous brown algal model Ectocarpus sp. loses its branched morphology and grows with a small ball-like appearance. Nine strains of periphytic bacteria isolated from Ectocarpus sp. unialgal cultures were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing, and assessed for their effect on morphology, reproduction and the metabolites secreted by axenic Ectocarpus sp. Six of these isolates restored morphology and reproduction features of axenic Ectocarpus sp. Bacteria-algae co-culture supernatants, but not the supernatant of the corresponding bacterium growing alone, also recovered morphology and reproduction of the alga. Furthermore, colonization of axenic Ectocarpus sp. with a single bacterial isolate impacted significantly the metabolites released by the alga. These results show that the branched typical morphology and the individuals produced by Ectocarpus sp. are strongly dependent on the presence of bacteria, while the bacterial effect on the algal exometabolome profile reflects the impact of bacteria on the whole physiology of this alga. PMID:26941722

  12. Dietary lipids from marine unicellular algae enhance the amount of liver and blood omega-3 fatty acids in rats.

    PubMed

    Sukenik, A; Takahashi, H; Mokady, S

    1994-01-01

    The nutritional effect of omega-3 (omega 3) polyenoic fatty acids, originating from marine unicellular algae or from fish oil, on the liver and blood lipids was studied in weanling rats fed for 2 weeks on control or experimental diets. Isolipid experimental diets containing either 10% marine microalgae or algal lipids or fish (capelin) oil substituting part (40%) or all of the soybean oil of the control diet. The algae employed were Nannochloropsis sp. or Isochrysis galbana, which are rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), respectively. Cell disruption improved the digestibility of the Nannochloropsis biomass. Diets containing algal meal significantly reduced the relative abundance of arachidonic acid (AA) in the blood and liver lipids and caused a significant increase in the percentage of the omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Feeding Nannochloropsis lipids resulted in a similar effect on the plasma and liver fatty acid pattern as that of a diet containing disrupted cells of Nannochloropsis biomass. In comparison, the response of the plasma and liver lipids to capelin oil was characterized by a further reduction in the abundance of AA and a significant elevation in the percentage of EPA and DHA. These differences are probably due to the variations in the fatty acid composition and not to the fact that omega 3 fatty acids are associated with different lipid classes in these lipid sources. Based on the present study, it is postulated that certain marine unicellular algae can be used as a nutritional source for omega 3 PUFA. PMID:8067689

  13. Ultrastructure and Composition of the Nannochloropsis gaditana Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Matthew J.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Jing, Jia; Roth, Robyn; Goodenough, Ursula; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine algae of the genus Nannochloropsis are promising producers of biofuel precursors and nutraceuticals and are also harvested commercially for aquaculture feed. We have used quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and carbohydrate analyses to characterize the architecture of the Nannochloropsis gaditana (strain CCMP 526) cell wall, whose recalcitrance presents a significant barrier to biocommodity extraction. The data indicate a bilayer structure consisting of a cellulosic inner wall (∼75% of the mass balance) protected by an outer hydrophobic algaenan layer. Cellulase treatment of walls purified after cell lysis generates highly enriched algaenan preparations without using the harsh chemical treatments typically used in algaenan isolation and characterization. Nannochloropsis algaenan was determined to comprise long, straight-chain, saturated aliphatics with ether cross-links, which closely resembles the cutan of vascular plants. Chemical identification of >85% of the isolated cell wall mass is detailed, and genome analysis is used to identify candidate biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:25239976

  14. Effect of sonication frequency on the disruption of algae.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Masaki; King, Patrick M; Wu, Xiaoge; Joyce, Eadaoin M; Mason, Timothy J; Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the efficiency of ultrasonic disruption of Chaetoceros gracilis, Chaetoceros calcitrans, and Nannochloropsis sp. was investigated by applying ultrasonic waves of 0.02, 0.4, 1.0, 2.2, 3.3, and 4.3 MHz to algal suspensions. The results showed that reduction in the number of algae was frequency dependent and that the highest efficiency was achieved at 2.2, 3.3, and 4.3MHz for C. gracilis, C. calcitrans, and Nannochloropsis sp., respectively. A review of the literature suggested that cavitation, rather than direct effects of ultrasonication, are required for ultrasonic algae disruption, and that chemical effects are likely not the main mechanism for algal cell disruption. The mechanical resonance frequencies estimated by a shell model, taking into account elastic properties, demonstrated that suitable disruption frequencies for each alga were associated with the cell's mechanical properties. Taken together, we consider here that physical effects of ultrasonication were responsible for algae disruption. PMID:26964936

  15. Performance assessment of biofuel production in an algae-based remediation system.

    PubMed

    Wuang, Shy Chyi; Luo, Yanpei Darren; Wang, Simai; Chua, Pei Qiang Danny; Tee, Pok Siang

    2016-03-10

    The production of biofuel from microalgae has been an area of great interest as microalgae have higher productivities than land plants, and certain species have high lipid constituents which are the major feedstock for biodiesel production. One way to enhance the economic feasibility of algal-based biofuel is to couple it with waste remediation. This study investigated the technical feasibility of cultivating Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. with fish water for biofuel production. The remediation potential of Chlorella sp. was found to be higher but the lipid yield is lower, when compared to Nannochloropsis sp. Lipid productivities were found to be similar for both types of algae at 1.1-1.3mgL(-1)h(-1). The fatty acid profiles of the obtained lipids were found suitable for biofuel production, and the calorific values were high at 30-32MJ/kg. The results provide insights into lipid production in Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp., when coupled with waste remediation. PMID:26808868

  16. A lipid droplet protein of Nannochloropsis with functions partially analogous to plant oleosins.

    PubMed

    Vieler, Astrid; Brubaker, Shane B; Vick, Bertrand; Benning, Christoph

    2012-04-01

    As our understanding of the dynamics of lipid droplets (LDs) in animal, plant, and fungal cells is rapidly evolving, still little is known about the formation and turnover of these organelles in microalgae. Yet with the growing importance of algal feedstock for the production of biofuels and high-value lipids, there is a need to understand the mechanisms of LD dynamics in microalgae. Thus, we investigated the proteins associated with LDs of the emerging heterokont model alga Nannochloropsis sp. and discovered an abundant hydrophobic lipid droplet surface protein (LDSP) with unique primary sequence but structural similarities to other LD proteins. LDSP abundance in Nannochloropsis cells closely tracked the amount of triacylglycerols during conditions of oil accumulation and degradation. Functional characterization of LDSP in an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) OLEOSIN1-deficient mutant allowed a separation of its physical and structural properties in its interaction with LDs from its physiological or biochemical activities. Although LDSP presence in Arabidopsis predictably affected LD size, it could not reverse the physiological impact of OLEOSIN deficiency on triacylglycerol hydrolysis during germination. PMID:22307965

  17. Evaluation of the Marine Algae Gracilaria salicornia and Sargassum sp. For the Biosorption of Cr (VI) from Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams Khorramabadi, Gh.; Darvishi Cheshmeh Soltani, R.

    In this study, the adsorption properties of two different marine algae (Gracilaria salicornia (red algae) and Sargassum sp. (brown algae) were investigated. Equilibrium isotherms were studied to evaluate the relative ability of the two algae to sequester Cr (VI) from aqueous solutions. The maximum biosorption capacity obtained was 45.959 mg g-1 for G. salicornia and 33.258 mg g-1 for Sargassum sp. at a solution pH of 4 and 50 mg L-1 initial chromium concentration. A significant fraction of the total Cr (VI) uptake was achieved within 60 min. Biosorbed chromium ions concentrations increased with increasing concentrations of biosorbents and increasing pH. The biosorption of Cr (VI) on G. salicornia and Sargassum sp. could best be described by the Langmuir model (R2>0.997 for Sargassum sp. and R2>0.999 for G. salicornia).

  18. Removal of trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, and triclosan by the green alga Nannochloris sp.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuelian; Acharya, Kumud

    2016-09-01

    Trimethoprim (TMP), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and triclosan (TCS) are widely used and continuously released into aquatic environments. Freshwater algae can be responsible for the uptake and transfer of the contaminants because they are a major food source for most aquatic organisms. This research applied incubation studies to evaluate the removal efficiency of TMP, SMX, and TCS by the green alga Nannochloris sp. The results showed that the hydrophilic antibiotics TMP and SMX remained in the algal culture at 100% and 68%, respectively, after 14days of incubation, and therefore were not significantly removed from the medium. However, the lipophilic antimicrobial TCS was significantly removed from the medium. Immediately after incubation began, 74% of TCS dissipated and 100% of TCS was removed after 7days of incubation. Additionally, over 42% of TCS was found associated with the algal cells throughout the incubation. The results demonstrate that the presence of Nannochloris sp. eliminated TCS in the aquatic system, but could not significantly remove the antibiotics TMP and SMX. The removal mechanisms of SMX and TCS were found to be different in the algal culture. Algae-promoted photolysis was the primary process for removing SMX and algae-mediated uptake played a major role in removing TCS. PMID:27179202

  19. Pyropia plicata sp. nov. (Bangiales, Rhodophyta): naming a common intertidal alga from New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A commonly found red alga of the upper intertidal zone of New Zealand rocky coasts is described for the first time as Pyropia plicata sp. nov. This species has been incorrectly known as Porphyra columbina Mont. (now Pyropia columbina (Mont.) W.A.Nelson) for many years. Pyropia plicata is widespread and common, and it is readily distinguished from other species of bladed Bangiales in New Zealand by its distinctive morphology, with pleated blades attached by a central rhizoidal holdfast. PMID:23794933

  20. Photochemical Performance of the Acidophilic Red Alga Cyanidium sp. in a pH Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvíderová, Jana

    2012-06-01

    The acidophilic red alga Cyanidium sp. is one of the dominant mat-forming species in the highly acidic waters of Río Tinto, Spain. The culture of Cyanidium sp., isolated from a microbial mat sample collected at Río Tinto, was exposed to 9 different pH conditions in a gradient from 0.5 to 5 for 24 h and its physiological status evaluated by variable chlorophyll a fluorescence kinetics measurements. Maximum quantum yield was determined after 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h and 24 h of exposure after 15 min dark adaptation. The effect of pH on photochemical activity of Cyanidium sp. was observable as early as 30 min after exposure and the pattern remained stable or with only minor modifications for 24 h. The optimum pH ranged from 1.5 to 2.5. A steep decrease of the photochemical activity was observed at pH below 1 even after 30 min of exposure. Although the alga had tolerated the exposure to pH = 1 for at least 6 h, longer (24 h) exposure resulted in reduction of the photochemical activity. At pH above 2.5, the decline was more moderate and its negative effect on photochemistry was less severe. According to the fluorescence measurements, the red alga Cyanidium sp. is well-adapted to prevailing pH at its original locality at Río Tinto, i.e. pH of 1 to 3. The short-term survival in pH < 1.5 may be adaptation to rare exposures to such low pH in the field. The tolerance of pH above 3 could be caused by adaptation to the microenvironment of the inner parts of microbial mats in which Cyanidium sp. usually dominates and where higher pH could occur due to photosynthetic oxygen production.

  1. Bioconcentration of tetrachlorobenzene in marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Lin; Ma, Yan-Jun; Cheng, Gang; Yu, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun

    1997-09-01

    Bioconcentration of tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB) in Chlorella marine, Nannochloropsis oculata, Pyramidomonas sp., Platymonas subcordiformis, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum; and toxicity of TeCB to the marine algae were tested. Values of bioconcentration potential parameters, including uptake rate constant k 1, elimination rate constant k 2 and bioconcentration factor BCF, were obtained not only from the time course of TeCB uptake by the marine algae by using a bioconcentration model, but also from the acute toxicity test data for percent inhibition PI(%)˜exposure concentration of TeCB-time by using a combined bioconcentration and probability model. The results showed good relationship between k 1(TOXIC) and k 1(UPTAKE) and k 2(TOXIC), k 2(UPTAKE), and BCF D(IOXIC) and BCF D(UPTAKE). Especially, the values of BCF D(TOXIC) were well consistent with those of BCF D(UPTAKE).

  2. Some Nutritional Characteristics of a Naturally Occurring Alga (Microcystis sp.) in a Guatemalan Lake

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Gabriel; Flores, Antonio; Molina, Mario R.; Almengor, Leticia; Bressani, Ricardo

    1977-01-01

    The nutritional characteristics of an alga (Microcystis sp.) that occurs naturally in a Guatemalan lake were determined. The sun-dried material proved to have a high protein content (55.6%) and to be a possible good source of calcium and phosphorus (1, 169.1 and 633.4 mg/100 mg, respectively). Amino acid analysis showed that total sulfur amino acids were the most deficient ones, giving a protein score of 42 to the material. The in vitro protein digestibility of the material was 69.5%. Biological trials demonstrated that when the material was offered as the only protein source, very low consumption and a high mortality rate were obtained whether or not the diet was supplemented with 0.4% dl-methionine. However, when the material supplied 25% of the total protein of a corn-algae diet, the protein quality of the cereal was significantly improved (P < 0.05). PMID:16345191

  3. Importance of algae as a potential source of biofuel.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    Algae have a great potential source of biofuels and also have unique importance to reduce gaseous emissions, greenhouse gases, climatic changes, global warming receding of glaciers, rising sea levels and loss of biodiversity. The microalgae, like Scenedesmus obliquus, Neochloris oleabundans, Nannochloropsis sp., Chlorella emersonii, and Dunaliella tertiolecta have high oil content. Among the known algae, Scenedesmus obliquus is one of the most potential sources for biodiesel as it has adequate fatty acid (linolenic acid) and other polyunsaturated fatty acids. Bio—ethanol is already in the market of United States of America and Europe as an additive in gasoline. Bio—hydrogen is the cleanest biofuel and extensive efforts are going on to bring it to market at economical price. This review highlights recent development and progress in the field of algae as a potential source of biofuel. PMID:25535720

  4. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs. PMID:25004359

  5. New α-glucosidase inhibitors from marine algae-derived Streptomyces sp. OUCMDZ-3434

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengbo; Hao, Jiejie; Wang, Liping; Wang, Yi; Kong, Fandong; Zhu, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Wailupemycins H (1) and I (2) with a new skeleton coupled two 6-(2-phenylnaphthalene-1-yl)pyrane-2-one nuclei to a –CH2– linkage were identified from the culture of Streptomyces sp. OUCMDZ-3434 associated with the marine algae, Enteromorpha prolifera. Compounds 1 and 2 are two new α-glucosidase inhibitors with the Ki/IC50 values of 16.8/19.7 and 6.0/8.3 μM, respectively. In addition, the absolute configurations of wailupemycins D (3) and E (4) are also resolved in this paper for the first time. PMID:26822662

  6. Rapid method for DNA isolation from a tough cell wall green alga Tetraspora sp. CU2551.

    PubMed

    Maneeruttanarungroj, Cherdsak; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2016-06-01

    Genetic studies are important to understand the complex biological system of various organisms. Some eukaryotic green organisms have tough cell wall which precludes the efficient extraction of the genetic materials. Here, we developed the method for simple and rapid isolation of high quality DNA from a green alga Tetraspora sp. CU2551. The cell homogenization procedures were combined with physical force plus heat treatment to disrupt the cell envelope of Tetraspora sp. CU2551. Without protease treatment, vortexing with glass bead for 30-105 s at 70 °C led to the isolation of a high purity DNA which was suitable for downstream process. The improved method was successfully developed and could be applied for the rapid isolation of DNA from other unicellular and filamentous green microalgal strains. PMID:27116965

  7. Cellular Fe-hydroxides and heavy metal sorption in Euglena sp. (algae): implications for biomineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, H.; Beveridge, T.O. Fyfe, W.S.; Tazaki, K.

    1985-01-01

    STEM imagery and electron diffraction patterns of Euglena sp. reveal pronounced intra and cellular-membrane aggregates of Fe-hydroxides (some lepidocrocite), in natural communities from tailings waters, Elliott Lake, Ontario. Pure isolates of Euglena sp. contain 40-70% Fe by dry weight and in addition average Al 28,000 ppm, Sr 150, Ba 40, Zn 150, Mn 250, Ni 120, Pb 1600, Th 70, Cu 200 and U 180. In tailings waters, Fe solute concentrations average 560 ppm and U 50 ppb. Concentration factors for Fe, Ba, Zn, Mn, Ti, V, Ni, Pb, Cr, Ag, Co and Cu in algae referenced to average world river waters are greater than or equal to 10/sup 6/. These results endorse the premise that microorganisms mediate transfer of many solutes between the hydrosphere and sedimentary regime.

  8. Defluviitalea phaphyphila sp. nov., a Novel Thermophilic Bacterium That Degrades Brown Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shi-Qi; Wang, Bing; Lu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Brown algae are one of the largest groups of oceanic primary producers for CO2 removal and carbon sinks for coastal regions. However, the mechanism for brown alga assimilation remains largely unknown in thermophilic microorganisms. In this work, a thermophilic alginolytic community was enriched from coastal sediment, from which an obligate anaerobic and thermophilic bacterial strain, designated Alg1, was isolated. Alg1 shared a 16S rRNA gene identity of 94.6% with Defluviitalea saccharophila LIND6LT2T. Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic studies suggested strain Alg1 represented a novel species of the genus Defluviitalea, for which the name Defluviitalea phaphyphila sp. nov. is proposed. Alg1 exhibited an intriguing ability to convert carbohydrates of brown algae, including alginate, laminarin, and mannitol, to ethanol and acetic acid. Three gene clusters participating in this process were predicted to be in the genome, and candidate enzymes were successfully expressed, purified, and characterized. Six alginate lyases were demonstrated to synergistically deconstruct alginate into unsaturated monosaccharide, followed by one uronic acid reductase and two 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG) kinases to produce pyruvate. A nonclassical mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalyzing d-mannitol 1-phosphate to fructose 1-phosphate in the presence of NAD+, and one laminarase also were disclosed. This work revealed that a thermophilic brown alga-decomposing system containing numerous novel thermophilic alginate lyases and a unique mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase was adopted by the natural ethanologenic strain Alg1 during the process of evolution in hostile habitats. PMID:26590273

  9. Defluviitalea phaphyphila sp. nov., a Novel Thermophilic Bacterium That Degrades Brown Algae.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shi-Qi; Wang, Bing; Lu, Ming; Li, Fu-Li

    2016-02-01

    Brown algae are one of the largest groups of oceanic primary producers for CO2 removal and carbon sinks for coastal regions. However, the mechanism for brown alga assimilation remains largely unknown in thermophilic microorganisms. In this work, a thermophilic alginolytic community was enriched from coastal sediment, from which an obligate anaerobic and thermophilic bacterial strain, designated Alg1, was isolated. Alg1 shared a 16S rRNA gene identity of 94.6% with Defluviitalea saccharophila LIND6LT2(T). Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic studies suggested strain Alg1 represented a novel species of the genus Defluviitalea, for which the name Defluviitalea phaphyphila sp. nov. is proposed. Alg1 exhibited an intriguing ability to convert carbohydrates of brown algae, including alginate, laminarin, and mannitol, to ethanol and acetic acid. Three gene clusters participating in this process were predicted to be in the genome, and candidate enzymes were successfully expressed, purified, and characterized. Six alginate lyases were demonstrated to synergistically deconstruct alginate into unsaturated monosaccharide, followed by one uronic acid reductase and two 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG) kinases to produce pyruvate. A nonclassical mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalyzing D-mannitol 1-phosphate to fructose 1-phosphate in the presence of NAD(+), and one laminarase also were disclosed. This work revealed that a thermophilic brown alga-decomposing system containing numerous novel thermophilic alginate lyases and a unique mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase was adopted by the natural ethanologenic strain Alg1 during the process of evolution in hostile habitats. PMID:26590273

  10. A Lipid Droplet Protein of Nannochloropsis with Functions Partially Analogous to Plant Oleosins1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vieler, Astrid; Brubaker, Shane B.; Vick, Bertrand; Benning, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    As our understanding of the dynamics of lipid droplets (LDs) in animal, plant, and fungal cells is rapidly evolving, still little is known about the formation and turnover of these organelles in microalgae. Yet with the growing importance of algal feedstock for the production of biofuels and high-value lipids, there is a need to understand the mechanisms of LD dynamics in microalgae. Thus, we investigated the proteins associated with LDs of the emerging heterokont model alga Nannochloropsis sp. and discovered an abundant hydrophobic lipid droplet surface protein (LDSP) with unique primary sequence but structural similarities to other LD proteins. LDSP abundance in Nannochloropsis cells closely tracked the amount of triacylglycerols during conditions of oil accumulation and degradation. Functional characterization of LDSP in an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) OLEOSIN1-deficient mutant allowed a separation of its physical and structural properties in its interaction with LDs from its physiological or biochemical activities. Although LDSP presence in Arabidopsis predictably affected LD size, it could not reverse the physiological impact of OLEOSIN deficiency on triacylglycerol hydrolysis during germination. PMID:22307965

  11. Ozonation of the marine dinoflagellate alga Amphidinium sp.--implications for ballast water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Oemcke, D J; Hans van Leeuwen, J

    2005-12-01

    Ozone has been investigated for its potential to remove marine dinoflagellate algae from ships' ballast water. Dinoflagellate algae, Amphidinium sp. isolated from the Great Barrier Reef, Townsville, Australia were used as indicators since these produce a type of cyst that is difficult to inactivate, but are relatively easy to culture. The ozonation experiments have demonstrated a high ozone demand for inactivation of the algal cultures, which increases as the culture ages. The main ozone demand in seawater is due to its reaction with bromide to form bromine compounds. The non-bromide ozone demand has been estimated by measuring the residuals produced after various doses of ozone. The Amphidinium sp. show an unexpected response to both ozonation and bromination, with an instantaneous inactivation of the organisms for all doses that produced an oxidant residual in the seawater, followed by an effect of the disinfection residual. The standard design procedure of comparing Ct will not be effective for predicting the response of the organism to varying dose, C, and contact time, t, and a plot of ozone produced oxidant residual against organism inactivation for various contact times is proposed for design purposes. High doses of ozone (5-11 mg/L) and up to 6h of residual contact were required for a 4-log inactivation of the Amphidinium sp. Ozonation is likely to be a difficult technology to implement for organisms with this ozone requirement in combination with characteristics of ballast tanks, which contain areas of sediments high in detritus and areas of corrosion. PMID:16289281

  12. Sphacelaria lacustris sp. nov. , a freshwater brown alga from Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Schloesser, R.E.; Blum, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The growth, reproduction and ultrasturcture of a new freshwater phaeophyte, Sphacelaria lacustris sp. nov., are described. The plant occurs as a minute calcified thallus at 5 to 15 m depth along the western shoreline of Lake Michigan. Both freshly collected and laboratory grown plants show apical growth of erect and basal filaments, intermittent longitudinal divisions in filament segments, vegetative reproduction by propagules, numerous parietal chloroplasts and an absence of pyrenoids, characteristics of Sphacelaria. This material is separated from the only other freshwater species in the genus (S. fluviatilis Jao) at least by differences in longitudinal septation, in branching, in its propagules and in general aspect. Between this plant and marine brown algae there are essential similarities of ultrastructure of cell wall and pores, chloroplasts, mitochondria, nucleus and the production/excretion of physodes.

  13. BIODIVERSITY OF CORALLINE ALGAE IN THE NORTHEASTERN ATLANTIC INCLUDING CORALLINA CAESPITOSA SP. NOV. (CORALLINOIDEAE, RHODOPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel H; Brodie, Juliet; Russell, Stephen; Irvine, Linda M; Orfanidis, Sotiris

    2009-02-01

    The Corallinoideae (Corallinaceae) is represented in the northeastern Atlantic by Corallina officinalis L.; Corallina elongata J. Ellis et Sol.; Haliptilon squamatum (L.) H. W. Johans., L. M. Irvine et A. M. Webster; and Jania rubens (L.) J. V. Lamour. The delimitation of these geniculate coralline red algae is based primarily on morphological characters. Molecular analysis based on cox1 and 18S rRNA gene phylogenies supported the division of the Corallinoideae into the tribes Janieae and Corallineae. Within the Janieae, a sequence difference of 46-48 bp (8.6%-8.9%) between specimens of H. squamatum and J. rubens in the cox1 phylogeny leads us to conclude that they are congeneric. J. rubens var. rubens and J. rubens var. corniculata (L.) Yendo clustered together in both phylogenies, suggesting that for those genes, there was no genetic basis for the morphological variation. Within the Corallineae, it appears that in some regions, the name C. elongata has been misapplied. C. officinalis samples formed two clusters that differed by 45-54 bp (8.4%-10.0%), indicating species-level divergence, and morphological differences were sufficient to define two species. One of these clusters was consistent with the morphology of the type specimen of C. officinalis (LINN 1293.9). The other species cluster is therefore described here as Corallina caespitosa sp. nov. This study has demonstrated that there is a clear need for a revision of the genus Corallina to determine the extent of "pseudocryptic" diversity in this group of red algae. PMID:27033664

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterization of mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from the model brown alga Ectocarpus sp.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Patricia; Groisillier, Agnès; Raimbault, Alice; Guibert, Anaïs; Boyen, Catherine; Tonon, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    The sugar alcohol mannitol is important in the food, pharmaceutical, medical and chemical industries. It is one of the most commonly occurring polyols in nature, with the exception of Archaea and animals. It has a range of physiological roles, including as carbon storage, compatible solute, and osmolyte. Mannitol is present in large amounts in brown algae, where its synthesis involved two steps: a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (M1PDH) catalyzes a reversible reaction between fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) and mannitol-1-phosphate (M1P) (EC 1.1.1.17), and a mannitol-1-phosphatase hydrolyzes M1P to mannitol (EC 3.1.3.22). Analysis of the model brown alga Ectocarpus sp. genome provided three candidate genes for M1PDH activities. We report here the sequence analysis of Ectocarpus M1PDHs (EsM1PDHs), and the biochemical characterization of the recombinant catalytic domain of EsM1PDH1 (EsM1PDH1cat). Ectocarpus M1PDHs are representatives of a new type of modular M1PDHs among the polyol-specific long-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (PSLDRs). The N-terminal domain of EsM1PDH1 was not necessary for enzymatic activity. Determination of kinetic parameters indicated that EsM1PDH1cat displayed higher catalytic efficiency for F6P reduction compared to M1P oxidation. Both activities were influenced by NaCl concentration and inhibited by the thioreactive compound pHMB. These observations were completed by measurement of endogenous M1PDH activity and of EsM1PDH gene expression during one diurnal cycle. No significant changes in enzyme activity were monitored between day and night, although transcription of two out of three genes was altered, suggesting different levels of regulation for this key metabolic pathway in brown algal physiology. PMID:26232554

  15. Use of conditioned medium for efficient transformation and cost-effective cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nam Kyu; Lee, Bongsoo; Shin, Sung-Eun; Jeon, Seungjib; Park, Min S; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-04-01

    The oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis sp. has been spotlighted as a promising candidate in genetic engineering research for biodiesel production. However, one of the major bottlenecks in the genetic manipulation against Nannochloropsis sp. is low transformation efficiency. Based on the idea that they grow rapidly in broth culture, the effect of conditioned medium on colonization and transformation efficiency of Nannochloropsis salina was investigated. Cells grown on agar plates with 20-40% conditioned medium produced colonies that were approximately 2.3-fold larger than cells grown without conditioned medium. More importantly, the transformation efficiency was about 2-fold greater on plates with 30% conditioned medium relative to those without conditioned medium. In addition, FAME productivity in liquid cultures with 100% conditioned medium increased up to 20% compared with cultures of control medium. These results suggest that conditioned medium can be applied for efficient transformation and cost-effective cultivation of N. salina for biodiesel production. PMID:25656867

  16. A pangenomic analysis of the Nannochloropsis organellar genomes reveals novel genetic variations in key metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae in the genus Nannochloropsis are photosynthetic marine Eustigmatophytes of significant interest to the bioenergy and aquaculture sectors due to their ability to efficiently accumulate biomass and lipids for utilization in renewable transportation fuels, aquaculture feed, and other useful bioproducts. To better understand the genetic complement that drives the metabolic processes of these organisms, we present the assembly and comparative pangenomic analysis of the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes from Nannochloropsis salina CCMP1776. Results The chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of N. salina are 98.4% and 97% identical to their counterparts in Nannochloropsis gaditana. Comparison of the Nannochloropsis pangenome to other algae within and outside of the same phyla revealed regions of significant genetic divergence in key genes that encode proteins needed for regulation of branched chain amino synthesis (acetohydroxyacid synthase), carbon fixation (RuBisCO activase), energy conservation (ATP synthase), protein synthesis and homeostasis (Clp protease, ribosome). Conclusions Many organellar gene modifications in Nannochloropsis are unique and deviate from conserved orthologs found across the tree of life. Implementation of secondary and tertiary structure prediction was crucial to functionally characterize many proteins and therefore should be implemented in automated annotation pipelines. The exceptional similarity of the N. salina and N. gaditana organellar genomes suggests that N. gaditana be reclassified as a strain of N. salina. PMID:24646409

  17. Antioxidant, cytotoxic, antitumor, and protective DNA damage metabolites from the red sea brown alga Sargassum sp

    PubMed Central

    Ayyad, Seif-Eldin N.; Ezmirly, Saleh T.; Basaif, Salim A.; Alarif, Walied M.; Badria, Adel F.; Badria, Farid A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Macroalgae can be viewed as a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory sources owing to their capability of producing compounds for its protection from environmental factors such as heat, pollution, stress, oxygen concentration, and UV radiations. Objective: To isolate major compounds which are mainly responsible for the pharmacological activity of brown alga under investigation, Sargassum sp. Materials and Methods: Algal material was air dried, extracted with a mixture of organic solvents, and fractionated with different adsorbents. The structures of obtained pure compounds were elucidated with different spectroscopic techniques, and two pure materials were tested for protection of DNA from damage, antioxidant, antitumor, and cytotoxicity. Results: Four pure compounds were obtained, of which fucosterol (1) and fucoxanthin (4) were tested; it was found that fucoxanthin has strong antioxidant and cytotoxicity against breast cancer (MCF-7) with IC50 = 11.5 μg/ml. Conclusion: The naturally highly conjugated safe compound fucoxanthin could be used as antioxidant and as an antitumor compound. PMID:22022163

  18. Amylibacter ulvae sp. nov., a new alphaproteobacterium isolated from the Pacific green alga Ulva fenestrata.

    PubMed

    Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Kukhlevskiy, Andrey D; Zhukova, Natalia V; Kim, Seung Bum

    2016-04-01

    A strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and non-motile bacterium, designated strain 6Alg 255(T), was isolated from the green alga Ulva fenestrata. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the novel strain affiliated to the family Rhodobacteraceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria being most closely related to Amylibacter marinus LMG 28364(T) with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.2 %. Strain 6Alg 255(T) grew with 0.5-6.0 % NaCl and at 4-33 °C, hydrolysed aesculin, casein, gelatin and urea. The DNA G + C content was 50.4 mol%. The prevalent fatty acids were C18:1 ω7c and C16:0. The polar lipid profile was characterized by the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and unidentified aminolipid. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The significant molecular distinctiveness between the novel isolate and its nearest neighbour was strongly supported by the differences in physiological and biochemical tests. Therefore, strain 6Alg 255(T) represents a novel species of the genus Amylibacter, for which the name Amylibacter ulvae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 6Alg 255(T) (=KCTC 32465(T) = KMM 6515(T)). PMID:26762377

  19. A Comparative biochemical study on two marine endophytes, Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS, Isolated from red sea algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman Fadl; Hassan, Hossam Mokhtar; Rateb, Mostafa Ezzat; Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Sameer, Somayah; Aly Taie, Hanan Anwar; Abdel-Hameed, Mohammed Sayed; Hammouda, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Two marine endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Red Sea algae; a red alga; Acanthophora dendroides and the brown alga Sargassum sabrepandum. The isolates were identified based on their 16SrRNA sequences as Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential anti-microbial and antioxidant activities of the extracts of the isolated bacteria grown in different nutrient conditions. Compared to amoxicillin (25μg/disk) and erythromycin (15μg/disk), the extracts of Bacterium SRCn min media II, III, IV and V were potent inhibitors of the gram-positive bacterium Sarcina maxima even at low concentrations. Also, the multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was more sensitive to the metabolites produced in medium (II) of the same endophyte than erythromycin (15μg/disk). A moderate activity of the Bacillus sp. JS extracts of media I and II was obtained against the same pathogen. The total compounds (500ug/ml) of both isolated endophytes showed moderate antioxidant activities (48.9% and 46.1%, respectively). LC/MS analysis of the bacterial extracts was carried out to investigate the likely natural products produced. Cyclo(D-cis-Hyp-L-Leu), dihydrosphingosine and 2-Amino-1,3-hexadecanediol were identified in the fermentation medium of Bacterium SRCnm, whereas cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo (L-Leu-L-Pro) were the suggested compounds of Bacillus sp. JS. PMID:26826831

  20. First Report of Pseudobodo sp, a New Pathogen for a Potential Energy-Producing Algae: Chlorella vulgaris Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bangzhou; Yang, Luxi; Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Jingyan; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Liu, Jingwen; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, is a kind of single-celled green algae, which could serve as a potential source of food and energy because of its photosynthetic efficiency. In our study, a pathogenic organism targeting C. vulgaris was discovered. The algae-lytic activity relates to a fraction from lysates of infected C. vulgaris that was blocked upon filtration through a 3 µm filter. 18S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that it shared 99.0% homology with the protist Pseudobodo tremulans. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed that Pseudobodo sp. KD51 cells were approximately 4–5 µm long, biflagellate with an anterior collar around the anterior part of the cell in unstressed feeding cells. Besides the initial host, Pseudobodo sp. KD51 could also kill other algae, indicating its relatively wide predatory spectrum. Heat stability, pH and salinity tolerance experiments were conducted to understand their effects on its predatory activities, and the results showed that Pseudobodo sp. KD51 was heat-sensitive, and pH and salinity tolerant. PMID:24599263

  1. First report of Pseudobodo sp, a new pathogen for a potential energy-producing algae: Chlorella vulgaris cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangran; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Yang, Luxi; Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Jingyan; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Liu, Jingwen; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, is a kind of single-celled green algae, which could serve as a potential source of food and energy because of its photosynthetic efficiency. In our study, a pathogenic organism targeting C. vulgaris was discovered. The algae-lytic activity relates to a fraction from lysates of infected C. vulgaris that was blocked upon filtration through a 3 µm filter. 18S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that it shared 99.0% homology with the protist Pseudobodo tremulans. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed that Pseudobodo sp. KD51 cells were approximately 4-5 µm long, biflagellate with an anterior collar around the anterior part of the cell in unstressed feeding cells. Besides the initial host, Pseudobodo sp. KD51 could also kill other algae, indicating its relatively wide predatory spectrum. Heat stability, pH and salinity tolerance experiments were conducted to understand their effects on its predatory activities, and the results showed that Pseudobodo sp. KD51 was heat-sensitive, and pH and salinity tolerant. PMID:24599263

  2. Winogradskyella eckloniae sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from the brown alga Ecklonia cava.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Park, So-Hyun; Seo, Ga-Young; Kim, Young-Ju; Oh, Duck-Chul

    2015-09-01

    A novel bacterial strain, designated EC29(T), was isolated from the brown alga Ecklonia cava collected on Jeju Island, Republic of Korea. Cells of strain EC29(T) were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped and motile by gliding. Growth was observed at 10-30 °C (optimum, 20-25 °C), at pH 6.0-9.5 (optimum, pH 7.5) and in the presence of 1-5% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the strain belonged to the genus Winogradskyella. Strain EC29(T) exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, of 96.5-97.8%, to the type strains of Winogradskyella pulchriflava EM106(T), Winogradskyella echinorum KMM 6211(T) and Winogradskyella ulvae KMM 6390(T). Strain EC29(T) exhibited < 27% DNA-DNA relatedness with Winogradskyella pulchriflava EM106(T) and Winogradskyella echinorum KMM 6211(T). The predominant fatty acids of strain EC29(T) were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 1 G, C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, iso-C15 : 0 3-OH and anteiso-C15 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 31.1 mol% and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-6 (MK-6). Based on a polyphasic study, strain EC29(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Winogradskyella, for which the name Winogradskyella eckloniae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is EC29(T) ( = KCTC 32172(T) = JCM 18703(T)). PMID:25979633

  3. Flavobacterium jejuensis sp. nov., isolated from marine brown alga Ecklonia cava.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Young-Ju; Heo, Moon-Soo

    2015-11-01

    A bacterial strain, designated EC11(T) was isolated from brown alga Ecklonia cava collected from Jeju Island, Korea. EC11(T) was identified as a Gram-negative, rod-shaped and yellow-pigmented bacterial strain. The strain EC11(T) grew over a temperature range of 10 °C to 30 °C (optimally at 25 °C), and a pH range of 6.0-10.5 (optimally at pH 7.5). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain EC11(T) belongs to the genus Flavobacterium. Strain EC11(T) shared close similarity with Flavobacterium jumunjinense HME7102(T) (96.4%), Flavobacterium dongtanense LW30(T) (95.8%), Flavobacterium haoranii LQY-7(T) (95.3%), and Flavobacterium urocaniciphilum (95.1%). The major fatty acids (> 5%) were iso-C17:0 3-OH (22.4%), iso-C15:0 3-OH (19.0%), C15:0 (12.4%), summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1 ω7c/ C16:1 ω6c; 9.78%), iso-C15:1 G (9.6%), and iso-C16:0 3-OH (9.0%). The DNA G+C content was 28.1 mol% and the strain contained MK-6 as the predominant menaquinone. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unknown aminolipids and three unknown polar lipids. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analysis, strain EC11T represents a novel species of the Flavobacterium genus, for which the name Flavobacterium jejuensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of F. jejuensis is EC11(T) (=KCTC 42149(T) = JCM 30735(T)). PMID:26502959

  4. Shewanella algicola sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from brown algae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Yoo, Han-Su; Lee, Dong-Heon; Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ju; Oh, Duck-Chul

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium motile by means of a single polar flagella, strain ST-6T, was isolated from a brown alga (Sargassum thunbergii) collected in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Strain ST-6T was psychrotolerant, growing at 4-30 °C (optimum 20 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences revealed that strain ST-6T belonged to a distinct lineage in the genus Shewanella. Strain ST-6T was related most closely to Shewanella basaltis J83T, S. gaetbuli TF-27T, S. arctica IT12T, S. vesiculosa M7T and S. aestuarii SC18T, showing 96-97 % and 85-70 % 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences similarities, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain ST-6T and the type strains of two species of the genus Shewanella were <22.6 %. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 %) were summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c and/ or iso-C15:0 2-OH), C16:0, iso-C13:0 and C17:1ω8c. The DNA G+C content of strain ST-6Twas 42.4 mol%, and the predominant isoprenoid quinones were menaquinone MK-7 and ubiquinones Q-7 and Q-8. On the basis of its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain ST-6T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella algicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ST-6T (= KCTC 23253T = JCM 31091T). PMID:26962005

  5. Mychonastes desiccatus Brown sp. nova (Chlorococcales, Chlorophyta)--an intertidal alga forming achlorophyllous desiccation-resistant cysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.; McKhann, H.; Moynihan, B.

    1988-01-01

    An intertidal Chlorella-like alga Mychonastes desiccatus Brown sp. nova, capable of forming achlorophyllous desiccation-resistant cysts, has been grown in unialgal culture. This small alga was first isolated from a dried sample of a well-studied microbial mat. The mat, located at North Pond, Laguna Figueroa, San Quintin, Baja California, Mexico, is a vertically-stratified microbial community which forms laminated sediments. Morphology, pigment composition and G+C content are within the range typical for the genus Chlorella s. 1. Unlike other chlorellae, however, upon desiccation M. desiccatus forms an achlorophyllous, lipid-filled cyst (thick-walled resting stage) in which no plastid is evident. Rewetting leads to chloroplast differentiation, excystment and recovery of the fully green alga. During desiccation, sporopollenin is deposited within a thickening cell wall. Encystment cannot be induced by growth in the dark. The formation of desiccation-induced cysts allows the alga to survive frequent and intermittent periods of dryness. These chlorellae tolerate wide ranges of acidity and temperature; they both grow and form cysts in media in which sodium ions are replaced with potassium. Although the cysts tolerate crystalline salts, the cell grow optimally in concentrations corresponding from three-quarters to full-strength seawater.

  6. Biodiesel production from algae oil high in free fatty acids by two-step catalytic conversion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Tianzhong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolin; Wang, Junfeng

    2012-05-01

    The effect of storage temperature and time on lipid composition of Scenedesmus sp. was studied. When stored at 4°C or higher, the free fatty acid content in the wet biomass increased from a trace to 62.0% by day 4. Using two-step catalytic conversion, algae oil with a high free fatty acid content was converted to biodiesel by pre-esterification and transesterification. The conversion rate of triacylglycerols reached 100% under the methanol to oil molar ratio of 12:1 during catalysis with 2% potassium hydroxide at 65°C for 30 min. This process was scaled up to produce biodiesel from Scenedesmus sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. oil. The crude biodiesel was purified using bleaching earth. Except for moisture content, the biodiesel conformed to Chinese National Standards. PMID:22401712

  7. PSI-driven cyclic electron flow allows intertidal macro-algae Ulva sp. (Chlorophyta) to survive in desiccated conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Shen, Songdong; Wang, Guangce; Niu, Jianfeng; Lin, Apeng; Pan, Guanghua

    2011-05-01

    Ulva sp. (Chlorophyta) is a representative species of the intertidal macro-algae responsible for the green tides that occurred along the shores of Qingdao in 2008 and had detrimental effects on the preparation for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games sailing competition. In view of its significance, we have investigated the photosynthetic performance of the photosystems and the changes in photosynthetic electron transport that occur during desiccation and rehydration of Ulva sp. The PSII activity in Ulva sp. declined gradually during the course of desiccation, which was reflected by the decreased maximum quantum yield and effective quantum yield, whereas the PSI activity fluctuated significantly. In contrast, the electron transport rates of PSII approached zero at severe levels of desiccation, but the electron transport of PSI, which still operated, could be suppressed effectively by a specific inhibitor. Furthermore, the electron transport of PSI during rehydration of desiccated thalli was recovered faster than that of PSII. All these results implied that the linear electron flow was abolished in desiccated Ulva sp., whereas the cyclic PSI activity was significantly elevated, was still active at severe levels of desiccation and could be restored faster than PSII activity. Based on these results, we concluded the PSI-driven cyclic electron flow might provide desiccation tolerance and additional flexibility for the cell physiology of Ulva sp. under desiccation conditions, which might be one of the most important factors that make Ulva sp. well suited to experience daily cycles of desiccation at low tide and rehydration at high tide. PMID:21471121

  8. Nannochloropsis Genomes Reveal Evolution of Microalgal Oleaginous Traits

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianqiang; Han, Danxiang; Wang, Hui; Zeng, Xiaowei; Jing, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Qian; Su, Xiaoquan; Chang, Xingzhi; Wang, Anhui; Wang, Wei; Jia, Jing; Wei, Li; Xin, Yi; Qiao, Yinghe; Huang, Ranran; Chen, Jie; Han, Bo; Yoon, Kangsup; Hill, Russell T.; Zohar, Yonathan; Chen, Feng; Hu, Qiang; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are promising feedstock for biofuels, yet the genetic diversity, origin and evolution of oleaginous traits remain largely unknown. Here we present a detailed phylogenomic analysis of five oleaginous Nannochloropsis species (a total of six strains) and one time-series transcriptome dataset for triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis on one representative strain. Despite small genome sizes, high coding potential and relative paucity of mobile elements, the genomes feature small cores of ca. 2,700 protein-coding genes and a large pan-genome of >38,000 genes. The six genomes share key oleaginous traits, such as the enrichment of selected lipid biosynthesis genes and certain glycoside hydrolase genes that potentially shift carbon flux from chrysolaminaran to TAG synthesis. The eleven type II diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes (DGAT-2) in every strain, each expressed during TAG synthesis, likely originated from three ancient genomes, including the secondary endosymbiosis host and the engulfed green and red algae. Horizontal gene transfers were inferred in most lipid synthesis nodes with expanded gene doses and many glycoside hydrolase genes. Thus multiple genome pooling and horizontal genetic exchange, together with selective inheritance of lipid synthesis genes and species-specific gene loss, have led to the enormous genetic apparatus for oleaginousness and the wide genomic divergence among present-day Nannochloropsis. These findings have important implications in the screening and genetic engineering of microalgae for biofuels. PMID:24415958

  9. Sorption properties of algae Spirogyra sp. and their use for determination of heavy metal ions concentrations in surface water.

    PubMed

    Rajfur, Małgorzata; Kłos, Andrzej; Wacławek, Maria

    2010-11-01

    Kinetics of heavy-metal ions sorption by alga Spirogyra sp. was evaluated experimentally in the laboratory, using both the static and the dynamic approach. The metal ions--Mn(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)--were sorbed from aqueous solutions of their salts. The static experiments showed that the sorption equilibria were attained in 30 min, with 90-95% of metal ions sorbed in first 10 min of each process. The sorption equilibria were approximated with the Langmuir isotherm model. The algae sorbed each heavy metal ions proportionally to the amount of this metal ions in solution. The experiments confirmed that after 30 min of exposition to contaminated water, the concentration of heavy metal ions in the algae, which initially contained small amounts of these metal ions, increased proportionally to the concentration of metal ions in solution. The presented results can be used for elaboration of a method for classification of surface waters that complies with the legal regulations. PMID:20435526

  10. Determining surface areas of marine alga cells by acid-base titration method.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Ma, Y; Su, Y

    1997-09-01

    A new method for determining the surface area of living marine alga cells was described. The method uses acid-base titration to measure the surface acid/base amount on the surface of alga cells and uses the BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller) equation to estimate the maximum surface acid/base amount, assuming that hydrous cell walls have carbohydrates or other structural compounds which can behave like surface Brönsted acid-base sites due to coordination of environmental H2O molecules. The method was applied to 18 diverse alga species (including 7 diatoms, 2 flagellates, 8 green algae and 1 red alga) maintained in seawater cultures. For the species examined, the surface areas of individual cells ranged from 2.8 x 10(-8) m2 for Nannochloropsis oculata to 690 x 10(-8) m2 for Dunaliella viridis, specific surface areas from 1,030 m2.g-1 for Dunaliella salina to 28,900 m2.g-1 for Pyramidomonas sp. Measurement accuracy was 15.2%. Preliminary studies show that the method may be more promising and accurate than light/electron microscopic measurements for coarse estimation of the surface area of living algae. PMID:9297794

  11. Interactions between marine facultative epiphyte Chlamydomonas sp. (Chlamydomonadales, Chlorophyta) and ceramiaceaen algae (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Klochkova, Tatyana A; Cho, Ga Youn; Boo, Sung Min; Chung, Ki Wha; Kim, Song Ja; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2008-07-01

    Previously unrecorded marine Chlamydomonas that grew epiphytic on ceramiaceaen algae was collected from the western coast of Korea and isolated into a unialgal culture. The isolate was subjected to 18S rDNA phylogenetic analysis as well as ultrastructure and life cycle studies. It had an affinity with the marine Chlamydomonas species and was less related to freshwater/terrestrial representatives of this genus. It had flagella shorter than the cell body two-layered cell wall with striated outer surface and abundant mucilaginous material beneath the innermost layer and no contractile vacuoles. This alga grew faster in mixed cultures with ceramiaceaen algae rather than in any tested unialgal culture condition; the cells looked healthier and zoosporangia and motile flagellated vegetative cells appeared more often. These results suggested that this Chlamydomonas might be a facultative epiphyte benefiting from its hosts. Several ceramiaceaen algae were tested as host plants. Meanwhile, cell deformation or collapse of the whole thallus was caused to Aglaothamnion byssoides, and preliminary study suggested that a substance released from Chlamydomonas caused the response. This is first report on harmful epiphytic interactions between Chlamydomonas species and red ceramiaceaen algae. PMID:19195375

  12. Optimization of culturing conditions for toxicity testing with the alga Oophila sp. (Chlorophyceae), an amphibian endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gil, José Luis; Brain, Richard; Baxter, Leilan; Ruffell, Sarah; McConkey, Brendan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Eggs of the yellow-spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) have a symbiotic relationship with green algae. It has been suggested that contaminants that are preferentially toxic to algae, such as herbicides, may impair the symbiont and, hence, indirectly affect the development of the salamander embryo. To enable testing under near-standard conditions for first-tier toxicity screening, the authors isolated the alga from field-collected eggs and identified conditions providing exponential growth rates in the apparent asexual phase of the alga. This approach provided a uniform, single-species culture, facilitating assessment of common toxicity end points and comparison of sensitivity relative to other species. Sequencing of the 18s ribosomal DNA indicated that the isolated alga is closely related to the recently described Oophila amblystomatis but is more similar to other known Chlamydomonas species, suggesting possible biogeographical variability in the genetic identity of the algal symbiont. After a tiered approach to culturing method refinement, a modified Bristol's media with 1 mM NH4 (+) as nitrogen source was found to provide suitable conditions for toxicity testing at 18 °C and 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on a 24-h light cycle. The validity of the approach was demonstrated with Zn(2+) as a reference toxicant. Overall, the present study shows that screening for direct effects of contaminants on the algal symbiont without the presence of the host salamander is possible under certain laboratory conditions. PMID:25113146

  13. Continuous flocculation-sedimentation for harvesting Nannochloropsis salina biomass.

    PubMed

    Chatsungnoen, Tawan; Chisti, Yusuf

    2016-03-20

    A continuous flow process is developed for recovery of the biomass of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina. Flocculation-sedimentation is used to recover the biomass from an algal suspension with an initial dry biomass concentration of 0.5 g L(-1), as would be typical of a raceway-based biomass production system. More than 85% of the biomass initially in suspension could be settled by gravity in a flocculation-sedimentation device with a total residence time of ∼148 min. Aluminum sulfate was used as an inexpensive, readily available and safe flocculant. The optimal flocculant dosage (as Al2(SO4)3) was 229 mg L(-1). Relative to a highly effective 62-min batch flocculation-sedimentation process for the same alga and flocculant, the continuous flow operation took longer and required nearly double the flocculant dose. The design of the flocculation-sedimentation system is explained. PMID:26880538

  14. Cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina in municipal wastewater or digester centrate.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bingfeng; Ho, Nam; Ogden, Kimberly L; Arnold, Robert G

    2014-05-01

    Meaningful use of biofuels for transportation depends on utilization of water from non-traditional, non-potable resources. Here it is hypothesized that (i) reclaimed wastewater or nutrient-rich side streams derived from municipal wastewater treatment are suitable for that purpose and (ii) use of those waters for algal growth can promote water quality through nutrient management. Experiments showed that metals levels in municipal wastewaters are unlikely to inhibit algal growth and lipid production, at least by metals tolerant microalgae like Nannochloropsis salina. Cells grew without inhibition in treated municipal wastewater or centrate derived from wastewater treatment at additions up to 75 percent v/v in their normal growth medium minus nitrogen and phosphorus. Although wastewater provides a suitable nutrient source for algal growth, not enough municipal wastewater is available to support a meaningful biofuels industry without efficient water recycling and nutrient recovery/reuse from spent algae. PMID:24565931

  15. Effects of Dried Algae Schizochytrium Sp., A Rich Source of Docosahexaenoic Acid, on Growth, Fatty Acid Composition, and Sensory Quality of Channel Catfish Ictalurus Punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of supplementation of dried algae Schizochytrium sp., a rich source of 22:6 n-3, on growth, fatty acid composition, and sensory quality of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Five isonitrogenous (28% crude protein) and isocaloric (2.78 kcal...

  16. Effectiveness and toxicity of a novel isolated actinomycete strain Streptomyces sp. JS01 on a harmful alga Phaeocystis globosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Su; Peng, Yun; Li, Yi; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-06-01

    An aquatic actinomycete capable of eliminating the brown tide causing marine alga Phaeocystis globosa was isolated from the surface sea water and the isolate named JS01 was characterized as Streptomyces on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The supernatant of JS01 could lyse algal cells, implying that JS01 produced a latent alga-lytic compound. Considering this algicidal activity and the response of the algal cells, Chlorophyll a fluorescence decreased significantly in P. globosa in response to the JS01 supernatant when analyzed with flow cytometry. The algal cells experienced cell shrinkage and plasmolysis before disintegration after 72 h of treatment. The released algicide(s) were heat-tolerant, except above 121 °C, and fluctuation in pH variations; even so, algicidal activity was also over 60 %. The maximum toxicity of JS01 was on the seventh day of culture, and the relative luminosity was 0.49 at that time when detected by luminous bacteria Vibrio fischeri. These results indicated that the Streptomyces sp. JS01 could function as a potential controller of Phaeocystis globosa blooms. PMID:25638354

  17. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    PubMed Central

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z.; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L.; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry. PMID:27483291

  18. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium.

    PubMed

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry. PMID:27483291

  19. Microbial utilization of aqueous co-products from hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael; Zhu, Lian; Thiel, Anne; Wu, Yan; Guan, Mary; Minty, Jeremy; Wang, Henry Y; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina

    2013-05-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction of algae biomass is a promising technology for the production of sustainable biofuels, but the non-oil, aqueous co-product of the process has only been examined to a limited extent. The aqueous phase from liquefaction of the alga Nannochloropsis oculata (AqAl) was used to make growth media for model heterotrophic microorganisms Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth rates, yields, and carbon/nitrogen/phosphorus uptake were measured. E. coli and P. putida could grow using AqAl as the sole C, N, and P source in media containing 10 vol.%-40 vol.% AqAl with the best growth occurring at 20 vol.%. S. cerevisiae could grow under these conditions only if the media were supplemented with glucose. The results indicate that in a biorefinery utilizing algae liquefaction, the aqueous co-product may be recycled via microbial cultures with significantly less dilution than previously published methods. PMID:23567726

  20. Preparation and Evaluation of the Chelating Nanocomposite Fabricated with Marine Algae Schizochytrium sp. Protein Hydrolysate and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Xixi; Tang, Mengru; Wang, Shaoyun

    2015-11-11

    Marine algae have been becoming a popular research topic because of their biological implication. The algae peptide-based metal-chelating complex was investigated in this study. Schizochytrium sp. protein hydrolysate (SPH) possessing high Ca-binding capacity was prepared through stepwise enzymatic hydrolysis to a degree of hydrolysis of 22.46%. The nanocomposites of SPH chelated with calcium ions were fabricated in aqueous solution at pH 6 and 30 °C for 20 min, with the ratio of SPH to calcium 3:1 (w/w). The size distribution showed that the nanocomposite had compact structure with a radius of 68.16 ± 0.50 nm. SPH was rich in acidic amino acids, accounting for 33.55%, which are liable to bind with calcium ions. The molecular mass distribution demonstrated that the molecular mass of SPH was principally concentrated at 180-2000 Da. UV scanning spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that the primary sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups, carbonyl groups, and amino groups of SPH. The results of fluorescent spectroscopy, size distribution, atomic force microscope, and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggested that calcium ions chelated with SPH would cause intramolecular and intermolecular folding and aggregating. The SPH-calcium chelate exerted remarkable stability and absorbability under either acidic or basic conditions, which was in favor of calcium absorption in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans. The investigation suggests that SPH-calcium chelate has the potential prospect to be utilized as a nutraceutical supplement to improve bone health in the human body. PMID:26499390

  1. Distinctive Architecture of the Chloroplast Genome in the Chlorodendrophycean Green Algae Scherffelia dubia and Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881.

    PubMed

    Turmel, Monique; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Chlorodendrophyceae is a small class of green algae belonging to the core Chlorophyta, an assemblage that also comprises the Pedinophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae. Here we describe for the first time the chloroplast genomes of chlorodendrophycean algae (Scherffelia dubia, 137,161 bp; Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881, 100,264 bp). Characterized by a very small single-copy (SSC) region devoid of any gene and an unusually large inverted repeat (IR), the quadripartite structures of the Scherffelia and Tetraselmis genomes are unique among all core chlorophytes examined thus far. The lack of genes in the SSC region is offset by the rich and atypical gene complement of the IR, which includes genes from the SSC and large single-copy regions of prasinophyte and streptophyte chloroplast genomes having retained an ancestral quadripartite structure. Remarkably, seven of the atypical IR-encoded genes have also been observed in the IRs of pedinophycean and trebouxiophycean chloroplast genomes, suggesting that they were already present in the IR of the common ancestor of all core chlorophytes. Considering that the relationships among the main lineages of the core Chlorophyta are still unresolved, we evaluated the impact of including the Chlorodendrophyceae in chloroplast phylogenomic analyses. The trees we inferred using data sets of 79 and 108 genes from 71 chlorophytes indicate that the Chlorodendrophyceae is a deep-diverging lineage of the core Chlorophyta, although the placement of this class relative to the Pedinophyceae remains ambiguous. Interestingly, some of our phylogenomic trees together with our comparative analysis of gene order data support the monophyly of the Trebouxiophyceae, thus offering further evidence that the previously observed affiliation between the Chlorellales and Pedinophyceae is the result of systematic errors in phylogenetic reconstruction. PMID:26849226

  2. Distinctive Architecture of the Chloroplast Genome in the Chlorodendrophycean Green Algae Scherffelia dubia and Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, Monique; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Chlorodendrophyceae is a small class of green algae belonging to the core Chlorophyta, an assemblage that also comprises the Pedinophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae. Here we describe for the first time the chloroplast genomes of chlorodendrophycean algae (Scherffelia dubia, 137,161 bp; Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881, 100,264 bp). Characterized by a very small single-copy (SSC) region devoid of any gene and an unusually large inverted repeat (IR), the quadripartite structures of the Scherffelia and Tetraselmis genomes are unique among all core chlorophytes examined thus far. The lack of genes in the SSC region is offset by the rich and atypical gene complement of the IR, which includes genes from the SSC and large single-copy regions of prasinophyte and streptophyte chloroplast genomes having retained an ancestral quadripartite structure. Remarkably, seven of the atypical IR-encoded genes have also been observed in the IRs of pedinophycean and trebouxiophycean chloroplast genomes, suggesting that they were already present in the IR of the common ancestor of all core chlorophytes. Considering that the relationships among the main lineages of the core Chlorophyta are still unresolved, we evaluated the impact of including the Chlorodendrophyceae in chloroplast phylogenomic analyses. The trees we inferred using data sets of 79 and 108 genes from 71 chlorophytes indicate that the Chlorodendrophyceae is a deep-diverging lineage of the core Chlorophyta, although the placement of this class relative to the Pedinophyceae remains ambiguous. Interestingly, some of our phylogenomic trees together with our comparative analysis of gene order data support the monophyly of the Trebouxiophyceae, thus offering further evidence that the previously observed affiliation between the Chlorellales and Pedinophyceae is the result of systematic errors in phylogenetic reconstruction. PMID:26849226

  3. Combined biocidal action of silver nanoparticles and ions against Chlorococcales (Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris) and filamentous algae (Klebsormidium sp.).

    PubMed

    Zouzelka, Radek; Cihakova, Pavlina; Rihova Ambrozova, Jana; Rathousky, Jiri

    2016-05-01

    Despite the extensive research, the mechanism of the antimicrobial and biocidal performance of silver nanoparticles has not been unequivocally elucidated yet. Our study was aimed at the investigation of the ability of silver nanoparticles to suppress the growth of three types of algae colonizing the wetted surfaces or submerged objects and the mechanism of their action. Silver nanoparticles exhibited a substantial toxicity towards Chlorococcales Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris, and filamentous algae Klebsormidium sp., which correlated with their particle size. The particles had very good stability against agglomeration even in the presence of multivalent cations. The concentration of silver ions in equilibrium with nanoparticles markedly depended on the particle size, achieving about 6 % and as low as about 0.1 % or even less for the particles 5 nm in size and for larger ones (40-70 nm), respectively. Even very limited proportion of small particles together with larger ones could substantially increase concentration of Ag ions in solution. The highest toxicity was found for the 5-nm-sized particles, being the smallest ones in this study. Their toxicity was even higher than that of silver ions at the same silver concentration. When compared as a function of the Ag(+) concentration in equilibrium with 5-nm particles, the toxicity of ions was at least 17 times higher than that obtained by dissolving silver nitrite (if not taking into account the effect of nanoparticles themselves). The mechanism of the toxicity of silver nanoparticles was found complex with an important role played by the adsorption of silver nanoparticles and the ions released from the particles on the cell surface. This mechanism could be described as some sort of synergy between nanoparticles and ions. While our study clearly showed the presence of this synergy, its detailed explanation is experimentally highly demanding, requiring a close cooperation between materials scientists

  4. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater by the green alga Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changfu; Yu, Xiaoqing; Lv, Hong; Yang, Jun

    2013-04-01

    The potential of microalgae as a source of renewable energy based on wastewater has received increasing interest worldwide in recent decades. A freshwater microalga Chlorella sp. was investigated for its ability to remove both nitrogen and phosphorus from influent and effluent wastewaters which were diluted in four different proportions (namely, 100%, 75%, 50% and 25%). Chlorella sp. grew fastest under 50% influent and effluent wastewaters culture conditions, and showed an maximum cell density (4.25 x 10(9) ind 1(-1) for influent wastewater and 3.54 x 109 ind l(-1) for effluent wastewater), indicating the levels of nitrogen and phosphorus greatly influenced algal growth. High removal efficiency for total nitrogen (17.04-58.85%) and total phosphorus (62.43-97.08%) was achieved. Further, more than 83% NH4-N in 75%, 50%, 25% influent wastewater, 88% NOx-N in effluent wastewater and 90% PO4-P in all treatments were eliminated after 24 days of incubation. Chlorella sp. grew well when PO4-P concentration was very low, indicating that this might be not the limiting factor to algal growth. Our results suggest the potential importance of integrating nutrient removal from wastewater by microalgae cultivation as biofuel production feedstock. PMID:24620613

  5. The mechanism of the acclimation of Nannochloropsis oceanica to freshwater deduced from its transcriptome profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Yang, Guanpin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we compared the transcriptomes of Nannochloropsis oceanica cultured in f/2 medium prepared with sea-water and freshwater, respectively, aiming to understand the acclimation mechanism of this alga to freshwater. Differentially expressed genes were mainly assigned to the degradation of cell components, ion transportation, and ribosomal biogenesis. These findings indicate that the algal cells degrade its components (mainly amino acids and fatty acids) to yield excessive energy (ATP) to maintain cellular ion (mainly K+ and Ca2+) homeostasis, while the depletion of amino acids and ATP, and the reduction of ribosomes attenuate the protein translation and finally slow down the cell growth.

  6. Genome of the halotolerant green alga Picochlorum sp. reveals strategies for thriving under fluctuating environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Foflonker, Fatima; Price, Dana C; Qiu, Huan; Palenik, Brian; Wang, Shuyi; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2015-02-01

    An expected outcome of climate change is intensification of the global water cycle, which magnifies surface water fluxes, and consequently alters salinity patterns. It is therefore important to understand the adaptations and limits of microalgae to survive changing salinities. To this end, we sequenced the 13.5 Mbp genome of the halotolerant green alga Picochlorum SENEW3 (SE3) that was isolated from a brackish water pond subject to large seasonal salinity fluctuations. Picochlorum SE3 encodes 7367 genes, making it one of the smallest and most gene dense eukaryotic genomes known. Comparison with the pico-prasinophyte Ostreococcus tauri, a species with a limited range of salt tolerance, reveals the enrichment of transporters putatively involved in the salt stress response in Picochlorum SE3. Analysis of cultures and the protein complement highlight the metabolic flexibility of Picochlorum SE3 that encodes genes involved in urea metabolism, acetate assimilation and fermentation, acetoin production and glucose uptake, many of which form functional gene clusters. Twenty-four cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacterial sources were found in Picochlorum SE3 with these genes involved in stress adaptation including osmolyte production and growth promotion. Our results identify Picochlorum SE3 as a model for understanding microalgal adaptation to stressful, fluctuating environments. PMID:24965277

  7. Mameliella phaeodactyli sp. nov., a member of the family Rhodobacteraceae isolated from the marine algae Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangran; Zhang, Jingyan; Lei, Xueqian; Lai, Qiliang; Yang, Luxi; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Yu, Zhiming; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-05-01

    A novel Gram-staining-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile, yellow bacterium designated strain KD53(T), was isolated from a culture of the alga Phaeodactylum tricornutum from Xiamen, Fujian Province, China. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison showed that strain KD53(T) was a member of the Roseobacter clade within the family Rhodobacteraceae , forming a distinct lineage with species of the genus Mameliella . The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain KD53(T) and other strains examined were all less than 97.0%. Strain KD53(T) was found to grow optimally at 28 °C, at pH 7.5-8.0 and in the presence of 3% (w/v) NaCl. The dominant fatty acids of strain KD53(T) were C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c, C18 : 0 and C16 : 0. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content was 65 mol% and the major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 10 (Q-10). On the basis of phenotypic data and phylogenetic inference, strain KD53(T) represents a novel member of the genus Mameliella , then the name Mameliella phaeodactyli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KD53(T) ( =MCCC 1K00273(T) =KCTC 42178(T)). PMID:25716952

  8. Phaeodactylibacter xiamenensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Saprospiraceae isolated from the marine alga Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangran; Lei, Xueqian; Lai, Qiliang; Li, Yi; Zhang, Bangzhou; Zhang, Jingyan; Zhang, Huajun; Yang, Luxi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Yu, Zhiming; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-staining-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile, reddish-orange and chemoheterotrophic bacteria, designated strain KD52(T), was isolated from a culture of the alga Phaeodactylum tricornutum from Xiamen, Fujian Province, China. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison showed that strain KD52(T) was a member of the family Saprospiraceae, forming a distinct lineage with 'Portibacter lacus' KCTC 23747. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain KD52(T) and the type strains of species of the family Saprospiraceae ranged from 86% to 89%. Growth occurred at 20-37 °C (optimum, 28 °C), in the presence of 1-9% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2.5%) and at pH 5-8.5 (optimum, pH 6.0). The dominant fatty acids (>10%) of strain KD52(T) were iso-C15:0 (33.1%), iso-C15:1 G (14.8%) and summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c, 13.8%). The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified phospholipids, four unknown lipids and one unidentified aminolipid. The DNA G+C content was 51 mol% and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone-7 (MK-7). On the basis of phenotypic data and phylogenetic inference, strain KD52(T) represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Phaeodactylibacter xiamenensis gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is KD52(T) ( = MCCC 1F01213(T) = KCTC 32575(T)). PMID:25052393

  9. Evaluation of an oil-producing green alga Chlorella sp. C2 for biological DeNOx of industrial flue gases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Chen, Hui; Chen, Weixian; Qiao, Yaqin; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2014-09-01

    NOx, a significant portion of fossil fuel flue gases, are among the most serious environmental issues in the world and must be removed in an additional costly gas treatment step. This study evaluated the growth of the green alga Chlorella sp. C2 under a nitrite-simulated NOx environment and the removal rates of actual flue gas fixed salts (FGFSs) from Sinopec's Shijiazhuang refinery along with lipid production. The results showed that nitrite levels lower than 176.5 mM had no significant adverse effects on the cell growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella sp. C2, demonstrating that this green alga could utilize nitrite and NOx as a nitrogen source. High concentrations of nitrite (88.25-176.5 mM) also resulted in the accumulation of neutral lipids. A 60% nitrite removal efficiency was obtained together with the production of 33% algae lipids when cultured with FGFS. Notably, the presence of nitrate in the FGFS medium significantly enhanced the nitrite removal capability, biomass and lipid production. Thus, this study may provide a new insight into the economically viable application of microalgae in the synergistic combination of biological DeNOx of industrial flue gases and biodiesel production. PMID:25105531

  10. Toxic potential of iron oxide, CdS/Ag₂S composite, CdS and Ag₂S NPs on a fresh water alga Mougeotia sp.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, E; Khan, Behlol; Chandran, Preethy; Khan, S Sudheer

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being used in many industries ranging from medical, textile, automobile, consumer products, etc. This may increase the probability of their (NPs) release into the environment and fresh water ecosystems. The present study focuses on testing the potential effect of iron oxide, nanocomposite of cadmium sulfide and silver sulfide, cadmium sulfide and silver sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) on a fresh water alga Mougeotia sp. as the model organism. The alga was treated with different concentrations of NPs (0.1-25 mg/L). The NPs exposure caused lipid peroxidation and ROS production, and suppressed the antioxidant defense system such as catalase, glutathione reductase, and superoxide dismutase. Adsorption of NPs on algal surface and membrane damage were confirmed through microscopic evaluation and increase in protein content in extracellular medium. The present investigation pointed out the ecological implications of NPs. The study warrants the need for regulatory agencies to monitor and regulate the use of NPs. PMID:25465759

  11. Transcriptome-wide analysis of DEAD-box RNA helicase gene family in an Antarctic psychrophilic alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Huang, Xiaohang

    2015-09-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase family proteins have been identified in almost all living organisms. Some of them play a crucial role in adaptation to environmental changes and stress response, especially in the low-temperature acclimation in different kinds of organisms. Compared with the full swing study in plants and bacteria, the characters and functions of DEAD-box family proteins had not been surveyed in algae. To identify genes critical for freezing acclimation in algae, we screened DEAD-box RNA helicase genes from the transcriptome sequences of a psychrophilic microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L which was isolated from Antarctic sea ice. Totally 39 DEAD-box RNA helicase genes had been identified. Most of the DEAD-box RNA helicase have 1:1 homologous relationships in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L with several exceptions. The homologous proteins in ICE-L to the helicases critical for cold or freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana had been identified based on phylogenetic comparison studies. The response of these helicase genes is not always identical in the Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L and Arabidopsis under the same low-temperature treatment. The expression of several DEAD-box RNA helicase genes including CiRH5, CiRH25, CiRH28, and CiRH55 were significantly up-regulated under freezing treatment of ICE-L and their function in freezing acclimation of ICE-L deserved further investigation. PMID:26174530

  12. Alterations in seawater pH and CO 2 affect calcification and photosynthesis in the tropical coralline alga, Hydrolithon sp. (Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semesi, I. Sware; Kangwe, Juma; Björk, Mats

    2009-09-01

    Calcification in the marine environment is the basis for the accretion of carbonate in structures such as coral reefs, algal ridges and carbonate sands. Among the organisms responsible for such calcification are the Corallinaceae (Rhodophyta), recognised as major contributors to the process world-wide. Hydrolithon sp. is a coralline alga that often forms rhodoliths in the Western Indian Ocean. In Zanzibar, it is commonly found in shallow lagoons, where it often grows within seagrass beds and/or surrounded by green algae such as Ulva sp. Since seagrasses in Zanzibar have recently been shown to raise the pH of the surrounding seawater during the day, and since calcification rates are sensitive to pH, which changes the saturation state of calcium carbonate, we measured the effects of pH on photosynthetic and calcification rates of this alga. It was found that pH had significant effects on both calcification and photosynthesis. While increased pH enhanced calcification rates both in the light and in the dark at pH >8.6, photosynthetic rates decreased. On the other hand, an increase in dissolved CO 2 concentration to ˜26 μmol kg -1 (by bubbling with air containing 0.9 mbar CO 2) caused a decrease in seawater pH which resulted in 20% less calcification after 5 days of exposure, while enhancing photosynthetic rates by 13%. The ecological implications of these findings is that photosynthetically driven changes in water chemistry by surrounding plants can affect calcification rates of coralline algae, as may future ocean acidification resulting from elevated atmospheric CO 2.

  13. Characterization and optimization of hydrogen production by a salt water blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. II - Use of immobilization for enhancement of hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phlips, E. J.; Mitsui, A.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of cellular immobilization was applied to the process of hydrogen photoproduction of nonheterocystous, filamentous marine blue-green alga, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. Immobilization with agar significantly improved the rate and longevity of hydrogen production, compared to free cell suspensions. Rates of H2 production in excess of 13 microliters H2 mg dry/wt h were observed and hydrogen production was sustained for three weeks. Immobilization also provided some stabilization to environmental variability and was adaptable to outdoor light conditions. In general, immobilization provides significant advantages for the production and maintenance of hydrogen photoproduction for this strain.

  14. Aurearenophyceae classis nova, a new class of Heterokontophyta based on a new marine unicellular alga Aurearena cruciata gen. et sp. nov. inhabiting sandy beaches.

    PubMed

    Kai, Atsushi; Yoshii, Yukie; Nakayama, Takeshi; Inouye, Isao

    2008-07-01

    A new heterokontophyte alga, Aurearena cruciata gen. et sp. nov., was isolated from sandy beaches in Japan. Isolates were characterized by light and electron microscopy, spectroscopy of pigment composition, and molecular phylogenetic analyses using 18S rDNA and rbcL. The alga usually possessed a cell wall but also retained two heterokont flagella beneath the cell wall. Each walled cell first produced only a single flagellate cell that subsequently divided into two flagellate cells. Electron-opaque vesicles, possibly associated with cell wall formation, were observed beneath the cell membrane. The chloroplast consisted of two compartments, each enclosed by a chloroplast envelope and the inner membrane of the chloroplast endoplasmic reticulum; these two compartments were surrounded by a common outer membrane of chloroplast endoplasmic reticulum. Molecular phylogenetic trees suggested that this alga was a new and independent member of the clade that included the Phaeophyceae and Xanthophyceae (PX clade). A new class, Aurearenophyceae classis nova was proposed for A. cruciata. PMID:18358776

  15. Transcriptional coordination of physiological responses in Nannochloropsis oceanica CCMP1779 under light/dark cycles.

    PubMed

    Poliner, Eric; Panchy, Nicholas; Newton, Linsey; Wu, Guangxi; Lapinsky, Andrew; Bullard, Blair; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Benning, Christoph; Shiu, Shin-Han; Farré, Eva M

    2015-09-01

    Nannochloropsis oceanica CCMP1779 is a marine unicellular stramenopile and an emerging reference species for basic research on oleogenic microalgae with biotechnological relevance. We investigated its physiology and transcriptome under light/dark cycles. We observed oscillations in lipid content and a predominance of cell division in the first half of the dark phase. Globally, more than 60% of the genes cycled in N. oceanica CCMP1779, with gene expression peaking at different times of the day. Interestingly, the phase of expression of genes involved in certain biological processes was conserved across photosynthetic lineages. Furthermore, in agreement with our physiological studies we found the processes of lipid metabolism and cell division enriched in cycling genes. For example, there was tight coordination of genes involved in the lower part of glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and lipid production at dawn preceding lipid accumulation during the day. Our results suggest that diel lipid storage plays a key role for N. oceanica CCMP1779 growth under natural conditions making this alga a promising model to gain a basic mechanistic understanding of triacylglycerol production in photosynthetic cells. Our data will help the formulation of new hypotheses on the role of cyclic gene expression in cell growth and metabolism in Nannochloropsis. PMID:26216534

  16. Biomass, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition of marine Nannochloropsis gaditana cultured in desalination concentrate.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ângelo Paggi; Feller, Rafael; Moecke, Elisa Helena Siegel; Sant'Anna, Ernani Sebastião

    2015-12-01

    In this study the feasibility of growing marine Nannochloropsis gaditana in desalination concentrate (DC) was explored and the influence of the DC concentration on the biomass growth, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition was assessed. The reuse of the medium with the optimum DC concentration in successive algal cultivation cycles and the additional of a carbon source to the optimized medium were also evaluated. On varying the DC concentration, the maximum biomass concentration (0.96gL(-1)) and lipid content (12.6%) were obtained for N. gaditana in the medium with the optimum DC concentration (75%). Over the course of the reuse of the optimum DC medium, three cultivation cycles were performed, observing that the biomass productivity is directly correlated to lipid productivity. Palmitic acid was the major fatty acid found in N. gaditana cells. The saturated fatty acids content of the algae enhanced significantly on increasing the DC concentration. PMID:26318921

  17. Cultivation of Nannochloropsis for eicosapentaenoic acid production in wastewaters of pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Anna; Valev, Dimitar; Tarvainen, Marko; Mishra, Sujata; Kinnunen, Viljami; Antal, Taras; Yang, Baoru; Rintala, Jukka; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2015-10-01

    The eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) containing marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata was grown in an effluent from anaerobic digestion of excess activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant serving a combination of a pulp and a paper mill and a municipality (digester effluent, DE), mixed with the effluent of the same wastewater treatment plant. The maximum specific growth rate and photosynthesis of N. oculata were similar in the DE medium and in artificial sea water medium (ASW) but after 7 days, algae grown in the DE medium contained seven times more triacylglycerols (TAGs) per cell than cells grown in ASW, indicating mild stress in the DE medium. However, the volumetric rate of EPA production was similar in the ASW and DE media. The results suggest that N. oculata could be used to produce EPA, utilizing the nutrients available after anaerobic digestion of excess activated sludge of a pulp and paper mill. PMID:26162525

  18. Multi-gene phylogenetic analyses of New Zealand coralline algae: Corallinapetra Novaezelandiae gen. et sp. nov. and recognition of the Hapalidiales ord. nov.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Wendy A; Sutherland, Judith E; Farr, Tracy J; Hart, Darren R; Neill, Kate F; Kim, Hee Jeong; Yoon, Hwan Su

    2015-06-01

    Coralline red algae from the New Zealand region were investigated in a study focused on documenting regional diversity. We present a multi-gene analysis using sequence data obtained for four genes (nSSU, psaA, psbA, rbcL) from 68 samples. The study revealed cryptic diversity at both genus and species levels, confirming and providing further evidence of problems with current taxonomic concepts in the Corallinophycidae. In addition, a new genus Corallinapetra novaezelandiae gen. et sp. nov. is erected for material from northern New Zealand. Corallinapetra is excluded from all currently recognized families and orders within the Corallinophycidae and thus represents a previously unrecognized lineage within this subclass. We discuss rank in the Corallinophycidae and propose the order Hapalidiales. PMID:26986662

  19. Biomass and hydrogen photoproduction by a marine blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7 in natural seawater culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, S.

    1985-01-01

    A non-heterocystous marine blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7 showed high biomass yields and hydrogen production rates in a natural seawater based system. Variations in water quality such as salinity, pH, trace metal concentration and combined nitrogen level did not affect either the biomass or the hydrogen production. Recycling of the two steps involved in hydrogen production (i.e., aerobic growth phase and anaerobic hydrogen production phase) significantly increased (> 400%) the hydrogen yield. Immobilization of cells improved hydrogen production activity and its tolerance to adverse environmental conditions. Both the biomass and hydrogen production were not affected under uncontrolled outdoor environments. High biomass yield (250 mg dry wt/l/day or 40 g/m/sup 2//day), solar energy conversion efficiency (3.2%) and hydrogen production rate (1 ml H/sub 2//ml gel/day) were obtained in small scale outdoor systems.

  20. Crouania pumila sp. nov. (Callithamniaceae: Rhodophyta), a new species of marine red algae from the Seaflower International Biosphere Reserve, Caribbean Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gavio, Brigitte; Reyes-Gómez, Viviana P; Wynne, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    In the Colombian Caribbean, the marine macroalgal flora of the Seaflower International Biosphere Reserve has been little studied, despite its ecological importance. Historical records have reported only 201 macroalgae species within its area of almost 350,000 km2. However, recent surveys have shown a diversity of small algae previously overlooked. With the aim to determine the macroalgal diversity in the Reserve, we undertook field surveys in different ecosystems: coral reefs, seagrass beds, and rocky and sandy substrates, at different depths, from intertidal to 37 m. During these field surveys, we collected a small described species belonging to the genus Crouania (Callithamniaceae, Rhodophyta), Crouania pumila sp. nov. that is decribed in this paper. This new species was distinguished from other species of the genus by a distinctive suite of traits including its diminutive size (to only 3.5 mm in length), its decumbent, slightly calcified habit (epiphytic on other algae), its ramisympodial branching, the ecorticate main axes, and the elongate shape of the terminal cells of the cortical filaments. The observations were provided for both female (cystocarpic) and tetrasporangiate thalli; however, male thalli were not seen. Further studies have to be undertaken in this Reserve in order to carry out other macroalgal analysis and descriptions. PMID:24027904

  1. Acidophilic green alga Pseudochlorella sp. YKT1 accumulates high amount of lipid droplets under a nitrogen-depleted condition at a low-pH.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Shunsuke; Higuchi, Sumio; Uzuka, Akihiro; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2014-01-01

    Microalgal storage lipids are considered to be a promising source for next-generation biofuel feedstock. However, microalgal biodiesel is not yet economically feasible due to the high cost of production. One of the reasons for this is that the use of a low-cost open pond system is currently limited because of the unavoidable contamination with undesirable organisms. Extremophiles have an advantage in culturing in an open pond system because they grow in extreme environments toxic to other organisms. In this study, we isolated the acidophilic green alga Pseudochlorella sp. YKT1 from sulfuric acid mine drainage in Nagano Prefecture, Japan. The vegetative cells of YKT1 display the morphological characteristics of Trebouxiophyceae and molecular phylogenetic analyses indicated it to be most closely related to Pseudochlorella pringsheimii. The optimal pH and temperature for the growth of YKT1 are pH 3.0-5.0 and a temperature 20-25°C, respectively. Further, YKT1 is able to grow at pH 2.0 and at 32°C, which corresponds to the usual water temperature in the outdoors in summer in many countries. YKT1 accumulates a large amount of storage lipids (∼30% of dry weigh) under a nitrogen-depleted condition at low-pH (pH 3.0). These results show that acidophilic green algae will be useful for industrial applications by acidic open culture systems. PMID:25221913

  2. Modelling and Optimization of Nannochloropsis and Chlorella Growth for Various Locations and Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozloo, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil providing domestic renewable energy. Algae-based biofuels are attractive for their large oil yield potential despite decreased land use and natural-resource requirements compared to terrestrial energy crops. Important factors controlling algal-lipid productivity include temperature, nutrient availability, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational approaches allow for inexpensive predictions of algae-growth kinetics for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without multiple, expensive measurement systems. In this work, we parameterize our physics-based computational algae growth model for the marine Nannochloropsis oceanica and freshwater Chlorella species. We then compare modelling results with experiments conducted in identical raceway ponds at six geographical locations in the United States (Hawaii, California, Arizona, Ohio, Georgia, and Florida) and three seasons through the Algae Testbed Public Private Partnership - Unified Field Studies. Results show that the computational model effectively predicts algae growth in systems across varying environments and identifies the causes for reductions in algal productivities. The model is then used to identify improvements to the cultivation system to produce higher biomass yields. This model could be used to study the effects of scale-up including the effects of predation, depth-decay of light (light extinction), and optimized nutrient and CO2 delivery. As more multifactorial data are accumulated for a variety of algal strains, the model could be used to select appropriate algal species for various geographic and climatic locations and seasons. Applying the model facilitates optimization of pond designs based on location and season.

  3. Inhibitory effects of soluble algae products (SAP) released by Scenedesmus sp. LX1 on its growth and lipid production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Yu, Yin; Wu, Yin-Hu; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2013-10-01

    Soluble algal products (SAP) accumulated in culture medium via water reuse may affect the growth of microalga during the cultivation. Scenedesmus sp. LX1, a freshwater microalga, was used in this study to investigate the effect of SAP on growth and lipid production of microalga. Under the SAP concentrations of 6.4-25.8 mg L(-1), maximum algal density (K) and maximum growth rate (Rmax) of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 were decreased by 50-80% and 35-70% compared with the control group, respectively. The effect of SAP on lipid accumulation of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 was non-significant. According to hydrophilic-hydrophobic and acid-base properties, SAP was fractionized into six fractions. All of the fractions could inhibit the growth of Scenedesmus sp. LX1. Organic bases (HIB, HOB) and hydrophilic acids (HIA) showed the strongest inhibition. HIA could also decrease the lipid content of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 by 59.2%. As the inhibitory effect, SAP should be seriously treated before water reuse. PMID:23982061

  4. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic laboratory-scale digestion of Nannochloropsis microalga residues.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, H V; Koskinen, P E P; Rintala, J

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies methane production using a marine microalga, Nannochloropsis sp. residue from biodiesel production. Residue cake from Nannochloropsis, oils wet-extracted, had a methane potential of 482LCH4kg(-1) volatile solids (VS) in batch assays. However, when dry-extracted, the methane potential of residue cake was only 194LCH4kg(-1) VS. In semi-continuous reactor trials with dry-extracted residue cake, a thermophilic reactor produced 48% higher methane yield (220LCH4kg(-1)VS) than a mesophilic reactor (149LCH4kg(-1)VS). The thermophilic reactor was apparently inhibited due to ammonia with organic loading rate (OLR) of 2kgVSm(-3)d(-1) (hydraulic retention time (HRT) 46d), whereas the mesophilic reactor performed with OLR of 3kgVSm(-3)d(-1) (HRT 30d). Algal salt content did not inhibit digestion. Additional methane (18-33% of primary digester yield) was produced during 100d post-digestion. PMID:24462882

  5. Use of biofuel by-product from the green algae Desmochloris sp. and diatom Nanofrustulum sp. meal in diets for nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Algal by-product meals from the Hawaiian biofuels industry were evaluated as protein ingredients in diets for juveniles of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Four experimental diets were formulated to contain 40% protein and were made with fish meal, soybean meal, whole diatom (Nanofrustulum sp.)...

  6. Long-term experiment on physiological responses to synergetic effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod in the Antarctic sea ice algae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Yitao; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Dongsheng; Ye, Naihao; Zhang, Xiaowen; Mou, Shanli; Guan, Zheng; Zhuang, Zhimeng

    2014-07-15

    Studies on ocean acidification have mostly been based on short-term experiments of low latitude with few investigations of the long-term influence on sea ice communities. Here, the combined effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod on the physiological response of the Antarctic sea ice microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L were examined. There was a general increase in growth, PSII photosynthetic parameters, and N and P uptake in continuous light, compared to those exposed to regular dark and light cycles. Elevated pCO2 showed no consistent effect on growth rate (p=0.8) and N uptake (p=0.38) during exponential phrase, depending on the photoperiod but had a positive effect on PSII photosynthetic capacity and P uptake. Continuous dark reduced growth, photosynthesis, and nutrient uptake. Moreover, intracellular lipid, mainly in the form of PUFA, was consumed at 80% and 63% in low and high pCO2 in darkness. However, long-term culture under high pCO2 gave a more significant inhibition of growth and Fv/Fm to high light stress. In summary, ocean acidification may have significant effects on Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L survival in polar winter. The current study contributes to an understanding of how a sea ice algae-based community may respond to global climate change at high latitudes. PMID:24922067

  7. The complete plastid genome sequence of the parasitic green alga Helicosporidium sp. is highly reduced and structured

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Audrey P; Keeling, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Background Loss of photosynthesis has occurred independently in several plant and algal lineages, and represents a major metabolic shift with potential consequences for the content and structure of plastid genomes. To investigate such changes, we sequenced the complete plastid genome of the parasitic, non-photosynthetic green alga, Helicosporidium. Results The Helicosporidium plastid genome is among the smallest known (37.5 kb), and like other plastids from non-photosynthetic organisms it lacks all genes for proteins that function in photosynthesis. Its reduced size results from more than just loss of genes, however; it has little non-coding DNA, with only one intron and tiny intergenic spaces, and no inverted repeat (no duplicated genes at all). It encodes precisely the minimal complement of tRNAs needed to translate the universal genetic code, and has eliminated all redundant isoacceptors. The Helicosporidium plastid genome is also highly structured, with each half of the circular genome containing nearly all genes on one strand. Helicosporidium is known to be related to trebouxiophyte green algae, but the genome is structured and compacted in a manner more reminiscent of the non-photosynthetic plastids of apicomplexan parasites. Conclusion Helicosporidium contributes significantly to our understanding of the evolution of plastid DNA because it illustrates the highly ordered reduction that occurred following the loss of a major metabolic function. The convergence of plastid genome structure in Helicosporidium and the Apicomplexa raises the interesting possibility that there are common forces that shape plastid genomes, subsequent to the loss of photosynthesis in an organism. PMID:16630350

  8. Enhanced lipid recovery from Nannochloropsis microalgae by treatment with optimized cell wall degrading enzyme mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zuorro, Antonio; Miglietta, Selenia; Familiari, Giuseppe; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    A statistical mixture design approach was used to investigate the effects of cell wall degrading enzymes on the recovery of lipids from Nannochloropsis sp. A preliminary screening of potentially suitable enzyme preparations, including lysozyme, cellulase and different types of hemicellulases, was carried out. The most effective preparations were then taken as basic components for the formulation of enzyme mixtures. Optimized ternary mixtures consisting of cellulase and two hemicellulases were obtained which allowed the recovery of up to 37.2g of lipids per 100g of dry biomass. SEM and TEM images of the enzymatically treated microalga revealed extensive cell damage, with degradation of the cell wall and release of intracellular material. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate that the mixture design method can be used to prepare cell wall degrading enzyme cocktails that can significantly improve the recovery of lipids or other valuable components from microalgae. PMID:27078205

  9. The importance of light and photoperiod in sexual reproduction and geographical distribution in the green snow alga, Chloromonas sp.-D (Chlorophyceae, Volvocales)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoham, Ronald W.; Marcarelli, Amy M.; Rogers, Haldre S.; Ragan, Michael D.; Petre, Benjamin M.; Ungerer, Michael D.; Barnes, Joseph M.; Francis, David O.

    2000-12-01

    The effects of premating light regimes on sexual reproduction and the production of spherical cells in Chloromonas sp.-D, a unicellular green snow alga, were studied using cross-mating strains 582C and 582D isolated from snowpacks associated with mixed hardwood- softwood forests in Whetstone Gulf State Park, Tughill Plateau, NY. Two pre-acclimation regimes were used, Vita-Lite as controls (530- 700 nm peak) and blue light as experimentals (430- 460 nm peak) prior to the mating experiments. In blue light, an increase in the number of matings and spherical cells (spheres) produced in the life cycle was observed as the photoperiod increased. This implies that longer photoperiods of blue light are more optimal for sexual reproduction in Chloromonas sp.-D than shorter ones. Under Vita-Lite, there was a significant increase in the number of matings and spheres with the extended 20 : 4 photoperiod compared with the shorter 14 : 10 photoperiod. Under blue light, significantly more matings and spheres occurred than under Vita-Lite using the same irradiance level of 95µmol photons m-2 s-1 (photosynthetically active radiation [PAR] of 400- 700 nm) for the 14 : 10 and 20 : 4 photoperiods. The results of these experiments suggest that Chloromonas sp.-D, known only from the Tughill Plateau, NY, is not reproducing optimally at this site where it grows and reproduces under an approximate 14 : 10 photoperiod in early April. However, in the upper 10 cm of snow in the Tughill Plateau, a blue light irradiance level of 95µmol photons m-2 s-1 occurs, which is optimal for this species. When these conditions are combined with a 14 : 10 photoperiod, the Tughill Plateau appears to be sub-optimal for mating and production of spherical cells. Since Chloromonas sp.-D does not appear to have a dependence on a dark cycle, this would allow it to expand its geographical distribution. It may reproduce more optimally under blue light (95µmol photons m-2 s-1) with an extended photoperiod (>20 : 4

  10. Enhancement of Biodiesel Production from Marine Alga, Scenedesmus sp. through In Situ Transesterification Process Associated with Acidic Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ga Vin; Choi, WoonYong; Kang, DoHyung; Lee, ShinYoung; Lee, HyeonYong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the yield of biodiesel produced by Scenedesmus sp. through in situ transesterification by optimizing various process parameters. Based on the orthogonal matrix analysis for the acidic catalyst, the effects of the factors decreased in the order of reaction temperature (47.5%) > solvent quantity (26.7%) > reaction time (17.5%) > catalyst amount (8.3%). Based on a Taguchi analysis, the effects of the factors decreased in the order of solvent ratio (34.36%) > catalyst (28.62%) > time (19.72%) > temperature (17.32%). The overall biodiesel production appeared to be better using NaOH as an alkaline catalyst rather than using H2SO4 in an acidic process, at 55.07 ± 2.18% (based on lipid weight) versus 48.41 ± 0.21%. However, in considering the purified biodiesel, it was found that the acidic catalyst was approximately 2.5 times more efficient than the alkaline catalyst under the following optimal conditions: temperature of 70°C (level 2), reaction time of 10 hrs (level 2), catalyst amount of 5% (level 3), and biomass to solvent ratio of 1 : 15 (level 2), respectively. These results clearly demonstrated that the acidic solvent, which combined oil extraction with in situ transesterification, was an effective catalyst for the production of high-quantity, high-quality biodiesel from a Scenedesmus sp. PMID:24689039

  11. The production of sulfonated chitosan-sodium alginate found in brown algae (Sargassum sp.) composite membrane as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wafiroh, Siti; Pudjiastuti, Pratiwi; Sari, Ilma Indana

    2016-03-01

    The majority of energy was used in this period is from fossil fuel, which getting decreased in the future. The objective of this research is production and characterization of sulfonated chitosan-sodium alginate found in brown algae (Sargassum sp.) composite membrane as Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) for alternative energy. PEMFC was produced with 4 variations (w/w) ratio between chitosan and sodium alginate, 8 : 0, 8 : 1, 8 : 2, 8 : 4 (w/w). The production of membrane was mixed sodium alginate solution into chitosan solution and sulfonated with H2SO4 0.72 N. The characterization of the PEM was uses Modulus Young analysis, water swelling, ion exchange capacity, FTIR, SEM, DTA, methanol permeability and proton conductivity. The result of the research, showed that the optimum membrane was with ratio 8 : 2 (w/w) that the Modulus Young 8564 kN/m2, water swelling 31.86%, ion exchange capacity 1.020 meq/g, proton conductivity 8,8 × 10-6 S/cm, methanol permeability 1.90 × 10-8 g/cm2s and glass transition temperature (Tg) 100.9 °C, crystalline temperature (Tc) 227.6 °C, and the melting temperature (Tm) 267.9 °C.

  12. Effective Biological DeNOx of Industrial Flue Gas by the Mixotrophic Cultivation of an Oil-Producing Green Alga Chlorella sp. C2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixian; Zhang, Shanshan; Rong, Junfeng; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are the components of fossil flue gas that result in the most serious environmental concerns. We previously showed that the biological removal of NOx by microalgae appears superior to traditional treatments. This study optimizes the strategy for the microalgal-based DeNOx of flue gas by fed-batch mixotrophic cultivation. By using actual flue gas fixed salts (FGFS) as the nitrogen supply, the mixotrophical cultivation of the green alga Chlorella sp. C2 with high NOx absorption efficiency was optimized in a stepwise manner in a 5 L bioreactor and resulted in a maximum biomass productivity of 9.87 g L(-1) d(-1). The optimized strategy was further scaled up to 50 L, and a biomass productivity of 7.93 g L(-1) d(-1) was achieved, with an overall DeNOx efficiency of 96%, along with an average nitrogen CR of 0.45 g L(-1) d(-1) and lipid productivity of 1.83 g L(-1) d(-1). With an optimized mixotrophical cultivation, this study further proved the feasibility of using Chlorella for the combination of efficient biological DeNOx of flue gas and microalgae-based products production. Thus, this study shows a promising industrial strategy for flue gas biotreatment in plants with limited land area. PMID:26751001

  13. Symbiodinium thermophilum sp. nov., a thermotolerant symbiotic alga prevalent in corals of the world's hottest sea, the Persian/Arabian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Hume, B. C. C.; D'Angelo, C.; Smith, E. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Burt, J.; Wiedenmann, J.

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are in rapid decline on a global scale due to human activities and a changing climate. Shallow water reefs depend on the obligatory symbiosis between the habitat forming coral host and its algal symbiont from the genus Symbiodinium (zooxanthellae). This association is highly sensitive to thermal perturbations and temperatures as little as 1°C above the average summer maxima can cause the breakdown of this symbiosis, termed coral bleaching. Predicting the capacity of corals to survive the expected increase in seawater temperatures depends strongly on our understanding of the thermal tolerance of the symbiotic algae. Here we use molecular phylogenetic analysis of four genetic markers to describe Symbiodinium thermophilum, sp. nov. from the Persian/Arabian Gulf, a thermally tolerant coral symbiont. Phylogenetic inference using the non-coding region of the chloroplast psbA gene resolves S. thermophilum as a monophyletic lineage with large genetic distances from any other ITS2 C3 type found outside the Gulf. Through the characterisation of Symbiodinium associations of 6 species (5 genera) of Gulf corals, we demonstrate that S. thermophilum is the prevalent symbiont all year round in the world's hottest sea, the southern Persian/Arabian Gulf. PMID:25720577

  14. Symbiodinium thermophilum sp. nov., a thermotolerant symbiotic alga prevalent in corals of the world's hottest sea, the Persian/Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Hume, B C C; D'Angelo, C; Smith, E G; Stevens, J R; Burt, J; Wiedenmann, J

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are in rapid decline on a global scale due to human activities and a changing climate. Shallow water reefs depend on the obligatory symbiosis between the habitat forming coral host and its algal symbiont from the genus Symbiodinium (zooxanthellae). This association is highly sensitive to thermal perturbations and temperatures as little as 1°C above the average summer maxima can cause the breakdown of this symbiosis, termed coral bleaching. Predicting the capacity of corals to survive the expected increase in seawater temperatures depends strongly on our understanding of the thermal tolerance of the symbiotic algae. Here we use molecular phylogenetic analysis of four genetic markers to describe Symbiodinium thermophilum, sp. nov. from the Persian/Arabian Gulf, a thermally tolerant coral symbiont. Phylogenetic inference using the non-coding region of the chloroplast psbA gene resolves S. thermophilum as a monophyletic lineage with large genetic distances from any other ITS2 C3 type found outside the Gulf. Through the characterisation of Symbiodinium associations of 6 species (5 genera) of Gulf corals, we demonstrate that S. thermophilum is the prevalent symbiont all year round in the world's hottest sea, the southern Persian/Arabian Gulf. PMID:25720577

  15. Subunit Asa1 spans all the peripheral stalk of the mitochondrial ATP synthase of the chlorophycean alga Polytomella sp.

    PubMed

    Colina-Tenorio, Lilia; Miranda-Astudillo, Héctor; Cano-Estrada, Araceli; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Cardol, Pierre; Remacle, Claire; González-Halphen, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial F1FO-ATP synthase of chlorophycean algae is dimeric. It contains eight orthodox subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, OSCP, a and c) and nine atypical subunits (Asa1 to 9). These subunits build the peripheral stalk of the enzyme and stabilize its dimeric structure. The location of the 66.1kDa subunit Asa1 has been debated. On one hand, it was found in a transient subcomplex that contained membrane-bound subunits Asa1/Asa3/Asa5/Asa8/a (Atp6)/c (Atp9). On the other hand, Asa1 was proposed to form the bulky structure of the peripheral stalk that contacts the OSCP subunit in the F1 sector. Here, we overexpressed and purified the recombinant proteins Asa1 and OSCP and explored their interactions in vitro, using immunochemical techniques and affinity chromatography. Asa1 and OSCP interact strongly, and the carboxy-terminal half of OSCP seems to be instrumental for this association. In addition, the algal ATP synthase was partially dissociated at relatively high detergent concentrations, and an Asa1/Asa3/Asa5/Asa8/a/c10 subcomplex was identified. Furthermore, Far-Western analysis suggests an Asa1-Asa8 interaction. Based on these results, a model is proposed in which Asa1 spans the whole peripheral arm of the enzyme, from a region close to the matrix-exposed side of the mitochondrial inner membrane to the F1 region where OSCP is located. 3D models show elongated, helix-rich structures for chlorophycean Asa1 subunits. Asa1 subunit probably plays a scaffolding role in the peripheral stalk analogous to the one of subunit b in orthodox mitochondrial enzymes. PMID:26657474

  16. Description of Lecythium terrestris sp. nov. (Chlamydophryidae, Cercozoa), a Soil Dwelling Protist Feeding on Fungi and Algae.

    PubMed

    Dumack, Kenneth; Müller, Marina E H; Bonkowski, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Testate amoebae have been frequently studied by protistologists, but still little information is available on some groups like the Chlamydophryidae. These amoebae are difficult to culture and therefore quantitative information on their morphology, phylogeny and ecology is scarce. We isolated and cultured a small testate amoeba from an agricultural field at Müncheberg near Berlin, Germany. Morphological analyses revealed it to be a new species of the genus Lecythium. We describe Lecythium terrestris sp. nov. and present its morphology, mycophagous and algivorous feeding habits and its ability to form cell aggregates by fusion. Using small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene phylogeny, we could confirm the phylogenetic position of the genus Lecythium among the Cercozoa where it groups closely to Pseudodifflugiidae (Tectofilosida). PMID:26874465

  17. Evaluation of the potential of 9 Nannochloropsis strains for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yubin; Wang, Zhiyao; Yu, Changjiang; Yin, Yehu; Zhou, Gongke

    2014-09-01

    Nannochloropsis have attracted sustained interest from algal biodiesel researchers due to their high biomass accumulation rate and high lipid content. There are six recognized species in the Nannochloropsis genus that are phylogenetically divided into Nannochloropsis gaditana, Nannochloropsis salina, Nannochloropsis granulata, Nannochloropsis limnetica, Nannochloropsis oceanica and Nannochloropsis oculata. In this study, the potential of 9 Nannochloropsis species from the 6 genus for biodiesel production was evaluated by determining their growth rate, biomass accumulation, lipid productivity, lipid composition, fatty acid profiles and biodiesel properties. The results showed that the best strain was N. oceanica IMET1, with lipid productivity of 158.76 ± 13.83 mg L(-1)day(-1), TAG production of 1.67 ± 0.20 g/L, favorable fatty acid profiles of C16-C18 (56.62 ± 1.96%) as well as suitable biodiesel properties of higher cetane number (54.61 ± 0.25), lower iodine number (104.85 ± 2.80 g I2/100g) and relative low cloud point (3.45 ± 0.50°C). N. oceanica IMET1 could be consider as valuable feedstock for microalgal biodiesel production. PMID:25013933

  18. Effects of inorganic carbon concentration on carbon formation, nitrate utilization, biomass and oil accumulation of Nannochloropsis oculata CS 179.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Gu, Na; Li, Gang; Lin, Junda; Huang, Liangmin; Tan, LingLing

    2012-05-01

    This investigation examined the effects of the inorganic carbon concentration (4, 0.8 and 0 g/L NaHCO(3)) on the carbon formation, nitrate utilization, growth and fatty acids compositions of Nannochloropsis oculata. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration in the three treatments decreased sharply during the first 6 days, and the percentage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (% of total organic carbon (TOC)) decreased with the depletion of the DIC. The NO(3)(-) assimilation of the algae was correlated with the DIC concentration. The algae in the highest DIC treatment had the highest specific grow rate (0.0843 d(-1)) (P<0.0001), and their biomass and fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) productivity were 84.00 and 9.69 mg/L/d, respectively (P<0.0001). Contents of C16 and C18 series (% of FAME) were high and the C16:0 increased with the decrease of C18:1 during the cultivation. The iodine value (IV) of the algae was low at the low DIC media. PMID:22386465

  19. Safety assessment of EPA-rich polar lipid oil produced from the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Michael L; Sullivan, Dexter W; Gad, Shayne C; Ballou, Corey M

    2014-01-01

    Almega PL is an eicosapentaenoic acid-rich ω-3 oil that is isolated from Nannochloropsis oculata algae and developed as a dietary supplement. The safety of the algal oil was evaluated in 14- and 90-day studies in Sprague-Dawley rats by oral gavage at dose levels of 0, 250, 500, and 2500 mg/kg/d and 0, 200, 400, and 2000 mg/kg/d, respectively. No mortalities occurred and no signs of toxicity were observed during the studies. No treatment-related effects were seen for body weight, food consumption, ophthalmology, neurological effects, urinalysis, clinical pathology, gross pathology, organ weights, or histopathology. Although statistically significant effects were noted for some end points, none were considered to be of toxicological significance. The no observed adverse effect level for Almega PL was 2000 mg/kg/d. Additionally, Almega PL was not mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium or Escherichia coli, did not induce chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and did not induce genotoxic effects in vivo in rat bone marrow erythrocytes. PMID:25305242

  20. NUCLEAR MONOPLOIDY AND ASEXUAL PROPAGATION OF NANNOCHLOROPSIS OCEANICA (EUSTIGMATOPHYCEAE) AS REVEALED BY ITS GENOME SEQUENCE(1).

    PubMed

    Pan, Kehou; Qin, Junjie; Li, Si; Dai, Wenkui; Zhu, Baohua; Jin, Yuanchun; Yu, Wengong; Yang, Guanpin; Li, Dongfang

    2011-12-01

    Species in genus Nannochloropsis are promising candidates for both biofuel and biomass production due to their ability to accumulate rich fatty acids and grow fast; however, their sexual reproduction has not been studied. It is clear that the construction of their metabolic pathways, such as that of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biosynthesis, and understanding of their biological characteristics, such as nuclear ploidy and reproductive strategy, will certainly facilitate their genetic improvement through gene engineering and mutation and clonal expansion. In this study, the genome of N. oceanica S. Suda et Miyashita was sequenced with the next-generation Illumina GA sequencing technologies. The genome was ∼30 Mb in size, which contained 11,129 protein-encoding genes. Of them, 59.65% were annotated by aligning with those in diverse protein databases, and 29.68% were assigned at least one function described in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. Less frequent polymorphic nucleotides (one in 22.06 kb) and the obvious deviation from 1:1 (major:minor, minor ≥10) expectation indicated the nuclear monoploidy of N. oceanica. The lack of the majority of meiosis-specific proteins implied the asexual reproduction of this alga. In combination, the nuclear monoploidy and asexual propagation led us to favor the hypothesis that N. oceanica was a premeiotic or ameiotic alga. In addition, sequence similarity-based searching identified the elongase- and desaturase-encoding genes involved in the biosynthesis of long-chain PUFAs, which provided the genetic basis of its rich content of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). The functional genes and their metabolic pathways profiled against its genome sequence will facilitate its integrative investigations. PMID:27020366

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Mitochondrial Genomes in Eustigmatophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Klimeš, Vladimír; Zbránková, Veronika; Strnad, Hynek; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Eustigmatophyceae (Ochrophyta, Stramenopiles) is a small algal group with species of the genus Nannochloropsis being its best studied representatives. Nuclear and organellar genomes have been recently sequenced for several Nannochloropsis spp., but phylogenetically wider genomic studies are missing for eustigmatophytes. We sequenced mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of three species representing most major eustigmatophyte lineages, Monodopsis sp. MarTras21, Vischeria sp. CAUP Q 202 and Trachydiscus minutus, and carried out their comparative analysis in the context of available data from Nannochloropsis and other stramenopiles, revealing a number of noticeable findings. First, mitogenomes of most eustigmatophytes are highly collinear and similar in the gene content, but extensive rearrangements and loss of three otherwise ubiquitous genes happened in the Vischeria lineage; this correlates with an accelerated evolution of mitochondrial gene sequences in this lineage. Second, eustigmatophytes appear to be the only ochrophyte group with the Atp1 protein encoded by the mitogenome. Third, eustigmatophyte mitogenomes uniquely share a truncated nad11 gene encoding only the C-terminal part of the Nad11 protein, while the N-terminal part is encoded by a separate gene in the nuclear genome. Fourth, UGA as a termination codon and the cognate release factor mRF2 were lost from mitochondria independently by the Nannochloropsis and T. minutus lineages. Finally, the rps3 gene in the mitogenome of Vischeria sp. is interrupted by the UAG codon, but the genome includes a gene for an unusual tRNA with an extended anticodon loop that we speculate may serve as a suppressor tRNA to properly decode the rps3 gene. PMID:26872774

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Mitochondrial Genomes in Eustigmatophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Klimeš, Vladimír; Zbránková, Veronika; Strnad, Hynek; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Eustigmatophyceae (Ochrophyta, Stramenopiles) is a small algal group with species of the genus Nannochloropsis being its best studied representatives. Nuclear and organellar genomes have been recently sequenced for several Nannochloropsis spp., but phylogenetically wider genomic studies are missing for eustigmatophytes. We sequenced mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of three species representing most major eustigmatophyte lineages, Monodopsis sp. MarTras21, Vischeria sp. CAUP Q 202 and Trachydiscus minutus, and carried out their comparative analysis in the context of available data from Nannochloropsis and other stramenopiles, revealing a number of noticeable findings. First, mitogenomes of most eustigmatophytes are highly collinear and similar in the gene content, but extensive rearrangements and loss of three otherwise ubiquitous genes happened in the Vischeria lineage; this correlates with an accelerated evolution of mitochondrial gene sequences in this lineage. Second, eustigmatophytes appear to be the only ochrophyte group with the Atp1 protein encoded by the mitogenome. Third, eustigmatophyte mitogenomes uniquely share a truncated nad11 gene encoding only the C-terminal part of the Nad11 protein, while the N-terminal part is encoded by a separate gene in the nuclear genome. Fourth, UGA as a termination codon and the cognate release factor mRF2 were lost from mitochondria independently by the Nannochloropsis and T. minutus lineages. Finally, the rps3 gene in the mitogenome of Vischeria sp. is interrupted by the UAG codon, but the genome includes a gene for an unusual tRNA with an extended anticodon loop that we speculate may serve as a suppressor tRNA to properly decode the rps3 gene. PMID:26872774

  3. Catenovulum maritimus sp. nov., a novel agarolytic gammaproteobacterium isolated from the marine alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (AST58-103), and emended description of the genus Catenovulum.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Qi; Zhou, Yan-Xia; Liu, Tao; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2015-08-01

    A novel agarolytic, Gram-stain negative, heterotrophic, facultatively anaerobic and pale-white pigmented bacterial strain, designated Q1(T), was isolated from the marine alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda (AST58-103) collected from the coastal area of Weihai, China. The cells are motile by means of peritrichous flagella. The isolate requires NaCl for growth, while seawater is not necessary, and growth occurs optimally at about 30-33 °C, in 1-3 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7-7.5. Strain Q1(T) shows oxidase-positive and catalase-negative activities, and possesses the ability to hydrolyse starch and alginate, but not cellulose, gelatin, urea or Tween-80. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain Q1(T) is affiliated with the family Alteromonadaceae within the class Gammaproteobacteria. The isolate, strain Q1(T), is most closely related to Catenovulum agarivorans YM01(T) (94.85 %), with less than 91.2 % sequence similarity to other close relatives with validly published names. The draft genome sequence of strain Q1(T) consists of 62 contigs (>200 bp) of 4,548,270 bp. The genomes of Q1(T) and YM01(T) have an ANI value of 70.7 %, and the POCP value between the two genomes is 64.4 %. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain Q1(T) is 37.9 mol% as calculated from the draft genome sequence. The main isoprenoid quinone is ubiquinone-8. The predominant cellular fatty acids are summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH), C16:0 and C18:1 ω7c. The major polar lipids are phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. Based on data from a polyphasic chemotaxonomic, physiological and biochemical study, strain Q1(T) should be classified as a novel species of the genus Catenovulum, for which the name Catenovulum maritimus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Q1(T) (=CICC 10836(T)=DSM 28813(T)). PMID:26036673

  4. Effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, S. ); Sengar, R.M.S. ); Mittal, S.; Bhattacharjee, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Algal species (65) were isolated from oil refinery effluent. Twenty-five of these species were cultured in Benecke's medium in a growth chamber, along with controls. Retardation in algal growth, inhibition in algal photosynthesis, and discoloration was observed in petroleum enriched medium. Few forms, viz. Cyclotella sp., Cosmarium sp., and Merismopedia sp. could not survive. The lag phase lengthened by several days and slope of exponential phase was also depressed. Chlamydomonas sp., Scenedesmus sp., Ankistrodesmus sp., Nitzschia sp. and Navicula sp. were comparatively susceptible to petroleum. Depression in carbon fixation, cell numbers, and total dry algal mass was noticeable, showing toxicity to both diatoms and green algae.

  5. Harvesting fresh water and marine algae by magnetic separation: screening of separation parameters and high gradient magnetic filtration.

    PubMed

    Cerff, Martin; Morweiser, Michael; Dillschneider, Robert; Michel, Aymeé; Menzel, Katharina; Posten, Clemens

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the focus is on magnetic separation of fresh water algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris as well as marine algae Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Nannochloropsis salina by means of silica-coated magnetic particles. Due to their small size and low biomass concentrations, harvesting algae by conventional methods is often inefficient and cost-consuming. Magnetic separation is a powerful tool to capture algae by adsorption to submicron-sized magnetic particles. Hereby, separation efficiency depends on parameters such as particle concentration, pH and medium composition. Separation efficiencies of >95% were obtained for all algae while maximum particle loads of 30 and 77 g/g were measured for C. reinhardtii and P. tricornutum at pH 8 and 12, respectively. This study highlights the potential of silica-coated magnetic particles for the removal of fresh water and marine algae by high gradient magnetic filtration and provides critical discussion on future improvements. PMID:22705536

  6. The Study of Algae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  7. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-09-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal objects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charophyte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorption spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance between 400-550nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this high absorbance was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did hardly change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400-500nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. PMID:27442511

  8. Lipidomic analysis can distinguish between two morphologically similar strains of Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Xu, Jilin; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Chengxu; Yu, Xuejun; Zhong, Yingying; Chen, Juanjuan; Yan, Xiaojun

    2015-04-01

    The two morphologically similar microalgae NMBluh014 and NMBluh-X belong to two different strains of Nannochloropsis oceanica. They possess obviously different feeding effects on bivalves, but are indistinguishable by 18S rRNA and morphological features. In this work, lipidomic analysis followed by principal component analysis and orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis provided a clear distinction between these strains. Metabolites that definitively contribute to the classification were selected as potential biomarkers. The most important difference in polar lipids were sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (containing 18:1/16:0 and 18:3/16:0) and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (containing 18:3/16:3 and 20:5/14:0), which were detected only in NMBluh-X. Additionally, an exhaustive qualitative and quantitative profiling of the neutral lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) in the two strains was carried out. The predominant species of TAG containing 16:1/16:1/16:1 acyl groups was detected only in NMBluh-X with a content of ~93.67 ± 11.85 nmol · mg(-1) dry algae at the onset of stationary phase. Meanwhile, TAG containing 16:0/16:0/16:0 was the main TAG in NMBluh014 with a content of 40.25 ± 3.92 nmol · mg(-1) . These results provided the most straightforward evidence for differentiating the two species. The metabolomic profiling indicated that NMBluh-X underwent significant chemical and physiological changes during the growth process, whereas NMBluh014 did not show such noticeable time-dependent metabolite change. This study is the first using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Electrospray ionization-Quadrupole-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) for lipidomic profiling with multivariate statistical analysis to explore lipidomic differences of plesiomorphous microalgae. Our results demonstrate that lipidomic profiling is a valid chemotaxonomic tool in the study of microalgal systematics. PMID:26986522

  9. CO2 Biofixation and Growth Kinetics of Chlorella vulgaris and Nannochloropsis gaditana.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Michał; Lasek, Janusz; Skawińska, Agnieszka

    2016-08-01

    CO2 biofixation was investigated using tubular bioreactors (15 and 1.5 l) either in the presence of green algae Chlorella vulgaris or Nannochloropsis gaditana. The cultivation was carried out in the following conditions: temperature of 25 °C, inlet-CO2 of 4 and 8 vol%, and artificial light enhancing photosynthesis. Higher biofixation were observed in 8 vol% CO2 concentration for both microalgae cultures than in 4 vol%. Characteristic process parameters such as productivity, CO2 fixation, and kinetic rate coefficient were determined and discussed. Simplified and advanced methods for determination of CO2 fixation were compared. In a simplified method, it is assumed that 1 kg of produced biomass equals 1.88 kg recycled CO2. Advance method is based on empirical results of the present study (formula with carbon content in biomass). It was observed that application of the simplified method can generate large errors, especially if the biomass contains a relatively low amount of carbon. N. gaditana is the recommended species for CO2 removal due to a high biofixation rate-more than 1.7 g/l/day. On day 10 of cultivation, the cell concentration was more than 1.7 × 10(7) cells/ml. In the case of C. vulgaris, the maximal biofixation rate and cell concentration did not exceed 1.4 g/l/day and 1.3 × 10(7) cells/ml, respectively. PMID:27052208

  10. Effect of Interactions Among Algae on Nitrogen Fixation by Blue-Green Algae (Cyanobacteria) in Flooded Soils

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John T.; Greene, Sarah; Alexander, Martin

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) by algae in flooded soil was limited by interactions within the algal community. Nitrogen fixation by either indigenous algae or Tolypothrix tenuis was reduced severalfold by a dense suspension of the green alga Nephrocytium sp. Similarly, interactions between the nitrogen-fixing alga (cyanobacterium) Aulosira 68 and natural densities of indigenous algae limited nitrogen-fixing activity in one of two soils examined. This was demonstrated by developing a variant of Aulosira 68 that was resistant to the herbicide simetryne at concentrations that prevented development of indigenous algae. More nitrogen was fixed by the resistant variant in flooded soil containing herbicide than was fixed in herbicide-free soil by either the indigenous algae or indigenous algae plus the parent strain of Aulosira. Interference from indigenous algae may hamper the development of nitrogen-fixing algae introduced into rice fields in attempts to increase biological nitrogen fixation. PMID:16345463

  11. Nutrient removal from horticultural wastewater by benthic filamentous algae Klebsormidium sp., Stigeoclonium spp. and their communities: From laboratory flask to outdoor Algal Turf Scrubber (ATS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzhuo; Danneels, Bram; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Benthic filamentous algae have evident advantages in wastewater treatment over unicellular microalgae, including the ease in harvesting and resistance to predation. To assess the potentials of benthic filamentous algae in treating horticultural wastewater under natural conditions in Belgium, three strains and their mixture with naturally wastewater-borne microalgae were cultivated in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks in laboratory as well as in 1 m(2) scale outdoor Algal Turf Scrubber (ATS) with different flow rates. Stigeoclonium competed well with the natural wastewater-borne microalgae and contributed to most of the biomass production both in Erlenmeyer flasks and outdoor ATS at flow rates of 2-6 L min(-1) (water velocity 3-9 cm s(-1)), while Klebsormidium was not suitable for growing in horticultural wastewater under the tested conditions. Flow rate had great effects on biomass production and nitrogen removal, while phosphorus removal was less influenced by flow rate due to other mechanisms than assimilation by algae. PMID:26841229

  12. Clearance Rate of the Mussel Anodonta Californiensis Exposed to Nannochloropsis Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, G. R.; Luthy, R. G.; Ismail, N.

    2012-12-01

    Bivalves such as mussels and clams are filter feeding organisms that can be utilized to remove particulate matter from water. The native mussel species Anodonta californiensis is being studied for use as a potential natural treatment mechanism to filter water within treatment wetlands. Quantifying the ability of these mussels to remove particulate matter is important information necessary to understand their potential to purify water. Results from clearance rate experiments will be discussed. Information obtained from these clearance rate experiments can potentially be extrapolated to understand the capability of mussels to remove other particulate matter or contaminants.

  13. The Phytoplankton Nannochloropsis oculata Enhances the Ability of Roseobacter Clade Bacteria to Inhibit the Growth of Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Sharifah, Emilia Noor; Eguchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Background Phytoplankton cultures are widely used in aquaculture for a variety of applications, especially as feed for fish larvae. Phytoplankton cultures are usually grown in outdoor tanks using natural seawater and contain probiotic or potentially pathogenic bacteria. Some Roseobacter clade isolates suppress growth of the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum. However, most published information concerns interactions between probiotic and pathogenic bacteria, and little information is available regarding the importance of phytoplankton in these interactions. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to identify probiotic Roseobacter clade members in phytoplankton cultures used for rearing fish larvae and to investigate their inhibitory activity towards bacterial fish pathogens in the presence of the phytoplankton Nannochloropsis oculata. Methodology/Principal Findings The fish pathogen V. anguillarum, was challenged with 6 Roseobacter clade isolates (Sulfitobacter sp. (2 strains), Thalassobius sp., Stappia sp., Rhodobacter sp., and Antarctobacter sp.) from phytoplankton cultures under 3 different nutritional conditions. In an organic nutrient-rich medium (VNSS), 6 Roseobacter clade isolates, as well as V. anguillarum, grew well (109 CFU/ml), even when cocultured. In contrast, in a phytoplankton culture medium (ESM) based on artificial seawater, coculture with the 6 isolates decreased the viability of V. anguillarum by approximately more than 10-fold. Excreted substances in media conditioned by growth of the phytoplankton N. oculata (NCF medium) resulted in the complete eradication of V. anguillarum when cocultured with the roseobacters. Autoclaved NCF had the same inhibitory effect. Furthermore, Sulfitobacter sp. much more efficiently incorporated 14C- photosynthetic metabolites (14C-EPM) excreted by N. oculata than did V. anguillarum. Conclusion/Significance Cocultures of a phytoplankton species and Roseobacter clade members exhibited a greater antibacterial

  14. Growth aspects of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Jorge M S; Garcia, Juan E C; Henriques, Marta H F

    2003-07-01

    Nannochloropsis is well appreciated in aquaculture due to its nutritional value and the ability to produce valuable chemical compounds, such as pigments (zeaxanthin, astaxanthin...) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (EPA). Commercial exploitation needs high cell densities but the low growth rate and the small size of cells are practical difficulties. To increase biomass concentration the positive effect of several factors was evident: (i) pH approximately 8 control (with dilute Tris-HCl buffer); (ii) the continuous illumination (no evidence of photo-inhibition was observed); (iii) a quite large temperature range (25+/-5 degrees C); (iv) the presence of organic carbon source (with the danger of contamination); (v) the presence of urea as an additional nitrogen source (10 mM); (vi) a small air flow rate with large bubbles can be more efficient for CO(2) mass transfer (associated to reduced shearing). PMID:12919803

  15. Adjusted Light and Dark Cycles Can Optimize Photosynthetic Efficiency in Algae Growing in Photobioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Eleonora; Simionato, Diana; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Bertucco, Alberto; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels from algae are highly interesting as renewable energy sources to replace, at least partially, fossil fuels, but great research efforts are still needed to optimize growth parameters to develop competitive large-scale cultivation systems. One factor with a seminal influence on productivity is light availability. Light energy fully supports algal growth, but it leads to oxidative stress if illumination is in excess. In this work, the influence of light intensity on the growth and lipid productivity of Nannochloropsis salina was investigated in a flat-bed photobioreactor designed to minimize cells self-shading. The influence of various light intensities was studied with both continuous illumination and alternation of light and dark cycles at various frequencies, which mimic illumination variations in a photobioreactor due to mixing. Results show that Nannochloropsis can efficiently exploit even very intense light, provided that dark cycles occur to allow for re-oxidation of the electron transporters of the photosynthetic apparatus. If alternation of light and dark is not optimal, algae undergo radiation damage and photosynthetic productivity is greatly reduced. Our results demonstrate that, in a photobioreactor for the cultivation of algae, optimizing mixing is essential in order to ensure that the algae exploit light energy efficiently. PMID:22745696

  16. Growth of mono- and mixed cultures of Nannochloropsis salina and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on struvite as a nutrient source.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan W; Siccardi, Anthony J; Huysman, Nathan D; Wyatt, Nicholas B; Hewson, John C; Lane, Todd W

    2015-12-01

    The suitability of crude and purified struvite (MgNH4PO4), a major precipitate in wastewater streams, was investigated for renewable replacement of conventional nitrogen and phosphate resources for cultivation of microalgae. Bovine effluent wastewater stone, the source of crude struvite, was characterized for soluble N/P, trace metals, and biochemical components and compared to the purified mineral. Cultivation trials using struvite as a major nutrient source were conducted using two microalgae production strains, Nannochloropsis salina and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, in both lab and outdoor pilot-scale raceways in a variety of seasonal conditions. Both crude and purified struvite-based media were found to result in biomass productivities at least as high as established media formulations (maximum outdoor co-culture yield ∼20±4gAFDW/m(2)/day). Analysis of nutrient uptake by the alga suggest that struvite provides increased nutrient utilization efficiency, and that crude struvite satisfies the trace metals requirement and results in increased pigment productivity for both microalgae strains. PMID:26433155

  17. ELLIPTOCHLORIS MARINA SP. NOV. (TREBOUXIOPHYCEAE, CHLOROPHYTA), SYMBIOTIC GREEN ALGA OF THE TEMPERATE PACIFIC SEA ANEMONES ANTHOPLEURA XANTHOGRAMMICA AND A. ELEGANTISSIMA (ANTHOZOA, CNIDARIA)(1).

    PubMed

    Letsch, Molly R; Muller-Parker, Gisèle; Friedl, Thomas; Lewis, Louise A

    2009-10-01

    Symbiotic green algae from two species of intertidal Pacific sea anemones, Anthopleura elegantissima and Anthopleura xanthogrammica, were collected from the northeastern Pacific coast of North America across the known range of the symbiont. Freshly isolated Anthopleura symbionts were used for both morphological and molecular analyses because Anthopleura symbiont cultures were not available. Light and transmission electron microscopy supported previous morphological studies, showing the symbionts consist of spherical unicells from 5 to 10 μm in diameter, with numerous vesicles, and a single bilobed chloroplast. Pyrenoids were not seen in LM, but a thylakoid-free area was observed in TEM, consistent with previous findings. Many algal cells extracted from fresh anemone tissue were observed in the process of division, producing two autospores within a maternal cell wall. The morphology of the green symbionts matches that of Elliptochloris Tscherm.-Woess. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear SSU rDNA and the plastid encoded gene for the large subunit of RUBISCO (rbcL) support the monophyly of these green algal symbionts, regardless of host species and geographic origin. Phylogenetically, sequences of the Anthopleura symbionts are nested within the genus Elliptochloris and are distinct from sequences of all other Elliptochloris spp. examined. Given the ecological and phylogenetic distinctions among the green algal symbionts in Anthopleura spp. and the named species of Elliptochloris, we designate the green algal symbionts as a new species, Elliptochloris marina (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta). PMID:27032358

  18. Synchroma pusillum sp. nov. and other new algal isolates with chloroplast complexes confirm the Synchromophyceae (Ochrophyta) as a widely distributed group of amoeboid algae.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Maria; Horn, Susanne; Flieger, Kerstin; Ehlers, Katrin; Wilhelm, Christian; Schnetter, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Seven new isolates of the heterokont algal class Synchromophyceae are described from coastal habitats of the Atlantic Ocean, including the Caribbean and Mediterranean Seas. All of the new isolates contain chloroplast complexes, a key feature of this group of algae. Morphology, pigments and DNA sequences support a monophyletic grouping of the Synchromophyceae to the exclusion of other Ochrophyta (primarily photosynthetic stramenopiles). Within the Synchromophyceae, two phylogenetic clades based on rbcL and 18S rDNA data were discovered, which differ in cell size and also the number of plastid complexes per cell. Two isolates form a clade with the type species Synchroma grande, while all other isolates form a separate clade, including the newly described species S. pusillum. Further species delineation of the isolates is difficult due to the highly similar morphology and life cycle strategy. Phylogenetic relationships with other genera of the Ochrophyta, such as Leukarachnion and Chlamydomyxa, are apparent and shed light on a heterogeneous branch of heterokont evolution. PMID:22578425

  19. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Ivanov, Alexander G; Modla, Shannon; Czymmek, Kirk; Hüner, Norman P A; Priscu, John C; Lisle, John T; Hanson, Thomas E

    2008-09-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the "photopsychrophiles") in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10 degrees C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. PMID:18661097

  20. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan-Kiss, R. M.; Ivanov, A.G.; Modla, S.; Czymmek, K.; Huner, N.P.A.; Priscu, J.C.; Lisle, J.T.; Hanson, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the 'photopsychrophiles') in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10??C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. ?? 2008 Springer.

  1. RESPONSES OF MARINE UNICELLULAR ALGAE TO BROMINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SIX GROWTH MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine unicellular algae, Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Chlorella sp., were exposed to the industrial brominated compounds, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBP), decabromobiphenyloxide (DBBO), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromomethylbenzene (PBMB), pentabromo...

  2. Longitudinal Analysis of Microbiota in Microalga Nannochloropsis salina Cultures.

    PubMed

    Geng, Haifeng; Sale, Kenneth L; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao; Lane, Todd W; Yu, Eizadora T

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale open microalgae cultivation has tremendous potential to make a significant contribution to replacing petroleum-based fuels with biofuels. Open algal cultures are unavoidably inhabited with a diversity of microbes that live on, influence, and shape the fate of these ecosystems. However, there is little understanding of the resilience and stability of the microbial communities in engineered semicontinuous algal systems. To evaluate the dynamics and resilience of the microbial communities in microalgae biofuel cultures, we conducted a longitudinal study on open systems to compare the temporal profiles of the microbiota from two multigenerational algal cohorts, which include one seeded with the microbiota from an in-house culture and the other exogenously seeded with a natural-occurring consortia of bacterial species harvested from the Pacific Ocean. From these month-long, semicontinuous open microalga Nannochloropsis salina cultures, we sequenced a time-series of 46 samples, yielding 8804 operational taxonomic units derived from 9,160,076 high-quality partial 16S rRNA sequences. We provide quantitative evidence that clearly illustrates the development of microbial community is associated with microbiota ancestry. In addition, N. salina growth phases were linked with distinct changes in microbial phylotypes. Alteromonadeles dominated the community in the N. salina exponential phase whereas Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia were more prevalent in the stationary phase. We also demonstrate that the N. salina-associated microbial community in open cultures is diverse, resilient, and dynamic in response to environmental perturbations. This knowledge has general implications for developing and testing design principles of cultivated algal systems. PMID:26956183

  3. CO2 Biofixation by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and the Green Alga Chlorella fusca LEB 111 Grown Using Gas Effluents and Solid Residues of Thermoelectric Origin.

    PubMed

    da Silva Vaz, Bruna; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from 280 to 400 ppm in the last 10 years, and the coal-fired power plants are responsible for approximately 22 % of these emissions. The burning of fossil fuel also produces a great amount of solid waste that causes serious industrial and environmental problems. The biological processes become interesting alternative in combating pollution and developing new products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the CO2 biofixation potential of microalgae that were grown using gaseous effluents and solid residues of thermoelectric origin. The microalgae Chlorella fusca LEB 111 presented higher rate of CO2 biofixation (42.8 %) (p < 0.01) than did Spirulina sp. LEB 18. The values for the CO2 biofixation rates and the kinetic parameters of Spirulina and Chlorella cells grown using combustion gas did not differ significantly from those of cells grown using CO2 and a carbon source in the culture media. These microalgae could be grown using ash derived from coal combustion, using the minerals present in this residue as the source of the essential metals required for their growth and the CO2 derived from the combustion gas as their carbon source. PMID:26453033

  4. Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.K.; Wood, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    Six strains of algae and one Euglena sp. were tested for their ability to bioaccumulate nickel. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni was used together with a microplate technique to determine the conditions for nickel removal by axenic cultures of cyanobacteria, green algae, and one euglenoid. The cyanobacteria tested were found to be more sensitive to nickel toxicity than the green algae or the Euglena sp. The concentration factor (CF) for nickel was determined under a variety of conditions and found to be in the range from 0 to 3.0 x 10/sup 3/. The effect of environmental variables on nickel uptake was examined, and a striking pH effect for biaccumulation was observed, with most of the algal strains accumulating nickel optimally at approximately pH 8.0. Competition experiments for binding sites between nickel and other cations as well as with other complexing anions, showed that /sup 63/Ni uptake was affected only by cobalt and by humic acids.

  5. Novel Bacterial Isolate from Permian Groundwater, Capable of Aggregating Potential Biofuel-Producing Microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Laughinghouse, Haywood D.; Anderson, Matthew A.; Chen, Feng; Willliams, Ernest; Place, Allen R.; Zmora, Odi; Zohar, Yonathan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing petroleum costs and climate change have resulted in microalgae receiving attention as potential biofuel producers. Little information is available on the diversity and functions of bacterial communities associated with biofuel-producing algae. A potential biofuel-producing microalgal strain, Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1, was grown in Permian groundwater. Changes in the bacterial community structure at three temperatures were monitored by two culture-independent methods, and culturable bacteria were characterized. After 9 days of incubation, N. oceanica IMET1 began to aggregate and precipitate in cultures grown at 30°C, whereas cells remained uniformly distributed at 15°C and 25°C. The bacterial communities in cultures at 30°C changed markedly. Some bacteria isolated only at 30°C were tested for their potential for aggregating microalgae. A novel bacterium designated HW001 showed a remarkable ability to aggregate N. oceanica IMET1, causing microalgal cells to aggregate after 3 days of incubation, while the total lipid content of the microalgal cells was not affected. Direct interaction of HW001 and N. oceanica is necessary for aggregation. HW001 can also aggregate the microalgae N. oceanica CT-1, Tetraselmis suecica, and T. chuii as well as the cyanobacterium Synechococcus WH8007. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons indicated the great novelty of this strain, which exhibited only 89% sequence similarity with any previously cultured bacteria. Specific primers targeted to HW001 revealed that the strain originated from the Permian groundwater. This study of the bacterial communities associated with potential biofuel-producing microalgae addresses a little-investigated area of microalgal biofuel research and provides a novel approach to harvest biofuel-producing microalgae by using the novel bacterium strain HW001. PMID:22194289

  6. Draft genome sequence and genetic transformation of the oleaginous alga Nannochloropis gaditana.

    PubMed

    Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E; Fuerstenberg, Susan I; Tae, Hongseok; Settlage, Robert E; Boore, Jeffrey L; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2012-01-01

    The potential use of algae in biofuels applications is receiving significant attention. However, none of the current algal model species are competitive production strains. Here we present a draft genome sequence and a genetic transformation method for the marine microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana CCMP526. We show that N. gaditana has highly favourable lipid yields, and is a promising production organism. The genome assembly includes nuclear (~29 Mb) and organellar genomes, and contains 9,052 gene models. We define the genes required for glycerolipid biogenesis and detail the differential regulation of genes during nitrogen-limited lipid biosynthesis. Phylogenomic analysis identifies genetic attributes of this organism, including unique stramenopile photosynthesis genes and gene expansions that may explain the distinguishing photoautotrophic phenotypes observed. The availability of a genome sequence and transformation methods will facilitate investigations into N. gaditana lipid biosynthesis and permit genetic engineering strategies to further improve this naturally productive alga. PMID:22353717

  7. Draft genome sequence and genetic transformation of the oleaginous alga Nannochloropis gaditana

    PubMed Central

    Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Fuerstenberg, Susan I.; Tae, Hongseok; Settlage, Robert E.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    The potential use of algae in biofuels applications is receiving significant attention. However, none of the current algal model species are competitive production strains. Here we present a draft genome sequence and a genetic transformation method for the marine microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana CCMP526. We show that N. gaditana has highly favourable lipid yields, and is a promising production organism. The genome assembly includes nuclear (~29 Mb) and organellar genomes, and contains 9,052 gene models. We define the genes required for glycerolipid biogenesis and detail the differential regulation of genes during nitrogen-limited lipid biosynthesis. Phylogenomic analysis identifies genetic attributes of this organism, including unique stramenopile photosynthesis genes and gene expansions that may explain the distinguishing photoautotrophic phenotypes observed. The availability of a genome sequence and transformation methods will facilitate investigations into N. gaditana lipid biosynthesis and permit genetic engineering strategies to further improve this naturally productive alga. PMID:22353717

  8. A quantitative kinetic model for the fast and isothermal hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis sp.

    PubMed

    Hietala, David C; Faeth, Julia L; Savage, Phillip E

    2016-08-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a technology for converting algal biomass into biocrude oil and high-value products. To elucidate the underlying kinetics for this process, we conducted isothermal and non-isothermal reactions over a broad range of holding times (10s-60min), temperatures (100-400°C), and average heating rates (110-350°Cmin(-1)). Biocrude reached high yields (⩾37wt%) within 2min for heat-source set-point temperatures of 350°C or higher. We developed a microalgal HTL kinetic model valid from 10s to 60min, including significantly shorter timescales (10s-10min) than any previous model. The model predicts that up to 46wt% biocrude yields are achievable at 400°C and 1min, reaffirming the utility of short holding times and "fast" HTL. We highlight potential trade-offs between maximizing biocrude quantity and facilitating aqueous phase recovery, which may improve biocrude quality. PMID:27128195

  9. Fatty acid composition analyses of the DCMU resistant mutants of Nannochloropsis oculata (eustigmatophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimin, Zhang; Shuang, Liu; Xue, Sun; Guanpin, Yang; Xuecheng, Zhang; Zhenhui, Gao

    2003-04-01

    Ultraviolet mutagenesis was applied to Nannochloropsis oculata and three mutants resistant to 3-(3, 4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) were isolated. The cellular chlorophyll a and total lipid content of the wild are higher in the medium supplemented with DCMU than in the control without DCMU. Without DCMU, the growth rates and chlorophyll a contents of the mutants are similar to those of the wild. Significant changes of fatty acid content and composition have occurred in DCMU-resistant mutants growing in the medium supplemented with DCMU. The total lipid, palmitic acid (16:0), palmitoleic acid (16:1ω9) and oleic (18:1ω9) contents decrease significantly, while the vaccenic acid (18:1ω11) increases significantly and the EPA content of dried powder increases slightly in the mutants. The study may provide a basis to improve EPA content in Nannochloropsis oculata in the future.

  10. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk with your health provider.Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Blue-green algae might slow blood clotting. Taking blue-green algae along with medications that ...

  11. Magnetic separation of algae

    DOEpatents

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  12. Phylogeny of the Eustigmatophyceae Based upon 18S rDNA, with Emphasis on Nannochloropsis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, R A; Brett, R W; Potter, D; Sexton, J P

    1998-02-01

    Complete 18S rDNA sequences were determined for 25 strains representing five genera of the Eustigmatophyceae, including re-examination of three strains with previously published sequences. Parsimony analysis of these and 44 published sequences for other heterokont chromophytes (unalignable sites removed) revealed that the Eustigmatophyceae were a monophyletic group. Analysis of eustigmatophyte taxa only (complete gene analyzed) supported the current familial classification scheme. Twenty one strains of Nannochloropsis were also examined using light microscopy. Gross morphology of cells was variable and overlapped among the strains; cell size was consistent within strains but sometimes varied considerably among strains of a species. The 18S rDNA of N. gaditana, N. oculata and N. salina was re-sequenced for strains used in previous publications and one or more nucleotide differences were found. Nucleotide sequences for Nannochloropsis species varied by up to 32 nucleotides. Identical sequences were found for six strains of N. salina, five strains of N. gadifana, four strains of N. granulata, and two strains of N. oculata, respectively. Four strains could not be assigned to described species and may represent two new species. The unique 18S rDNA sequences for each sibling species of Nannochloropsis demonstrates the presence of considerable genetic diversity despite the extremely simple morphology in this genus. PMID:23196114

  13. A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Braden J.; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Chavis, Aaron R.; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L ARID (Algae Raceway Integrated Design) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8 to 20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superior temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9 °C, the water temperature was 18 °C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 - 25 % and 5 - 15 %, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acid comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 vs 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.34 vs. 3.47 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.

  14. Unlocking nature's treasure-chest: screening for oleaginous algae.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Stephen P; Zhang, QianYi; Ross, Michael; Anderson, Avril; Thomas, Naomi J; Lapresa, Ángela; Rad-Menéndez, Cecilia; Campbell, Christine N; Black, Kenneth D; Stanley, Michele S; Day, John G

    2015-01-01

    Micro-algae synthesize high levels of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins photoautotrophically, thus attracting considerable interest for the biotechnological production of fuels, environmental remediation, functional foods and nutraceuticals. Currently, only a few micro-algae species are grown commercially at large-scale, primarily for "health-foods" and pigments. For a range of potential products (fuel to pharma), high lipid productivity strains are required to mitigate the economic costs of mass culture. Here we present a screen concentrating on marine micro-algal strains, which if suitable for scale-up would minimise competition with agriculture for water. Mass-Spectrophotometric analysis (MS) of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) was subsequently validated by measurement of total fatty acids (TFA) by Gas-Chromatography (GC). This identified a rapid and accurate screening strategy based on elemental analysis. The screen identified Nannochloropsis oceanica CCAP 849/10 and a marine isolate of Chlorella vulgaris CCAP 211/21A as the best lipid producers. Analysis of C, N, protein, carbohydrate and Fatty Acid (FA) composition identified a suite of strains for further biotechnological applications e.g. Dunaliella polymorpha CCAP 19/14, significantly the most productive for carbohydrates, and Cyclotella cryptica CCAP 1070/2, with utility for EPA production and N-assimilation. PMID:26202369

  15. Basis for the Resistance of Several Algae to Microbial Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Gunnison, Douglas; Alexander, Martin

    1975-01-01

    The basis for the resistance of certain algae to microbial decomposition in natural waters was investigated using Pediastrum duplex, Staurastrum sp., and Fischerella muscicola as test organisms. Enzyme preparations previously found to convert susceptible algae into spheroplasts had no such effect on the resistant species, although glucose and galacturonic acid were released from P. duplex walls. Little protein or lipid but considerable carbohydrate was found in the walls of the refractory organisms, but resistance was not correlated with the presence of a unique sugar monomer. A substance present in Staurastrum sp. walls was characterized as lignin or lignin-like on the basis of its extraction characteristics, infrared spectrum, pyrolysis pattern, and content of an aromatic building block. Sporopollenin was found in P. duplex, and cellulose in Staurastrum sp. Cell walls of the algae were fractionated, and the fractions least susceptible to microbial degradation were the sporopollenin of P. duplex, the polyaromatic component of Staurastrum sp., and two F. muscicola fractions containing several sugar monomers. The sporopollenin content of P. duplex, the content of lignin or a related constituent of Staurastrum sp., and the resistance of the algae to microbial attack increased with age. It is suggested that resistance results from the presence of sporopollenin in P. duplex, a lignin-like material in Staurastrum sp., and possibly heteropolysaccharides in F. muscicola. PMID:808166

  16. Cloning and phylogenetic analysis of a fatty acid elongase gene from Nannochloropsis oculata CS179

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kehou; Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Baohua; Yang, Guanpin

    2009-12-01

    Nannochloropsis oculata CS179, a unicellular marine microalga, is rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs). Elongase and desaturase play a key role in the biosynthesis of PUFAs. A new elongase gene, which encodes 322 amino acids, was identified via RT-PCR and 5' and 3' RACE. The sequence of the elongase gene was blast-searched in the NCBI GenBank and showed a similarity to those of the cryptosporidium. But the NJ-tree revealed that the N. oculata CS179 elongase clustered with those of the microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Ostreococcus tauri and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

  17. [Harmful algae and health].

    PubMed

    Kankaanpää, Harri T

    2011-01-01

    Harmful algae are a worldwide problem. Phycotoxins is a general term for toxic compounds produced by harmful species of the phytoplankton. This review deals with the occurrence of harmful algae and phycotoxins in the Baltic Sea and other domestic waters, the ways of getting exposed to them, and their effects. Advice on how to avoid the exposure is provided. PMID:21834336

  18. Manipulation of oil synthesis in Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145 with a phosphorus starvation-inducible promoter from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Masako; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs) under conditions of nutrient stress. Phosphorus (P) starvation induces the accumulation of TAGs, and the cells under P starvation maintain growth through photosynthesis. We recently reported that P starvation-dependent overexpression of type-2 diacylglycerol acyl-CoA acyltransferase (CrDGTT4) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using a sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol synthase 2 (SQD2) promoter, which has increased activity during P starvation, enhances TAG accumulation in C. reinhardtii cells. As a result, the content of C18:1 fatty acid, a preferred substrate of CrDGTT4, is increased in TAGs. Here we isolated genes encoding SQD2 from strain NIES-2145 of the eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis and showed that their expression, like that in C. reinhardtii, was up-regulated during P starvation. To enhance oil accumulation under P starvation, we transformed pCrSQD2-CrDGTT4 into Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145. The transformants had a fatty acid composition that was more similar to that of C. reinhardtii, which resulted in enhanced TAG accumulation and higher 18:1(9) content. The results indicated that the P starvation-inducible promoter of C. reinhardtii was able to drive expression of the CrDGTT4 gene in Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145 under P starvation. We conclude that the heterologous CrSQD2 promoter is effective in manipulating TAG synthesis in Nannochloropsis during P starvation. PMID:26441858

  19. Responses of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 to Long-Term Nitrogen Starvation and Recovery1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hong-Po; Williams, Ernest; Wang, Da-zhi; Xie, Zhang-Xian; Hsia, Ru-ching; Jenck, Alizée; Halden, Rolf; Li, Jing; Chen, Feng; Place, Allen R.

    2013-01-01

    The Nannochloropsis genus contains oleaginous microalgae that have served as model systems for developing renewable biodiesel. Recent genomic and transcriptomic studies on Nannochloropsis species have provided insights into the regulation of lipid production in response to nitrogen stress. Previous studies have focused on the responses of Nannochloropsis species to short-term nitrogen stress, but the effect of long-term nitrogen deprivation remains largely unknown. In this study, physiological and proteomic approaches were combined to understand the mechanisms by which Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is able to endure long-term nitrate deprivation and its ability to recover homeostasis when nitrogen is amended. Changes of the proteome during chronic nitrogen starvation espoused the physiological changes observed, and there was a general trend toward recycling nitrogen and storage of lipids. This was evidenced by a global down-regulation of protein expression, a retained expression of proteins involved in glycolysis and the synthesis of fatty acids, as well as an up-regulation of enzymes used in nitrogen scavenging and protein turnover. Also, lipid accumulation and autophagy of plastids may play a key role in maintaining cell vitality. Following the addition of nitrogen, there were proteomic changes and metabolic changes observed within 24 h, which resulted in a return of the culture to steady state within 4 d. These results demonstrate the ability of N. oceanica IMET1 to recover from long periods of nitrate deprivation without apparent detriment to the culture and provide proteomic markers for genetic modification. PMID:23637339

  20. Manipulation of oil synthesis in Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145 with a phosphorus starvation–inducible promoter from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Masako; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs) under conditions of nutrient stress. Phosphorus (P) starvation induces the accumulation of TAGs, and the cells under P starvation maintain growth through photosynthesis. We recently reported that P starvation–dependent overexpression of type-2 diacylglycerol acyl-CoA acyltransferase (CrDGTT4) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using a sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol synthase 2 (SQD2) promoter, which has increased activity during P starvation, enhances TAG accumulation in C. reinhardtii cells. As a result, the content of C18:1 fatty acid, a preferred substrate of CrDGTT4, is increased in TAGs. Here we isolated genes encoding SQD2 from strain NIES-2145 of the eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis and showed that their expression, like that in C. reinhardtii, was up-regulated during P starvation. To enhance oil accumulation under P starvation, we transformed pCrSQD2-CrDGTT4 into Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145. The transformants had a fatty acid composition that was more similar to that of C. reinhardtii, which resulted in enhanced TAG accumulation and higher 18:1(9) content. The results indicated that the P starvation–inducible promoter of C. reinhardtii was able to drive expression of the CrDGTT4 gene in Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145 under P starvation. We conclude that the heterologous CrSQD2 promoter is effective in manipulating TAG synthesis in Nannochloropsis during P starvation. PMID:26441858

  1. Algae Derived Biofuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, Kauser

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  2. Exploration on Bioflocculation of Nannochloropsis oculata Using Response Surface Methodology for Biodiesel Production

    PubMed Central

    Surendhiran, Duraiarasan; Vijay, Mani

    2014-01-01

    Harvesting of algal biomass in biodiesel production involves high energy input and cost incurred process. In order to overcome these problems, bioflocculation process was employed and the efficiency of this process was further improved by the addition of a cationic inducer. In this work marine Bacillus subtilis was used for bioflocculation of Nannochloropsis oculata and ZnCl2 as cationic inducer. This study worked under the principle of divalent cationic bridging (DCB) theory. Under temperature stress and high pH, the bacterium produced exopolysaccharide that bound with microalga Nannochloropsis oculata and flocculated them. A maximum efficiency of 95.43% was observed with the optimised RSM parameters—temperature 30.78°C, pH 10.8, flocculation time 6.7 h, bioflocculant size 0.38 mL, and cationic inducer concentration 0.035 mM. The present investigation focused on the cost effective harvesting of microalga on a larger scale for biodiesel production than using toxic, ecofriendly chemical flocculants. PMID:24683320

  3. In vitro bioaccessibility of proteins and lipids of pH-shift processed Nannochloropsis oculata microalga.

    PubMed

    Cavonius, L R; Albers, E; Undeland, I

    2016-04-01

    The pH-shift process fractionates biomass into soluble proteins and insoluble fractions, followed by precipitation and recovery of the solubilized proteins. Nannochloropsis oculata in seawater was subjected to the pH-shift process, followed by digestion of various intermediates and product fractions of the process, using the Infogest in vitro digestion model (Minekus et al., 2014) with added gastric lipase. As measures for protein and lipid accessibility, degrees of protein hydrolysis and fatty acid liberation were assessed post-digestion and compared to the amounts of peptide bonds and total fatty acids present in the raw materials. Results showed that neither proteins nor lipids of intact Nannochloropsis cells were accessible to the mammalian digestive enzymes used in the digestion model. Cell disruption, and to a lesser extent, further pH-shift processing with protein solubilisation at pH 7 or pH 10, increased the accessibility of lipids. For proteins, differences amongst the pH-shift processed materials were non-significant, though pre-freezing the product prior to digestion increased the accessibility from 32% to 47%. For fatty acids, pH-shift process-products gave rise to 43% to 52% lipolysis, with higher lipolysis for products solubilised at pH 10 as opposed to pH 7. Our results indicate the importance of processing to produce an algal product that has beneficial nutritional properties when applied as food or feed. PMID:27045666

  4. Light Remodels Lipid Biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana by Modulating Carbon Partitioning between Organelles.

    PubMed

    Alboresi, Alessandro; Perin, Giorgio; Vitulo, Nicola; Diretto, Gianfranco; Block, Maryse; Jouhet, Juliette; Meneghesso, Andrea; Valle, Giorgio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Maréchal, Eric; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2016-08-01

    The seawater microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana is capable of accumulating a large fraction of reduced carbon as lipids. To clarify the molecular bases of this metabolic feature, we investigated light-driven lipid biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana cultures combining the analysis of photosynthetic functionality with transcriptomic, lipidomic and metabolomic approaches. Light-dependent alterations are observed in amino acid, isoprenoid, nucleic acid, and vitamin biosynthesis, suggesting a deep remodeling in the microalgal metabolism triggered by photoadaptation. In particular, high light intensity is shown to affect lipid biosynthesis, inducing the accumulation of diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomo-Ser and triacylglycerols, together with the up-regulation of genes involved in their biosynthesis. Chloroplast polar lipids are instead decreased. This situation correlates with the induction of genes coding for a putative cytosolic fatty acid synthase of type 1 (FAS1) and polyketide synthase (PKS) and the down-regulation of the chloroplast fatty acid synthase of type 2 (FAS2). Lipid accumulation is accompanied by the regulation of triose phosphate/inorganic phosphate transport across the chloroplast membranes, tuning the carbon metabolic allocation between cell compartments, favoring the cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum at the expense of the chloroplast. These results highlight the high flexibility of lipid biosynthesis in N. gaditana and lay the foundations for a hypothetical mechanism of regulation of primary carbon partitioning by controlling metabolite allocation at the subcellular level. PMID:27325666

  5. A type 2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase accelerates the triacylglycerol biosynthesis in heterokont oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Wei; Cen, Shi-Ying; Liu, Yu-Hong; Balamurugan, Srinivasan; Zheng, Xin-Yan; Alimujiang, Adili; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2016-07-10

    Oleaginous microalgae have received a considerable attention as potential biofuel feedstock. However, lack of industry-suitable strain with lipid rich biomass limits its commercial applications. Targeted engineering of lipogenic pathways represents a promising strategy to enhance the efficacy of microalgal oil production. In this study, a type 2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), a rate-limiting enzyme in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis, was identified and overexpressed in heterokont oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica for the first time. Overexpression of DGAT2 in Nannochloropsis increased the relative transcript abundance by 3.48-fold in engineered microalgae cells. TAG biosynthesis was subsequently accelerated by DGAT2 overexpression and neutral lipid content was significantly elevated by 69% in engineered microalgae. The fatty acid profile determined by GC-MS revealed that fatty acid composition was altered in engineered microalgae. Saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids were found to be increased whereas monounsaturated fatty acids content decreased. Furthermore, DGAT2 overexpression did not show negative impact on algal growth parameters. The present investigation showed that the identified DGAT2 would be a potential candidate for enhancing TAG biosynthesis and might facilitate the development of promising oleaginous strains with industrial potential. PMID:27164260

  6. Light Remodels Lipid Biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana by Modulating Carbon Partitioning between Organelles1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vitulo, Nicola; Diretto, Gianfranco; Block, Maryse; Jouhet, Juliette; Meneghesso, Andrea; Valle, Giorgio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Maréchal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The seawater microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana is capable of accumulating a large fraction of reduced carbon as lipids. To clarify the molecular bases of this metabolic feature, we investigated light-driven lipid biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana cultures combining the analysis of photosynthetic functionality with transcriptomic, lipidomic and metabolomic approaches. Light-dependent alterations are observed in amino acid, isoprenoid, nucleic acid, and vitamin biosynthesis, suggesting a deep remodeling in the microalgal metabolism triggered by photoadaptation. In particular, high light intensity is shown to affect lipid biosynthesis, inducing the accumulation of diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomo-Ser and triacylglycerols, together with the up-regulation of genes involved in their biosynthesis. Chloroplast polar lipids are instead decreased. This situation correlates with the induction of genes coding for a putative cytosolic fatty acid synthase of type 1 (FAS1) and polyketide synthase (PKS) and the down-regulation of the chloroplast fatty acid synthase of type 2 (FAS2). Lipid accumulation is accompanied by the regulation of triose phosphate/inorganic phosphate transport across the chloroplast membranes, tuning the carbon metabolic allocation between cell compartments, favoring the cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum at the expense of the chloroplast. These results highlight the high flexibility of lipid biosynthesis in N. gaditana and lay the foundations for a hypothetical mechanism of regulation of primary carbon partitioning by controlling metabolite allocation at the subcellular level. PMID:27325666

  7. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  8. CONTRIBUTION OF MARINE ALGAE TO TRIHALOMETHANE PRODUCTION IN CHLORINATED ESTUARINE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three species of marine algae representing major taxonomic groups of phytoplankton, Isochrysis galbana (Chrysophyceae), Carteria sp. (Chlorophyceae), and Thalassiosira pseudonana (Bacillariphyceae), were utilized to investigate the potential of natural occurring chlorophyll a of ...

  9. Production of algae-based biodiesel using the continuous catalytic Mcgyan process.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Brian J; McNeff, Clayton V; Yan, Bingwen; Nowlan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the production of algal biodiesel from Dunaliella tertiolecta, Nannochloropsis oculata, wild freshwater microalgae, and macroalgae lipids using a highly efficient continuous catalytic process. The heterogeneous catalytic process uses supercritical methanol and porous titania microspheres in a fixed bed reactor to catalyze the simultaneous transesterification and esterification of triacylglycerides and free fatty acids, respectively, to fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel). Triacylglycerides and free fatty acids were converted to alkyl esters with up to 85% efficiency as measured by 300 MHz (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The lipid composition of the different algae was studied gravimetrically and by gas chromatography. The analysis showed that even though total lipids comprised upwards of 19% of algal dry weight the saponifiable lipids, and resulting biodiesel, comprised only 1% of dry weight. Thus highlighting the need to determine the triacylglyceride and free fatty acid content when considering microalgae for biodiesel production. PMID:20561783

  10. A Comparison of Nannochloropsis salina Growth Performance in Two Outdoor Pond Designs: Conventional Raceways versus the ARID Pond with Superior Temperature Management

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crowe, Braden; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jon; Chavis, Aaron; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kim L.; et al

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L algae raceway integrated design (ARID) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8-20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superiormore » temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9°C, the water temperature was 18°C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 to 25% and from 5 to15%, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acids comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 versus 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.47 versus 3.34 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.« less

  11. Comparative study of tissue deposition of omega-3 fatty acids from polar-lipid rich oil of the microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata with krill oil in rats.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Michael L; Levy, Aharon; Leikin-Frenkel, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) exert health benefits which are dependent upon their incorporation into blood, cells and tissues. Plasma and tissue deposition of LC n-3 PUFA from oils extracted from the micro-algae Nannochloropsis oculata and from krill were compared in rats. The algal oil provides eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) partly conjugated (15%) to phospholipids and glycolipids but no docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), whereas krill oil provides both EPA and DHA conjugated in part (40%) to phospholipids. Rats fed a standard diet received either krill oil or polar-lipid rich algal oil by gavage daily for 7 days (5 ml oil per kg body weight each day). Fatty acid concentrations were analyzed in plasma, brain and liver, and two adipose depots since these represent transport, functional and storage pools of fatty acids, respectively. When measuring total LC n-3 PUFA (sum of EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and DHA), there was no statistically significant difference between the algal oil and krill oil for plasma, brain, liver and gonadal adipose tissue. Concentrations of LC n-3 PUFA were higher in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue from the algal oil group. Tissue uptake of LC n-3 PUFA from an algal oil containing 15% polar lipids (glycolipids and phospholipids) was found to be equivalent to krill oil containing 40% phospholipids. This may be due to glycolipids forming smaller micelles during ingestive hydrolysis than phospholipids. Ingestion of fatty acids with glycolipids may improve bioavailability, but this needs to be further explored. PMID:25360534

  12. A Comparison of Nannochloropsis salina Growth Performance in Two Outdoor Pond Designs: Conventional Raceways versus the ARID Pond with Superior Temperature Management

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Braden; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jon; Chavis, Aaron; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kim L.; Huesemann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L algae raceway integrated design (ARID) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8-20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superior temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9°C, the water temperature was 18°C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 to 25% and from 5 to15%, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acids comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 versus 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.47 versus 3.34 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.

  13. Direct transesterification of Oedogonium sp. oil be using immobilized isolated novel Bacillus sp. lipase.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Ramachandran; Muthukumar, Karuppan

    2014-01-01

    This work emphasizes the potential of the isolated Bacillus sp. lipase for the production of fatty acid methyl ester by the direct transesterification of Oedogonium sp. of macroalgae. Dimethyl carbonate was used as the extraction solvent and also as the reactant. The effect of solvent/algae ratio, water addition, catalyst, temperature, stirring and time on the direct transesterification was studied. The highest fatty acid methyl ester yield obtained under optimum conditions (5 g Oedogonium sp. powder, 7.5 ml of solvent (dimethyl carbonate)/g of algae, 8% catalyst (%wt/wt of oil), distilled water 1% (wt/wt of algae), 36 h, 55°C and 180 rpm) was 82%. Final product was subjected to thermogravimetric analysis and (1)H NMR analysis. The results showed that the isolated enzyme has good potential in catalyzing the direct transesterification of algae, and the dimethyl carbonate did not affect the activity of the isolated lipase. PMID:23890544

  14. BIOCONCENTRATION OF A HEXACHLOROBIPHENYL IN GREAT LAKES PLANKTONIC ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioconcentration of 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (HCB) was examined in the Great Lakes algae Fragilaria crotonensis, Ankistrodesmus falcatus, and Microcystis sp. The bioconcentration factors varied from species to species, whether they were expressed in terms of cell num...

  15. The plastid genome of the red alga Laurencia.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Heroen; Costa, Joana F

    2015-06-01

    We present the 174,935 nt long plastid genome of the red alga Laurencia sp. JFC0032. It is the third plastid genome characterized for the largest order of red algae (Ceramiales). The circular-mapping plastid genome is small compared to most florideophyte red algae, and our comparisons show a trend toward smaller plastid genome sizes in the family Rhodomelaceae, independent from a similar trend in Cyanidiophyceae. The Laurencia genome is densely packed with 200 annotated protein-coding genes (188 widely conserved, 3 open reading frames shared with other red algae and 9 hypothetical coding regions). It has 29 tRNAs, a single-copy ribosomal RNA cistron, a tmRNA, and the RNase P RNA. PMID:26986672

  16. Triacylglycerol Accumulation in Photosynthetic Cells in Plants and Algae.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhi-Yan; Benning, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Plant and algal oils are some of the most energy-dense renewable compounds provided by nature. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are the major constituent of plant oils, which can be converted into fatty acid methyl esters commonly known as biodiesel. As one of the most efficient producers of TAGs, photosynthetic microalgae have attracted substantial interest for renewable fuel production. Currently, the big challenge of microalgae based TAGs for biofuels is their high cost compared to fossil fuels. A conundrum is that microalgae accumulate large amounts of TAGs only during stress conditions such as nutrient deprivation and temperature stress, which inevitably will inhibit growth. Thus, a better understanding of why and how microalgae induce TAG biosynthesis under stress conditions would allow the development of engineered microalgae with increased TAG production during conditions optimal for growth. Land plants also synthesize TAGs during stresses and we will compare new findings on environmental stress-induced TAG accumulation in plants and microalgae especially in the well-characterized model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and a biotechnologically relevant genus Nannochloropsis. PMID:27023236

  17. Temperature effects on lipid properties of microalgae Tetraselmis subcordiformis and Nannochloropsis oculata as biofuel resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Likun; Huang, Xuxiong; Huang, Zhengzheng

    2014-09-01

    Microalgae Tetraselmis subcordiformis and Nannochloropsis oculata were cultured at 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35°C and their properties as potential biofuel resources were examined. The results indicate that T. subcordiformis and N. oculata grew best at 20°C and 25°C and yielded the highest total lipids at 20°C and 30°C, respectively. With increased temperature, neutral lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) decreased while saturated FAs increased, accompanied by increased monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs) in T. subcordiformis and decreased MUFAs in N. oculata; meanwhile, the predicted cetane number of FA methyl esters increased from 45.3 to 47.6 in T. subcordiformis and from 52.3 to 60.3 in N. oculata. Therefore, optimizing culture temperatures is important for improving microalgal biodiesel production.

  18. Temperature effects on lipid properties of microalgae Tetraselmis subcordiformis and Nannochloropsis oculata as biofuel resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Likun; Huang, Xuxiong; Huang, Zhengzheng

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae Tetraselmis subcordiformis and Nannochloropsis oculata were cultured at 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35°C and their properties as potential biofuel resources were examined. The results indicate that T. subcordiformis and N. oculata grew best at 20°C and 25°C and yielded the highest total lipids at 20°C and 30°C, respectively. With increased temperature, neutral lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) decreased while saturated FAs increased, accompanied by increased monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs) in T. subcordiformis and decreased MUFAs in N. oculata; meanwhile, the predicted cetane number of FA methyl esters increased from 45.3 to 47.6 in T. subcordiformis and from 52.3 to 60.3 in N. oculata. Therefore, optimizing culture temperatures is important for improving microalgal biodiesel production.

  19. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, T.A.; Macia, V. Mora; Rooks, P.; White, D.A.; Ali, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed. PMID:26753128

  20. Cultivation of Nannochloropsis oceanica biomass rich in eicosapentaenoic acid utilizing wastewater as nutrient resource.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Madhusree; Shah, Freny; Bharadwaj, S V Vamsi; Patidar, Shailesh Kumar; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-10-01

    The eicosapentaenoic acid rich marine eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis oceanica was grown in wastewaters sampled from four different industries (i.e. pesticides industry, pharmaceutical industry, activated sludge treatment plant of municipality sewage and petroleum (oil) industry). Under the wastewater based growth conditions used in this study, the biomass productivity ranged from 21.78±0.87 to 27.78±0.22mgL(-1)d(-1) in relation to freeze dried biomass, while the lipid productivity varied between 5.59±0.02 and 6.81±0.04mgL(-1)d(-1). Although comparatively higher biomass, lipid and EPA productivity was observed in Conway medium, the %EPA content was similarly observed in pesticides industry and municipal effluents. The results highlight the possibility of selectively using wastewater as a growth medium, demonstrating the elevated eicosapentaenoic acid content and biodiesel properties, that complies with the European standards for biodiesel. PMID:27472494

  1. Cloning and characterization of a delta-6 desaturase encoding gene from Nannochloropsis oculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Pan, Jin; Yang, Guanpin

    2011-03-01

    A gene ( NANOC-D6D) encoding a desaturase that removes two hydrogen atoms from fatty acids at delta 6 position was isolated from a cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop) D. J. Hibberd (Eustigmatophyceae). The unicellular marine microalga N. oculata synthesizes rich long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA). The deduced protein contains 474 amino acids that fold into 4 trans-membrane domains. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicates that NANOC-D6D is phylogenetically close to the delta-6 fatty acid desaturase of marine microalgae such as Glossomastix chrysoplasta, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVScl to verify the substrate specificity of NANOC-D6D. Our results suggest that the recombinant NANOC-D6D simultaneously desaturates linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA).

  2. First record of a large-scale bloom-causing species Nannochloropsis granulata (Monodopsidaceae, Eustigmatophyceae) in China Sea waters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Kan, Jinjun; Wang, Jing; Gu, Haifeng; Hu, Jun; Zhao, Yuan; Sun, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Nannochloropsis is an ubiquitous genus, found in diverse aquatic environments including open ocean as well as fresh and brackish water. Recently, large-scale blooms occurred frequently along eutrophic coastal zone from the Bohai Sea to the northern Yellow Sea in China. The cell density reached 10(9) to 10(10)cells per liter during a bloom near Qinhuangdao, Hebei Province. The bloom forming species, a yellow-green microalgae was successfully isolated and cultivated in the laboratory. Microscopic observation indicated that the cells contained simple morphological characteristics with a diameter about 2 μm. Pigment analyses confirmed that the pigment composition of the newly isolated strain BDH02 was similar to that of Nannochloropsis granulata. Phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA gene, ITS, and rbcL gene indicated that the strain was closely related to N. granulata. This is the first record of a bloom caused by N. granulata in China. PMID:26024617

  3. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of translationally-controlled tumor protein from photosynthetic microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xingzhe; Xiao, Yan; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2015-10-01

    Translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a eukaryote-conserved protein with crucial roles in cellular growth. It has also been proposed that plant TCTP has functions specific to plant, while no structure of TCTP from photosynthetic organism has been reported. Nannochloropsis is a photosynthetic microalga with high yield of lipid and high-value polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is promising for biodiesel production. Study of growth-related proteins may provide new clue for improving the yield of lipid. TCTP from Nannochloropsis oceanica shares low sequence identity with structure-known TCTPs. Here we reported the NMR resonance assignments of TCTP from N. oceanica for further structural and functional studies. PMID:25680850

  4. Plasmodesmata of brown algae.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10-20 nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD could not be observed in brown algae. In the brown alga, Dictyota dichotoma, PD are produced during cytokinesis through the formation of their precursor structures (pre-plasmodesmata, PPD). Clustering of PD in a structure termed "pit field" was recognized in several species having a complex multicellular thallus structure but not in those having uniseriate filamentous or multiseriate one. The pit fields might control cell-to-cell communication and contribute to the establishment of the complex multicellular thallus. In this review, we discuss fundamental morphological aspects of brown algal PD and present questions that remain open. PMID:25516500

  5. The Effect of Diel Temperature and Light Cycles on the Growth of Nannochloropsis oculata in a Photobioreactor Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Dale T.; Szabó, Milán; Lilley, Ross McC; Larkum, Anthony W. D.; Franklin, Jim B.; Kramer, David M.; Blackburn, Susan I.; Raven, John A.; Schliep, Martin; Ralph, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    A matrix of photobioreactors integrated with metabolic sensors was used to examine the combined impact of light and temperature variations on the growth and physiology of the biofuel candidate microalgal species Nannochloropsis oculata. The experiments were performed with algal cultures maintained at a constant 20°C versus a 15°C to 25°C diel temperature cycle, where light intensity also followed a diel cycle with a maximum irradiance of 1920 µmol photons m−2 s−1. No differences in algal growth (Chlorophyll a) were found between the two environmental regimes; however, the metabolic processes responded differently throughout the day to the change in environmental conditions. The variable temperature treatment resulted in greater damage to photosystem II due to the combined effect of strong light and high temperature. Cellular functions responded differently to conditions before midday as opposed to the afternoon, leading to strong hysteresis in dissolved oxygen concentration, quantum yield of photosystem II and net photosynthesis. Overnight metabolism performed differently, probably as a result of the temperature impact on respiration. Our photobioreactor matrix has produced novel insights into the physiological response of Nannochloropsis oculata to simulated environmental conditions. This information can be used to predict the effectiveness of deploying Nannochloropsis oculata in similar field conditions for commercial biofuel production. PMID:24465862

  6. Clocks in algae.

    PubMed

    Noordally, Zeenat B; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-01-20

    As major contributors to global oxygen levels and producers of fatty acids, carotenoids, sterols, and phycocolloids, algae have significant ecological and commercial roles. Early algal models have contributed much to our understanding of circadian clocks at physiological and biochemical levels. The genetic and molecular approaches that identified clock components in other taxa have not been as widely applied to algae. We review results from seven species: the chlorophytes Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Ostreococcus tauri, and Acetabularia spp.; the dinoflagellates Lingulodinium polyedrum and Symbiodinium spp.; the euglenozoa Euglena gracilis; and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The relative simplicity, experimental tractability, and ecological and evolutionary diversity of algal systems may now make them particularly useful in integrating quantitative data from "omic" technologies (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics) with computational and mathematical methods. PMID:25379817

  7. Modification of algae with zinc, copper and silver ions for usage as natural composite for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Mahltig, B; Soltmann, U; Haase, H

    2013-03-01

    Nanometer sized metal particles are used in many applications as antimicrobial materials. However in public discussion nanoparticular materials are a matter of concern due to potential health risks. Hence there is a certain demand for alternative antimicrobial acting materials. For this, the aim of this work is to realize an antimicrobial active material based on the release of metal ions from a natural depot. By this, the use of elemental metal particles or metal oxide particles in nanometer or micrometer scale is avoided. As natural depot four different algae materials (gained from Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesicolosus, Spirulina platensis and Nannochloropsis) are used and loaded by bioabsorption with metal ions Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The amount of metal bound by biosorption differs strongly in the range of 0.8 to 5.4 mg/g and depends on type of investigated algae material and type of metal ion. For most samples a smaller release of biosorbed Ag(+) and Cu(2+) is observed compared to a strong release of Zn(2+). The antibacterial activity of the prepared composites is investigated with Escherichia coli. Algae material without biosorbed metal has only a small effect on E. coli. Also by modification of algae with Zn(2+) only a small antibacterial property can be observed. Only with biosorption of Ag(+), the algae materials gain a strong bactericidal effect, even in case of a small amount of released silver ions. These silver modified algae materials can be used as highly effective bactericidal composites which may be used in future applications for the production of antimicrobial textiles, papers or polymer materials. PMID:25427514

  8. Nannochloropsis plastid and mitochondrial phylogenomes reveal organelle diversification mechanism and intragenus phylotyping strategy in microalgae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microalgae are promising feedstock for production of lipids, sugars, bioactive compounds and in particular biofuels, yet development of sensitive and reliable phylotyping strategies for microalgae has been hindered by the paucity of phylogenetically closely-related finished genomes. Results Using the oleaginous eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis as a model, we assessed current intragenus phylotyping strategies by producing the complete plastid (pt) and mitochondrial (mt) genomes of seven strains from six Nannochloropsis species. Genes on the pt and mt genomes have been highly conserved in content, size and order, strongly negatively selected and evolving at a rate 33% and 66% of nuclear genomes respectively. Pt genome diversification was driven by asymmetric evolution of two inverted repeats (IRa and IRb): psbV and clpC in IRb are highly conserved whereas their counterparts in IRa exhibit three lineage-associated types of structural polymorphism via duplication or disruption of whole or partial genes. In the mt genomes, however, a single evolution hotspot varies in copy-number of a 3.5 Kb-long, cox1-harboring repeat. The organelle markers (e.g., cox1, cox2, psbA, rbcL and rrn16_mt) and nuclear markers (e.g., ITS2 and 18S) that are widely used for phylogenetic analysis obtained a divergent phylogeny for the seven strains, largely due to low SNP density. A new strategy for intragenus phylotyping of microalgae was thus proposed that includes (i) twelve sequence markers that are of higher sensitivity than ITS2 for interspecies phylogenetic analysis, (ii) multi-locus sequence typing based on rps11_mt-nad4, rps3_mt and cox2-rrn16_mt for intraspecies phylogenetic reconstruction and (iii) several SSR loci for identification of strains within a given species. Conclusion This first comprehensive dataset of organelle genomes for a microalgal genus enabled exhaustive assessment and searches of all candidate phylogenetic markers on the organelle genomes. A new strategy

  9. SOME FACTORS IN THE COMPETITION OR ANTAGONISM AMONG BACTERIA, ALGAE, AND AQUATIC WEEDS.

    PubMed

    Filzgerald, G P

    1969-12-01

    Field observations of changes in the populations of aquatic weeds and phytoplankton have confirmed that aquatic weeds have antagonistic activity toward phytoplankton. Nutritional studies in the laboratory indicate that cultures of the aquatic weeds, Myriophyllum sp., Ceratophyllum sp., and duckweed (Lemma minor L.); liquid cultures of barley (Hordeum vulgare L., Dickson variety); and cultures of the filamentous green algae, Cladophora sp. and Pithophora oedogonium (Mont.) Withrock, will remain relatively free of epiphytes or competing phytoplankton if the cultures are nitrogen-limited. Field observations of Cladophora sp. have confirmed that the growth of epiphytes on the Cladophora is related to conditions of surplus available nitrogen compounds. It is proposed that this antagonistic activity may be due to a "nitrogen sink" effect in which the aquatic weeds or filamentous green algae prevent the growth of contaminating algae by competition for the limited nitrogen compounds available. However, the presence of bacteria-sized organisms which have selective toxicity to certain algae indicates that perhaps multiple factors exist. Discussed are the ecological implications of associations of certain algae with bacteria that have selective toxicities for other species of algae under certain environmental conditions such as nitrogen-limited growth. PMID:27096454

  10. Combined Effects of Nitrogen Concentration and Seasonal Changes on the Production of Lipids in Nannochloropsis oculata

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Martin; Lamela, Teresa; Nilsson, Emmelie; Bergé, Jean-Pascal; del Pino, Victória; Uronen, Pauliina; Legrand, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Instead of sole nutrient starvation to boost algal lipid production, we addressed nutrient limitation at two different seasons (autumn and spring) during outdoor cultivation in flat panel photobioreactors. Lipid accumulation, biomass and lipid productivity and changes in fatty acid composition of Nannochloropsis oculata were investigated under nitrogen (N) limitation (nitrate:phosphate N:P 5, N:P 2.5 molar ratio). N. oculata was able to maintain a high biomass productivity under N-limitation compared to N-sufficiency (N:P 20) at both seasons, which in spring resulted in nearly double lipid productivity under N-limited conditions (0.21 g L−1 day−1) compared to N-sufficiency (0.11 g L−1 day−1). Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increased from 76% to nearly 90% of total fatty acids in N-limited cultures. Higher biomass and lipid productivity in spring could, partly, be explained by higher irradiance, partly by greater harvesting rate (~30%). Our results indicate the potential for the production of algal high value products (i.e., polyunsaturated fatty acids) during both N-sufficiency and N-limitation. To meet the sustainability challenges of algal biomass production, we propose a dual-system process: Closed photobioreactors producing biomass for high value products and inoculum for larger raceway ponds recycling waste/exhaust streams to produce bulk chemicals for fuel, feed and industrial material. PMID:24691025

  11. Combined effects of nitrogen concentration and seasonal changes on the production of lipids in Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Martin; Lamela, Teresa; Nilsson, Emmelie; Bergé, Jean-Pascal; del Pino, Victória; Uronen, Pauliina; Legrand, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Instead of sole nutrient starvation to boost algal lipid production, we addressed nutrient limitation at two different seasons (autumn and spring) during outdoor cultivation in flat panel photobioreactors. Lipid accumulation, biomass and lipid productivity and changes in fatty acid composition of Nannochloropsis oculata were investigated under nitrogen (N) limitation (nitrate:phosphate N:P 5, N:P 2.5 molar ratio). N. oculata was able to maintain a high biomass productivity under N-limitation compared to N-sufficiency (N:P 20) at both seasons, which in spring resulted in nearly double lipid productivity under N-limited conditions (0.21 g L⁻¹ day⁻¹) compared to N-sufficiency (0.11 g L⁻¹ day⁻¹). Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increased from 76% to nearly 90% of total fatty acids in N-limited cultures. Higher biomass and lipid productivity in spring could, partly, be explained by higher irradiance, partly by greater harvesting rate (~30%). Our results indicate the potential for the production of algal high value products (i.e., polyunsaturated fatty acids) during both N-sufficiency and N-limitation. To meet the sustainability challenges of algal biomass production, we propose a dual-system process: Closed photobioreactors producing biomass for high value products and inoculum for larger raceway ponds recycling waste/exhaust streams to produce bulk chemicals for fuel, feed and industrial material. PMID:24691025

  12. Anaerobic co-digestion of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina with energy crops.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Sebastian; Kowalczyk, Alexandra; Gerber, Mandy; Span, Roland

    2013-11-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of corn silage with the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina was investigated under batch and semi-continuous conditions. Under batch conditions process stability and biogas yields significantly increased by microalgae addition. During semi-continuous long-term experiments anaerobic digestion was stable in corn silage mono- and co-digestion with the algal biomass for more than 200 days. At higher organic loading rates (4.7 kg volatile solids m(-3)d(-1)) inhibition and finally process failure occurred in corn silage mono-digestion, whereas acid and methane formation remained balanced in co-digestion. The positive influences in co-digestion can be attributed to an adjusted carbon to nitrogen ratio, enhanced alkalinity, essential trace elements and a balanced nutrient composition. The results suggest that N. salina biomass is a suitable feedstock for anaerobic co-digestion of energy crops, especially for regions with manure scarcity. Enhanced process stability may result in higher organic loading rates or lower digester volumes. PMID:24071442

  13. Time-dependent radiation characteristics of Nannochloropsis oculata during batch culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports the temporal evolution of the scattering and absorbing cross-sections of marine eustigmatophycease Nannochloropsis oculata grown in a flat-plate photobioreactor (PBR). The PBR was operated in batch mode under constant irradiance of 7500 or 10,000 lux provided by red LEDs emitting at 630 nm. The radiation characteristics between 400 and 750 nm and pigment concentrations of N. oculata were measured systematically every 24 h for up to 18 days. They were found to vary significantly with time in response to changes in light and nutrients availability. The results were interpreted in terms of up- and down-regulations of pigments and other intracellular components. Finally, this study demonstrates that the light transfer in the PBR could be predicted using constant radiation characteristics measured during the exponential growth phase with reasonable accuracy provided that the cultures were not nitrogen limited. During nitrogen starvation, pigment concentrations decreased and radiation characteristics evolved rapidly. These results will be useful in the design and operation of PBRs for biofuel production at both small and large scales.

  14. Using fluorochemical as oxygen carrier to enhance the growth of marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Hsiang; Yeh, Yu-Ling; Lin, Keng-Hsien; Hsu, Yu-Chih

    2013-08-01

    The commercial value of marine Nannochloropsis oculata has been recognized due to its high content of eicosapentaenoic acid (>50% w/w). To make it as a profitable bioresource, one of the most desirable goals is to develop a quality-controlled, cost-effective, and large-scale photobioreactor for N. oculata growth. Generally, closed culture system can offer many advantages over open system such as small space requirement, controllable process and low risk of contamination. However, oxygen accumulation is often a detrimental factor for enclosed microalgal culture that has seriously hampered the development of microalga-related industries. In this study, we proposed to use fluorochemical as oxygen carrier to overcome the challenge where four liquid fluorochemicals namely perfluorooctyl bromide, perfluorodecalin, methoxynonafluorobutane, and ethoxynonafluorobutane were investigated separately. Our results showed that the microalgal proliferation with different fluorinated liquids was similar and comparable to the culture without a fluorochemical. When cultured in the photobioreactor with 60% oxygen atmosphere, the N. oculata can grow up in all the fluorochemical photobioreactors, but completely inhibited in the chamber without a fluorochemical. Moreover, the perfluorooctyl bromide system exhibited the most robust efficacy of oxygen removal in the culture media (perfluorooctyl bromide > perfluorodecalin > methoxynonafluorobutane > ethoxynonafluorobutane), and yielded a >3-fold increase of biomass production after 5 days. In summary, the developed fluorochemical photobioreactors offer a feasible means for N. oculata growth in closed and large-scale setting without effect of oxygen inhibition. PMID:23178985

  15. Biodiesel production from Nannochloropsis gaditana lipids through transesterification catalyzed by Rhizopus oryzae lipase.

    PubMed

    Navarro López, Elvira; Robles Medina, Alfonso; González Moreno, Pedro Antonio; Esteban Cerdán, Luis; Martín Valverde, Lorena; Molina Grima, Emilio

    2016-03-01

    Biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs) was produced from saponifiable lipids (SLs) extracted from wet Nannochloropsis gaditana biomass using methanolysis catalyzed by Rhizopus oryzae intracellular lipase. SLs were firstly extracted with ethanol to obtain 31 wt% pure SLs. But this low SL purity also gave a low biodiesel conversion (58%). This conversion increased up to 80% using SLs purified by crystallization in acetone (95 wt% purity). Polar lipids play an important role in decreasing the reaction velocity - using SLs extracted with hexane, which have lower polar lipid content (37.4% versus 49.0% using ethanol), we obtained higher reaction velocities and less FAME conversion decrease when the same lipase batch was reused. 83% of SLs were transformed to biodiesel using a 70 wt% lipase/SL ratio, 11:1 methanol/SL molar ratio, 10 mL t-butanol/g SLs after 72 h. The FAME conversion decreased to 71% after catalyzing three reactions with the same lipase batch. PMID:26735878

  16. Construction and characterization of a normalized cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Eustigmatophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianzhong; Ma, Xiaolei; Pan, Kehou; Yang, Guanpin; Yu, Wengong

    2010-07-01

    We constructed and characterized a normalized cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata CS-179, and obtained 905 nonredundant sequences (NRSs) ranging from 431-1 756 bp in length. Among them, 496 were very similar to nonredundant ones in the GenBank ( E ≤1.0e-05), and 349 ESTs had significant hits with the clusters of eukaryotic orthologous groups (KOG). Bases G and/or C at the third position of codons of 14 amino acid residues suggested a strong bias in the conserved domain of 362 NRSs (>60%). We also identified the unigenes encoding phosphorus and nitrogen transporters, suggesting that N. oculata could efficiently transport and metabolize phosphorus and nitrogen, and recognized the unigenes that involved in biosynthesis and storage of both fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which will facilitate the demonstration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) biosynthesis pathway of N. oculata. In comparison with the original cDNA library, the normalized library significantly increased the efficiencies of random sequencing and rarely expressed genes discovering, and decreased the frequency of abundant gene sequences.

  17. Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Miller, Tyler W.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Hook, Paul W.; Crowe, Braden J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2012-03-12

    Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the climate, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity (5-850 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and temperature (13-40 C); exponential growth rate, total fatty acids (TFA) and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day{sup -1} at 23 C and 250 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid (C16:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoeic acids (C20:5{omega}3). As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid (C18:1{omega}9). The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. This data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production.

  18. The utilization of natural soda resource of Ordos in the cultivation of Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yanfei; Yang, Haibo; Meng, Yingying; Liu, Jiao; Shen, Peili; Wu, Peichun; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis oceanica is famous for its strong environmental adaptability and oil-richness, especially high eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content. In this report, the possibility and cultivation parameters for N. oceanica using natural crude soda were testified and compared with seawater culture. To keep a suitable salinity range, different ratio of sea salt addition into soda lake water were used and the growth, lipid content, Fv/Fm and fatty acids profiling were inspected with nitrogen repletion or depletion. The results showed the best performance were achieved while 18g/L (salinity 25‰) sea salt was added into crude soda solution. The μmax and EPA content in fatty acids were 0.72/0.42 and 36%/23% in 500mL/100L bioreactor cultivations respectively, which maintained a relative high productivity to other reports. By comparing the growth and operations with Spirulina production, the feasibility of N. Oceanica in Ordos was proved on both technical and economical point of view. PMID:26528905

  19. Ultrasound-assisted green solvent extraction of high-added value compounds from microalgae Nannochloropsis spp.

    PubMed

    Parniakov, O; Apicella, E; Koubaa, M; Barba, F J; Grimi, N; Lebovka, N; Pataro, G; Ferrari, G; Vorobiev, E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate ultrasound (US)-assisted green solvent extraction of valuable compounds from the microalgae Nannochloropsis spp. Individual green solvents (water, ethanol (EtOH), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) and binary mixture of solvents (water-DMSO and water-EtOH) were used for the extraction procedures. Maximum total phenolic compounds yield (Yp ≈ 0.33) was obtained after US pre-treatment (W=400 W, 15 min), being almost 5-folds higher compared to that found for the untreated samples and aqueous extraction (Yp ≈ 0.06). The highest yield of total chlorophylls (Yc ≈ 0.043) was obtained after US (W=400 W, 7.5 min), being more than 9-folds higher than those obtained for the untreated samples and aqueous extraction (Yc ≈ 0.004). The recovery efficiency decreased as DMSO>EtOH>H2O. The optimal conditions to recover phenolic compounds and chlorophylls from microalgae were obtained after US pre-treatment (400 W, 5 min), binary mixtures of solvents (water-DMSO and water-EtOH) at 25-30%, and microalgae concentration of 10%. PMID:26398670

  20. Effects of CO₂ Concentration and pH on Mixotrophic Growth of Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Razzak, Shaikh A; Ilyas, Muhammad; Ali, Saad Aldin M; Hossain, Mohammad M

    2015-07-01

    This communication reports an experimental investigation of integrated CO2 bio-conversion, wastewater treatment, and biomass production by microalgae cultivation. In this regard, the effects of CO2 concentrations on mixotrophic growth kinetics of a microalgae strain (Nannochloropsis oculata) are conducted in a semi-batch photobioreactor. The concentration of CO2 in the feed stream is varied from 4 to 12 mol% by adjusting CO2-to-air ratio. The variation of pH of the synthetic wastewater culture media and nutrient uptake by the microalgae are also monitored. The experimental evaluation shows that 8 % CO2 gives the highest growth rate of N. oculata with a productivity of 0.088 g L(-1) day(-1). Under the studied conditions, the pH value of the culture media between 5.5 and 6.5 is favorable for the growth of N. oculata in mixotrophic condition. Among the nutrients available in the culture media, percentage of ammonia removal is found to be the highest (98.9 %) as compared that of other compounds such as nitrate (88.2 %) and phosphate (18.9 %). The thermochemical characteristics of the cultivated microalgae are assessed by thermogravimetric analysis in presence of air. The produced microalgae is thermally stable up to 200 °C. Following that, the microalgae biomass is sharply decomposed within 600 °C. PMID:25926014

  1. Genetic transformation of Nannochloropsis oculata with a bacterial phleomycin resistance gene as dominant selective marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Pan, Kehou; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Baohua; Yang, Guanpin; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    The gene ble from Streptoalloteichus hindustanus is widely used as a selective antibiotic marker. It can control the phleomycin resistance, and significantly increase the tolerance of hosts to zeocin. The unicellular marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata is extremely sensitive to zeocin. We selected ble as the selective marker for the genetic transformation of N. oculata. After the algal cells at a density of 2×107 cells mL-1 was digested with 4% hemicellulase and 2% driselase for 1 h, the protoplasts accounted for 90% of the total. The ble was placed at the downstream of promoter HSP70A-RUBS2 isolated from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, yielding a recombinant expression construct pMS188. The construct was transferred into the protoplasts through electroporation (1 kV, 15 μS). The transformed protoplasts were cultured in fresh f/2 liquid medium, and selected on solid f/2 medium supplemented with 500 ng mL-1 zeocin. The PCR result proved that ble existed in the transformants. Three transformants had been cultured for at least 5 generations without losing ble. Southern blotting analysis showed that the ble has been integrated into the genome of N. oculata. The ble will serve as a new dominant selective marker in genetic engineering N. oculata.

  2. A low-cost culture medium for the production of Nannochloropsis gaditana biomass optimized for aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Rodríguez, J; Cerón-García, M C; González-López, C V; Fernández-Sevilla, J M; Contreras-Gómez, A; Molina-Grima, E

    2013-09-01

    Nannochloropsis gaditana is a microalga with a high nutritional value and a protein and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content that makes it interesting as a feed in aquaculture. To maximize its productivity and nutritional value in large-scale culture, a well-known commercial medium was optimized to the most favorable nutrient level using commercial fertilizers. Optimal growth conditions were obtained in the alternative fertilizer-based medium at a nitrogen concentration of 11.3 mM, a phosphorus concentration of 0.16 mM, and a micronutrient concentration of 30 μL L(-1). This alternative medium allowed to obtain a biomass concentration similar to that achieved when using the commercial formula but with a reduction in Cu, Fe, and Mo content of 71%, 89%, and 99%, respectively. A maximum biomass productivity of 0.51 g L(-1) d(-1) was obtained. The eicosapentaenoic acid and protein contents of the biomass were 2.84% and 44% of dry weight, respectively. PMID:23863872

  3. Arsoniumphospholipid in algae*

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Robert V.; Mumma, R. O.; Benson, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    A novel phospholipid containing arsenic was formed by all marine algae cultured in [74As]arsenate. Components of the labeled algal extracts readily separated by two-dimensional paper radiochromatography. Base-catalyzed deacylation of the major lipid yielded a phosphodiester identical to one of the two major water-soluble compounds. Acid or enzymic hydrolysis of the phosphodiester produced a product identified as trimethylarsoniumalactic acid. The structure of the phospholipid therefore is O-phosphatidyltrimethylarsoniumlactic acid. Detoxication of arsenate by marine algae leads to accumulation of the arsoniumphospholipid as a major reservoir for arsenic. Its degradation to trimethylarsoniumbetaine, dimethylarsinic acid, methanearsonic acid, and arsenate in marine food chains and its metabolism in human beings are of considerable interest. Images PMID:16592562

  4. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  5. Settlement of marine periphytic algae in a tropical estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayar, S.; Goh, B. P. L.; Chou, L. M.

    2005-08-01

    This note describes settlement studies of marine periphytic algae on glass substrata in a tropical estuary in Singapore. The rates of production in terms of 14C radiotracer uptake, biomass in terms of chlorophyll a, community structure and cell abundance were measured from the settled periphytic algae at various depths in the water column and compared with the prevailing hydrographical conditions. Relatively higher periphytic algal settlement was observed at 1 m depth, even though it was not statistically different from other depths. Diatoms such as Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira rotula dominated the assemblage, together with the marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. The three settlement parameters viz., periphytic algal production, chlorophyll a and cell counts showed significant differences between the days of settlement, with no significant differences observed for different depths. The periphytic algal community in this study comprised 30 microalgal species, dominated by diatoms (78%), followed by cyanobacteria (19% - primarily Synechococcus sp.), green flagellates (1%), dinoflagellates (1%) and other forms accounting for the remaining 1% of the total cell counts. Correlation studies and principal component analysis (PCA) revealed significant influence of silicate concentrations in the water column with the settlement of periphytic algae in this estuary. Though photoinhibited at the surface, photosynthetically available radiation did not seem to influence the overall settlement of periphytic algae. Diatoms and Synechococcus in the periphytic algal community were influenced by water temperature, PAR, pH and dissolved oxygen as seen in the PCA plots.

  6. Photosynthetic responses and accumulation of mesotrione in two freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Lai, Jinhu; Wan, Jinbao; Chen, Lianshui

    2014-01-01

    Mesotrione is a herbicide used for killing annual grasses and broad-leaved weeds in maize. A recent investigation has shown that mesotrione has been detected as an organic contaminant in aquatic environments and may have a negative impact on aquatic organisms. To evaluate the eco-toxicity of mesotrione to algae, experiments focusing on photosynthetic responses and mesotrione accumulation in Microcystis sp. and Scenedesmus quadricauda were carried out. Both algae treated with mesotrione at 0.05-10 mg L(-1) for 7 days reduced the photosynthetic capacity. The fluorescence of chlorophyll a, the maximal PSII activity (Fv/Fm), and the parameters (Ik, α and ETRmax) of rapid light curves (RLCs) in both algae were decreased under mesotrione exposure. The 96 h EC50 values for mesotrione on S. quadricauda and Microcystis sp. were 4.41 and 6.19 mg L(-1), respectively. The latter shows more tolerance to mesotrione. Mesotrione was shown to be readily accumulated by both species. Such uptake of mesotrione led to the rapid removal of mesotrione from the medium. Overall, this study represents the initial comprehensive analyses of Microcystis sp. and S. quadricauda in adaptation to the mesotrione contaminated aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25059419

  7. Purple Chromoprotein Gene Serves as a New Selection Marker for Transgenesis of the Microalga Nannochloropsis oculata

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chen-Han; Chen, Hsiao-Yin; Lee, Hung-Chieh; Tsai, Huai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Among the methods used to screen transgenic microalgae, antibiotics selection has raised environmental and food safety concerns, while the observation of fluorescence proteins could be influenced by the endogenous fluorescence of host chloroplasts. As an alternative, this study isolated the purple chromoprotein (CP) from Stichodacyla haddoni (shCP). A plasmid in which shCP cDNA is driven by a heat-inducible promoter was linearized and electroporated into 2.5×108 protoplasts of Nannochloropsis oculata. Following regeneration and cultivation on an f/2 medium plate for two weeks, we observed 26 colonies that displayed a slightly dark green coloration. After individually subculturing and performing five hours of heat shock at 42°C, a dark brown color was mosaically displayed in five of these colonies, indicating that both untransformed and transformed cells were mixed together in each colony. To obtain a uniform expression of shCP throughout the whole colony, we continuously isolated each transformed cell that exhibited brown coloration and subcultured it on a fresh plate, resulting in the generation of five transgenic lines of N. oculata which stably harbored the shCP gene for at least 22 months, as confirmed by PCR detection and observation by the naked eye. As shown by Western blot, exogenous shCP protein was expressed in these transgenic microalgae. Since shCP protein is biodegradable and originates from a marine organism, both environmental and food safety concerns have been eliminated, making this novel shCP reporter gene a simple, but effective and ecologically safe, marker for screening and isolating transgenic microalgae. PMID:25793255

  8. Effects of light and circadian clock on growth and chlorophyll accumulation of Nannochloropsis gaditana.

    PubMed

    Braun, Regina; Farré, Eva M; Schurr, Ulrich; Matsubara, Shizue

    2014-06-01

    Circadian clocks synchronize various physiological, metabolic and developmental processes of organisms with specific phases of recurring changes in their environment (e.g. day and night or seasons). Here, we investigated whether the circadian clock plays a role in regulation of growth and chlorophyll (Chl) accumulation in Nannochloropsis gaditana, an oleaginous marine microalga which is considered as a potential feedstock for biofuels and for which a draft genome sequence has been published. Optical density (OD) of N. gaditana culture was monitored at 680 and 735 nm under 12:12 h or 18:6 h light-dark (LD) cycles and after switching to continuous illumination in photobioreactors. In parallel, Chl fluorescence was measured to assess the quantum yield of photosystem II. Furthermore, to test if red- or blue-light photoreceptors are involved in clock entrainment in N. gaditana, some of the experiments were conducted by using only red or blue light. Growth and Chl accumulation were confined to light periods in the LD cycles, increasing more strongly in the first half than in the second half of the light periods. After switching to continuous light, rhythmic oscillations continued (especially for OD680 ) at least in the first 24 h, with a 50% decrease in the capacity to grow and accumulate Chl during the first subjective night. Pronounced free-running oscillations were induced by blue light, but not by red light. In contrast, the photosystem II quantum yield was determined by light conditions. The results indicate interactions between circadian and light regulation of growth and Chl accumulation in N. gaditana. PMID:26988324

  9. Lipid accumulation and CO2 utilization of Nannochloropsis oculata in response to CO2 aeration.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Chien-Ya; Tsai, Ming-Ta; Ong, Seow-Chin; Chen, Chiun-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    In order to produce microalgal lipids that can be transformed to biodiesel fuel, effects of concentration of CO(2) aeration on the biomass production and lipid accumulation of Nannochloropsis oculata in a semicontinuous culture were investigated in this study. Lipid content of N. oculata cells at different growth phases was also explored. The results showed that the lipid accumulation from logarithmic phase to stationary phase of N. oculata NCTU-3 was significantly increased from 30.8% to 50.4%. In the microalgal cultures aerated with 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% CO(2), the maximal biomass and lipid productivity in the semicontinuous system were 0.480 and 0.142 g L(-1)d(-1) with 2% CO(2) aeration, respectively. Even the N. oculata NCTU-3 cultured in the semicontinuous system aerated with 15% CO(2), the biomass and lipid productivity could reach to 0.372 and 0.084 g L(-1)d(-1), respectively. In the comparison of productive efficiencies, the semicontinuous system was operated with two culture approaches over 12d. The biomass and lipid productivity of N. oculata NCTU-3 were 0.497 and 0.151 g L(-1)d(-1) in one-day replacement (half broth was replaced each day), and were 0.296 and 0.121 g L(-1)d(-1) in three-day replacement (three fifth broth was replaced every 3d), respectively. To optimize the condition for long-term biomass and lipid yield from N. oculata NCTU-3, this microalga was suggested to grow in the semicontinuous system aerated with 2% CO(2) and operated by one-day replacement. PMID:18722767

  10. Purple chromoprotein gene serves as a new selection marker for transgenesis of the microalga Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chen-Han; Chen, Hsiao-Yin; Lee, Hung-Chieh; Tsai, Huai-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Among the methods used to screen transgenic microalgae, antibiotics selection has raised environmental and food safety concerns, while the observation of fluorescence proteins could be influenced by the endogenous fluorescence of host chloroplasts. As an alternative, this study isolated the purple chromoprotein (CP) from Stichodacyla haddoni (shCP). A plasmid in which shCP cDNA is driven by a heat-inducible promoter was linearized and electroporated into 2.5×10(8) protoplasts of Nannochloropsis oculata. Following regeneration and cultivation on an f/2 medium plate for two weeks, we observed 26 colonies that displayed a slightly dark green coloration. After individually subculturing and performing five hours of heat shock at 42°C, a dark brown color was mosaically displayed in five of these colonies, indicating that both untransformed and transformed cells were mixed together in each colony. To obtain a uniform expression of shCP throughout the whole colony, we continuously isolated each transformed cell that exhibited brown coloration and subcultured it on a fresh plate, resulting in the generation of five transgenic lines of N. oculata which stably harbored the shCP gene for at least 22 months, as confirmed by PCR detection and observation by the naked eye. As shown by Western blot, exogenous shCP protein was expressed in these transgenic microalgae. Since shCP protein is biodegradable and originates from a marine organism, both environmental and food safety concerns have been eliminated, making this novel shCP reporter gene a simple, but effective and ecologically safe, marker for screening and isolating transgenic microalgae. PMID:25793255

  11. Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: The utility of lipid extracted algae as a protein source in forage or starch-based ruminant diets.

    PubMed

    Lodge-Ivey, S L; Tracey, L N; Salazar, A

    2014-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of lipid extracted algae (LEA) on OM digestibility, N flow, and rumen fermentation. Six samples of LEA were evaluated representing 2 genus of microalgae (Nannochloropsis spp. [n = 3] or Chlorella spp. [n = 3]). Four dual-flow continuous flow fermenters (2,700 mL) were used in a Latin square design to evaluate LEA in forage or concentrate diets compared with soybean meal. Temperature (39 °C), pH, solid (5%/h) and liquid (10%/h) dilution rates, and feed schedule were maintained constant for all experiments. Each experimental period consisted of 6-d adaptation and 4-d sampling periods. There were 7 treatments consisting of 6 different samples of LEA and a soybean meal control (SOY). Diets for Exp.1 were formulated to be 13.0% CP (DM basis) using either soybean meal or LEA and met or exceeded the requirements of a nonpregnant and nonlactating beef cow (450 kg). The forage portion consisted of sorghum-sudan hay (6.4% CP and 46.2% TDN, DM basis) and alfalfa (26.1% CP and 82.3% TDN, DM basis). Concentrate diets used in Exp. 2 met or exceeded the nutrient requirements of a (400 kg) growing steer and contained 85% fine ground corn and included 7% (DM basis) soybean meal or LEA. Data were analyzed as mixed model considering the effect of each LEA compared with soybean meal. Orthogonal contrasts were used to determine the overall effect of LEA genus vs. SOY. True OM digestibility were not influenced by LEA addition to forage diets (P ≥ 0.08) but increased with Chlorella LEA addition to concentrate diets (P < 0.01) but not Nannochloropsis LEA. Degradation of N was greater for SOY with forage diets and LEA for concentrate diets (P < 0.0001). Total VFA production was greatest for SOY in forage diets and increased when LEA was added to concentrate diets (P < 0.0001). Microbial efficiency did not differ between SOY and LEA in forage diets (P ≤ 0.08). In concentrate diets Nannochloropsis decreased microbial efficiency

  12. TFA and EPA Productivities of Nannochloropsis salina Influenced by Temperature and Nitrate Stimuli in Turbidostatic Controlled Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Maren; Marxen, Kai; Schulz, Rüdiger; Vanselow, Klaus Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    The influence of different nitrate concentrations in combination with three cultivation temperatures on the total fatty acids (TFA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content of Nannochloropsis salina was investigated. This was done by virtue of turbidostatic controlled cultures. This control mode enables the cultivation of microalgae under defined conditions and, therefore, the influence of single parameters on the fatty acid synthesis of Nannochloropsis salina can be investigated. Generally, growth rates decreased under low nitrate concentrations. This effect was reinforced when cells were exposed to lower temperatures (from 26 °C down to 17 °C). Considering the cellular TFA concentration, nitrate provoked an increase of TFA under nitrate limitation up to 70% of the biological dry mass (BDM). In contrast to this finding, the EPA content decreased under low nitrate concentrations. Nevertheless, both TFA and EPA contents increased under a low culture temperature (17 °C) compared to moderate temperatures of 21 °C and 26 °C. In terms of biotechnological production, the growth rate has to be taken into account. Therefore, for both TFA and EPA production, a temperature of 17 °C and a nitrate concentration of 1800 μmol L−1 afforded the highest productivities. Temperatures of 21 °C and 26 °C in combination with 1800 μmol L−1 nitrate showed slightly lower TFA and EPA productivities. PMID:20948904

  13. Miocene Coralline algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bosence, D.W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The coralline algae (Order Corallinales) were sedimentologically and ecologically important during the Miocene, a period when they were particularly abundant. The many poorly described and illustrated species and the lack of quantitative data in coralline thalli make specific determinations particularly difficult, but some species are well known and widespread in the Tethyan area. The sedimentologic importance of the Miocene coralline algae is reflected in the abundance of in-situ coralline buildups, rhodoliths, and coralline debris facies at Malta and Spain; similar sequences are known throughout the Tethyan Miocene. In-situ buildups vary from leafy crustose biostromes to walled reefs with dense coralline crusts and branches. Growth forms are apparently related to hydraulic energy. Rhodoliths vary from leafy, crustose, and open-branched forms in muddy sediments to dense, crustose, and radial-branching forms in coarse grainstones. Rhodolith form and internal structure correlate closely with hydraulic energy. Coralline genera are conservative and, as such, are useful in paleoenvironmental analysis. Of particular interest are the restricted depth ranges of recent coralline genera. More research is needed on the sedimentology, paleoecology, and systematics of the Cenozoic corallines, as they have particular value in paleoenvironmental analysis.

  14. Cellular Auxin Transport in Algae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Suyun; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is one of the main directors of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxin is generated in apical plant parts and transported from cell-to-cell in a polar fashion. Auxin is present in all plant phyla, and the existence of polar auxin transport (PAT) is well established in land plants. Algae are a group of relatively simple, autotrophic, photosynthetic organisms that share many features with land plants. In particular, Charophyceae (a taxon of green algae) are closest ancestors of land plants. In the study of auxin function, transport and its evolution, the algae form an interesting research target. Recently, proof for polar auxin transport in Chara species was published and auxin related research in algae gained more attention. In this review we discuss auxin transport in algae with respect to land plants and suggest directions for future studies. PMID:27135491

  15. Cellular Auxin Transport in Algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyun; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is one of the main directors of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxin is generated in apical plant parts and transported from cell-to-cell in a polar fashion. Auxin is present in all plant phyla, and the existence of polar auxin transport (PAT) is well established in land plants. Algae are a group of relatively simple, autotrophic, photosynthetic organisms that share many features with land plants. In particular, Charophyceae (a taxon of green algae) are closest ancestors of land plants. In the study of auxin function, transport and its evolution, the algae form an interesting research target. Recently, proof for polar auxin transport in Chara species was published and auxin related research in algae gained more attention. In this review we discuss auxin transport in algae with respect to land plants and suggest directions for future studies. PMID:27135491

  16. Respiratory Chain of Colorless Algae II. Cyanophyta

    PubMed Central

    Webster, D. A.; Hackett, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Whole cell difference spectra of the blue-green algae, Saprospira grandis, Leucothrix mucor, and Vitreoscilla sp. have one, or at the most 2, broad α-bands near 560 mμ. At −190° these bands split to give 4 peaks in the α-region for b and c-type cytochromes, but no α-band for a-type cytochromes is visible. The NADH oxidase activity of these organisms was shown to be associated with particulate fractions of cell homogenates. The response of this activity to inhibitors differed from the responses of the NADH oxidase activities of particulate preparations from the green algae and higher plants to the same inhibitors, but is more typical of certain bacteria. No cytochrome oxidase activity was present in these preparations. The respiration of Saprospira and Vitreoscilla can be light-reversibly inhibited by CO, and all 3 organisms have a CO-binding pigment whose CO complex absorbs near 570, 535, and 417 mμ. The action spectrum for the light reversal of CO-inhibited Vitreoscilla respiration shows maxima at 568, 534, and 416 mμ. The results suggest that the terminal oxidase in these blue-greens is an o-type cytochrome. Images PMID:5932404

  17. Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A.

    1999-02-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

  18. Ecology of Harmful Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Daniel L.

    2007-07-01

    Edna Graneli and Jefferson T. Turner, Editors;Ecological Studies Series, Vol. 189; Springer; ISBN 3540322094; 413 pp.; 2006; $195 Harmful algal blooms (HABs) affect commercially and recreationally important species, human health, and ecosystem functioning. Hallmark events are the visually stunning blooms where waters are discolored and filled with ichthyotoxin-producing algae that lead to large fish kills. Of most concern, however, are HABs that pose a threat to human health. For example, some phycotoxins bioaccumulate in the guts and tissues of commercially and recreationally important species that when consumed by humans, may result in nausea, paralysis, memory loss, and even death. In addition to the deleterious impacts of phycotoxins, HABs can be problematic in other ways. For example, the decay of blooms often leads to low dissolved oxygen in subsurface waters. Blooms also reduce light penetration into the water column. Both processes disrupt ecosystems and in some cases have completely destroyed benthic communities.

  19. The effects of barley straw (Hordeum vulgare) on the growth of freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, M D; Butler, B R; Terlizzi, D E; Lacouture, R V

    2005-11-01

    Bioassays were conducted to determine the efficacy of barley straw liquor in controlling algal growth of 12 freshwater species of algae representing three divisions. Barley straw liquor inhibited the growth of three nuisance algae common in freshwater: Synura petersenii, Dinobyron sp., and Microcystis aeruginosa. However, Selenastrum capricornutum, Spirogyra sp., Oscillatoria lutea var. contorta, and Navicula sp. had significantly increased growth in the presence of straw liquor. The growth of the remainder, Ulothrix fimbriata, Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris, Anabaena flos-aquae, and Synedra sp. showed no significant difference from controls. In a related field study, we treated four of six ponds with barley straw and monitored their chlorophyll a levels for one growing season. While phytoplankton populations in all ponds decreased in midsummer, the phytoplankton biomass in treated ponds did not differ significantly from that of control ponds, suggesting that the application of barley straw had no effect on algal growth in these systems. PMID:16051085

  20. Platinum anniversary: virus and lichen alga together more than 70 years.

    PubMed

    Petrzik, Karel; Vondrák, Jan; Kvíderová, Jana; Lukavský, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Trebouxia aggregata (Archibald) Gärtner (phylum Chlorophyta, family Trebouxiaceae), a lichen symbiotic alga, has been identified as host of the well-known herbaceous plant virus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV, family Caulimoviridae). The alga had been isolated from Xanthoria parietina more than 70 years ago and has been maintained in a collection since that time. The CaMV detected in this collection entry has now been completely sequenced. The virus from T. aggregata is mechanically transmissible to a herbaceous host and induces disease symptoms there. Its genome differs by 173 nt from the closest European CaMV-D/H isolate from cauliflower. No site under positive selection was found on the CaMV genome from T. aggregata. We therefore assume that the virus's presence in this alga was not sufficiently long to fix any specific changes in its genome. Apart from this symbiotic alga, CaMV capsid protein sequences were amplified from many other non-symbiotic algae species maintained in a collection (e.g., Oonephris obesa, Elliptochloris sp., Microthamnion kuetzingianum, Chlorella vulgaris, Pseudococcomyxa sp.). CaMV-free Chlorella vulgaris was treated with CaMV to establish virus infection. The virus was still detected there after five passages. The virus infection is morphologically symptomless on Chlorella algae and the photosynthesis activity is slightly decreased in comparison to CaMV-free alga culture. This is the first proof as to the natural presence of CaMV in algae and the first demonstration of algae being artificially infected with this virus. PMID:25789995

  1. Platinum Anniversary: Virus and Lichen Alga Together More than 70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Petrzik, Karel; Vondrák, Jan; Kvíderová, Jana; Lukavský, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Trebouxia aggregata (Archibald) Gärtner (phylum Chlorophyta, family Trebouxiaceae), a lichen symbiotic alga, has been identified as host of the well-known herbaceous plant virus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV, family Caulimoviridae). The alga had been isolated from Xanthoria parietina more than 70 years ago and has been maintained in a collection since that time. The CaMV detected in this collection entry has now been completely sequenced. The virus from T. aggregata is mechanically transmissible to a herbaceous host and induces disease symptoms there. Its genome differs by 173 nt from the closest European CaMV-D/H isolate from cauliflower. No site under positive selection was found on the CaMV genome from T. aggregata. We therefore assume that the virus’s presence in this alga was not sufficiently long to fix any specific changes in its genome. Apart from this symbiotic alga, CaMV capsid protein sequences were amplified from many other non-symbiotic algae species maintained in a collection (e.g., Oonephris obesa, Elliptochloris sp., Microthamnion kuetzingianum, Chlorella vulgaris, Pseudococcomyxa sp.). CaMV-free Chlorella vulgaris was treated with CaMV to establish virus infection. The virus was still detected there after five passages. The virus infection is morphologically symptomless on Chlorella algae and the photosynthesis activity is slightly decreased in comparison to CaMV-free alga culture. This is the first proof as to the natural presence of CaMV in algae and the first demonstration of algae being artificially infected with this virus. PMID:25789995

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae.

    PubMed

    Huerlimann, Roger; Zenger, Kyall R; Jerry, Dean R; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid) and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric). All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa) and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta) have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO), Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta). These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was acquired by the

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Huerlimann, Roger; Zenger, Kyall R.; Jerry, Dean R.; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid) and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric). All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa) and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta) have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO), Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta). These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was acquired by the

  4. Complexity and idiosyncrasy in the responses of algae to disturbance in mono- and multi-species assemblages.

    PubMed

    Goodsell, P J; Underwood, A J

    2008-09-01

    There is considerable debate about whether stability (e.g. inertia) of an assemblage, or of individuals in an assemblage, is positively associated with the number of species or whether there are idiosyncratic effects of particular species. We assessed the general model that the loss of an individual alga, caused by trampling, is greater in monospecific than in multi-species stands but that the responses of algae are idiosyncratic, depending on the morphology of the species. The experiment was done on conspicuous and dominant algae with different morphology on temperate Australian rocky shores: the fucalean algae Hormosira banksii and Sargassum sp. and the coralline alga Corallina officinalis. We assessed the relative and interactive effects of the extent of trampling (number of paths) and the localised intensity of trampling (number of travels per path) on the three algae. The number of paths trampled (the extent of disturbance) had more impact on each alga than the number of times paths were travelled (the intensity of disturbance). As predicted, H. banksii was most susceptible to trampling at each level than were the coarser algae Sargassum sp. and C. officinalis. There was a consistent trend for each alga to be more inert to trampling when in the presence of the other two species than when in monospecific stands, but this was only statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the softer alga H. banksii. The responses of H. banksii and Sargassum sp. to disturbance seemed, in many cases, to be due to the presence of C. officinalis rather than to "diversity" per se. The relationship between the number of species and stability is complex in intertidal habitats, depending on the species and the combinations of species with which it grows. PMID:18574597

  5. Feasibility and Treatment of Oil and Gas Produced Water as a Medium for Nannochloropsis Salina cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J.; Dean, Cynthia A.; Yoshida, Thomas M.; Steichen, Seth A.; Laur, Paul A.; Visolay, Alfonz

    2012-06-06

    Some conclusions of this paper are: (1) How much PW is available - (a) Lots, but probably not enough to support the largest estimates of algae production needed, (b) Diluent water is likely needed to support cultivation in some cases, (c) An assessment of how much PW is really available for use is needed; (2) Where is it available - (a) In many places near other resources (land, CO{sub 2}, sunlight, nutrients) and infrastructure (pipelines, refineries, disposal operations/wells); (3) Is the water chemistry acceptable for use - (a) Yes, in many cases with minimal treatment, (b) Additional constituents of value exist in PW for media; (4) Does it need treatment prior to use - (a) Yes, it may often need treatment for organics, some metals, and biological contaminants, (b) Source control and monitoring can reduce need for treatment; (5) How much does it cost to treat it - (a) If desalination is not needed, from <$0.01-$0.60 per m3 is a starting estimate; and (6) Can you grow algae in it - (a) Yes, but we need more experimentation to optimize field conditions, media mixing, and algae types.

  6. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  7. [From algae to "functional foods"].

    PubMed

    Vadalà, M; Palmieri, B

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, a growing interest for nutraceutical algae (tablets, capsules, drops) has been developed, due to their effective health benefits, as a potential alternative to the classic drugs. This review explores the use of cyanobacterium Spirulina, the microalgae Chlorella, Dunaliella, Haematococcus, and the macroalgae Klamath, Ascophyllum, Lithothamnion, Chondrus, Hundaria, Glacilaria, Laminaria, Asparagopsis, Eisenia, Sargassum as nutraceuticals and dietary supplements, in terms of production, nutritional components and evidence-based health benefits. Thus, our specific goals are: 1) Overview of the algae species currently used in nutraceuticals; 2) Description of their characteristics, action mechanisms, and possible side effects; 3) Perspective of specific algae clinical investigations development. PMID:26378764

  8. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  9. Cyanobactericidal effect of Rhodococcus sp. isolated from eutrophic lake on Microcystis sp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ki; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Kim, Hee-Sik; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2010-11-01

    A bacterium, which was observed in all cultivations of Microcystis sp., was isolated and designated as Rhodococcus sp. KWR2. The growth of bloom-forming cyanobacteria, including four strains of Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena variabilis, was suppressed by up to 75-88% by 2% (v/v) culture broth of KWR2 after 5 days. But KWR2 did not inhibit eukaryotic algae, Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus sp. An extracellular algicidal substance produced by KWR2 showed a cyanobactericidal activity of 94% and was water-soluble with a molecular weight of lower than 8 kDa. PMID:20640876

  10. Photosynthesis and photorespiration in algae.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, N D; Canvin, D T; Culver, D A

    1977-05-01

    The CO(2) exchange of several species of fresh water and marine algae was measured in the laboratory to determine whether photorespiration occurs in these organisms. The algae were positioned as thin layers on filter paper and the CO(2) exchange determined in an open gas exchange system. In either 21 or 1% O(2) there was little difference between (14)CO(2) and (12)CO(2) uptake. Apparent photosynthesis was the same in 2, 21, or 50% O(2). The compensation points of all algae were less than 10 mul 1(-1). CO(2) or (14)CO(2) evolution into CO(2)-free air in the light was always less than the corresponding evolution in darkness. These observations are inconsistent with the proposal that photorespiration exists in these algae. PMID:16659972

  11. Algae fuel clean electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, D.

    1993-02-08

    The paper describes plans for a 600-kW pilot generating unit, fueled by diesel and Chlorella, a green alga commonly seen growing on the surface of ponds. The plant contains Biocoil units in which Chlorella are grown using the liquid effluents from sewage treatment plants and dissolved carbon dioxide from exhaust gases from the combustion unit. The algae are partially dried and fed into the combustor where diesel fuel is used to maintain ignition. Diesel fuel is also used for start-up and as a backup fuel for seasonal shifts that affect the algae growing conditions. Since the algae use the carbon dioxide emitted during the combustion process, the process will not contribute to global warming.

  12. Cambrian calcareous algae and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchinina, Veronica A.; Terleev, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Individual calcareous algae were known in Riphean. Their mass distribution is connected to the beginning of Cambrian. Despite of a long history of study, the nature of this group long time remained not clear. The new unique finds of algae from East Sayan region have shown, that primary carbonate thallus disappeared in the process of fossilization, and after it the calcareous cover formed by association of bacteria and cyanobacteria only.

  13. Improved aqueous extraction of microalgal lipid by combined enzymatic and thermal lysis from wet biomass of Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Li, Runzhi; Ren, Xiaoli; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-08-01

    High moisture content in wet algal biomass hinders effective performance of current lipid extraction methods. An improved aqueous extraction method combing thermal and enzymatic lysis was proposed and performed in algal slurry of Nannochloropsis oceanica (96.0% moisture) in this study. In general, cell-wall of N. oceanica was disrupted via thermal lysis and enzymatic lysis and lipid extraction was performed using aqueous surfactant solution. At the optimal conditions, high extraction efficiencies for both lipid (88.3%) and protein (62.4%) were obtained, which were significantly higher than those of traditional hexane extraction and other methods for wet algal biomass. Furthermore, an excessive extraction of polar lipid was found for wet biomass compared with dry biomass. The advantage of this method is to efficiently extract lipids from high moisture content algal biomass and avoid using organic solvent, indicating immense potential for commercial microalgae-based biofuel production. PMID:27132220

  14. Effect of specific light supply rate on photosynthetic efficiency of Nannochloropsis salina in a continuous flat plate photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Eleonora; Calvaruso, Claudio; Meneghesso, Andrea; Morosinotto, Tomas; Bertucco, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    In this work, Nannochloropsis salina was cultivated in a continuous-flow flat-plate photobioreactor, working at different residence times and irradiations to study the effect of the specific light supply rate on biomass productivity and photosynthetic efficiency. Changes in residence times lead to different steady-state cell concentrations and specific growth rates. We observed that cultures at steady concentration were exposed to different values of light intensity per cell. This specific light supply rate was shown to affect the photosynthetic status of the cells, monitored by fluorescence measurements. High specific light supply rate can lead to saturation and photoinhibition phenomena if the biomass concentration is not optimized for the selected operating conditions. Energy balances were applied to quantify the biomass growth yield and maintenance requirements in N. salina cells. PMID:26257264

  15. Measurement of photorespiration in algae.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, B C; Coleman, J R; Colman, B

    1982-01-01

    The rates of true and apparent photosynthesis of two unicellular green algae, one diatom and four blue-green algae were measured in buffer at pH 8.0 at subsaturating concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (13-27 micromolar). Initial rates of depletion from the medium of inorganic carbon and (14)C activity caused by the algae in a closed system were measured by gas chromatography and by liquid scintillation counting, respectively. The rate of photorespiration was calculated as the difference between the rates of apparent and true photosynthesis. The three eucaryotic algae and two blue-green algae had photorespiratory rates of 10 to 28% that of true photosynthesis at air levels of O(2). Reduction of the O(2) level to 2% caused a 52 to 91% reduction in photorespiratory rate. Two other blue-green algae displayed low photorespiratory rates, 2.4 to 6.2% that of true photosynthesis at air levels of O(2), and reduction of the O(2) concentration had no effect on these rates. PMID:16662171

  16. On-line stable isotope gas exchange reveals an inducible but leaky carbon concentrating mechanism in Nannochloropsis salina.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David T; Collins, Aaron M; Jones, Howland D T; Roesgen, John; Lopez-Nieves, Samuel; Timlin, Jerilyn A

    2014-09-01

    Carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are common among microalgae, but their regulation and even existence in some of the most promising biofuel production strains is poorly understood. This is partly because screening for new strains does not commonly include assessment of CCM function or regulation despite its fundamental role in primary carbon metabolism. In addition, the inducible nature of many microalgal CCMs means that environmental conditions should be considered when assessing CCM function and its potential impact on biofuels. In this study, we address the effect of environmental conditions by combining novel, high frequency, on-line (13)CO2 gas exchange screen with microscope-based lipid characterization to assess CCM function in Nannochloropsis salina and its interaction with lipid production. Regulation of CCM function was explored by changing the concentration of CO2 provided to continuous cultures in airlift bioreactors where cell density was kept constant across conditions by controlling the rate of media supply. Our isotopic gas exchange results were consistent with N. salina having an inducible "pump-leak" style CCM similar to that of Nannochloropsis gaditana. Though cells grew faster at high CO2 and had higher rates of net CO2 uptake, we did not observe significant differences in lipid content between conditions. Since the rate of CO2 supply was much higher for the high CO2 conditions, we calculated that growing cells bubbled with low CO2 is about 40 % more efficient for carbon capture than bubbling with high CO2. We attribute this higher efficiency to the activity of a CCM under low CO2 conditions. PMID:24844569

  17. Gas Exchange of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Elizabeth C. B.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1965-01-01

    Continuously growing cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Starr 252, operating at constant density and under constant environmental conditions, produced uniform photosynthetic quotient (PQ = CO2/O2) and O2 values during 6 months of observations. The PQ for the entire study was 0.90 ± 0.024. The PQ remained constant over a threefold light-intensity change and a threefold change in O2 production (0.90 ± 0.019). At low light intensities, when the rate of respiration approached the rate of photosynthesis, the PQ became extremely variable. Six lamps of widely different spectral-energy distribution produced no significant change in the PQ (0.90 ± 0.025). Oxygen production was directly related to the number of quanta available, irrespective of spectral-energy distribution. Such dependability in producing uniform PQ and O2 values warrants a consideration of algae to maintain a constant gas environment for submarine or spaceship use. Images Fig. 1 PMID:14339260

  18. Geographic variation in the damselfish-red alga cultivation mutualism in the Indo-West Pacific

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background On coral reefs, damselfish defend their territories from invading herbivores and maintain algal turfs, from which they harvest filamentous algae. In southern Japan, intensive weeding of indigestible algae by Stegastes nigricans results in overgrowth by one filamentous alga, Polysiphonia sp. 1. Because this alga is highly susceptible to grazing and is competitively inferior to other algae, it survives only within the protective territories of this fish species, suggesting an obligate mutualism between damselfish and their cultivated alga. The wide distribution of damselfish species through the Indo-Central Pacific raises the question of whether this species-specific mutualism is maintained throughout the geographic range of the fish. To address this question, from all 18 damselfish species we conducted comprehensive surveys of algal flora within their territories throughout the Indo-West Pacific, and identified species of Polysiphonia using morphological examination and gene sequencing data. Results Several species of the genus Polysiphonia were observed as a major crop in territories throughout the geographic range of S. nigricans. Polysiphonia sp. 1 occurred only in territories of S. nigricans in central areas of the Indo-Pacific. However, its occurrence was low from the Great Barrier Reef and Mauritius. In contrast, other indigenous Polysiphonia species, which formed a clade with Polysiphonia sp. 1, occurred in the territories of fishes from Egypt, Kenya, and the Maldives. The other Polysiphonia species in the clade only inhabited damselfish territories and were never found elsewhere. Conclusions Cultivation mutualism between the damselfish S. nigricans and algae of Polysiphonia was maintained throughout the Indo-West Pacific, although algal crop species and the mode of cultivation (e.g., presence/absence of selective weeding, the species composition of algal turfs) varied among localities. This finding implies that damselfish utilize indigenous

  19. Response of freshwater algae to water quality in Qinshan Lake within Taihu Watershed, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianying; Ni, Wanmin; Luo, Yang; Jan Stevenson, R.; Qi, Jiaguo

    Although frequent algal blooms in Taihu Lake in China have become major environmental problems and have drawn national and international attention, little is understood about the relationship between algal blooms and water quality. The goal of this study was to assess the growth and species responses of freshwater algae to variation in water quality in Qinshan Lake, located in headwaters of the Taihu watershed. Water samples were collected monthly from ten study sites in the Qinshan Lake and were analyzed for species distribution of freshwater algae and physiochemical parameters such as total nitrogen (TN), NH4+-N, NO3--N, total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD Mn) and Chl-a. The results showed that average TN was 4.47 mg/L, with 92.2% of values greater than the TN standard set by the Chinese Environmental Protection Agency; average TP was 0.051 mg/L, with 37.9% of values above the TP national standard; and average trophic level index (TLI) was 53, the lower end of eutrophic condition. Average Chl-a concentration was 12.83 mg/m 3. Green algae and diatom far outweighed other freshwater algae and were dominant most time of the year, with the highest relative abundances of 96% and 99%, respectively. Blue-green algae, composed mainly toxic strains like Microcystis sp ., Nostoc sp. and Oscillatoria sp., became most dominant in the summer with the maximum relative abundance of 69%. The blue-green algae sank to the lake bottom to overwinter, and then dinoflagellates became the dominant species in the winter, with highest relative abundance of 89%. Analysis indicated that nutrients, especially control of ammonia and co-varying nutrients were the major restrictive factor of population growth of blue-green algae, suggesting that control in nutrient enrichments is the major preventive measure of algal blooms in Qinshan Lake.

  20. Oxidative stability and ignition quality of algae derived methyl esters containing varying levels of methyl eicosapentaenoate and methyl docosahexaenoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucy, Harrison

    Microalgae is currently receiving strong consideration as a potential biofuel feedstock to help meet the advanced biofuels mandate of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act because of its theoretically high yield (gallons/acre/year) in comparison to current terrestrial feedstocks. Additionally, microalgae also do not compete with food and can be cultivated with wastewater on non-arable land. Microalgae lipids can be converted into a variety of biofuels including fatty acid methyl esters (e.g. FAME biodiesel), renewable diesel, renewable gasoline, or jet fuel. For microalgae derived FAME, the fuel properties will be directly related to the fatty acid composition of the lipids produced by the given microalgae strain. Several microalgae species under consideration for wide scale cultivation, such as Nannochloropsis, produce lipids with fatty acid compositions containing substantially higher quantities of long chainpolyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) in comparison to terrestrial feedstocks. It is expected that increased levels of LC-PUFA will be problematic in terms of meeting all of the current ASTM specifications for biodiesel. For example, it is known that oxidative stability and cetane number decrease with increasing levels of LC-PUFA. However, these same LC-PUFA fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA: C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA: C22:6) are known to have high nutritional value thereby making separation of these compounds economically attractive. Given the uncertainty in the future value of these LC-PUFA compounds and the economic viability of the separation process, the goal of this study was to examine the oxidative stability and ignition quality of algae-based FAME with varying levels of EPA and DHA removal. Oxidative stability tests were conducted at a temperature of 110°C and airflow of 10 L/h using a Metrohm 743 Rancimat with automatic induction period determination following the EN 14112 Method from the ASTM D6751 and EN 14214

  1. The Response of Nannochloropsis gaditana to Nitrogen Starvation Includes De Novo Biosynthesis of Triacylglycerols, a Decrease of Chloroplast Galactolipids, and Reorganization of the Photosynthetic Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Simionato, Diana; Block, Maryse A.; La Rocca, Nicoletta; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae of the genus Nannochloropsis are capable of accumulating triacylglycerols (TAGs) when exposed to nutrient limitation (in particular, nitrogen [N]) and are therefore considered promising organisms for biodiesel production. Here, after nitrogen removal from the medium, Nannochloropsis gaditana cells showed extensive triacylglycerol accumulation (38% TAG on a dry weight basis). Triacylglycerols accumulated during N deprivation harbored signatures, indicating that they mainly stemmed from freshly synthesized fatty acids, with a small proportion originating from a recycling of membrane glycerolipids. The amount of chloroplast galactoglycerolipids, which are essential for the integrity of thylakoids, decreased, while their fatty acid composition appeared to be unaltered. In starved cells, galactolipids were kept at a level sufficient to maintain chloroplast integrity, as confirmed by electron microscopy. Consistently, N-starved Nannochloropsis cells contained less photosynthetic membranes but were still efficiently performing photosynthesis. N starvation led to a modification of the photosynthetic apparatus with a change in pigment composition and a decrease in the content of all the major electron flow complexes, including photosystem II, photosystem I, and the cytochrome b6f complex. The photosystem II content was particularly affected, leading to the inhibition of linear electron flow from water to CO2. Such a reduction, however, was partially compensated for by activation of alternative electron pathways, such as cyclic electron transport. Overall, these changes allowed cells to modify their energetic metabolism in order to maintain photosynthetic growth. PMID:23457191

  2. Chlamydomonas sajao nov. sp. (Chlorophyta, Volvocales)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Ralph A.

    1984-06-01

    A new species of Chlamydomonas, namely, C. sajao nov. sp. of the Volvocales, Chlorophyta was isolated from a duckweed growing near a ricefield in the vicinity of Guangzhou, China. This interesting unicellular green alga, similar to C. mexicana from Mexico, secretes quantities of extracellular mucilaginous polysaccharides, and may be employed in improving soil quality. The new species resembles C. waldenburgensis Moewus in most characteristics but differs in three important features.

  3. The role of algae in mine drainage bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The effect of mine drainage effluent on aquatic ecosystems has been abundantly documented and remediation efforts to data have always been costly and temporary at best. Bioremediation, using natural environmental microbes, to treat acid mine drainage has shown great promise as an affordable, permanent treatment. At Lambda, we used mixatrophic cultures of bacteria, algae, protozoans and fungal groups on four different jobs and it has proven effective. The role of two particular algal groups, the Euglena mutabilis and the Ochramonas sp. are particularly of phycological interest.

  4. Microscopic Gardens: A Close Look at Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Mary Ann

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom activities using algae, including demonstration of eutrophication, examination of mating strains, and activities with Euglena. Includes on algal morphology/physiology, types of algae, and field sources for collecting these organisms. (JN)

  5. Impact of green algae on the measurement of Microcystis aeruginosa populations in lagoon-treated wastewater with an algae online analyser.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thang; Roddick, Felicity A; Fan, Linhua

    2015-01-01

    Tests on the algae online analyser (AOA) showed that there was a strong direct linear correlation between cell density and in vivo Chl-a concentration for M. aeruginosa over the range of interest for a biologically treated effluent at a wastewater treatment plant (25,000-65,000 cells mL(-1), equivalent to a biovolume of 2-6 mm3 L(-1)). However, the AOA can provide an overestimate or underestimate of M. aeruginosa populations when green algae are present in the effluent, depending on their species and relative numbers. The results from this study demonstrated that the green algae (e.g., Euglena gracilis, Chlorella sp.) in the field phytoplankton population should be considered during calibration. In summary, the AOA has potential for use as an alert system for the presence of M. aeruginosa, and thus potentially of cyanobacterial blooms, in wastewater stabilization ponds. PMID:25204421

  6. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  7. The effect of low temperature on Antarctic endolithic green algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. A.; Morris, G. J.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that undercooling to about -5 degrees C occurs in colonized Beacon sandstones of the Ross Desert, Antarctica. High-frequency temperature oscillations between 5 degrees C and -5 degrees C or -10 degrees C (which occur in nature on the rock surface) did not damage Hemichloris antarctica. In a cryomicroscope, H. antarctica appeared to be undamaged after slow or rapid cooling to -50 degrees C. 14CO2 incorporation after freezing to -20 degrees C was unaffected in H. antarctica or in Trebouxia sp. but slightly depressed in Stichococcus sp. (isolated from a less extreme Antarctic habitat). These results suggest that the freezing regime in the Antarctic desert is not injurious to endolithic algae. It is likely that the freezing-point depression inside the rock makes available liquid water for metabolic activity at subzero temperatures. Freezing may occur more frequently on the rock surface and contribute to the abiotic nature of the surface.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species Gloiopeltis furcata, Porphyra...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species Analipus japonicus, Eisenia...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  18. Algae. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    The plants and plantlike organisms informally grouped together as algae show great diversity of form and size and occur in a wide variety of habitats. These extremely important photosynthesizers are also economically significant. For example, some species contaminate water supplies; others provide food for aquatic animals and for man; still others…

  19. Biological importance of marine algae

    PubMed Central

    El Gamal, Ali A.

    2009-01-01

    Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Algae can be classified into two main groups; first one is the microalgae, which includes blue green algae, dinoflagellates, bacillariophyta (diatoms)… etc., and second one is macroalgae (seaweeds) which includes green, brown and red algae. The microalgae phyla have been recognized to provide chemical and pharmacological novelty and diversity. Moreover, microalgae are considered as the actual producers of some highly bioactive compounds found in marine resources. Red algae are considered as the most important source of many biologically active metabolites in comparison to other algal classes. Seaweeds are used for great number of application by man. The principal use of seaweeds as a source of human food and as a source of gums (phycocollides). Phycocolloides like agar agar, alginic acid and carrageenan are primarily constituents of brown and red algal cell walls and are widely used in industry. PMID:23960716

  20. Distribution of periphytic algae in wetlands (Palm swamps, Cerrado), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dunck, B; Nogueira, I S; Felisberto, S A

    2013-05-01

    The distribution of periphytic algae communities depends on various factors such as type of substrate, level of disturbance, nutrient availability and light. According to the prediction that impacts of anthropogenic activity provide changes in environmental characteristics, making impacted Palm swamps related to environmental changes such as deforestation and higher loads of nutrients via allochthonous, the hypothesis tested was: impacted Palm swamps have higher richness, density, biomass and biovolume of epiphytic algae. We evaluated the distribution and structure of epiphytic algae communities in 23 Palm swamps of Goiás State under different environmental impacts. The community structure attributes here analyzed were composition, richness, density, biomass and biovolume. This study revealed the importance of the environment on the distribution and structuration of algal communities, relating the higher values of richness, biomass and biovolume with impacted environments. Acidic waters and high concentration of silica were important factors in this study. Altogether 200 taxa were identified, and the zygnemaphycea was the group most representative in richness and biovolume, whereas the diatoms, in density of studied epiphyton. Impacted Palm swamps in agricultural area presented two indicator species, Gomphonema lagenula Kützing and Oedogonium sp, both related to mesotrophic to eutrophic conditions for total nitrogen concentrations of these environments. PMID:23917560

  1. Measurements of photorespiration in some microscopic algae.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K H; Colman, B

    1974-09-01

    The rate of photorespiration in three green algae and four blue-green algae was determined by the measurement of the rate of loss of photosynthetically fixed (14)CO2 in light in CO2-free air at 25°. In all algae studied, CO2 evolution in light was considerably less than that in the dark, except for Chlamydomonas reinhardii which released slightly more CO2 in the light. Raising the temperature to 35° had little effect on the ratio of light to dark (14)CO2 release. Blue-green algae showed the lowest photorespiration rate of the algae studied. PMID:24458883

  2. Effects of acid stress on Scenedesmus quadricauda (chlorophyta) and Anabaena sp. (cyanophyta)

    SciTech Connect

    Hadden-Carter, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of pH in conjunction with light and temperature on growth of Scenedesmus quadricauda (Chlorophyta) and Anabaena sp. (Cyanophyta) were examined in culture. Decreasing pH from 7 to 3 inhibited growth, more so in the blue-green alga. Effects were greatly influenced by light and temperature. Above a critical level (pH4 with the blue-green, pH 3 with the green) both algae recovered when acid stress was removed; post-acidification growth rates varied inversely with pH for the green alga and directly for the blue-green. Two sheathed blue-green algae (Lyngbya and Gleocapsa) grew below pH 6, while two unsheathed blue-green algae (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) did not. Cell dimensions of both S. quadricaude and Anabaena sp. generally increased as pH declined; the green alga was the more plastic of the two. Acid stress significantly decreased photosynthetic rate in S. quadricauda but did not for Anabaena sp. Respiratory rates were not significantly related to pH for either alga. Chlorophyll a per cell was higher than controls (pH 7) at pH 5 and 6 in Anabaena sp. and at pH 4 through 6 for S. quadricauda. Both cell division and total culture biomass declined with pH. When grown in mixed culture, the green alga usually predominated at pH 4 and often at pH 5; the blue-green was favored at lower light intensities and higher temperatures. In no instance did one alga stimulate growth of the other, although mutual inhibition occurred in several instances.

  3. CONDITIONAL PRODUCTION OF A FUNCTIONAL FISH GROWTH HORMONE IN THE TRANSGENIC LINE OF NANNOCHLOROPSIS OCULATA (EUSTIGMATOPHYCEAE)(1).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin Liang; Li, Si Shen; Huang, Rang; Tsai, Huai-Jen

    2008-06-01

    Plasmid phr-YPGHc, containing the fish growth hormone (GH) cDNA driven by a heat shock protein 70A promoter and a RUBISCO SSU 2 promoter, was transferred into the protoplast of marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop) D. J. Hibberd by electroporation. Four transgenic clones were obtained in which the transferred phr-YPGHc was integrated into the genome and existed stably at least until the 50th generation. When we treated these transgenic microalgae by heat shock, the heterologous fish GH was produced in the amount of 0.42 to 0.27 μg · mL(-1) from the 50 mL of medium. We incubated artemia with the wildtype and transgenic N. oculata for 6 h and then fed these microalgae-treated artemia to red-tilapia larvae. After feeding, the growth of larvae that were fed artemia incubated with transgenic microalgae was greater (i.e., statistically significant: P < 0.05) than that of larvae that were fed artemia incubated with nontransgenic microalgae: 316% versus 104% in weight gain, and 217% versus 146% in body length increase, respectively. Therefore, the N. oculata enables production of functional GH, and we propose that it might be an excellent bioreactor material. PMID:27041435

  4. Choreography of Transcriptomes and Lipidomes of Nannochloropsis Reveals the Mechanisms of Oil Synthesis in Microalgae[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Han, Danxiang; Wang, Dongmei; Ning, Kang; Jia, Jing; Wei, Li; Jing, Xiaoyan; Huang, Shi; Chen, Jie; Li, Yantao; Hu, Qiang; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the molecular mechanisms of oleaginousness in microalgae, transcriptomic and lipidomic dynamics of the oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 under nitrogen-replete (N+) and N-depleted (N-) conditions were simultaneously tracked. At the transcript level, enhanced triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis under N- conditions primarily involved upregulation of seven putative diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) genes and downregulation of six other DGAT genes, with a simultaneous elevation of the other Kennedy pathway genes. Under N- conditions, despite downregulation of most de novo fatty acid synthesis genes, the pathways that shunt carbon precursors from protein and carbohydrate metabolic pathways into glycerolipid synthesis were stimulated at the transcript level. In particular, the genes involved in supplying carbon precursors and energy for de novo fatty acid synthesis, including those encoding components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), glycolysis, and PDHC bypass, and suites of specific transporters, were substantially upregulated under N- conditions, resulting in increased overall TAG production. Moreover, genes involved in the citric acid cycle and β-oxidation in mitochondria were greatly enhanced to utilize the carbon skeletons derived from membrane lipids and proteins to produce additional TAG or its precursors. This temporal and spatial regulation model of oil accumulation in microalgae provides a basis for improving our understanding of TAG synthesis in microalgae and will also enable more rational genetic engineering of TAG production. PMID:24692423

  5. Engineering strategies for enhancing the production of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from an isolated microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica CY2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Chen, Yu-Chun; Huang, Hsiao-Chen; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Lee, Wen-Lung; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae have emerged as promising resources for highly unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, an indigenous microalga identified as Nannochloropsis oceanica CY2 was grown photoautotrophically to produce eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5, n-3). Specific engineering strategies were employed to stimulate EPA accumulation in the microalgal cells. The results show that BG-11 was the most effective medium to grow N. oceanica CY2, giving an EPA content and biomass concentration of 2.38% (per dry cell weight) and 1.53 g/l. The EPA content nearly doubled when using the optimal nitrogen source (NaNO3) at a concentration of 1.50 g/l. The illumination system also markedly affected the EPA content for the photoautotrophic microalga. When the microalgal culture was illuminated with a red LED, an impressively high EPA content of 5.5% was obtained. Finally, using semi-batch cultures operations with LED-blue illumination, the EPA content of N. oceanica CY2 was stably maintained at 5.0%. PMID:23994697

  6. Survival of Nannochloropsis Phytoplankton in Hypervelocity Impact Events up to Velocities of 6.07 km/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D. L. S.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Studies have previously been conducted to verify the survivability of living cells during hypervelocity impact events to test the panspermia and lithopanspermia hypothesis [1], [2]. It has been demonstrated that bacteria survive impacts up to 5.4 km s-1 (approx. shock pressure 30 GPa) - albeit with a low probability of survival [1] whilst larger more complex objects (such as seeds) break up at ~1 km s-1 [2]. The survivability of yeast spores in impacts up to 7.4 km s-1 has also recently been shown [3]. We demonstrate here the survivability of Nannochloropsis Phytoplankton, a eukaryotic photosynthesizing autotroph found in the 'euphotic zone'(sunlit surface layers of oceans) [4] at impact velocities up to 6.07 km s-1. Phytoplankton from a culture sample was frozen and then fired into water (to simulate oceanic impacts, as described in [5]) using a light gas gun (LGG) [6]. The water was then retrieved and placed into a sealed culture vessel and left under a constant light source to check the viability of any remnant organisms.

  7. Pyrogenic transformation of Nannochloropsis oceanica into fatty acid methyl esters without oil extraction for estimating total lipid content.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Jung, Jong-Min; Lee, Jechan; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Tae O; Kim, Jae-Kon; Jeon, Young Jae; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2016-07-01

    This study fundamentally investigated the pseudo-catalytic transesterification of dried Nannochloropsis oceanica into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) without oil extraction, which was achieved in less than 5min via a thermo-chemical pathway. This study presented that the pseudo-catalytic transesterification reaction was achieved in the presence of silica and that its main driving force was identified as temperature: pores in silica provided the numerous reaction space like a micro-reactor, where the heterogeneous reaction was developed. The introduced FAME derivatization showed an extraordinarily high tolerance of impurities (i.e., pyrolytic products and various extractives). This study also explored the thermal cracking of FAMEs derived from N. oceanica: the thermal cracking of saturated FAMEs was invulnerable at temperatures lower than 400°C. Lastly, this study reported that N. oceanica contained 14.4wt.% of dried N. oceanica and that the introduced methylation technique could be applicable to many research fields sharing the transesterification platform. PMID:27082269

  8. Use of natural pH variation to increase the flocculation of the marine microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Sales, Rafael; Abreu, Paulo Cesar

    2015-02-01

    Microalgae is largely used in aquaculture as feed. More recently, these microorganisms have been considered as an important feedstock for biodiesel production. However, the concentration of produced biomass represents a large parcel of production costs. In this study, we have evaluated the influence of natural pH variation of culture medium, caused by photosynthetic activity, on the flocculation of the marine microalgae Nannochloropsis oculata. Experiments were conducted with the same culture with different pH values (8.5 and 9.6), obtained after exposing the cells to different light conditions. For each pH value, different treatments were composed by adding 0, 5, 10, and 30 mM of NaOH and the flocculant Flopam® (FO4800 SH) at concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, and 5 ppm. Higher flocculation efficiencies were obtained for the culture with pH 9.6 in comparison to 8.5 for the same NaOH and Flopam concentrations. Lower concentrations of base and flocculant were needed for flocculating the culture in higher pH, representing an economy of 20 % in the costs of crop harvesting. PMID:25432344

  9. Regulation of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway and its integration with fatty acid biosynthesis in the oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sterols are vital structural and regulatory components in eukaryotic cells; however, their biosynthetic pathways and functional roles in microalgae remain poorly understood. Results In the oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica, the sterol biosynthetic pathway produces phytosterols as minor products and cholesterol as the major product. The evidence together with their deduced biosynthetic pathways suggests that N. oceanica exhibits features of both higher plants and mammals. Temporal tracking of sterol profiles and sterol-biosynthetic transcripts in response to changes in light intensity and nitrogen supply reveal that sterols play roles in cell proliferation, chloroplast differentiation, and photosynthesis. Furthermore, the dynamics of fatty acid (FA) and FA-biosynthetic transcripts upon chemical inhibitor-induced sterol depletion reveal possible co-regulation of sterol production and FA synthesis, in that the squalene epoxidase inhibitor terbinafine reduces sterol content yet significantly elevates free FA production. Thus, a feedback regulation of sterol and FA homeostasis is proposed, with the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS, the committed enzyme in isoprenoid and sterol biosynthesis) gene potentially subject to feedback regulation by sterols. Conclusion These findings reveal features of sterol function and biosynthesis in microalgae and suggest new genetic engineering or chemical biology approaches for enhanced oil production in microalgae. PMID:24920959

  10. Effect of outdoor conditions on Nannochloropsis salina cultivation in artificial seawater using nutrients from anaerobic digestion effluent.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Park, Stephen Y; Li, Yebo

    2014-01-01

    The effects of simulated outdoor seasonal climatic conditions on Nannochloropsis salina (N. salina) grown using nutrients from anaerobic digestion (AD) effluent were evaluated in this study. Under various light exposure (LE) and temperature (10-30 °C) conditions, N. salina specific growth rate (μ) was strongly affected by LE. Light availability (LA) was observed to be crucial for biomass production, with μ values of 0.038±0.013 d(-1), 0.093±0.013 d(-1), and 0.151±0.021 d(-1) for 6-h, 12-h, and 24-h LA conditions, respectively. Temperature (10-25 °C) was not significant in affecting the light dependent growth coefficient (μ/LE), indicating the suitability of culturing this strain in the Ohio climate. Cultures exposed to low illumination had significantly higher unsaturated fatty acid content than those under high illumination, with nearly 29% higher eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5) content. Using LE and light attenuation resulted in adequate prediction of N. salina growth in a 1000 L open raceway pond. PMID:24291316

  11. Hydrothermal-acid treatment for effectual extraction of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-abundant lipids from Nannochloropsis salina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ilgyu; Han, Jong-In

    2015-09-01

    Hydrothermal acid treatment, was adopted to extract eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from wet biomass of Nannochloropsis salina. It was found that sulfuric acid-based treatment increased EPA yield from 11.8 to 58.1 mg/g cell in a way that was nearly proportional to its concentration. Nitric acid exhibited the same pattern at low concentrations, but unlike sulfuric acid its effectiveness unexpectedly dropped from 0.5% to 2.0%. The optimal and minimal conditions for hydrothermal acid pretreatment were determined using a statistical approach; its maximum EPA yield (predicted: 43.69 mg/g cell; experimental: 43.93 mg/g cell) was established at a condition of 1.27% of sulfuric acid, 113.34 °C of temperature, and 36.71 min of reaction time. Our work demonstrated that the acid-catalyzed cell disruption, accompanied by heat, can be one potentially promising option for ω-3 fatty acids extraction. PMID:25966023

  12. Iron encrustations on filamentous algae colonized by Gallionella-related bacteria in a metal-polluted freshwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J. F.; Neu, T. R.; Lu, S.; Händel, M.; Totsche, K. U.; Küsel, K.

    2015-09-01

    some putative predators of algae. A loss of chloroplasts in the brown algae could have led to lower photosynthetic activities and reduced EPS production, which is known to affect predator colonization. Collectively, our results suggest the coexistence of oxygen-generating algae Tribonema sp. and strictly microaerophilic neutrophilic FeOB in a heavy metal-rich environment.

  13. Hydrothermal upgrading of algae paste: Inorganics and recycling potential in the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavish; Guo, Miao; Chong, Chinglih; Sarudin, Syazwani Hj Mat; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2016-10-15

    Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) for algal biomass conversion is a promising technology capable of producing high yields of biocrude as well as partitioning even higher quantity of nutrients in the aqueous phase. To assess the feasibility of utilizing the aqueous phase, HTL of Nannochloropsis sp. was carried out in the temperature range of 275 to 350°C and Residence Times (RT) ranging between 5 and 60min The effect of reaction conditions on the NO3(-),PO4(3-),SO4(2-),Cl(-),Na(+),andK(+) ions as well as Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and pH was investigated with view of recycling the aqueous phase for either cultivation or energy generation via Anaerobic Digestion (AD), quantified via Lifecycle Assessment (LCA). It addition to substantial nutrient partitioning at short RT, an increase in alkalinity to almost pH10 and decrease in COD at longer RT was observed. The LCA investigation found reaction conditions of 275°C/30min and 350°C/10min to be most suitable for nutrient and energy recovery but both processing routes offer environmental benefit at all reaction conditions, however recycling for cultivation has marginally better environmental credentials compared to AD. PMID:27318079

  14. The remote sensing of algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    State agencies need rapid, synoptic and inexpensive methods for lake assessment to comply with the 1972 Amendments to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. Low altitude aerial photography may be useful in providing information on algal type and quantity. Photography must be calibrated properly to remove sources of error including airlight, surface reflectance and scene-to-scene illumination differences. A 550-nm narrow wavelength band black and white photographic exposure provided a better correlation to algal biomass than either red or infrared photographic exposure. Of all the biomass parameters tested, depth-integrated chlorophyll a concentration correlated best to remote sensing data. Laboratory-measured reflectance of selected algae indicate that different taxonomic classes of algae may be discriminated on the basis of their reflectance spectra.

  15. [Discrimination of Red Tide algae by fluorescence spectra and principle component analysis].

    PubMed

    Su, Rong-guo; Hu, Xu-peng; Zhang, Chuan-song; Wang, Xiu-lin

    2007-07-01

    Fluorescence discrimination technology for 11 species of the Red Tide algae at genus level was constructed by principle component analysis and non-negative least squares. Rayleigh and Raman scattering peaks of 3D fluorescence spectra were eliminated by Delaunay triangulation method. According to the results of Fisher linear discrimination, the first principle component score and the second component score of 3D fluorescence spectra were chosen as discriminant feature and the feature base was established. The 11 algae species were tested, and more than 85% samples were accurately determinated, especially for Prorocentrum donghaiense, Skeletonema costatum, Gymnodinium sp., which have frequently brought Red tide in the East China Sea. More than 95% samples were right discriminated. The results showed that the genus discriminant feature of 3D fluorescence spectra of Red Tide algae given by principle component analysis could work well. PMID:17891964

  16. Synthetic polyester from algae oil.

    PubMed

    Roesle, Philipp; Stempfle, Florian; Hess, Sandra K; Zimmerer, Julia; Río Bártulos, Carolina; Lepetit, Bernard; Eckert, Angelika; Kroth, Peter G; Mecking, Stefan

    2014-06-23

    Current efforts to technically use microalgae focus on the generation of fuels with a molecular structure identical to crude oil based products. Here we suggest a different approach for the utilization of algae by translating the unique molecular structures of algae oil fatty acids into higher value chemical intermediates and materials. A crude extract from a microalga, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was obtained as a multicomponent mixture containing amongst others unsaturated fatty acid (16:1, 18:1, and 20:5) phosphocholine triglycerides. Exposure of this crude algae oil to CO and methanol with the known catalyst precursor [{1,2-(tBu2 PCH2)2C6H4}Pd(OTf)](OTf) resulted in isomerization/methoxycarbonylation of the unsaturated fatty acids into a mixture of linear 1,17- and 1,19-diesters in high purity (>99 %). Polycondensation with a mixture of the corresponding diols yielded a novel mixed polyester-17/19.17/19 with an advantageously high melting and crystallization temperature. PMID:24845347

  17. Parasites in algae mass culture

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Laura T.; Lane, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential for parasites to have a devastating effect on commercial scale monoculture. As commercial algal production continues to expand with a widening variety of applications, including biofuel, food and pharmaceuticals, the parasites associated with algae will become of greater interest and potential economic impact. A number of important algal parasites have been identified in algal mass culture systems in the last few years and this number is sure to grow as the number of commercial algae ventures increases. Here, we review the research that has identified and characterized parasites infecting mass cultivated algae, the techniques being proposed and or developed to control them, and the potential impact of parasites on the future of the algal biomass industry. PMID:24936200

  18. Optimization of liquid media and biosafety assessment for algae-lysing bacterium NP23.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunli; Liu, Xiaobo; Shan, Linna

    2014-09-01

    To control algal bloom caused by nutrient pollution, a wild-type algae-lysing bacterium was isolated from the Baiguishan reservoir in Henan province of China and identified as Enterobacter sp. strain NP23. Algal culture medium was optimized by applying a Placket-Burman design to obtain a high cell concentration of NP23. Three minerals (i.e., 0.6% KNO3, 0.001% MnSO4·H2O, and 0.3% K2HPO4) were found to be independent factors critical for obtaining the highest cell concentration of 10(13) CFU/mL, which was 10(4) times that of the control. In the algae-lysing experiment, the strain exhibited a high lysis rate for the 4 algae test species, namely, Chlorella vulgari, Scenedesmus, Microcystis wesenbergii, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Acute toxicity and mutagenicity tests showed that the bacterium NP23 had no toxic and mutagenic effects on fish, even in large doses such as 10(7) or 10(9) CFU/mL. Thus, Enterobacter sp. strain NP23 has strong potential application in the microbial algae-lysing project. PMID:25188453

  19. Red algae and their use in papermaking.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yung-Bum; Lee, Youn-Woo; Lee, Chun-Han; You, Hack-Chul

    2010-04-01

    Gelidialian red algae, that contain rhizoidal filaments, except the family Gelidiellaceae were processed to make bleached pulps, which can be used as raw materials for papermaking. Red algae consist of rhizoidal filaments, cortical cells usually reddish in color, and medullary cells filled with mucilaginous carbohydrates. Red algae pulp consists of mostly rhizoidal filaments. Red algae pulp of high brightness can be produced by extracting mucilaginous carbohydrates after heating the algae in an aqueous medium and subsequently treating the extracted with bleaching chemicals. In this study, we prepared paper samples from bleached pulps obtained from two red algae species (Gelidium amansii and Gelidium corneum) and compared their properties to those of bleached wood chemical pulps. PMID:20022488

  20. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  1. A new microscopic method to analyse desiccation-induced volume changes in aeroterrestrial green algae.

    PubMed

    Lajos, K; Mayr, S; Buchner, O; Blaas, K; Holzinger, A

    2016-08-01

    Aeroterrestrial green algae are exposed to desiccation in their natural habitat, but their actual volume changes have not been investigated. Here, we measure the relative volume reduction (RVRED ) in Klebsormidium crenulatum and Zygnema sp. under different preset relative air humidities (RH). A new chamber allows monitoring RH during light microscopic observation of the desiccation process. The RHs were set in the range of ∼4 % to ∼95% in 10 steps. RVRED caused by the desiccation process was determined after full acclimation to the respective RHs. In K. crenulatum, RVRED (mean ± SE) was 46.4 ± 1.9%, in Zygnema sp. RVRED was only 34.3 ± 2.4% at the highest RH (∼95%) tested. This indicates a more pronounced water loss at higher RHs in K. crenulatum versus Zygnema sp. By contrast, at the lowest RH (∼4%) tested, RVRED ranged from 75.9 ± 2.7% in K. crenulatum to 83.9 ± 2.2% in Zygnema sp. The final volume reduction is therefore more drastic in Zygnema sp. These data contribute to our understanding of the desiccation process in streptophytic green algae, which are considered the closest ancestors of land plants. PMID:27075881

  2. A new microscopic method to analyse desiccation‐induced volume changes in aeroterrestrial green algae

    PubMed Central

    LAJOS, K.; MAYR, S.; BUCHNER, O.; BLAAS, K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aeroterrestrial green algae are exposed to desiccation in their natural habitat, but their actual volume changes have not been investigated. Here, we measure the relative volume reduction (RVRED) in Klebsormidium crenulatum and Zygnema sp. under different preset relative air humidities (RH). A new chamber allows monitoring RH during light microscopic observation of the desiccation process. The RHs were set in the range of ∼4 % to ∼95% in 10 steps. RVRED caused by the desiccation process was determined after full acclimation to the respective RHs. In K. crenulatum, RVRED (mean ± SE) was 46.4 ± 1.9%, in Zygnema sp. RVRED was only 34.3 ± 2.4% at the highest RH (∼95%) tested. This indicates a more pronounced water loss at higher RHs in K. crenulatum versus Zygnema sp. By contrast, at the lowest RH (∼4%) tested, RVRED ranged from 75.9 ± 2.7% in K. crenulatum to 83.9 ± 2.2% in Zygnema sp. The final volume reduction is therefore more drastic in Zygnema sp. These data contribute to our understanding of the desiccation process in streptophytic green algae, which are considered the closest ancestors of land plants. PMID:27075881

  3. Assessing the potential impact of water-based drill cuttings on deep-water calcareous red algae using species specific impact categories and measured oceanographic and discharge data.

    PubMed

    Nilssen, Ingunn; dos Santos, Francisco; Coutinho, Ricardo; Gomes, Natalia; Cabral, Marcelo Montenegro; Eide, Ingvar; Figueiredo, Marcia A O; Johnsen, Geir; Johnsen, Ståle

    2015-12-01

    The potential impact of drill cuttings on the two deep water calcareous red algae Mesophyllum engelhartii and Lithothamnion sp. from the Peregrino oil field was assessed. Dispersion modelling of drill cuttings was performed for a two year period using measured oceanographic and discharge data with 24 h resolution. The model was also used to assess the impact on the two algae species using four species specific impact categories: No, minor, medium and severe impact. The corresponding intervals for photosynthetic efficiency (ΦPSIImax) and sediment coverage were obtained from exposure-response relationship for photosynthetic efficiency as function of sediment coverage for the two algae species. The temporal resolution enabled more accurate model predictions as short-term changes in discharges and environmental conditions could be detected. The assessment shows that there is a patchy risk for severe impact on the calcareous algae stretching across the transitional zone and into the calcareous algae bed at Peregrino. PMID:26412110

  4. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shi; Fulbright, Scott P; Zeng, Xiaowei; Yates, Tracy; Wardle, Greg; Chisholm, Stephen T; Xu, Jian; Lammers, Peter

    2011-03-16

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We

  5. Low-temperature affected LC-PUFA conversion and associated gene transcript level in Nannochloropsis oculata CS-179

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Li, Si; Yang, Guanpin

    2011-09-01

    Nannochloropsis oculata CS-179, a marine eukaryotic unicellular microalga, is rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs). Culture temperature affected cell growth and the composition of LC-PUFAs. At an initial cell density of 1.5 × 106 cell mL-1, the highest growth was observed at 25°C and the cell density reached 3 × 107 cell mL-1 at the beginning of logarithmic phase. The content of LC-PUFAs varied with culture temperature. The highest content of LC-PUFAs (43.96%) and EPA (36.6%) was gained at 20°C. Real-time PCR showed that the abundance of Δ6-desaturase gene transcripts was significantly different among 5 culture temperatures and the highest transcript level (15°C) of Nanoc-D6D took off at cycle 21.45. The gene transcript of C20-elongase gene was higher at lower temperatures (10, 15, and 20°C), and the highest transcript level (20°C) of Nanoc-E took off at cycle 21.18. The highest conversion rate (39.3%) of Δ6-desaturase was also gained at 20°C. But the conversion rate of Nanoc-E was not detected. The higher content of LC-PUFAs was a result of higher gene transcript level and higher enzyme activity. Compared with C20-elongase gene, Δ6-desaturase gene transcript and enzyme activity varied significantly with temperature. It will be useful to study the mechanism of how the content of LC-PUFAs is affected by temperature.

  6. Efficient light-harvesting using non-carbonyl carotenoids: Energy transfer dynamics in the VCP complex from Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Keşan, Gürkan; Litvín, Radek; Bína, David; Durchan, Milan; Šlouf, Václav; Polívka, Tomáš

    2016-04-01

    Violaxanthin-chlorophyll a protein (VCP) from Nannochloropsis oceanica is a Chl a-only member of the LHC family of light-harvesting proteins. VCP binds carotenoids violaxanthin (Vio), vaucheriaxanthin (Vau), and vaucheriaxanthin-ester (Vau-ester). Here we report on energy transfer pathways in the VCP complex. The overall carotenoid-to-Chla energy transfer has efficiency over 90%. Based on their energy transfer properties, the carotenoids in VCP can be divided into two groups; blue carotenoids with the lowest energy absorption band around 480nm and red carotenoids with absorption extended up to 530nm. Both carotenoid groups transfer energy efficiently from their S2 states, reaching efficiencies of ~70% (blue) and ~60% (red). The S1 pathway, however, is efficient only for the red carotenoid pool for which two S1 routes characterized by 0.33 and 2.4ps time constants were identified. For the blue carotenoids the S1-mediated pathway is represented only by a minor route likely involving a hot S1 state. The relaxed S1 state of blue carotenoids decays to the ground state within 21ps. Presence of a fraction of non-transferring red carotenoids with the S1 lifetime of 13ps indicates some specific carotenoid-protein interaction that must shorten the intrinsic S1 lifetime of Vio and/or Vau whose S1 lifetimes in methanol are 26 and 29ps, respectively. The VCP complex from N. oceanica is the first example of a light-harvesting complex binding only non-carbonyl carotenoids with carotenoid-to-chlorophyll energy transfer efficiency over 90%. PMID:26744091

  7. Sulfated Galactofucan from the Brown Alga Saccharina latissima—Variability of Yield, Structural Composition and Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Ehrig, Karina; Alban, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides (SP) from brown algae exhibit a wide range of bioactivities and are, therefore, considered promising candidates for health-supporting and medicinal applications. A critical issue is their availability in high, reproducible quality. The aim of the present study was to fractionate and characterize the SP extracted from Saccharina latissima (S.l.-SP) harvested from two marine habitats, the Baltic Sea and North Atlantic Ocean, in May, June and September. The fractionation of crude S.l.-SP by anion exchange chromatography including analytical investigations revealed that S.l.-SP is composed of a homogeneous fraction of sulfated galactofucan (SGF) and a mixture of low-sulfated, uronic acid and protein containing heteropolysaccharides. Furthermore, the results indicated that S.l. growing at an intertidal zone with high salinity harvested at the end of the growing period delivered the highest yield of S.l.-SP with SGF as the main fraction (67%). Its SGF had the highest degree of sulfation (0.81), fucose content (86.1%) and fucose/galactose ratio (7.8) and was most active (e.g., elastase inhibition: IC50 0.21 μg/mL). Thus, S.l. from the North Atlantic harvested in autumn proved to be more appropriate for the isolation of S.l.-SP than S.l. from the Baltic Sea and S.l. harvested in spring, respectively. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that habitat and harvest time of brown algae should be considered as factors influencing the yield as well as the composition and thus also the bioactivity of their SP. PMID:25548975

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of a Novel Marine Bacterium, Paraglaciecola sp. Strain S66, with Hydrolytic Activity against Seaweed Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Schultz-Johansen, Mikkel; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Bech, Pernille K.

    2016-01-01

    A novel agarolytic gammaproteobacterium, Paraglaciecola sp. S66, was isolated from marine samples of eelgrass (Zostera sp.) and sequenced. The draft genome contains a large number of enzyme-encoding genes with predicted function against several complex polysaccharides found in the cell walls of algae. PMID:27103729

  9. Mechanism of algal aggregation by Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2014-07-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  10. Mechanism of Algal Aggregation by Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  11. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae

    SciTech Connect

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

  12. Take a Dip! Culturing Algae Is Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory activities using algae as the organisms of choice. These include examination of typical algal cells, demonstration of alternation of generations, sexual reproduction in Oedogonium, demonstration of phototaxis, effect of nitrate concentration on Ankistrodesmus, and study of competition between two algae in the same environment.…

  13. SSMILes: Measuring the Nutrient Tolerance of Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedgepeth, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity integrating mathematics and science intended to introduce students to the use of metric measurement of mass as a way to increase the meaningfulness of observations about variables in life sciences. Involves measuring the nutrient tolerance of algae. Contains a reproducible algae nutrient graph. (Author/MKR)

  14. Nutritional And Taste Characteristics Of Algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Nakhost, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of chemical composition of blue-green algae Synechococcus 6311, as well as preparation of protein isolate from green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and incorporation into variety of food products evaluated for taste. Part of program to investigate growth of microalgae aboard spacecraft for use as food.

  15. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  16. Hydrogen metabolism of photosynthetic bacteria and algae

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism, metabolic pathways and biochemistry of hydrogen in photosynthetic bacteria and algae are reviewed. Detailed information on the occurrence and measurement of hydrogenase activity is presented. Hydrogen production rates for different species of algae and bacteria are presented. 173 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

  17. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  18. Composting of waste algae: a review.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Clarke, William; Pratt, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Although composting has been successfully used at pilot scale to manage waste algae removed from eutrophied water environments and the compost product applied as a fertiliser, clear guidelines are not available for full scale algae composting. The review reports on the application of composting to stabilize waste algae, which to date has mainly been macro-algae, and identifies the peculiarities of algae as a composting feedstock, these being: relatively low carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio, which can result in nitrogen loss as NH3 and even N2O; high moisture content and low porosity, which together make aeration challenging; potentially high salinity, which can have adverse consequence for composting; and potentially have high metals and toxin content, which can affect application of the product as a fertiliser. To overcome the challenges that these peculiarities impose co-compost materials can be employed. PMID:24602833

  19. The anti-allergic activity of polyphenol extracted from five marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Hong; Li, Zhenxing; Mou, Quangui

    2015-08-01

    Natural polyphenol has been widely believed to be effective in allergy remission. Currently, most of the natural polyphenol products come from terrestrial sources such as tea, grape seeds among others, and few polyphenols have been developed from algae for their anti-allergic activity. The aim of the study was to screen some commercial seaweed for natural extracts with anti-allergic activity. Five algae including Laminaria japonica, Porphyra sp., Spirulina platensis, Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scytosiphon sp. were extracted with ethanol, and the extracts were evaluated for total polyphenol contents and anti-allergic activity with the hyaluronidase inhibition assay. Results showed that the total polyphenol contents in the ethanol extracts ranged from 1.67% to 8.47%, while the highest was found in the extract from Scytosiphon sp. Hyaluronidase inhibition assay showed that the extracts from Scytosiphon sp. had the lowest IC50, 0.67 mg mL-1, while Chlorella pyrenoidosa extract had the highest IC50, 15.07 mg mL-1. The anti-allergic activity of Scytosiphon sp. extract was even higher than the typical anti-allergic drug Disodium Cromoglycate (DSCG) (IC50 = 1.13 mg mL-1), and was similar with natural polyphenol from Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) (IC50 = 0.56 mg mL-1). These results indicated that the ethanol extract of Scytosiphon sp. contains a high concentration of polyphenol with high anti-allergic activity. Potentially Scytosiphon sp. can be developed to a natural anti-allergic compound for allergy remission.

  20. Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Burkhard; Marin, Birger

    2009-01-01

    Background Land plants (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte green algae, a small group of freshwater algae ranging from scaly, unicellular flagellates (Mesostigma) to complex, filamentous thalli with branching, cell differentiation and apical growth (Charales). Streptophyte algae and embryophytes form the division Streptophyta, whereas the remaining green algae are classified as Chlorophyta. The Charales (stoneworts) are often considered to be sister to land plants, suggesting progressive evolution towards cellular complexity within streptophyte green algae. Many cellular (e.g. phragmoplast, plasmodesmata, hexameric cellulose synthase, structure of flagellated cells, oogamous sexual reproduction with zygote retention) and physiological characters (e.g. type of photorespiration, phytochrome system) originated within streptophyte algae. Recent Progress Phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that Mesostigma (flagellate) and Chlorokybus (sarcinoid) form the earliest divergence within streptophytes, as sister to all other Streptophyta including embryophytes. The question whether Charales, Coleochaetales or Zygnematales are the sister to embryophytes is still (or, again) hotly debated. Projects to study genome evolution within streptophytes including protein families and polyadenylation signals have been initiated. In agreement with morphological and physiological features, many molecular traits believed to be specific for embryophytes have been shown to predate the Chlorophyta/Streptophyta split, or to have originated within streptophyte algae. Molecular phylogenies and the fossil record allow a detailed reconstruction of the early evolutionary events that led to the origin of true land plants, and shaped the current diversity and ecology of streptophyte green algae and their embryophyte descendants. Conclusions The Streptophyta/Chlorophyta divergence correlates with a remarkably conservative preference for freshwater/marine habitats, and the early freshwater

  1. Balamuthia mandrillaris: in vitro interactions with selected protozoa and algae.

    PubMed

    Tapia, José L; Torres, Benjamin Nogueda; Visvesvara, Govinda S

    2013-01-01

    Although Balamuthia mandrillaris was identified more than two decades ago as an agent of fatal granulomatous encephalitis in humans and other animals, little is known about its ecological niche, biological behavior in the environment, food preferences and predators, if any. When infecting humans or other animals, Balamuthia feeds on tissues; and in vitro culture, it feeds on mammalian cells (monkey kidney cells, human lung fibroblasts, and human microvascular endothelial cells). According to recent reports, it is believed that Balamuthia feeds on small amebae, for example, Acanthamoeba that are present in its ecological niche. To test this hypothesis, we associated Balamuthia on a one-on-one basis with selected protozoa and algae. We videotaped the behavior of Balamuthia in the presence of a potential prey, its ability to hunt and attack its food, and the time required to eat and cause damage to the target cell by direct contact. We found that B. mandrillaris ingested trophozoites of Naegleria fowleri, Naegleria gruberi, Acanthamoeba spp., Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes, Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, and Giardia. However, it did not feed on Acanthamoeba cysts or algae. Balamuthia caused cytolysis of T. cruzi epimastigotes and T. gondii tachyzoites by direct contact. Balamuthia trophozoites and cysts were, however, eaten by Paramecium sp. PMID:23790262

  2. Biotransformation of arsenic by a Yellowstone thermoacidophilic eukaryotic alga

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jie; Lehr, Corinne R.; Yuan, Chungang; Le, X. Chris; McDermott, Timothy R.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic is the most common toxic substance in the environment, ranking first on the Superfund list of hazardous substances. It is introduced primarily from geochemical sources and is acted on biologically, creating an arsenic biogeocycle. Geothermal environments are known for their elevated arsenic content and thus provide an excellent setting in which to study microbial redox transformations of arsenic. To date, most studies of microbial communities in geothermal environments have focused on Bacteria and Archaea, with little attention to eukaryotic microorganisms. Here, we show the potential of an extremophilic eukaryotic alga of the order Cyanidiales to influence arsenic cycling at elevated temperatures. Cyanidioschyzon sp. isolate 5508 oxidized arsenite [As(III)] to arsenate [As(V)], reduced As(V) to As(III), and methylated As(III) to form trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) and dimethylarsenate [DMAs(V)]. Two arsenic methyltransferase genes, CmarsM7 and CmarsM8, were cloned from this organism and demonstrated to confer resistance to As(III) in an arsenite hypersensitive strain of Escherichia coli. The 2 recombinant CmArsMs were purified and shown to transform As(III) into monomethylarsenite, DMAs(V), TMAO, and trimethylarsine gas, with a Topt of 60–70 °C. These studies illustrate the importance of eukaryotic microorganisms to the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic in geothermal systems, offer a molecular explanation for how these algae tolerate arsenic in their environment, and provide the characterization of algal methyltransferases. PMID:19276121

  3. Antiherpetic activities of sulfated polysaccharides from green algae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Bum; Hayashi, Kyoko; Maeda, Masaakira; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2004-09-01

    In order to evaluate the potency of novel antiviral drugs, 11 natural sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from 10 green algae ( Enteromorpha compressa, Monostroma nitidum, Caulerpa brachypus, C. okamurai, C. scapelliformis, Chaetomorpha crassa, C. spiralis, Codium adhaerens, C. fragille, and C. latum) and 4 synthetic sulfated xylans (SXs) prepared from the beta-(1,3)-xylan of C. brachypus, were assayed for anti-Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activity. Except for one from E. compressa, all SPs showed potent anti-HSV-1 activities with 50 % inhibitory concentrations (IC (50)) of 0.38 - 8.5 microg/mL, while having low cytotoxicities with 50 % inhibitory concentrations of >2900 microg/mL. Anti-HSV-1 activities of SXs were dependent on their degrees of sulfation. To delineate the drug-sensitive phase, 4 polysaccharides, which showed potent anti-HSV-1 activities, were applied to time-of-addition experiments. Among the polysaccharides tested, 3 polysaccharides (SX4, SP4 from C. brachypus, and SP11 from C. latum) showed strong anti-HSV-1 activities with IC (50) of 6.0, 7.5, and 6.9 microg/mL, respectively, even when added to the medium 8 h post-infection. These experiments demonstrated that some sulfated polysaccharides not only inhibited the early stages of HSV-1 replication, such as virus binding to and penetration into host cells, but also interfered with late steps of virus replication. These results revealed that some sulfated polysaccharides from green algae should be promising candidates of antiviral agents which might act on different stages in the virus replication cycle. PMID:15386190

  4. Integration of biological kinetics and computational fluid dynamics to model the growth of Nannochloropsis salina in an open channel raceway.

    PubMed

    Park, Stephen; Li, Yebo

    2015-05-01

    Microalgal growth and systemic productivity is not only affected by environmental conditions such as temperature, irradiance, and nutrient concentrations, but also by physical processes such as fluid flow and particulate sedimentation. Modeling and simulating the system is a cost-effective way to predict the growth behavior under various environmental and physical conditions while determining effective engineering approaches to maximize productivity. Many mathematical models have been proposed to describe microalgal growth, while computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to model the behavior of many fluid systems. Integrating the growth kinetics into a CFD model can help researchers understand the impact of a variety of parameters and determine what measures can be taken to overcome some obstacles in the aquaculture industry--self-shading, biomass sedimentation, and contamination--which prevent the production of high biomass yields. The aim of this study was to integrate physical and environmental effects to predict space- and time-dependent algal growth in industrial scale raceways. A commercial CFD software, ANSYS-Fluent 14.5, was used to solve the proposed models in regards to fluid flow, heat transfer, and nutrient balance. User-defined functions written in C language were used to incorporate the kinetic equations into a three-dimensional standard k-ε turbulence model of an open channel raceway system driven by a single paddlewheel. Simulated results were compared with light intensity, temperature, nutrient concentration, and algal biomass data acquired for 56 day from an industrial scale raceway pond constructed for the growth of Nannochloropsis salina and were observed to be in good agreement with one another. There was up to a 17.6% increase in simulated productivity when the incoming CO2 concentration was increased from 0.0006 to 0.150 g L(-1), while the effect of paddlewheel velocity was not significant. Sensitivity analysis showed that the model

  5. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Results Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Conclusions Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model. PMID:22540986

  6. Algae Biofuel in the Nigerian Energy Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elegbede, Isa; Guerrero, Cinthya

    2016-05-01

    The issue of energy consumption is one of the issues that have significantly become recognized as an important topic of global discourse. Fossil fuels production reportedly experiencing a gradual depletion in the oil-producing nations of the world. Most studies have relatively focused on biofuel development and adoption, however, the awareness of a prospect in the commercial cultivation of algae having potential to create economic boost in Nigeria, inspired this research. This study aims at exploring the potential of the commercialization of a different but commonly found organism, algae, in Nigeria. Here, parameters such as; water quality, light, carbon, average temperature required for the growth of algae, and additional beneficial nutrients found in algae were analysed. A comparative cum qualitative review of analysis was used as the study made use of empirical findings on the work as well as the author's deductions. The research explored the cultivation of algae with the two major seasonal differences (i.e. rainy and dry) in Nigeria as a backdrop. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in the contribution of algae and other sources of biofuels as a necessity for bioenergy in Nigeria. However, for an effective sustainability of this prospect, adequate measures need to be put in place in form of funding, provision of an economically-enabling environment for the cultivation process as well as proper healthcare service in the face of possible health hazard from technological processes. Further studies can seek to expand on the potential of cultivating algae in the Harmattan season.

  7. Method and apparatus for processing algae

    DOEpatents

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2012-07-03

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells. The lysate separates into at least two layers including a lipid-containing hydrophobic layer and an ionic liquid-containing hydrophilic layer. A salt or salt solution may be used to remove water from the ionic liquid-containing layer before the ionic liquid is reused. The used salt may also be dried and/or concentrated and reused. The method can operate at relatively low lysis, processing, and recycling temperatures, which minimizes the environmental impact of algae processing while providing reusable biofuels and other useful products.

  8. Errors When Extracting Oil from Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, E.; Treat, R.; Ichiuji, T.

    2014-12-01

    Oil is in popular demand, but the worldwide amount of oil is decreasing and prices for it are steadily increasing. Leading scientists have been working to find a solution of attaining oil in an economically and environmentally friendly way. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have determined that "a small mixture of algae and water can be turned into crude oil in less than an hour" (Sheehan, Duhahay, Benemann, Poessler). There are various ways of growing the algae, such as closed loop and open loop methods, as well as processes of extracting oil, such as hydrothermal liquefaction and the hexane-solvent method. Our objective was to grow the algae (C. reinhardtii) and extract oil from it using NaOH and HCl, because we had easy access to those specific chemicals. After two trials of attempted algae growth, we discovered that a bacteria was killing off the algae. This led us to further contemplation on how this dead algae and bacteria are affecting our environment, and the organisms within it. Eutrophication occurs when excess nutrients stimulate rapid growth of algae in an aquatic environment. This can clog waterways and create algal blooms in blue-green algae, as well as neurotoxic red tide phytoplankton. These microscopic algae die upon consumption of the nutrients in water and are degraded by bacteria. The bacteria respires and creates an acidic environment with the spontaneous conversion of carbon dioxide to carbonic acid in water. This process of degradation is exactly what occurred in our 250 mL flask. When the phytoplankton attacked our algae, it created a hypoxic environment, which eliminated any remaining amounts of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nutrients in the water, resulting in a miniature dead zone. These dead zones can occur almost anywhere where there are algae and bacteria, such as the ocean, and make it extremely difficult for any organism to survive. This experiment helped us realize the

  9. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  10. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  11. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  12. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  13. Post-coital contraceptive activity of crude extracts of Sri Lankan marine red algae.

    PubMed

    Ratnasooriya, W D; Premakumara, G A; Tillekeratne, L M

    1994-09-01

    This study investigates the potential of marine red algae as a source for post-coital contraceptive agents using three varieties: Gracilaria corticata, Gelidiella acerosa and Jania sp. Methanol: methylene chloride (1:1) extracts of these red algae were made and were orally administered (500 or 1000 mg/kg/day) to female rats from day 1 to day 7 of pregnancy. The higher dose of Gracilaria corticata and both doses of Gelidiella acerosa extracts produced significant post-coital contraceptive activities without any marked side effects. Furthermore, the post-coital contraceptive activity of the latter extract was dose-dependent. On the other hand, extract made from Jania sp. had no significant post-coital contraceptive action. The post-coital contraceptive activity of Gracilaria corticata was due to enhanced pre-implantation loss and of Gelidiella acerosa was due to elevated post-implantation loss. These findings indicate that marine red algae is a useful source to be harvested for potential post-coital contraceptive drugs. PMID:7805379

  14. Transesterification of Nannochloropsis oculata microalga's lipid to biodiesel on Al2O3 supported CaO and MgO catalysts.

    PubMed

    Umdu, Emin Selahattin; Tuncer, Mert; Seker, Erol

    2009-06-01

    In this study, we present the activities of Al(2)O(3) supported CaO and MgO catalysts in the transesterification of lipid of yellow green microalgae, Nannochloropsis oculata, as a function of methanol amount and the CaO and MgO loadings at 50 degrees C. We found that pure CaO and MgO were not active and CaO/Al(2)O(3) catalyst among all the mixed oxide catalysts showed the highest activity. Not only the basic site density but also the basic strength is important to achieve the high biodiesel yield. Biodiesel yield over 80 wt.% CaO/Al(2)O(3) catalyst increased to 97.5% from 23% when methanol/lipid molar ratio was 30. PMID:19201601

  15. Pond Crash Forensics: Presumptive identification of pond crash agents by next generation sequencing in replicate raceway mass cultures of Nannochloropsis salina

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carney, Laura T.; Wilkenfeld, Joshua S.; Lane, Pam D.; Solberg, Owen D.; Fuqua, Zachary B.; Cornelius, Nina G.; Gillespie, Shaunette; Williams, Kelly P.; Samocha, Tzachi M.; Lane, Todd W.

    2016-06-02

    Productivity of algal mass culture can be severely reduced by contaminating organisms. It is, therefore, important to identify contaminants, determine their effect on productivity and, ultimately, develop countermeasures against such contamination. In this paper, we utilized microbiome analysis by second-generation sequencing of small subunit rRNA genes to characterize the predator and pathogen burden of open raceway cultures of Nannochloropsis salina. Samples were analyzed from replicate raceways before and after crashes. In one culture cycle, we identified two algivorous species, the rotifer Brachionus and gastrotrich Chaetonotus, the presence of which may have contributed to the loss of algal biomass. In themore » second culture cycle, the raceways were treated with hypochlorite in an unsuccessful attempt to interdict the crash. Finally, our analyses were shown to be an effective strategy for the identification of the biological contaminants and the characterization of intervention strategies.« less

  16. Optimization of bead milling parameters for the cell disruption of microalgae: process modeling and application to Porphyridium cruentum and Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Montalescot, V; Rinaldi, T; Touchard, R; Jubeau, S; Frappart, M; Jaouen, P; Bourseau, P; Marchal, L

    2015-11-01

    A study of cell disruption by bead milling for two microalgae, Nannochloropsis oculata and Porphyridium cruentum, was performed. Strains robustness was quantified by high-pressure disruption assays. The hydrodynamics in the bead mill grinding chamber was studied by Residence Time Distribution modeling. Operating parameters effects were analyzed and modeled in terms of stress intensities and stress number. RTD corresponded to a 2 CSTR in series model. First order kinetics cell disruption was modeled in consequence. Continuous bead milling was efficient for both strains disruption. SI-SN modeling was successfully adapted to microalgae. As predicted by high pressure assays, N. oculata was more resistant than P. cruentum. The critical stress intensity was twice more important for N. oculata than for P. cruentum. SI-SN modeling allows the determination of operating parameters minimizing energy consumption and gives a scalable approach to develop and optimize microalgal disruption by bead milling. PMID:26253918

  17. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  18. Larval settlement preferences of Acropora palmata and Montastraea faveolata in response to diverse red algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritson-Williams, R.; Arnold, S. N.; Paul, V. J.; Steneck, R. S.

    2014-03-01

    Settlement specificity can regulate recruitment but remains poorly understood for coral larvae. We studied larvae of the corals, Acropora palmata and Montastraea faveolata, to determine their rates of settlement and metamorphosis in the presence of ten species of red algae, including eight species of crustose coralline algae, one geniculated coralline and one encrusting peyssonnelid. Twenty to forty percent of larvae of A. palmata settled on coralline surfaces of Hydrolithon boergesenii, Lithoporella atlantica, Neogoniolithon affine, and Titanoderma prototypum, whereas none settled and metamorphosed on Neogoniolithon mamillare. Larvae of M. faveolata had 13-25 % settlement onto the surface of Amphiroa tribulus, H. boergesenii, N. affine, N. munitum, and T. prototypum, but had no settlement on the surface of N. mamillare, Porolithon pachydermum, and a noncoralline crust Peyssonnelia sp. Some of these algal species were common on Belizean reefs, but the species that induced the highest rates of larval settlement and metamorphosis tended to be rare and primarily found in low-light environments. The shallow coral, A. palmata, and the deeper coral, M. faveolata, both had increased larval settlement rates in the presence of only a few species of red algae found at deeper depths suggesting that patterns of coral distribution can only sometimes be related to the distribution of red algae species.

  19. Laboratory study on the ecological impact of sophorolipid used for harmful algae elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Kim, Eunki; Sun, Song

    2010-11-01

    We studied the role of sophorolipid in inhibiting harmful algae bloom (HAB). Different sophorolipid concentrations were tested on marine microalgae, zooplankton, fish, and bivalve ( Mytilus edulis) in laboratory. The result shows that sophorolipid could inhibit the growth of algal species selectively. Among three algae species selected, Platymonas helgolandica var. tsingtaoensis was promoted with increasing sophorolipid concentration; Isochrysis galbana was inhibited seven days later in sophorolipid concentration below 40 mg/L; and Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima was inhibited obviously in only a high sophorolipid concentration over 20 mg/L. Therefore, sophorolipid in a low concentration at <20 mg/L could remove certain harmful algae species effectively without harming other non-harmful microalgae. For other animals, sophorolipid could inhibit the growth of ciliate Strombidium sp. by 50% at 20 mg/L sophorolipid concentration after 96 h. The concentration in 96-h LC50 for Calanus sinicus, Neomysis awatschensis, Lateolabrax japonicus, and Paralichthys olivaceus was 15, 150, 60, and 110 mg/L, respectively. The 24 h LC50 value for Artemia salina was 600 mg/L. The relative clearance rate of mussel Mytilus edulis decreased to 80%, 40%, and 20% of the control group after being exposed to 20, 50, and 100 mg/L sophorolipid for 24 h. Therefore, the toxicity for mitigation of harmful algae bloom at previously recommended concentration of 5-20 mg/L sophorolipid is low for most tested organisms in this reaserch.

  20. Removal of Cr{sup 6+} from waste water by dead cells of Pachymeniopsis sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Y.H.; Yang, J.E.; Rhee, H.I.

    1995-12-31

    A red algae, Pachymeniopsis sp., was screened as a Cr{sup +6} specific biosorbent and its adsorption characteristics for Cr{sup +6} were studied. It is well known that several heavy metal ions such as cadmium, nickel, mercury can be selectively adsorbed by some specific marine algae. However, so far there has been no report that the biosorbent specific for Cr{sup +6} adsorption was successfully developed. Thus, trials of searching for a high Cr{sup +6} selective biosorbent with high adsorption capacity were made by examination of the Cr{sup +6} adsorption capacities of about fifty species of red, brown, or green marine algae which were sampled from the east coast of Korea. As the result of screening, a red marine algae showed most excellent adsorption characteristics among them and it was classified as Pachymeniopsis sp. Adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics were investigated to examine the applicability of Pachymeniopsis sp. as a Cr{sup +6} specific biosorbent. Pachymeniopsis sp. showed high selectivity for Cr{sup +6} ions since it showed low adsorption capacities for other heavy metal ions such as cadmium and manganese ions. An investigation of adsorption isotherms of dried powder of the Pachymeniopsis sp. for Cr{sup +6} adsorption at 25 C, pH 5.0 and 7.0 showed Langmuir type dependence. The isotherms show that the maximum Cr{sup +6} adsorption capacity of selected algae is about 20 (mg/g dry wt. of adsorbent). The 500 ml of artificial waste water with initial Cr{sup +6} concentration of 100 ppm was treated with 2.5 g of dried powder of Pachymeniopsis sp. in a batch slurry reactor. About 30 ppm of Cr{sup +6} remained after 1 hr`s contacting, showing 70% removal of Cr{sup +6}.

  1. Collection, Isolation and Culture of Marine Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of collecting, isolating, and culturing microscopic and macroscopic marine algae are described. Three different culture media list of chemicals needed and procedures for preparing Erdschreiber's and Provasoli's E. S. media. (BC)

  2. Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis Caused by Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Fluke, Erin C; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2016-07-01

    Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is an orthopedic emergency most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci and occasionally, when associated with water exposure, Mycobacterium marinum. Shewanella algae, a gram-negative bacillus found in warm saltwater environments, has infrequently been reported to cause serious soft tissue infections and necrosis. In this case, S. algae caused complicated flexor tenosynovitis requiring open surgical irrigation and debridement. Flexor tenosynovitis caused by S. algae rapidly presented with all 4 Kanavel cardinal signs as well as subcutaneous purulence, ischemia, and necrosis, thus meeting the requirements for Pang et al group III classification of worst prognosis. Because of its rarity and virulence, S. algae should always be considered in cases of flexor tenosynovitis associated with traumatic water exposure to treat and minimize morbidity appropriately. PMID:27206398

  3. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joyce

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Algae Platform Review meeting.

  4. The Alga Ochromonas danica Produces Bromosulfolipids.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander R; Duggan, Brendan M; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Vanderwal, Christopher D

    2016-03-01

    Many halogenases interchangeably incorporate chlorine and bromine into organic molecules. On the basis of an unsubstantiated report that the alga Ochromonas danica, a prodigious producer of chlorosulfolipids, was able to produce bromosulfolipids, we have investigated the promiscuity of its halogenases toward bromine incorporation. We have found that bromosulfolipids are produced with the exact positional and stereochemical selectivity as in the chlorosulfolipid danicalipin A when this alga is grown under modified conditions containing excess bromide ion. PMID:26889956

  5. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-03

    We consider a general framework to predict the development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a lake driven by uncertain parameters. To quantify the concentration uncertainty of those algae groups via their joint probabilistic density function (PDF), we explore an approach based on the Fokker-Planck equation. Our result is presented in an example where abundant nutrients contribute to the proliferation of cyanobacteria and other minor algae groups.

  6. Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov., and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov., novel members of coccoid Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rigonato, Janaina; Gama, Watson Arantes; Alvarenga, Danillo Oliveira; Branco, Luis Henrique Zanini; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Fiore, Marli Fatima

    2016-09-01

    Two Cyanobacteria isolated from South Atlantic Ocean continental shelf deep water and from a marine green algae inhabiting the Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica were investigated based on morphological and ultrastructural traits, phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, secondary structure of the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions and phylogenomic analyses. The majority of these evaluations demonstrated that both strains differ from the genera of cyanobacteria with validly published names and, therefore, supported the description of the novel genus as Aliterella gen. nov. The identity and phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, together with the secondary structure of D1D1' and BoxB intergenic regions, further supported the two strains representing distinct species: Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type SP469036, strain CENA595T) and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov. (type SP469035, strain CENA408T). The phylogenomic analysis of A. atlantica sp. nov. CENA595T, based on 21 protein sequences, revealed that this genus belongs to the cyanobacterial order Chroococcidiopsidales. The isolation and cultivation of two geographically distant unicellular members of a novel cyanobacterial genus and the sequenced genome of the type strain bring new insights into the current classification of the coccoid group, and into the reconstruction of their evolutionary history. PMID:27054834

  7. Occurrence of arsenic species in algae and freshwater plants of an extreme arid region in northern Chile, the Loa River Basin.

    PubMed

    Pell, Albert; Márquez, Anna; López-Sánchez, José Fermín; Rubio, Roser; Barbero, Mercedes; Stegen, Susana; Queirolo, Fabrizio; Díaz-Palma, Paula

    2013-01-01

    This study reports data on arsenic speciation in two green algae species (Cladophora sp. and Chara sp.) and in five aquatic plants (Azolla sp., Myriophyllum aquaticum, Phylloscirpus cf. desserticola, Potamogeton pectinatus, Ruppia filifolia and Zannichellia palustris) from the Loa River Basin in the Atacama Desert (northern Chile). Arsenic content was measured by Mass spectrometry coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-MS), after acidic digestion. Liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation, using both anionic and cationic chromatographic exchange systems. Inorganic arsenic compounds were the main arsenic species measured in all samples. The main arsenic species in the extracts of freshwater algae and plants were arsenite and arsenate, whereas glycerol-arsenosugar (gly-sug), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and methylarsonic acid (MA) were present only as minor constituents. Of the samples studied, algae species accumulated more arsenic than aquatic plants. Total arsenic content ranged from 182 to 11100 and from 20 to 248 mg As kg(-1) (d.w.) in algae and freshwater plants, respectively. In comparison with As concentration in water samples, there was hyper-accumulation (>0.1% d.w.) in Cladophora sp. PMID:22981629

  8. Biogas production experimental research using algae.

    PubMed

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Misevičius, Antonas

    2015-01-01

    The current study is on the the use of macro-algae as feedstock for biogas production. Three types of macro-algae, Cladophora glomerata (CG), Chara fragilis (CF), and Spirogyra neglecta (SN), were chosen for this research. The experimental studies on biogas production were carried out with these algae in a batch bioreactor. In the bioreactor was maintained 35 ± 1°C temperature. The results showed that the most appropriate macro-algae for biogas production are Spirogyra neglecta (SN) and Cladophora glomerata (CG). The average amount of biogas obtained from the processing of SN - 0.23 m(3)/m(3)d, CG - 0.20 m(3)/m(3)d, and CF - 0.12 m(3)/m(3)d. Considering the concentration of methane obtained during the processing of SN and CG, which after eight days and until the end of the experiment exceeded 60%, it can be claimed that biogas produced using these algae is valuable. When processing CF, the concentration of methane reached the level of 50% only by the final day of the experiment, which indicates that this alga is less suitable for biogas production. PMID:25859392

  9. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kelman, Dovi; Posner, Ellen Kromkowski; McDermid, Karla J.; Tabandera, Nicole K.; Wright, Patrick R.; Wright, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer. PMID:22412808

  10. Inhibition of mast cells by algae.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph A; Sanny, Charles; Shevlin, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    There is a history of use of algae as foods and as food additives, or nutraceuticals. Although algae are a safe component of human foods and animal feeds, the effects of the algae other than as a source of protein are not clear. We examined the prevalence of an antiinflammatory activity in selected algae using, as an assay system, the inhibition of histamine release from mast cells. Methanolic extracts of eleven algae were examined for activity to inhibit the release of histamine from mast cells in vitro. This activity was found widely among the samples tested. The activities of these extracts were not uniformly stable in acid methanol. Selected extracts studied further did not separate with the use of size-exclusion filtration filters. LH-20 chromatography suggested at least two main elution areas of activity of the Chlorella extract. In summary, we saw wide phylogenetic dispersion of mast cell inhibition activity, suggesting that this antiinflammatory property is common in algae. This effect was apparently due to multiple activities within the algal extracts. PMID:12639395

  11. Screening of new antileukemic agents from essential oils of algae extracts and computational modeling of their interactions with intracellular signaling nodes.

    PubMed

    Atasever-Arslan, Belkis; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Kalkan, Zeynep; Timucin, Ahmet Can; Gür, Hazal; Isik, Fatma Busra; Deniz, Emre; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2016-02-15

    Microalgae are very rich in bioactive compounds, minerals, polysaccharides, poly-unsaturated fatty acids and vitamins, and these rich constituents make microalgae an important resource for the discovery of new bioactive compounds with applications in biotechnology. In this study, we studied the antileukemic activity of several chosen microalgae species at the molecular level and assessed their potential for drug development. Here we identified Stichococcus bacillaris, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Microcystis aeruginosa and Nannochloropsis oculata microalgae extracts with possible antileukemic agent potentials. Specifically we studied the effects of these extracts on intracellular signal nodes and apoptotic pathways. We characterized the composition of essential oils of these fifteen different algae extracts using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Finally, to identify potential molecular targets causing the phenotypic changes in leukemic cell lines, we docked a selected group of these essential oils to several key intracellular proteins. According to results of rank score algorithm, five of these essential oils analyzed might be considered as in silico plausible candidates to be used as antileukemic agents. PMID:26709080

  12. The impact of cell-specific absorption properties on the correlation of electron transport rates measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen production in planktonic algae.

    PubMed

    Blache, Ulrich; Jakob, Torsten; Su, Wanwen; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E)-curves describe the photosynthetic performance of autotrophic organisms. From these P-E-curves the photosynthetic parameters α-slope, P(max), and E(k) can be deduced which are often used to characterize and to compare different organisms or organisms in acclimation to different environmental conditions. Particularly, for in situ-measurements of P-E curves of phytoplankton the analysis of variable chlorophyll fluorescence proved its potential as a sensitive and rapid method. By using Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae), Nannochloropsis salina (Eustigmatophyceae), Skeletonema costatum and Cyclotella meneghiniana (Bacillariophyceae), the present study investigated the influence of cellular bio-optical properties on the correlation of the photosynthetic parameters derived from fluorescence-based P-E-curves with photosynthetic parameters obtained from the measurement of oxygen evolution. It is demonstrated that small planktonic algae show a wide range of cellular absorptivity which was subject to species-specifity, growth stage and environmental conditions, e.g. nutrient limitation. This variability in bio-optical properties resulted in a great deviation of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) from oxygen-based photosynthesis rates. Thus, the photosynthetic parameters α-slope and P(max) derived from rETRs strongly depend on the specific cellular absorptivity and cannot be used to compare the photosynthetic performance of cells with different optical properties. However, it was shown that E(k) is independent of cellular absorptivity and could be used to compare samples with unknown optical properties. PMID:21571541

  13. Algae for controlled ecological life support system diet characterization of cyanobacteria 'spirulina' in batch cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadros, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    Spirulina sp. is a bioregenerative photosynthetic and edible alga for space craft crews in a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CLESS). It was characterized for growth rate and biomass yield in batch cultures, under various environmental conditions. The cell characteristics were identified for one strain of Spirulina: S. maxima. Fast growth rate and high yield were obtained. The partitioning of the assimulatory products (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids) were manipulated by varying the environmental conditions. Experiments with Spirulina demonstrated that under stress conditions carbohydrate increased at the expense of protein. In other experiments, where the growth media were sufficient in nutrients and incubated under optimum growth conditions, the total proteins were increased up to almost 70 percent of the organic weight. In other words, the nutritional quality of the alga could be manipulated by growth conditions. These results support the feasibility of considering Spirulina as a subsystem in CELSS because of the ease with which its nutrient content can be manipulated.

  14. Responses of marine unicellular algae to brominated organic compounds in six growth media

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Yoder, M.J.; McLaughlin, L.L.; Lores, E.M.

    1987-12-01

    Marine unicellular algae, Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Chlorella sp. were exposed to the industrial brominated compounds tetrabromobisphenol A, decabromobiphenyloxide (DBBO), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromomethylbenzene (PBMB), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), and the herbicide bromoxynil (BROM), in six algal growth media. High concentrations of DBBO (1 mg liter-1), PBMB (1 mg liter-1), and PBEB (0.5 mg liter-1) reduced growth by less than 50%. EC50s of the other compounds varied with growth medium, with high EC50/low EC50 ratios between 1.3 and 9.9. Lowest EC50s, 9.3 to 12.0 micrograms liter-1, were obtained with S. costatum and HBCD. It is concluded that responses to toxicants in different media are the results of interactions among algae, growth medium, toxicant, and solvent carrier.

  15. Investigating the feasibility of growing algae for fuel in Southern nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazeni, Faegheh

    Microalgae capable of growing in waste are adequate to be mass-cultivated for biodiesel, avoiding fertilizers and clean water, two obstacles to sustainability of the feedstock production. This study replaces fertilizers and clean water with waste products. The investigated wastes include (1) the liquid fraction of sewage after solids and particles are removed, known as centrate, and (2) algal biomass residue, i.e. the algae remaining at the end of the lipids extraction process at biofuel plants. These wastes contain sufficient amount of nitrogen and phosphorus required for algal growth. This study proposes a system in which centrate would be used as an initial source of water and nutrients for microalgal growth. The generated biomass waste can be continuously recycled, serving as a fertilizer. If so desired, the centrate can be reverted back into the system from time to time as a nutrition supplement and as a make-up water source, particularly in open ponds that face evaporation. Of the six studied algae, i.e. Chlorella sorokiniana, Encyonema caespitosum, Nitzschia thermalis, Scenedesmus sp., Synechocystis sp., and Limnothrix sp., mostly isolated from the habitats influenced by municipal wastewater in and around the Las Vegas Valley, two green algae were eligible. In the laboratory, the green algae C. sorokiniana and Scenedesmus sp. grew in the media composed of centrate or algal residue faster than in the mineral medium BG11, optimized for algal growth. The enhanced productivity is mainly attributed to the photosynthesis known for mixotrophic process and the presence of organic carbon in the waste which serves as an extra source of energy. Tolerance for hard water and strong light and, in the case of C. sorokiniana , an unusually high optimum temperature between 32 and 35°C are also attributing factors to the enhanced productivity of algae. These studied species are particularly suited for cultivation in their native southwestern United States, particularly

  16. Effects of lead on growth, photosynthetic characteristics and production of reactive oxygen species of two freshwater green algae.

    PubMed

    Dao, Ly H T; Beardall, John

    2016-03-01

    In the natural environment, heavy metal contamination can occur as long-term pollution of sites or as pulses of pollutants from wastewater disposal. In this study two freshwater green algae, Chlorella sp. FleB1 and Scenedesmus YaA6, were isolated from lead-polluted water samples and the effects of 24 h vs 4 and 8 d exposure of cultures to lead on growth, photosynthetic physiology and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of these algae were investigated. In Chlorella sp. FleB1, there was agreement between lead impacts on chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and growth in most case. However, in Scenedesmus acutus YaA6 growth was inhibited at lower lead concentrations (0.03-0.87 × 10(-9) M), under which ROS, measured by 2',7' dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluorescence, were 4.5 fold higher than in controls but photosynthesis was not affected, implying that ROS had played a role in the growth inhibition that did not involve direct effects on photosynthesis. Effects of short-term (5 h, 24 h) vs long-term (4 d and 8 d) exposure to lead were also compared between the two algae. The results contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of lead toxicity to algae. PMID:26774308

  17. Dynamic photoinhibition exhibited by red coralline algae in the red sea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Red coralline algae are critical components of tropical reef systems, and their success and development is, at least in part, dependent on photosynthesis. However, natural variability in the photosynthetic characteristics of red coralline algae is poorly understood. This study investigated diurnal variability in encrusting Porolithon sp. and free-living Lithophyllum kotschyanum. Measured parameters included: photosynthetic characteristics, pigment composition, thallus reflectance and intracellular concentrations of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), an algal antioxidant that is derived from methionine, an indirect product of photosynthesis. L. kotschyanum thalli were characterised by a bleached topside and a pigmented underside. Results Minimum saturation intensity and intracellular DMSP concentrations in Porolithon sp. were characterised by significant diurnal patterns in response to the high-light regime. A smaller diurnal pattern in minimum saturation intensity in the topside of L. kotschyanum was also evident. The overall reflectance of the topside of L. kotschyanum also exhibited a diurnal pattern, becoming increasingly reflective with increasing ambient irradiance. The underside of L. kotschyanum, which is shaded from ambient light exposure, exhibited a much smaller diurnal variability. Conclusions This study highlights a number of dynamic photoinhibition strategies adopted by coralline algae, enabling them to tolerate, rather than be inhibited by, the naturally high irradiance of tropical reef systems; a factor that may become more important in the future under global change projections. In this context, this research has significant implications for tropical reef management planning and conservation monitoring, which, if natural variability is not taken into account, may become flawed. The information provided by this research may be used to inform future investigations into the contribution of coralline algae to reef accretion, ecosystem

  18. Pathways of Lipid Metabolism in Marine Algae, Co-Expression Network, Bottlenecks and Candidate Genes for Enhanced Production of EPA and DHA in Species of Chromista

    PubMed Central

    Mühlroth, Alice; Li, Keshuai; Røkke, Gunvor; Winge, Per; Olsen, Yngvar; Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F.; Vadstein, Olav; Bones, Atle M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) for human health has received more focus the last decades, and the global consumption of n-3 LC-PUFA has increased. Seafood, the natural n-3 LC-PUFA source, is harvested beyond a sustainable capacity, and it is therefore imperative to develop alternative n-3 LC-PUFA sources for both eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3). Genera of algae such as Nannochloropsis, Schizochytrium, Isochrysis and Phaedactylum within the kingdom Chromista have received attention due to their ability to produce n-3 LC-PUFAs. Knowledge of LC-PUFA synthesis and its regulation in algae at the molecular level is fragmentary and represents a bottleneck for attempts to enhance the n-3 LC-PUFA levels for industrial production. In the present review, Phaeodactylum tricornutum has been used to exemplify the synthesis and compartmentalization of n-3 LC-PUFAs. Based on recent transcriptome data a co-expression network of 106 genes involved in lipid metabolism has been created. Together with recent molecular biological and metabolic studies, a model pathway for n-3 LC-PUFA synthesis in P. tricornutum has been proposed, and is compared to industrialized species of Chromista. Limitations of the n-3 LC-PUFA synthesis by enzymes such as thioesterases, elongases, acyl-CoA synthetases and acyltransferases are discussed and metabolic bottlenecks are hypothesized such as the supply of the acetyl-CoA and NADPH. A future industrialization will depend on optimization of chemical compositions and increased biomass production, which can be achieved by exploitation of the physiological potential, by selective breeding and by genetic engineering. PMID:24284429

  19. Pathways of lipid metabolism in marine algae, co-expression network, bottlenecks and candidate genes for enhanced production of EPA and DHA in species of Chromista.

    PubMed

    Mühlroth, Alice; Li, Keshuai; Røkke, Gunvor; Winge, Per; Olsen, Yngvar; Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F; Vadstein, Olav; Bones, Atle M

    2013-11-01

    The importance of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) for human health has received more focus the last decades, and the global consumption of n-3 LC-PUFA has increased. Seafood, the natural n-3 LC-PUFA source, is harvested beyond a sustainable capacity, and it is therefore imperative to develop alternative n-3 LC-PUFA sources for both eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3). Genera of algae such as Nannochloropsis, Schizochytrium, Isochrysis and Phaedactylum within the kingdom Chromista have received attention due to their ability to produce n-3 LC-PUFAs. Knowledge of LC-PUFA synthesis and its regulation in algae at the molecular level is fragmentary and represents a bottleneck for attempts to enhance the n-3 LC-PUFA levels for industrial production. In the present review, Phaeodactylum tricornutum has been used to exemplify the synthesis and compartmentalization of n-3 LC-PUFAs. Based on recent transcriptome data a co-expression network of 106 genes involved in lipid metabolism has been created. Together with recent molecular biological and metabolic studies, a model pathway for n-3 LC-PUFA synthesis in P. tricornutum has been proposed, and is compared to industrialized species of Chromista. Limitations of the n-3 LC-PUFA synthesis by enzymes such as thioesterases, elongases, acyl-CoA synthetases and acyltransferases are discussed and metabolic bottlenecks are hypothesized such as the supply of the acetyl-CoA and NADPH. A future industrialization will depend on optimization of chemical compositions and increased biomass production, which can be achieved by exploitation of the physiological potential, by selective breeding and by genetic engineering. PMID:24284429

  20. PPR proteins of green algae

    PubMed Central

    Tourasse, Nicolas J; Choquet, Yves; Vallon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Using the repeat finding algorithm FT-Rep, we have identified 154 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins in nine fully sequenced genomes from green algae (with a total of 1201 repeats) and grouped them in 47 orthologous groups. All data are available in a database, PPRdb, accessible online at http://giavap-genomes.ibpc.fr/ppr. Based on phylogenetic trees generated from the repeats, we propose evolutionary scenarios for PPR proteins. Two PPRs are clearly conserved in the entire green lineage: MRL1 is a stabilization factor for the rbcL mRNA, while HCF152 binds in plants to the psbH-petB intergenic region. MCA1 (the stabilization factor for petA) and PPR7 (a short PPR also acting on chloroplast mRNAs) are conserved across the entire Chlorophyta. The other PPRs are clade-specific, with evidence for gene losses, duplications, and horizontal transfer. In some PPR proteins, an additional domain found at the C terminus provides clues as to possible functions. PPR19 and PPR26 possess a methyltransferase_4 domain suggesting involvement in RNA guanosine methylation. PPR18 contains a C-terminal CBS domain, similar to the CBSPPR1 protein found in nucleoids. PPR16, PPR29, PPR37, and PPR38 harbor a SmR (MutS-related) domain similar to that found in land plants pTAC2, GUN1, and SVR7. The PPR-cyclins PPR3, PPR4, and PPR6, in addition, contain a cyclin domain C-terminal to their SmR domain. PPR31 is an unusual PPR-cyclin containing at its N terminus an OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) and a RAP domain. We consider the possibility that PPR proteins with a SmR domain can introduce single-stranded nicks in the plastid chromosome. PMID:24021981

  1. Are Algae Relevant to the Detritus-Based Food Web in Tank-Bromeliads?

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Olivier; Le Jeune, Anne-Hélène; Leroy, Céline; Cereghino, Régis; Roux, Olivier; Pelozuelo, Laurent; Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Carrias, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of algae in five species of tank-bromeliads found in contrasting environmental sites in a Neotropical, primary rainforest around the Nouragues Research Station, French Guiana. The distributions of both algal abundance and biomass were examined based on physical parameters, the morphological characteristics of bromeliad species and with regard to the structure of other aquatic microbial communities held in the tanks. Algae were retrieved in all of the bromeliad species with mean densities ranging from ∼102 to 104 cells/mL. Their biomass was positively correlated to light exposure and bacterial biomass. Algae represented a tiny component of the detrital food web in shaded bromeliads but accounted for up to 30 percent of the living microbial carbon in the tanks of Catopsis berteroniana, located in a highly exposed area. Thus, while nutrient supplies are believed to originate from wind-borne particles and trapped insects (i.e., allochtonous organic matter), our results indicate that primary producers (i.e., autochtonous organic matter) are present in this insectivorous bromeliad. Using a 24-h incubation of size-fractionated and manipulated samples from this plant, we evaluated the impact of mosquito foraging on algae, other microorganisms and rotifers. The prey assemblages were greatly altered by the predation of mosquito larvae. Grazing losses indicated that the dominant algal taxon, Bumilleriopsis sp., like protozoa and rotifers, is a significant part of the diet of mosquito larvae. We conclude that algae are a relevant functional community of the aquatic food web in C. berteroniana and might form the basis of a complementary non-detrital food web. PMID:21625603

  2. Estimation of alga growth stage and lipid content growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embaye, Tsegereda N. (Inventor); Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Method and system for estimating a growth stage of an alga in an ambient fluid. Measured light beam absorption or reflection values through or from the alga and through an ambient fluid, in each of two or more wavelength sub-ranges, are compared with reference light beam absorption values for corresponding wavelength sub-ranges for in each alga growth stage to determine (1) which alga growth stage, if any, is more likely and (2) whether estimated lipid content of the alga is increasing or has peaked. Alga growth is preferably terminated when lipid content has approximately reached a maximum value.

  3. Studies on marine algae for haemagglutinic activity.

    PubMed

    Alam, M T; Usmanghani, K

    1994-07-01

    Lectins (agglutinins) are important in medical and immunological applications. Phytohaemagglutinins have been found useful in blood banking. Keeping in view of these facts, the marine algae found at Karachi coastal region have been screened for agglutinic activity by using human erythrocytes of A, B, AB and 0 group. Altogether 53 algal samples were collected and subjected to extraction, fractionation serial dilution and titre determinations. The total marine algae screened for haemagglutinic activity were 44 out of these 14, 13 and 17 belonged to Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta, and Rhodophyta respectively. Among these three groups the Rhodophyta showed the highest number of lytic activity. The green marine alga Valoniopsis pachynema showed a titre value between 2(2) and 2(3), which is statistically significant. In case of brown marine algae Colpomenia sinuosa was found to be active (titre 2(3)), while Dictyota dichotoma, D. indica and Iyengaria stellata, furnished week titre value as 2(2). The red marine algae screened were 17, out of these 4 spp. showed significant activity (titre 2(3)), and these are Gelidium usmanghani, Gracilaria foliifera Hypnea pannosa and Hynea valentiae. While Scinaia fascicularis, Scinaia indica and Champia parvula were found to be weak in their onset on human erythrocytes. The results obtained were quite in agreement with those reported in the literature. PMID:16414751

  4. Controlled regular locomotion of algae cell microrobots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuangxi; Jiao, Niandong; Tung, Steve; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-06-01

    Algae cells can be considered as microrobots from the perspective of engineering. These organisms not only have a strong reproductive ability but can also sense the environment, harvest energy from the surroundings, and swim very efficiently, accommodating all these functions in a body of size on the order of dozens of micrometers. An interesting topic with respect to random swimming motions of algae cells in a liquid is how to precisely control them as microrobots such that they swim according to manually set routes. This study developed an ingenious method to steer swimming cells based on the phototaxis. The method used a varying light signal to direct the motion of the cells. The swimming trajectory, speed, and force of algae cells were analyzed in detail. Then the algae cell could be controlled to swim back and forth, and traverse a crossroad as a microrobot obeying specific traffic rules. Furthermore, their motions along arbitrarily set trajectories such as zigzag, and triangle were realized successfully under optical control. Robotize algae cells can be used to precisely transport and deliver cargo such as drug particles in microfluidic chip for biomedical treatment and pharmacodynamic analysis. The study findings are expected to bring significant breakthrough in biological drives and new biomedical applications. PMID:27206511

  5. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    PubMed

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements. PMID:20547408

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome of a hydrocarbon-producing green alga Botryococcus braunii strain Showa.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiajun; Bi, Guiqi

    2016-07-01

    Complete mitochondrial genome of Botryococcus braunii strain Showa was assembled and annotated. It contains 31 protein-coding genes, 23 tRNA genes and 3 rRNA (23S, 16S, 5S rRNA) genes. The 31 protein-coding genes include 5 atp genes, 3 cox genes, 9 nad genes, 12 ribosomal protein genes, cob and tatC genes. The presence of extra non-coding regions makes it currently the largest mitochondrial genome in Trebouxiophyceae. Phylogenetic analysis showed Botryococcus braunii strain Showa clustered into Trebouxiophyceae clade and had close genetic relationship with algae Coccomyxa sp. C-169. PMID:26119114

  7. Plasmids in Frankia sp.

    PubMed

    Normand, P; Simonet, P; Butour, J L; Rosenberg, C; Moiroud, A; Lalonde, M

    1983-07-01

    A method to achieve cell lysis and isolate Frankia sp. plasmid DNA was developed. A screening of Frankia sp. strains belonging to different host compatibility groups (Alnus sp., Elaeagnus sp., Ceanothus sp.) showed that, of 39 strains tested, 4 (strains Cp11, ARgN22d, ArI3, and EUN1f) possessed plasmids ranging in size from 7.1 to 32.2 kilobase pairs as estimated from agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. A total of 11 plasmids were detected. PMID:6863219

  8. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  9. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2014-06-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  10. Genome of the red alga Porphyridium purpureum.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debashish; Price, Dana C; Chan, Cheong Xin; Qiu, Huan; Rose, Nicholas; Ball, Steven; Weber, Andreas P M; Arias, Maria Cecilia; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Krishnan, Anagha; Zäuner, Simone; Morath, Shannon; Hilliou, Frédérique; Egizi, Andrea; Perrineau, Marie-Mathilde; Yoon, Hwan Su

    2013-01-01

    The limited knowledge we have about red algal genomes comes from the highly specialized extremophiles, Cyanidiophyceae. Here, we describe the first genome sequence from a mesophilic, unicellular red alga, Porphyridium purpureum. The 8,355 predicted genes in P. purpureum, hundreds of which are likely to be implicated in a history of horizontal gene transfer, reside in a genome of 19.7 Mbp with 235 spliceosomal introns. Analysis of light-harvesting complex proteins reveals a nuclear-encoded phycobiliprotein in the alga. We uncover a complex set of carbohydrate-active enzymes, identify the genes required for the methylerythritol phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, and find evidence of sexual reproduction. Analysis of the compact, function-rich genome of P. purpureum suggests that ancestral lineages of red algae acted as mediators of horizontal gene transfer between prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes, thereby significantly enriching genomes across the tree of photosynthetic life. PMID:23770768

  11. Algae control problems and practices workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pryfogle, P.A.; Ghio, G.

    1996-09-01

    Western water resources are continuously facing increased demand from industry and the public. Consequently, many of these resources are required to perform multiple tasks as they cycle through the ecosystem. Many plants and animals depend upon these resources for growth. Algae are one group of plants associated with nutrient and energy cycles in many aquatic ecosystems. Although most freshwater algae are microscopic in size, they are capable of dominating and proliferating to the extent that the value of the water resource for both industrial and domestic needs is compromised. There is a great diversity of aquatic environments and systems in which algae may be found, and there are many varieties of treatment and control techniques available to reduce the impacts of excessive growth. This workshop was organized to exchange information about these control problems and practices.

  12. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-03-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores ( <10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation.

  13. Anti-glycation properties of the aqueous extract solutions of dried algae products and effect of lactic acid fermentation on the properties.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Takashi; Eda, Mika; Kataoka, Manami; Nemoto, Maki; Kawahara, Miho; Oshio, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon

    2016-02-01

    The antioxidant and anti-glycation properties in aqueous extract solutions (AESs) of 11 dried algae products were investigated. AESs of brown algae Ecklonia kurome (kurome) and Ecklonia stolonifera (tsuruarame) showed a strong DPPH radical-scavenging capacity and Fe-reducing power with high total phenolic compound content. On the other hand, superoxide anion radical-scavenging capacities of Porphyra sp. (iwanori, red alga), sporophyll of Undaria pinnatifida (mekabu, brown alga), and Gelidiaceae sp. (tengusa, red alga) were also high. Anti-glycation activities in BSA-fructose and BSA-methylglyoxal glycation were also high in kurome, while iwanori showed high activity. Results of the BSA-fructose model agreed with those of superoxide anion radical-scavenging. On the other hand, those of the BSA-methylglyoxal model agreed with those of the phenolic content, DPPH radical-scavenging capacity, and Fe-reducing power. Anti-glycation activities of iwanori, U. pinnatifida (wakame), and mekabu in the BSA-fructose model were clearly increased by fermentation with Lactobacillus plantarum AN6. PMID:26304454

  14. Harvesting of algae by froth flotation.

    PubMed

    LEVIN, G V; CLENDENNING, J R; GIBOR, A; BOGAR, F D

    1962-03-01

    A highly efficient froth flotation procedure has been developed for harvesting algae from dilute suspensions. The method does not depend upon the addition of flotants. Harvesting is carried out in a long column containing the feed solution which is aerated from below. A stable column of foam is produced and harvested from a side arm near the top of the column. The cell concentration of the harvest is a function of pH, aeration rate, aerator porosity, feed concentration, and height of foam in the harvesting column. The economic aspects of this process seem favorable for mass harvesting of algae for food or other purposes. PMID:14464557

  15. Use of Brown Algae to Demonstrate Natural Products Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Lee A.

    1985-01-01

    Background information is provided on the natural products found in marine organisms in general and the brown algae in particular. Also provided are the procedures needed to isolate D-mannitol (a primary metabolite) and cholesterol from brown algae. (JN)

  16. Photodegradation of Norfloxacin in aqueous solution containing algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junwei; Fu, Dafang; Wu, Jilong

    2012-01-01

    Photodegradation of Norfloxacin in aqueous solution containing algae under a medium pressure mercury lamp (15 W, lambda(max) = 365 nm) was investigated. Results indicated that the photodegradation of Norfloxacin could be induced by the algae in the heterogeneous algae-water systems. The photodegradation rate of Norfloxacin increased with increasing algae concentration, and was greatly influenced by the temperature and pH of solution. Meanwhile, the cooperation action of algae and Fe(III), and the ultrasound were beneficial to photodegradation of Norfloxacin. The degradation kinetics of Norfloxacin was found to follow the pseudo zero-order reaction in the suspension of algae. In addition, we discussed the photodegradation mechanism of Norfloxacin in the suspension of algae. This work will be helpful for understanding the photochemical degradation of antibiotics in aqueous environment in the presence of algae, for providing a new method to deal with antibiotics pollution. PMID:22894111

  17. An Overview of Algae Biofuel Production and Potential Environmental Impact

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algae are among the most potentially significant sources of sustainable biofuels in the future of renewable energy. A feedstock with virtually unlimited applicability, algae can metabolize various waste streams (e.g., municipal wastewater, carbon dioxide from industrial flue gas)...

  18. [Accumulation of polycyclic arenes in Baltic Sea algae].

    PubMed

    Veldre, I A; Itra, A R; Paal'me, L P; Kukk, Kh A

    1985-01-01

    The paper presents data on the level of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and some other polycyclic arenes in alga and phanerogam specimens from different gulfs of the Baltic Sea. Algae were shown to absorb BP from sea water. The mean concentration of BP in sea water was under 0.004 microgram/1, while in algae it ranged 0.1-21.2 micrograms/kg dry weight. Algae accumulate BP to a higher degree than phanerogams. The highest concentrations of BP were found in algae Enteromorpha while the lowest ones in Furcellaria. In annual green algae, BP level was higher in autumn, i. e. at the end of vegetation period, than in spring. Brown algae Fucus vesiculosus is recommended for monitoring polycyclic arene pollution in the area from Vormsi Island to Käsmu and green algae Cladophora or Enteromorpha in the eastern part of the Finnish Gulf. PMID:4060672

  19. ALGAE BLOOMS AND PHOSPHORUS LOADING IN LAKE LOWELL, IDAHO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algae blooms limit recreational use of Lake Lowell, ID (17050114) by reducing water clarity and esthetic qualities. Under bloom conditions, algae have a negative impact on the reservoir fishery because of periodic oxygen depletion associated with respiration and decomposition. ...

  20. WASP7 BENTHIC ALGAE - MODEL THEORY AND USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard WASP7 eutrophication module includes nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, dissolved oxygen-organic matter interactions, and phytoplankton kinetics. In many shallow streams and rivers, however, the attached algae (benthic algae, or periphyton, attached to submerged substr...

  1. Hydrogen production from salt water by Marine blue green algae and solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, A.; Rosner, D.; Kumazawa, S.; Barciela, S.; Phlips, E.

    1985-01-01

    Two marine bluegreen algae, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7 and Synechococcus sp Miami 041511 have been selected as the result of over 10 years continuous and intensive effort of isolation, growth examination, and the screening of hydrogen photoproduction capability in this laboratory. Both strains photoproduced hydrogen for several days at high rates and a quantity of hydrogen was accumulated in a closed vessel. Overall hydrogen donor substance of the hydrogen photoproduction was found to be salt water. Using strain Miami BG 7, a two step method of hydrogen photoproduction from salt water was successfully developed and this was recycled several times over a one month period using both free cells and immobilized cells in both indoor and outdoor under natural sunlight. According to these experiments, a prototype floating hydrogen production system was designed for further development of the biosolar hydrogen production system.

  2. Preliminary development and evaluation of an algae-based air regeneration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nienow, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of air regeneration system based on the growth of microalgae on the surface of porous ceramic tubes is evaluated. The algae have been maintained in the system for extended periods, up to 360 days. Preliminary measurements of the photosynthetic capacity have been made for Chlorella vulgaris (UTEX 259), Neospongiococcum punctatum (UTEX 786), Stichococcus sp., and Gloeocapsa sp. Under standard test conditions (photosynthetic photon flux approximately 66 micromoles m-2 s-1, initial CO2 concentration approximately 450 micromoles mol-1), mature tubes remove up to 0.2 micromoles of CO2 per tube per minute. The rate of removal increases with photon flux up to at least 225 micromoles m-2 s-1 (PPF); peak rates of 0.35 micromoles of CO2 per tube per minute have been achieved with Chlorella vulgaris. These rates correspond to between 120 and 210 micromoles of CO2 removed per square meter of projected area per minute.

  3. Heavy metal bioaccumulation in sediment, common reed, algae, and blood worm from the Shoor river, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hamidian, Amir Hossein; Zareh, Maryam; Poorbagher, Hadi; Vaziri, Leila; Ashrafi, Sohrab

    2016-03-01

    Concentrations of 11 metals (cadmium, zinc, copper (Cu), vanadium (V), lead, magnesium (Mg), manganese, aluminum, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), and nickel), and one metalloid (arsenic (As)) were measured in sediment, common reed (Phragmites australis), algae (Spirogyra sp.), and blood worm (Chironomus sp.) tissues of samples collected from the Shoor river. Samples were dried, acid digested, and the concentrations of metals were measured using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer. A higher concentration of heavy metals was accumulated in Spirogyra and Chironomids than sediment and common reed. The highest rate of accumulation was found for Mg, V, Fe, As, Cu, and Cr. Spirogyra and Chironomids are capable of accumulating and thereby removing metals from polluted water bodies and are suitable for biomonitoring purposes. PMID:24105065

  4. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  5. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  6. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  7. How to Identify and Control Water Weeds and Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Biochemists, Inc., Mequon, WI.

    Included in this guide to water management are general descriptions of algae, toxic algae, weed problems in lakes, ponds, and canals, and general discussions of mechanical, biological and chemical control methods. In addition, pictures, descriptions, and recommended control methods are given for algae, 6 types of floating weeds, 18 types of…

  8. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  9. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the...

  10. Fucoidans — sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, Anatolii I.; Bilan, M. I.

    2009-08-01

    The methods of isolation of fucoidans and determination of their chemical structures are reviewed. The fucoidans represent sulfated polysaccharides of brown algae, the composition of which varies from simple fucan sulfates to complex heteropolysaccharides. The currently known structures of such biopolymers are presented. A variety of the biological activities of fucoidans is briefly summarised.

  11. Potential of mass algae production in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, A.; Fekri, M.

    1984-11-01

    The rationale for efficient light absorption by algae at a production unit is given and design details of an intensive thin-layer technology outdoor (2.11m/sup 2/) unit are presented. Data on productivity under extreme conditions were collected. Maximum productivity data are close to those reported in the literature for similar geographic areas.

  12. Laser-fluorescence measurement of marine algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in remote sensing of algae by laser-induced fluorescence is subject of comprehensive report. Existing single-wavelength and four-wavelength systems are reviewed, and new expression for power received by airborne sensor is derived. Result differs by as much as factor of 10 from those previously reported. Detailed error analysis evluates factors affecting accuracy of laser-fluorosensor systems.

  13. OPTIMAL COST CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ATTACHED ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a cost-benefit analysis for alternative programs intended for the control of the nuisance growth of an attached alga (Cladophora). Such analyses require that changes in water quality be quantitatively related to the cost of implementation for specific manageme...

  14. Spirulina: The Alga That Can End Malnutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Ripley D.

    1985-01-01

    One approach to eliminating malnutrition worldwide is to grow spirulina in recycled village wastes. Spirulina is a blue-green alga and a natural concentrated food. Spirulina can give poor villages a nutritional food supplement they can grow themselves and can reduce infectious disease at the same time. (Author/RM)

  15. Effect of Relative Humidity on the Survival of Airborne Unicellular Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ehresmann, Douglas W.; Hatch, Melvin T.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described which is suitable for assessing the effects of relative humidity (RH) on the viability of two unicellular algae in experimental aerosols. Viable cells of Nannochloris atomus collected from the airborne state were detected by plating onto agar surfaces of an appropriate growth medium, whereas viable airborne cells of Synechococcus sp., because of unreliable growth on solid media, were determined by a liquid assay system. The assays were performed at intervals during short-term and prolonged storage of algal aerosols in chambers preconditioned to a selected RH and temperature. Both species showed the greatest loss in viability during the first minute after atomization, and the extent of this inactivation, as a function of RH, reflected the subsequent long-term survival. The airborne eukaryotic alga was unable to survive at an RH below 91%, whereas the airborne prokaryotic alga was comparatively stable over a wide humidity range. Initial inactivation was least and long-term survival best, for both species, at 94% RH. Images PMID:1115506

  16. First freshwater coralline alga and the role of local features in a major biome transition

    PubMed Central

    Žuljević, A.; Kaleb, S.; Peña, V.; Despalatović, M.; Cvitković, I.; De Clerck, O.; Le Gall, L.; Falace, A.; Vita, F.; Braga, Juan C.; Antolić, B.

    2016-01-01

    Coralline red algae are significant components of sea bottom and up to now considered as exclusively marine species. Here we present the first coralline alga from a freshwater environment, found in the Cetina River (Adriatic Sea watershed). The alga is fully adapted to freshwater, as attested by reproductive structures, sporelings, and an inability to survive brackish conditions. Morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses reveal the species belongs to Pneophyllum and is described as P. cetinaensis sp. nov. The marine-freshwater transition most probably occurred during the last glaciation. The brackish-water ancestor was preadapted to osmotic stress and rapid changes in water salinity and temperature. The particular characteristics of the karst Cetina River, such as hard water enriched with dissolved calcium carbonate and a pH similar to the marine environment, favoured colonization of the river by a marine species. The upstream advance and dispersal is facilitated by exceptionally pronounced zoochory by freshwater gastropods. Pneophyllum cetinaensis defies the paradigm of Corallinales as an exclusively marine group. PMID:26791421

  17. First freshwater coralline alga and the role of local features in a major biome transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žuljević, A.; Kaleb, S.; Peña, V.; Despalatović, M.; Cvitković, I.; de Clerck, O.; Le Gall, L.; Falace, A.; Vita, F.; Braga, Juan C.; Antolić, B.

    2016-01-01

    Coralline red algae are significant components of sea bottom and up to now considered as exclusively marine species. Here we present the first coralline alga from a freshwater environment, found in the Cetina River (Adriatic Sea watershed). The alga is fully adapted to freshwater, as attested by reproductive structures, sporelings, and an inability to survive brackish conditions. Morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses reveal the species belongs to Pneophyllum and is described as P. cetinaensis sp. nov. The marine-freshwater transition most probably occurred during the last glaciation. The brackish-water ancestor was preadapted to osmotic stress and rapid changes in water salinity and temperature. The particular characteristics of the karst Cetina River, such as hard water enriched with dissolved calcium carbonate and a pH similar to the marine environment, favoured colonization of the river by a marine species. The upstream advance and dispersal is facilitated by exceptionally pronounced zoochory by freshwater gastropods. Pneophyllum cetinaensis defies the paradigm of Corallinales as an exclusively marine group.

  18. First freshwater coralline alga and the role of local features in a major biome transition.

    PubMed

    Žuljević, A; Kaleb, S; Peña, V; Despalatović, M; Cvitković, I; De Clerck, O; Le Gall, L; Falace, A; Vita, F; Braga, Juan C; Antolić, B

    2016-01-01

    Coralline red algae are significant components of sea bottom and up to now considered as exclusively marine species. Here we present the first coralline alga from a freshwater environment, found in the Cetina River (Adriatic Sea watershed). The alga is fully adapted to freshwater, as attested by reproductive structures, sporelings, and an inability to survive brackish conditions. Morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses reveal the species belongs to Pneophyllum and is described as P. cetinaensis sp. nov. The marine-freshwater transition most probably occurred during the last glaciation. The brackish-water ancestor was preadapted to osmotic stress and rapid changes in water salinity and temperature. The particular characteristics of the karst Cetina River, such as hard water enriched with dissolved calcium carbonate and a pH similar to the marine environment, favoured colonization of the river by a marine species. The upstream advance and dispersal is facilitated by exceptionally pronounced zoochory by freshwater gastropods. Pneophyllum cetinaensis defies the paradigm of Corallinales as an exclusively marine group. PMID:26791421

  19. Combined toxicity of pesticide mixtures on green algae and photobacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Wang, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Xiang-Wei; Li, Wei-Ying

    2013-09-01

    Different organisms have diverse responses to the same chemicals or mixtures. In this paper, we selected the green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) and photobacteria Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 (V. qinghaiensis) as target organisms and determined the toxicities of six pesticides, including three herbicides (simetryn, bromacil and hexazinone), two fungicides (dodine and metalaxyl) and one insecticide (propoxur), and their mixtures by using the microplate toxicity analysis. The toxicities of three herbicides to C. pyrenoidosa are much higher than those to V. qinghaiensis, and the toxicities of metalaxyl and propoxur to V. qinghaiensis are higher than those to C. pyrenoidosa, while the toxicity of dodine to C. pyrenoidosa is similar to those to V. qinghaiensis. Using the concentration addition as an additive reference model, the binary pesticide mixtures exhibited different toxicity interactions, i.e., displayed antagonism to C. pyrenoidosa but synergism to V. qinghaiensis. However, the toxicities of the multi-component mixtures of more than two components are additive and can be predicted by the concentration addition model. PMID:23816361

  20. Validation of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in an ice alga Chlamydomonas during freezing acclimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Wu, Guangting; Huang, Xiaohang; Liu, Shenghao; Cong, Bailin

    2012-05-01

    Antarctic ice alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L can endure extreme low temperature and high salinity stress under freezing conditions. To elucidate the molecular acclimation mechanisms using gene expression analysis, the expression stabilities of ten housekeeping genes of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L during freezing stress were analyzed. Some discrepancies were detected in the ranking of the candidate reference genes between geNorm and NormFinder programs, but there was substantial agreement between the groups of genes with the most and the least stable expression. RPL19 was ranked as the best candidate reference genes. Pairwise variation (V) analysis indicated the combination of two reference genes was sufficient for qRT-PCR data normalization under the experimental conditions. Considering the co-regulation between RPL19 and RPL32 (the most stable gene pairs given by geNorm program), we propose that the mean data rendered by RPL19 and GAPDH (the most stable gene pairs given by NormFinder program) be used to normalize gene expression values in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L more accurately. The example of FAD3 gene expression calculation demonstrated the importance of selecting an appropriate category and number of reference genes to achieve an accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression during freeze acclimation in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L. PMID:22527038

  1. Kinetics of nutrient removal and expression of extracellular polymeric substances of the microalgae, Chlorella sp. and Micractinium sp., in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Kuo-Dahab, Wenye Camilla; Dolan, Sona; Park, Chul

    2014-02-01

    Two species of green algae, Chlorella sp. and Micractinium sp., were cultivated in primary effluent wastewater and high-strength wastewater (a mixture of anaerobic digestion centrate and primary effluent) to study nutrient removal and EPS (extracellular polymeric substances) expression during their growth. The high N concentration and P-limited condition in the mixed wastewater (total N=197 mg/L; N/P mass ratio=56) led to about 3 times greater specific N removal rate than the primary effluent set, indicating that algal cells growing in N-rich wastewater had N over-uptake. Both Chlorella and Micractinium grown in the high-strength wastewater also produced larger amounts of protein EPS, possibly accounting for higher N uptake in those cultivation sets. These results suggest that different types of wastewater could cause different nutrient removal kinetics and EPS expression by algae, which may subsequently influence harvesting and anaerobic digestion of their biomass. PMID:24384320

  2. Influence of phosphate on toxicity and bioaccumulation of arsenic in a soil isolate of microalga Chlorella sp.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Md Mezbaul; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the toxicity, biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenite and arsenate in a soil microalga, Chlorella sp., were investigated using different phosphate levels. The results indicated that arsenate was highly toxic than arsenite to the alga, and the phosphate limitation in growth media greatly enhanced arsenate toxicity. The uptake of arsenate in algal cells was more than that of arsenite, and the predominant species in the growth media was arsenate after 8 days of exposure to arsenite or arsenate, indicating arsenite oxidation by this microalga. Arsenate reduction was also observed when the alga was incubated in a phosphate-limiting growth medium. Similar to the process of biotransformation, the alga accumulated more arsenic when it was exposed to arsenate and preferably more in a phosphate-limiting condition. Although phosphate significantly influences the biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenic, the oxidizing ability and higher accumulation capacity of this alga have great potential for its application in arsenic bioremediation. PMID:26438364

  3. Integrated 'Omics', Targeted Metabolite and Single-cell Analyses of Arctic Snow Algae Functionality and Adaptability.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M; Field, Katie; Benning, Liane G

    2015-01-01

    Snow algae are poly-extremophilic microalgae and important primary colonizers and producers on glaciers and snow fields. Depending on their pigmentation they cause green or red mass blooms during the melt season. This decreases surface albedo and thus further enhances snow and ice melting. Although the phenomenon of snow algal blooms has been known for a long time, large aspects of their physiology and ecology sill remain cryptic. This study provides the first in-depth and multi-omics investigation of two very striking adjacent green and red snow fields on a glacier in Svalbard. We have assessed the algal community composition of green and red snow including their associated microbiota, i.e., bacteria and archaea, their metabolic profiles (targeted and non-targeted metabolites) on the bulk and single-cell level, and assessed the feedbacks between the algae and their physico-chemical environment including liquid water content, pH, albedo, and nutrient availability. We demonstrate that green and red snow clearly vary in their physico-chemical environment, their microbial community composition and their metabolic profiles. For the algae this likely reflects both different stages of their life cycles and their adaptation strategies. Green snow represents a wet, carbon and nutrient rich environment and is dominated by the algae Microglena sp. with a metabolic profile that is characterized by key metabolites involved in growth and proliferation. In contrast, the dry and nutrient poor red snow habitat is colonized by various Chloromonas species with a high abundance of storage and reserve metabolites likely to face upcoming severe conditions. Combining a multitude of techniques we demonstrate the power of such complementary approaches in elucidating the function and ecology of extremophiles such as green and red snow algal blooms, which play crucial roles in glacial ecosystems. PMID:26635781

  4. Blue-Green Algae Inhibit the Development of Atherosclerotic Lesions in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chai Siah; Kim, Bohkyung; Pham, Tho X; Yang, Yue; Wegner, Casey J; Park, Young-Ki; Balunas, Marcy; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia and inflammation contribute to the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective was to determine antiatherogenic effect of edible blue-green algae (BGA) species, that is, Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP), in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice, a well-established mouse model of atherosclerosis. Male ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol (HF/HC, 15% fat and 0.2% cholesterol by wt) control diet or a HF/HC diet supplemented with 5% (w/w) of NO or SP powder for 12 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured, and livers were analyzed for histology and gene expression. Morphometric analysis for lesions and immunohistochemical analysis for CD68 were conducted in the aorta and the aortic root. NO supplementation significantly decreased plasma TC and TG, and liver TC, compared to control and SP groups. In the livers of NO-fed mice, less lipid droplets were present with a concomitant decrease in fatty acid synthase protein levels than the other groups. There was a significant increase in hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein levels in SP-supplemented mice than in control and NO groups. Quantification of aortic lesions by en face analysis demonstrated that both NO and SP decreased aortic lesion development to a similar degree compared with control. While lesions in the aortic root were not significantly different between groups, the CD68-stained area in the aortic root was significantly lowered in BGA-fed mice than controls. In conclusion, both NO and SP supplementation decreased the development of atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting that they may be used as a natural product for atheroprotection. PMID:26566121

  5. Chlorophyll-Protein Complexes of the Cyanophyte, Nostoc sp. 1

    PubMed Central

    Rusckowski, Mary; Zilinskas, Barbara A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chlorophyll-protein complexes have been resolved from the cyanophyte, Nostoc sp., by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 4 C. Complexes solubilized by SDS from Spinacia oleracea were run for comparison. As has been well documented, the P700-chlorophyll a-protein complex from the higher plant and blue-green algal samples are similar, and the light-harvesting pigment protein complex is present only in the former. Most noteworthy are two closely migrating chlorophyll proteins in Nostoc sp. which have approximately the same mobility as a single chlorophyll-protein band resolvable from spinach. The absorption maximum of the complex from spinach is at 667 nanometers, and those of the two complexes from Nostoc sp. are at 667 and 669 nanometers; the fluorescence emission maximum at −196 C is at 685 nanometers, and the 735 nanometer fluorescence peak, characteristic of the P700-chlorophyll a-protein complex, is absent. The apoproteins of these new complexes from Nostoc sp. and spinach are in the kilodalton range. It appears that at least one of these two chlorophyll-protein complexes from Nostoc sp. compares with those recently described by others from higher plants and green algae as likely photosystem II complexes, perhaps containing P680, although no photochemical data are yet available. Images PMID:16661198

  6. Structurally Distinct Cation Channelrhodopsins from Cryptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2016-06-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are remarkable for the diversity of their functional mechanisms based on the same protein scaffold. A class of rhodopsins from cryptophyte algae show close sequence homology with haloarchaeal rhodopsin proton pumps rather than with previously known channelrhodopsins from chlorophyte (green) algae. In particular, both aspartate residues that occupy the positions of the chromophore Schiff base proton acceptor and donor, a hallmark of rhodopsin proton pumps, are conserved in these cryptophyte proteins. We expressed the corresponding polynucleotides in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and studied electrogenic properties of the encoded proteins with whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Despite their lack of residues characteristic of the chlorophyte cation channels, these proteins are cation-conducting channelrhodopsins that carry out light-gated passive transport of Na(+) and H(+). These findings show that channel function in rhodopsins has evolved via multiple routes. PMID:27233115

  7. Phycobilisomes in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Ruth B.; Bowen, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen species of freshwater blue-green algae, including unicellular, filamentous, and colonial forms, were subjected to a variety of fixatives, fixation conditions, and stains for comparison of the preservation of phycobilisomes. Absorption spectra of the corresponding in vivo and released photosynthetic pigments, in 10 of the species that were maintained in culture, demonstrated the presence of phycocyanin in all 10 species and phycoerythrin in only 2 of them. Spectroscope and electron microscope evidence was obtained for localization of phycobiliproteins in phycobilisomes of Nostoc muscorum. Phycobilisomes were observed in all species examined in situ, strenghening the hypothesis that phycobilisomes are common to all phycobiliprotein-containing photosynthetic blue-green algae. Images PMID:4204443

  8. Biofuels from algae: challenges and potential

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Michael; Gimpel, Javier; Tran, Miller; Rasala, Beth; Mayfield, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Algae biofuels may provide a viable alternative to fossil fuels; however, this technology must overcome a number of hurdles before it can compete in the fuel market and be broadly deployed. These challenges include strain identification and improvement, both in terms of oil productivity and crop protection, nutrient and resource allocation and use, and the production of co-products to improve the economics of the entire system. Although there is much excitement about the potential of algae biofuels, much work is still required in the field. In this article, we attempt to elucidate the major challenges to economic algal biofuels at scale, and improve the focus of the scientific community to address these challenges and move algal biofuels from promise to reality. PMID:21833344

  9. The GC-Rich Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Alga Coccomyxa Give Insight into the Evolution of Organelle DNA Nucleotide Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Roy; Burki, Fabien; Yamada, Takashi; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2011-05-13

    Most of the available mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences are biased towards adenine and thymine (AT) over guanine and cytosine (GC). Examples of GC-rich organelle DNAs are limited to a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green algae. Here, to gain insight in the evolution of organelle nucleotide landscape, we present the GC-rich mitochondrial and plastid DNAs from the trebouxiophyte green alga Coccomyxa sp. C-169. We compare these sequences with other GC-rich organelle DNAs and argue that the forces biasing them towards G and C are nonadaptive and linked to the metabolic and/or life history features of this species. The Coccomyxa organelle genomes are also used for phylogenetic analyses, which highlight the complexities in trying to resolve the interrelationships among the core chlorophyte green algae, but ultimately favour a sister relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae, with the Trebouxiophyceae branching at the base of the chlorophyte crown.

  10. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  11. Algae-Derived Dietary Ingredients Nourish Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    In the 1980s, Columbia, Maryland-based Martek Biosciences Corporation worked with Ames Research Center to pioneer the use of microalgae as a source of essential omega-3 fatty acids, work that led the company to develop its highly successful Formulaid product. Now the Nutritional Products Division of Royal DSM, the company also manufactures DHAgold, a nutritional supplement for pets, livestock and farm-raised fish that uses algae to deliver docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

  12. Algae as Reservoirs for Coral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Michael J.; Bythell, John C.; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2013-01-01

    Benthic algae are associated with coral death in the form of stress and disease. It's been proposed that they release exudates, which facilitate invasion of potentially pathogenic microbes at the coral-algal interface, resulting in coral disease. However, the original source of these pathogens remains unknown. This study examined the ability of benthic algae to act as reservoirs of coral pathogens by characterizing surface associated microbes associated with major Caribbean and Indo-Pacific algal species/types and by comparing them to potential pathogens of two dominant coral diseases: White Syndrome (WS) in the Indo-Pacific and Yellow Band Disease (YBD) in the Caribbean. Coral and algal sampling was conducted simultaneously at the same sites to avoid spatial effects. Potential pathogens were defined as those absent or rare in healthy corals, increasing in abundance in healthy tissues adjacent to a disease lesion, and dominant in disease lesions. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected in both WS and YBD and were also present within the majority of algal species/types (54 and 100% for WS and YBD respectively). Pathogenic ciliates were associated only with WS and not YBD lesions and these were also present in 36% of the Indo-Pacific algal species. Although potential pathogens were associated with many algal species, their presence was inconsistent among replicate algal samples and detection rates were relatively low, suggestive of low density and occurrence. At the community level, coral-associated microbes irrespective of the health of their host differed from algal-associated microbes, supporting that algae and corals have distinctive microbial communities associated with their tissue. We conclude that benthic algae are common reservoirs for a variety of different potential coral pathogens. However, algal-associated microbes alone are unlikely to cause coral death. Initial damage or stress to the coral via other competitive mechanisms is most likely a

  13. Prokaryotic algae associated with Australian proterozoic stromatolites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licari, G. R.; Cloud, P.

    1972-01-01

    The most favorable sites in which to study the associations between stromatolites and the algae responsible for them are places where a variety of stromatolites of possibly early diagenetic or primary silica occupy a layer of substantial thickness of little metamorphosed ancient sediments. One such place is in northwestern Queensland, Australia. Five cases of association between stromatolites and blue-green algal nannofossils were observed within a 100-m sequence of carbonate rocks in that area.

  14. Sequestration of CO2 by halotolerant algae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The potential of halotolerant algae isolated from natural resources was used to study CO2 fixation and algal lipid production. Biological fixation of CO2 in photobioreactor in presence of salinity is exploited. The CO2 concentration 1060 ppm gave the highest biomass yield (700 mg dry wt/l), the highest total lipid content (10.33%) with 80% of CO2 removal. PMID:24847439

  15. Dermatitis from purified sea algae toxin (debromoaplysiatoxin).

    PubMed

    Solomon, A E; Stoughton, R B

    1978-09-01

    Cutaneous inflammation was induced by debromoaplysiatoxin, a purified toxin extracted from Lyngbya majuscula Gomont. This alga causes a seaweed dermatitis that occurs in persons who have swum off the coast of Oahu in Hawaii. By topical application, the toxin was found to produce an irritant pustular folliculitis in humans and to cause a severe cutaneous inflammatory reaction in the rabbit and in hairless mice. PMID:686747

  16. Environmental life cycle comparison of algae to other bioenergy feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Clarens, Andres F; Resurreccion, Eleazer P; White, Mark A; Colosi, Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    Algae are an attractive source of biomass energy since they do not compete with food crops and have higher energy yields per area than terrestrial crops. In spite of these advantages, algae cultivation has not yet been compared with conventional crops from a life cycle perspective. In this work, the impacts associated with algae production were determined using a stochastic life cycle model and compared with switchgrass, canola, and corn farming. The results indicate that these conventional crops have lower environmental impacts than algae in energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and water regardless of cultivation location. Only in total land use and eutrophication potential do algae perform favorably. The large environmental footprint of algae cultivation is driven predominantly by upstream impacts, such as the demand for CO(2) and fertilizer. To reduce these impacts, flue gas and, to a greater extent, wastewater could be used to offset most of the environmental burdens associated with algae. To demonstrate the benefits of algae production coupled with wastewater treatment, the model was expanded to include three different municipal wastewater effluents as sources of nitrogen and phosphorus. Each provided a significant reduction in the burdens of algae cultivation, and the use of source-separated urine was found to make algae more environmentally beneficial than the terrestrial crops. PMID:20085253

  17. Electro-coagulation-flotation process for algae removal.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shanshan; Yang, Jixian; Tian, Jiayu; Ma, Fang; Tu, Gang; Du, Maoan

    2010-05-15

    Algae in surface water have been a long-term issue all over the world, due to their adverse influence on drinking water treatment process as well as drinking water quality. The algae removal by electro-coagulation-flotation (ECF) technology was investigated in this paper. The results indicated that aluminum was an excellent electrode material for algae removal as compared with iron. The optimal parameters determined were: current density=1 mA/cm(2), pH=4-7, water temperature=18-36 degrees C, algae density=0.55 x 10(9)-1.55 x 10(9) cells/L. Under the optimal conditions, 100% of algae removal was achieved with the energy consumption as low as 0.4 kWh/m(3). The ECF performed well in acid and neutral conditions. At low initial pH of 4-7, the cell density of algae was effectively removed in the ECF, mainly through the charge neutralization mechanism; while the algae removal worsened when the pH increased (7-10), and the main mechanism shifted to sweeping flocculation and enmeshment. The mechanisms for algae removal at different pH were also confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. Furthermore, initial cell density and water temperature could also influence the algae removal. Overall, the results indicated that the ECF technology was effective for algae removal, from both the technical and economical points of view. PMID:20042280

  18. New records of marine algae in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hau, Nhu; Ly, Bui Minh; Van Huynh, Tran; Trung, Vo Thanh

    2015-06-01

    In May, 2013, a scientific expedition was organized by the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST) and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEBRAS) through the frame of the VAST-FEBRAS International Collaboration Program. The expedition went along the coast of Vietnam from Quang Ninh to Kien Giang. The objective was to collect natural resources to investigate the biological and biochemical diversity of the territorial waters of Vietnam. Among the collected algae, six taxa are new records for the Vietnam algal flora. They are the red algae Titanophora pikeana (Dickie) Feldmann from Cu Lao Xanh Island, Laurencia natalensis Kylin from Tho Chu Island, Coelothrix irregularis (Harvey) Børgesen from Con Dao Island, the green algae Caulerpa oligophylla Montagne, Caulerpa andamanensis (W.R. Taylor) Draisma, Prudhomme et Sauvage from Phu Quy Island, and Caulerpa falcifolia Harvey & Bailey from Ly Son Island. The seaweed flora of Vietnam now counts 833 marine algal taxa, including 415 Rhodophyta, 147 Phaeophyceae, 183 Chlorophyta, and 88 Cyanobacteria.

  19. Antibody Production in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2016-04-29

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a wide range of modern applications, including research, diagnostic, therapeutic, and industrial uses. Market demand for mAbs is high and continues to grow. Although mammalian systems, which currently dominate the biomanufacturing industry, produce effective and safe recombinant mAbs, they have a limited manufacturing capacity and high costs. Bacteria, yeast, and insect cell systems are highly scalable and cost effective but vary in their ability to produce appropriate posttranslationally modified mAbs. Plants and green algae are emerging as promising production platforms because of their time and cost efficiencies, scalability, lack of mammalian pathogens, and eukaryotic posttranslational protein modification machinery. So far, plant- and algae-derived mAbs have been produced predominantly as candidate therapeutics for infectious diseases and cancer. These candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models, and some have shown efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we review ongoing efforts to advance the production of mAbs in plants and algae. PMID:26905655

  20. [Pharmacology and toxicology of Spirulina alga].

    PubMed

    Chamorro, G; Salazar, M; Favila, L; Bourges, H

    1996-01-01

    Spirulina, a unicellular filamentous blue-green alga has been consumed by man since ancient times in Mexico and central Africa. It is currently grown in many countries by synthetic methods. Initially the interest in Spirulina was on its nutritive value: it was found almost equal to other plant proteins. More recently, some preclinical testing suggests it has several therapeutic properties such as hypocholesterolemic, immunological, antiviral and antimutagenic. This has led to more detailed evaluations such as nucleic acid content and presence of toxic metals, biogenic toxins and organic chemicals: they have shown absence or presence at tolerable levels according to the recommendations of international regulatory agencies. In animal experiments for acute, subchronic and chronic toxicity, reproduction, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity the algae did not cause body or organ toxicity. In all instances, the Spirulina administered to the animals were at much higher amounts than those expected for human consumption. On the other hand there is scant information of the effects of the algae in humans. This area needs more research. PMID:9005517

  1. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1–1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:24614119

  2. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the red alga Porphyra purpurea. Cyanobacterial introns and shared ancestry of red and green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Burger, G; Saint-Louis, D; Gray, M W; Lang, B F

    1999-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Porphyra purpurea, a circular-mapping genome of 36,753 bp, has been completely sequenced. A total of 57 densely packed genes has been identified, including the basic set typically found in animals and fungi, as well as seven genes characteristic of protist and plant mtDNAs and specifying ribosomal proteins and subunits of succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. The mitochondrial large subunit rRNA gene contains two group II introns that are extraordinarily similar to those found in the cyanobacterium Calothrix sp, suggesting a recent lateral intron transfer between a bacterial and a mitochondrial genome. Notable features of P. purpurea mtDNA include the presence of two 291-bp inverted repeats that likely mediate homologous recombination, resulting in genome rearrangement, and of numerous sequence polymorphisms in the coding and intergenic regions. Comparative analysis of red algal mitochondrial genomes from five different, evolutionarily distant orders reveals that rhodophyte mtDNAs are unusually uniform in size and gene order. Finally, phylogenetic analyses provide strong evidence that red algae share a common ancestry with green algae and plants. PMID:10488235

  3. Hydrogenases in green algae: do they save the algae's life and solve our energy problems?

    PubMed

    Happe, Thomas; Hemschemeier, Anja; Winkler, Martin; Kaminski, Annette

    2002-06-01

    Green algae are the only known eukaryotes with both oxygenic photosynthesis and a hydrogen metabolism. Recent physiological and genetic discoveries indicate a close connection between these metabolic pathways. The anaerobically inducible hydA genes of algae encode a special type of highly active [Fe]-hydrogenase. Electrons from reducing equivalents generated during fermentation enter the photosynthetic electron transport chain via the plastoquinone pool. They are transferred to the hydrogenase by photosystem I and ferredoxin. Thus, the [Fe]-hydrogenase is an electron 'valve' that enables the algae to survive under anaerobic conditions. During sulfur deprivation, illuminated algal cultures evolve large quantities of hydrogen gas, and this promises to be an alternative future energy source. PMID:12049920

  4. Removal of Pb(2+) by biomass of marine algae.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, A A

    2000-10-01

    New biosorbent material derived from ubiquitous marine algae has been examined in packed-bed flow for Pb(2+) removal through sorption columns. Mixed biomass of marine algae has been used, consisting of representative species of the following algae: Ulva lactuca (green algae), Jania rubens (red algae), and Sargassum asperifolium (brown algae). A mixture of these three species showed a promising removal capacity for Pb(2+) from aqueous solution. Lead uptake up to 281.8 mg/g dry algal mixture was observed. Equilibrium was achieved after 120 min. No significant effect of changing the flow rate on the removal capacity was noticed. It was found that Langmuir model expresses the system at pH 4. Mineral acids exhibited good elution properties (a mean of 93%) for recovery of sorbed biomass ions as compared with the tested alkalies (about 60%). PMID:10977889

  5. Exploring the potential of algae/bacteria interactions.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-06-01

    Algae are primary producers in aquatic ecosystems, where heterotrophic bacteria grow on organics produced by algae and recycle nutrients. Ecological studies have identified the co-occurrence of particular species of algae and bacteria, suggesting the presence of their specific interactions. Algae/bacteria interactions are categorized into nutrient exchange, signal transduction and gene transfer. Studies have examined how these interactions shape aquatic communities and influence geochemical cycles in the natural environment. In parallel, efforts have been made to exploit algae for biotechnology processes, such as water treatment and bioenergy production, where bacteria influence algal activities in various ways. We suggest that better understanding of mechanisms underlying algae/bacteria interactions will facilitate the development of more efficient and/or as-yet-unexploited biotechnology processes. PMID:25744715

  6. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga-Competition or Allelopathy?

    PubMed

    B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, Gábor; Dobronoki, Dalma; Gonda, Sándor; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2015-11-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control). Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds. PMID:26528991

  7. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1984-01-01

    Efficiency of process for producing H.sub.2 by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  8. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-06-16

    Efficiency of process for producing H/sub 2/ by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  9. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    ScienceCinema

    Elliott, Doug

    2014-06-02

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  10. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Doug

    2013-12-17

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  11. Bromophenols from marine algae with potential anti-diabetic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiukun; Liu, Ming

    2012-12-01

    Marine algae contain various bromophenols with a variety of biological activities, including antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-diabetic effects. Here, we briefly review the recent progress in researches on the biomaterials from marine algae, emphasizing the relationship between the structure and the potential anti-diabetic applications. Bromophenols from marine algae display their hyperglycemic effects by inhibiting the activities of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, α-glucosidase, as well as other mechanisms.

  12. Method and apparatus for iterative lysis and extraction of algae

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Geoffrey; Boggs, Tabitha; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Doherty, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    A method and system for processing algae involves the use of an ionic liquid-containing clarified cell lysate to lyse algae cells. The resulting crude cell lysate may be clarified and subsequently used to lyse algae cells. The process may be repeated a number of times before a clarified lysate is separated into lipid and aqueous phases for further processing and/or purification of desired products.

  13. Diplosphaera sp. MM1 - A microalga with phycoremediation and biomethane potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuixia; Subashchandrabose, Suresh R; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Hu, Zhiquan; Xiao, Bo

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the potential of a microalga Diplosphaera sp. MM1 for its ability to generate energy through biomass production from wastewater remediation. 33% dairy wastewater and 50% winery wastewater demonstrated as promising alternative media for cultivating Diplosphaera sp. MM1 biomass. Interestingly, the alga cultivated in 50% winery wastewater with limited nitrogen produced the highest lipid content (43.07% total solid) and the lowest carbohydrate content (9.35% TS). On the contrary, the lowest lipid content (16.98% TS) and the highest carbohydrate content (29.39% TS) were exhibited by the alga cultivated in 33% dairy wastewater. The results from anaerobic digestion processes in terms of biochemical methane potential of the alga cultivated in BG-11 medium, 33% dairy wastewater and 50% winery wastewater were 197.39, 129.75 and 218.51NmLg(-1)VS, respectively. Further, this study demonstrates the potential of winery wastewater as a candidate to increase the lipid content of algae and enhance biofuel production of algal biomass. PMID:27472493

  14. Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

    2011-01-01

    The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in

  15. Exploring the potential of using algae in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min David; Chen, Ching-Chun; Huynh, Pauline; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    The applications of microalgae in cosmetic products have recently received more attention in the treatment of skin problems, such as aging, tanning and pigment disorders. There are also potential uses in the areas of anti-aging, skin-whitening, and pigmentation reduction products. While algae species have already been used in some cosmetic formulations, such as moisturizing and thickening agents, algae remain largely untapped as an asset in this industry due to an apparent lack of utility as a primary active ingredient. This review article focuses on integrating studies on algae pertinent to skin health and beauty, with the purpose of identifying serviceable algae functions in practical cosmetic uses. PMID:25537136

  16. Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae

    DOEpatents

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2013-03-05

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

  17. Algae Bioreactor Using Submerged Enclosures with Semi-Permeable Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D (Inventor); Gormly, Sherwin J (Inventor); Embaye, Tsegereda N (Inventor); Delzeit, Lance D (Inventor); Flynn, Michael T (Inventor); Liggett, Travis A (Inventor); Buckwalter, Patrick W (Inventor); Baertsch, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for producing hydrocarbons, including oil, by processing algae and/or other micro-organisms in an aquatic environment. Flexible bags (e.g., plastic) with CO.sub.2/O.sub.2 exchange membranes, suspended at a controllable depth in a first liquid (e.g., seawater), receive a second liquid (e.g., liquid effluent from a "dead zone") containing seeds for algae growth. The algae are cultivated and harvested in the bags, after most of the second liquid is removed by forward osmosis through liquid exchange membranes. The algae are removed and processed, and the bags are cleaned and reused.

  18. Sequencing of complete mitochondrial genome of brown algal Saccharina sp. ye-F.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiao; Wang, Shuai; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Xiaowen; Xu, Le; Miao, Yu; Ye, Naihao

    2016-09-01

    The complete sequence (37 657 bp) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the Saccharina sp. ye-F was determined using Illumina sequencing data (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). The genome contains 38 protein-coding genes (PCG), three ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and 25 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes that are typical of Saccharina mtDNA. A phylogenetic analysis based on the mitochondrial genomes of brown algae indicated that Saccharina sp. ye-F and Saccharina longissima, Saccharina japonica are the most closely related species, which strongly supports their close phylogenetic affinity. PMID:26358639

  19. Inhibition of Microcystis aeruginosa by the extracellular substances from an Aeromonas sp.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Mei; Chen, Ming-Jun; Wang, Meng-Hui; Jia, Rui-Bao; Li, Li

    2013-09-28

    Growth of Microcystis aeruginosa could be inhibited significantly within 24 h by the extracellular substances prepared from Aeromonas sp. strain FM. During the treatment, the concentration of extracellular soluble carbohydrates increased significantly in algal culture. Morphological and ultrastructural changes in M. aeruginosa cells, including breakage of the cell surface, secretion of mucilage, and intracellular disorganization of thylakoids, were observed. HPLC-MS analysis showed that the extracellular substances of Aeromonas sp. strain FM were a mixture of free amino acids, tripeptides, and clavulanate. Among these, the algae-lysis effects of lysine and clavulanate were confirmed. PMID:23727796

  20. Sequencing of complete mitochondrial genome of brown algal Saccharina sp. ye-W.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Fan, Xiao; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Xiaowen; Miao, Yu; Xu, Le; Ye, Naihao

    2016-07-01

    The complete sequence (37 657 bp) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the Saccharina sp. ye-W was determined using Illumina sequencing data. The genome contains 38 protein-coding genes (PCG), three ribosomal RNA (rRNA), 25 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes that are typical of Saccharina mtDNA. Phylogenetic analysis based on the mitochondrial genomes of brown algae indicated that Saccharina sp. ye-W and Saccharina longissima, Saccharina japonica are the most closely related species, which strongly supports their close phylogenetic affinity. PMID:26153752

  1. Alga-Derived Substrates Select for Distinct Betaproteobacterial Lineages and Contribute to Niche Separation in Limnohabitans Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Šimek, Karel; Kasalický, Vojtěch; Zapomělová, Eliška; Horňák, Karel

    2011-01-01

    We examined the proportions of major Betaproteobacteria subgroups within bacterial communities in diverse nonaxenic, monospecific cultures of algae or cyanobacteria: four species of cryptophyta (genera Cryptomonas and Rhodomonas), four species of chlorophyta (genera Pediastrum, Staurastrum, and Chlamydomonas), and two species of cyanobacteria (genera Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon). In the cryptophyta cultures, Betaproteobacteria represented 48 to 71% of total bacteria, the genus Limnohabitans represented 18 to 26%, and the Polynucleobacter B subcluster represented 5 to 16%. In the taxonomically diverse chlorophyta group, the genus Limnohabitans accounted for 7 to 45% of total bacteria. In contrast, cyanobacterial cultures contained significantly lower proportions of the Limnohabitans bacteria (1 to 3% of the total) than the cryptophyta and chlorophyta cultures. Notably, largely absent in all of the cultures was Polynucleobacter necessarius (Polynucleobacter C subcluster). Subsequently, we examined the growth of Limnohabitans strains in the presence of different algae or their extracellular products (EPP). Two strains, affiliated with Limnohabitans planktonicus and Limnohabitans parvus, were separately inoculated into axenic cultures of three algal species growing in an inorganic medium: Cryptomonas sp., Chlamydomonas noctigama, and Pediastrum boryanum. The Limnohabitans strains cocultured with these algae or inoculated into their EPP consistently showed (i) pronounced population growth compared to the control without the algae or EPP and (ii) stronger growth stimulation of L. planktonicus than of L. parvus. Overall, growth responses of the Limnohabitans strains cultured with algae were highly species specific, which suggests a pronounced niche separation between two closely related Limnohabitans species likely mediated by different abilities to utilize the substrates produced by different algal species. PMID:21873481

  2. Alga-derived substrates select for distinct Betaproteobacterial lineages and contribute to niche separation in Limnohabitans strains.

    PubMed

    Simek, Karel; Kasalický, Vojtĕch; Zapomĕlová, Eliska; Hornák, Karel

    2011-10-01

    We examined the proportions of major Betaproteobacteria subgroups within bacterial communities in diverse nonaxenic, monospecific cultures of algae or cyanobacteria: four species of cryptophyta (genera Cryptomonas and Rhodomonas), four species of chlorophyta (genera Pediastrum, Staurastrum, and Chlamydomonas), and two species of cyanobacteria (genera Dolichospermum and Aphanizomenon). In the cryptophyta cultures, Betaproteobacteria represented 48 to 71% of total bacteria, the genus Limnohabitans represented 18 to 26%, and the Polynucleobacter B subcluster represented 5 to 16%. In the taxonomically diverse chlorophyta group, the genus Limnohabitans accounted for 7 to 45% of total bacteria. In contrast, cyanobacterial cultures contained significantly lower proportions of the Limnohabitans bacteria (1 to 3% of the total) than the cryptophyta and chlorophyta cultures. Notably, largely absent in all of the cultures was Polynucleobacter necessarius (Polynucleobacter C subcluster). Subsequently, we examined the growth of Limnohabitans strains in the presence of different algae or their extracellular products (EPP). Two strains, affiliated with Limnohabitans planktonicus and Limnohabitans parvus, were separately inoculated into axenic cultures of three algal species growing in an inorganic medium: Cryptomonas sp., Chlamydomonas noctigama, and Pediastrum boryanum. The Limnohabitans strains cocultured with these algae or inoculated into their EPP consistently showed (i) pronounced population growth compared to the control without the algae or EPP and (ii) stronger growth stimulation of L. planktonicus than of L. parvus. Overall, growth responses of the Limnohabitans strains cultured with algae were highly species specific, which suggests a pronounced niche separation between two closely related Limnohabitans species likely mediated by different abilities to utilize the substrates produced by different algal species. PMID:21873481

  3. Integrated Bacillus sp. immobilized cell reactor and Synechocystis sp. algal reactor for the treatment of tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sekaran, G; Karthikeyan, S; Nagalakshmi, C; Mandal, A B

    2013-01-01

    The wastewater discharged from leather industries lack biodegradability due to the presence of xenobiotic compounds. The primary clarification and aerobic treatment in Bacillus sp. immobilized Chemo Autotrophic Activated Carbon Oxidation (CAACO) reactor removed considerable amount of pollution parameters. The residual untreated organics in the wastewater was further treated in algal batch reactor inoculated with Synechocystis sp. Sodium nitrate, K(2)HPO(4), MgSO(4).7H(2)O, NH(4)Cl, CaCl(2)·2H(2)O, FeCl(3) (anhydrous), and thiamine hydrochloride, rice husk based activated carbon (RHAC), immobilization of Bacillus sp. in mesoporous activated carbon, sand filter of dimensions diameter, 6 cm and height, 30 cm; and the CAACO reactor of dimensions diameter, 5.5 cm and height, 30 cm with total volume 720 ml, and working volume of 356 ml. In the present investigation, the CAACO treated tannery wastewater was applied to Synechocystis sp. inoculated algal batch reactor of hydraulic residence time 24 h. The BOD(5), COD, and TOC of treated wastewater from algal batch reactor were 20 ± 7, 167 ± 29, and 78 ± 16 mg/l respectively. The integrated CAACO system and Algal batch reactor was operated for 30 days and they accomplished a cumulative removal of BOD(5),COD, TOC, VFA and sulphide as 98 %, 95 %, 93 %, 86 %, and 100 %, respectively. The biokinetic constants for the growth of algae in the batch reactor were specific growth rate, 0.095(day(-1)) and yield coefficient, 3.15 mg of algal biomass/mg of COD destructed. The degradation of xenobiotic compounds in the algal batch reactor was confirmed through HPLC and FT-IR techniques. The integrated CAACO-Algal reactor system established a credible reduction in pollution parameters in the tannery wastewater. The removal mechanism is mainly due to co-metabolism between algae and bacterial species and the organics were completely metabolized rather than by adsorption. PMID:22528997

  4. Inorganic carbon acquisition in some synurophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Shabana; Colman, Brian

    2008-05-01

    Some characteristics of photosynthesis of three synurophyte algae, Synura petersenii, Synura uvella and Tessellaria volvocina were investigated to determine the mechanism of inorganic carbon (C(i)) uptake. All three species were found to have no external carbonic anhydrase, no capacity for direct bicarbonate uptake and a low whole-cell affinity for C(i). The internal pH of S. petersenii determined using (14)C-benzoic acid and [2-(14)C]-5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione was pH 7.0-7.5, over an external pH range of 5.0-7.5. Thus, the pH difference between the cell interior of S. petersenii and the external medium was large enough, over the alga's growth range, to allow the accumulation of C(i) by the diffusive uptake of CO(2). Monitoring O(2) evolution and CO(2) uptake by suspensions of S. petersenii at pH 7.0 by mass spectrometry did not indicate a rapid uptake of CO(2), and the final CO(2) compensation concentration reached was 24 +/- 0.7 microM. Furthermore, when the cells were darkened, a brief burst of CO(2) occurred before a steady rate of dark respiration was established, suggesting a loss of CO(2) by photorespiration. An examination of the kinetics of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in homogenates of cells of S. petersenii, S. uvella and Mallomonas papillosa showed that values of the K(m) (CO(2)) were 28.4, 41.8 and 18.2 microM, respectively. These species lack the characteristics of cells with a CO(2)-concentrating mechanism because the cell affinity for C(i) appears to be determined by the relatively high CO(2) affinity of the Rubisco of these algae. PMID:18298411

  5. Algae-bacteria association inferred by 16S rDNA similarity in established microalgae cultures.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Dagmar; Nohynek, Liisa; Rischer, Heiko

    2014-06-01

    Forty cultivable, visually distinct bacterial cultures were isolated from four Baltic microalgal cultures Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Scenedesmus obliquus, Isochrysis sp., and Nitzschia microcephala, which have been maintained for several years in the laboratory. Bacterial isolates were characterized with respect to morphology, antibiotic susceptibility, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence. A total of 17 unique bacterial strains, almost all belonging to one of three families, Rhodobacteraceae, Rhizobiaceae, and Erythrobacteraceae, were subsequently isolated. The majority of isolated bacteria belong to Rhodobacteraceae. Literature review revealed that close relatives of the bacteria isolated in this study are not only often found in marine environments associated with algae, but also in lakes, sediments, and soil. Some of them had been shown to interact with organisms in their surroundings. A Basic Local Alignment Search Tool study indicated that especially bacteria isolated from the Isochrysis sp. culture were highly similar to microalgae-associated bacteria. Two of those isolates, I1 and I6, belong to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, members of which are known to occur in close communities with microalgae. An UniFrac analysis revealed that the bacterial community of Isochrysis sp. significantly differs from the other three communities. PMID:24799387

  6. A technical evaluation of biodiesel from vegetable oils vs. algae. Will algae-derived biodiesel perform?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel, one of the most prominent renewable alternative fuels, can be derived from a variety of sources including vegetable oils, animal fats and used cooking oils as well as alternative sources such as algae. While issues such as land-use change, food vs. fuel, feedstock availability, and produc...

  7. Growing Chlorella sp. on meat processing wastewater for nutrient removal and biomass production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Ma, Xiaochen; Chandra, Ceria; Doan, Yen T T; Ma, Yiwei; Zheng, Hongli; Cheng, Sibo; Griffith, Richard; Chen, Paul; Chen, Chi; Urriola, Pedro E; Shurson, Gerald C; Gislerød, Hans R; Ruan, Roger

    2015-12-01

    In this work, Chlorella sp. (UM6151) was selected to treat meat processing wastewater for nutrient removal and biomass production. To balance the nutrient profile and improve biomass yield at low cost, an innovative algae cultivation model based on wastewater mixing was developed. The result showed that biomass yield (0.675-1.538 g/L) of algae grown on mixed wastewater was much higher than that on individual wastewater and artificial medium. Wastewater mixing eased the bottleneck for algae growth and contributed to the improved biomass yield. Furthermore, in mixed wastewater with sufficient nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies (68.75-90.38%) and total nitrogen removal efficiencies (30.06-50.94%) were improved. Wastewater mixing also promoted the synthesis of protein in algal cells. Protein content of algae growing on mixed wastewater reached 60.87-68.65%, which is much higher than that of traditional protein source. Algae cultivation model based on wastewater mixing is an efficient and economical way to improve biomass yield. PMID:26386422

  8. Pheromones in marine algae: A technical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, G.; Müller, D. G.; Fritz, P.

    1995-03-01

    It is now well known that many marine organisms use low-molecular volatile substances as signals, in order to coordinate activities between different individuals. The study of such pheromones requires the isolation and enrichment of the secretions from undisturbed living cells or organisms over extended periods of time. The Grob-Hersch extraction device, which we describe here, avoids adverse factors for the biological materials such as strong water currents, rising gas bubbles or chemical solvents. Furthermore, the formation of sea-water spray is greatly reduced. The application of this technique for the isolation of pheromones of marine algae and animals is described.

  9. Factors affecting spore germination in algae - review.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S C

    2009-01-01

    This review surveys whatever little is known on the influence of different environmental factors like light, temperature, nutrients, chemicals (such as plant hormones, vitamins, etc.), pH of the medium, biotic factors (such as algal extracellular substances, algal concentration, bacterial extracellular products, animal grazing and animal extracellular products), water movement, water stress, antibiotics, UV light, X-rays, gamma-rays, and pollution on the spore germination in algae. The work done on the dormancy of algal spores and on the role of vegetative cells in tolerating environmental stress is also incorporated. PMID:19826917

  10. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool

    2013-09-18

    ABCLAT was built to help any model user with spatially explicit Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon Dioxide nutrient flux information, and solar resource information evaluate algal cultivation potential. Initial applications of this modeling framework include Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool Canada and Australia. The Canadian application was copyrighted November 29th 2011 as the Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada. This copyright assertion is for the general framework from which any country or region with themore » requisite data could create a regionally specific application. The ABCLAT model framework developed by SNL looks at the growth potential in a given region as a function of available nutrients from wastewater and other sources, carbon dioxide from power plants, available solar potential, and if available, land cover and use information. The model framework evaluates the biomass potential, fixed carbon dioxide, potential algal biocrude and required land area for nutrient sources. ABCLAT is built with an object-oriented software program that can provide an easy to use interface for exploring questions related to aigal biomass production.« less

  11. Viruses and viruslike particles of eukaryotic algae.

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, J L; Lane, L C; Meints, R H

    1991-01-01

    Until recently there was little interest or information on viruses and viruslike particles of eukaryotic algae. However, this situation is changing. In the past decade many large double-stranded DNA-containing viruses that infect two culturable, unicellular, eukaryotic green algae have been discovered. These viruses can be produced in large quantities, assayed by plaque formation, and analyzed by standard bacteriophage techniques. The viruses are structurally similar to animal iridoviruses, their genomes are similar to but larger (greater than 300 kbp) than that of poxviruses, and their infection process resembles that of bacteriophages. Some of the viruses have DNAs with low levels of methylated bases, whereas others have DNAs with high concentrations of 5-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine. Virus-encoded DNA methyltransferases are associated with the methylation and are accompanied by virus-encoded DNA site-specific (restriction) endonucleases. Some of these enzymes have sequence specificities identical to those of known bacterial enzymes, and others have previously unrecognized specificities. A separate rod-shaped RNA-containing algal virus has structural and nucleotide sequence affinities to higher plant viruses. Quite recently, viruses have been associated with rapid changes in marine algal populations. In the next decade we envision the discovery of new algal viruses, clarification of their role in various ecosystems, discovery of commercially useful genes in these viruses, and exploitation of algal virus genetic elements in plant and algal biotechnology. Images PMID:1779928

  12. Effects of nitrogen dioxide on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Wodzinski, R.S.; Alexander, M.

    1980-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity of Anabaena flos-aquae in a soil suspension at an initial pH of 4.9 was almost totally eliminated after 3 days of exposure to 5.0 ppm (..mu..l/liter) NO/sub 2/, at which time the pH had fallen to 3.9. In contrast, A. flos-aquae in soil suspensions at an initial pH of 6.0 was not inhibited after 3 days by 5.0 ppm NO/sub 2/, but the activity was reduced by half in the presence of 15.0 ppm NO/sub 2/; the pH was 6.5 and 5.8, respectively, in the NO/sub 2/-treated samples on day 3. Photosynthesis by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ankistrodesmus falcatus in soil suspensions at an initial pH of approx 4.2 was not appreciably affected by 15.0 ppm of NO/sub 2/ after 3 days, at which time the pH had fallen below 4.0. The high levels of NO/sub 2/ and low pH values required for toxicity suggest that blue-green and green algae probably will not be affected directly by NO/sub 2/ in polluted air.

  13. Effects of nitrogen dioxide on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Wodzinski, R.S.; Alexander, M.

    1980-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity of Anabaena flos-aquae in a soil suspension at an initial pH of 4.9 was almost totally eliminated after 3 days of exposure to 5.0 ppM (..mu..l/liter) NO/sub 2/, at which time the pH had fallen to 3.9. In contrast, A. flos-aquae in soil suspensions at an initial pH of 6.0 was not inhibited after 3 days by 5.0 ppM NO/sub 2/, but the activity was reduced by half in the presence of 15.0 ppM NO/sub 2/; the pH was 6.5 and 5.8, respectively, in the NO/sub 2/-treated samples on day 3. Photosynthesis by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ankistrodesmus falcatus in soil suspensions at an initial pH of approx. 4.2 was not appreciably affected by 15.0 ppM of NO/sub 2/ after 3 days, at which time the pH had fallen below 4.0. The high levels of NO/sub 2/ and low pH values required for toxicity suggest that blue-green and green algae probably will not be affected directly by NO/sub 2/ in polluted air.

  14. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-18

    ABCLAT was built to help any model user with spatially explicit Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon Dioxide nutrient flux information, and solar resource information evaluate algal cultivation potential. Initial applications of this modeling framework include Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool Canada and Australia. The Canadian application was copyrighted November 29th 2011 as the Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada. This copyright assertion is for the general framework from which any country or region with the requisite data could create a regionally specific application. The ABCLAT model framework developed by SNL looks at the growth potential in a given region as a function of available nutrients from wastewater and other sources, carbon dioxide from power plants, available solar potential, and if available, land cover and use information. The model framework evaluates the biomass potential, fixed carbon dioxide, potential algal biocrude and required land area for nutrient sources. ABCLAT is built with an object-oriented software program that can provide an easy to use interface for exploring questions related to aigal biomass production.

  15. Video micrography of algae photomovement and vectorial method of biomonitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posudin, Yuri I.; Massjuk, N. P.; Lilitskaya, G. G.

    1996-01-01

    The simultaneous recording of several photomovement parameters of algae as test-functions during biomonitoring is proposed. Green alga Dunaliella viridis Teod. was used as the test- object for the estimation of different heavy metals. The quantitative changes of photomovement parameters as a criterion of toxicity were determined by means of the vectorial method of biomonitoring.

  16. Comments on the Manuscript, "Biodiesel Production from Freshwater Algae"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent publication (Vijayaragahavan, K.; Hemanathan, K., Biodiesel from freshwater algae, Energy Fuels, 2009, 23(11):5448-5453) on fuel production from algae is evaluated. It is discussed herein that the fuel discussed in that paper is not biodiesel, rather it probably consists of hydrocarbons. ...

  17. Evaluation of Culture Conditions to Obtain Fatty Acids from Saline Microalgae Species: Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Castilla Casadiego, D. A.; Albis Arrieta, A. R.; Angulo Mercado, E. R.; Cervera Cahuana, S. J.; Baquero Noriega, K. S.; Suárez Escobar, A. F.; Morales Avendaño, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    The use of the saline microalgae, Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp., was explored as an alternative source for the production of fatty acids using fertilizer and glycerol as culture media. The nutrient medium used contained “Nutrifoliar,” a commercial fertilizer, and/or glycerol, in natural sea water. The microalgae were placed in cultures with different conditions. The parameters that favored the largest production of fatty acids were 24 hours of agitation and illumination, 1620 L/day of air supply, 2.25 L of air/min, and a temperature of 32°C using “Nutrifoliar” as the culture media. Results indicated that, from 3 g of microalgae in wet base of Chroomonas sp., 54.43 mg of oil was produced. The chromatographic characterization of oil obtained revealed the presence of essential fatty acids such as 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid (omega-3) and 4,7,10-hexadecatrienoic acid (omega-6) from the species Dunaliella salina. On the other hand, 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (omega-6) and cis-11-eicosenoic acid (omega-9) were identified from the species Chroomonas sp. The temperature variations played an important role in the velocity of growth or the production of the algae biomass, the amount of oil, and the ability to produce fatty acids. PMID:27376085

  18. Algae Farming in Low Earth Orbit: Past Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, N.

    Algal strains used as a production engine represent a novel example of living mechanical systems with tremendous potential for applications in space. Algae use photosynthesis to create lipids, glycerin, and biomass, with different strains of algae producing different oils. Algae can be grown to produce many types of oils, with low, medium or long hydrocarbon chain lengths. This article examines the history of algae research, as well as its value to astronauts as both a food supplement and as an oxygen production and carbon sequester engine. Consideration is given to ways algae is currently being used and tested in space, followed by a look forward envisioning dynamic living technological systems that can help to sustain our race as we travel the void between stars.

  19. Cryoalgotox: Use of cryopreserved alga in a semistatic microplate test

    SciTech Connect

    Benhra, A.; Radetski, C.M.; Ferard, J.F.

    1997-03-01

    Use of cryopreserved alga Selenastrum capricornutum has been evaluated as a simple and cost-efficient procedure in a new semistatic algal ecotoxicity test. Experiments have been conducted to compare performance criteria of this method, named Cryoalgotox, versus the classic microplate test using fresh algae. Cryoalgotox 72-h 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) determined with Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 6+}, and atrazine were more sensitive, repeatable (low coefficients of variation), and reproducible (low time effect) than the results obtained with the classical microplate tests. The effect of storage time at {minus}80 C on the sensitivity of the algae was assessed using cadmium as a toxic reference; it was shown that algae stored at {minus}80 C over a 3-month period gave comparable toxicity results to those found with fresh algae.

  20. Comparative Studies on Plastoquinones. IV. Plastoquinones in Algae

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Elena; Barr, Rita; Crane, F. L.

    1968-01-01

    Plastoquinones A and C have been found in all classes of algae, including representatives of greens, yellow-greens, blue-greens, reds, browns and the flagellate, Euglena. Plastoquinone C from red and brown algae can be separated into 6 different types. An additional plastoquinone C has been found in Gigartina and Rhydomela. From chromatographic evidence this may be equivalent to plastoquinone Co, a C type with a hydroxyl group on the first isoprene unit of the terpenoid sidechain of this substituted benzo-quinone. The ubiquinone, vitamin K and α-tocopherylquinone content of several algae is also reported. The presence of plastoquinone A in all green plants and many algae indicates that it may be a functional element in photosynthesis. Our study shows that plastoquinone C is more regularly present in algae than has been previously shown. PMID:16656993

  1. [Marine algae of Baja California Sur, Mexico: nutritional value].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Domínguez, Silvia; Casas Valdez, Margarita; Ramos Ramos, Felipe; Pérez-Gil, Fernando; Sánchez Rodríguez, Ignacio

    2002-12-01

    The Baja California Peninsula is one of the richest regions of seaweed resources in México. The objective of this study was to determine the chemical composition of some marine algae species of Baja California Sur, with an economical potential due to their abundance and distribution, and to promote their use as food for human consumption and animal feeding. The algae studied were Green (Ulva spp., Enteromorpha intestinalis, Caulerpa sertularoides, Bryopsis hypnoides), Red (Laurencia johnstonii, Spyridia filamentosa, Hypnea valentiae) and Brown (Sargassum herporizum, S. sinicola, Padina durvillaei, Hydroclathrus clathrathus, Colpomenia sinuosa). The algae were dried and ground before analysis. In general, the results showed that algae had a protein level less than 11%, except L. johnstonii with 18% and low energy content. The ether extract content was lower than 1%. However, the algae were a good source of carbohydrates and inorganic matter. PMID:12868282

  2. Mitigating ammonia nitrogen deficiency in dairy wastewaters for algae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Ma, Xiaochen; Ma, Yiwei; Chen, Paul; Zheng, Hongli; Doan, Yen T T; Liu, Hui; Chen, Chi; Urriola, Pedro E; Shurson, Gerald C; Ruan, Roger

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrated that the limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewater was the ammonia nitrogen deficiency. Dairy wastewaters were mixed with a slaughterhouse wastewater that has much higher ammonia nitrogen content. The results showed the mixing wastewaters improved the nutrient profiles and biomass yield at low cost. Algae grown on mixed wastewaters contained high protein (55.98-66.91%) and oil content (19.10-20.81%) and can be exploited to produce animal feed and biofuel. Furthermore, algae grown on mixed wastewater significantly reduced nutrient contents remained in the wastewater after treatment. By mitigating limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewaters, the key issue of low biomass yield of algae grown on dairy wastewaters was resolved and the wastewater nutrient removal efficiency was significantly improved by this study. PMID:26623940

  3. Red Algae (Rhodophyta) from the Coast of Madagascar: Preliminary Bioactivity Studies and Isolation of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Rahelivao, Marie Pascaline; Gruner, Margit; Andriamanantoanina, Hanta; Andriamihaja, Bakolinirina; Bauer, Ingmar; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-01

    Several species of red algae (Rhodophyta) from the coastal regions of Madagascar have been investigated for their natural products. The most abundant compound was cholesterol (5) in combination with a series of oxidized congeners. The brominated indoles 1-3 along with the sesquiterpene debilone (4) have been isolated from Laurencia complanata. For the first time, debilone (4) has been obtained from a marine plant. From the methanol extract of Calloseris sp., we have achieved the second isolation of the unusual A-ring contracted steroids (-)-2-ethoxycarbonyl-2β-hydroxy-A-nor-cholest-5-en-4-one (9) and phorbasterone B (10). The crude extracts of Laurencia complanata exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. PMID:26198236

  4. Red Algae (Rhodophyta) from the Coast of Madagascar: Preliminary Bioactivity Studies and Isolation of Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Rahelivao, Marie Pascaline; Gruner, Margit; Andriamanantoanina, Hanta; Andriamihaja, Bakolinirina; Bauer, Ingmar; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Several species of red algae (Rhodophyta) from the coastal regions of Madagascar have been investigated for their natural products. The most abundant compound was cholesterol (5) in combination with a series of oxidized congeners. The brominated indoles 1–3 along with the sesquiterpene debilone (4) have been isolated from Laurencia complanata. For the first time, debilone (4) has been obtained from a marine plant. From the methanol extract of Calloseris sp., we have achieved the second isolation of the unusual A-ring contracted steroids (−)-2-ethoxycarbonyl-2β-hydroxy-A-nor-cholest-5-en-4-one (9) and phorbasterone B (10). The crude extracts of Laurencia complanata exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. PMID:26198236

  5. The influence of nitrogen on heterocyst production in blue-green algae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogawa, Roann E.; Carr, John F.

    1969-01-01

    A series of experiments on heterocyst production in Anabaena variabilis provides some strong indirect evidence for the role of heterocysts in nitrogen fixation. Of the algae tested (Anabaena variabilis, A. inaequalis, A. cylindrica, A. flos-aquae, Tolypothrix distorta, Gloeotrichia echinulata, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Oscillatoria sp., and Microcystis aeruginosa), only those with heterocysts grew in a nitrate-free medium. Growth in the nitrate-free medium was accompanied by an increase in heterocysts. Heterocyst formation in A. variabilis was evident 24 hr after transfer from a nitrate-containing to a nitrate-free medium. The number of heterocysts was altered by changes in the nitrogen source. Numbers were lowest when NH4-N was used as a nitrogen source and highest when nitrogen (N2-N) was derived from the atmosphere. Heterocyst numbers could also be regulated by controlling the concentration of NO3-N in the medium. Heterocyst production depended on the absence of combined nitrogen and the presence of phosphate. Data are presented on the occurrence of blue-green algae (with heterocysts) in Lake Erie and the environmental conditions apparently necessary for them to become dominant.

  6. Response of benthic algae to environmental gradients in an agriculturally dominated landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, M.D.; Black, R.W.; Gruber, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Benthic algal communities were assessed in an agriculturally dominated landscape in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington, to determine which environmental variables best explained species distributions, and whether algae species optima models were useful in predicting specific water-quality parameters. Land uses in the study area included forest, range, urban, and agriculture. Most of the streams in this region can be characterized as open-channel systems influenced by intensive dryland (nonirrigated) and irrigated agriculture. Algal communities in forested streams were dominated by blue-green algae, with communities in urban and range streams dominated by diatoms. The predominance of either blue-greens or diatoms in agricultural streams varied greatly depending on the specific site. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated a strong gradient effect of several key environmental variables on benthic algal community composition. Conductivity and % agriculture were the dominant explanatory variables when all sites (n = 24) were included in the CCA; water velocity replaced conductivity when the CCA included only agricultural and urban sites. Other significant explanatory variables included dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), orthophosphate (OP), discharge, and precipitation. Regression and calibration models accurately predicted conductivity based on benthic algal communities, with OP having slightly lower predictability. The model for DIN was poor, and therefore may be less useful in this system. Thirty-four algal taxa were identified as potential indicators of conductivity and nutrient conditions, with most indicators being diatoms except for the blue-greens Anabaenasp. and Lyngbya sp.

  7. Cenoses of phototrophic algae of ultrasaline lakes in the Kulunda steppe (Altai krai, Russian Federation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, Ph. V.; Kalinina, O. Yu.; Nikitin, M. A.; Samylina, O. S.

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, expeditions of the Institute of Microbiology, Russian Academy of Sciences, delivered samples of algo-bacterial mats from Kulunda steppe alkaline lakes (Petukhovskoe alkaline lake, Tanatar VI, and Gorchina III). The filamentous alga Ctenocladus circinnatus (Chlorophyta) acted as an edificator of the mats. The composition of cenoses algocomponents also included chlorophytes Dunaliella viridis and Picocystis salinarum as well as diatoms Anomeoneis sphaerophora, Brachysira brebissonii, B. zellensis, Mastogloia pusilla var. subcapitata, Nitzschia amphibia, N. cf. communis, and Nitzschia sp. 1. The composition and structure of phototrophic algae cenoses (including diatom taxocenes) were described for the investigated lakes for the first time. For the period from 2011 to 2012, the total mineralization significantly increased in lakes. This involved sensible alterations of cenoses. B. zellensis was the most permanent component of diatom taxocenes in both seasons. In the summer of 2011, it was often accompanied by A. sphaerophora and B. brebissonii. In the summer of 2012, A. sphaerophora was found only singularly in Lake Gorchina III, and some biotopes of Lake Tanatar VI were massively inhabited by N. cf. communis, including colonies that had not been previously described for the species. The genetic analysis of three diatoms, which are markedly different from each other in their appearance and were sampled from different lakes but were all determined as Nitzschia cf. communis, showed their complete similarity to each other with the 18S rRNA gene fragment and the highest similarity of all the three diatoms with the species Nitzschia communis.

  8. Host specificity and growth of kelp gametophytes symbiotic with filamentous red algae (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Charlene B.; Garbary, David J.; Kim, Kwang Young; Chiasson, David M.

    2004-02-01

    Kelp gametophytes were previously observed in nature living endophytically in red algal cell walls. Here we examine the interactions of two kelp species and six red algae in culture. Gametophytes of Nereocystis luetkeana (Mertens) Postels et Ruprecht became endophytic in the cell walls of Griffithsia pacifica Kylin and Antithamnion defectum Kylin, and grew epiphytically in high abundance on G. japonica Okamura and Aglaothamnion oosumiense Itono. Alaria esculenta (Linnaeus) Greville from the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia became endophytic in Aglaothamnion oosumiense, Antithamnion defectum, Callithamnion sp., G. japonica, G. pacifica, and Pleonosporium abysicola Gardner, all from the Pacific Ocean. Some cultures were treated with phloroglucinol before infection to thicken the cell walls. The endophytic gametophytes were smaller and grew more slowly than gametophytes epiphytic on the same host. N. luetkeana failed to become endophytic in some of the potential hosts, and this may reflect host specificity, or culture artifacts. This work improves our understanding of the process of infection of red algae by kelp gametophytes, and broadens our knowledge of host specificity in endophytic symbioses.

  9. Enhanced accumulation of PCB congeners by Baltic Sea blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, with increased algae enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Gilek, M.; Bjoerk, M.; Broman, D.; Kautsky, N.; Naef, C.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine if natural variations in the quantity of phytoplankton-derived particulate and dissolved organic carbon influences the accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the tissues of Baltic Sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). In a laboratory flow-through experiment the authors exposed M. edulis to the technical PCB mixture Aroclor{reg_sign} 1248 for 21 d at three different enrichments of the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas sp., 0.10, 0.16, and 0.32 mg particulate organic carbon (POC)/L. Tissue and water concentrations were determined for seven PCB congeners and 21-d bioaccumulation factors were calculated against total water concentrations. Contrary to what would be expected, an increase in algae enrichment from 0.10 to 0.32 mg POC/L resulted in an enhanced PCB accumulation by a factor of approx. 2. This increase in PCB accumulation was more pronounced for PCB congeners with lower hydrophobicity. These observations have implications for the design of laboratory accumulation studies and potentially for PCB accumulation and cycling in field populations of suspension-feeding mussels in response to changes in eutrophication status.

  10. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Therien, Jesse B.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Peters, John W.

    2014-10-18

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. We demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

  11. Heterococcus endolithicus sp. nov. (Xanthophyceae) and other terrestrial Heterococcus species from Antarctica: morphological changes during life history and response to temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darling, R. B.; Friedmann, E. I.; Broady, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Strains of Heterococcus endolithicus sp. nov., H. pleurococcoides Pitschmann, H. caespitosus Vischer, and H. protonematoides Vischer isolated from terrestrial habitats in Antarctica were studied in culture. Morphology of the algae changes with stage in life history. The characteristic branching patterns are not present in very young or old cultures. Filament formation is suppressed when cultures are grown outside their optimal temperature range.

  12. Factors determining growth and vertical distribution of planktonic algae in extremely acidic mining lakes (pH 2.7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissinger, Vera

    2003-04-01

    In this thesis, I investigated the factors influencing the growth and vertical distribution of planktonic algae in extremely acidic mining lakes (pH 2-3). In the focal study site, Lake 111 (pH 2.7; Lusatia, Germany), the chrysophyte, Ochromonas sp., dominates in the upper water strata and the chlorophyte, Chlamydomonas sp., in the deeper strata, forming a pronounced deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). Inorganic carbon (IC) limitation influenced the phototrophic growth of Chlamydomonas sp. in the upper water strata. Conversely, in deeper strata, light limited its phototrophic growth. When compared with published data for algae from neutral lakes, Chlamydomonas sp. from Lake 111 exhibited a lower maximum growth rate, an enhanced compensation point and higher dark respiration rates, suggesting higher metabolic costs due to the extreme physico-chemical conditions. The photosynthetic performance of Chlamydomonas sp. decreased in high-light-adapted cells when IC limited. In addition, the minimal phosphorus (P) cell quota was suggestive of a higher P requirement under IC limitation. Subsequently, it was shown that Chlamydomonas sp. was a mixotroph, able to enhance its growth rate by taking up dissolved organic carbon (DOC) via osmotrophy. Therefore, it could survive in deeper water strata where DOC concentrations were higher and light limited. However, neither IC limitation, P availability nor in situ DOC concentrations (bottom-up control) could fully explain the vertical distribution of Chlamydomonas sp. in Lake 111. Conversely, when a novel approach was adopted, the grazing influence of the phagotrophic phototroph, Ochromonas sp., was found to exert top-down control on its prey (Chlamydomonas sp.) reducing prey abundance in the upper water strata. This, coupled with the fact that Chlamydomonas sp. uses DOC for growth, leads to a pronounced accumulation of Chlamydomonas sp. cells at depth; an apparent DCM. Therefore, grazing appears to be the main factor influencing the

  13. Azolla filiculoides Nitrogenase Activity Decrease Induced by Inoculation with Chlamydomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Habte, M

    1986-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of Chlamydomonas sp. on nitrogen fixation (C(2)H(2) --> C(2)H(4)) in Azolla filiculoides and on the nitrogen fixation and growth of free-living Anabaena azollae 2B organisms. Inoculation of azolla medium with Chlamydomonas sp. was associated with decreased nitrogenase activity in A. filiculoides and with increases in the density of a fungal population identified as Acremonium sp. Subsequent inoculation of azolla medium with this fungus was also accompanied by a significant decrease in nitrogenase activity of A. filiculoides. However, the extent of depression of nitrogenase activity was significantly higher when azolla medium was inoculated with Chlamydomonas sp. than when it was inoculated with Acremonium sp. Inoculation of nitrogen-free Stanier medium with either Acremonium sp. or Chlamydomonas sp. did not adversely affect the growth or nitrogenase activity of free-living A. azollae. Decreased nitrogenase activity in A. filiculoides is apparently related to the adverse influence of the green alga and the fungus on the macrosymbiont. The mechanisms that might be involved are discussed. PMID:16347211

  14. Azolla filiculoides Nitrogenase Activity Decrease Induced by Inoculation with Chlamydomonas sp. †

    PubMed Central

    Habte, Mitiku

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of Chlamydomonas sp. on nitrogen fixation (C2H2 → C2H4) in Azolla filiculoides and on the nitrogen fixation and growth of free-living Anabaena azollae 2B organisms. Inoculation of azolla medium with Chlamydomonas sp. was associated with decreased nitrogenase activity in A. filiculoides and with increases in the density of a fungal population identified as Acremonium sp. Subsequent inoculation of azolla medium with this fungus was also accompanied by a significant decrease in nitrogenase activity of A. filiculoides. However, the extent of depression of nitrogenase activity was significantly higher when azolla medium was inoculated with Chlamydomonas sp. than when it was inoculated with Acremonium sp. Inoculation of nitrogen-free Stanier medium with either Acremonium sp. or Chlamydomonas sp. did not adversely affect the growth or nitrogenase activity of free-living A. azollae. Decreased nitrogenase activity in A. filiculoides is apparently related to the adverse influence of the green alga and the fungus on the macrosymbiont. The mechanisms that might be involved are discussed. PMID:16347211

  15. Chloroplast Phylogenomic Inference of Green Algae Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linhua; Fang, Ling; Zhang, Zhenhua; Chang, Xin; Penny, David; Zhong, Bojian

    2016-01-01

    The green algal phylum Chlorophyta has six diverse classes, but the phylogenetic relationship of the classes within Chlorophyta remains uncertain. In order to better understand the ancient Chlorophyta evolution, we have applied a site pattern sorting method to study compositional heterogeneity and the model fit in the green algal chloroplast genomic data. We show that the fastest-evolving sites are significantly correlated with among-site compositional heterogeneity, and these sites have a much poorer fit to the evolutionary model. Our phylogenomic analyses suggest that the class Chlorophyceae is a monophyletic group, and the classes Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Prasinophyceae are non-monophyletic groups. Our proposed phylogenetic tree of Chlorophyta will offer new insights to investigate ancient green algae evolution, and our analytical framework will provide a useful approach for evaluating and mitigating the potential errors of phylogenomic inferences. PMID:26846729

  16. An algae-covered alligator rests warily

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An algae-covered alligator keeps a wary eye open as it rests in one of the ponds at Kennedy Space Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  17. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  18. Random flow induced by swimming algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Rushkin, Ilia; Goldstein, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    In this work we studied the random flow induced in a fluid by the motion of a dilute suspension of the swimming algae Volvox carteri. The fluid velocity in the suspension is a superposition of the flow fields set up by the individual organisms, which in turn have multipole contributions that decay as inverse powers of distance from the organism. Here we show that the conditions under which the central limit theorem guarantees a Gaussian probability distribution function of velocity fluctuations are satisfied when the leading force singularity is a Stokeslet. Deviations from Gaussianity are shown to arise from near-field effects. Comparison is made with the statistical properties of abiotic sedimenting suspensions. The experimental results are supplemented by extensive numerical studies.

  19. High-fidelity phototaxis in biflagellate algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptos, Kyriacos; Chioccioli, Maurizio; Furlan, Silvano; Pesci, Adriana; Goldstein, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    The single-cell alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a motile biflagellate that can swim towards light for its photosynthetic requirements, a behavior referred to as phototaxis. The cell responds upon light stimulation through its rudimentary eye - the eyespot - by changing the beating amplitude of its two flagella accordingly - a process called the photoresponse. All this occurs in a coordinated fashion as Chlamydomonas spins about its body axis while swimming, thus experiencing oscillating intensities of light. We use high-speed video microscopy to measure the flagellar dynamics of the photoresponse on immobilized cells and interpret the results with a mathematical model of adaptation similar to that used previously for Volvox. These results are incorporated into a model of phototactic steering to yield trajectories that are compared to those obtained by three-dimensional tracking. Implications of these results for the evolution of multicellularity in the Volvocales are discussed.

  20. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  1. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  2. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  3. Study on the relationship between speciation of heavy metals and their ecotoxicity. I. Toxicity of Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn in seawater to three marine algae in the presence of different complexation agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Manping; Wang, Juying; Bao, Junbo

    1992-09-01

    Heavy metal is a main pollutant in the marine ecosystem, so study on the effect of heavy metal on phytoplankton is important. Algae ( Chaetoceros sp., Dunaliella sp., Dicrateria zhanjiangenis Hu. var. sp.) were laboratory cultured to observe the effect of heavy metals on their growth. The effect of different metal ion concentration, the detoxication effect of complexation agents and the growth of algae in different media and different nutrition levels were studied to evaluate the effect of metal speciation. It is proved that trace amount of heavy metals can stimulate the growth of algae cells but that high concentration is lethal. The sequence of toxicity is Cd2+>Zn2+>Pb2+. In ordinary nutrition conditions, the detoxication sequence of complexation agents to Chaetoceros sp. is EDTA >sodium salicylate>sodium oxalate >sodium citrate>sulfanilic acid>O-phenanthroline. This is in good conformity with the stability constant sequence of these agents with copper and good evidence that toxicity of metal ion is related to its activity and not to its total concentration.

  4. Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lizotte, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 {mu}g C {center dot} {mu}g chl{sup {minus}1} {center dot} h{sup {minus}1} higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and {sup 14}C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and {sup 14}C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities.

  5. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution. PMID:23011851

  6. Selection of microalgae and cyanobacteria strains for bicarbonate-based integrated carbon capture and algae production system.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhanyou; Elloy, Farah; Xie, Yuxiao; Hu, Yucai; Chen, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Using microalgae to capture CO2 from flue gas is an ideal way to reduce CO2 emission, but this is challenged by the high cost of carbon capture and transportation. To address this problem, a bicarbonate-based integrated carbon capture and algae production system (BICCAPS) has been proposed, in which bicarbonate is used for algae culture, and the regenerated carbonate from this process can be used to capture more CO2. High-concentration bicarbonate is obligate for the BICCAPS. Thus, different strains of microalgae and cyanobacteria were tested in this study for their capability to grow in high-concentration NaHCO3. The highest NaHCO3 concentrations they are tolerant to were determined as 0.30 M for Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, 0.60 M for Cyanothece sp., 0.10 M for Chlorella sorokiniana, 0.60 M for Dunaliella salina, and 0.30 M for Dunaliella viridis and Dunaliella primolecta. In further study, biomass production from culture of D. primolecta in an Erlenmeyer flask with either 0.30 M NaHCO3 or 2 % CO2 bubbling was compared, and no significant difference was detected. This indicates BICCAPS can reach the same biomass productivity as regular CO2 bubbling culture, and it is promising for future application. PMID:24092450

  7. Morphology, ultrastructure and life cycle of Vitrella brassicaformis n. sp., n. gen., a novel chromerid from the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Oborník, Miroslav; Modrý, David; Lukeš, Martin; Cernotíková-Stříbrná, Eva; Cihlář, Jaromír; Tesařová, Martina; Kotabová, Eva; Vancová, Marie; Prášil, Ondřej; Lukeš, Julius

    2012-03-01

    Chromerida are photoautotrophic alveolates so far only isolated from corals in Australia. It has been shown that these secondary plastid-containing algae are closely related to apicomplexan parasites and share various morphological and molecular characters with both Apicomplexa and Dinophyta. So far, the only known representative of the phylum was Chromera velia. Here we provide a formal description of another chromerid, Vitrella brassicaformis gen. et sp. nov., complemented with a detailed study on its ultrastructure, allowing insight into its life cycle. The novel alga differs significantly from the related chromerid C. velia in life cycle, morphology as well as the plastid genome. Analysis of photosynthetic pigments on the other hand demonstrate that both chromerids lack chlorophyll c, the hallmark of phototrophic chromalveolates. Based on the relatively high divergence between C. velia and V. brassicaformis, we propose their classification into distinct families Chromeraceae and Vitrellaceae. Moreover, we predict a hidden and unexplored diversity of the chromerid algae. PMID:22055836

  8. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  9. Comparison of denitrification between Paracoccus sp. and Diaphorobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Srinandan S; Pande, Samay; Kapoor, Ashish; Nerurkar, Anuradha S

    2011-09-01

    Denitrification was compared between Paracoccus sp. and Diaphorobacter sp. in this study, both of which were isolated from activated sludge of a denitrifying reactor. Denitrification of both isolates showed contrasting patterns, where Diaphorobacter sp. showed accumulation of nitrite in the medium while Paracoccus sp. showed no accumulation. The nitrate reduction rate was 1.5 times more than the nitrite reduction in Diaphorobacter sp., as analyzed by the resting state denitrification kinetics. Increasing the nitrate concentration in the medium increased the nitrite accumulation in Diaphorobacter sp., but not in Paracoccus sp., indicating a branched electron transfer during denitrification. Diaphorobacter sp. was unable to denitrify efficiently at high nitrate concentrations from 1 M, but Paracoccus sp. could denitrify even up to 2 M nitrate. Paracoccus sp. was found to be an efficient denitrifier with insignificant amounts of nitrite accumulation, and it could also denitrify high amounts of nitrate up to 2 M. Efficient denitrification without accumulation of intermediates like nitrite is desirable in the removal of high nitrates from wastewaters. Paracoccus sp. is shown to suffice this demand and could be a potential organism to remove high nitrates effectively. PMID:21509603

  10. Antiviral property and mechanisms of a sulphated polysaccharide from the brown alga Sargassum patens against Herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Chiu, L C M; Ooi, V E C; Chan, P K S; Ang, P O

    2006-11-01

    A sulphated polysaccharide (SP-2a) from the brown alga Sargassum patens (Kütz.) Agardh (Sargassaceae) was found to significantly inhibit the in vitro replication of both the acyclovir (ACV)-sensitive and -resistant strains of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), in dose-dependent manners, with 50% inhibitions occurring with 1.5-5.3 microg/ml of the polysaccharide. SP-2a exhibited extracellular virucidal activity only against the ACV-sensitive strains, but not the resistant strain, at the concentration of 100 microg/ml. The strongest antiviral activities against the different strains of HSV-1 were observed when this polysaccharide was present during and after adsorption of the virus to host cells. The inhibitory effect of SP-2a on virus adsorption occurred dose-dependently in all the HSV-1 strains tested, and the adsorption of the ACV-resistant DM2.1 strain was reduced by 81.9% (relative to control) with 4 microg/ml of the polysaccharide. This study clearly demonstrated that the antiviral mode of action of SP-2a is mediated mainly by inhibiting virus attachment to host cells, and this sulphated polysaccharide might have different modes of action against the ACV-sensitive and -resistant strains of HSV-1. PMID:16427262

  11. Genomes and Virulence Factors of Novel Bacterial Pathogens Causing Bleaching Disease in the Marine Red Alga Delisea pulchra

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Neil; Case, Rebecca J.; Longford, Sharon R.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.; Steinberg, Peter D.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Thomas, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Nautella sp. R11, a member of the marine Roseobacter clade, causes a bleaching disease in the temperate-marine red macroalga, Delisea pulchra. To begin to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underpinning the ability of Nautella sp. R11 to colonize, invade and induce bleaching of D. pulchra, we sequenced and analyzed its genome. The genome encodes several factors such as adhesion mechanisms, systems for the transport of algal metabolites, enzymes that confer resistance to oxidative stress, cytolysins, and global regulatory mechanisms that may allow for the switch of Nautella sp. R11 to a pathogenic lifestyle. Many virulence effectors common in phytopathogenic bacteria are also found in the R11 genome, such as the plant hormone indole acetic acid, cellulose fibrils, succinoglycan and nodulation protein L. Comparative genomics with non-pathogenic Roseobacter strains and a newly identified pathogen, Phaeobacter sp. LSS9, revealed a patchy distribution of putative virulence factors in all genomes, but also led to the identification of a quorum sensing (QS) dependent transcriptional regulator that was unique to pathogenic Roseobacter strains. This observation supports the model that a combination of virulence factors and QS-dependent regulatory mechanisms enables indigenous members of the host alga's epiphytic microbial community to switch to a pathogenic lifestyle, especially under environmental conditions when innate host defence mechanisms are compromised. PMID:22162749

  12. Integrated ‘Omics’, Targeted Metabolite and Single-cell Analyses of Arctic Snow Algae Functionality and Adaptability

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Field, Katie; Benning, Liane G.

    2015-01-01

    Snow algae are poly-extremophilic microalgae and important primary colonizers and producers on glaciers and snow fields. Depending on their pigmentation they cause green or red mass blooms during the melt season. This decreases surface albedo and thus further enhances snow and ice melting. Although the phenomenon of snow algal blooms has been known for a long time, large aspects of their physiology and ecology sill remain cryptic. This study provides the first in-depth and multi-omics investigation of two very striking adjacent green and red snow fields on a glacier in Svalbard. We have assessed the algal community composition of green and red snow including their associated microbiota, i.e., bacteria and archaea, their metabolic profiles (targeted and non-targeted metabolites) on the bulk and single-cell level, and assessed the feedbacks between the algae and their physico-chemical environment including liquid water content, pH, albedo, and nutrient availability. We demonstrate that green and red snow clearly vary in their physico-chemical environment, their microbial community composition and their metabolic profiles. For the algae this likely reflects both different stages of their life cycles and their adaptation strategies. Green snow represents a wet, carbon and nutrient rich environment and is dominated by the algae Microglena sp. with a metabolic profile that is characterized by key metabolites involved in growth and proliferation. In contrast, the dry and nutrient poor red snow habitat is colonized by various Chloromonas species with a high abundance of storage and reserve metabolites likely to face upcoming severe conditions. Combining a multitude of techniques we demonstrate the power of such complementary approaches in elucidating the function and ecology of extremophiles such as green and red snow algal blooms, which play crucial roles in glacial ecosystems. PMID:26635781

  13. Population and community changes of attached algae to zinc stress alone and in combination with selected environmental variables

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Three experiments were performed along the New River, Virginia. Outdoor flow-through stream mesocosms were continuously supplied with natural river water, and chemical treatments were administered with peristaltic pumps. The response variable was biovolume of algae attached to glass-rod artificial substrates. The first experiment was performed in spring, summer, and fall, 1984. Algal communities were exposed to four zinc (Zn) treatments (Ambient, 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 mg Zn/l). Treatments as low as 0.05 mg Zn/l reduced abundance of diatoms characteristics of the control treatment and increased abundance of green and blue-green algae. A similarity index (SIMI) indicated that samples generally became less similar to control samples as treatment increased from 0.05 to 1.0 mg/l. Total biovolume responded later than individual taxa and sometimes failed to distinguish between treatments. Zinc bound to periphyton was more reliable than total Zn in water for identifying Zn treatments. The second experiment investigated factorial treatments of snail grazing (absent, 400 Mudalia sp/m) and Zn (ambient, 0.5 mg/l) on algal abundance. Zinc treatment inhibited all algal taxa regardless of snail treatment. Snail grazing reduced abundance of 5 of 10 diatom taxa, but low temperature may have reduced grazing rate so that these algal populations increased by the end of the experiment. A third experiment investigated change in algal biovolume due to factorial treatments of pH (6, ambient, 9) and Zn (ambient, 0.05 mg An/l). Added Zn and pH 6 treatments reduced abundance of some diatoms and a filamentous blue-green alga and increased abundance of other diatoms, green, and coccoid blue-green algae.

  14. Long- and short-term effects of smothering and burial by drill cuttings on calcareous algae in a static-renewal test.

    PubMed

    Reynier, Márcia V; Tâmega, Frederico T S; Daflon, Sarah D A; Santos, Maurício A B; Coutinho, Ricardo; Figueiredo, Marcia A O

    2015-07-01

    Discharge of drill cuttings into the ocean during drilling of offshore oil wells can impact benthic communities through an increase in the concentrations of suspended particles in the water column and sedimentation of particles on the seafloor around the drilling installation. The present study assessed effects of water-based drill cuttings, barite, bentonite, and natural sediments on shallow- and deep-water calcareous algae in short-term (30 d) and long-term (90 d) experiments, using 2 species from Peregrino's oil field at Campos Basin, Brazil: Mesophyllum engelhartii and Lithothamnion sp. The results were compared with the shallow-water species Lithothamnion crispatum. Smothering and burial exposures were simulated. Oxygen production and fluorescence readings were recorded. Although less productive, M. engelhartii was as sensitive to stress as Lithothamnion sp. Mesophyllum engelhartii was sensitive to smothering by drill cuttings, barite, and bentonite after 60 d of exposure and was similarly affected by natural sediments after 90 d. These results indicate that smothering by sediments caused physical effects that might be attributable to partial light attenuation and partial restriction on gas exchange but did not kill the calcareous algae in the long term. However, 1-mo burial by either natural sediments or drill cuttings was sufficient after 60 d for both species to reduce oxygen production, and the algae were completely dead under both sources of sediments. PMID:25689779

  15. Complete Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Microalga Trebouxiophyceae sp. Strain MX-AZ01 Isolated from a Highly Acidic Geothermal Lake

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-01-01

    We report the complete organelle genome sequences of Trebouxiophyceae sp. strain MX-AZ01, an acidophilic green microalga isolated from a geothermal field in Mexico. This eukaryote has the remarkable ability to thrive in a particular shallow lake with emerging hot springs at the bottom, extremely low pH, and toxic heavy metal concentrations. Trebouxiophyceae sp. MX-AZ01 represents one of few described photosynthetic eukaryotes living in such a hostile environment. The organelle genomes of Trebouxiophyceae sp. MX-AZ01 are remarkable. The plastid genome sequence currently presents the highest G+C content for a trebouxiophyte. The mitochondrial genome sequence is the largest reported to date for the Trebouxiophyceae class of green algae. The analysis of the genome sequences presented here provides insight into the evolution of organelle genomes of trebouxiophytes and green algae. PMID:23104370

  16. Comparison of the Photosynthetic Yield of Cyanobacteria and Green Algae: Different Methods Give Different Answers

    PubMed Central

    Schuurmans, R. Milou; van Alphen, Pascal; Schuurmans, J. Merijn; Matthijs, Hans C. P.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2015-01-01

    The societal importance of renewable carbon-based commodities and energy carriers has elicited a particular interest for high performance phototrophic microorganisms. Selection of optimal strains is often based on direct comparison under laboratory conditions of maximal growth rate or additional valued features such as lipid content. Instead of reporting growth rate in culture, estimation of photosynthetic efficiency (quantum yield of PSII) by pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorimetry is an often applied alternative method. Here we compared the quantum yield of PSII and the photonic yield on biomass for the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana 211-8K and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Our data demonstrate that the PAM technique inherently underestimates the photosynthetic efficiency of cyanobacteria by rendering a high F0 and a low FM, specifically after the commonly practiced dark pre-incubation before a yield measurement. Yet when comparing the calculated biomass yield on light in continuous culture experiments, we obtained nearly equal values for both species. Using mutants of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we analyzed the factors that compromise its PAM-based quantum yield measurements. We will discuss the role of dark respiratory activity, fluorescence emission from the phycobilisomes, and the Mehler-like reaction. Based on the above observations we recommend that PAM measurements in cyanobacteria are interpreted only qualitatively. PMID:26394153

  17. Effects of marine actinomycete on the removal of a toxicity alga Phaeocystis globose in eutrophication waters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Su; Peng, Yun; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Xu, Hong; Yu, Zhiming; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa blooms in eutrophication waters can cause severely damage in marine ecosystem and consequently influence human activities. This study investigated the effect and role of an algicidal actinomycete (Streptomyces sp. JS01) on the elimination process of P. globosa. JS01 supernatant could alter algal cell membrane permeability in 4 h when analyzed with flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were 7.2 times higher than that at 0 h following exposure to JS01 supernatant for 8 h, which indicated that algal cells suffered from oxidative damage. The Fv/Fm value which could reflect photosystem II (PS II) electron flow status also decreased. Real-time PCR showed that the expression of the photosynthesis related genes psbA and rbcS were suppressed by JS01 supernatant, which might induce damage to PS II. Our results demonstrated that JS01 supernatant can change algal membrane permeability in a short time and then affect photosynthesis process, which might block the PS II electron transport chain to produce excessive ROS. This experiment demonstrated that Streptomyces sp. JS01 could eliminate harmful algae in marine waters efficiently and may be function as a harmful algal bloom controller material. PMID:26042109

  18. Comparison of the Photosynthetic Yield of Cyanobacteria and Green Algae: Different Methods Give Different Answers.

    PubMed

    Schuurmans, R Milou; van Alphen, Pascal; Schuurmans, J Merijn; Matthijs, Hans C P; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2015-01-01

    The societal importance of renewable carbon-based commodities and energy carriers has elicited a particular interest for high performance phototrophic microorganisms. Selection of optimal strains is often based on direct comparison under laboratory conditions of maximal growth rate or additional valued features such as lipid content. Instead of reporting growth rate in culture, estimation of photosynthetic efficiency (quantum yield of PSII) by pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorimetry is an often applied alternative method. Here we compared the quantum yield of PSII and the photonic yield on biomass for the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana 211-8K and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Our data demonstrate that the PAM technique inherently underestimates the photosynthetic efficiency of cyanobacteria by rendering a high F0 and a low FM, specifically after the commonly practiced dark pre-incubation before a yield measurement. Yet when comparing the calculated biomass yield on light in continuous culture experiments, we obtained nearly equal values for both species. Using mutants of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we analyzed the factors that compromise its PAM-based quantum yield measurements. We will discuss the role of dark respiratory activity, fluorescence emission from the phycobilisomes, and the Mehler-like reaction. Based on the above observations we recommend that PAM measurements in cyanobacteria are interpreted only qualitatively. PMID:26394153

  19. Effects of marine actinomycete on the removal of a toxicity alga Phaeocystis globose in eutrophication waters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Su; Peng, Yun; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Xu, Hong; Yu, Zhiming; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa blooms in eutrophication waters can cause severely damage in marine ecosystem and consequently influence human activities. This study investigated the effect and role of an algicidal actinomycete (Streptomyces sp. JS01) on the elimination process of P. globosa. JS01 supernatant could alter algal cell membrane permeability in 4 h when analyzed with flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were 7.2 times higher than that at 0 h following exposure to JS01 supernatant for 8 h, which indicated that algal cells suffered from oxidative damage. The Fv/Fm value which could reflect photosystem II (PS II) electron flow status also decreased. Real-time PCR showed that the expression of the photosynthesis related genes psbA and rbcS were suppressed by JS01 supernatant, which might induce damage to PS II. Our results demonstrated that JS01 supernatant can change algal membrane permeability in a short time and then affect photosynthesis process, which might block the PS II electron transport chain to produce excessive ROS. This experiment demonstrated that Streptomyces sp. JS01 could eliminate harmful algae in marine waters efficiently and may be function as a harmful algal bloom controller material. PMID:26042109

  20. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Uses and restrictions. The color additive dried algae meal may be safely used in chicken feed in... color of chicken skin and eggs. (2) The quantity of the color additive incorporated in the feed is...

  1. Harmful algae blooms removal from fresh water with modified vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunguang; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Zhengyan; Wang, Xiangqin

    2014-01-01

    Vermiculite and vermiculite modified with hydrochloric acid were investigated to evaluate their flocculation efficiencies in freshwater containing harmful algae blooms (HABs) (Microcystis aeruginosa). Scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, converted fluorescence microscope, plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, and Zetasizer were used to study the flocculation mechanism of modified vermiculite. It was found that the vermiculite modified with hydrochloric acid could coagulate algae cells through charge neutralization, chemical bridging, and netting effect. The experimental results show that the efficiency of flocculation can be notably improved by modified vermiculite. Ninety-eight per cent of algae cells in algae solution could be removed within 10 min after the addition ofmodified vermiculite clay. The method that removal of HABs with modified vermiculite is economical with high efficiency, and more research is needed to assess their ecological impacts before using in practical application. PMID:24600873

  2. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY EXTRACTION OF MERCURY FROM GROUNDWATER IMMOBILIZED ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bio-Recovery Systems, Inc. conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to adsorb mercury from contamina...

  3. EXTRACTION OF SUGARS FROM ALGAE FOR DIRECT CONVERSION TO BUTANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We will have a complete full scale design at the end of this project including algae growth and butanol production. Further, the group will have a working prototype for display at the National Mall.

  4. Colourful Cultures: Classroom Experiments with the Unicellular Alga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delpech, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Describes an investigation into the photosynthetic potential of the different developmental stages of the green unicellular alga Haematococcus pluvialis. Reviews the biotechnological applications of astaxanthin, the red pigment which can be extracted from Haematococcus pluvialis. (Author/MM)

  5. [Parameter determination of algae growth based on ecological tank experiment].

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Ding, Ling; Gao, Guang

    2005-05-01

    A dynamic simulation experiment of algae in an ecological tank was performed at the Taihu Laboratory for Lake Ecosystem Research. During the experiment, water from Taihu Lake was infused into the ecological tank and samples were taken continually to observe algae growth under varying conditions, such as temperature, sunlight and nutrients. Based on the experiment, an algae growth model, considering nitrogen and phosphorus cycle, was developed by using the advanced PHREEQC model. After that, a detailed calibration and validation of parameters in the model were done on the basis of experimental results. The least square method was used to determine the optimal set of parameters. The calculated values of algae and nutrient concentrations show fairly satisfying fittness with measured data. PMID:16124474

  6. ENDOTOXINS, ALGAE AND 'LIMULUS' AMOEBOCYTE LYSATE TEST IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to determine the distribution of algae and bacteria, and investigate sources of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides) in drinking water. The field survey was performed on five drinking water systems located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania ...

  7. Application of synthetic biology in cyanobacteria and algae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Weiwen; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria and algae are becoming increasingly attractive cell factories for producing renewable biofuels and chemicals due to their ability to capture solar energy and CO2 and their relatively simple genetic background for genetic manipulation. Increasing research efforts from the synthetic biology approach have been made in recent years to modify cyanobacteria and algae for various biotechnological applications. In this article, we critically review recent progresses in developing genetic tools for characterizing or manipulating cyanobacteria and algae, the applications of genetically modified strains for synthesizing renewable products such as biofuels and chemicals. In addition, the emergent challenges in the development and application of synthetic biology for cyanobacteria and algae are also discussed. PMID:23049529

  8. ALGAE AND CRUSTACEANS AS INDICATORS OF BIOACTIVITY OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater (Selenastrum capricornutum) and estuarine (Skeketonema costatum) algae were exposed to liquid wastes from 10 industrial sites in laboratory bioassays. All wastes affected algal growth either by stimulation or by stimulation at low concentrations and inhibition at high ...

  9. Algae Reefs in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Numerous algae reefs are seen in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia (26.0S, 113.5E) especially in the southern portions of the bay. The south end is more saline because tidal flow in and out of the bay is restricted by sediment deposited at the north and central end of the bay opposite the mouth of the Wooramel River. This extremely arid region produces little sediment runoff so that the waters are very clear, saline and rich in algae.

  10. Photobiological hydrogen production in green algae and photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1986-01-01

    We have shown that, under appropriate physiological conditions, certain freshwater and marine green algae are capable of splitting water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen in a sustained steady-state reaction. In these algae, the gaseous-fuel-producing reaction can be driven by light throughout the visible portion of the solar emission spectrum, including the long wavelength (red) 700-nm region. No external energy sources are required.

  11. Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

    1980-05-16

    The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

  12. Melatonin as an antioxidant and its semi-lunar rhythm in green macroalga Ulva sp.

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Ofir; Haim, Abraham; Harel, Orna; Gerchman, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    The presence and role of melatonin in plants are still under debate owing to difficulties of identification and quantification. Accordingly, although it has been frequently proposed that melatonin acts as an antioxidant in phototrophic organisms, experimental data on its physiological role are scarce. This study describes the use of a rapid and simple new method for quantification of melatonin in the marine macroalga Ulva sp., organisms routinely exposed to tide-related environmental stresses and known for their high tolerance to abiotic conditions. The method was used here to show that exposure to oxidative stress-inducing environmental conditions (elevated temperature and heavy metals) induced a rise in melatonin level in the algae. Addition of exogenous melatonin alleviated the algae from cadmium-induced stress. Interestingly, although the algae were taken from a culture growing free floating and kept under constant photoperiod and water level, they exhibited a semi-lunar rhythm of melatonin levels that correlated with predicted spring tides. The correlation can probably be interpreted as reflecting preparation for predicted low tides, when the algae are exposed to increasing temperature, desiccation, and salinity, all known to induce oxidative stress. Given the simplicity of the described method it can easily be adapted for the study of melatonin in many other phototrophic organisms. These results provide, for the first time, experimental data that support both an antioxidant role for melatonin and its semi-lunar rhythm in macroalgae. PMID:21220782

  13. Study on algae removal by immobilized biosystem on sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong

    2006-10-01

    In this study, sponges were used to immobilize domesticated sludge microbes in a limited space, forming an immobilized biosystem capable of algae and microcystins removal. The removal effects on algae, microcystins and UV260 of this biosystem and the mechanism of algae removal were studied. The results showed that active sludge from sewage treatment plants was able to remove algae from a eutrophic lake’s water after 7 d of domestication. The removal efficiency for algae, organic matter and microcystins increased when the domesticated sludge was immobilized on sponges. When the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 5h, the removal rates of algae, microcystins and UV260 were 90%, 94.17% and 84%, respectively. The immobilized biosystem consisted mostly of bacteria, the Ciliata and Sarcodina protozoans and the Rotifer metazoans. Algal decomposition by zoogloea bacteria and preying by microcreatures were the two main modes of algal removal, which occurred in two steps: first, absorption by the zoogloea; second, decomposition by the zoogloea bacteria and the predacity of the microcreatures.

  14. Feeding preferences of mesograzers on aquacultured Gracilaria and sympatric algae.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Rivera, Edwin; Friedlander, Michael

    2011-12-21

    While large grazers can often be excluded effectively from algal aquaculture operations, smaller herbivores such as small crustaceans and gastropods may be more difficult to control. The susceptibility of three Gracilaria species to herbivores was evaluated in multiple-choice experiments with the amphipod Ampithoe ramondi and the crab Acanthonyx lunulatus. Both mesograzers are common along the Mediterranean coast of Israel. When given a choice, the amphipod preferred to consume Gracilaria lemaneiformis significantly more than either G. conferta or G. cornea. The crab, however, consumed equivalent amounts of G. lemaneiformis and G. conferta, but did not consume G. cornea. Organic content of these algae, an important feeding cue for some mesograzers, could not account for these differences. We further assessed the susceptibility of a candidate species for aquaculture, G. lemaneiformis, against local algae, including common epiphytes. When given a choice of four algae, amphipods preferred the green alga Ulva lactuca over Jania rubens. However, consumption of U. lactuca was equivalent to those of G. lemaneiformis and Padina pavonica. In contrast, the crab showed a marked and significant preference for G. lemaneiformis above any of the other three algae offered. Our results suggest that G. cornea is more resistant to herbivory from common mesograzers and that, contrary to expectations, mixed cultures or epiphyte growth on G. lemaneiformis cannot reduce damage to this commercially appealing alga if small herbivores are capable of recruiting into culture ponds. Mixed cultures may be beneficial when culturing other Gracilaria species. PMID:22711945

  15. Feeding preferences of mesograzers on aquacultured Gracilaria and sympatric algae

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Rivera, Edwin; Friedlander, Michael

    2011-01-01

    While large grazers can often be excluded effectively from algal aquaculture operations, smaller herbivores such as small crustaceans and gastropods may be more difficult to control. The susceptibility of three Gracilaria species to herbivores was evaluated in multiple-choice experiments with the amphipod Ampithoe ramondi and the crab Acanthonyx lunulatus. Both mesograzers are common along the Mediterranean coast of Israel. When given a choice, the amphipod preferred to consume Gracilaria lemaneiformis significantly more than either G. conferta or G. cornea. The crab, however, consumed equivalent amounts of G. lemaneiformis and G. conferta, but did not consume G. cornea. Organic content of these algae, an important feeding cue for some mesograzers, could not account for these differences. We further assessed the susceptibility of a candidate species for aquaculture, G. lemaneiformis, against local algae, including common epiphytes. When given a choice of four algae, amphipods preferred the green alga Ulva lactuca over Jania rubens. However, consumption of U. lactuca was equivalent to those of G. lemaneiformis and Padina pavonica. In contrast, the crab showed a marked and significant preference for G. lemaneiformis above any of the other three algae offered. Our results suggest that G. cornea is more resistant to herbivory from common mesograzers and that, contrary to expectations, mixed cultures or epiphyte growth on G. lemaneiformis cannot reduce damage to this commercially appealing alga if small herbivores are capable of recruiting into culture ponds. Mixed cultures may be beneficial when culturing other Gracilaria species. PMID:22711945

  16. An overview of algae biofuel production and potential environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Menetrez, Marc Y

    2012-07-01

    Algae are among the most potentially significant sources of sustainable biofuels in the future of renewable energy. A feedstock with virtually unlimited applicability, algae can metabolize various waste streams (e.g., municipal wastewater, carbon dioxide from industrial flue gas) and produce products with a wide variety of compositions and uses. These products include lipids, which can be processed into biodiesel; carbohydrates, which can be processed into ethanol; and proteins, which can be used for human and animal consumption. Algae are commonly genetically engineered to allow for advantageous process modification or optimization. However, issues remain regarding human exposure to algae-derived toxins, allergens, and carcinogens from both existing and genetically modified organisms (GMOs), as well as the overall environmental impact of GMOs. A literature review was performed to highlight issues related to the growth and use of algal products for generating biofuels. Human exposure and environmental impact issues are identified and discussed, as well as current research and development activities of academic, commercial, and governmental groups. It is hoped that the ideas contained in this paper will increase environmental awareness of issues surrounding the production of algae and will help the algae industry develop to its full potential. PMID:22681590

  17. Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Coutu, Sylvain; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Herbicide concentrations fluctuate widely in watercourses after crop applications and rain events. The level of concentrations in pulses can exceed the water chronic quality criteria. In the present study, we proposed modelling the effects of successive pulse exposure on algae. The deterministic model proposed is based on two parameters: (i) the typical growth rate of the algae, obtained by monitoring growth rates of several successive batch cultures in growth media, characterizing both the growth of the control and during the recovery periods; (ii) the growth rate of the algae exposed to pulses, determined from a dose-response curve obtained with a standard toxicity test. We focused on the herbicide isoproturon and on the freshwater alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus, and we validated the model prediction based on effect measured during five sequential pulse exposures in laboratory. The comparison between the laboratory and the modelled effects illustrated that the results yielded were consistent, making the model suitable for effect prediction of the herbicide photosystem II inhibitor isoproturon on the alga S. vacuolatus. More generally, modelling showed that both pulse duration and level of concentration play a crucial role. The application of the model to a real case demonstrated that both the highest peaks and the low peaks with a long duration affect principally the cell density inhibition of the alga S. vacuolatus. It is therefore essential to detect these characteristic pulses when monitoring of herbicide concentrations are conducted in rivers. PMID:25499055

  18. Extraction of mercury from ground-water using immobilized algae

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, N.P.

    1991-01-01

    Bio-recovery Systems Inc., conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to absorb mercury from contaminated groundwater in laboratory studies and pilot-scale field tests. Algae biomass was incorporated in a permeable polymeric matrix. The product, AlgaSORB, packed into absorption columns, exhibited excellent flow characteristics, and functioned as a 'biological' ion exchange resin. A sequence of eleven laboratory tests demonstrated the ability of the product to absorb mercury from groundwater that contained high levels of total dissolved solids and hard water components. However, use of a single AlgaSORB preparation yielded non-repeatable results with samples collected at different times of the year. The strategy of extracting the groundwater through two columns containing different times of the year. The strategy of extracting the groundwater through two columns containing different preparations of AlgaSORB was developed and proved successful in laboratory and pilot-scale field tests. Field test results indicate that AlgaSORB could be economically competitive with ion exchange resins for removal of mercury, with the advantage that hardness and other dissolved solids do not appear to compete with heavy metals for binding capacity. (Copyright (c) 1991--Air and Waste Management Association.)

  19. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    SciTech Connect

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on green fuels which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI's have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  20. Phosphorus-limited growth of a green alga and a blue-green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, D.S.; Brown, E.J.

    1981-12-01

    The phosphorus-limited growth kinetics of the chlorophyte Scenedesmus quadricauda and the cyanophyte Synechococcus Nageli were studied by using batch and continuous culturing techniques. The steady-state phosphate transport capability and the phosphorus storage capacity is higher in S. Nageli than in S. quadricauda. Synechococcus Nageli can also deplete phosphate to much lower levels than can S. quadricauda. These results, along with their morphological characteristics, were used to construct partial physiological profiles for each organism. The profiles indicate that this unicellular cyanophyte (cyanobacterium) is better suited for growth in phosphorus-limited oligotrophic niches than is this chlorophyte (green alga). (Refs. 44).