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Sample records for algaas barrier layer

  1. Deep level transient spectroscopy assessment of silicon contamination in AlGaAs layers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, E.; Sanchez, F.; Muñoz, E.; Gibart, P.; Powell, A.; Roberts, J. S.

    1995-08-01

    A systematic silicon contamination has been detected by deep level transient spectroscopy in undoped and n-type doped (Te, Se, Sn) AlGaAs layers, grown in two different metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy reactors. DX center generation by substitutional donors, with very specific capture and emission thermal barriers (fingerprints), is the key to unambiguously identifying their presence, with detection limits well below the standard secondary ion mass spectroscopy capability. We comment on the potential sources of Si contamination (most common in this epitaxial technique), and on the relevance of such contamination to interpreting correctly experimental data related to the microscopic structure of DX centers.

  2. Interfacial atomic composition and Schottky barrier heights at the Al/GaAs(001) interface

    SciTech Connect

    Dandrea, R.G.; Duke, C.B.

    1993-07-01

    The influence of different interfacial chemical compositions on the Schottky barrier heights across the Al/GaAs(001) interface is studied using first-principles local density functional calculations. The barrier heights are calculated for seven different interfacial chemical compositions, including the chemically abrupt As-terminated and Ga-terminated interfaces, and also several other interfaces related by Al{leftrightarrow}Ga place exchange or containing As antisites. We find p-type barrier heights {phi}p that vary by 0.4 eV, demonstrating a significant influence of the interface composition on the resulting barrier heights. The barrier height variation is explained by the different chemical bonding at the interface in the various cases. The metal induced gap states (MIGS) of two structures with different barrier heights are compared in order to demonstrate why such states do not result in barrier heights independent of interfacial chemical composition.

  3. DX center analysis in Sn-doped AlGaAs layer of double heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniewski, J.; Kaniewska, M.; Ždánský, K.

    1987-12-01

    Capacitance as well as photovoltage methods have been used to analyze deep centers in an n-type AlGaAs:Sn layer of double heterostructures. It is suggested that the trap with thermal activation energy equal to ΔE2=0.33±0.02 eV is associated with the L minimum of AlGaAs and could be interpreted as a DX center related to Sn. The observed changes of deep center concentration in double heterostructures are due to different Al contents within the depletion region.

  4. Recombination-current suppression in GaAs p-n junctions grown on AlGaAs buffer layers by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancour, D. P.; Melloch, M. R.; Pierret, R. F.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Klausmeier-Brown, M. E.; Kyono, C. S.

    1987-08-01

    n+pp+GaAs and n+pP+ GaAs/GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As mesa diodes have been fabricated from films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The diodes made from films employing an AlGaAs buffer layer show marked improvements (a factor of 5 reduction) in recombination current densities. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements moreover indicate that deep level concentrations are reduced by the AlGaAs buffer.

  5. Capture barrier of Sn-related DX centers in AlGaAs epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xifeng; Kang, Junyong; Zhan, Huahan; Huang, Qisheng; Wang, Zhanguo

    2000-11-01

    Thermal capture and emission processes of Sn-related DX centers in AlxGa1-xAs (x equals 0.26) were measured by a constant capacitance voltage transient in various temperatures. By employing a Laplace defect spectroscopic method, the non-exponential transients were decomposed into several discrete exponential components. The results shown that more exponential components appeared int he small emission rate region as capture period increased. This indicates that electrons preferentially fill shallow energy levels due to their lower capture barriers. Discrete exponential components of the capture process were identified and four of their barriers were preliminarily measured to be about 0.14, 0.15, 0.16, and 0.17 eV, respectively.

  6. GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells with indirect-gap AlGaAs barriers for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, T. Otto, L. M.; Elborg, M.; Jo, M.; Mano, T.; Kawazu, T.; Han, L.; Sakaki, H.

    2014-03-24

    We have fabricated GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) solar cells in which 3 nm-thick QWs and indirect-gap Al{sub 0.78}Ga{sub 0.22}As barriers are embedded, and we studied extraction processes of photogenerated carriers in this QW system. The photocurrent under 700 nm light illumination at voltages close to the open-circuit voltage shows only a small reduction, indicating that the carrier recombination inside QWs is largely suppressed. We attribute this result to an efficient extraction of electrons from the QWs through the X-valley of AlGaAs. The insertion of QWs is shown to be effective in extending the absorption wavelengths and in enhancing the photocurrent. The use of indirect-gap materials as barriers is found to enhance carrier extraction processes, and result in an improved performance of QW solar cells.

  7. Theoretical Study of the Effect of an AlGaAs Double Heterostructure on Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetector Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Ali F.; Smith, Arlynn W.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The impulse and square-wave input response of different GaAs metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector (MSM) designs are theoretically examined using a two dimensional drift- diffusion numerical calculation with a thermionic-field emission boundary condition model for the heterojunctions. The rise time and the fall time of the output signal current are calculated for a simple GaAs, epitaxially grown, MSM device as well as for various double-heterostructure barrier devices. The double heterostructure devices consist of an AlGaAs layer sandwiched between the top GaAs active, absorption layer and the bottom GaAs substrate. The effect of the depth of the AlGaAs layer on the speed and responsivity of the MSM devices is examined. It is found that there is an optimal depth, at fixed applied bias, of the AlGaAs layer within the structure that provides maximum responsivity at minimal compromise in speed.

  8. Multi-layer waste containment barrier

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Ann Marie; Gardner, Bradley M.; Nickelson, David F.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for constructing an underground containment barrier for containing an in-situ portion of earth. The apparatus includes an excavating device for simultaneously (i) excavating earthen material from beside the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming an open side trench defined by opposing earthen sidewalls, and (ii) excavating earthen material from beneath the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming a generally horizontal underground trench beneath the in-situ portion defined by opposing earthen sidewalls. The apparatus further includes a barrier-forming device attached to the excavating device for simultaneously forming a side barrier within the open trench and a generally horizontal, multi-layer barrier within the generally horizontal trench. The multi-layer barrier includes at least a first layer and a second layer.

  9. Method for forming a barrier layer

    DOEpatents

    Weihs, Timothy P.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  10. Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-09-12

    This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

  11. Identification of photoluminescence bands in AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs PHEMT heterostructures with donor-acceptor-doped barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyaev, D. V. Zhuravlev, K. S.; Bakarov, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.

    2015-02-15

    The photoluminescence of AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs pseudomorphic high-electron mobility transistor heterostructures with donor-acceptor-doped AlGaAs barriers is studied. It is found that the introduction of additional p{sup +}-doped AlGaAs layers into the design brings about the appearance of new bands in the photoluminescence spectra. These bands are identified as resulting from transitions (i) in donor-acceptor pairs in doped AlGaAs layers and (ii) between the conduction subband and acceptor levels in the undoped InGaAs quantum well.

  12. Efficient spin injection through a crystalline AlOx tunnel barrier prepared by the oxidation of an ultra-thin Al epitaxial layer on GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, N.; Munekata, H.

    2013-07-01

    We report that an ultra-thin, post-oxidized aluminum epilayer grown on the AlGaAs surface works as a high-quality tunnel barrier for spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal to a semiconductor. One of the key points of the present oxidation method is the formation of the crystalline AlOx template layer without oxidizing the AlGaAs region near the Al/AlGaAs interface. The oxidized Al layer is not amorphous but show well-defined single crystalline feature reminiscent of the spinel γ-AlOx phase. A spin-light emitting diode consisting of a Fe layer, a crystalline AlOx barrier layer, and an AlGaAs-InGaAs double hetero-structure has exhibited circularly polarized electroluminescence with circular polarization of PEL ˜ 0.145 at the remnant magnetization state of the Fe layer, indicating the relatively high spin injection efficiency (≡2PEL/PFe) of 0.63.

  13. Barrier layer technology for flexible displays

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, Gordon L.; Burrows, Paul E.; Williford, Ralph E.; Praino, Robert F.

    2005-05-01

    This chapter will briefly summarize the development of thin-film barrier layers in various applications, and more concisely describe the OLED vapor barrier technical requirements (Section 4.2). This is followed, in Section 4.3, by a brief summary of relevant experimental methods used to measure gas permeation in thin-films. Attempts are made to delineate the advantages and disadvantages of each measurement technique. In Section 4.4 we describe some of the historical analytical/modeling approaches that have been invoked to explain the measured analytical results, and discuss some of the more important shortcomings of those modeling concepts. This is followed in Section 4.5 by presentation of an approach suitable to describe gas diffusion in multilayer thin-film structures. Transient permeation measurements are used to extract physically reasonable values for the in-situ effective diffusivity and solubility of the various polymer and oxide layers, as well as estimates of defect size and spatial density consistent with those parameters. The implications of these results are that lag times for permeant breakthrough in multilayered barrier systems are extremely long and are likely to dominate many of the results reported to date, rather than the commonly measured steady state flux. These findings are then discussed in relation to practical OLED encapsulation in Section 4.6, along with the need for new techniques for further improving the barrier quality. Section 4.7 contains the conclusions of the paper.

  14. Alternative barrier layers for surface covers in dry climates

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Surface covers are one of the most widespread remediation and waste management options in all climates. Barrier layers to limit percolation through cover systems are principal features of engineered, multi-component cover designs. Conventional barrier layer components developed for humid climates have limitations in dry climates. One alternative barrier layer is a capillary barrier, which consists of a fine-over-coarse soil arrangement. The capacity of capillary barrier to laterally divert downward moving water is the key to their success. Another alternative is a dry barrier, in which atmospheric air is circulated through a coarse layer within the cover to remove water vapor. Incorporating a coarse layer which stores water for subsequent removal by air flow reduces the requirements for the air flow velocity and increases the applicability of the dry barrier.

  15. Efficient AlGaAs shallow-homojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R.P.; Fan, J.C.C.; Turner, G.W.; Chapman, R.L.; Pantano, J.V.

    1984-03-15

    Shallow-homojunction n/sup +//p/p/sup +/ solar cells with one-sun, AM1 conversion efficiencies as high as 12.9% have been fabricated in Al/sub 0.2/Ga/sub 0.8/As epitaxial layers grown by organometallic chemical vapor deposition on single-crystal GaAs substrates. For these cells, which have n/sup +/ layers thinned by anodic oxidation to about 500 A, the quantum efficiencies in the short-wavelength portion of the spectrum are as high as the best reported for AlGaAs cells with high band-gap window layers.

  16. Multilayer article having stabilized zirconia outer layer and chemical barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multilayer article includes a substrate that includes at least one of a ceramic compound and a Si-containing metal alloy. An outer layer includes stabilized zirconia. Intermediate layers are located between the outer layer and the substrate and include a mullite-containing layer and a chemical barrier layer. The mullite-containing layer includes 1) mullite or 2) mullite and an alkaline earth metal aluminosilicate. The chemical barrier layer is located between the mullite-containing layer and the outer layer. The chemical barrier layer includes at least one of mullite, hafnia, hafnium silicate and rare earth silicate (e.g., at least one of RE.sub.2 SiO.sub.5 and RE.sub.2 Si.sub.2 O.sub.7 where RE is Sc or Yb). The multilayer article is characterized by the combination of the chemical barrier layer and by its lack of a layer consisting essentially of barium strontium aluminosilicate between the mullite-containing layer and the chemical barrier layer. Such a barium strontium aluminosilicate layer may undesirably lead to the formation of a low melting glass or unnecessarily increase the layer thickness with concomitant reduced durability of the multilayer article. In particular, the chemical barrier layer may include at least one of hafnia, hafnium silicate and rare earth silicate.

  17. Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells incorporating a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells which incorporate a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer adjacent to the junction forming metal layer exhibit increased open circuit voltages compared to standard rectifying junction metal devices, i.e., Schottky barrier devices, and rectifying junction metal insulating silicon devices, i.e., MIS devices.

  18. Capillary barrier effect from underlying coarser soil layer

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C.; Anderson, C.E.

    1999-08-01

    Infiltration tests were conducted on soil columns of silty sand over pea gravel, concrete sand over pea gravel, and silty sand over concrete sand to investigate the capillary barrier effect of an underlying coarser soil layer. Water movement across the interface occurred when the suction head at the interface reached the breakthrough head of the coarser lower soil layer, defined as the suction head at which the coarser layer first became conductive, regardless of infiltration rate or the properties of the overlying finer soil layer. Thus, the coarser lower soil layer controlled breakthrough in this study. After infiltration was terminated, the suction head near the interface increased above the breakthrough head and the barrier was restored. The breakthrough head did not change substantially after eight test cycles of breakthrough and restoration for a capillary barrier with a pea gravel as the coarser lower soil layer. The barrier formed with the concrete sand as the coarser layer permitted breakthrough at a greater suction head than did the barrier with the pea gravel, indicating that the more uniform and coarse the lower soil layer is, the more effective the capillary barrier.

  19. Frequency stabilization of algaas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, M.; Tsuchida, H.; Tako, T.

    1982-01-01

    Performances of semiconductor lasers have been remarkably improved by the demand of the optical communications industry. Recently, a single longitudinal mode, CW oscillation at room temperature has been realized. The price of each laser has been reduced as low as $250. These lasers are mostly oscillated in the near-infrared, and the coherent lights of 0.83 micrometers and 1.3-1.6 micrometers in wavelengths are obtained by AlGaAs lasers and InGaAsP lasers, respectively. Since few number of other kind of lasers oscillates in these wavelength regions, these semiconductor lasers could be conveniently used not only in optical communications but in many fields of application, e.g., laser spectroscopy, optical pumping, frequency and length standards, laser radar, air-borne gyroscope, etc.

  20. Ocean barrier layers' effect on tropical cyclone intensification.

    PubMed

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R; Leung, L Ruby; Xu, Zhao; Li, Mingkui; Hsieh, Jen-Shan

    2012-09-01

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are "quasi-permanent" features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  1. Impact of Ocean Barrier Layers on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, K.; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, L.

    2012-12-01

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are "quasi-permanent" features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.;

  2. Silicon based substrate with environmental/ thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Nanottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  3. Silicon based substrate with environmental/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  4. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  5. Selective thermal terahertz emission from GaAs and AlGaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Požela, K. Širmulis, E.; Kašalynas, I.; Šilėnas, A.; Požela, J.; Jucienė, V.

    2014-09-01

    The selective thermally stimulated terahertz (THz) radiation emission from GaAs and AlGaAs alloys are experimentally observed at frequencies of coupled oscillations of free electron plasma and different branches of interface AlGaAs optical phonons. The effect of strong absorption of incident radiation with large oblique angle (26°) by heated GaAs and AlGaAs is revealed. The coherent THz radiation emission with the frequency of 7.6 THz from the heated high conductivity GaAs (n = 4 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) layer is observed. The results are highly relevant to application in optoelectronic THz devices.

  6. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  7. Foil fabrication and barrier layer application for monolithic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Glenn A. Clark, Curtis R.; Jue, J.-F.; Swank, W. David; Haggard, D.C.; Chapple, Michael D.; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2008-07-15

    This presentation provides details of recent UMo fuel developments efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory. Processing of monolithic fuel foil, the friction bonding process, and hot isostatic press (HIP) sample preparation will be presented. Details of the hot rolling, foil annealing, zirconium barrier-layer application to U10Mo fuel foils via the hot-rolling process and application of silicon rich aluminum interfacial-layers via a thermal spray process will be presented. (author)

  8. Super Gas Barrier Thin Films via Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Polyelectrolytes and Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priolo, Morgan; Gamboa, Daniel; Grunlan, Jaime

    2010-03-01

    Thin composite films of branched polyethylenimine (PEI), polyacrylic acid (PAA) and sodium montmorillonite clay (MMT) platelets were prepared using layer-by-layer assembly. Film thickness, mass deposited per layer, and barrier were shown to increase exponentially with the number of deposition cycles. After 32 layers (i.e., eight PEI/PAA/PEI/MMT quadlayers) are deposited, the resulting transparent film exhibits an oxygen transmission rate below the detection limit of commercial instrumentation (< 0.005 cm^3/m^2 . day). This level of oxygen barrier is believed to be due to a nano-brick wall microstructure comprised of exfoliated clay bricks in polymeric mortar, where the enhanced spacing between MMT layers, provided by PEI and PAA, creates channels perpendicular concentration gradient that delay the permeating molecule. These films are good candidates for flexible electronics, food, and pharmaceutical packaging due to their transparency, super gas barrier (that rivals SiOx) and lack of metal.

  9. Parametric study of unsaturated drainage layers in a capillary barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1999-12-01

    Unsaturated drainage layers (UDLs) have been demonstrated to greatly increase the lateral diversion capacity of capillary barriers. The inclusion of a UDL allows native soils suitable for vegetation growth to be used as the finer soil as lateral drainage properties of the layer no longer need to be considered. A comprehensive numerical study was conducted to investigate the influence of the interface slope and the UDL material on the system's ability to laterally divert downward moving moisture. A capillary barrier system with and without a UDL was simulated for 10 years using daily varying climatic data for three locations in the US. Three different sands were simulated as the UDL and were modeled at slopes of 5, 10, and 20%. The numerical results confirm that the inclusion of an unsaturated drainage layer at the fine/coarse interface of a capillary barrier can provide significant improvements in the performance of the cover system by laterally draining water. This improvement in performance may allow the system to be successfully implemented in climates wetter than previously were thought suitable. The diversion length (the distance water is diverted laterally with no downward flow through the fine/coarse interface) of a capillary barrier with a UDL was found to be proportional to the slope of the fine/coarse interface. In addition, a relationship between lateral diversion lengths in a capillary barrier and the UDL material was developed and found to be dependent on the unsaturated flow characteristics of the UDL. These relationships allow the performance of a variety capillary barrier UDL designs to be calculated knowing the behavior of one system for a given location.

  10. Effects of plasma spray parameters on two layer thermal barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1981-01-01

    The power level and the type of arc gas used during plasma spraying of a two layer thermal barrier system (TBS) were found to affect the life of the system. Life at 1095 C in a cyclic furnace test was improved by about 140 percent by increasing the power during plasma spray applications of the bond and thermal barrier coatings. This improvement is due to increases in the densities of the bond and thermal barrier coatings by 3 and 5 percent, respectively. These increases in densities are equivalent to about 45 and 30 percent reduction in mean porosities, respectively. The addition of hydrogen to the argon arc gas had the same effect as the reduction in power level and caused a reduction in TBS life.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition Films as Diffusion Barriers for Silver Artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, Amy; Breitung, Eric; Drayman-Weisser, Terry; Gates, Glenn; Rubloff, Gary W.; Phaneuf, Ray J.

    2012-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was investigated as a means to create transparent oxide diffusion barrier coatings to reduce the rate of tarnishing for silver objects in museum collections. Accelerated aging by heating various thicknesses (5 to 100nm) of ALD alumina (Al2O3) thin films on sterling and fine silver was used to determine the effectiveness of alumina as a barrier to silver oxidation. The effect of aging temperature on the thickness of the tarnish layer (Ag2S) created at the interface of the ALD coating and the bulk silver substrate was determined by reflectance spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectric Spectroscopy (XPS). Reflectance spectroscopy was an effective rapid screening tool to determine tarnishing rates and the coating's visual impact. X-Ray Photoelectric Spectroscopy (XPS), and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) analysis showed a phase transformation in the Ag2S tarnish layer at 177 C and saturation in the thickness of the silver sulfide layer, indicating possible self-passivation of the tarnish layer.

  12. Multilayer barrier films comprising nitrogen spacers between free-standing barrier layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, Jimmy Erik

    The air sensitivity of organic electronic devices has delayed the broad commercialization of the printed "plastics" electronics technology. The vacuum deposition methods used to fabricate multi-layers which fulfill the encapsulation requirements for plastic electronic devices are complex and expensive. Fully printed "plastic" electronics requires the development of encapsulation architectures which comprise solution deposited barriers and/or low-cost free-standing barrier films based on polymers, e.g. poly ethylene terephthalate (PET). One way to reach this goal is the insertion of contaminant-free (e.g. pure N2) gas-phase spacers between free-standing barrier films in a multilayer structure. The spacers themselves do not exhibit any barrier properties (diffusion of gas permeants in a gas phase is orders of magnitude faster than in a solid), but they delay the attainment of steady state. The spacer also reduces the chemical potential gradient across downstream barrier layers during the transient regime, reducing permeation rate to the device. Furthermore, if sorption is not fully equilibrated and introduces a kinetic barrier to transport, the additional sorption and desorption steps needed for permeant to reach the device may also slow the steady-state permeation rate. Encapsulation architectures utilizing both single-matrix (without nitrogen spacers) and multiple-matrix structures (with nitrogen spacers) were fabricated in this study, including Russian Doll structures utilizing pairs of free-standing barrier films and epoxy seals separated by nitrogen spacers. This structure enables the use of low-cost epoxy to attach two or more free-standing barrier films to a substrate with improved barrier performance. The performance of various Russian Doll encapsulations was evaluated with the calcium thin film optical transmission test, showing improved performance of the Russian doll configuration relative to a non-nested barrier/spacer architecture, and demonstrating that

  13. nBn and pBp infrared detectors with graded barrier layer, graded absorption layer, or chirped strained layer super lattice absorption layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An nBn detector is described where for some embodiments the barrier layer has a concentration gradient, for some embodiments the absorption layer has a concentration gradient, and for some embodiments the absorption layer is a chirped strained layer super lattice. The use of a graded barrier or absorption layer, or the use of a chirped strained layer super lattice for the absorption layer, allows for design of the energy bands so that the valence band may be aligned across the device. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  14. Single photon emission from impurity centers in AlGaAs epilayers on Ge and Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Minari, S.; Cavigli, L.; Sarti, F.; Abbarchi, M.; Accanto, N.; Munoz Matutano, G.; Vinattieri, A.; Gurioli, M.; Bietti, S.; Sanguinetti, S.

    2012-10-22

    We show that the epitaxial growth of thin layers of AlGaAs on Ge and Si substrates allows to obtain single photon sources by exploiting the sparse and unintentional contamination with acceptors of the AlGaAs. Very bright and sharp single photoluminescence lines are observed in confocal microscopy. These lines behave very much as single excitons in quantum dots, but their implementation is by far much easier, since it does not require 3D nucleation. The photon antibunching is demonstrated by time resolved Hanbury Brown and Twiss measurements.

  15. Multiexciton complex from extrinsic centers in AlGaAs epilayers on Ge and Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sarti, F.; Muñoz Matutano, G.; Bauer, D.; Dotti, N.; Vinattieri, A.; Gurioli, M.; Bietti, S.; Sanguinetti, S.; Isella, G.

    2013-12-14

    The multiexciton properties of extrinsic centers from AlGaAs layers on Ge and Si substrates are addressed. The two photon cascade is found both in steady state and in time resolved experiments. Polarization analysis of the photoluminescence provides clearcut attribution to neutral biexciton complexes. Our findings demonstrate the prospect of exploiting extrinsic centers for generating entangled photon pairs on a Si based device.

  16. Mixing Layer Excitation by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Richard; Little, Jesse

    2012-11-01

    The response of a mixing layer with velocity ratio 0.28 to perturbations near the high-speed side (U2=11 m/s, ReL = 0.26 × 106) of its origin from dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Both alternating current (ac) and nanosecond (ns) pulse driven plasma are investigated in an effort to clarify the mechanisms associated with each technique as well as the more general physics associated with flow control via momentum-based versus thermal actuation. Ac-DBD plasma actuators, which function through electrohydrodynamic effects, are found to generate an increase in mixing layer momentum thickness that is strongly dependent on forcing frequency. Results are qualitatively similar to previous archival literature on the topic employing oscillating flaps. Ns-DBD plasma, which is believed to function through thermal effects, has no measureable influence on the mixing layer profile at similar forcing conditions. In the context of previous archival literature, these results suggest different physical mechanisms govern active control via ac- and ns-DBD plasma actuation and more generally, momentum versus thermal perturbations. Further investigation of these phenomena will be provided through variation of the boundary/mixing layer properties and forcing parameters in the context of spatially and temporally resolved experimental data. Supported by: AFOSR and Raytheon Missile Systems.

  17. Anisotropic photoluminescence behaviour of vertical AlGaAs structures grown on gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeire, G.; Yu, Z. Q.; Vermaerke, F.; Buydens, L.; Van Daele, P.; Demeester, P.

    1992-11-01

    The formation of vertical AlGaAs quantum wells during MOVPE growth of AlGaAs layers on submicron gratings has been investigated. The influence of the growth temperature, growth velocity, V/III ratio and the overall Al content has been examined and explained using surface diffusion effects of the group III atoms (or reactant species). 77 K PL measurements show a polarization anisotropy and indicate lateral quantum confinement. Also the growth of QWWs on submicron gratings is reported, showing very large PL intensities and polarization anisotropy. Finally the realization of QWWs has been proposed by growing Al xGa 1- xAs/Al yGa 1- yAs QWs on gratings and based on the different surface mobilities of Ga and Al.

  18. Formation Mechanism of Barrier Layer in the Subtropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, S.; Oka, E.; Sato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Formation mechanism of barrier layers (BLs) in the subtropical Pacific was investigated by using Argo profiling float data and shipboard hydrographic section data. In this region, BLs were formed mainly in winter in association with the sea surface salinity (SSS) front, which was located on the equator side of the SSS maximum region. While BLs from gridded Argo data were broadly distributed, their distribution from raw Argo profiles was patchy and their temporal scale was shorter than 10 days. Formation mechanism of BLs was attributed to two processes: freshening near the sea surface and salinification in the subsurface. As for the former process, poleward Ekman advection of fresher water from the tropics across the SSS front was dominant, while the effect of precipitation was small. As for the latter process, inflow of high salinity water into mixed layers associated with the SSS front can contribute to the BL formation, but actually the core of subducted Tropical Water was too deep to affect salinity structure in the mixed layers across the seasonal thermocline. These features strongly suggest that tilting of the SSS front is essentially important for the BL formation in the subtropical Pacific. This tilting process can only occur where the contribution of horizontal SSS gradient to the horizontal density gradient is strong, and explains why spatial distribution of BLs corresponded to the SSS front. Seasonal variation of BLs corresponded well to that of mixed layer depth, indicating that the deeper mixed layers are before the BL formation, the thicker BLs are formed when the SSS front is tilted.

  19. Composition, microstructure, and surface barrier layer development during brine salting.

    PubMed

    Melilli, C; Carcò, D; Barbano, D M; Tumino, G; Carpino, S; Licitra, G

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the changes in chemical composition, porosity, and structure that occur at the surface of a block of brine-salted cheese and their relationship to the rate at which salt is taken up from the brine. To create a difference in composition, salt uptake, and barrier layer properties, identical blocks of Ragusano cheese were placed in saturated and 18% salt brine at 18 degrees C for 12 d. The overall moisture content and porosity decreased, whereas salt and salt in moisture content increased near the surface of blocks of brine-salted Ragusano cheese for all treatments. The general appearance of the microstructure of the surface of the blocks of brine-salted cheese was much more compact than the microstructure 1 mm inside the block at both brine concentrations. Large differences in porosity of the barrier layer were produced by brine-salting cheese in 18% vs. saturated brine, with cheese in saturated brine having much lower porosity at the surface and taking up much less salt during brining. The macro network of water channels within the microstructure of the cheese was less open near the surface of the block for cheese in both saturated and 18% brine after 4 d. However, no large differences in the size of the macro channels in the cheese structure due to the difference in brine concentration were observed by scanning electron microscopy. It is possible that the shrinkage of the much smaller pore structure within the casein matrix of the cheese is more important and will become more limiting to the rate of salt diffusion. Further microstructure work at higher resolution is needed to answer this question. The calculated decrease in porosity at the exterior 1-mm portion of the block was 50.8 and 29.2% for cheeses that had been in saturated vs. 18% brine for 12 d, respectively. The difference in brine concentration had a very large impact on the salt in moisture content of the cheese. The exterior of the cheese in 18% brine reached

  20. Barrier layer for a MCrAlY basecoat superalloy combination

    DOEpatents

    Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.; Vance, Steven J.

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component contains a substrate (22) such as a superalloy, a basecoat (24) of the type MCrAlY, and a continuous barrier layer (28) between the substrate and basecoat, where the barrier layer (28) is made of an alloy of (Re, Ta, Ru, Os)X, where X can be Ni, Co or their mixture, where the barrier layer is at least 2 micrometers thick and substantially prevents materials from both the basecoat and substrate from migrating through it.

  1. Tunable staged release of therapeutics from layer-by-layer coatings with clay interlayer barrier.

    PubMed

    Min, Jouha; Braatz, Richard D; Hammond, Paula T

    2014-03-01

    In developing new generations of coatings for medical devices and tissue engineering scaffolds, there is a need for thin coatings that provide controlled sequential release of multiple therapeutics while providing a tunable approach to time dependence and the potential for sequential or staged release. Herein, we demonstrate the ability to develop a self-assembled, polymer-based conformal coating, built by using a water-based layer-by-layer (LbL) approach, as a dual-purpose biomimetic implant surface that provides staggered and/or sustained release of an antibiotic followed by active growth factor for orthopedic implant applications. This multilayered coating consists of two parts: a base osteoinductive component containing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) beneath an antibacterial component containing gentamicin (GS). For the fabrication of truly stratified composite films with the customized release behavior, we present a new strategy-implementation of laponite clay barriers-that allows for a physical separation of the two components by controlling interlayer diffusion. The clay barriers in a single-component GS system effectively block diffusion-based release, leading to approximately 50% reduction in bolus doses and 10-fold increase in the release timescale. In a dual-therapeutic composite coating, the top GS component itself was found to be an effective physical barrier for the underlying rhBMP-2, leading to an order of magnitude increase in the release timescale compared to the single-component rhBMP-2 system. The introduction of a laponite interlayer barrier further enhanced the temporal separation between release of the two drugs, resulting in a more physiologically appropriate dosing of rhBMP-2. Both therapeutics released from the composite coating retained their efficacy over their established release timeframes. This new platform for multi-drug localized delivery can be easily fabricated, tuned, and translated to a variety of implant applications

  2. Effect of an Opaque Reflecting Layer on the Thermal Behavior of a Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spuckler, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    A parametric study using a two-flux approximation of the radiative transfer equation was performed to examine the effects of an opaque reflective layer on the thermal behavior of a typical semitransparent thermal barrier coating on an opaque substrate. Some ceramic materials are semitransparent in the wavelength ranges where thermal radiation is important. Even with an opaque layer on each side of the semitransparent thermal barrier coating, scattering and absorption can have an effect on the heat transfer. In this work, a thermal barrier coating that is semitransparent up to a wavelength of 5 micrometers is considered. Above 5 micrometers wavelength, the thermal barrier coating is opaque. The absorption and scattering coefficient of the thermal barrier was varied. The thermal behavior of the thermal barrier coating with an opaque reflective layer is compared to a thermal barrier coating without the reflective layer. For a thicker thermal barrier coating with lower convective loading, which would be typical of a combustor liner, a reflective layer can significantly decrease the temperature in the thermal barrier coating and substrate if the scattering is weak or moderate and for strong scattering if the absorption is large. The layer without the reflective coating can be about as effective as the layer with the reflective coating if the absorption is small and the scattering strong. For low absorption, some temperatures in the thermal barrier coating system can be slightly higher with the reflective layer. For a thin thermal barrier coating with high convective loading, which would be typical of a blade or vane that sees the hot sections of the combustor, the reflective layer is not as effective. The reflective layer reduces the surface temperature of the reflective layer for all conditions considered. For weak and moderate scattering, the temperature of the TBC-substrate interface is reduced but for strong scattering, the temperature of the substrate is increased

  3. Monolithic AlGaAs second-harmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gili, V. F.; Carletti, L.; Locatelli, A.; Rocco, D.; Finazzi, M.; Ghirardini, L.; Favero, I.; Gomez, C.; Lemaître, A.; Celebrano, M.; De Angelis, C.; Leo, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate monolithic aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) optical anoantennas. Using a selective oxidation technique, we fabricate such epitaxial semiconductor nanoparticles on an aluminum oxide substrate. Second harmonic generation from an AlGaAs nanocylinder of height h=400 nm and varying radius pumped with femtosecond pulses delivered at 1554-nm wavelength has been measured, revealing a peak conversion efficiency exceeding 10-5 for nanocylinders with an otpimized geometry.

  4. Monolithic AlGaAs second-harmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Gili, V F; Carletti, L; Locatelli, A; Rocco, D; Finazzi, M; Ghirardini, L; Favero, I; Gomez, C; Lemaître, A; Celebrano, M; De Angelis, C; Leo, G

    2016-07-11

    We demonstrate monolithic aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) optical nanoantennas. Using a selective oxidation technique, we fabricated epitaxial semiconductor nanocylinders on an aluminum oxide substrate. Second harmonic generation from AlGaAs nanocylinders of 400 nm height and varying radius pumped with femtosecond pulses delivered at 1554-nm wavelength has been measured, revealing a peak conversion efficiency exceeding 10-5 for nanocylinders with an optimized geometry. PMID:27410864

  5. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    PubMed

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  6. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    PubMed

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  7. Adhesion and reliability of copper interconnects with Ta and TaN barrier layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Michael; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Krishna, Nety; Hashim, Imran

    2000-01-01

    With the advent of copper metallization in interconnect structures, new barrier layers are required to prevent copper diffusion into adjacent dielectrics and the underlying silicon. The barrier must also provide adequate adhesion to both the dielectric and copper. While Ta and TaN barrier layers have been incorporated for these purposes in copper metallization schemes, little quantitative data exist on their adhesive properties. In this study, the critical interface fracture energy and the subcritical debonding behavior of ion-metal-plasma sputtered Ta and TaN barrier layers in Cu interconnect structures were investigated. Specifically, the effects of interfacial chemistry, Cu layer thickness, and oxide type were examined. Behavior is rationalized in terms of relevant reactions at the barrier/dielectric interface and plasticity in adjacent metal layers. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society.

  8. Tunable Staged Release of Therapeutics from Layer-by-Layer Coatings with Clay Interlayer Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jouha; Braatz, Richard D.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    In developing new generations of coatings for medical devices and tissue engineering scaffolds, there is a need for thin coatings that provide controlled sequential release of multiple therapeutics while providing a tunable approach to time dependence and the potential for sequential or staged release. Herein, we demonstrate the ability to develop a self-assembled, polymer-based conformal coating, built by using a water-based layer-by-layer (LbL) approach, as a dual-purpose biomimetic implant surface that provides staggered and/or sustained release of an antibiotic followed by active growth factor for orthopedic implant applications. This multilayered coating consists of two parts: a base osteoinductive component containing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) beneath an antibacterial component containing gentamicin (GS). For the fabrication of truly stratified composite films with the customized release behavior, we present a new strategy—implementation of laponite clay barriers—that allows for a physical separation of the two components by controlling interlayer diffusion. The clay barriers in a single-component GS system effectively block diffusion-based release, leading to approximately 50% reduction in bolus doses and 10-fold increase in the release timescale. In a dual-therapeutic composite coating, the top GS component itself was found to be an effective physical barrier for the underlying rhBMP-2, leading to an order of magnitude increase in the release timescale compared to the single-component rhBMP-2 system. The introduction of a laponite interlayer barrier further enhanced the temporal separation between release of the two drugs, resulting in a more physiologically appropriate dosing of rhBMP-2. Both therapeutics released from the composite coating retained their efficacy over their established release timeframes. This new platform for multi-drug localized delivery can be easily fabricated, tuned, and translated to a variety of implant

  9. THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, K V

    2013-06-30

    The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm{sup -1} in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm{sup -1}, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers. (lasers)

  10. Low resistance barrier layer for isolating, adhering, and passivating copper metal in semiconductor fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Weihs, Timothy P.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  11. Group-III nitride based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with barrier/spacer layer

    DOEpatents

    Chavarkar, Prashant; Smorchkova, Ioulia P.; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh; Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Wu, Yifeng

    2005-02-01

    A Group III nitride based high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) is disclosed that provides improved high frequency performance. One embodiment of the HEMT comprises a GaN buffer layer, with an Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N (y=1 or y 1) layer on the GaN buffer layer. An Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5) barrier layer on to the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer, opposite the GaN buffer layer, Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer having a higher Al concentration than that of the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. A preferred Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer has y=1 or y.about.1 and a preferred Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer has 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. A 2DEG forms at the interface between the GaN buffer layer and the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer. Respective source, drain and gate contacts are formed on the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. The HEMT can also comprising a substrate adjacent to the buffer layer, opposite the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer and a nucleation layer between the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N buffer layer and the substrate.

  12. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate environmental/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  13. Wavevector filtering through single-layer and bilayer graphene with magnetic barrier structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masir, M. Ramezani; Vasilopoulos, P.; Peeters, F. M.

    2008-12-01

    We show that the angular range of the transmission through magnetic barrier structures can be efficiently controlled in single-layer and bilayer graphenes and this renders the structure's efficient wavevector filters. As the number of magnetic barriers increases, this range shrinks, the gaps in the transmission versus energy become wider, and the conductance oscillates with the Fermi energy.

  14. Functional barrier in two-layer recycled PP films for food packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfato, P.; Di Maio, L.; Milana, M. R.; Feliciani, R.; Denaro, M.; Incarnato, L.

    2014-05-01

    A preliminary study on bi-layer virgin/contaminated polypropylene co-extruded films was performed in order to evaluate the possibility to realize an effective functional barrier in PP-based multi-layer systems. In particular, the specific migration in 10% v/v aqueous ethanol of two surrogate contaminants (phenyl-cyclohexane and benzophenone) contained in the contaminated layer across the PP functional barrier was measured at different times and the results were compared with those obtained from a contaminated mono-layer polypropylene film. Moreover, the thermal and mechanical performances of the produced films were investigated.

  15. Co-Rolled U10Mo/Zirconium-Barrier-Layer Monolithic Fuel Foil Fabrication Process

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Moore; M. C. Marshall

    2010-01-01

    Integral to the current UMo fuel foil processing scheme being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the incorporation of a zirconium barrier layer for the purpose of controlling UMo-Al interdiffusion at the fuel-meat/cladding interface. A hot “co-rolling” process is employed to establish a ~25-µm-thick zirconium barrier layer on each face of the ~0.3-mm-thick U10Mo fuel foil.

  16. Graded-bandgap AlGaAs solar cells for AlGaAs/Ge cascade cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmons, M. L.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Colpitts, T. S.; Hills, J. S.; Hutchby, J. A.; Iles, P. A.; Chu, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Some p/n graded-bandgap Al(x)Ga(1-x)As solar cells were fabricated and show AMO conversion efficiencies in excess of 15 percent without antireflection (AR) coatings. The emitters of these cells are graded between 0.008 is less than or equal to x is less than or equal to 0.02 during growth of 0.25 to 0.30 micron thick layers. The keys to achieving this performance were careful selection of organometallic sources and scrubbing oxygen and water vapor from the AsH3 source. Source selection and growth were optimized using time-resolved photoluminescence. Preliminary radiation-resistance measurements show AlGaAs cells degraded less than GaAs cells at high 1 MeV electron fluences, and AlGaAs cells grown on GaAs and Ge substrates degrade comparably.

  17. Convective initiation sensitivity to the presence of an oceanic barrier layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Schmidt, J.; Flatau, M. K.; Richman, J. G.; Jensen, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign reveal the formation of an oceanic barrier layer after the passage of Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) events. The motivation for the work stems from the CINDY/DYNAMO hypothesis III which states: "The barrier-layer, wind- and shear-driven mixing, shallow thermocline, and mixing-layer entrainment all play essential roles in the MJO initiation over the Indian Ocean by controlling the upper-ocean heat content and sea surface temperature, and thereby surface flux feedback". An idealized Coupled Ocean/Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) framework is used to study the sensitivity of the barrier layer influence on the transition of post MJO dry phase to the pre-MJO moist phase. We will discuss results from the idealized coupled simulations that are initialized either with or without the barrier layer. The sensitivity of the atmospheric boundary moisture recovery due to the presence of barrier layer as well as the sensitivity to the convective initiation will be presented.

  18. Deviations from Electroneutrality in Membrane Barrier Layers: A Possible Mechanism Underlying High Salt Rejections.

    PubMed

    Yaroshchuk, Andriy; Zhu, Yan; Bondarenko, Mykola; Bruening, Merlin L

    2016-03-22

    Reverse osmosis and nanofiltration (NF) employ composite membranes whose ultrathin barrier layers are significantly more permeable to water than to salts. Although solution-diffusion models of salt transport through barrier layers typically assume ubiquitous electroneutrality, in the case of ultrathin selective skins and low ion partition coefficients, space-charge regions may occupy a significant fraction of the membrane barrier layer. This work investigates the implications of these deviations from electroneutrality on salt transport. Both immobile external surface charge and unequal cation and anion solvation energies in the barrier layer lead to regions with excess mobile charge, and the size of these regions increases with decreasing values of either feed concentrations or ion partition coefficients. Moreover, the low concentration of the more excluded ion in the space-charge region can greatly increase resistance to salt transport to enhance salt rejection during NF. These effects are especially pronounced for membranes with a fixed external surface charge density whose sign is the same as that of the more excluded ion in a salt. Because of the space-charge regions, the barrier-layer resistance to salt transport initially rises rapidly with increasing barrier thickness and then plateaus or even declines within a certain thickness range. This trend in resistance implies that thin, defect-free barrier layers will exhibit higher salt rejections than thicker layers during NF at a fixed transmembrane pressure. Deviations from electroneutrality are consistent with both changes in NF salt rejections that occur upon changing the sign of the membrane fixed external surface charge, and CaCl2 rejections that in some cases may first decrease, then increase and then decrease again with increasing CaCl2 concentrations in NF feed solutions. PMID:26894470

  19. Fabrication of Multilayer Barrier Layer Capacitors with Semiconducting (Ba, Sr)TiO3 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tatsuhiko; Tashiro, Shinjiro; Igarashi, Hideji

    1993-09-01

    Multilayer barrier layer capacitors were successfully fabricated by utilizing potential barriers at grain boundaries of semiconducting (Ba,Sr)TiO3 ceramics in the temperature region above the Curie point of -140°C. A small amount of Mn improved the dissipation factor and temperature dependence of permittivity in the temperature region from -30°C to 100°C. Multilayer barrier layer capacitors were composed of 10 layers having 80-μm thickness per layer. Resistivity above 1010 Ω\\cdotcm was attained at room temperature, and relative permittivities above 5500 and dissipation factors less than 2% were obtained in the temperature region from -30°C to 100°C.

  20. On the hydro-dispersive equivalence between multi-layered mineral barriers.

    PubMed

    Guyonnet, D; Perrochet, P; Côme, B; Seguin, J J; Parriaux, A

    2001-10-01

    In the context of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste disposal, the notion of "equivalence" between different barrier designs appears in regulatory documents from several industrialized countries. While in the past, equivalence has been thought of mainly in terms of contaminant travel times, in recent years it has been defined more in terms of the magnitude of a disposal site's potential impact on groundwater resources. This paper presents some original analytical solutions to the problem of contaminant migration through a multi-layered mineral barrier. The solutions account for the two major mechanisms of subsurface contaminant migration, namely, advection and diffusion-dispersion. An example application using the proposed solutions and a numerical model illustrates how one multi-layered mineral barrier can be considered superior to another from a strictly hydro-dispersive viewpoint. The influence of partial saturation of the mineral barrier is investigated using a numerical solution to the Richards equation for unsaturated flow. It is emphasized that conclusions relative to the superiority of one multi-layered barrier, with respect to another, should not only consider hydro-dispersive aspects, but also other processes such as the mechanical and chemical evolutions of the different barrier components. Although such phenomena are poorly addressed by existing models, failure to take them into account, at least in a qualitative fashion, may lead to unconservative conclusions with respect to barrier equivalence.

  1. Transparent Conductors and Barrier Layers for Thin Film Solar Cells:

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R. G.; Broomhall-Dillard, R.; Liu, X.; Pang, D.; Barton, J.

    2001-12-01

    This report describes the research undertaken to increase the efficiency of thin-film solar cells based on amorphous silicon in the so-called''superstrate structure'' (glass front surface/transparent electrically conductive oxide (TCO)/pin amorphous silicon/metal back electrode). The TCO layer must meet many requirements: high optical transparency in the wavelength region from about 350 to 900 nm, low electrical sheet resistance, stability during handling and deposition of the subsequent layers and during use, a textured (rough) surface to enhance optical absorption of red and near-infrared light, and low-resistance electrical contact to the amorphous silicon p-layer. Fluorine-doped tin oxide has been the TCO used in most commercial superstrate amorphous silicon cells. Fluorine-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:F) was later shown to be even more transparent than fluorine-doped tin oxide, as well as being more resistant to the strongly reducing conditions encountered during the deposition of amorphous silicon. Solar cells based on ZnO:F showed the expected higher currents, but the fill factors were lower than standard cells grown on tin oxide, resulting in no consistent improvement in efficiency. This problem was recently mitigated by using a new proprietary p/buffer layer combination developed at BP Solar.

  2. The 1.1 micrometer and visible emission semiconductor diode lasers. [(AlGa)As lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Nuese, C. J.; Kressel, H.

    1978-01-01

    In (AlGa)As, the first of three alloy systems studied, Continuous Wave (CW) operation was obtained at room temperature at a wavelength as low as 7260 A. Reliability in this system was studied in the incoherent mode. Zinc doped devices had significant degradation, whereas Ge or Ge plus Zi doped devices had none. The Al2O3 facet coatings were shown to significantly reduce facet deterioration in all types of lasers, longer wavelength units of that type having accumulated (at the time of writing) 22,000 hours with little if any degradation. A CL study of thin (AlGa)As layers revealed micro fluctuation in composition. A macro-scale fluctuation was observed by electroreflectance. An experimental and theoretical study of the effect of stripe width on the threshold current was carried out. Emission below 7000 A was obtained in VPE grown Ga(AsP) (In,Ga)P with CW operation at 10 C. Lasers and LED's were made by LPE in (InGa) (AsP). Laser thresholds of 5 kA/cm2 were obtained, while LED efficiences were on the order of 2%. Incoherent life test over 6000 hours showed no degradation.

  3. Ultrathin cobalt-alloyed barrier layers for copper metallization by a new seeding and electroless-deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sung-Te; Liu, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Giin-Shan

    2015-11-01

    Pioneering activation-seeding processes grow catalytic particles with sizes exceeding 10 nm due to agglomeration, and thus are unable to act as a template for electroless deposition of a barrier layer with a thickness of 10 nm or less, which is desperately needed for the incoming ULSI copper interconnecting technology. In this work, the capacity of a seeding process to grow a continuous Co-P barrier layer of 8-nm thickness on thermally oxidized SiO2 layers using electroless deposition will be demonstrated. The Co-P barrier layer works effectively in retarding (a) Cu agglomeration and (b) Cu diffusion into the dielectric layer subjected to thermal annealing. Evidently, thermal stability of the Cu film on SiO2 is markedly strengthened by interposing the 8-nm-thick barrier layer. The mechanism of the interposed barrier layer in enhancing thermal stability of the metallization layer is currently under investigation.

  4. Barrier layers against oxygen transmission on the basis of electron beam cured methacrylated gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherzer, Tom

    1997-08-01

    The development of barrier layers against oxygen transmission on the basis of radiation-curable methacrylated gelatin will be reported. The electron beam cured gelatin coatings show an extremely low oxygen permeability and a high resistance against boiling water. Moreover, the methacrylated gelatins possess good adhesion characteristics. Therefore, they are suited as barrier adhesives in laminates for food packaging applications. If substrate foils from biodegradable polymers are used, the development of completely biodegradable packaging materials seems to be possible.

  5. Shape control of AlGaAs selective oxidation by intermixing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gi, Tetsu; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Shape control of AlGaAs selective oxidation regions by heterointerface intermixing was investigated. The oxidation rate dependence on the intermixing conditions was characterized. Under 880 °C with three hours of intermixing, the oxidation rate was reduced to half that of the usual oxidation without intermixing. The thicknesses of a GaAs capping layer and a deposited SiO2 layer affected the oxidation rate. A detailed analysis of the oxidation after intermixing was carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) measurement. On the basis of the oxidation characteristics with intermixing, in-plane shape control was demonstrated. This result will be helpful in the fabrication of complicated device shapes.

  6. Confinement of electromigration induced void propagation in Cu interconnect by a buried Ta diffusion barrier layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M. Y.; Tu, K. N.; Vairagar, A. V.; Mhaisalkar, S. G.; Krishnamoorthy, Ahila

    2005-12-01

    Direct observation, by means of in situ scanning electron microscopy, of void heterogeneous nucleation and migration controlled electromigration failure mechanism in Cu dual damascene interconnect structures has been recently reported [A. V. Vairagar, S. G. Mhaisalkar, A. Krishnamoorthy, K. N. Tu, A. M. Gusak, M. A. Meyer, and E. Zschech, Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 2502 (2004)] In the present study, a dual damascene structure with an additional 25nm Ta diffusion barrier embedded into the upper Cu layer was fabricated. This thin layer of diffusion barrier blocked voids from propagating into the via, thus eliminating the previously reported failure mechanism. With this structure, a lifetime improvement of at least 40 times was achieved. Analysis on failed samples suggested that failures in samples with the embedded Ta barrier layer occurred at the bottom of the via, which were caused by void migration along the bottom of the Cu lines.

  7. Two-layer thermal barrier coating for turbine airfoils - furnace and burner rig test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, two-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system was developed which has the potential for protecting high temperature air-cooled gas turbine components. Of those coatings initially examined, the most promising system consisted of a Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.6Y (in wt%) thermal barrier coating (about 0.005 to 0.010 cm thick) and a ZrO2-12Y2O3 (in wt%) thermal barrier coating (about 0.025 to 0.064 cm thick). This thermal barrier substantially lowered the metal temperature of an air-cooled airfoil. The coating withstood 3,200 cycles (80 sec at 1,280 C surface temperature) and 275 cycles (1 hr at 1,490 C surface temperature) without cracking or spalling. No separation of the thermal barrier from the bond coating or the bond coating from the substrate was observed.

  8. Investigation of Diffusion Barrier Layers for Bi-Doped Mg2(Si,Ge) Thermoelectric Legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahoveanu, Codrin; Laversenne, Laetitia; de Vaulx, Cédric; Bès, Alexandre; Azzouz, Kamel; Lacoste, Ana

    2016-11-01

    The performance of thermoelectric (TE) modules is governed not only by the thermoelectric materials whose properties are capitalized, but also on the quality of the electrical contacts which are ubiquitous in the design of the device. To ensure the necessary stability of the interfaces between the TE materials and the electrodes, diffusion barriers are generally used. In this study, attempts are presented in finding diffusion barriers that would be suitable for Mg2(Si,Ge) TE materials. These involved the deposition by microwave plasma-assisted co-sputtering of intermediate gradient layers starting from Mg and Si, ending up with a Ni layer, or the deposition of metallic layers (Ti, Cr, W and Ta). The effectiveness of the deposited layers as diffusion barriers is assessed after the legs were subjected to a brazing process, with the results favoring the use of gradient layers with a thick Ni layer and metallic layers based on Ta and Cr, despite some adherence issues for the latter.

  9. Investigation of Diffusion Barrier Layers for Bi-Doped Mg2(Si,Ge) Thermoelectric Legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahoveanu, Codrin; Laversenne, Laetitia; de Vaulx, Cédric; Bès, Alexandre; Azzouz, Kamel; Lacoste, Ana

    2016-08-01

    The performance of thermoelectric (TE) modules is governed not only by the thermoelectric materials whose properties are capitalized, but also on the quality of the electrical contacts which are ubiquitous in the design of the device. To ensure the necessary stability of the interfaces between the TE materials and the electrodes, diffusion barriers are generally used. In this study, attempts are presented in finding diffusion barriers that would be suitable for Mg2(Si,Ge) TE materials. These involved the deposition by microwave plasma-assisted co-sputtering of intermediate gradient layers starting from Mg and Si, ending up with a Ni layer, or the deposition of metallic layers (Ti, Cr, W and Ta). The effectiveness of the deposited layers as diffusion barriers is assessed after the legs were subjected to a brazing process, with the results favoring the use of gradient layers with a thick Ni layer and metallic layers based on Ta and Cr, despite some adherence issues for the latter.

  10. Switching Energy Barrier and Current Reduction in MTJs with Composite Free Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Makarov, Alexander; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the properties of a penta-layer magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with a composite soft layer by exhaustive micromagnetic simulations. The structure CoFe/spacer (1nm)/Py (4nm)/spacer (1nm)/ CoFe (Py is Ni81Fe19) with an elliptical cross-section (major axes 90nm and 35nm, correspondingly) is considered. The system with the composite soft layer is obtained by removing a central stripe of 5nm width from the monolithic free layer. The MTJ with a composite free layer switches two to three times faster than the one with a monolithic layer [1]. We have found that in the MTJ structure with the composite layer the switching energy barrier is decreased and becomes equal to the shape anisotropy energy barrier responsible for thermal stability. This results in a switching current density reduction. The physical reasons for the switching energy barrier reduction are discussed.[4pt] [1] A. Makarov et al., Phys. Status Solidi RRL 5, No. 12, 420-422 (2011).

  11. Micromagnetic analysis of Heusler alloy-based perpendicular double barrier synthetic antiferromagnetic free layer MTJs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bahniman; Dwivedi, Kshitij

    2015-07-01

    We investigate spin transfer torque switching in a perpendicular double barrier synthetic antiferromagnetic free layer MTJ stack using micromagnetic simulations. For the material used in free layers, we use two different Cobalt-based Heusler alloys and compare their performance on the basis of switching speed, thermal stability and Tunnel magnetoresistance. We show that for Heusler alloys switching from one state to other is significantly faster but they suffer from the drawback of low thermal stability.

  12. High-flux Thin-film Nanofibrous Composite Ultrafiltration Membranes Containing Cellulose Barrier Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Yoon, K; Rong, L; Mao, Y; Mo, Z; Fang, D; Hollander, Z; Gaiteri, J; Hsiao , B; Chu, B

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of thin-film nanofibrous composite (TFNC) membrane consisting of a cellulose barrier layer, a nanofibrous mid-layer scaffold, and a melt-blown non-woven substrate was successfully fabricated and tested as an ultrafiltration (UF) filter to separate an emulsified oil and water mixture, a model bilge water for on-board ship bilge water purification. Two ionic liquids: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, were chosen as the solvent to dissolve cellulose under mild conditions. The regenerated cellulose barrier layer exhibited less crystallinity (determined by wide-angle X-ray diffraction, WAXD) than the original cotton linter pulps, but good thermal stability (determined by thermal gravimetric analysis, TGA). The morphology, water permeation, and mechanical stability of the chosen TFNCmembranes were thoroughly investigated. The results indicated that the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous scaffold was partially imbedded in the cellulose barrier layer, which enhanced the mechanical strength of the top barrier layer. The permeation flux of the cellulose-based TFNCmembrane was significantly higher (e.g. 10x) than comparable commercial UFmembranes (PAN10 and PAN400, Sepro) with similar rejection ratios for separation of oil/water emulsions. The molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of TFNC membranes with cellulose barrier layer was evaluated using dextran feed solutions. The rejection was found to be higher than 90% with a dextran molecular weight of 2000 KDa, implying that the nominal pore size of the membrane was less than 50 nm. High permeation flux was also observed in the filtration of an emulsified oil/water mixture as well as of a sodium alginate aqueous solution, while high rejection ratio (above 99.5%) was maintained after prolonged operation. A variation of the barrier layer thickness could dramatically affect the permeation flux and the rejection ratio of the TFNCmembranes, while different sources of cellulose

  13. Excitonic binding energies in diffused-intermixed GaAs/AlAs/AlGaAs double barrier quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, R. K.; Chen, Y.

    1995-03-01

    We report a detailed study of the exciton properties in thermally diffused GaAs/AlAs/AlxGa1-xAs double barrier quantum wells (DBQW). The interband transition energies have been calculated with a standard transfer matrix method, while the exciton binding energy is obtained by a variational approach with an elliptic exciton envelope function. It is found that the inserted thin AlAs layer between the GaAs well and the AlGaAs barriers has a substantial effect on the exciton confinement and the intermixing properties. For thin enough AlAs barriers, the exciton binding energy increases for increasing diffusion lengths, reaches a maximum and then decreases gradually. The results show that a DBQW mixes faster than a single QW, due to the additional AlAs layers. Thick AlAs barriers enable the formation of an indirect AlGaAs intermixed well region, and the effects which stem from the indirect band line up are discussed.

  14. Nanosecond spin relaxation times in single layer graphene spin valves with hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Simranjeet; Katoch, Jyoti; Xu, Jinsong; Tan, Cheng; Zhu, Tiancong; Amamou, Walid; Hone, James; Kawakami, Roland

    2016-09-01

    We present an experimental study of spin transport in single layer graphene using atomic sheets of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) as a tunnel barrier for spin injection. While h-BN is expected to be favorable for spin injection, previous experimental studies have been unable to achieve spin relaxation times in the nanosecond regime, suggesting potential problems originating from the contacts. Here, we investigate spin relaxation in graphene spin valves with h-BN barriers and observe room temperature spin lifetimes in excess of a nanosecond, which provides experimental confirmation that h-BN is indeed a good barrier material for spin injection into graphene. By carrying out measurements with different thicknesses of h-BN, we show that few layer h-BN is a better choice than monolayer for achieving high non-local spin signals and longer spin relaxation times in graphene.

  15. Dynamic Ellipsometric Porosimetry Investigation of Permeation Pathways in Moisture Barrier Layers on Polymers.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Alberto; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2016-09-28

    The quality assessment of moisture permeation barrier layers needs to include both water permeation pathways, namely through bulk nanoporosity and local macroscale defects. Ellipsometric porosimetry (EP) has been already demonstrated a valuable tool for the identification of nanoporosity in inorganic thin film barriers, but the intrinsic lack of sensitivity toward the detection of macroscale defects prevents the overall barrier characterization. In this contribution, dynamic EP measurements are reported and shown to be sensitive to the detection of macroscale defects in SiO2 layers on polyethylene naphthalate substrate. In detail, the infiltration of probe molecules, leading to changes in optical properties of the polymeric substrate, is followed in time and related to permeation through macroscale defects. PMID:27618251

  16. Organo-montmorillonite Barrier Layers Formed by Combustion: Nanostructure and Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, James B; Ambuken, Preejith V.; Stretz, Holly A; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Payzant, E Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles into barrier layers has been the most cited theoretical explanation for the significant reduction in flammability often noted for nanocomposites formed from polymers and montmorillonite organoclays. Both mass and heat transport reductions have been credited for such improvements, and in most cases a coupled mechanism is expected. To provide validation for early models, new model barrier layers were produced from organoclays, and these barrier layers subjected to novel permeability analysis to obtain a flux. The effects of surfactant, temperature and pressure on barrier layer structure were examined. XRD versus TGA results suggest that chemical degradation of four different organoclays and physical collapse on heating are not correlated. Addition of pressure as low as 7kPa also altered the structure produced. Permeability of Ar through the ash was found to be sensitive to structural change/self assembly of high aspect ratio MMT nanoparticles. Actual fluxes ranged from 0.139 to 0.151 mol(m2.sec)-1, values which will provide useful limits in verifying models for the coupled contribution of mass and heat transfer to flammability parameters such as peak heat release rate.

  17. Transparent conductive gas-permeation barriers on plastics by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chun-Ting; Yu, Pei-Wei; Tseng, Ming-Hung; Hsu, Che-Chen; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2013-03-25

    A mixed-deposition atomic layer deposition process produces Hf:ZnO films with uniform dopant distribution and high electrical conductivity (resistivity = 4.5 × 10(-4) W cm), optical transparency (>85% from 400-1800 nm), and moisture-barrier property (water vapor transmission rate = 6.3 × 10(-6) g m(-2) day(-1)). PMID:23386315

  18. Investigation of hydrogeologic processes in a dipping layer structure: 1. The flow barrier effect.

    PubMed

    Alfnes, E; Kinzelbach, W; Aagaard, P

    2004-04-01

    Numerical simulations of a field experiment were performed in order to study the processes contributing to lateral diversion of water flow in the unsaturated zone. The experimental site is a glacial delta with dipping layers of alternating finer and coarser sand. Model soil physical parameters for each of the stratigraphic layers were estimated from soil grain size distributions. Anisotropy of the hydraulic conductivity within the layers was critical in order to reproduce the flow pattern observed in the experiment. Capillary and hydraulic barriers were of minor importance for the observed lateral diversion. PMID:15028389

  19. Development of Barrier Layers for the Protection of Candidate Alloys in the VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Carlos G.; Jones, J. Wayne; Pollock, Tresa M.; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-22

    The objective of this project was to develop concepts for barrier layers that enable leading candi- date Ni alloys to meet the longer term operating temperature and durability requirements of the VHTR. The concepts were based on alpha alumina as a primary surface barrier, underlay by one or more chemically distinct alloy layers that would promote and sustain the formation of the pro- tective scale. The surface layers must possess stable microstructures that provide resistance to oxidation, de-carburization and/or carburization, as well as durability against relevant forms of thermo-mechanical cycling. The system must also have a self-healing ability to allow endurance for long exposure times at temperatures up to 1000°C.

  20. i Barrier layer mechanism engineering in calcium copper titanate thin film capacitors through microstructure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisley, E. A.; Losego, M. D.; Aygun, S. M.; Craft, H. S.; Maria, J.-P.

    2008-12-01

    A peak permittivity greater than 10 000 has been achieved for calcium copper titanate (CCT) thin films by engineering a thin film microstructure that maximizes space charge contributions to polarizability. This permittivity is an order of magnitude greater than previous polycrystalline thin film efforts. This unique microstructure control is accomplished using a chemical solution deposition process flow that produces highly dense parallel layers ˜100 nm in thickness. We observe a thickness dependent permittivity where the entire film thickness constitutes the conducting region of a barrier layer capacitor despite the presence of multiple grain boundaries within that thickness. The model predictions are in good agreement with experimental data and are consistent with existing literature reports. These trends in permittivity with dielectric thickness raise new questions regarding the nature of barrier layers in CCT—and specifically, these results suggest that grain boundaries may not always participate as high resistance interlayers.

  1. Surface barrier height for different Al compositions and barrier layer thicknesses in AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Nitin Fjeldly, Tor A.; Iniguez, Benjamin

    2013-12-04

    In this paper, we present a physics based analytical model for the calculation of surface barrier height for given values of barrier layer thicknesses and Al mole fractions. An explicit expression for the two dimensional electron gas density is also developed incorporating the change in polarization charges for different Al mole fractions.

  2. Low temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of thin vanadium nitride layers for copper diffusion barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Rampelberg, Geert; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe; Blasco, Nicolas

    2013-03-18

    Thin vanadium nitride (VN) layers were grown by atomic layer deposition using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)vanadium and NH{sub 3} plasma at deposition temperatures between 70 Degree-Sign C and 150 Degree-Sign C on silicon substrates and polymer foil. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a composition close to stoichiometric VN, while x-ray diffraction showed the {delta}-VN crystal structure. The resistivity was as low as 200 {mu}{Omega} cm for the as deposited films and further reduced to 143 {mu}{Omega} cm and 93 {mu}{Omega} cm by annealing in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/He/N{sub 2}, respectively. A 5 nm VN layer proved to be effective as a diffusion barrier for copper up to a temperature of 720 Degree-Sign C.

  3. Intestinal Diffusion Barrier: Unstirred Water Layer or Membrane Surface Mucous Coat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithson, Kenneth W.; Millar, David B.; Jacobs, Lucien R.; Gray, Gary M.

    1981-12-01

    The dimensions of the small intestinal diffusion barrier interposed between luminal nutrients and their membrane receptors were determined from kinetic analysis of substrate hydrolysis by integral surface membrane enzymes. The calculated equivalent thickness of the unstirred water layer was too large to be compatible with the known dimensions of rat intestine. The discrepancy could be reconciled by consideration of the mucous coat overlying the intestinal surface membrane. Integral surface membrane proteins could not be labeled by an iodine-125 probe unless the surface coat was first removed. The mucoprotein surface coat appears to constitute an important diffusion barrier for nutrients seeking their digestive and transport sites on the outer intestinal membrane.

  4. Determination of the Schottky barrier height of ferromagnetic contacts to few-layer phosphorene

    SciTech Connect

    Anugrah, Yoska; Robbins, Matthew C.; Koester, Steven J.; Crowell, Paul A.

    2015-03-09

    Phosphorene, the 2D analogue of black phosphorus, is a promising material for studying spin transport due to its low spin-orbit coupling and its ½ nuclear spin, which could allow the study of hyperfine effects. In this work, the properties of permalloy (Py) and cobalt (Co) contacts to few-layer phosphorene are presented. The Schottky barrier height was extracted and determined as a function of gate bias. Flat-band barrier heights, relative to the valence band edge, of 110 meV and 200 meV were determined for Py and Co, respectively. These results are important for future studies of spin transport in phosphorene.

  5. Determination of the Schottky barrier height of ferromagnetic contacts to few-layer phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anugrah, Yoska; Robbins, Matthew C.; Crowell, Paul A.; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorene, the 2D analogue of black phosphorus, is a promising material for studying spin transport due to its low spin-orbit coupling and its ½ nuclear spin, which could allow the study of hyperfine effects. In this work, the properties of permalloy (Py) and cobalt (Co) contacts to few-layer phosphorene are presented. The Schottky barrier height was extracted and determined as a function of gate bias. Flat-band barrier heights, relative to the valence band edge, of 110 meV and 200 meV were determined for Py and Co, respectively. These results are important for future studies of spin transport in phosphorene.

  6. Ceramic barrier layers for flexible thin film solar cells on metallic substrates: a laboratory scale study for process optimization and barrier layer properties.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Sanchez, Jose-Maria; Guilera, Nuria; Francesch, Laia; Alba, Maria D; Lopez, Laura; Sanchez, Emilio

    2014-11-12

    Flexible thin film solar cells are an alternative to both utility-scale and building integrated photovoltaic installations. The fabrication of these devices over electrically conducting low-cost foils requires the deposition of dielectric barrier layers to flatten the substrate surface, provide electrical isolation between the substrate and the device, and avoid the diffusion of metal impurities during the relatively high temperatures required to deposit the rest of the solar cell device layers. The typical roughness of low-cost stainless-steel foils is in the hundred-nanometer range, which is comparable or larger than the thin film layers comprising the device and this may result in electrical shunts that decrease solar cell performance. This manuscript assesses the properties of different single-layer and bilayer structures containing ceramics inks formulations based on Al2O3, AlN, or Si3N4 nanoparticles and deposited over stainless-steel foils using a rotogravure printing process. The best control of the substrate roughness was achieved for bilayers of Al2O3 or AlN with mixed particle size, which reduced the roughness and prevented the diffusion of metals impurities but AlN bilayers exhibited as well the best electrical insulation properties.

  7. Planar varactor frequency multiplier devices with blocking barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, Udo (Inventor); Frerking, Margaret A. (Inventor); Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to planar varactor frequency multiplier devices with a heterojunction blocking barrier for near millimeter wave radiation of moderate power from a fundamental input wave. The space charge limitation of the submillimeter frequency multiplier devices of the BIN(sup +) type is overcome by a diode structure comprising an n(sup +) doped layer of semiconductor material functioning as a low resistance back contact, a layer of semiconductor material with n-type doping functioning as a drift region grown on the back contact layer, a delta doping sheet forming a positive charge at the interface of the drift region layer with a barrier layer, and a surface metal contact. The layers thus formed on an n(sup +) doped layer may be divided into two isolated back-to-back BNN(sup +) diodes by separately depositing two surface metal contacts. By repeating the sequence of the drift region layer and the barrier layer with the delta doping sheet at the interfaces between the drift and barrier layers, a plurality of stacked diodes is formed. The novelty of the invention resides in providing n-type semiconductor material for the drift region in a GaAs/AlGaAs structure, and in stacking a plurality of such BNN(sup +) diodes stacked for greater output power with and connected back-to-back with the n(sup +) GaAs layer as an internal back contact and separate metal contact over an AlGaAs barrier layer on top of each stack.

  8. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba-Son; Lin, Jen-Fin

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750 °C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750 °C. At 800 °C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  9. Alumina Paste Layer as a Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Yb14MnSb11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Caillat, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Sublimation is a major cause of degradation of thermoelectric power generation systems. Most thermoelectric materials tend to have peak values at the temperature where sublimation occurs. A sublimation barrier is needed that is stable at operating temperatures, inert against thermoelectric materials, and able to withstand thermal cycling stress. A porous alumina paste layer is suitable as a sublimation barrier for Yb14MnSb11. It can accommodate stress generated by the thermal expansion discrepancy between the suppression layer and thermoelectric materials. Sublimation suppression is achieved by filling pores naturally with YbO2, a natural byproduct of sublimation. YbO2 generated during the sublimation of Yb14MnSb11 fills the porous structure of the alumina paste, causing sublimation to decrease with time as the pores become filled.

  10. Mechanisms governing the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system with double ceramic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Fan, Xueling; Wang, T. J.

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study of factors affecting the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) with double ceramic layers (DCL) is presented. Crack driving forces for delaminations at two weak interfaces are examined. The results show that a thicker outermost ceramic layer can induce dramatic increase in crack driving force and make the interface between two ceramic coatings become more prone to delamination. The behavior is shown to be more prominent in TBCs with stiffer outmost coating. The thickness ratio of two ceramic layers is an important parameter for controlling the failure mechanisms and determining the lifetime of DCL TBCs under inservice condition. By accounting for the influences of thickness ratio of two ceramic layers and interfacial fracture toughnesses of two involved interfaces, the fracture mechanism map of DCL TBCs has been constructed, in which different failure mechanisms are identified. The results quanlitatively agree with the aviliable experimental data.

  11. Low-temperature integration of lead-based ferroelectric capacitors on Si with diffusion barrier layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. T.; Maki, K.; Aggarwal, S.; Nagaraj, B.; Nagarajan, V.; Salamanca-Riba, L.; Ramesh, R.; Dhote, A. M.; Auciello, O.

    2002-05-01

    Ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate thin films have been integrated on silicon substrates using Ti-Al-based conducting diffusion barriers produced by sputter deposition. The microstructure of the Ti-Al barrier layer was systematically altered through changes in the sputtering conditions, specifically the power density and deposition pressure. We find that the crystallinity of the Ti-Al film strongly correlates with sputtering power density and ambient i.e., it is amorphous at low power density and/or high deposition pressure, and polycrystalline at high power density and/or low deposition pressure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy studies demonstrate that the amorphous Ti-Al (a-Ti-Al) films contain a higher concentration of dissolved oxygen than crystalline Ti-Al. A low temperature sol-gel process has been used to prepare Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 PZT films at 450 °C on conducting Si wafers with a-Ti-Al conducting barrier layer and La-Sr-Co-O top and bottom electrodes. The excellent ferroelectric properties obtained with the a-Ti-Al barrier provide a promising approach for integration of PZT-based capacitors with silicon transistor technology for the fabrication of nonvolatile ferroelectric memories.

  12. Thick growing multilayer nanobrick wall thin films: super gas barrier with very few layers.

    PubMed

    Guin, Tyler; Krecker, Michelle; Hagen, David Austin; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2014-06-24

    Recent work with multilayer nanocoatings composed of polyelectrolytes and clay has demonstrated the ability to prepare super gas barrier layers from water that rival inorganic CVD-based films (e.g., SiOx). In an effort to reduce the number of layers required to achieve a very low oxygen transmission rate (OTR (<0.01 cc/m(2)·day·atm)) in these nanocoatings, buffered cationic chitosan (CH) and vermiculite clay (VMT) were deposited using layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. Buffering the chitosan solution and its rinse with 50 mM Trizma base increased the thickness of these films by an order of magnitude. The OTR of a 1.6-μm-thick, six-bilayer film was 0.009 cc/m(2)·day·atm, making this the best gas barrier reported for such a small number of layers. This simple modification to the LbL process could likely be applied more universally to produce films with the desired properties much more quickly.

  13. Observations of capillary barriers and preferential flow in layered snow during cold laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Katsushima, Takafumi; De Michele, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Data of liquid water flow around a capillary barrier in snow are still limited. To gain insight into this process, we carried out observations of dyed water infiltration in layered snow at 0 °C during cold laboratory experiments. We considered three different finer-over-coarser textures and three different water input rates. By means of visual inspection, horizontal sectioning, and measurements of liquid water content (LWC), capillary barriers and associated preferential flow were characterized. The flow dynamics of each sample were also simulated solving the Richards equation within the 1-D multi-layer physically based snow cover model SNOWPACK. Results revealed that capillary barriers and preferential flow are relevant processes ruling the speed of water infiltration in stratified snow. Both are marked by a high degree of spatial variability at centimeter scale and complex 3-D patterns. During unsteady percolation of water, observed peaks in bulk volumetric LWC at the interface reached ˜ 33-36 vol % when the upper layer was composed by fine snow (grain size smaller than 0.5 mm). However, LWC might locally be greater due to the observed heterogeneity in the process. Spatial variability in water transmission increases with grain size, whereas we did not observe a systematic dependency on water input rate for samples containing fine snow. The comparison between observed and simulated LWC profiles revealed that the implementation of the Richards equation reproduces the existence of a capillary barrier for all observed cases and yields a good agreement with observed peaks in LWC at the interface between layers.

  14. Suitability of polystyrene as a functional barrier layer in coloured food contact materials.

    PubMed

    Genualdi, Susan; Addo Ntim, Susana; Begley, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Functional barriers in food contact materials (FCMs) are used to prevent or reduce migration from inner layers in multilayer structures to food. The effectiveness of functional barrier layers was investigated in coloured polystyrene (PS) bowls due to their intended condition of use with hot liquids such as soups or stew. Migration experiments were performed over a 10-day period using USFDA-recommended food simulants (10% ethanol, 50% ethanol, corn oil and Miglyol) along with several other food oils. At the end of the 10 days, solvent dyes had migrated from the PS bowls at 12, 1 and 31,000 ng cm(-)(2) into coconut oil, palm kernel oil and Miglyol respectively, and in coconut oil and Miglyol the colour change was visible to the human eye. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images revealed that the functional barrier was no longer intact for the bowls exposed to coconut oil, palm kernel oil, Miglyol, 10% ethanol, 50% ethanol and goat's milk. Additional tests showed that 1-dodecanol, a lauryl alcohol derived from palm kernel oil and coconut oil, was present in the PS bowls at an average concentration of 11 mg kg(-1). This compound is likely to have been used as a dispersing agent for the solvent dye and aided the migration of the solvent dye from the PS bowl into the food simulant. The solvent dye was not found in the 10% ethanol, 50% ethanol and goat's milk food simulants above their respective limits of detection, which is likely to be due to its insolubility in aqueous solutions. A disrupted barrier layer is of concern because if there are unregulated materials in the inner layers of the laminate, they may migrate to food, and therefore be considered unapproved food additives resulting in the food being deemed adulterated under the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act. PMID:25569333

  15. Morphological instability of Ag films caused by phase transition in the underlying Ta barrier layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mardani, Shabnam Vallin, Örjan; Wätjen, Jörn Timo; Norström, Hans; Olsson, Jörgen; Zhang, Shi-Li

    2014-08-18

    Wide-bandgap (WBG) semiconductor technologies are maturing and may provide increased device performance in many fields of applications, such as high-temperature electronics. However, there are still issues regarding the stability and reliability of WBG devices. Of particular importance is the high-temperature stability of interconnects for electronic systems based on WBG-semiconductors. For metallization without proper encapsulation, morphological degradation can occur at elevated temperatures. Sandwiching Ag films between Ta and/or TaN layers in this study is found to be electrically and morphologically stabilize the Ag metallization up to 800 °C, compared to 600 °C for uncapped films. However, the barrier layer plays a key role and TaN is found to be superior to Ta, resulting in the best achieved stability, whereas the difference between Ta and TaN caps is negligible. The β-to-α phase transition in the underlying Ta barrier layer is identified as the major cause responsible for the morphological instability observed above 600 °C. It is shown that this phase transition can be avoided using a stacked Ta/TaN barrier.

  16. Effect of salinity barrier layer in the preconditioning and onset of El Nino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, C.; Picaut, J.; Belamari, S.

    2002-12-01

    Specific salinity stratification of the western Pacific warm pool known as the barrier layer has been proposed to be important in the coupling between sea surface temperature (SST) and winds leading to El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Thick barrier layer maintains surface waters warmer than 28C (the threshold for organized atmospheric convection) by reducing the entrainment cooling from below the ocean mixed layer. This mechanism allows an accumulation of heat in the upper ocean layers prior to El Nino. It also confines the forcing of westerly wind burst (WWB), the most accepted process as a trigger of El Nino, in a shallow mixed layer thus increasing the eastward displacement of the eastern edge of the warm pool. The importance of salinity barrier layer in the preconditioning phase characterized by high ocean heat content and in the onset phase characterized by high WWB activity is investigated using a general circulation coupled model of the tropical Pacific. coupled to a general circulation model. The Meteo-France/ARPEGE global atmospheric model coupled to the LODYC/OPA ocean model is able to reproduce self-sustained El Nino events together with WWBs. The methodology consists of removing the stratification effect of salinity in the vertical mixing parameterization. This cutoff is restricted to the western side of the equatorial band (4N-4S) where SST is larger than 28C. By removing the barrier layer, the main effect is to reduce the ocean heat content in the preconditioning period and to modify the ocean dynamics in response to WWBs in the onset period. Considering three El Nino events of different intensities, hindcasts show that interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere over the warm pool do not amplify and each El Nino is weakened or even aborted. A detailed analysis confirms that the physics of the warm pool such as vertical diffusion and horizontal advection is essential to set up the favorable conditions for the development of El Nino. For each event

  17. Laboratory-based observations of capillary barriers and preferential flow in layered snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, F.; Hirashima, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Katsushima, T.; De Michele, C.

    2015-12-01

    Several evidences are nowadays available that show how the effects of capillary gradients and preferential flow on water transmission in snow may play a more important role than expected. To observe these processes and to contribute in their characterization, we performed observations on the development of capillary barriers and preferential flow patterns in layered snow during cold laboratory experiments. We considered three different layering (all characterized by a finer-over-coarser texture in grain size) and three different water input rates. Nine samples of layered snow were sieved in a cold laboratory, and subjected to a constant supply of dyed tracer. By means of visual inspection, horizontal sectioning and liquid water content measurements, the processes of ponding and preferential flow were characterized as a function of texture and water input rate. The dynamics of each sample were replicated using the multi-layer physically-based SNOWPACK model. Results show that capillary barriers and preferential flow are relevant processes ruling the speed of liquid water in stratified snow. Ponding is associated with peaks in LWC at the boundary between the two layers equal to ~ 33-36 vol. % when the upper layer is composed by fine snow (grain size smaller than 0.5 mm). The thickness of the ponding layer at the textural boundary is between 0 and 3 cm, depending on sample stratigraphy. Heterogeneity in water transmission increases with grain size, while we do not observe any clear dependency on water input rate. The extensive comparison between observed and simulated LWC profiles by SNOWPACK (using an approximation of Richards Equation) shows high performances by the model in estimating the LWC peak over the boundary, while water speed in snow is underestimated by the chosen water transport scheme.

  18. Four-State Sub-12-nm FETs Employing Lattice-Matched II-VI Barrier Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, F.; Chan, P.-Y.; Suarez, E.; Lingalugari, M.; Kondo, J.; Gogna, P.; Miller, B.; Chandy, J.; Heller, E.

    2013-11-01

    Three-state behavior has been demonstrated in Si and InGaAs field-effect transistors (FETs) when two layers of cladded quantum dots (QDs), such as SiO x -cladded Si or GeO x -cladded Ge, are assembled on the thin tunnel gate insulator. This paper describes FET structures that have the potential to exhibit four states. These structures include: (1) quantum dot gate (QDG) FETs with dissimilar dot layers, (2) quantum dot channel (QDC) with and without QDG layers, (3) spatial wavefunction switched (SWS) FETs with multiple coupled quantum well channels, and (4) hybrid SWS-QDC structures having multiple drains/sources. Four-state FETs enable compact low-power novel multivalued logic and two-bit memory architectures. Furthermore, we show that the performance of these FETs can be enhanced by the incorporation of II-VI nearly lattice-matched layers in place of gate oxides and quantum well/dot barriers or claddings. Lattice-matched high-energy gap layers cause reduction in interface state density and control of threshold voltage variability, while providing a higher dielectric constant than SiO2. Simulations involving self-consistent solutions of the Poisson and Schrödinger equations, and transfer probability rate from channel (well or dot layer) to gate (QD layer) are used to design sub-12-nm FETs, which will aid the design of multibit logic and memory cells.

  19. In2O3 nanocrystal memory with the barrier engineered tunnel layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Uk; Kim, Seon Pil; Han, Dong Seok; Kim, Eun Kyu; Park, Goon-Ho; Cho, Won-Ju; Kim, Young-Ho

    2011-01-01

    In2O3 nanocrystal memories with barrier-engineered tunnel layers were fabricated on a p-type Si substrate. The structure and thickness of the barrier-engineered tunnel layers were SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 (ONO) and 2/2/3 nm, respectively. The equivalent oxide thickness of the ONO tunnel layers was 5.64 nm. The average size and density of the In2O3 nanocrystals after the reaction between BPDA-PDA polyimide and the In thin film were about 8 nm and 4 x 10(11) cm(-2), respectively. The electrons were charged from the channel of the memory device to the quantum well of the In2O3 nanocrystal through the ONO tunnel layer via Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The memory window was about 1.4 V when the program and erase conditions of the In2O3 nanocrystal memory device were 12 V for 1 s and -15 V for 200 ms.

  20. Significance of thermal contact resistance in two-layer thermal-barrier-coated turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of thermal contact resistance between layers in heat transfer through two layer, plasma sprayed, thermal barrier coatings applied to turbine vanes was investigated. Results obtained with a system of NiCrAlY bond and yttria stabilized zirconia ceramic show that thermal contact resistance between layers is negligible. These results also verified other studies which showed that thermal contact resistance is negligible for a different coating system of NiCr bond calcia stabilized zirconia ceramic. The zirconia stabilized ceramic thermal conductivity data scatter presented in the literature is ?20 to -10 percent about a curve fit of the data. More accurate predictions of heat transfer and metal wall temperatures are obtained when the thermal conductivity values are used at the ?20 percent level.

  1. Josephson Junctions with Tunnel Barriers Grown Via In Situ Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, Alan J.

    Since the 1970's, silicon technology has increased processing power by increasing the density of silicon transistors according to Moore's Law. However, silicon transistor feature sizes are approaching a minimum size limit, and a new paradigm is required to continue progress. Quantum computing is a promising paradigm that relies on the entanglement of macroscopic quantum objects, called qubits, to perform calculations. Josephson junction (JJ) based qubits are a promising candidate for the implementation of quantum computers. However, JJ qubits have suffered from poor coherence. A major source of decoherence in JJ qubits is two-level fluctuators in the insulating materials of the JJ circuit, particularly oxygen vacancies and interstitials in the thermally oxidized tunnel barrier. In order to realize the full potential of JJ qubits, an alternative method to thermal oxidation must be found for tunnel barrier growth. This work explores using atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the growth of ultrathin (~ 1 nm) tunnel barriers in JJs. A unique thin film deposition tool was built which integrates ultra-high vacuum sputtering with ALD in situ. The growth of ALD-Al2O3 on in situ sputtered Al films was studied in depth. Atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry were used to determine that ALD-Al2O3 grows conformally on Al, but a ~ 2 nm thermally oxidized interfacial layer (IL) develops between the Al and Al2O3 for ALD films > 2 nm. The thickness of this IL decreased when the Al film was < 2 nm, confirming the IL is a thermal oxide. As a proof of concept, Nb/Al/ALD-Al2O3/Nb trilayers with ultrathin (< 1 nm) tunnel barriers were grown and processed into JJs. The junction specific resistance and gap current density were found to depend exponentially on the ALD film thickness, indicating that the tunnel barrier thickness can be controlled by ALD. Despite evidence for an estimated 0.8 nm interfacial layer in the ultrathin tunnel barrier, this work incontrovertibly concludes that ALD

  2. Improvement in mechanical and barrier properties of polyethylene blown films using atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gyeong Beom; Hak Song, Seung; Wook Moon, Sung; Woo Kim, Jun; Hyung Shim, Joon; Choi, Byoung-Ho; Moo Heo, Young

    2014-01-15

    Recently, thin films deposited on polymer substrates have been widely utilized as encapsulation barriers in electronic applications such as flexible displays, packaging films, and organic light-emitting diodes. The barrier and mechanical properties of these films are critical aspects when using them for protecting the inner modules of electronic devices from environmental factors such as moisture, oxygen, and sunlight. In particular, polymers can be degraded or decomposed more easily than other materials under such environmental conditions. Therefore, polymer films can be deposited using thin functional materials; however, suitable deposition methods for polymers are scarce owing to many limitations such as low melting/glass transition temperature, thermal degradation, and oxidation. In this study, a thin alumina oxide film was deposited on a high-density polyethylene blown film by using atomic layer deposition. The mechanical and barrier properties of the alumina oxide film deposited on the polyethylene film were characterized by a microtensile test and water vapor transmission rate test. Process conditions such as process temperature, plasma surface treatment, and number of cycles were varied to ascertain the reliability of the thin alumina oxide film deposited on the high-density polyethylene blown film. The results showed that the barrier property of the deposited film improved upon the application of plasma surface treatment, and that its mechanical properties varied under different process conditions.

  3. Role of Arsenic During Aluminum Droplet Etching of Nanoholes in AlGaAs.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Christian; Zocher, Michel; Schnüll, Sandra; Hansen, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Self-assembled nanoholes are drilled into (001) AlGaAs surfaces during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using local droplet etching (LDE) with Al droplets. It is known that this process requires a small amount of background arsenic for droplet material removal. The present work demonstrates that the As background can be supplied by both a small As flux to the surface as well as by the topmost As layer in an As-terminated surface reconstruction acting as a reservoir. We study the temperature-dependent evaporation of the As topmost layer with in situ electron diffraction and determine an activation energy of 2.49 eV. After thermal removal of the As topmost layer droplet etching is studied under well-defined As supply. We observe with decreasing As flux four regimes: planar growth, uniform nanoholes, non-uniform holes, and droplet conservation. The influence of the As supply is discussed quantitatively on the basis of a kinetic rate model. PMID:27671015

  4. Role of Arsenic During Aluminum Droplet Etching of Nanoholes in AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyn, Christian; Zocher, Michel; Schnüll, Sandra; Hansen, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Self-assembled nanoholes are drilled into (001) AlGaAs surfaces during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using local droplet etching (LDE) with Al droplets. It is known that this process requires a small amount of background arsenic for droplet material removal. The present work demonstrates that the As background can be supplied by both a small As flux to the surface as well as by the topmost As layer in an As-terminated surface reconstruction acting as a reservoir. We study the temperature-dependent evaporation of the As topmost layer with in situ electron diffraction and determine an activation energy of 2.49 eV. After thermal removal of the As topmost layer droplet etching is studied under well-defined As supply. We observe with decreasing As flux four regimes: planar growth, uniform nanoholes, non-uniform holes, and droplet conservation. The influence of the As supply is discussed quantitatively on the basis of a kinetic rate model.

  5. The effect of a tin barrier layer on the permeability of hydrogen through mild steel and ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, J.; Piercy, G.R.

    1984-11-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the effectiveness of a commercially electroplated tin layer as a barrier to hydrogen, and to see how this altered when the tin layer was converted to FeSn. The authors measured the permeability of hydrogen through AISI 410 ferritic stainless steel and determined the effectiveness of tin as a surface barrier on it. The measured values for the permeability of hydrogen in iron and ferritic stainless steel are shown.

  6. Intermediate type excitons in Schottky barriers of A3B6 layer semiconductors and UV photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekperov, O. Z.; Guseinov, N. M.; Nadjafov, A. I.

    2006-09-01

    Photoelectric and photovoltaic spectra of Schottky barrier (SB) structures of InSe, GaSe and GaS layered semiconductors (LS) are investigated at quantum energies from the band edge excitons of corresponding materials up to 6.5eV. Spectral dependences of photoconductivity (PC) of photo resistors and barrier structures are strongly different at the quantum energies corresponding to the intermediate type excitons (ITE) observed in these semiconductors. It was suggested that high UV photoconductivity of A3B6 LS is due to existence of high mobility light carriers in the depth of the band structure. It is shown that SB of semitransparent Au-InSe is high sensitive photo detector in UV region of spectra.

  7. Surface-barrier photoconverters with graded-gap layers in the space-charge region

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrenko, Yu. N.; Pavelets, S. Yu. Pavelets, A. M.; Semikina, T. V.; Yaroshenko, N. V.

    2015-04-15

    A novel possibility of controlling the parameters of p-Cu{sub 1.8}S-n-II-VI surface-barrier structures by embedding a thin graded-gap layer into a photoconverter space-charge region (SCR) is implemented. The feature of quasi-electric fields built in the SCR, i.e., the fact that an increase in the drift field for minority carriers can be accompanied by a decrease in the potential barrier for majority carriers, is considered. The proper choice of the parameters of the Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}S graded-gap layer embedded in the Cu{sub 1.8}S-ZnS structure SCR made it possible to double the quantum efficiency in the ultraviolet spectral region. For Cu{sub 1.8}S-CdS photoconverters with a (CdS){sub x}(ZnSe){sub 1−x} intermediate layer, dark diode currents are decreased by three orders of magnitude while retaining a high quantum efficiency.

  8. Fabrication of metallic single electron transistors featuring plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbasian, Golnaz

    The continuing increase of the device density in integrated circuits (ICs) gives rise to the high level of power that is dissipated per unit area and consequently a high temperature in the circuits. Since temperature affects the performance and reliability of the circuits, minimization of the energy consumption in logic devices is now the center of attention. According to the International Technology Roadmaps for Semiconductors (ITRS), single electron transistors (SETs) hold the promise of achieving the lowest power of any known logic device, as low as 1x10-18 J per switching event. Moreover, SETs are the most sensitive electrometers to date, and are capable of detecting a fraction of an electron charge. Despite their low power consumption and high sensitivity for charge detection, room temperature operation of these devices is quite challenging mainly due to lithographical constraints in fabricating structures with the required dimensions of less than 10 nm. Silicon based SETs have been reported to operate at room temperature. However, they all suffer from significant variation in batch-to-batch performance, low fabrication yield, and temperature-dependent tunnel barrier height. In this project, we explored the fabrication of SETs featuring metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions. While Si-based SETs suffer from undesirable effect of dopants that result in irregularities in the device behavior, in metal-based SETs the device components (tunnel barrier, island, and the leads) are well-defined. Therefore, metal SETs are potentially more predictable in behavior, making them easier to incorporate into circuits, and easier to check against theoretical models. Here, the proposed fabrication method takes advantage of unique properties of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). Chemical mechanical polishing provides a path for tuning the dimensions of the tunnel junctions, surpassing the limits imposed by electron beam

  9. Role of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as oxidation barrier for silicon based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe Morana, Bruno; Forte, Salvatore; Sarro, Pasqualina Maria

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, the authors study the protective effect against oxidation of a thin layer of atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Nitrogen doped silicon carbide (poly-SiC:N) based microheaters coated with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used as test structure to investigate the barrier effect of the alumina layers to oxygen and water vapor at very high temperature (up to 1000 °C). Different device sets have been fabricated changing the doping levels, to evaluate possible interaction between the dopants and the alumina layer. The as-deposited alumina layer morphology has been evaluated by means of AFM analysis and compared to an annealed sample (8 h at 1000 °C) to estimate the change in the grain structure and the film density. The coated microheaters are subjected to very long oxidation time in dry and wet environment (up to 8 h at 900 and 1000 °C). By evaluating the electrical resistance variation between uncoated reference devices and the ALD coated devices, the oxide growth on the SiC is estimated. The results show that the ALD alumina coating completely prevents the oxidation of the SiC up to 900 °C in wet environment, while an oxide thickness reduction of 50% is observed at 1000 °C compared to uncoated devices.

  10. Colossal internal barrier layer capacitance effect in polycrystalline copper (II) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sudipta; Jana, Pradip Kumar; Chaudhuri, B. K.

    2008-01-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy analysis of the high permittivity (κ˜104) copper (II) oxide (CuO) ceramic shows that the grain contribution plays a major role for the giant-κ value at low temperature, whereas grain boundary (GB) contribution dominates around room temperature and above. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy analysis reveals electrically heterogeneous microstructure in CuO consisting of semiconducting grains and insulating GBs. Finally, the giant dielectric phenomenon exhibited by CuO is attributed to the internal barrier layer (due to GB) capacitance mechanism.

  11. The explanation of barrier height inhomogeneities in Au/n-Si Schottky barrier diodes with organic thin interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taşçıoǧlu, Ilke; Aydemir, Umut; Altındal, Şemsettin

    2010-09-01

    The forward bias current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of Au/n-Si Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) with Zn doped poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA:Zn) interfacial layer have been investigated in the wide temperature range of 80-400 K. The conventional Richardson plot of the ln(Io/T2) versus q /kT has two linear regions: the first region (200-400 K) and the second region (80-170 K). The values of activation energy (Ea) and Richardson constant (A∗) were obtained from this plot and especially the values of A∗ are much lower than the known theoretical value for n-type Si. Also the value of Ea is almost equal to the half of the band gap energy of Si. Therefore, the Φap versus q /2kT plot was drawn to obtain the evidence of a Gaussian distribution (GD) of barrier heights (BHs) and it shows two linear region similar to ln(Io)/T2 versus q /kT plot. The analysis of I-V data based on thermionic emission of the Au/PVA:Zn/n-Si SBDs has revealed the existence of double GD with mean BH values (Φ¯B0) of 1.06 eV and 0.86 eV with standard deviation (σ ) of 0.110 eV and 0.087 V, respectively. Thus, we modified ln(Io/T2)-(qσ)2/2(kT)2 versus q /kT plot for two temperature regions (200-400 K and 80-170 K) and it gives renewed mean BHs Φ¯B0 values as 1.06 eV and 0.85 eV with Richardson constant (A∗) values 121 A/cm2 K2 and 80.4 A/cm2 K2, respectively. This obtained value of A∗=121 A/cm2 K2 is very close to the known theoretical value of 120 A/cm2 K2 for n-type Si.

  12. High efficiency yellow organic light-emitting diodes with optimized barrier layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ye; Zhang, Shiming; Yue, Shouzhen; Wu, Qingyang; Zhao, Yi

    2015-12-01

    High efficiency Iridium (III) bis (4-phenylthieno [3,2-c] pyridinato-N,C2‧) acetylacetonate (PO-01) based yellow organic light-emitting devices are fabricated by employing multiple emission layers. The efficiency of the device using 4,4‧,4″-tris(N-carbazolyl) triphenylamine (TCTA) as potential barrier layer (PBL) outperforms those devices based on other PBLs and detailed analysis is carried out to reveal the mechanisms. A forward-viewing current efficiency (CE) of 65.21 cd/A, which corresponds to a maximum total CE of 110.85 cd/A is achieved at 335.8 cd/m2 in the optimized device without any outcoupling enhancement structures.

  13. A three-terminal ultraviolet photodetector constructed on a barrier-modulated triple-layer architecture

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Daqian; Mei, Zengxia; Liang, Huili; liu, Lishu; Zhang, Yonghui; Li, Junqiang; Liu, Yaoping; Gu, Changzhi; Du, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel three-terminal device fabricated on MgZnO/ZnO/MgZnO triple-layer architecture. Because of the combined barrier modulation effect by both gate and drain biases, the device shows an unconventional I–V characteristics compared to a common field effect transistor. The photoresponse behavior of this unique device was also investigated and applied in constructing a new type ultraviolet (UV) photodetector, which may be potentially used as an active element in a UV imaging array. More significantly, the proper gate bias-control offers a new pathway to overcome the common persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effect problem. Additionally, the MgZnO:F as a channel layer was chosen to optimize the photoresponse properties, and the spectrum indicated a gate bias-dependent wavelength-selectable feature for different response peaks, which suggests the possibility to build a unique dual-band UV photodetector with this new architecture. PMID:27181255

  14. A three-terminal ultraviolet photodetector constructed on a barrier-modulated triple-layer architecture.

    PubMed

    Ye, Daqian; Mei, Zengxia; Liang, Huili; Liu, Lishu; Zhang, Yonghui; Li, Junqiang; Liu, Yaoping; Gu, Changzhi; Du, Xiaolong

    2016-05-16

    We report a novel three-terminal device fabricated on MgZnO/ZnO/MgZnO triple-layer architecture. Because of the combined barrier modulation effect by both gate and drain biases, the device shows an unconventional I-V characteristics compared to a common field effect transistor. The photoresponse behavior of this unique device was also investigated and applied in constructing a new type ultraviolet (UV) photodetector, which may be potentially used as an active element in a UV imaging array. More significantly, the proper gate bias-control offers a new pathway to overcome the common persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effect problem. Additionally, the MgZnO:F as a channel layer was chosen to optimize the photoresponse properties, and the spectrum indicated a gate bias-dependent wavelength-selectable feature for different response peaks, which suggests the possibility to build a unique dual-band UV photodetector with this new architecture.

  15. AlGaAs diode pumped tunable chromium lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    An all-solid-state laser system is disclosed wherein the laser is pumped in the longwave wing of the pump absorption band. By utilizing a laser material that will accept unusually high dopant concentrations without deleterious effects on the crystal lattice one is able to compensate for the decreased cross section in the wing of the absorption band, and the number of pump sources which can be used with such a material increases correspondingly. In a particular embodiment a chromium doped colquiriite-structure crystal such as Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 is the laser material. The invention avoids the problems associated with using AlGaInP diodes by doping the Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 heavily to enable efficient pumping in the longwave wing of the absorption band with more practical AlGaAs diodes.

  16. Single-Layer Graphene as a Barrier Layer for Intense UV Laser-Induced Damages for Silver Nanowire Network.

    PubMed

    Das, Suprem R; Nian, Qiong; Saei, Mojib; Jin, Shengyu; Back, Doosan; Kumar, Prashant; Janes, David B; Alam, Muhammad A; Cheng, Gary J

    2015-11-24

    Single-layer graphene (SLG) has been proposed as the thinnest protective/barrier layer for wide applications involving resistance to oxidation, corrosion, atomic/molecular diffusion, electromagnetic interference, and bacterial contamination. Functional metallic nanostructures have lower thermal stability than their bulk forms and are therefore susceptible to high energy photons. Here, we demonstrate that SLG can shield metallic nanostructures from intense laser radiation that would otherwise ablate them. By irradiation via a UV laser beam with nanosecond pulse width and a range of laser intensities (in millions of watt per cm(2)) onto a silver nanowire network, and conformally wrapping SLG on top of the nanowire network, we demonstrate that graphene "extracts and spreads" most of the thermal energy away from nanowire, thereby keeping it damage-free. Without graphene wrapping, the radiation would fragment the wires into smaller pieces and even decompose them into droplets. A systematic molecular dynamics simulation confirms the mechanism of SLG shielding. Consequently, particular damage-free and ablation-free laser-based nanomanufacturing of hybrid nanostructures might be sparked off by application of SLG on functional surfaces and nanofeatures. PMID:26447828

  17. Glomerular endothelial surface layer acts as a barrier against albumin filtration.

    PubMed

    Dane, Martijn J C; van den Berg, Bernard M; Avramut, M Cristina; Faas, Frank G A; van der Vlag, Johan; Rops, Angelique L W M M; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Koster, Bram J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J

    2013-05-01

    Glomerular endothelium is highly fenestrated, and its contribution to glomerular barrier function is the subject of debate. In recent years, a polysaccharide-rich endothelial surface layer (ESL) has been postulated to act as a filtration barrier for large molecules, such as albumin. To test this hypothesis, we disturbed the ESL in C57Bl/6 mice using long-term hyaluronidase infusion for 4 weeks and monitored albumin passage using immunolabeling and correlative light-electron microscopy that allows for complete and integral assessment of glomerular albumin passage. ESL ultrastructure was visualized by transmission electron microscopy using cupromeronic blue and by localization of ESL binding lectins using confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that glomerular fenestrae are filled with dense negatively charged polysaccharide structures that are largely removed in the presence of circulating hyaluronidase, leaving the polysaccharide surfaces of other glomerular cells intact. Both retention of native ferritin [corrected] in the glomerular basement membrane and systemic blood pressure were unaltered. Enzyme treatment, however, induced albumin passage across the endothelium in 90% of glomeruli, whereas this could not be observed in controls. Yet, there was no net albuminuria due to binding and uptake of filtered albumin by the podocytes and parietal epithelium. ESL structure and function completely recovered within 4 weeks on cessation of hyaluronidase infusion. Thus, the polyanionic ESL component, hyaluronan, is a key component of the glomerular endothelial protein permeability barrier.

  18. Thermal stability of atomic layer deposited Ru layer on Si and TaN/Si for barrier application of Cu interconnection.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Chan; Kim, Moo Ryul; Lee, Jong Ho; Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Hong Kee

    2012-07-01

    The thermal stability of thin Ru single layer and Ru/TaN bilayers grown on bare Si by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) have been studied with Cu/Ru, Cu/Ru/TaN structures as a function of annealing temperature. To investigate the characteristics as a copper diffusion barrier, a 50 nm thick Cu film was sputtered on Ru and Ru/TaN layers and each samples subjected to thermal annealing under N2 ambient with varied temperature 300, 400, and 500 degrees C, respectively. It was found that the single 5 nm thick ALD Ru layer acted as an effective Cu diffusion barrier up to 400 degrees C. On the other hand ALD Ru (5 nm)/TaN (3.2 nm) showed the improved diffusion barrier characteristics even though the annealing temperature increased up to 500 degrees C. Based on the experimental results, the failure mechanism of diffusion barrier would be related to the crystallization of amorphous Ru thin film as temperature raised which implies the crystallized Ru grain boundary served as the diffusion path of Cu atoms. The combination of ALD Ru incorporated with TaN layer would be a promising barrier structure in Cu metallization.

  19. Effectiveness of compacted soil liner as a gas barrier layer in the landfill final cover system.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seheum; Nam, Kyoungphile; Kim, Jae Young; Hwan, Shim Kyu; Chung, Moonkyung

    2008-01-01

    A compacted soil liner (CSL) has been widely used as a single barrier layer or a part of composite barrier layer in the landfill final cover system to prevent water infiltration into solid wastes for its acceptable hydraulic permeability. This study was conducted to test whether the CSL was also effective in prohibiting landfill gas emissions. For this purpose, three different compaction methods (i.e., reduced, standard, and modified Proctor methods) were used to prepare the soil specimens, with nitrogen as gas, and with water and heptane as liquid permeants. Measured gas permeability ranged from 2.03 x 10(-10) to 4.96 x 10(-9) cm(2), which was a magnitude of two or three orders greater than hydraulic permeability (9.60 x 10(-13) to 1.05 x 10(-11) cm(2)). The difference between gas and hydraulic permeabilities can be explained by gas slippage, which makes gas more permeable, and by soil-water interaction, which impedes water flow and then makes water less permeable. This explanation was also supported by the result that a liquid permeability measured with heptane as a non-polar liquid was similar to the intrinsic gas permeability. The data demonstrate that hydraulic requirement for the CSL is not enough to control the gas emissions from a landfill. PMID:17964132

  20. Effectiveness of compacted soil liner as a gas barrier layer in the landfill final cover system.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seheum; Nam, Kyoungphile; Kim, Jae Young; Hwan, Shim Kyu; Chung, Moonkyung

    2008-01-01

    A compacted soil liner (CSL) has been widely used as a single barrier layer or a part of composite barrier layer in the landfill final cover system to prevent water infiltration into solid wastes for its acceptable hydraulic permeability. This study was conducted to test whether the CSL was also effective in prohibiting landfill gas emissions. For this purpose, three different compaction methods (i.e., reduced, standard, and modified Proctor methods) were used to prepare the soil specimens, with nitrogen as gas, and with water and heptane as liquid permeants. Measured gas permeability ranged from 2.03 x 10(-10) to 4.96 x 10(-9) cm(2), which was a magnitude of two or three orders greater than hydraulic permeability (9.60 x 10(-13) to 1.05 x 10(-11) cm(2)). The difference between gas and hydraulic permeabilities can be explained by gas slippage, which makes gas more permeable, and by soil-water interaction, which impedes water flow and then makes water less permeable. This explanation was also supported by the result that a liquid permeability measured with heptane as a non-polar liquid was similar to the intrinsic gas permeability. The data demonstrate that hydraulic requirement for the CSL is not enough to control the gas emissions from a landfill.

  1. Ultrathin, transferred layers of thermally grown silicon dioxide as biofluid barriers for biointegrated flexible electronic systems

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hui; Yu, Ki Jun; Song, Enming; Farimani, Amir Barati; Chiang, Chia-Han; Jin, Xin; Xu, Dong; Du, Wenbo; Seo, Kyung Jin; Zhong, Yiding; Yang, Zijian; Won, Sang Min; Fang, Guanhua; Choi, Seo Woo; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Huang, Yonggang; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Viventi, Jonathan; Aluru, N. R.; Rogers, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Materials that can serve as long-lived barriers to biofluids are essential to the development of any type of chronic electronic implant. Devices such as cardiac pacemakers and cochlear implants use bulk metal or ceramic packages as hermetic enclosures for the electronics. Emerging classes of flexible, biointegrated electronic systems demand similar levels of isolation from biofluids but with thin, compliant films that can simultaneously serve as biointerfaces for sensing and/or actuation while in contact with the soft, curved, and moving surfaces of target organs. This paper introduces a solution to this materials challenge that combines (i) ultrathin, pristine layers of silicon dioxide (SiO2) thermally grown on device-grade silicon wafers, and (ii) processing schemes that allow integration of these materials onto flexible electronic platforms. Accelerated lifetime tests suggest robust barrier characteristics on timescales that approach 70 y, in layers that are sufficiently thin (less than 1 μm) to avoid significant compromises in mechanical flexibility or in electrical interface fidelity. Detailed studies of temperature- and thickness-dependent electrical and physical properties reveal the key characteristics. Molecular simulations highlight essential aspects of the chemistry that governs interactions between the SiO2 and surrounding water. Examples of use with passive and active components in high-performance flexible electronic devices suggest broad utility in advanced chronic implants. PMID:27791052

  2. CaCu3Ti4O12: One-step internal barrier layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Derek C.; Adams, Timothy B.; Morrison, Finlay D.; West, Anthony R.

    2002-03-01

    There has been much recent interest in a so-called "giant-dielectric phenomenon" displayed by an unusual cubic perovskite-type material, CaCu3Ti4O12; however, the origin of the high permittivity has been unclear [M. A. Subramanian, L. Dong, N. Duan, B. A. Reisner, and A. W. Sleight, J. Solid State Chem. 151, 323 (2000); C. C. Homes, T. Vogt, S. M. Shapiro, S. Wakimoto, and A. P. Ramirez, Science 293, 673 (2001); A. P. Ramirez, M. A. Subramanian, M. Gardel, G. Blumberg, D. Li, T. Vogt, and S. M. Shapiro, Solid State Commun. 115, 217 (2000)]. Impedance spectroscopy on CaCu3Ti4O12 ceramics demonstrates that they are electrically heterogeneous and consist of semiconducting grains with insulating grain boundaries. The giant-dielectric phenomenon is therefore attributed to a grain boundary (internal) barrier layer capacitance (IBLC) instead of an intrinsic property associated with the crystal structure. This barrier layer electrical microstructure with effective permittivity values in excess of 10 000 can be fabricated by single-step processing in air at ˜1100 °C. CaCu3Ti4O12 is an attractive option to the currently used BaTiO3-based materials which require complex, multistage processing routes to produce IBLCs of similar capacity.

  3. Ga0.5In0.5P Barrier Layer for Wet Oxidation of AlAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Wei-I

    2000-05-01

    We study the stability of Ga0.5In0.5P and Al0.4Ga0.6As barrier layers for wet thermal oxidation of AlAs on GaAs. Samples with a Ga0.5In0.5P or Al0.4Ga0.6As barrier layer are oxidized in a water vapor environment under various oxidation conditions. The results of photoluminescence and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profile measurements indicate that the Ga0.5In0.5P barrier layer is more stable than the Al0.4Ga0.6As layer at higher oxidation temperatures and longer periods of oxidation time.

  4. GaAs/AlGaAs resonant tunneling diodes with a GaInNAs absorption layer for telecommunication light sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, F.; Langer, F.; Bisping, D.; Musterer, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Forchel, A.; Worschech, L.

    2012-04-01

    Al0.6Ga0.4As/GaAs/Al0.6Ga0.4As double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes (RTD) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy with a nearby, lattice-matched Ga0.89In0.11N0.04As0.96 absorption layer. RTD mesas with ring contacts and an aperture for optical excitation of charge carriers were fabricated on the epitaxial layers. Electrical and optical properties of the RTDs were investigated for different thicknesses of a thin GaAs spacer layer incorporated between the AlGaAs tunnel barrier adjacent to the GaInNAs absorption layer. Illumination of the RTDs with laser light of 1.3 μm wavelength leads to a pronounced photo-effect with a sensitivities of around 103 A/W.

  5. Acid modulates the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating the localization of claudins in the superficial layers.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Tadayuki; Koseki, Junichi; Chen, Xin; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Acid is a major cause of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. However, the influence of acid on the esophageal stratified epithelial barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins is not fully understood. Here, we explore the influence of acid on barrier function and TJ proteins using a newly developed model of the esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers that employs an air-liquid interface (ALI) system. Barrier function was determined by measuring trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and diffusion of paracellular tracers. TJ-related protein (claudin-1, claudin-4, occludin and ZO-1) expression and localization was examined by immunofluorescent staining, and by western blotting of 1% NP-40 soluble and insoluble fractions. We also examined the influence of acid (pH 2-4) on the barrier created by these cells. The in vitro ALI culture system showed a tight barrier (1500-2500 Ω·cm(2)) with the expression of claudin-1, claudin-4, occludin and ZO-1 in the superficial layers. Claudin-1, claudin-4, occludin and ZO-1 were detected as dots and whisker-like lines in the superficial layers, and as a broad line in the suprabasal layers. These localization patterns are similar to those in the human esophagus. On day 7 under ALI culture, TJ proteins were detected in the superficial layers with functional properties, including decreased permeability and increased TEER. Dilated intercellular spaces were detected at the suprabasal cell layers even under the control conditions of ALI cells. pH 2 acid on the apical side significantly reduced the TEER in ALI-cultured cells. This decrease in TEER by the acid was in parallel with the decreased amount of detergent-insoluble claudin-4. Claudin-4 delocalization was confirmed by immunofluorescent staining. In conclusion, TJs are located in the superficial layers of the esophagus, and acid stimulation disrupts barrier function, at least in part by modulating the amount and localization of claudin-4 in the superficial layers.

  6. Gas Diffusion Barriers Using Atomic Layer Deposition: A New Calcium Test and Polymer Substrate Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Jacob Andrew

    The increasing demand on available energy resources has led to a desire for more energy efficient devices. The wide use of displays in consumer electronics, such as televisions, cell phones, cameras and computers makes them an ideal target for improvement. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a good candidate to replace traditional Si based devices. However, the low work function metals typically used as electrodes in OLEDs are very reactive with water and oxygen. Ultralow permeability gas diffusion barriers with water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs) as low as <10-6g/(m2*day) are required on the polymers used to fabricate organic electronic and thin film photovoltaic devices. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) uses self-limiting surface reactions to deposit thin conformal films. ALD is capable of depositing thin, conformal, high quality barriers. WVTR values as low as ˜5 x 10-5 g/(m2*day) have been measured for Al2O3 ALD films at 38 °C/85% RH using the Ca test with optical transmission probing. The Ca test is a technique with very high sensitivity to measure ultralow WVTRs. This test relies on measuring the oxidation of a Ca metal film by monitoring the change in its optical or electrical properties. However, glass lid control experiments have indicated that the WVTRs measured by the Ca test are limited by H2O permeability through the epoxy seals. Varying results have been reported in the literature using the electrical conductance of Ca to measure permeation. In this work, two approaches were applied to overcome the epoxy edge seal limitations. The first approach was to deposit Al2O 3 ALD barriers directly on Ca metal. While the Al 2O3 ALD barriers were successfully deposited, the measurement of an accurate WVTR was limited by barrier pinholes. The presence of pinholes in the Al2O3 ALD barrier on Ca results in the localized oxidation of the Ca sensor. Heterogeneous degradation of the Ca causes inaccuracies in the conductance of the film. As oxidation regions

  7. Multi-layered ruthenium-containing bond coats for thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, Brian S.

    Advances in thermal barrier coating (TBC) technology for Ni-base superalloys have shown that B2 Pt-modified NiAl-based bond coatings outperform conventional NiAl bond coat layers for high temperature TBC multilayer systems. This thesis addresses the potential improvement in the high temperature capability of a 132 Ru-modified aluminide bond coat layer due to improved high temperature properties of RuAl over NiAl. The objectives of this research have been to define a processing path for fabrication of a multi-layered Ru-modified aluminide bond coating and to investigate its performance within a TBC system. Microstructural development and the oxidation behavior of Ru-modified and Ru/Pt-modified bond coatings have been studied in detail. Two types of Ru-modified bond coatings have been fabricated: one by means of high temperature, low activity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processing, and one via high temperature, high activity pack-aluminization. The location of the RuAl-rich layer has been shown to be process dependent with a low activity Ru-containing bond coating producing an exterior B2 NiAl layer with an interior B2 RuAl layer and a high activity Ru-containing bond coat producing the reverse arrangement of B2 layers. While all bond coating systems studied offer some oxidation protection by forming alpha-Al2O3, the low activity Ru/Pt-modified bond coatings exhibited a higher resistance to oxidation-induced failure compared to Ru-modified bond coatings. Through 1000 cyclic oxidation exposures, the Ru/Pt-modified coatings with an initial Ru deposition of 3mum are comparable to conventional Pt-modified aluminide coatings. The Ru-Al-Ni ternary system is the basis for Ru-modifed aluminide coating systems. An experimental assessment of the Ru-Al-Ni phase diagram at 1000°C and 1100°C has been produced via a series of diffusion couple experiments. A continuous solid-solution has been shown to exist between the RuAl and NiAl phases in the ternary system at the

  8. Direct growth of single-layer graphene on Ni surface manipulated by Si barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Da; Zheng, Li; Zheng, Xiaohu; Guo, Qinglei; Wei, Xing; Ding, Guqiao; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Su

    2014-05-01

    Pure Ni film is the first metal catalyst that can generate graphene with small domains and variable thickness across the film. The lack of control over layer number is attributed to the high carbon solubility of Ni. We designed a combinatorial Ni/Si system, which enables the direct growth of monolayer graphene via chemical vapor deposition method. In this system, Si was introduced as the carbon diffusion barriers to prevent carbon diffusing into Ni film. The designed system fully overcomes the fundamental limitations of Ni and provides a facile and effective strategy to yield homogenous monolayer graphene over large area. The field effect transistors were fabricated and characterized to determine the electrical properties of the synthesized graphene film. Furthermore, this technique can utilize standard equipments available in semiconductor technology.

  9. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization in Characterization of Organic Compounds Separated on Thin-Layer Chromatography Plates

    PubMed Central

    Cegłowski, Michał; Smoluch, Marek; Babij, Michał; Gotszalk, Teodor; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    A new method for on-spot detection and characterization of organic compounds resolved on thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates has been proposed. This method combines TLC with dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI), which produces stable low-temperature plasma. At first, the compounds were separated on TLC plates and then their mass spectra were directly obtained with no additional sample preparation. To obtain good quality spectra the center of a particular TLC spot was heated from the bottom to increase volatility of the compound. MS/MS analyses were also performed to additionally characterize all analytes. The detection limit of proposed method was estimated to be 100 ng/spot of compound. PMID:25170762

  10. Investigation of Thickness Dependence of Metal Layer in Al/Mo/4H-SiC Schottky Barrier Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seula; Lee, Jinseon; Kang, Tai-Young; Kyoung, Sinsu; Jung, Eun Sik; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present the preparation and characterization of Schottky barrier diodes based on silicon carbide with various Schottky metal layer thickness values. In this structure, molybdenum and aluminum were employed as the Schottky barrier metal and top electrode, respectively. Schottky metal layers were deposited with thicknesses ranging from 1000 to 3000 Å, and top electrodes were deposited with thickness as much as 3000 Å. The deposition of both metal layers was performed using the facing target sputtering (FTS) method, and the fabricated samples were annealed with the tubular furnace at 300 degrees C under argon ambient for 10 min. The Schottky barrier height, series resistance, and ideality factor was calculated from the forward I-V characteristic curve using the methods proposed by Cheung and Cheung, and by Norde. For as-deposited Schottky diodes, we observed an increase of the threshold voltage (V(T)) as the thickness of the Schottky metal layer increased. After the annealing, the Schottky barrier heights (SBHs) of the diodes, including Schottky metal layers of over 2000 Å, increased. In the case of the Schottky metal layer deposited to 1000 Å, the barrier heights decreased due to the annealing process. This may have been caused by the interfacial penetration phenomenon through the Schottky metal layer. For variations of V(T), the SBH changed with a similar tendency. The ideality factor and series resistance showed no significant changes before or after annealing. This indicates that this annealing condition is appropriate for Mo SiC structures. Our results confirm that it is possible to control V(T) by adjusting the thickness of the Schottky metal layer.

  11. Investigation of Thickness Dependence of Metal Layer in Al/Mo/4H-SiC Schottky Barrier Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seula; Lee, Jinseon; Kang, Tai-Young; Kyoung, Sinsu; Jung, Eun Sik; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present the preparation and characterization of Schottky barrier diodes based on silicon carbide with various Schottky metal layer thickness values. In this structure, molybdenum and aluminum were employed as the Schottky barrier metal and top electrode, respectively. Schottky metal layers were deposited with thicknesses ranging from 1000 to 3000 Å, and top electrodes were deposited with thickness as much as 3000 Å. The deposition of both metal layers was performed using the facing target sputtering (FTS) method, and the fabricated samples were annealed with the tubular furnace at 300 degrees C under argon ambient for 10 min. The Schottky barrier height, series resistance, and ideality factor was calculated from the forward I-V characteristic curve using the methods proposed by Cheung and Cheung, and by Norde. For as-deposited Schottky diodes, we observed an increase of the threshold voltage (V(T)) as the thickness of the Schottky metal layer increased. After the annealing, the Schottky barrier heights (SBHs) of the diodes, including Schottky metal layers of over 2000 Å, increased. In the case of the Schottky metal layer deposited to 1000 Å, the barrier heights decreased due to the annealing process. This may have been caused by the interfacial penetration phenomenon through the Schottky metal layer. For variations of V(T), the SBH changed with a similar tendency. The ideality factor and series resistance showed no significant changes before or after annealing. This indicates that this annealing condition is appropriate for Mo SiC structures. Our results confirm that it is possible to control V(T) by adjusting the thickness of the Schottky metal layer. PMID:26726688

  12. High-power single spatial mode AlGaAs channeled-substrate-planar semiconductor diode lasers for spaceborne communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. C.; Carlin, D. B.; Ettenberg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A high power single spatial mode channeled substrate planar AlGaAs semiconductor diode laser was developed. The emission wavelength was optimized at 860 to 880 nm. The operating characteristics (power current, single spatial mode behavior, far field radiation patterns, and spectral behavior) and results of computer modeling studies on the performance of the laser are discussed. Reliability assessment at high output levels is included. Performance results on a new type of channeled substrate planar diode laser incorporating current blocking layers, grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, to more effectively focus the operational current to the lasing region was demonstrated. The optoelectronic behavior and fabrication procedures for this new diode laser are discussed. The highlights include single spatial mode devices with up to 160 mW output at 8600 A, and quantum efficiencies of 70 percent (1 W/amp) with demonstrated operating lifetimes of 10,000 h at 50 mW.

  13. Alloy broadening of the emission barrier of the DX center in aluminum gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, S.; Anand, S.; Chakravarty, S.; Arora, B. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of alloy fluctuations on the emission barrier of the DX center in aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) is studied by constant capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy using Si-doped and Sn-doped samples grown by different growth techniques. All the samples showed single broadened peaks which were analyzed by assuming a Gaussian distribution for the emission barrier. The full width at half maximum for the emission barrier spread was found to be the same (˜0.05+0.005 eV) for all the samples and is of the same order as the reported capture barrier spread for Si-doped AlGaAs, which strongly suggests that the binding energy spread of the DX center in AlGaAs is very small.

  14. Design, installation, and performance of a multi-layered permeable reactive barrier, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Longmire, P. A.; Strietelmeier, E. A.; Taylor, T. P.; Den-Baars, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-layered permeable reactive barrier (PRB) has been installed in Mortandad Canyon, on the Pajarito Plateau in the north-central part of LANL, to demonstrate in-situ treatment of a suite of contaminants with dissimilar geochemical properties. The PRB will also mitigate possible vulnerabilities from downgradient contaminant movement within alluvial and deeper perched groundwater. Mortandad Canyon was selected as the location for this demonstration project because the flow of alluvial groundwater is constrained by the geology of the canyon, a large network of monitoring wells already were installed along the canyon reach, and the hydrochemistry and contaminant history of the canyon is well-documented. The PRB uses a funnel-and-gate system with a series of four reactive media cells to immobilize or destroy contaminants present in alluvial groundwater, including strontium-90, plutonium-238,239,240, americium-241, perchlorate, and nitrate. The four cells, ordered by sequence of contact with the groundwater, consist of gravel-sized scoria (for colloid removal); phosphate rock containing apatite (for metals and radionuclides); pecan shells and cotton seed admixed with gravel (bio-barrier, to deplete dissolved oxygen and destroy potential RCRA organic compounds, nitrate and perchlorate); and limestone (pH buffering and anion adsorption). Design elements of the PRB are based on laboratory-scale treatability studies and on a field investigation of hydrologic, geochemical, and geotechnical parameters. The PRB was designed with the following criteria: 1-day residence time within the biobarrier, 10-year lifetime, minimization of surface water infiltration and erosion, optimization of hydraulic capture, and minimization of excavated material requiring disposal. Each layer has been equipped with monitoring wells or ports to allow sampling of groundwater and reactive media, and monitor wells are located immediately adjacent to the up- and down-gradient perimeter of the

  15. Enhanced Barrier Performance of Engineered Paper by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Mirvakili, Mehr Negar; Van Bui, Hao; van Ommen, J Ruud; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G; Englezos, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Surface modification of cellulosic paper is demonstrated by employing plasma assisted atomic layer deposition. Al2O3 thin films are deposited on paper substrates, prepared with different fiber sizes, to improve their barrier properties. Thus, a hydrophobic paper is created with low gas permeability by combining the control of fiber size (and structure) with atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 films. Papers are prepared using Kraft softwood pulp and thermomechanical pulp. The cellulosic wood fibers are refined to obtain fibers with smaller length and diameter. Films of Al2O3, 10, 25, and 45 nm in thickness, are deposited on the paper surface. The work demonstrates that coating of papers prepared with long fibers efficiently reduces wettability with slight enhancement in gas permeability, whereas on shorter fibers, it results in significantly lower gas permeability. Wettability studies on Al2O3 deposited paper substrates have shown water wicking and absorption over time only in papers prepared with highly refined fibers. It is also shown that there is a certain fiber size at which the gas permeability assumes its minimum value, and further decrease in fiber size will reverse the effect on gas permeability.

  16. Enhanced Barrier Performance of Engineered Paper by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Mirvakili, Mehr Negar; Van Bui, Hao; van Ommen, J Ruud; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G; Englezos, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Surface modification of cellulosic paper is demonstrated by employing plasma assisted atomic layer deposition. Al2O3 thin films are deposited on paper substrates, prepared with different fiber sizes, to improve their barrier properties. Thus, a hydrophobic paper is created with low gas permeability by combining the control of fiber size (and structure) with atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 films. Papers are prepared using Kraft softwood pulp and thermomechanical pulp. The cellulosic wood fibers are refined to obtain fibers with smaller length and diameter. Films of Al2O3, 10, 25, and 45 nm in thickness, are deposited on the paper surface. The work demonstrates that coating of papers prepared with long fibers efficiently reduces wettability with slight enhancement in gas permeability, whereas on shorter fibers, it results in significantly lower gas permeability. Wettability studies on Al2O3 deposited paper substrates have shown water wicking and absorption over time only in papers prepared with highly refined fibers. It is also shown that there is a certain fiber size at which the gas permeability assumes its minimum value, and further decrease in fiber size will reverse the effect on gas permeability. PMID:27165172

  17. AlGaAs phased array laser for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    Phased locked arrays of multiple AlGaAs diode laser emitters were investigated both in edge emitting and surface emitting configurations. CSP edge emitter structures, coupled by either evanescent waves or Y-guides, could not achieve the required powers (greater than or similar to 500 mW) while maintaining a diffraction limited, single lobed output beam. Indeed, although the diffraction limit was achieved in this type of device, it was at low powers and in the double lobed radiation pattern characteristic of out-of-phase coupling. Grating surface emitting (GSE) arrays were, therefore, investigated with more promising results. The incorporation of second order gratings in distribute Bragg reflector (DBR) structures allows surface emission, and can be configured to allow injection locking and lateral coupling to populate 2-D arrays that should be able to reach power levels commensurate with the needs of high performance, free space optical communications levels. Also, a new amplitude modulation scheme was developed for GSE array operation.

  18. Alternative group V sources for growth of GaAs and AlGaAs by MOMBE (CBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathy, C. R.; Wisk, P. W.; Pearton, S. J.; Ren, F.; Bohling, D. A.; Muhr, G. T.

    1992-11-01

    We have investigated the use of phenylarsine (PhAsH 2) and trisdimethylaminoarsenic (DMAAs) as potential replacements for AsH 3 during growth by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE), alternatively known as chemical beam epitaxy (CBE). PhAsH 2 was found to decompose rather inefficiently on the surface at a growth temperature of 525°C. However, GaAs and AlGaAs growth rates up to ˜ 95 Å/min could still be obtained at this temperature without incurring any degradation in morphology. The hydrogen generated by the decomposition of the PhAsH 2 did not appear to getter carbon from the surface as both GaAs and AlGaAs grown from PhAsH 2 contained ten times more carbon than layers grown under the same flux of AsH 3. By contrast, DMAAs was found to decompose readily on the wafer surface allowing growth rates up to 220 Å/min and growth temperatures as low as 375°C. Furthermore, DMAAs was found to getter carbon more efficiently than cracked AsH 3, probably as a result of tertiary amine formation at the wafer surface. As a result, comparable carbon backgrounds were obtained at 525°C from either TEG or TMG. By using these sources in tandem, it appears that AsH 3 may no longer be required for growth of GaAs or AlGaAs by MOMBE. In addition, these sources allow new flexibility for selective growth as well. The stability of PhAsH 2 allows for selective deposition of pAlGaAs even at temperatures as low as 525°C. While the same effect is not observed for GaAs growth from TEG at these temperatures, it is possible through the use of DMAAs to deposit high purity GaAs selectivity from TMG since the DMAAs getters the carbon without inducing deposition on the mask. Thus the use of PhAsH 2 and DMAAs will allow selective deposition of device structures such as Pnp HBTs at their optimum growth temperature of ˜ 525°C.

  19. Compressibility effects on the non-linear receptivity of boundary layers to dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denison, Marie F. C.

    The reduction of drag and aerodynamic heating caused by boundary layer transition is of central interest for the development of hypersonic vehicles. Receptivity to flow perturbation in the form of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave growth often determines the first stage of the transition process, which can be delayed by depositing specific excitations into the boundary layer. Weakly ionized Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) actuators are being investigated as possible sources of such excitations, but little is known today about their interaction with high-speed flows. In this framework, the first part of the thesis is dedicated to a receptivity study of laminar compressible boundary layers over a flat plate by linear stability analysis following an adjoint operator formulation, under DBD representative excitations assumed independent of flow conditions. The second part of the work concentrates on the development of a coupled plasma-Navier and Stokes solver targeted at the study of supersonic flow and compressibility effects on DBD forcing and non-parallel receptivity. The linear receptivity study of quasi-parallel compressible flows reveals several interesting features such as a significant shift of the region of maximum receptivity deeper into the flow at high Mach number and strong wave amplitude reduction compared to incompressible flows. The response to DBD relevant excitation distributions and to variations of the base flow conditions and system length scales follows these trends. Observed absolute amplitude changes and relative sensitivity modifications between source types are related to the evolution of the offset between forcing peak profile and relevant adjoint mode maximum. The analysis highlights the crucial importance of designing and placing the actuator in a way that matches its force field to the position of maximum boundary layer receptivity for the specific flow conditions of interest. In order to address the broad time and length scale spectrum

  20. Barrier layers of the Atlantic warm pool: Formation mechanism and influence on weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Karthik

    The aim of this research is to study the formation mechanism of Barrier Layers (BL) in the western tropical Atlantic and their influence on the tropical Atlantic climate at both short and long timescales. Many Coupled General Circulation Models (CGCMs) tend to overestimate the salinity in the Atlantic warm pool or the Northwestern Tropical Atlantic (NWTA) and underestimate the surface salinity in the subtropical salinity maxima region. Most of these models also suffer from a sea-surface temperature (SST) bias in the NWTA region, leading to suggestions that the upper ocean salinity stratification may need to be improved in order to improve the BL simulations and thus the SST through BL-SST-Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) feedbacks. We used a CGCM to perform a set of idealized numerical experiments to understand the sensitivity of the BL and consequently SST in the NWTA region to freshwater flux and hence the upper ocean salinity stratification. We find that the BL of the western tropical Atlantic is quite sensitive to upper ocean salinity changes in the Amazon River discharge region and the subtropical salinity maxima region. The BL phenomenon is further manifested by the formation of winter temperature inversions in our model simulations. However, in the region of improved BL simulation, the SST response is not statistically significant. SST response to Tropical Cyclones (TCs) is studied for the Atlantic region using a high-resolution coupled regional climate model (CRCM) and observational data sets. The presence of a BL, defined as the layer below the mixed layer that separates the base of the isothermal layer from the base of the isohaline layer, is found to modulate the SST response. The amplitude of TC-induced surface cooling is reduced by more than 35% in the presence of a BL, as a consequence of the weak thermal stratification. Furthermore, in locations when the BL exhibits a temperature inversion, TC-induced mixing can result in weak surface warming

  1. Barrier performance optimization of atomic layer deposited diffusion barriers for organic light emitting diodes using x-ray reflectivity investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Aarti Schröder, Uwe; Klumbies, Hannes; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Leo, Karl; Geidel, Marion; Knaut, Martin; Hoßbach, Christoph; Albert, Matthias; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2013-12-02

    The importance of O{sub 3} pulse duration for encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with ultra thin inorganic atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers is demonstrated for deposition temperatures of 50 °C. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements show that O{sub 3} pulse durations longer than 15 s produce dense and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Correspondingly, black spot growth is not observed in OLEDs encapsulated with such layers during 91 days of aging under ambient conditions. This implies that XRR can be used as a tool for process optimization of OLED encapsulation layers leading to devices with long lifetimes.

  2. Switching mechanism in single-layer molybdenum disulfide transistors: an insight into current flow across Schottky barriers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Si, Mengwei; Deng, Yexin; Neal, Adam T; Du, Yuchen; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun; Ye, Peide D

    2014-01-28

    In this article, we study the properties of metal contacts to single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) crystals, revealing the nature of switching mechanism in MoS2 transistors. On investigating transistor behavior as contact length changes, we find that the contact resistivity for metal/MoS2 junctions is defined by contact area instead of contact width. The minimum gate dependent transfer length is ∼0.63 μm in the on-state for metal (Ti) contacted single-layer MoS2. These results reveal that MoS2 transistors are Schottky barrier transistors, where the on/off states are switched by the tuning of the Schottky barriers at contacts. The effective barrier heights for source and drain barriers are primarily controlled by gate and drain biases, respectively. We discuss the drain induced barrier narrowing effect for short channel devices, which may reduce the influence of large contact resistance for MoS2 Schottky barrier transistors at the channel length scaling limit.

  3. InGaP Heterojunction Barrier Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, Roger E.

    2010-01-01

    A new solar-cell structure utilizes a single, ultra-wide well of either gallium arsenide (GaAs) or indium-gallium-phosphide (InGaP) in the depletion region of a wide bandgap matrix, instead of the usual multiple quantum well layers. These InGaP barrier layers are effective at reducing diode dark current, and photogenerated carrier escape is maximized by the proper design of the electric field and barrier profile. With the new material, open-circuit voltage enhancements of 40 and 100 mV (versus PIN control systems) are possible without any degradation in short-circuit current. Basic tenets of quantum-well and quantum- dot solar cells are utilized, but instead of using multiple thin layers, a single wide well works better. InGaP is used as a barrier material, which increases open current, while simultaneously lowering dark current, reducing both hole diffusion from the base, and space charge recombination within the depletion region. Both the built-in field and the barrier profile are tailored to enhance thermionic emissions, which maximizes the photocurrent at forward bias, with a demonstrated voltage increase. An InGaP heterojunction barrier solar cell consists of a single, ultra-wide GaAs, aluminum-gallium-arsenide (AlGaAs), or lower-energy-gap InGaP absorber well placed within the depletion region of an otherwise wide bandgap PIN diode. Photogenerated electron collection is unencumbered in this structure. InGaAs wells can be added to the thick GaAs absorber layer to capture lower-energy photons.

  4. The Barrier Layer of the Atlantic Warmpool: Formation Mechanism and Influence on the Mean Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Jang, C. J.

    2012-04-20

    Many Coupled General Circulation Models (CGCMs) tend to overestimate the salinity in the Atlantic warm pool or the Northwestern Tropical Atlantic (NWTA) and underestimate the surface salinity in the subtropical salinity maxima region. Most of these models also suffer from a sea-surface temperature (SST) bias in the NWTA region, leading to suggestions that the upper ocean salinity stratification may need to be improved in order to improve the Barrier Layer (BL) simulations and thus the SST through BL-SST-Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) feedbacks. In the present study, we use a CGCM to perform a set of idealized numerical experiments to test and understand the sensitivity of the BL and consequently SST in the NWTA region to freshwater flux and hence the upper ocean salinity stratification. We find that the BL of the NWTA is sensitive to upper ocean salinity changes in the Amazon river discharge region and the subtropical salinity maxima region. The BL phenomenon is further manifested by the formation of winter temperature inversions in our model simulations, the maximum magnitude of inversions being about 0.20 C. The atmo- spheric response causes a statistically significant reduction of mean precipitation and SST in the equatorial Atlantic region and helps improve the respective biases by 10-15 %. In the region of improved BL simulation, the SST change is positive and in the right direction of bias correction, albeit weak.

  5. Thin-film Nanofibrous Composite Membranes Containing Cellulose or Chitin Barrier Layers Fabricated by Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    H Ma; B Hsiao; B Chu

    2011-12-31

    The barrier layer of high-flux ultrafiltration (UF) thin-film nanofibrous composite (TFNC) membranes for purification of wastewater (e.g., bilge water) have been prepared by using cellulose, chitin, and a cellulose-chitin blend, regenerated from an ionic liquid. The structures and properties of regenerated cellulose, chitin, and a cellulose-chitin blend were analyzed with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). The surface morphology, pore size and pore size distribution of TFNC membranes were determined by SEM images and molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) methods. An oil/water emulsion, a model of bilge water, was used as the feed solution, and the permeation flux and rejection ratio of the membranes were investigated. TFNC membranes based on the cellulose-chitin blend exhibited 10 times higher permeation flux when compared with a commercial UF membrane (PAN10, Sepro) with a similar rejection ratio after filtration over a time period of up to 100 h, implying the practical feasibility of such membranes for UF applications.

  6. Polystyrene films as barrier layers for corrosion protection of copper and copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Románszki, Loránd; Datsenko, Iaryna; May, Zoltán; Telegdi, Judit; Nyikos, Lajos; Sand, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Dip-coated polystyrene layers of sub-micrometre thickness (85-500nm) have been applied on copper and copper alloys (aluminium brass, copper-nickel 70/30), as well as on stainless steel 304, and produced an effective barrier against corrosion and adhesion of corrosion-relevant microorganisms. According to the dynamic wettability measurements, the coatings exhibited high advancing (103°), receding (79°) and equilibrium (87°) contact angles, low contact angle hysteresis (6°) and surface free energy (31mJ/m(2)). The corrosion rate of copper-nickel 70/30 alloy samples in 3.5% NaCl was as low as 3.2μm/a (44% of that of the uncoated samples), and in artificial seawater was only 0.9μm/a (29% of that of the uncoated samples). Cell adhesion was studied by fluorescence microscopy, using monoculture of Desulfovibrio alaskensis. The coatings not only decreased the corrosion rate but also markedly reduced the number of bacterial cells adhered to the coated surfaces. The PS coating on copper gave the best result, 2×10(3)cells/cm(2) (1% of that of the uncoated control).

  7. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed.

  8. Remodeling of Tight Junctions and Enhancement of Barrier Integrity of the CACO-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Layer by Micronutrients

    PubMed Central

    Valenzano, Mary Carmen; DiGuilio, Katherine; Mercado, Joanna; Teter, Mimi; To, Julie; Ferraro, Brendan; Mixson, Brittany; Manley, Isabel; Baker, Valerissa; Moore, Beverley A.; Wertheimer, Joshua; Mullin, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The micronutrients zinc, quercetin, butyrate, indole and berberine were evaluated for their ability to induce remodeling of epithelial tight junctions (TJs) and enhance barrier integrity in the CACO-2 gastrointestinal epithelial cell culture model. All five of these chemically very diverse micronutrients increased transepithelial electrical resistance (Rt) significantly, but only berberine also improved barrier integrity to the non-electrolyte D-mannitol. Increases of Rt as much as 200% of untreated controls were observed. Each of the five micronutrients also induced unique, signature-like changes in TJ protein composition, suggesting multiple pathways (and TJ arrangements) by which TJ barrier function can be enhanced. Decreases in abundance by as much as 90% were observed for claudin-2, and increases of over 300% could be seen for claudins -5 and -7. The exact effects of the micronutrients on barrier integrity and TJ protein composition were found to be highly dependent on the degree of differentiation of the cell layer at the time it was exposed to the micronutrient. The substratum to which the epithelial layer adheres was also found to regulate the response of the cell layer to the micronutrient. The implications of these findings for therapeutically decreasing morbidity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease are discussed. PMID:26226276

  9. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium-Titanium Nitride Mixed-Phase Layers for Direct-Plate Liner and Copper Diffusion Barrier Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, Adam James

    Current interconnect networks in semiconductor processing utilize a sputtered TaN diffusion barrier, Ta liner, and Cu seed to improve the adhesion, microstructure, and electromigration resistance of electrochemically deposited copper that fills interconnect wires and vias. However, as wire/via widths shrink due to device scaling, it becomes increasingly difficult to have the volume of a wire/via be occupied with ECD Cu which increases line resistance and increases the delay in signal propagation in IC chips. A single layer that could serve the purpose of a Cu diffusion barrier and ECD Cu adhesion promoter could allow ECD Cu to occupy a larger volume of a wire/via, leading to a decrease in line resistance and decrease in signal delay. Previous work has shown RuTaN, RuWCN, and RuCo films can act as Cu diffusion barriers and be directly platable to thickness of 2-3nm. However, other material selections may prove as effective or possibly better. Mixed-phase films of ruthenium titanium nitride grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated for their performance as a Cu diffusion barrier and as a surface for the direct plating of ECD Cu. All Ru was deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) while TiN was deposited by either thermal ALD or PEALD. RuTiN, films with thermal ALD TiN and a Ru:Ti of 20:1 showed barrier performance comparable to PVD TaN at 3-4 nm thickness and 15 nm planar films were directly platable. Follow up work is certainly needed for this material set, yet initial results indicate RuTiN could serve as an effective direct plate liner for Cu interconnects.

  10. Ultraviolet-enhanced light emitting diode employing individual ZnO microwire with SiO{sub 2} barrier layers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yingtian; Xu, Li; Dai, Jun; Ma, Yan; Chu, Xianwei; Zhang, Yuantao; Du, Guotong; Zhang, Baolin; Yin, Jingzhi

    2015-05-25

    This paper details the fabrication of n-ZnO single microwire (SMW)-based high-purity ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) with an added SiO{sub 2} barrier layer on the p-Si substrate. However, the current-voltage (I-V) curve exhibited non-ideal rectifying characteristics. Under forward bias, both UV and visible emissions could be detected by electroluminescence (EL) measurement. When bias voltage reached 60 V at room temperature, a UV emission spike occurred at 390 nm originating from the n-ZnO SMW. Compared with the EL spectrum of the n-ZnO SMW/p-Si heterojunction device without the SiO{sub 2} barrier layer, we saw improved UV light extraction efficiency from the current-blocking effect of the SiO{sub 2} layer. The intense UV emission in the n-ZnO SMW/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si heterojunction indicated that the SiO{sub 2} barrier layer can restrict the movement of electrons as expected and result in effective electron-hole recombination in ZnO SMW.

  11. High reflectance Cr/V multilayer with B(4)C barrier layer for water window wavelength region.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiushi; Fei, Jiani; Liu, Yang; Li, Pin; Wen, Mingwu; Xie, Chun; Jonnard, Philippe; Giglia, Angelo; Zhang, Zhong; Wang, Kun; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-02-15

    To develop the high reflectance mirror for the short wavelength range of the water window region (λ=2.42-2.73  nm), Cr/V multilayers with B4C barrier layers are studied. The grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry results show that the multilayer interface widths are significantly reduced down to 0.21-0.31 nm, after the introduction of 0.1 nm B4C barrier layers at both interfaces. The [B4C/Cr/B4C/V] multilayer with a large number of bilayers of N=300 maintains the same small interface widths while the surface roughness is only 0.2 nm. According to the transmission electron microscope measurements, the layer structure improvement with barrier layers can be attributed to the suppression of the crystallization of vanadium inside the structure. Using the interface engineered multilayer, a maximum soft x-ray reflectance of 24.3% is achieved at λ=2.441  nm, under the grazing incidence of 42°. PMID:26872167

  12. Chromium oxide as a metal diffusion barrier layer: An x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad Mohiddon, Md.; Lakshun Naidu, K.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.; Dalba, G.; Ahmed, S. I.; Rocca, F.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction at the interface between chromium and amorphous Silicon (a-Si) films in the presence of a sandwich layer of chromium oxide is investigated using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The oxidized interface was created, in situ, prior to the deposition of a 400 nm tick a-Si layer over a 50 nm tick Cr layer. The entire stack of substrate/metallic Cr/Cr2O3/a-Si was then annealed at temperatures from 300 up to 700 °C. Analysis of the near edge and extended regions of each XAFS spectrum shows that only a small fraction of Cr is able to diffuse through the oxide layer up to 500 °C, while the remaining fraction is buried under the oxide layer in the form of metallic Cr. At higher temperatures, diffusion through the oxide layer is enhanced and the diffused metallic Cr reacts with a-Si to form CrSi2. At 700 °C, the film contains Cr2O3 and CrSi2 without evidence of unreacted metallic Cr. The activation energy and diffusion coefficient of Cr are quantitatively determined in the two temperature regions, one where the oxide acts as diffusion barrier and another where it is transparent to Cr diffusion. It is thus demonstrated that chromium oxide can be used as a diffusion barrier to prevent metal diffusion into a-Si.

  13. Optimal deposition conditions of TiN barrier layers for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes onto metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Céspedes, J.; Álvarez-García, J.; Zhang, X.; Hampshire, J.; Bertran, E.

    2009-05-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical deposition (PECVD) has proven over the years to be the preferred method for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and nanofibres (VACNTs and VACNFs, respectively). In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on metallic surfaces present a great potential for high power applications, including low resistance electrical contacts, high power switches, electron guns or supercapacitors. Nevertheless, the deposition of CNTs onto metallic substrates is challenging, due to the intrinsic incompatibility between such substrates and the metallic precursor layers required to promote the growth of CNTs. In particular, the formation of CNT films is assisted by the presence of a nanometric (10-100 nm) monolayer of catalyst clusters, which act as nucleation sites for CNTs. The nanometric character of the precursor layer, together with the high growth temperature involved during the PECVD process (~700 °C), strongly favours the in-diffusion of the catalyst nanoclusters into the bulk of the metallic substrate, which results in a dramatic reduction in the nucleation of CNTs. In order to overcome this problem, it is necessary to coat the metallic substrate with a diffusion barrier layer, prior to the growth of the catalyst precursor. Unlike other conventional ceramic barrier layers, TiN provides high electrical conductivity, thus being a promising candidate for use as barrier material in applications involving low resistance contacts. In this work we investigate the anti-diffusion properties of TiN sputtered coatings and its potential applicability to the growth of CNTs onto copper substrates, using Fe as catalyst material. The barrier and catalyst layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the diffusivity of Fe into TiN. Morphological characterization of the CNTs coatings was performed on scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were employed to

  14. Tunneling processes in asymmetric double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a thin top MgO layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F.; Yu, G. Q.; Guo, P.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F.; Chen, J. Y.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2013-12-07

    Dynamic conductance dI/dV and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) d{sup 2}I/dV{sup 2} have been measured at different temperatures for double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a thin top MgO layer. The resistance in the antiparallel state exhibits a normal tunnel-like behavior, while the resistance in the parallel state shows metallic-like transport, indicating the presence of pinholes in the thin top MgO layer. Three IETS peaks are the zero-bias anomaly, interface magnons, and barrier phonons in both the parallel and antiparallel states. The zero-bias anomaly is the strongest peak in the parallel state and its intensity decreases with temperature. The magnon has the largest intensity in the antiparallel state and its intensity also decreases with temperature. The origins of the dips and peaks in the dI/dV-V curve are also discussed.

  15. Constraints on transmission, dispersion, and density of states in dielectric multilayers and stepwise potential barriers with an arbitrary layer arrangement.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, S V; Gaponenko, S V

    2008-04-01

    Normal-incidence transmission and dispersion properties of optical multilayers and one-dimensional stepwise potential barriers in the nontunneling regime are analytically investigated. The optical paths of every constituent layer in a multilayer structure, as well as the parameters of every step of the stepwise potential barrier, are constrained by a generalized quarter-wave condition. No other restrictions on the structure geometry are imposed, i.e., the layers are arranged arbitrarily. We show that the density of states (DOS) spectra of the multilayer or barrier in question are subject to integral conservation rules similar to the Barnett-Loudon sum rule but occurring within a finite frequency or energy interval. In the optical case, these frequency intervals are regular. For the potential barriers, only nonperiodic energy intervals can be present in the spectrum of any given structure, and only if the parameters of constituent potential steps are properly chosen. The integral conservation relations derived analytically have also been verified numerically. The relations can be used in dispersion-engineered multilayer-based devices, e.g., ultrashort pulse compressors or ultracompact optical delay lines, as well as to design multiple-quantum-well electronic heterostructures with engineered DOS.

  16. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, Alexander H.; Labelle, André J.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells.

  17. On statistical properties of transport barriers in magnetospheric and laboratory boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Sergey; Budaev, Viacheslav; Zeleniy, Lev; Amata, Ermanno; Kozak, Lyudmila; Buechner, Joerg; Romanov, Stanislav; Blecki, Jan; Balikhin, Michael A.; Lezhen, Liudmila

    Transport barriers at outer magnetospheric boundaries have a dualistic feature: being effec-tive in limitation of the momentum transfer and serving as an effective obstacle, they display the super-diffusive statistical properties and provide partial exchange of plasmas. In tokamaks namely the statistical properties of transport barriers look to control the high and low heating modes, while small size of the barriers prevents their detailed studies. We tend to use magne-tospheric multi-spacecraft data to improve understanding of common physics in the transport barriers. We show examples from Interball-1 and Cluster with quiet solar wind. The inherently turbulent crossings in this equilibrium cases demonstrate ion heating namely in the transport barrier. It agrees with the kinetic energy transformation into the thermal one inside the barrier -the turbulent dissipation of the magnetosheath kinetic energy -as simultaneously with the ion temperature rise, the general velocity component drops from its model prediction. In sense of the momentum transfer the transport turbulent barriers effectively isolate the high-alti-tude cusp from fast-flowing magnetosheath. Contrary to that, several examples from different missions and different plasma parameters demonstrate the super-diffusive transport character. The individual coherent structures inside the barriers, which we call Alfvenic 'collapsons', have similar scale chains to that of high kinetic plasma pressure jets, showing mutual interaction features. We think that the interacting jets and barriers, accompanying by classic and/ or micro-reconnection, have rather general importance for the plasma physics, and for understanding of turbulence and mechanisms of magnetic field generation. These coherent, nonlinear interacting structures, most probably, provide intermittency a long-range correlations inside the transport barriers (c.f. blobs and flow spikes in fusion devices). We recall that very high-amplitude turbulence in

  18. Enhancement of the barrier performance in organic/inorganic multilayer thin-film structures by annealing of the parylene layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Namsu; Graham, Samuel; Hwang, Kyung-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • High performance thin-film barrier structure for encapsulation was fabricated. • By annealing parylene in encapsulation structure, the barrier performance was improved. • The effective water vapor transmission rate is 7.2 ± 3.0 × 10{sup −6} g/m{sup 2}/day. - Abstract: A multilayered barrier structure was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition of parylene and subsequent plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of SiO{sub x} or SiN{sub x}. The barrier performance against water vapor ingress was significantly improved by annealing the parylene layer before the deposition of either SiO{sub x} or SiN{sub x}. The mechanism of this enhancement was investigated using atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The surface roughness of the parylene before the deposition of either SiO{sub x} or SiN{sub x} was found to correlate closely with the barrier performance of the multilayered structures. In addition, removing absorbed water vapor in the film by annealing results in a lower water vapor transmission rate in the transient region and a longer lag time. Annealing the parylene leads to a large decrease in the effective water vapor transmission rate, which reaches 7.2 ± 3.0 × 10{sup −6} g/m{sup 2}/day.

  19. Research Update: Reactively sputtered nanometer-thin ZrN film as a diffusion barrier between Al and boron layers for radiation detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshani, Negin; Mohammadi, V.; Schellevis, H.; Beenakker, C. I. M.; Ishihara, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, optimization of the process flow for PureB detectors is investigated. Diffusion barrier layers between a boron layer and the aluminum interconnect can be used to enhance the performance and visual appearance of radiation detectors. Few nanometers-thin Zirconium Nitride (ZrN) layer deposited by reactive sputtering in a mixture of Ar/N2, is identified as a reliable diffusion barrier with better fabrication process compatibility than others. The barrier properties of this layer have been tested for different boron layers deposited at low and high temperatures with extensive optical microscopy analyses, electron beam induced current, SEM, and electrical measurements. This study demonstrated that spiking behavior of pure Al on Si can be prevented by the thin ZrN layer thus improving the performance of the radiation detectors fabricated using boron layer.

  20. Research Update: Reactively sputtered nanometer-thin ZrN film as a diffusion barrier between Al and boron layers for radiation detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Golshani, Negin Mohammadi, V.; Schellevis, H.; Beenakker, C. I. M.; Ishihara, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, optimization of the process flow for PureB detectors is investigated. Diffusion barrier layers between a boron layer and the aluminum interconnect can be used to enhance the performance and visual appearance of radiation detectors. Few nanometers-thin Zirconium Nitride (ZrN) layer deposited by reactive sputtering in a mixture of Ar/N{sub 2}, is identified as a reliable diffusion barrier with better fabrication process compatibility than others. The barrier properties of this layer have been tested for different boron layers deposited at low and high temperatures with extensive optical microscopy analyses, electron beam induced current, SEM, and electrical measurements. This study demonstrated that spiking behavior of pure Al on Si can be prevented by the thin ZrN layer thus improving the performance of the radiation detectors fabricated using boron layer.

  1. Physical and numerical modeling of an inclined three-layer (silt/gravelly sand/clay) capillary barrier cover system under extreme rainfall.

    PubMed

    Ng, Charles W W; Liu, Jian; Chen, Rui; Xu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    As an extension of the two-layer capillary barrier, a three-layer capillary barrier landfill cover system is proposed for minimizing rainfall infiltration in humid climates. This system consists of a compacted clay layer lying beneath a conventional cover with capillary barrier effects (CCBE), which is in turn composed of a silt layer sitting on top of a gravelly sand layer. To explore the effectiveness of the new system in minimizing rainfall infiltration, a flume model (3.0 m × 1.0 m × 1.1 m) was designed and set up in this study. This physical model was heavily instrumented to monitor pore water pressure, volumetric water content, surface runoff, infiltration and lateral drainage of each layer, and percolation of the cover system. The cover system was subjected to extreme rainfall followed by evaporation. The experiment was also back-analyzed using a piece of finite element software called CODE_BRIGHT to simulate transient water flows in the test. Based on the results obtained from various instruments, it was found that breakthrough of the two upper layers occurred for a 4-h rainfall event having a 100-year return period. Due to the presence of the newly introduced clay layer, the percolation of the three-layer capillary barrier cover system was insignificant because the clay layer enabled lateral diversion in the gravelly sand layer above. In other words, the gravelly sand layer changed from being a capillary barrier in a convention CCBE cover to being a lateral diversion passage after the breakthrough of the two upper layers. Experimental and back-analysis results confirm that no infiltrated water seeped through the proposed three-layer barrier system. The proposed system thus represents a promising alternative landfill cover system for use in humid climates. PMID:25582391

  2. Physical and numerical modeling of an inclined three-layer (silt/gravelly sand/clay) capillary barrier cover system under extreme rainfall.

    PubMed

    Ng, Charles W W; Liu, Jian; Chen, Rui; Xu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    As an extension of the two-layer capillary barrier, a three-layer capillary barrier landfill cover system is proposed for minimizing rainfall infiltration in humid climates. This system consists of a compacted clay layer lying beneath a conventional cover with capillary barrier effects (CCBE), which is in turn composed of a silt layer sitting on top of a gravelly sand layer. To explore the effectiveness of the new system in minimizing rainfall infiltration, a flume model (3.0 m × 1.0 m × 1.1 m) was designed and set up in this study. This physical model was heavily instrumented to monitor pore water pressure, volumetric water content, surface runoff, infiltration and lateral drainage of each layer, and percolation of the cover system. The cover system was subjected to extreme rainfall followed by evaporation. The experiment was also back-analyzed using a piece of finite element software called CODE_BRIGHT to simulate transient water flows in the test. Based on the results obtained from various instruments, it was found that breakthrough of the two upper layers occurred for a 4-h rainfall event having a 100-year return period. Due to the presence of the newly introduced clay layer, the percolation of the three-layer capillary barrier cover system was insignificant because the clay layer enabled lateral diversion in the gravelly sand layer above. In other words, the gravelly sand layer changed from being a capillary barrier in a convention CCBE cover to being a lateral diversion passage after the breakthrough of the two upper layers. Experimental and back-analysis results confirm that no infiltrated water seeped through the proposed three-layer barrier system. The proposed system thus represents a promising alternative landfill cover system for use in humid climates.

  3. Analysis of Al diffusion processes in TiN barrier layers for the application in silicon solar cell metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumm, J.; Samadi, H.; Chacko, R. V.; Hartmann, P.; Wolf, A.

    2016-07-01

    An evaporated Al layer is known as an excellent rear metallization for highly efficient solar cells, but suffers from incompatibility with a common solder process. To enable solar cell-interconnection and module integration, in this work the Al layer is complemented with a solder stack of TiN/Ti/Ag or TiN/NiV/Ag, in which the TiN layer acts as an Al diffusion barrier. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove that diffusion of Al through the stack and the formation of an Al2O3 layer on the stack's surface are responsible for a loss of solderability after a strong post-metallization anneal, which is often mandatory to improve contact resistance and passivation quality. An optimization of the reactive TiN sputter process results in a densification of the TiN layer, which improves its barrier quality against Al diffusion. However, measurements with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show that small grains with vertical grain boundaries persist, which still offer fast diffusion paths. Therefore, the concept of stuffing is introduced. By incorporating oxygen into the grain boundaries of the sputtered TiN layer, Al diffusion is strongly reduced as confirmed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles. A quantitative analysis reveals a one order of magnitude lower Al diffusion coefficient for stuffed TiN layers. This metallization system maintains its solderability even after strong post-metallization annealing at 425 °C for 15 min. This paper thus presents an industrially feasible, conventionally solderable, and long-term stable metallization scheme for highly efficient silicon solar cells.

  4. Double-Layer Gadolinium Zirconate/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.; Harris, Alan B.; Gell, Maurice; Roth, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with lower thermal conductivity, increased resistance to calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS), and improved high-temperature capability, compared to traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBCs, are essential to higher efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. Double-layer rare-earth zirconate/YSZ TBCs are a promising solution. From a processing perspective, solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process with its unique and beneficial microstructural features can be an effective approach to obtaining the double-layer microstructure. Previously durable low-thermal-conductivity YSZ TBCs with optimized layered porosity, called the inter-pass boundaries (IPBs) were produced using the SPPS process. In this study, an SPPS gadolinium zirconate (GZO) protective surface layer was successfully added. These SPPS double-layer TBCs not only retained good cyclic durability and low thermal conductivity, but also demonstrated favorable phase stability and increased surface temperature capabilities. The CMAS resistance was evaluated with both accumulative and single applications of simulated CMAS in isothermal furnaces. The double-layer YSZ/GZO exhibited dramatic improvement in the single application, but not in the continuous one. In addition, to explore their potential application in integrated gasification combined cycle environments, double-layer TBCs were tested under high-temperature humidity and encouraging performance was recorded.

  5. Development of Thermal Barrier Coating System with Superior Thermal Cyclic Properties with an Intermediate Layer Containing MoSi2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoya, Keiji; Tobe, Shogo

    The authors have developed a method of improving the thermal cyclic resistance of the thermal barrier coating system that is deposited on gas turbine components. A conventional thermal barrier coating consists of a duplex system: a top coating and a bond coating. The developed system has a protective intermediate layer of MoSi2 which prevents oxidation of the bond coating. The conventional duplex plasma -sprayed coating was delaminated after 20 thermal cycles. On the other hand, the developed triple-layered coating system was not delaminated after 60 cycles. The reason for the enhanced resistance to thermal cycles of the developed triple-layered coating system is that the MoSi2 layer between the top coating and the bond coating has a self-repairing property. MoSi2 oxidizes to form SiO2, which seals the cracks and pores formed between the top coating and the bond coating. Thus, the formation of a thermally grown oxide(TGO), which causes the delamination of the coating, is prevented and the thermal cyclic resistance is improved.

  6. Increased single-photon emission from InP/AlGaInP quantum dots grown on AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßbach, R.; Schulz, W.-M.; Reischle, M.; Beirne, G. J.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.

    2008-11-01

    InP/GaInP quantum dots emitting in the red spectral range have been grown on an AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflector in order to increase the single-photon emission efficiency. We have observed an increase in ensemble photoluminescence by a factor of 28 in comparison to the reference InP/GaInP quantum dots grown without such a reflector underneath. Photon correlation measurements performed under pulsed excitation show a clear antibunching behavior ( g(0)=0.17) as expected for a single-photon emitter. Using aluminum containing barriers to surround the quantum dots the ensemble luminescence intensity could be increased by a factor of 500 at 240 K in comparison to the reference sample at 240 K.

  7. Laboratory column study for remediation of MTBE-contaminated groundwater using a biological two-layer permeable barrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, She-Jiang; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xin-Gang

    2006-10-01

    In this study, an in situ biological two-layer permeable reactive barrier system consisting of an oxygen-releasing material layer followed by a biodegradation layer was designed to evaluate the remediation effectiveness of MTBE-contaminated groundwater. The first layer containing calcium peroxide (CaO(2)) and other inorganic salts is to provide oxygen and nutrients for the immobilized microbes in the second layer in order to keep them in aerobic condition and maintain their normal metabolism. Furthermore, inorganic salts such as potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH(2)PO(4)) and ammonium sulphate ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)) can also decrease the high pH caused by the alkali salt degraded from CaO(2). The second layer using granular expanded perlite as microbial carrier is able to biodegrade MTBE entering the barrier system. Batch experiments were conducted to identify the appropriate components of oxygen-releasing materials and the optimum pH value for the biodegradation of MTBE. At pH=8.0, the biodegradation efficiency of MTBE is the maximum and approximately 48.9%. A laboratory-scale experiment using two continuous upflow stainless-steel columns was then performed to evaluate the feasibility of this designed system. The fist column was filled with oxygen-releasing materials at certain ratio by weight. The second column was filled with expanded perlite granules immobilizing MTBE-degrading microbial consortium. Simulated MTBE-contaminated groundwater, in which dissolved oxygen (DO) content was 0mg/L, was pumped into this system at a flow rate of 500mL/d. Samples from the second column were analyzed for MTBE and its major degradation byproduct. Results showed that MTBE could be removed, and its metabolic intermediate, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), could also be further degraded in this passive system.

  8. TlGaInNAs/GaAs double quantum well structures: Effect of barrier layers and substrate orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Fujiwara, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Asahi, H.

    2007-04-01

    The quinary TlGaInNAs-based double quantum well (DQW) structures were grown on GaAs substrates by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)-MBE and the samples were probed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Light emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated using these DQW wafers and their electroluminescence (EL) behaviors were studied at different temperatures. The effects of different barrier layers and substrate orientations on the amount of Tl incorporation and on the temperature dependency of the EL peak wavelengths of the LEDs were studied. Higher incorporation of Tl into the quantum well (QW) region and the ensuing change in the temperature dependency of the peak wavelengths owing to the TlGaAs barrier layer are reported. GaAs substrates having (3 1 1)B orientation were found to allow more Tl incorporation as compared to (1 0 0) and (3 1 1)A oriented substrates. The LEDs fabricated out of the TlGaInNAs/TlGaAs/(3 1 1)B GaAs DQW structures showed the least temperature dependency of the EL peak wavelengths exemplifying the usefulness of Tl in the QW as well as barrier region.

  9. Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with double barrier and single or synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer

    SciTech Connect

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Prejbeanu, Ioan L.; Dieny, Bernard

    2015-06-21

    The magnetic properties of double tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy were investigated. Two synthetic antiferromagnetic references are used, while the middle storage magnetic layer can be either a single ferromagnetic or a synthetic antiferromagnetic FeCoB-based layer, with a critical thickness as large as 3.0 nm. Among the different achievable magnetic configurations in zero field, those with either antiparallel references, and single ferromagnetic storage layer, or parallel references, and synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer, are of particular interest since they allow increasing the efficiency of spin transfer torque writing and the thermal stability of the stored information as compared to single tunnel junctions. The latter configuration can be preferred when stray fields would favour a parallel orientation of the reference layers. In this case, the synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer is also less sensitive to residual stray fields.

  10. Electrically Tunable and Negative Schottky Barriers in Multi-layered Graphene/MoS2 Heterostructured Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Dongri; Kim, Eun Kyu

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated multi-layered graphene/MoS2 heterostructured devices by positioning mechanically exfoliated bulk graphite and single-crystalline 2H-MoS2 onto Au metal pads on a SiO2/Si substrate via a contamination-free dry transfer technique. We also studied the electrical transport properties of Au/MoS2 junction devices for systematic comparison. A previous work has demonstrated the existence of a positive Schottky barrier height (SBH) in the metal/MoS2 system. However, analysis of the SBH indicates that the contacts of the multi-layered graphene/MoS2 have tunable negative barriers in the range of 300 to −46 meV as a function of gate voltage. It is hypothesized that this tunable SBH is responsible for the modulation of the work function of the thick graphene in these devices. Despite the large number of graphene layers, it is possible to form ohmic contacts, which will provide new opportunities for the engineering of highly efficient contacts in flexible electronics and photonics. PMID:26333680

  11. Silica-sol-based spin-coating barrier layer against phosphorous diffusion for crystalline silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Uzum, Abdullah; Fukatsu, Ken; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Tanimoto, Kenji; Yoshinaga, Seiya; Jiang, Yunjian; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorus barrier layers at the doping procedure of silicon wafers were fabricated using a spin-coating method with a mixture of silica-sol and tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which can be formed at the rear surface prior to the front phosphorus spin-on-demand (SOD) diffusion and directly annealed simultaneously with the front phosphorus layer. The optimization of coating thickness was obtained by changing the applied spin-coating speed; from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. The CZ-Si p-type silicon solar cells were fabricated with/without using the rear silica-sol layer after taking the sheet resistance measurements, SIMS analysis, and SEM measurements of the silica-sol material evaluations into consideration. For the fabrication of solar cells, a spin-coating phosphorus source was used to form the n(+) emitter and was then diffused at 930°C for 35 min. The out-gas diffusion of phosphorus could be completely prevented by spin-coated silica-sol film placed on the rear side of the wafers coated prior to the diffusion process. A roughly 2% improvement in the conversion efficiency was observed when silica-sol was utilized during the phosphorus diffusion step. These results can suggest that the silica-sol material can be an attractive candidate for low-cost and easily applicable spin-coating barrier for any masking purpose involving phosphorus diffusion.

  12. Effect of Layer-Graded Bond Coats on Edge Stress Concentration and Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability is closely related to design, processing and microstructure of the coating Z, tn systems. Two important issues that must be considered during the design of a thermal barrier coating are thermal expansion and modulus mismatch between the substrate and the ceramic layer, and substrate oxidation. In many cases, both of these issues may be best addressed through the selection of an appropriate bond coat system. In this study, a low thermal expansion and layer-graded bond coat system, that consists of plasma-sprayed FeCoNiCrAl and FeCrAlY coatings, and a high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed FeCrAlY coating, is developed to minimize the thermal stresses and provide oxidation resistance. The thermal expansion and oxidation behavior of the coating system are also characterized, and the strain isolation effect of the bond coat system is analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Experiments and finite element results show that the layer-graded bond coat system possesses lower interfacial stresses. better strain isolation and excellent oxidation resistance. thus significantly improving the coating performance and durability.

  13. Fabrication of stable electrode/diffusion barrier layers for thermoelectric filled skutterudite devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jie, Qing; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed are methods for the manufacture of n-type and p-type filled skutterudite thermoelectric legs of an electrical contact. A first material of CoSi.sub.2 and a dopant are ball-milled to form a first powder which is thermo-mechanically processed with a second powder of n-type skutterudite to form a n-type skutterudite layer disposed between a first layer and a third layer of the doped-CoSi.sub.2. In addition, a plurality of components such as iron, and nickel, and at least one of cobalt or chromium are ball-milled form a first powder that is thermo-mechanically processed with a p-type skutterudite layer to form a p-type skutterudite layer "second layer" disposed between a first and a third layer of the first powder. The specific contact resistance between the first layer and the skutterudite layer for both the n-type and the p-type skutterudites subsequent to hot-pressing is less than about 10.0 .mu..OMEGA.cm.sup.2.

  14. Formation and investigation of ultrathin layers of Co2FeSi ferromagnetic alloy synthesized on silicon covered with a CaF2 barrier layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenyuk, G. S.; Gomoyunova, M. V.; Pronin, I. I.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin (∼2 nm) films of Co2FeSi ferromagnetic alloy were formed on silicon by solid-phase epitaxy and studied in situ. Experiments were carried out in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using substrates of Si(1 1 1) single crystals covered with a 5 nm thick CaF2 barrier layer. The elemental and phase composition as well as the magnetic properties of the synthesized films were analyzed by photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation and by magnetic linear dichroism in photoemission of Fe 3p and Co 3p electrons. The study shows that the synthesis of the Co2FeSi ferromagnetic alloy occurs in the temperature range of 200-400 °C. At higher temperatures, the films become island-like and lose their ferromagnetic properties, as the CaF2 barrier layer is unable to prevent a mass transfer between the film and the Si substrate, which violates the stoichiometry of the alloy.

  15. Preparation of low-sulfur platinum and platinum aluminide layers in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Walston, William S. (Inventor); Schaeffer, Jon C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for preparing a coated nickel-base superalloy article reduces the sulfur content of the surface region of the metallic coating layers to low levels, thereby improving the adhesion of the coating layers to the article. The method includes depositing a first layer of platinum overlying the surface of a substrate, depositing a second layer of aluminum over the platinum, and final desulfurizing the article by heating the article to elevated temperature, preferably in hydrogen, and removing a small amount of material from the surface that was exposed during the step of heating. A ceramic layer may be deposited over the desulfurized article. The article may also be similarly desulfurized at other points in the fabrication procedure.

  16. Average power constraints in AlGaAs semiconductor lasers under pulse-position-modulation conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    In some optical communications systems there are advantages to using low duty-cycle pulsed modulation formats such as pulse-position-modulation. However, because of intrinsic limitations of AlGaAs semiconductor lasers, the average power that they can deliver in a pulsed mode of operation is lower than in a CW mode. The magnitude of this problem and its implications are analyzed in this letter, and one possible solution is mentioned.

  17. Enhanced second-harmonic generation driven from magnetic dipole resonance in AlGaAs nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carletti, Luca; Rocco, Davide; Locatelli, Andrea; Gili, Valerio; Leo, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Costantino

    2016-04-01

    We model the linear and nonlinear optical response of disk-shaped AlGaAs nanoantennas. We design nanoantennas with a magnetic dipole resonant mode in the near-infrared wavelength range, and we analyze volume second-harmonic generation driven by a magnetic dipole resonance by predicting a conversion efficiency exceeding 10-3 with 1 GW/cm2 of pump intensity.

  18. Altimetry and lidar using AlGaAs lasers modulated with pseudo-random codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Manizade, Serdar S.

    1992-01-01

    We have demonstrated a prototype laser altimeter and lidar which uses a low power AlGaAs laser modulated with a pseudorandom noise (PN) code, a 20 cm diameter telescope, and a photon counting receiver. Measurements to tree canopies over a 400 m horizontal path show strong signals with 5.3 mW average power and a 6.4 msec averaging time. Computer simulations predict lidar performance for various types of scattering performance.

  19. Reduction of aerodynamic friction drag of moving bodies using a Microwave-Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge actuator controlling the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Thiery

    2015-11-01

    A new plasma device named M-DBD (Microwave Dielectric Barrier Discharge) is used for controlling the boundary layer in order to reduce the drag force. A compact resonant UHF structure comprising a resonant element in the form of a quarter-wave antenna creates a mini-plasma insulated from the UHF electrodes by mica sheets. Additional electrodes induce an electric field in the plasma and transiently move the ions of the plasma. The high collision rate with the neutral molecules induce the global transient flow of the neutral gas. The temporal variation of the applied electric field is chosen in order to obtain a modification of the local boundary layer. First tests using an array of M-DBD plasma actuators are underway (see Patent ref. WO 2014111469 A1).

  20. Self-assembled Ge QDs Formed by High-Temperature Annealing on Al(Ga)As (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William A.; Qi, Meng; Yan, Lifan; Stephenson, Chad A.; Protasenko, Vladimir; Xing, Huili; Millunchick, Joanna M.; Wistey, Mark A.

    2015-05-01

    This work studies the spontaneous self-assembly of Ge QDs on AlAs, GaAs and AlGaAs by high-temperature in situ annealing using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The morphology of Ge dots formed on AlAs were observed by atom probe tomography, which revealed nearly spherical QDs with diameters approaching 10 nm and confirmed the complete absence of a wetting layer. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy of Ge annealed under similar conditions on GaAs and Al0.3Ga0.7As surfaces revealed the gradual suppression of QD formation with decreasing Al-content of the buffer. To investigate the prospects of using encapsulated Ge dots for upconverting photovoltaics, in which photocurrent can still be generated from photons with energy less than the host bandgap, Ge QDs were embedded into the active region of III-V PIN diodes by MBE. It was observed that orders of magnitude higher short-circuit current is obtained at photon energies below the GaAs bandgap compared with a reference PIN diode without Ge QDs. These results demonstrate the promise of Ge QDs for upconverting solar cells and the realization of device-quality integration of group IV and III-V semiconductors.

  1. Low-temperature gas-barrier films by atomic layer deposition for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hui-Huan; Chou, Kun-Yi; Jou, Jwo-Huei; Lin, Kung-Liang; Wang, Chin-Chiun; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Dependences of gas-barrier performance on the deposition temperature of atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) Al2O3, HfO2, and ZnO films were studied to establish low-temperature ALD processes for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). By identifying and controlling the key factors, i.e. using H2O2 as an oxidant, laminating Al2O3 with HfO2 or ZnO layers into AHO or AZO nanolaminates, and extending purge steps, OLED-acceptable gas-barrier performance (water vapor transmission rates ∼ 10‑6 g m‑2 d‑1) was achieved for the first time at a low deposition temperature of 50 °C in a thermal ALD mode. The compatibility of the low-temperature ALD process with OLEDs was confirmed by applying the process to encapsulate different types of OLED devices, which were degradation-free upon encapsulation and showed adequate lifetime during accelerated aging tests (pixel shrinkage <5% after 240 h at 60 °C/90% RH).

  2. Low-temperature gas-barrier films by atomic layer deposition for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hui-Huan; Chou, Kun-Yi; Jou, Jwo-Huei; Lin, Kung-Liang; Wang, Chin-Chiun; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Dependences of gas-barrier performance on the deposition temperature of atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) Al2O3, HfO2, and ZnO films were studied to establish low-temperature ALD processes for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). By identifying and controlling the key factors, i.e. using H2O2 as an oxidant, laminating Al2O3 with HfO2 or ZnO layers into AHO or AZO nanolaminates, and extending purge steps, OLED-acceptable gas-barrier performance (water vapor transmission rates ˜ 10-6 g m-2 d-1) was achieved for the first time at a low deposition temperature of 50 °C in a thermal ALD mode. The compatibility of the low-temperature ALD process with OLEDs was confirmed by applying the process to encapsulate different types of OLED devices, which were degradation-free upon encapsulation and showed adequate lifetime during accelerated aging tests (pixel shrinkage <5% after 240 h at 60 °C/90% RH).

  3. CdTe nBn photodetectors with ZnTe barrier layer grown on InSb substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhao-Yu; Campbell, Calli M.; Lassise, Maxwell B.; Lin, Zhi-Yuan; Becker, Jacob J.; Zhao, Yuan; Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2016-09-01

    We have demonstrated an 820 nm cutoff CdTe nBn photodetector with ZnTe barrier layer grown on an InSb substrate. At room temperature, under a bias of -0.1 V, the photodetector shows Johnson and shot noise limited specific detectivity (D*) of 3 × 1013 cm Hz1/2/W at a wavelength of 800 nm and 2 × 1012 cm Hz1/2/W at 200 nm. The D* is optimized by using a top contact design of ITO/undoped-CdTe. This device not only possesses nBn advantageous characteristics, such as generation-recombination dark current suppression and voltage-bias-addressed two-color photodetection, but also offers features including responsivity enhancements by deep-depletion and by using a heterostructure ZnTe barrier layer. In addition, this device provides a platform to study nBn device physics at room temperature, which will help us to understand more sophisticated properties of infrared nBn photodetectors that may possess a large band-to-band tunneling current at a high voltage bias, because this current is greatly suppressed in the large-bandgap CdTe nBn photodetector.

  4. AlGaAs ridge laser with 33% wall-plug efficiency at 100 °C based on a design of experiments approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecioru, Alin; Boohan, Niall; Justice, John; Gocalinska, Agnieszka; Pelucchi, Emanuele; Gubbins, Mark A.; Mooney, Marcus B.; Corbett, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Upcoming applications for semiconductor lasers present limited thermal dissipation routes demanding the highest efficiency devices at high operating temperatures. This paper reports on a comprehensive design of experiment optimisation for the epitaxial layer structure of AlGaAs based 840 nm lasers for operation at high temperature (100 °C) using Technology Computer-Aided Design software. The waveguide thickness, Al content, doping level, and quantum well thickness were optimised. The resultant design was grown and the fabricated ridge waveguides were optimised for carrier injection and, at 100 °C, the lasers achieve a total power output of 28 mW at a current of 50 mA, a total slope efficiency 0.82 W A-1 with a corresponding wall-plug efficiency of 33%.

  5. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  6. Application Of Ti-Based Self-Formation Barrier Layers To Cu Dual-Damascene Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kazuhiro; Kohama, Kazuyuki; Ohmori, Kazuyuki; Mori, Kenichi; Maekawa, Kazuyoshi; Asai, Koyu; Murakami, Masanori

    2010-11-24

    Cu interconnects have been used extensively in ULSI devices. However, large resistance-capacitance delay and poor device reliability have been critical issues as the device feature size has reduced to nanometer scale. In order to achieve low resistance and high reliability of Cu interconnects, we have applied a thin Ti-based self-formed barrier (SFB) using Cu(Ti) alloy seed to 45nm-node dual damascene interconnects and evaluated its performance. The line resistance and via resistance decreased significantly, compared with those of conventional Ta/TaN barriers. The stress migration performance was also drastically improved using the SFB process. A performance of time dependent dielectric breakdown revealed superior endurance. These results suggest that the Ti-based SFB process is one of the most promising candidates for advanced Cu interconnects. TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy observations for characterization of the Ti-based SFB structure were also performed. The Ti-based SFB consisted of mainly amorphous Ti oxides. Amorphous or crystalline Ti compounds such as TiC, TiN, and TiSi formed beneath Cu alloy films, and the formation varied with dielectric.

  7. Evaluation of a barrier to inhibit lesser mealworm (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and dermestidae movement in high-rise, caged-layer poultry facilities.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Phillip E; Reasor, Colleen; Murray, Kathleen D; Waldron, J Keith; Rutz, Donald A

    2005-10-01

    An evaluation of a mechanical barrier to prevent movement of adult and larval lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer); larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius L.; and hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus De Geer was conducted in caged-layer poultry facilities in New York and Maine. The barrier, a plastic collar wrapped around building support posts, proved highly effective at preventing movement of adult lesser mealworms. Significantly more lesser mealworm larvae were recovered from cardboard collar beetle traps placed below both washed and unwashed barriers than from traps placed above washed and unwashed barriers. Similarly, significantly more adult Dermestes were recovered from traps placed below washed barriers than from above both washed and unwashed barriers. The level of fly specking on the barrier was found to have no significant impact on the numbers of adult lesser mealworms and adult and larval Dermestes recovered either above or below barriers. Fly specking level did significantly impact the numbers of lesser mealworm larvae recovered above the barrier. Although washed barriers provided the greatest deterrent to adult lesser mealworms, the presence of the barrier, regardless of the level of fly specking, provided a significant deterrent to beetle climbing success. Washed barriers further reduced climbing success by lesser mealworm larvae by 17%, Dermestes adults by 7-28%, and Dermestes larvae by 33-38%. The high level of climbing observed by adult lesser mealworms suggests that the impact of adult beetle movement toward birds should be considered in its importance in building damage, disease transmission, feed infestation, and bird productivity and health. Observations on cost and maintenance of the barrier are discussed. PMID:16334349

  8. Thermoelastic characteristics of thermal barrier coatings with layer thickness and edge conditions through mathematical analysis.

    PubMed

    Go, Jaegwi; Myoung, Sang-Won; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Kim, Seokchan; Paik, Ungyu

    2014-10-01

    The thermoelastic behaviors of such as temperature distribution, displacements, and stresses in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are seriously influenced by top coat thickness and edge conditions, which were investigated based on the thermal and mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed TBCs. A couple of governing partial differential equations were derived based on the thermoelastic theory. Since the governing equations are too involved to solve analytically, a finite volume method was developed to obtain approximations. The thermoelastic characteristics of TBCs with the various thicknesses and microstructures were estimated through mathematical approaches with different edge conditions. The results demonstrated that the top coat thickness and the edge condition in theoretical analysis are crucial factors to be considered in controlling the thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed TBCs.

  9. On the optimization of asymmetric barrier layers in InAlGaAs/AlGaAs laser heterostructures on GaAs substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. E.; Asryan, L. V.; Semenova, E. S.; Zubov, F. I.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Maximov, M. V.

    2015-07-15

    Band offsets at the heterointerface are calculated for various combinations of InAlGaAs/AlGaAs heteropairs that can be synthesized on GaAs substrates in the layer-by-layer pseudomorphic growth mode. Patterns which make it possible to obtain an asymmetric barrier layer providing the almost obstruction-free transport of holes and the highest possible barrier height for electrons are found. The optimal compositions of both compounds (In{sup 0.232}Al{sup 0.594}Ga{sup 0.174}As/Al{sup 0.355}Ga{sup 0.645}As) at which the flux of electrons across the barrier is at a minimum are determined with consideration for the critical thickness of the indium-containing quaternary solid solution.

  10. Nanometer-thick amorphous-SnO2 layer as an oxygen barrier coated on a transparent AZO electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee Sang; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2016-07-01

    It is necessary for transparent conducting electrodes used in dye-sensitized or perovskite solar cells to have high thermal stability which is required when TiO2 is coated on the electrode. AZO films with their low-cost and good TCO properties are unfortunately unstable above 300 °C in air because of adsorbed oxygen. In this paper, the thermal stability of AZO films is enhanced by depositing an oxygen barrier on AZO films to block the oxygen. As the barrier material, SnO2 is used due to its high heat stability, electrical conductivity, and transmittance. Moreover, when the SnO2 is grown as amorphous phase, the protective effect become greater than the crystalline phase. The thermal stability of the amorphous-SnO2/AZO films varies depending on the thickness of the amorphous SnO2 layer. Because of the outstanding oxygen blocking properties of amorphous SnO2, its optimal thickness is very thin and it results in only a slight decrease in transmittance. The sheet resistance of the amorphous-SnO2/AZO film is 5.4 Ω sq-1 after heat treatment at 500 °C for 30 min in air and the average transmittance in the visible region is 83.4%. The results show that the amorphous-SnO2/AZO films have thermal stability with excellent electrical and optical properties. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Annual layers revealed by GPR in the subsurface of a prograding coastal barrier, southwest Washington, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, L.J.; Jol, H.M.; Kruse, S.; Vanderburgh, S.; Kaminsky, G.M.

    2004-01-01

    The southwest Washington coastline has experienced extremely high rates of progradation during the late Holocene. Subsurface stratigraphy, preserved because of progradation and interpreted using ground-penetrating radar (GPR), has previously been used successfully to document coastal response to prehistoric storm and earthquake events. New GPR data collected at Ocean Shores, Washington, suggest that the historic stratigraphy of the coastal barrier in this area represents a higher resolution record of coastal behavior than previously thought. GPR records for this location at 200 MHz reveal a series of gently sloping, seaward-dipping reflections with slopes similar to the modern beach and spacings on the order of 20-45 cm. Field evidence and model results suggest that thin (1-10 cm), possibly magnetite-rich, heavy-mineral lags or low-porosity layers left by winter storms and separated by thick (20-40 cm) summer progradational sequences are responsible for generating the GPR reflections. These results indicate that a record of annual progradation is preserved in the subsurface of the prograding barrier and can be quantified using GPR. Such records of annual coastal behavior, where available, will be invaluable in understanding past coastal response to climatic and tectonic forcing. ?? 2004.

  12. Performance enhancement of AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with varied superlattice barrier electron blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songqing; Ye, Chunya; Cai, Xuefen; Li, Shuping; Lin, Wei; Kang, Junyong

    2016-05-01

    The AlGaN-based deep-UV LEDs with specific design of varied superlattice barrier electron blocking layer (EBL) has been investigated numerically by APSYS software. The proposed structure exhibits significant improvement in the light output power, internal quantum efficiency, current-voltage curve and electroluminescence intensity. After analyzing the profiles of energy band diagrams, carriers concentration and radiative recombination rate, we find the main advantages of proposed structure are ascribed to higher barrier suppressing electron leakage and reduced barrier for hole injection. Thus, compared with reference sample, the proposed EBL design may be a good method for improving the whole performance of UV LEDs.

  13. Enhancing rectification of a nano-swimmer system by multi-layered asymmetric barriers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Fu; Xiao, Song; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-10-21

    The rectification of nano-swimmers in two chambers separated by a strip of funnel gates is explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. According to the trajectories of active colloids across the funnel zone, two rectification mechanisms are identified: geometry-assisted diffusion and trap-hindered diffusion. In general, geometry-assisted diffusion dominates at a small active force (Fa) and run time (τ) while trap-hindered diffusion governs at a large Fa and τ. The rectification ratio is affected by the funnel shape and various geometries are considered: open/closed triangular, circular and rectangular funnels. The rectification ratio of open funnels is always greater than that of closed funnels. Moreover, the open circular funnel has the best performance while the triangular one has the worst. Rectification can be enhanced as the number of funnel layers is increased. It is found that the rectification ratio of self-propelled colloids can be dramatically augmented by triple-layered funnels to be as high as 30. Our simulation study offers an efficient approach for rectification enhancement.

  14. Enhancing rectification of a nano-swimmer system by multi-layered asymmetric barriers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Fu; Xiao, Song; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-10-21

    The rectification of nano-swimmers in two chambers separated by a strip of funnel gates is explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. According to the trajectories of active colloids across the funnel zone, two rectification mechanisms are identified: geometry-assisted diffusion and trap-hindered diffusion. In general, geometry-assisted diffusion dominates at a small active force (Fa) and run time (τ) while trap-hindered diffusion governs at a large Fa and τ. The rectification ratio is affected by the funnel shape and various geometries are considered: open/closed triangular, circular and rectangular funnels. The rectification ratio of open funnels is always greater than that of closed funnels. Moreover, the open circular funnel has the best performance while the triangular one has the worst. Rectification can be enhanced as the number of funnel layers is increased. It is found that the rectification ratio of self-propelled colloids can be dramatically augmented by triple-layered funnels to be as high as 30. Our simulation study offers an efficient approach for rectification enhancement. PMID:26394906

  15. Enhancing rectification of a nano-swimmer system by multi-layered asymmetric barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Fu; Xiao, Song; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-10-01

    The rectification of nano-swimmers in two chambers separated by a strip of funnel gates is explored by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. According to the trajectories of active colloids across the funnel zone, two rectification mechanisms are identified: geometry-assisted diffusion and trap-hindered diffusion. In general, geometry-assisted diffusion dominates at a small active force (Fa) and run time (τ) while trap-hindered diffusion governs at a large Fa and τ. The rectification ratio is affected by the funnel shape and various geometries are considered: open/closed triangular, circular and rectangular funnels. The rectification ratio of open funnels is always greater than that of closed funnels. Moreover, the open circular funnel has the best performance while the triangular one has the worst. Rectification can be enhanced as the number of funnel layers is increased. It is found that the rectification ratio of self-propelled colloids can be dramatically augmented by triple-layered funnels to be as high as 30. Our simulation study offers an efficient approach for rectification enhancement.

  16. Improving the EUV reflectivity of Mg/SiC multilayers by inserting Zr barrier layers at the SiC-on-Mg interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuiping; Ji, Bei; Zhou, Jun; Li, Haochuan; Zhu, Jingtao

    2016-10-01

    In Mg/SiC multilayer deposition, the SiC-on-Mg interfaces were found to be much more diffused than the Mg-on-SiC interfaces. By inserting Zr barrier layers at the SiC-on-Mg interfaces, the diffusion at interface can be suppressed. The Mg/SiC multilayers were deposited by magnetron sputtering method, and were characterized by X-ray reflectometry and reflectometer of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of China, respectively. Results show that 0.5-nm-thick Zr barrier layers can dramatically reduce the interdiffusion at the SiC-on-Mg interfaces.

  17. High-power AlGaAs channeled substrate planar diode lasers for spaceborne communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. C.; Goldstein, B.; Pultz, G. N.; Slavin, S. E.; Carlin, D. B.; Ettenberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    A high power channeled substrate planar AlGaAs diode laser with an emission wavelength of 8600 to 8800 A was developed. The optoelectronic behavior (power current, single spatial and spectral behavior, far field characteristics, modulation, and astigmatism properties) and results of computer modeling studies on the performance of the laser are discussed. Lifetest data on these devices at high output power levels is also included. In addition, a new type of channeled substrate planar laser utilizing a Bragg grating to stabilize the longitudinal mode was demonstrated. The fabrication procedures and optoelectronic properties of this new diode laser are described.

  18. Single-hole transistor in p-type GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbić, Boris; Leturcq, Renaud; Ensslin, Klaus; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2005-12-01

    A single-hole transistor is patterned in a p-type, C-doped GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructure by scanning probe oxidation lithography. Clear Coulomb blockade resonances have been observed at Thole=300mK. A charging energy of ˜1.5meV is extracted from Coulomb diamond measurements, in agreement with the lithographic dimensions of the dot. The absence of excited states in Coulomb diamond measurements, as well as the temperature dependence of Coulomb peak heights indicate that the dot is in the multilevel transport regime. Fluctuations in peak spacings larger than the estimated mean single-particle level spacing are observed.

  19. Photon pair sources in AlGaAs: from electrical injection to quantum state engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autebert, C.; Boucher, G.; Boitier, F.; Eckstein, A.; Favero, I.; Leo, G.; Ducci, S.

    2015-11-01

    Integrated quantum photonics is a very active field of quantum information, communication, and processing. One of the main challenges to achieve massively parallel systems for complex operations is the generation, manipulation, and detection of many qubits within the same chip. Here, we present our last achievements on AlGaAs quantum photonic devices emitting nonclassical states of light at room temperature by spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC). The choice of this platform combines the advantages of a mature fabrication technology, a high nonlinear coefficient, a SPDC wavelength in the C-telecom band and the possibility of electrical injection.

  20. Direct Evidence for the DX Center Being a Substitutional Donor in AlGaAs Alloy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Masashi; Tachikawa, Masami; Kukimoto, Hiroshi; Minomura, Shigeru

    1985-02-01

    An experimental result that the DX center appears in GaAs:Si and GaAsd:Sn under hydrostatic pressure of about 30 kbars has been obtained for the first time. This indicates clearly that the DX center in the AlGaAs alloy system is due to a substitutional donor itself (not a complex referred to as “DX”). The change in nature from the the shallow donor to the deep DX center is discussed based on the complex multivalley conduction band structure of GaAs under various pressures and of AlGaAs with various compositions.

  1. Thin-film barrier performance of zirconium oxide using the low-temperature atomic layer deposition method.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yu; Sun, Fengbo; Yang, Yongqiang; Chen, Ping; Yang, Dan; Duan, Yahui; Wang, Xiao

    2014-03-26

    In this study, ZrO2 films deposited by the atomic layer deposition method, as the encapsulation layer for organic electronics devices, were characterized. Both the effects of tetrakis (dimethylamido) zirconium(IV) growth temperature and oxidants, such as water (H2O) and ozone (O3), were investigated. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows the amorphous characteristic of the 80-nm-thick films grown at 80 °C, the crystallinity of the films was much lower than those grown at 140 and 200 °C. The scanning electron microscopy analyses showed that the surface morphology strongly depended on the crystallinity of the film. The water vapor transmission rate of the 80 nm thick ZrO2 films can be reduced from 3.74 × 10(-3) g/(m(2) day) (80 °C-H2O as the oxidant) to 6.09 × 10(-4) g/(m(2) day) (80 °C-O3 as the oxidant) under the controlled environment of 20 °C and a relative humidity of 60%. Moreover, the organic light-emitting diodes integrated with 80 °C-O3-derived ZrO2 films were undamaged, and their luminance decay time changed considerably. This was attributed to the better barrier property of the low-temperature ZrO2 film to the amorphous microscopic bulk and almost homogeneous microscopic surface.

  2. The mucus layer is critical in protecting against ischemia-reperfusion-mediated gut injury and in the restitution of gut barrier function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Sheth, Sharvil U; Sharpe, Susan M; Dong, Wei; Lu, Qi; Xu, Dazhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2011-03-01

    It is well documented that the gut injury plays a critical role in the development of systemic inflammation and distant organ injury in conditions associated with splanchnic ischemia. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms leading to gut injury is important. In this context, recent work suggests a protective role for the intestinal mucus layer and an injury-inducing role for luminal pancreatic proteases. Thus, we explored the role of the mucus layer in gut barrier function by observing how the removal of the mucus layer affects ischemia-reperfusion-mediated gut injury in rats as well as the potential role of luminal pancreatic proteases in the pathogenesis of gut injury. Ischemia was induced by the ligation of blood vessels to segments of the ileum for 45 min, followed by up to 3 h of reperfusion. The ileal segments were divided into five groups. These included a nonischemic control, ischemic segments exposed to saline, the mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC), pancreatic proteases, or NAC + pancreatic proteases. Changes in gut barrier function were assessed by the permeation of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (molecular weight, 4,000 d) in ileal everted sacs. Gut injury was measured morphologically and by the luminal content of protein, DNA, and hemoglobin. The mucus layer was assessed functionally by measuring its hydrophobicity and morphologically. Gut barrier function was promptly and effectively reestablished during reperfusion, which was accompanied by the restoration of the mucus layer. In contrast, treatment of the gut with the mucolytic NAC for 10 min during ischemia resulted in a failure of mucus restitution and further increases in gut permeability and injury. The presence of digestive proteases by themselves did not exacerbate gut injury, but in combination with NAC, they caused an even greater increase in gut injury and permeability. These results suggest that the mucus layer not only serves as a barrier between the luminal contents and gut surface

  3. The mucus layer is critical in protecting against ischemia-reperfusion-mediated gut injury and in the restitution of gut barrier function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Sheth, Sharvil U; Sharpe, Susan M; Dong, Wei; Lu, Qi; Xu, Dazhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2011-03-01

    It is well documented that the gut injury plays a critical role in the development of systemic inflammation and distant organ injury in conditions associated with splanchnic ischemia. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms leading to gut injury is important. In this context, recent work suggests a protective role for the intestinal mucus layer and an injury-inducing role for luminal pancreatic proteases. Thus, we explored the role of the mucus layer in gut barrier function by observing how the removal of the mucus layer affects ischemia-reperfusion-mediated gut injury in rats as well as the potential role of luminal pancreatic proteases in the pathogenesis of gut injury. Ischemia was induced by the ligation of blood vessels to segments of the ileum for 45 min, followed by up to 3 h of reperfusion. The ileal segments were divided into five groups. These included a nonischemic control, ischemic segments exposed to saline, the mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC), pancreatic proteases, or NAC + pancreatic proteases. Changes in gut barrier function were assessed by the permeation of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (molecular weight, 4,000 d) in ileal everted sacs. Gut injury was measured morphologically and by the luminal content of protein, DNA, and hemoglobin. The mucus layer was assessed functionally by measuring its hydrophobicity and morphologically. Gut barrier function was promptly and effectively reestablished during reperfusion, which was accompanied by the restoration of the mucus layer. In contrast, treatment of the gut with the mucolytic NAC for 10 min during ischemia resulted in a failure of mucus restitution and further increases in gut permeability and injury. The presence of digestive proteases by themselves did not exacerbate gut injury, but in combination with NAC, they caused an even greater increase in gut injury and permeability. These results suggest that the mucus layer not only serves as a barrier between the luminal contents and gut surface

  4. Liquid Phase Chemical Enhanced Oxidation on AlGaAs and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuan-Wei; Wang, Yeong-Her; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2004-07-01

    A new method named the liquid phase chemical enhanced oxidation (LPCEO) technique has been proposed for the oxidation of aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) near room temperature. The initial stage of AlGaAs oxidation by this method has been investigated. The native oxide film composition is determined on the basis of the results of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Based on current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure, the leakage current density is approximately 5× 10-9 A/cm2 at the electric field of 1 MV/cm, and the breakdown field is at least 10 MV/cm after rapid temperature annealing. In addition, the oxide film properties can be improved after thermal annealing based on capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Finally, the application of the new method to the AlGaAs/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor pseudomorphic high-electronic-mobility transistor (MOS-PHEMT) is demonstrated.

  5. Integration of molecular-layer-deposited aluminum alkoxide interlayers into inorganic nanolaminate barriers for encapsulation of organic electronics with improved stress resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hossbach, Christoph Fischer, Dustin; Albert, Matthias; Bartha, Johann W.; Nehm, Frederik Klumbies, Hannes; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Leo, Karl; Singh, Aarti; Richter, Claudia; Schroeder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2015-01-15

    Diffusion barrier stacks for the encapsulation of organic electronics made from inorganic nanolaminates of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} with aluminum alkoxide interlayers have been deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD). As a part of the MLD process development, the deposition of aluminum alkoxide with low a density of about 1.7 g/cm{sup 3} was verified. The ALD/MLD diffusion barrier stack is meant to be deposited either on a polymer film, creating a flexible barrier substrate, or on top of a device on glass, creating a thin-film encapsulation. In order to measure the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) through the barrier, the device is replaced by a calcium layer acting as a water sensor in an electrical calcium test. For the barrier stack applied as thin-film encapsulation on glass substrates, high resolution scanning electron microscopy investigations indicate that the inorganic nanolaminates without MLD interlayers are brittle as they crack easily upon the stress induced by the corroding calcium below. The introduction of up to three MLD interlayers of 12 nm each into the 48 nm barrier film laminate successfully mitigates stress issues and prevents the barrier from cracking. Using the three MLD interlayer configurations on glass, WVTRs of as low as 10{sup −5} g/m{sup 2}/d are measured at 38 °C and 32% relative humidity. On polymer barrier substrates, the calcium is evaporated onto the barrier stack and encapsulated with a cavity glass. In this configuration, the corroding calcium has space for expansion and gas release without affecting the underlying barrier film. In consequence, a WVTR of about 3 × 10{sup −3} g/m{sup 2}/d is measured for all samples independently of the number of MLD interlayers. In conclusion, a stabilization and preservation of the ALD barrier film against mechanical stress is achieved by the introduction of MLD interlayers into the inorganic nanolaminate.

  6. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  7. Multilayer moisture barrier

    DOEpatents

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  8. Enhanced water vapor barrier properties for biopolymer films by polyelectrolyte multilayer and atomic layer deposited Al 2 O 3 double-coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi; Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Harlin, Ali; Salomäki, Mikko; Areva, Sami; Korhonen, Juuso T.; Karppinen, Maarit

    2011-09-01

    Commercial polylactide (PLA) films are coated with a thin (20 nm) non-toxic polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) film made from sodium alginate and chitosan and additionally with a 25-nm thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al 2O 3 layer. The double-coating of PEM + Al 2O 3 is found to significantly enhance the water vapor barrier properties of the PLA film. The improvement is essentially larger compared with the case the PLA film being just coated with an ALD-grown Al 2O 3 layer. The enhanced water vapor barrier characteristics of the PEM + Al 2O 3 double-coated PLA films are attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the surface of these films.

  9. Improved oxygen diffusion barrier properties of ruthenium-titanium nitride thin films prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Kim, Doo-In; Kim, Sang Ouk; Han, Tae Hee; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Jin-Seong; Kwon, Se-Hun

    2011-01-01

    Ru-TiN thin films were prepared from bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium and tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The Ru and TiN were deposited sequentially to intermix TiN with Ru. The composition of Ru-TiN films was controlled precisely by changing the number of deposition cycles allocated to Ru, while fixing the number of deposition cycles allocated to TiN. Although both Ru and TiN thin films have a polycrystalline structure, the microstructure of the Ru-TiN films changed from a TiN-like polycrystalline structure to a nanocrystalline on increasing the Ru intermixing ratio. Moreover, the electrical resistivity of the Ru0.67-TiN0.33 thin films is sufficiently low at 190 microomega x cm and was maintained even after O2 annealing at 750 degrees C. Therefore, Ru-TiN thin films can be utilized as a oxygen diffusion barrier material for future dynamic (DRAM) and ferroelectric (FeRAM) random access memory capacitors.

  10. Seasonal variations in the barrier layer in the South China Sea: characteristics, mechanisms and impact of warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lili; Wang, Dongxiao

    2016-06-01

    A new observational dataset, the South China Sea Physical Oceanographic Dataset 2014, is examined to investigate the seasonal characteristics, formation mechanisms, and warming effects of the barrier layer (BL) in the South China Sea (SCS). Statistical analysis reveals that the BL is thicker and occurs more frequently during summer and early autumn, while in winter it often coexists with temperature inversions. The formation mechanisms are discussed from the perspective of the controlling regime and the net turbulent energy required for BL evolution. In the initial stage (March-May), the BL is absent due to weak mixing, scarce rainfall and surface warming. In the formation and maintenance stage (June-September), the BL grows in summer and persists into the transition season. The BLs can be classified into three regimes: the flux regime (in the Luzon Strait), the combined regime (in the eastern basin) and the wind regime (southeast of Vietnam). In the attenuation stage (October-February), associated with the winter monsoon, the BL mainly occurs in the combined regime (along the path of western boundary current) and the flux regime (in the southeast corner). The characteristics and generation mechanisms of the temperature inversions near the south Chinese coast, east of Vietnam, and in the Gulf of Thailand are also discussed. Our analysis further demonstrates that the BL has a significant warming effect on upper ocean temperature and heat content in the SCS.

  11. Off state breakdown behavior of AlGaAs / InGaAs field plate pHEMTs

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, John; Mil'shtein, Samson

    2014-05-15

    Off-state breakdown voltage, V{sub br}, is an important parameter determining the maximum power output of microwave Field Effect Transistors (FETs). In recent years, the use of field plates has been widely adopted to significantly increase V{sub br}. This important technological development has extended FET technologies into new areas requiring these higher voltages and power levels. Keeping with this goal, field plates were added to an existing AlGaAs / InGaAs pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistor (pHEMT) process with the aim of determining the off-state breakdown mechanism and the dependency of V{sub br} on the field plate design. To find the mechanism responsible for breakdown, temperature dependent off-state breakdown measurements were conducted. It was found that at low current levels, the temperature dependence indicates thermionic field emission at the Schottky gate and at higher current levels, impact ionization is indicated. The combined results imply that impact ionization is ultimately the mechanism that is responsible for the breakdown in the tested transistors, but that it is preceded by thermionic field emission from the gate. To test the dependence of V{sub br} upon the field plate design, the field plate length and the etch depth through the highly-doped cap layer under the field plate were varied. Also, non-field plate devices were tested along side field plate transistors. It was found that the length of the etched region under the field plate is the dominant factor in determining the off-state breakdown of the more deeply etched devices. For less deeply etched devices, the length of the field plate is more influential. The influence of surface states between the highly doped cap layer and the passivation layer along the recess are believed to have a significant influence in the case of the more deeply etched examples. It is believed that these traps spread the electric field, thus raising the breakdown voltage. Three terminal breakdown

  12. Dense fully 111-textured TiN diffusion barriers: Enhanced lifetime through microstructure control during layer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, J.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J.E.

    1999-10-01

    Low-temperature deposition of TiN by reactive evaporation or sputter deposition onto amorphous substrates leads to highly underdense layers which develop mixed 111/002 orientations through competitive growth. In contrast, we demonstrate here the growth of low-temperature (450&hthinsp;{degree}C) fully dense polycrystalline TiN layers with complete 111 texture. This was achieved by reactive magnetron sputter deposition using a combination of: (1) highly oriented 25-nm-thick 0002 Ti underlayers to provide 111 TiN orientation through texture inheritance (local epitaxy) and (2) high flux (J{sub N{sub 2}{sup +}}/J{sub Ti}=14), low-energy (E{sub N{sub 2}{sup +}}{approx_equal}20&hthinsp;eV), N{sub 2}{sup +} ion irradiation in a magnetically unbalanced mode to provide enhanced adatom diffusion leading to densification during TiN deposition. The Ti underlayers were also grown in a magnetically unbalanced mode, in this case with an incident Ar{sup +}/Ti flux ratio of 2 and E{sub Ar{sup +}}{approx_equal}11&hthinsp;eV. All TiN films were slightly overstoichiometric with a N/Ti ratio of 1.02{plus_minus}0.03. In order to assess the diffusion-barrier properties of dense 111-textured TiN, Al overlayers were deposited without breaking vacuum at 100&hthinsp;{degree}C. Al/TiN bilayers were then annealed at a constant ramp rate of 3thinsp{degree}Cthinsps{sup {minus}1} to 650thinsp{degree}Cthinsps{sup {minus}1} and the interfacial reaction between Al and TiN was monitored by {ital in situ} synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements. As a reference point, we find that interfacial Al{sub 3}Ti formation is observed at 450&hthinsp;{degree}C in Al/TiN bilayers in which the TiN layer is deposited directly on SiO{sub 2} in a conventional magnetically balanced mode and, hence, is underdense with a mixed 111/002 orientation. However, the onset temperature for interfacial reaction was increased to 610&hthinsp;{degree}C in bilayers with fully dense TiN exhibiting complete 111 preferred orientation

  13. Precise control of Schottky barrier height in SrTiO3/SrRuO3 heterojunctions using ultrathin interface polar layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath Kumar, V.; Niranjan, Manish K.

    2016-06-01

    Control of Schottky barrier height using a polar interface layer at oxide heterointerfaces offers interesting and promising applications in oxide-based electronics. Using ab initio density functional theory, the Schottky barrier heights are determined in SrRuO3 /SrTiO3(0 0 1) heterojunctions with interfacial polar layers such as (LaO)+, (AlO2)-, etc. The Schottky barriers at these heterointerfaces are found to modulate significantly depending on the charge of the interface layer. Large shifts in Schottky barrier height due to polar layer insertions are explained using a micro-capacitor model. Further, the ionic and electronic contributions to the Schottky barrier height at the SrRuO3/SrTiO3 interface are determined and analyzed vis-à-vis basic assumptions of empirical models based on metal-induced gap states (MIGS) and bond polarization theory. In addition, the interface electronic structure and distribution of interface MIGS in SrRuO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures are determined. Furthermore, the electronic structures for SrO- and RuO2-terminated SrRuO3(0 0 1) and SrO- and TiO2-terminated SrTiO3(0 0 1) surfaces are explored and compared to those for SrRuO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. The modulations in workfunctions of SrO- and RuO2-terminated SrRuO3(0 0 1) surfaces due to polar (LaO)+ and (AlO2)- surface monolayers are also examined and discussed.

  14. In-situ surface and interface study of atomic oxygen modified carbon containing porous low-κ dielectric films for barrier layer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogan, J.; Lundy, R.; P. McCoy, A.; O'Connor, R.; Byrne, C.; Walsh, L.; Casey, P.; Hughes, G.

    2016-09-01

    The surface treatment of ultralow-κ dielectric layers by exposure to atomic oxygen is presented as a potential mechanism to modify the chemical composition of the dielectric surface to facilitate copper diffusion barrier layer formation. High carbon content, low-κ dielectric films of varying porosity were exposed to atomic oxygen treatments at room temperature, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal both the depletion of carbon and the incorporation of oxygen at the surface. Subsequent dynamic water contact angle measurements show that the chemically modified surfaces become more hydrophilic after treatment, suggesting that the substrates have become more "SiO2-like" at the near surface region. This treatment is shown to be thermally stable up to 400 °C. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy elemental profiles confirm the localised removal of carbon from the surface region. Manganese (≈1 nm) was subsequently deposited on the modified substrates and thermally annealed to form surface localized MnSiO3 based barrier layers. The energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental maps show that the atomic oxygen treatments facilitate the formation of a continuous manganese silicate barrier within dense low-k films, but significant manganese diffusion is observed in the case of porous substrates, negatively impacting the formation of a discrete barrier layer. Ultimately, the atomic oxygen treatment proves effective in modifying the surface of non-porous dielectrics while continuing to facilitate barrier formation. However, in the case of high porosity films, diffusion of manganese into the bulk film remains a critical issue.

  15. [ACTIVITY OF ANTIMICROBIAL NANOSTRUCTURED BARRIER LAYERS BASED ON POLYETHYLENETEREPHTHALATE IN RELATION TO CLINICAL STRAINES OF MICROORGANISMS FOR SICK PERSONS OF GASTROENTEROLOGICAL PROFILE].

    PubMed

    Elinson, V M; Rusanova, E V; Vasilenko, I A; Lyamin, A N; Kostyuchenko, L N

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis transgressions of enteral medium including disbiotic ones are often accompanying deseases of digestive tract. Espessially it touches upon sick persons connected with probe nourishing. One of the way for solving this problem is normalization of digestion microflore by means of wares with nanotechnological modifications of walls (probes, stomic tubes) which provide them antimicrobial properties and assist to normalization of digestive microbiotis and enteral homeostasis completely. The aim to study is research of antimicrobial activity of of nanostructured barrier layers based on polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) in relation to clinical straines of microorganisms. For barrier layer creation the approach on the base of methods of ion-plasma technology was used including ion-plasma treatment (nanostructuring) of the surface by ions noble and chemically active gases and following formation nanodimensional carbon films on the surface/ For the study of antimicrobial activity in relation to clinical straines of microorganisms we used the technique which allowed to establish the influence of parting degree of microorganisms suspension and time for samples exposing and microorganisms adsorbed on the surface. In experiment clinical straines obtained from different materials were used: Staphylococcus Hly+ and Calbicans--from pharyngeal mucosa, E. coli--from feces, K.pneumoniae--from urine. Sharing out and species identification of microorganisms were fulfilled according with legasy documents. In results of the study itwas obtained not only the presence of staticticaly confirmed antimicrobial activity of PET samples with nanostructured barrier layers in relation to different stimulators of nosocomical infections but also the influence of different factors connected with formation of nanostructured layers and consequently based with them physicochemical characteristics such as, in particular, surface energy, surface relief parameters, surface charg and others, as well

  16. High power master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) AlGaAs laser for intersatellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration has been developed using an anti-reflection-coated AlGaAs semiconductor broad area laser in a reflective amplifier mode. For CW injection, the MOPA produced 340 mW of diffraction-limited power. The semiconductor MOPA configuration also produced peak diffraction-limited powers of 360 mW and 320 mW for quaternary pulse position Q-PPM modulation rates of 50 Mbps and 325 Mbps, respectively, for a peak injected power of 100 mW. Angular beamsteering during modulation was minimized by collimating the injected beam. The diffraction-limited peak power was limited by the frequency chirp of the master oscillator and also by the coupling losses of the injected beam.

  17. AlGaAs laser diode FM spectrum: Phased array antenna application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, Martin; Tetu, Michel

    Preliminary results are presented on the use of an AlGaAs laser diode to generate microwave signals suitable for application with phased array antennas. The relative intensity noise (RIN) was measured under various operating conditions to give an indication of the frequency response limitation of the laser diode. The frequency response to intensity modulation was also measured directly at microwave frequencies. Finally, the FM spectrum was observed using a heterodyne technique and compared with an empirical model. The spectrum of intensity fluctuations shows a peak near the relaxation oscillation frequency. This is a good indication of the cutoff frequency for direct current modulation of the laser diode. The behavior of the modulated laser diode is well characterized by the simultaneous intensity and frequency modulation taking into account a phase difference between the two.

  18. Use of admittance spectroscopy to probe the DX-centers in AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, S.; Chakravarty, S.; Anand, S.; Arora, B. M.

    1991-02-01

    We have used admittance spectroscopy to characterize the DX centers in Sn doped A1GaAs and Si doped A1GaAs samples. Three peaks in conductance and the corresponding steps in capacitance are observed in the admittance spectra of Sn doped samples. It is shown that these peaks arise from the multiple states of the same physical center rather than to three different types of defects. The deepest state corresponds to the conventional DX state in the Sn doped AlGaAs probed by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The other two states are not normally observed in DLTS experiments due to experimental limitations. In the case of Si doped A1GaAs samples only one peak which is broad or slightly asymmetric is observed and it corresponds to the main DLTS peak of the Si-DX center.

  19. AlGaAs growth by OMCVD using an excimer laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Wilt, David M.; Pouch, John J.; Aron, Paul R.

    1986-01-01

    AlGaAs has been grown on GaAs by laser assisted OMCVD using an excimer laser, wavelength 193 nm, and a Cambridge OMCVD reactor. Films were grown at temperatures of 450 and 500 C with the laser beam parallel to the surface and impinging onto the surface at 15 deg from parallel. The samples were heated by RF coils while the laser beam was perpendicular to the gas flow. Typical gas flow parameters are 12 slm of H2, 15 sccm of Ga(CH3)3, 13 sccm of Al(CH3)3, and a pressure of 250 mbar. The initial energy density of the beam at the surface was 40 mJ/sq cm, the pulse rate was 20 pps, and the growth time was 7 min. The films were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy for the aluminum concentration and by TEM for the surface morphology.

  20. Seasonal-to-interannual variability of the barrier layer in the western Pacific warm pool associated with ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidong; Liu, Hailong

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the seasonal-to-interannual variability of the barrier layer (BL) associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using in situ temperature-salinity observations and simple ocean assimilation data (SODA). The comparisons with the BL derived from the in situ observations show that SODA successfully captures the variability of the BL in the Pacific warm pool. On seasonal timescale, based on the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, we identify that three seasonal leading modes of the BL along the equatorial Pacific are closely associated with the transition, resurgence and onset of ENSO, respectively. We also confirm that two interannual leading modes of the BL are related to different flavors of ENSO events. EOF1 mainly embodies a combined response to the central and east Pacific ENSO events while EOF2 is related to the central Pacific ENSO events. We especially focus on the contrast of the BL between east Pacific El Niño (EPEN) and central Pacific El Niño (CPEN). During EPEN, the abnormally thick BL appears in the east of the dateline. It follows the sea surface salinity front to shift zonally with the evolution of EPEN event, and propagates toward the central Pacific. It can be attributed to horizontal ocean advection, heavy precipitation and the downwelling Kelvin waves. In contrast, during CPEN, the abnormally thick BL is confined to the region between 160°E and 180°E around the SSS front without significant west-east displacement. It is mainly dominated by the local processes including Ekman pumping, precipitation, and zonal ocean advection. Different from the BL in the EPEN events, it has no evident basin-scale propagating signal.

  1. The consequences of air flow on the distribution of aqueous species during dielectric barrier discharge treatment of thin water layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-10-01

    The desired outcomes of wet tissue treatment by dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) strongly depend on the integrated fluences of reactive species incident onto the tissue, which are determined by power, frequency and treatment time. The reactivity produced by such plasmas is often expected to be proportional to treatment time due to the accumulation of radicals in the liquid over the tissue. However, one of the typically uncontrolled parameters in DBD treatment of liquids and tissue is gas flow, which could affect the delivery of plasma produced radicals to the tissue. Gas flow can redistribute long-lived, plasma produced gas phase species prior to solvating in the liquid, while not greatly affecting the solvation of short-lived species. Gas flow can therefore potentially be a control mechanism for tailoring the fluences of reactive species to the tissue. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of the consequences of gas flow on treatment of liquid layers covering tissue by atmospheric DBDs by up to 100 pulses. We found that gas flow (through residence time of the gas) can control the production of gas phase species requiring many collisions to form, such as reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The resulting solvation of the RNS in turn controls the production of aqueous species such as \\text{NO}\\text{3aq}- and \\text{ONOO}\\text{aq}- (aq denotes an aqueous species). With the exception of O3 and O3aq, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are less sensitive to gas flow, and so OHaq and H2O2aq, are determined primarily by discharge properties.

  2. Fine Structure in the Electron Emission Process for Two DX-Like Centers in Sn-Doped AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hua-han; Kang, Jun-yong; Huang, Qi-sheng

    1998-01-01

    Fine structure in the electron emission process for DX(Sn) centers in AlGaAs has been studied with high resolution Laplace defect spectroscopy. The influence of the different local configuration of Al and Ga atoms around the centers on the electron thermal emissions was observed. An experimental evidence for the microscopic structure of two DX-like centers in Sn-doped AlGaAs is provided.

  3. Improved conversion efficiency of Ag2S quantum dot-sensitized solar cells based on TiO2 nanotubes with a ZnO recombination barrier layer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We improve the conversion efficiency of Ag2S quantum dot (QD)-sensitized TiO2 nanotube-array electrodes by chemically depositing ZnO recombination barrier layer on plain TiO2 nanotube-array electrodes. The optical properties, structural properties, compositional analysis, and photoelectrochemistry properties of prepared electrodes have been investigated. It is found that for the prepared electrodes, with increasing the cycles of Ag2S deposition, the photocurrent density and the conversion efficiency increase. In addition, as compared to the Ag2S QD-sensitized TiO2 nanotube-array electrode without the ZnO layers, the conversion efficiency of the electrode with the ZnO layers increases significantly due to the formation of efficient recombination layer between the TiO2 nanotube array and electrolyte. PMID:21777458

  4. Impact of the TiN barrier layer on the positive bias temperature instabilities of high-k/metal-gate field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Da-Cheng; Gong, Jeng; Huang, Chih-Fang; Chung, Steve S.

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the impact of positive bias temperature instability (PBTI) on n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (n-MOSFET) with TiN barrier layer sandwiched between metal gate electrode and HfO2 dielectric. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the diffusion mechanism of oxygen and nitrogen as a result of the post metallization treatment was the root cause of the PBTI. In this mechanism, the oxygen during the post metallization annealing (PMA) was diffused into TiN layer and replaced the nitrogen in the TiN layer. Subsequently, these replaced nitrogens were diffused into the HfO2, from which these replaced nitrogen atoms were used to passivate the defects in the HfO2. Results show that by increasing the thickness of TiN barrier layer, the driving current and the PBTI of n-MOSFET can be greatly improved. The larger the thickness of the TiN layer is, the better the PBTI reliability becomes.

  5. The mucus layer is critical in protecting against ischemia/reperfusion-mediated gut injury and in the restitution of gut barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaofa; Sheth, Sharvil U.; Sharpe, Susan M.; Dong, Wei; Lu, Qi; Xu, Dazhong; Deitch, Edwin A.

    2011-01-01

    It is well documented that the gut injury plays a critical role in the development of systemic inflammation and distant organ injury in conditions associated with splanchnic ischemia. Consequently understanding the mechanisms leading to gut injury is important. In this context, recent work suggests a protective role for the intestinal mucus layer and an injury-inducing role for luminal pancreatic proteases. Thus, we explored the role of the mucus layer in gut barrier function by observing how the removal of the mucus layer affects ischemia/reperfusion-mediated gut injury in rats as well as the potential role of luminal pancreatic proteases in the pathogenesis of gut injury. Ischemia was induced by the ligation of blood vessels to segments of the ileum for 45 min, followed by up to three hours of reperfusion. The ileal segments were divided into 5 groups. These included a non-ischemic control, ischemic segments exposed to saline, the mucolytic N-acetylcholine (NAC), pancreatic proteases or NAC plus pancreatic proteases. Changes in gut barrier function were assessed by the permeation of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (MW 4000 Da; FD4) in ileal everted sacs. Gut injury was measured morphologically and by the luminal content of protein, DNA and hemoglobin. The mucus layer was assessed functionally by measuring its hydrophobicity and morphologically. Gut barrier function was promptly and effectively re-established during reperfusion, which was accompanied by the restoration of the mucus layer. In contrast, treatment of the gut with the mucolytic NAC for 10 min during ischemia resulted in a failure of mucus restitution and further increases in gut permeability and injury. The presence of digestive proteases by themselves did not exacerbate gut injury but in combination with NAC, they caused an even greater increase in gut injury and permeability. These results suggest that the mucus layer not only serves as a barrier between the luminal contents and gut surface

  6. Tuning the interfacial hole injection barrier between p-type organic materials and Co using a MoO{sub 3} buffer layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuzhan; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Cao Liang; Qi Dongchen; Chen Wei; Gao Xingyu

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate that the interfacial hole injection barrier {Delta}{sub h} between p-type organic materials (i.e., CuPc and pentacene) and Co substrate can be tuned by the insertion of a MoO{sub 3} buffer layer. Using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, it was found that the introduction of MoO{sub 3} buffer layer effectively reduces the hole injection barrier from 0.8 eV to 0.4 eV for the CuPc/Co interface, and from 1.0 eV to 0.4 eV for the pentacene/Co interface, respectively. In addition, by varying the thickness of the buffer, the tuning effect of {Delta}{sub h} is shown to be independent of the thickness of MoO{sub 3} interlayer at both CuPc/Co and pentacene/Co interfaces. This Fermi level pinning effect can be explained by the integer charge-transfer model. Therefore, the MoO{sub 3} buffer layer has the potential to be applied in p-type organic spin valve devices to improve the device performance via reducing the interfacial hole injection barrier.

  7. Ohmic contacts to [ital n]-GaAs with a Pt/Ge/Au contacting layer and a Ta-Si-N barrier: Electrical and metallurgical characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.S.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. ); Ruiz, R.P. )

    1994-06-01

    Pt/Ge/Au trilayers of various Pt:Ge compositions, overlaid with a Ta-Si-N barrier layer and an Au metallization layer, are investigated as ohmic contacts to [ital n]-type GaAs. After annealing in flowing argon at 450 [degree]C for 15 min, a contact resistivity of 3.7[times]10[sup [minus]6] [Omega] cm[sup 2] is obtained for the sample of atomic ratio Pt/Ge=1. The contact resistivity of this sample degrades only slightly to 5.0[times]10[sup [minus]6] [Omega] cm[sup 2] upon aging at 450 [degree]C for 60 h, while the surface stays smooth. Contact resistivities of samples with other Pt/Ge atomic ratios are in the range of 10[sup [minus]5]--10[sup [minus]4] [Omega] cm[sup 2]. To understand this electrical behavior, the contacts are characterized by backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive analysis of x rays. The reaction products vary with the Pt:Ge compositions due to the difference of the chemical reactivity between Pt, Ge, and GaAs. The formation and distribution of a ternary PtGe:As phase are the determining factors for the contact resistivity. The outstanding thermal stability of the contact is due to the Ta-Si-N barrier layer which closes the GaAs-trilayer system and protects their chemical equilibria from being disrupted by an inflow of Au from the metallization layer. Without the barrier layer, the morphology of the contact degrades badly at 450 [degree]C after 20 h or less.

  8. AlGaAs top solar cell for mechanical attachment in a multi-junction tandem concentrator solar cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Hannon, M. H.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    The AstroPower self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs top solar cell can be stacked upon any well-developed bottom solar cell for improved system performance. This is an approach to improve the performance and scale of space photovoltaic power systems. Mechanically stacked tandem solar cell concentrator systems based on the AlGaAs top concentrator solar cell can provide near term efficiencies of 36 percent (AMO, 100x). Possible tandem stack efficiencies greater than 38 percent (100x, AMO) are feasible with a careful selection of materials. In a three solar cell stack, system efficiencies exceed 41 percent (100x, AMO). These device results demonstrate a practical solution for a state-of-the-art top solar cell for attachment to an existing, well-developed solar cell.

  9. Controlling phase transition for single-layer MTe2 (M = Mo and W): modulation of the potential barrier under strain.

    PubMed

    Huang, H H; Fan, Xiaofeng; Singh, David J; Chen, Hong; Jiang, Q; Zheng, W T

    2016-02-01

    Using first-principles DFT calculations, the pathway and the energy barrier of phase transition between 2H and 1T' have been investigated for MoTe2 and WTe2 monolayers. The Phase transition is controlled by the simultaneous movement of metal atoms and Te atoms in their plane without the intermediate phase 1T. The energy barrier (less than 0.9 eV per formula cell) is not so high that the phase transition is dynamically possible. The relative stability of both 2H and 1T' phases and the energy barrier for phase transition can be modulated by the biaxial and uniaxial strain. The dynamic energy barrier is decreased by applying the strain. The phase transition between 2H and 1T' controlled by the strain can be used to modulate the electronic properties of MoTe2 and WTe2. PMID:26778806

  10. Combined effect of capillary barrier and layered slope on water, solute and nanoparticle transfer in an unsaturated soil at lysimeter scale.

    PubMed

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Coutinho, Artur Paiva; Lassabatere, Laurent; Bien, Le Binh; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    It is well recognized that colloidal nanoparticles are highly mobile in soils and can facilitate the transport of contaminants through the vadose zone. This work presents the combined effect of the capillary barrier and soil layer slope on the transport of water, bromide and nanoparticles through an unsaturated soil. Experiments were performed in a lysimeter (1×1×1.6m(3)) called LUGH (Lysimeter for Urban Groundwater Hydrology). The LUGH has 15 outputs that identify the temporal and spatial evolution of water flow, solute flux and nanoparticles in relation to the soil surface conditions and the 3D system configuration. Two different soil structures were set up in the lysimeter. The first structure comprises a layer of sand (0-0.2cm, in diameter) 35cm thick placed horizontally above a layer of bimodal mixture also 35cm thick to create a capillary barrier at the interface between the sand and bimodal material. The bimodal material is composed of a mixture 50% by weight of sand and gravel (0.4-1.1cm, in diameter). The second structure, using the same amount of sand and bimodal mixture as the first structure represents an interface with a 25% slope. A 3D numerical model based on Richards equation for flow and the convection dispersion equations coupled with a mechanical module for nanoparticle trapping was developed. The results showed that under the effect of the capillary barrier, water accumulated at the interface of the two materials. The sloped structure deflects flow in contrast to the structure with zero slope. Approximately 80% of nanoparticles are retained in the lysimeter, with a greater retention at the interface of two materials. Finally, the model makes a good reproduction of physical mechanisms observed and appears to be a useful tool for identifying key processes leading to a better understanding of the effect of capillary barrier on nanoparticle transfer in an unsaturated heterogeneous soil. PMID:26184062

  11. Combined effect of capillary barrier and layered slope on water, solute and nanoparticle transfer in an unsaturated soil at lysimeter scale.

    PubMed

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Coutinho, Artur Paiva; Lassabatere, Laurent; Bien, Le Binh; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    It is well recognized that colloidal nanoparticles are highly mobile in soils and can facilitate the transport of contaminants through the vadose zone. This work presents the combined effect of the capillary barrier and soil layer slope on the transport of water, bromide and nanoparticles through an unsaturated soil. Experiments were performed in a lysimeter (1×1×1.6m(3)) called LUGH (Lysimeter for Urban Groundwater Hydrology). The LUGH has 15 outputs that identify the temporal and spatial evolution of water flow, solute flux and nanoparticles in relation to the soil surface conditions and the 3D system configuration. Two different soil structures were set up in the lysimeter. The first structure comprises a layer of sand (0-0.2cm, in diameter) 35cm thick placed horizontally above a layer of bimodal mixture also 35cm thick to create a capillary barrier at the interface between the sand and bimodal material. The bimodal material is composed of a mixture 50% by weight of sand and gravel (0.4-1.1cm, in diameter). The second structure, using the same amount of sand and bimodal mixture as the first structure represents an interface with a 25% slope. A 3D numerical model based on Richards equation for flow and the convection dispersion equations coupled with a mechanical module for nanoparticle trapping was developed. The results showed that under the effect of the capillary barrier, water accumulated at the interface of the two materials. The sloped structure deflects flow in contrast to the structure with zero slope. Approximately 80% of nanoparticles are retained in the lysimeter, with a greater retention at the interface of two materials. Finally, the model makes a good reproduction of physical mechanisms observed and appears to be a useful tool for identifying key processes leading to a better understanding of the effect of capillary barrier on nanoparticle transfer in an unsaturated heterogeneous soil.

  12. Radiolysis products and sensory properties of electron-beam-irradiated high-barrier food-packaging films containing a buried layer of recycled low-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Chytiri, S D; Badeka, A V; Riganakos, K A; Kontominas, M G

    2010-04-01

    The aim was to study the effect of electron-beam irradiation on the production of radiolysis products and sensory changes in experimental high-barrier packaging films composed of polyamide (PA), ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE). Films contained a middle buried layer of recycled LDPE, while films containing 100% virgin LDPE as the middle buried layer were taken as controls. Irradiation doses ranged between zero and 60 kGy. Generally, a large number of radiolysis products were produced during electron-beam irradiation, even at the lower absorbed doses of 5 and 10 kGy (approved doses for food 'cold pasteurization'). The quantity of radiolysis products increased with irradiation dose. There were no significant differences in radiolysis products identified between samples containing a recycled layer of LDPE and those containing virgin LDPE (all absorbed doses), indicating the 'functional barrier' properties of external virgin polymer layers. Sensory properties (mainly taste) of potable water were affected after contact with irradiated as low as 5 kGy packaging films. This effect increased with increasing irradiation dose.

  13. Penetration resistant barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, William R.; Mead, Keith E.; Street, Henry K.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a barrier for resisting penetration by such as hand tools and oxy-acetylene cutting torches. The barrier comprises a layer of firebrick, which is preferably epoxy impregnated sandwiched between inner and outer layers of steel. Between the firebrick and steel are layers of resilient rubber-like filler.

  14. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Ramsey, David R.; Stampfer, Joseph F.; Macdonald, John M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  15. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  16. A tantalum diffusion barrier layer for improving the output performance of AlGaInP-based light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun; Park, Jae-Seong; Kang, Daesung; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of a Ta diffusion barrier layer on the electrical characteristics of AuBe/Au contacts on a p-GaP window layer for AlGaInP-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). It was shown that after annealing at 500 °C, the AuBe/Ta/Au contacts exhibited nearly 2 orders of magnitude lower specific contact resistance (2.8 × 10-6 Ω·cm2) than the AuBe/Au contacts (1.0 × 10-4 Ω·cm2). The LEDs with and without the Ta diffusion barrier layer showed an external quantum efficiency of 14.03 and 13.5% at 50 mA, respectively. After annealing at 500 °C, the AuBe/Ta/Au contacts showed a higher reflectance (92.8% at 617 nm) than that of the AuBe/Au contacts (87.7%). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that the Ga 2p core level for the annealed AuBe/Au samples shifted to higher binding energies, while this level shifted towards lower binding energies for the AuBe/Ta/Au samples. Depth profiles using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) showed that annealing of the AuBe/Au samples caused the outdiffusion of both Be and P atoms into the metal contact, while for the AuBe/Ta/Au samples, the outdiffusion of Be atoms was blocked by the Ta barrier layer and more Be atoms were indiffused into GaP. The annealing-induced electrical degradation and ohmic contact formation are described and discussed based on the XPS and electrical results.

  17. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  18. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  19. A flexible transparent gas barrier film employing the method of mixing ALD/MLD-grown Al2O3 and alucone layers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wang; Hui, Duan Ya; Zheng, Chen; Yu, Duan; Qiang, Yang Yong; Ping, Chen; Xiang, Chen Li; Yi, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been widely reported as a novel method for thin film encapsulation (TFE) of organic light-emitting diodes and organic photovoltaic cells. Both organic and inorganic thin films can be deposited by ALD with a variety of precursors. In this work, the performances of Al2O3 thin films and Al2O3/alucone hybrid films have been investigated. The samples with a 50 nm Al2O3 inorganic layer deposited by ALD at a low temperature of 80°C showed higher surface roughness (0.503 ± 0.011 nm), higher water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) values (3.77 × 10(-4) g/m(2)/day), and lower transmittance values (61%) when compared with the Al2O3 (inorganic)/alucone (organic) hybrid structure under same conditions. Furthermore, a bending test upon single Al2O3 layers showed an increased WVTR of 1.59 × 10(-3) g/m(2)/day. However, the film with a 4 nm alucone organic layer inserted into the center displayed improved surface roughness, barrier performance, and transmittance. After the bending test, the hybrid film with 4 nm equally distributed alucone maintained better surface roughness (0.339 ± 0.014 nm) and barrier properties (9.94 × 10(-5) g/m(2)/day). This interesting phenomenon reveals that multilayer thin films consisting of inorganic layers and decentralized alucone organic components have the potential to be useful in TFE applications on flexible optical electronics.

  20. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  1. Low-temperature laser assisted CBE-growth of AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothilingam, R.; Farrell, T.; Joyce, T. B.; Goodhew, P. J.

    1998-06-01

    We report preliminary studies of low-temperature (335-400°C) chemical beam epitaxial (CBE) growth of Al xGa 1- xAs on GaAs(0 0 1) using triethylgallium (TEG), trimethylaminealane (TMAA) and thermally precracked Arsine (AsH 3) as precursors. We also report results of Ar + laser assisted chemical beam epitaxial growth over the same temperature range. The growth rate for both assisted and unassisted growth as a function of substrate temperature, laser power and precursor beam pressures was determined using laser reflectometry in which the Ar + laser was also used as the probe. In the nonlaser assisted growth Al incorporation is observed to be significantly higher than would be expected at the normal growth temperature of 500°C. With laser assistance the Al concentration, while higher than that at normal growth temperatures, is less than that without laser assistance and the growth rate is higher. These observations, which extended Abernathy's early results to higher nominal Al concentration, are discussed in terms of the relative enhancement of the decomposition of TEG and the alane during laser assistance. Using literature values of the refractive index of AlGaAs alloys at the growth temperature, laser reflectometry was used to monitor both composition and growth rate over a range of growth temperatures. Reflectometry data were compared with the results of Auger Electron Microscopy (AES) and Dektak stylus profiling.

  2. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, K. V.

    2015-01-28

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh–Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture; then, a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F{sup 0}{sub 11}(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional “cubic” diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas—from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development.

  3. Nanohole formation on AlGaAs surfaces by local droplet etching with gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyn, Ch.; Stemmann, A.; Hansen, W.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled generation of nanoholes on AlGaAs surfaces by local droplet etching (LDE). For the etching process, Ga is deposited on the surface, where liquid droplets are formed in a Volmer-Weber-like growth mode. The etching takes place locally at the interface between droplets and substrate and removes a significant amount of substrate material. The structural properties of the LDE nanoholes are studied with atomic force microscopy as function of etching temperature and Ga coverage. A bimodal depth distribution with flat and deep holes is observed. The formation of flat holes can be almost suppressed by optimized etching parameters. The depth of deep holes was adjusted by the process parameters up to a maximum depth of 15 nm. The density of deep holes is in the range 5×10 -7-1×10 -8 cm -2 and depends only slightly on the etching parameters. However, the density can be significantly increased by repeated etching.

  4. Impact of InGaN back barrier layer on performance of AIInN/AlN/GaN MOS-HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Sanjit Kumar; Adak, Sarosij; Pati, Sudhansu Kumar; Sarkar, Chandan Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, we have discussed the effect of InGaN back barrier on device performances of 100 nm gate length AlInN/AlN/GaN metal oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MOS-HEMT) device and a wide comparison is made with respect to without considering the back barrier layer. The InGaN layer is introduced in the intension to raise the conduction band of GaN buffer with respect to GaN channel so that there is an improvement in the carrier confinement and at the same time witnessed excellent high frequency performance. The simulations are carried out using 2D Sentaurus TCAD simulator using Hydrodynamic mobility model by taking interface traps into consideration. Due to high value of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and mobility in AlInN/AlN/GaN MOS-HEMT device, higher drain current density is achieved. Simulation are carried out for different device parameters such as transfer characteristic (Id-Vg), transconductance factor (gm), drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL), Subthreshold slope (SS), conduction band energy, transconductance generation factor (gm/Id) and electric field. We have also examined the RF performance such as, total gate capacitance (Cgg), current gain cutoff frequency (fT) and power gain cutoff frequency (fmax) of the proposed devices. Use of InGaN back barrier tends to increase threshold voltage towards more positive value, reduced DIBL, and improves SS and significant growth in (gm/Id) by 5.5%. It also helps to achieve better frequency response like substantial increase in fT up to 91 GHz with current gain 60 dB as compare to 67 GHz with 56 dB for the device without considering back barrier and increase in fmax up to 112 GHz with respect 94 GHz. These results evident that use of InGaN back barrier in such devices can be better solution for future analog and RF applications.

  5. Improved characteristics of ultraviolet AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diodes with step-graded quantum barriers close to waveguide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuefen; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong

    2016-09-01

    Ultraviolet AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diodes (LDs) with step-graded quantum barriers (QBs) instead of conventional first and last QBs close to waveguide layers are proposed. The characteristics of this type of laser diodes are numerically investigated by using the software PICS3D and it is found that the performances of these LDs are greatly improved. The results indicates that the structure with step-graded QBs exhibits higher output light power, slope efficiency and emission intensity, as well as lower series resistance and threshold current density under the identical condition, compared with conventional LD structure.

  6. Observations of Surface Energy Fluxes and Boundary-Layer Structure Over Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKellar, Mellissa C.; McGowan, Hamish A.; Phinn, Stuart R.; Soderholm, Joshua S.

    2013-02-01

    Over warm, shallow coral reefs the surface radiation and energy fluxes differ from those of the open ocean and result in modification to the marine atmospheric boundary layer via the development of convective internal boundary layers. The complex interrelationships between the surface energy balance and boundary-layer characteristics influence local weather (wind, temperature, humidity) and hydrodynamics (water temperature and currents), as well as larger scale processes, including cloud field properties and precipitation. The nature of these inter-relationships has not been accurately described for coral reef environments. This study presents the first measurements of the surface energy balance, radiation budget and boundary layer thermodynamics made over a coral reef using an eddy-covariance system and radiosonde aerological profiling of the lower atmosphere. Results show that changes in surface properties and the associated energetics across the ocean-reef boundary resulted in modification to the marine atmospheric boundary layer during the Austral winter and summer. Internal convective boundary layers developed within the marine atmospheric boundary layer over the reef and were found to be deeper in the summer, yet more unstable during the winter when cold and drier flow from the mainland enhances heat and moisture fluxes to the atmosphere. A mixed layer was identified in the marine atmospheric boundary layer varying from 375 to 1,200 m above the surface, and was deeper during the summer, particularly under stable anticyclonic conditions. Significant cloud cover and at times rain resulted in the development of a stable stratified atmosphere over the reef. Our findings show that, for Heron Reef, a lagoonal platform reef, there was a horizontal discontinuity in surface energy fluxes across the ocean-reef boundary, which modified the marine atmospheric boundary layer.

  7. Influence of PEDOT:PSS on the effectiveness of barrier layers prepared by atomic layer deposition in organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wegler, Barbara; Schmidt, Oliver; Hensel, Bernhard

    2015-01-15

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are well suited for energy saving lighting applications, especially when thinking about highly flexible and large area devices. In order to avoid the degradation of the organic components by water and oxygen, OLEDs need to be encapsulated, e.g., by a thin sheet of glass. As the device is then no longer flexible, alternative coatings are required. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a very promising approach in this respect. The authors studied OLEDs that were encapsulated by 100 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited by ALD. The authors show that this coating effectively protects the active surface area of the OLEDs from humidity. However, secondary degradation processes still occur at sharp edges of the OLED stack where the extremely thin encapsulation layer does not provide perfect coverage. Particularly, the swelling of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) mixed with poly(styrenesulfonate), which is a popular choice for the planarization of the bottom electrode and at the same time acts as a hole injection layer, affects the effectiveness of the encapsulation layer.

  8. Adhesive flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    DOEpatents

    Blizzard, John Donald; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-02-05

    An adhesive flexible barrier film comprises a substrate and a barrier layer disposed on the substrate. The barrier layer is formed from a barrier composition comprising an organosilicon compound. The adhesive flexible barrier film also comprises an adhesive layer disposed on the barrier layer and formed from an adhesive composition. A method of forming the adhesive flexible barrier film comprises the steps of disposing the barrier composition on the substrate to form the barrier layer, disposing the adhesive composition on the barrier layer to form the adhesive layer, and curing the barrier layer and the adhesive layer. The adhesive flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  9. Apoplastic barriers effectively block oxygen permeability across outer cell layers of rice roots under deoxygenated conditions: roles of apoplastic pores and of respiration.

    PubMed

    Kotula, Lukasz; Ranathunge, Kosala; Steudle, Ernst

    2009-12-01

    *Despite the importance of the barrier to oxygen losses of the roots of hygrophytes growing in wet environments devoid of oxygen, there are few data available on permeability coefficients for O(2) across outer root cell layers (P(OPR)) and how they may change in response to low O(2). *A gas perfusion technique was used to measure the P(OPR) of rice (Oryza sativa) plants grown in either aerated or deoxygenated solution. The contributions of the apoplast and of living cells to the overall P(OPR) were characterized either by blocking apoplastic pores with precipitates of brown Cu(2)[Fe(CN)(6)] or by killing cells with 0.1 N HCl. *Compared with that of plants from aerated hydroponics, the P(OPR) of plants grown in deoxygenated medium was smaller by an order of magnitude. Precipitates resulting from CuSO(4)/K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)] treatment only formed in plants grown in aerated solution, where they reduced the P(OPR) by 5-20%. Killing of root segments with HCl increased P(OPR) in plants grown in both conditions by 20-55%. *The results indicated that apoplastic barriers effectively restricted radial O(2) loss. The relative role of the respiratory O(2) consumption of root peripheral layers increased as P(OPR) decreased.

  10. A three solar cell system based on a self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs top solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negley, Gerald H.; Rhoads, Sandra L.; Terranova, Nancy E.; Mcneely, James B.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a three solar cell stack can lead to practical efficiencies greater than 30 percent (1x,AM0). A theoretical efficiency limitation of 43.7 percent at AM0 and one sun is predicted by this model. Including expected losses, a practical system efficiency of 36.8 percent is anticipated. These calculations are based on a 1.93eV/1.43eV/0.89eV energy band gap combination. AlGaAs/GaAs/GaInAsP materials can be used with a six-terminal wiring configuration. The key issues for multijunction solar cells are the top and middle solar cell performance and the sub-bandgap transparency. AstroPower has developed a technique to fabricate AlGaAs solar cells on rugged, self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs substrates. Top solar cell efficiencies greater than 11 percent AM0 have been achieved. State-of-the-art GaAs or InP devices will be used for the middle solar cell. GaInAsP will be used to fabricate the bottom solar cell. This material is lattice-matched to InP and offers a wide range of bandgaps for optimization of the three solar cell stack. Liquid phase epitaxy is being used to grow the quaternary material. Initial solar cells have shown open-circuit voltages of 462 mV for a bandgap of 0.92eV. Design rules for the multijunction three solar cell stack are discussed. The progress in the development of the self-supporting AlGaAs top solar cell and the GaInAsP bottom solar cell is presented.

  11. Electrical behavior on n-type dopants in AlGaAs alloys: Shallow levels and DX centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Elias

    1990-11-01

    The electrical properties of n-type Al(x)Ga(1-x)As are governed by deep donor states, formerly called DX centers, and created by the isolated donor atoms. At very low Al compositions, such deep donors become resonant with the gamma minimum. For GaAs compositions, the electron thermal emission was studied under hydrostatic pressure. It is suggested that deep donors show a discrete structure of energy levels, revealed in their thermal emission kinetics. An analysis of the capacitance behavior of AlGaAs n-type regions (x greater than 0.2) was performed for Si and Sn donors. Electron capture kinetics was modeled.

  12. Proactive control of the metal-ceramic interface behavior of thermal barrier coatings using an artificial alpha-Al2O 3 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Feng

    The reliability and life of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in the hottest sections of advanced aircraft engines and power generation systems are largely dictated by: (1) the ability of a metallic bond coating to form an adherent thermally grown oxide (TGO) at the metal-ceramic interface and (2) the rate at which the TGO grows upon oxidation. It is postulated that a thin alpha-Al2O3 layer, if it could be directly deposited on a Ni-based alloy, will guide the alloy surface to form a TGO that is more tenacious and slower growing than what is attainable with state-of-the-art bond coatings. A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process was used to directly deposit an alpha-Al2O3 layer on the surface of a single crystal Ni-bases superalloy. The layer was 150 nm thick, and consisted of small columnar grains (˜100 to 200 nm) with alpha-Al2O 3 as the major phase with a minute amount of theta-Al2O 3. Within 0.5 h of oxidation at 1150°C, the resulting TGO formed on the alloy surface underwent significant lateral grain growth. Consequently, within this time scale, the columnar nature of the TGO became well established. After 50 h, a network of ridges was clearly observed on the TGO surface instead of equiaxed grains typically observed on uncoated alloy surface. Comparison of the TGO morphologies observed with and without the CVD-Al2O 3 layer suggested that the transient oxidation of the alloy surface was considerably reduced. The alloy coated with the CVD-Al2O 3 layer also produced a much more adherent and slow growing TGO in comparison to that formed on the uncoated alloy surface. The CVD-Al2O 3 layer also improved its spallation resistance. Without the CVD-Al 2O3 layer, more than 50% of the TGO spalled off the alloy surface after 500 h in oxidation with significant wrinkling of the TGO that remained on the alloy surface. In contrast, the TGO remained intact with the CVD-Al2O3 layer after the 500 h exposure. Furthermore, the CVD layer significantly reduced the degree of

  13. Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. J.; Jeong, T. S.; Youn, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature-dependent photoresponse characteristics of MnAl2S4 layers have been investigated, for the first time, by use of photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy. Three peaks were observed at all temperatures. The electronic origin of these peaks was associated with band-to-band transitions from the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y) to the conduction-band state Γ1( s). On the basis of the relationship between PC-peak energy and temperature, the optical band gap could be well expressed by the expression E g( T) = E g(0) - 2.80 × 10-4 T 2/(287 + T), where E g(0) was estimated to be 3.7920 eV, 3.7955 eV, and 3.8354 eV for the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y), respectively. Results from PC spectroscopy revealed the crystal-field and spin-orbit splitting were 3.5 meV and 39.9 meV. The gradual decrease of PC intensity with decreasing temperature can be explained on the basis of trapping centers associated with native defects in the MnAl2S4 layers. Plots of log J ph, the PC current density, against 1/ T, revealed a dominant trap level in the high-temperature region. By comparing PC and the Hall effect results, we confirmed that this trap level is a shallow donor 18.9 meV below the conduction band.

  14. Effect of Split Gate Size on the Electrostatic Potential and 0.7 Anomaly within Quantum Wires on a Modulation-Doped GaAs /AlGaAs Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Thomas, K. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    2016-04-01

    We study 95 split gates of different size on a single chip using a multiplexing technique. Each split gate defines a one-dimensional channel on a modulation-doped GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructure, through which the conductance is quantized. The yield of devices showing good quantization decreases rapidly as the length of the split gates increases. However, for the subset of devices showing good quantization, there is no correlation between the electrostatic length of the one-dimensional channel (estimated using a saddle-point model) and the gate length. The variation in electrostatic length and the one-dimensional subband spacing for devices of the same gate length exceeds the variation in the average values between devices of different lengths. There is a clear correlation between the curvature of the potential barrier in the transport direction and the strength of the "0.7 anomaly": the conductance value of the 0.7 anomaly reduces as the barrier curvature becomes shallower. These results highlight the key role of the electrostatic environment in one-dimensional systems. Even in devices with clean conductance plateaus, random fluctuations in the background potential are crucial in determining the potential landscape in the active device area such that nominally identical gate structures have different characteristics.

  15. Schottky barrier contrasts in single and bi-layer graphene contacts for MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Hyewon; Kim, Taekwang; Shin, Somyeong; Kim, Dahye; Seo, Sunae; Kim, Hakseong; Lee, Sang Wook; Sung, Ji Ho; Jo, Moon-Ho; Lee, Myoung Jae; Seo, David H.

    2015-12-07

    We have investigated single- and bi-layer graphene as source-drain electrodes for n-type MoS{sub 2} transistors. Ti-MoS{sub 2}-graphene heterojunction transistors using both single-layer MoS{sub 2} (1M) and 4-layer MoS{sub 2} (4M) were fabricated in order to compare graphene electrodes with commonly used Ti electrodes. MoS{sub 2}-graphene Schottky barrier provided electron injection efficiency up to 130 times higher in the subthreshold regime when compared with MoS{sub 2}-Ti, which resulted in V{sub DS} polarity dependence of device parameters such as threshold voltage (V{sub TH}) and subthreshold swing (SS). Comparing single-layer graphene (SG) with bi-layer graphene (BG) in 4M devices, SG electrodes exhibited enhanced device performance with higher on/off ratio and increased field-effect mobility (μ{sub FE}) due to more sensitive Fermi level shift by gate voltage. Meanwhile, in the strongly accumulated regime, we observed opposing behavior depending on MoS{sub 2} thickness for both SG and BG contacts. Differential conductance (σ{sub d}) of 1M increases with V{sub DS} irrespective of V{sub DS} polarity, while σ{sub d} of 4M ceases monotonic growth at positive V{sub DS} values transitioning to ohmic-like contact formation. Nevertheless, the low absolute value of σ{sub d} saturation of the 4M-graphene junction demonstrates that graphene electrode could be unfavorable for high current carrying transistors.

  16. Improving the efficiency of cadmium sulfide-sensitized titanium dioxide/indium tin oxide glass photoelectrodes using silver sulfide as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals are deposited on the titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystalline film on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate to prepare CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO photoelectrodes through a new method known as the molecular precursor decomposition method. The Ag2S is interposed between the TiO2 nanocrystal film and CdS nanocrystals as an energy barrier layer and a light absorber. As a consequence, the energy conversion efficiency of the CdS/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrodes is significantly improved. Under AM 1.5 G sunlight irradiation, the maximum efficiency achieved for the CdS(4)/Ag2S/TiO2/ITO electrode is 3.46%, corresponding to an increase of about 150% as compared to the CdS(4)/TiO2/ITO electrode without the Ag2S layer. Our experimental results show that the improved efficiency is mainly due to the formation of Ag2S layer that may increase the light absorbance and reduce the recombination of photogenerated electrons with redox ions from the electrolyte. PMID:25411566

  17. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification. PMID:25747301

  18. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification.

  19. Nucleation and initial growth of atomic layer deposited titanium oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and the effect of pretreatment by surface barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, David C.; Krumpolec, Richard; Ivanova, Tatiana V.; Homola, Tomáš; Černák, Mirko

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the initial nucleation stage of the atomic layer deposition of the anatase phase of titanium dioxide on silicon substrates. Careful control and analysis of the ellipsometric measurements enables the determination of the evolution of crystallite diameter and surface density in the nucleation stage before a continuous film is formed. This growth behaviour is in line with atomic force microscopy measurements of the crystallite size. The crystallite diameter is a linear function of the number of ALD cycles with a slope of approximately 1.7 Å cycle-1 which is equivalent to a layer growth rate of 0.85 Å cycle-1 consistent with a ripening process which increases the crystallite size while reducing their density. The crystallite density decreases from ∼3 × 1017 m-3 in the initial nucleation stages to ∼3 × 1015 m-3 before the film becomes continuous. The effect of exposing the substrate to a diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in an air atmosphere before deposition was measured and only small differences were found: the plasma treated samples were slightly rougher in the initial stages and required a greater number of cycles to form a continuous film (∼80) compared to the untreated films (∼50). A thicker layer of native oxide was found after plasma treatment.

  20. Growth of ultrahigh-Sn-content Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer and its impact on controlling Schottky barrier height of metal/Ge contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Wakana; Kurosawa, Masashi; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2016-04-01

    We examined the epitaxial growth of an ultrahigh-Sn-content Ge1- x Sn x layer on a Ge substrate and investigated the impact of a Ge1- x Sn x interlayer on the Schottky barrier height (SBH) of the metal/Ge contact. In this study, we considered guidelines of the strain energy and growth temperature to realize a high-Sn-content Ge1- x Sn x layer while keeping the epitaxial growth and suppressing the Sn precipitation. By reducing the film thickness and keeping a low growth temperature, we formed an atomically flat and uniform Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer with a Sn content up to 46% on a Ge(001) substrate. We also performed the current density-voltage measurement for Al/Ge1- x Sn x /n-Ge Schottky diodes to estimate the SBH. We found that the SBH of Al/Ge1- x Sn x /n-Ge contact decreases with increasing Sn content in the Ge1- x Sn x interlayer. The shift of the pinning position towards the conduction band edge of Ge is one of the reasons for the SBH reduction of Al/Ge1- x Sn x /n-Ge contact because the valence band edge of Ge1- x Sn x would rise as the Sn content increases.

  1. Hall Effect Studies of AlGaAs Grown by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy for Tandem Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Montgomery, Kyle H.; Woodall, Jerry M.

    2014-11-01

    We report results from Hall effect studies on Al x Ga1- x As ( x = 0.23-0.24) with bandgap energies of 1.76 ± 0.01 eV grown by liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE). Room-temperature Hall measurements on unintentionally doped AlGaAs revealed p-type background doping for concentrations in the range 3.7-5.2 × 1016 cm-3. Sn, Te, Ge, and Zn-doped AlGaAs were also characterized to study the relationship between doping concentrations and the atomic fractions of the dopants in the melt. Temperature-dependent Hall measurements were performed to determine the activation energies of the four dopants. Deep donor levels (DX centers) were dominant for Sn-doped Al0.24Ga0.76As, but not for Te-doped Al0.24Ga0.76As. Comparison of the temperature-dependent Hall effect results for unintentionally and intentionally doped Al0.24Ga0.76As indicated that the impurity contributing to the p-type background doping had the same activation energy as Mg. We thus suggest a Te-doped emitter and an undoped or Ge-doped base to maximize the efficiency of Al x Ga1- x As ( x ˜ 0.23) solar cells grown by LPE.

  2. Resistance switching memory characteristics of CaF2/Si/CaF2 resonant-tunneling quantum-well heterostructures sandwiched by nanocrystalline Si secondary barrier layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, Yuya; Suda, Keita; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    A novel resistance switching memory using CaF2/Si/CaF2 resonant-tunneling quantum well heterostructures sandwiched by nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si) as secondary barrier layers has been proposed and the room temperature current–voltage characteristics of the basic resistance switching memory operation have been demonstrated. A resistance switching voltage of 1.0 V, a peak current density of approximately 42 kA/cm2, and an ON/OFF ratio of 2.8 were observed. In particular, more than 28000 write-read-erase cyclic memory operations have been demonstrated by applying pulsed input voltage sequences, which suggests better endurance than the device using a CaF2/CdF2/CaF2 heterostructure.

  3. Chemical and structural investigations of the incorporation of metal manganese into ruthenium thin films for use as copper diffusion barrier layers

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, A. P.; Casey, P.; Bogan, J.; Hughes, G.; Lozano, J. G.; Nellist, P. D.

    2012-12-03

    The incorporation of manganese into a 3 nm ruthenium thin-film is presented as a potential mechanism to improve its performance as a copper diffusion barrier. Manganese ({approx}1 nm) was deposited on an atomic layer deposited Ru film, and the Mn/Ru/SiO{sub 2} structure was subsequently thermally annealed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal the chemical interaction of Mn with the SiO{sub 2} substrate to form manganese-silicate (MnSiO{sub 3}), implying the migration of the metal through the Ru film. Electron energy loss spectroscopy line profile measurements of the intensity of the Mn signal across the Ru film confirm the presence of Mn at the Ru/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  4. Investigation of the release of Si from SiO{sub 2} during the formation of manganese/ruthenium barrier layers

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, A. P.; Casey, P.; Bogan, J.; Byrne, C.; Hughes, G.

    2013-05-20

    The thermodynamic and structural stability of ruthenium-manganese diffusion barriers on SiO{sub 2} is assessed. A {approx}2 nm film composed of partially oxidized manganese (MnO{sub x} where x < 1) was deposited on a 3 nm thick Ru film and the Mn-MnO{sub x}/Ru/SiO{sub 2} structure was subsequently thermally annealed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy studies suggest the release and upward diffusion of Si from the dielectric substrate as a result of manganese-silicate formation at the Ru/SiO{sub 2} interface. The migration of Si up through the Ru film results in further manganese-silicate formation upon its interaction with the Mn-MnO{sub x} deposited layer.

  5. Study on transconductance non-linearity of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs considering acceptor-like traps in barrier layer under the gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiangfeng; Chen, Nanting; Jiang, Zhiguang; Bai, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yong; Liu, Yang; Yu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    DC and pulsed transfer characteristics of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been systematically investigated. A significant difference of transconductance linearity between DC and gate-pulsed measurements is clearly observed. The acceptor-like traps in the barrier layer under the gate is the main cause of non-linear behavior of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs transconductance. A physical model has been constructed to explain the phenomenon. In the modeling, an acceptor-like trap concentration of 1.2 × 1019 cm-3 with an energy level of 0.5 eV below the conduction band minimum shows the best fit to measurement results.

  6. CoFe alloy as middle layer for strong spin dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R. S.; Yang, See-Hun; Jiang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Rice, Philip M.; Canali, Carlo M.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2013-01-01

    We report the spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling effect in CoFe/MgO/CoFe/MgO/CoFeB (CoFe) double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. The dI/dV spectra reveal clear resonant peaks for the parallel magnetization configurations, which can be matched to quantum well resonances obtained from calculation. The differential TMR exhibits an oscillatory behavior with a sign change due to the formation of the spin-dependent QW states in the middle CoFe layer. Also, we observe pronounced TMR enhancement at resonant voltages at room temperature, suggesting that it is very promising to achieve high TMR using the spin-dependent QW resonant tunneling effect.

  7. Resistance switching memory characteristics of CaF2/Si/CaF2 resonant-tunneling quantum-well heterostructures sandwiched by nanocrystalline Si secondary barrier layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, Yuya; Suda, Keita; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    A novel resistance switching memory using CaF2/Si/CaF2 resonant-tunneling quantum well heterostructures sandwiched by nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si) as secondary barrier layers has been proposed and the room temperature current-voltage characteristics of the basic resistance switching memory operation have been demonstrated. A resistance switching voltage of 1.0 V, a peak current density of approximately 42 kA/cm2, and an ON/OFF ratio of 2.8 were observed. In particular, more than 28000 write-read-erase cyclic memory operations have been demonstrated by applying pulsed input voltage sequences, which suggests better endurance than the device using a CaF2/CdF2/CaF2 heterostructure.

  8. Use of weathered and fresh bottom ash mix layers as a subbase in road constructions: environmental behavior enhancement by means of a retaining barrier.

    PubMed

    Del Valle-Zermeño, R; Chimenos, J M; Giró-Paloma, J; Formosa, J

    2014-12-01

    The presence of neoformed cement-like phases during the weathering of non-stabilized freshly quenched bottom ash favors the development of a bound pavement material with improved mechanical properties. Use of weathered and freshly quenched bottom ash mix layers placed one over the other allowed the retention of leached heavy metals and metalloids by means of a reactive percolation barrier. The addition of 50% of weathered bottom ash to the total subbase content diminished the release of toxic species to below environmental regulatory limits. The mechanisms of retention and the different processes and factors responsible of leaching strongly depended on the contaminant under concern as well as on the chemical and physical factors. Thus, the immediate reuse of freshly quenched bottom ash as a subbase material in road constructions is possible, as both the mechanical properties and long-term leachability are enhanced. PMID:25180484

  9. Gate-modulated conductance of few-layer WSe{sub 2} field-effect transistors in the subgap regime: Schottky barrier transistor and subgap impurity states

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junjie; Feng, Simin; Rhodes, Daniel; Balicas, Luis; Nguyen, Minh An T.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Terrones, Mauricio; Zhu, J.

    2015-04-13

    Two key subjects stand out in the pursuit of semiconductor research: material quality and contact technology. The fledging field of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) faces a number of challenges in both efforts. This work attempts to establish a connection between the two by examining the gate-dependent conductance of few-layer (1-5L) WSe{sub 2} field effect devices. Measurements and modeling of the subgap regime reveal Schottky barrier transistor behavior. We show that transmission through the contact barrier is dominated by thermionic field emission (TFE) at room temperature, despite the lack of intentional doping. The TFE process arises due to a large number of subgap impurity states, the presence of which also leads to high mobility edge carrier densities. The density of states of such impurity states is self-consistently determined to be approximately 1–2 × 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}/eV in our devices. We demonstrate that substrate is unlikely to be a major source of the impurity states and suspect that lattice defects within the material itself are primarily responsible. Our experiments provide key information to advance the quality and understanding of TMDC materials and electrical devices.

  10. Large-scale fabrication of linear low density polyethylene/layered double hydroxides composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiazhuo; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Qinghua; Wang, Qingguo; Xu, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Novel LDH intercalated with organic aliphatic long-chain anion was large-scale synthesized innovatively by high-energy ball milling in one pot. The linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)/layered double hydroxides (LDH) composite films with enhanced heat retention, thermal, mechanical, optical and water vapor barrier properties were fabricated by melt blending and blowing process. FT IR, XRD, SEM results show that LDH particles were dispersed uniformly in the LLDPE composite films. Particularly, LLDPE composite film with 1% LDH exhibited the optimal performance among all the composite films with a 60.36% enhancement in the water vapor barrier property and a 45.73 °C increase in the temperature of maximum mass loss rate compared with pure LLDPE film. Furthermore, the improved infrared absorbance (1180-914 cm-1) of LLDPE/LDH films revealed the significant enhancement of heat retention. Therefore, this study prompts the application of LLDPE/LDH films as agricultural films with superior heat retention.

  11. Improving hole injection and carrier distribution in InGaN light-emitting diodes by removing the electron blocking layer and including a unique last quantum barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Liwen Chen, Haitao; Wu, Shudong

    2015-08-28

    The effects of removing the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL), and using a last quantum barrier (LQB) with a unique design in conventional blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), were investigated through simulations. Compared with the conventional LED design that contained a GaN LQB and an AlGaN EBL, the LED that contained an AlGaN LQB with a graded-composition and no EBL exhibited enhanced optical performance and less efficiency droop. This effect was caused by an enhanced electron confinement and hole injection efficiency. Furthermore, when the AlGaN LQB was replaced with a triangular graded-composition, the performance improved further and the efficiency droop was lowered. The simulation results indicated that the enhanced hole injection efficiency and uniform distribution of carriers observed in the quantum wells were caused by the smoothing and thinning of the potential barrier for the holes. This allowed a greater number of holes to tunnel into the quantum wells from the p-type regions in the proposed LED structure.

  12. Improving hole injection and carrier distribution in InGaN light-emitting diodes by removing the electron blocking layer and including a unique last quantum barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Liwen; Chen, Haitao; Wu, Shudong

    2015-08-01

    The effects of removing the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL), and using a last quantum barrier (LQB) with a unique design in conventional blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), were investigated through simulations. Compared with the conventional LED design that contained a GaN LQB and an AlGaN EBL, the LED that contained an AlGaN LQB with a graded-composition and no EBL exhibited enhanced optical performance and less efficiency droop. This effect was caused by an enhanced electron confinement and hole injection efficiency. Furthermore, when the AlGaN LQB was replaced with a triangular graded-composition, the performance improved further and the efficiency droop was lowered. The simulation results indicated that the enhanced hole injection efficiency and uniform distribution of carriers observed in the quantum wells were caused by the smoothing and thinning of the potential barrier for the holes. This allowed a greater number of holes to tunnel into the quantum wells from the p-type regions in the proposed LED structure.

  13. Long-term effects of multiply pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in air on thin water layers over tissue: stationary and random streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-12-01

    Tissue covered by thin liquid layers treated by atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical applications ultimately requires a reproducible protocol for human healthcare. The desired outcomes of wet tissue treatment by dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) depend on the plasma dose which determines the integral fluence of radicals, ions, electric fields and UV/VUV photons incident onto the tissue. These fluences are controlled by power, frequency and treatment time. To first order, these parameters determine the energy deposition (J cm-2) onto the tissue. However, energy deposition may not be the only parameter that determines the fluences of reactants to the underlying tissue. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of multipulse DBDs interacting with wet tissue. The DBDs were simulated for 100 pulses at different repetition rates and liquid thicknesses followed by 10 s or more of afterglow. Two schemes were investigated—stationary and random. In the stationary scheme, the DBD plasma streamer continues to strike at the same location on the liquid layer, whereas in the random scheme the plasma streamer strikes at random locations on the liquid layer. These differences in streamer locations strongly affect the spatial distribution of solvated species such as OHaq and H2O2aq (‘aq’ represents an aqueous species), which have high rates of solvation. The spatial distribution of species such as NOaq, which have low rates of solvation, are less affected by the location of the streamer due to the remediating effects of diffusion in the air. The end result is that fluences to the tissue are sensitive to the spatial location of the streamer due to the ensuing reactions in the liquid between species that have low and high rates of solvation. These reactions can be controlled not only through location of the streamer, but also by repetition rate and thickness of the liquid layer.

  14. The Prospect of Y2SiO5-Based Materials as Protective Layer in Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, E.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    Bulk yttrium monosilicate (Y2SiO5) possesses interesting properties, such as low thermal expansion coefficient and stability in water vapor atmospheres, which make it a promising protective layer for SiC-based composites, intended for the hottest parts in the future gas turbines. Because protective layers are commonly applied by thermal spraying techniques, it is important to analyze the changes in structure and properties that these methods may produce in yttrium silicate coatings. In this work, two SiO2-Y2O3 compositions were flame sprayed in the form of coatings and beads. In parallel, the beads were spark plasma sintered at relatively low temperature to obtain partially amorphous bulk specimens that are used as model bulk material. The thermal aging—air and water vapor atmosphere—caused extensive nucleation of Y2SiO5 and Y2Si2O7 in both the bulk and coating. The rich water vapor condition caused the selective volatilization of SiO2 from Y2Si2O7 at the specimen surface leaving a very characteristic micro-ridged Y2SiO5 zones—either in coatings or sintered bodies. An important increase in the thermal conductivity of the aged materials was measured. The results of this work may be used as a reference body for the production of Y2SiO5 coatings using thermal spraying techniques.

  15. [Kinetics of immunoglobulin G transport through the multi-layer epithelial-hematic barrier of the respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, N V; Krekhnov, B V; Chenchikova, E Iu; Cherchenko, N G; Ishkov, A G; Remizova, E N; Sveshnikov, P G; Miroshnichenko, E V; Nazarov, Iu V; Morozov, A P

    1991-05-01

    A new class of drugs is now utilized for in vivo diagnoses and therapy of many widespread diseases. In these pharmacological and diagnostic preparations the active substance is conjugated with a vector which transports the drug to specific biological targets. Monoclonal antibodies are the most commonly used vectors: estimation of their permeability through multilayer and unilayer biomembranes is an important step in the analysis of efficiency of vector drugs. Experiments with Sprague-Dawley rats (mature females weighing 500 to 160 g) have demonstrated the ability of immunoglobulins G to penetrate through the respiratory epithelial-hematic barrier. Using solid phase ELISA, it was found that 5-25% of the total amount of mouse antiinsulin immunoglobulins G1 injected into the trachea under hexenal anesthesia can penetrate into the blood plasma. Accumulation of antibodies in the blood begins 4 hours and ceases 32 hours after the drug application in a dose of 400 micrograms. The kinetics of transmembrane transport is described by an S-like saturation function: C(t) = Cmax/(1+e-(at-b]. Penetration of monoclonal antibodies into the blood is accompanied by their distribution in the organs and tissues as well as by their clearance from the blood plasma. The clearance of monoclonal antibodies is characterized by a 24 hour half-life and is described by an exponential equation: C(t) = C0 x exp-kt. An algorithm for the interaction of these processes which should be taken into account during measurements of the transport of monoclonal antibodies and their complexes through biomembranes is proposed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1747414

  16. High-barrier Schottky contact on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer and studies of defect levels by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khai V.; Pak, Rahmi O.; Oner, Cihan; Mannan, Mohammad A.; Mandal, Krishna C.

    2015-08-01

    High barrier Schottky contact has been fabricated on 50 μm n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers grown on 350 μm thick substrate 8° off-cut towards the [11̅20] direction. The 4H-SiC epitaxial wafer was diced into 10 x 10 mm2 samples. The metal-semiconductor junctions were fabricated by photolithography and dc sputtering with ruthenium (Ru). The junction properties were characterized through current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Detectors were characterized by alpha spectroscopy measurements in terms of energy resolution and charge collection efficiency using a 0.1 μCi 241Am radiation source. It was found that detectors fabricated from high work function rare transition metal Ru demonstrated very low leakage current and significant improvement of detector performance. Defect characterization of the epitaxial layers was conducted by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) to thoroughly investigate the defect levels in the active region. The presence of a new defect level induced by this rare transition metal-semiconductor interface has been identified and characterized.

  17. Self-forming Al oxide barrier for nanoscale Cu interconnects created by hybrid atomic layer deposition of Cu–Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Han, Dong-Suk; Kang, You-Jin; Shin, So-Ra; Park, Jong-Wan

    2014-01-15

    The authors synthesized a Cu–Al alloy by employing alternating atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reactions using Cu and Al precursors, respectively. By alternating between these two ALD surface chemistries, the authors fabricated ALD Cu–Al alloy. Cu was deposited using bis(1-dimethylamino-2-methyl-2-butoxy) copper as a precursor and H{sub 2} plasma, while Al was deposited using trimethylaluminum as the precursor and H{sub 2} plasma. The Al atomic percent in the Cu–Al alloy films varied from 0 to 15.6 at. %. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that a uniform Al-based interlayer self-formed at the interface after annealing. To evaluate the barrier properties of the Al-based interlayer and adhesion between the Cu–Al alloy film and SiO{sub 2} dielectric, thermal stability and peel-off adhesion tests were performed, respectively. The Al-based interlayer showed similar thermal stability and adhesion to the reference Mn-based interlayer. Our results indicate that Cu–Al alloys formed by alternating ALD are suitable seed layer materials for Cu interconnects.

  18. Influence of source and drain contacts on the properties of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors based on amorphous carbon nanofilm as barrier layer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dongxiang; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Mingjie; Li, Min; Xu, Miao; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2015-02-18

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (α-IGZO TFTs) with damage-free back channel wet-etch (BCE) process were achieved by introducing a carbon nanofilm as a barrier layer. We investigate the effects of different source-and-drain (S/D) materials on TFT performance. We find the TFT with Ti/C S/D electrodes exhibits a superior performance with higher output current, lower threshold voltage, and higher effective electron mobility compared to that of Mo/C S/D electrodes. Transmittance electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to analysis the interfacial interaction between S/D metal/C/α-IGZO layers. The results indicate that the better performance of TFTs with Ti/C electrodes should be attributed to the formations of Ti-C and Ti-O at the Ti/C-contact regions, which lead to a lower contact resistance, whereas Mo film is relatively stable and does not react easily with C nanofilm, resulting in a nonohmic contact behavior between Mo/C and α-IGZO layer. However, both kinds of α-IGZO TFTs show good stability under thermal bias stress, indicating that the inserted C nanofilms could avoid the impact on the α-IGZO channel regions during S/D electrodes formation. Finally, we successfully fabricated a high-definition active-matrix organic lighting emitting diode prototype driven by α-IGZO TFTs with Ti/C electrodes in a pilot line.

  19. Joint assimilation of Aquarius-derived sea surface salinity and AVHRR-derived sea surface temperature in an ocean general circulation model using SEEK filter: Implication for mixed layer depth and barrier layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhisek; Sharma, Rashmi; Kumar, Raj; Basu, Sujit

    2015-10-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) from Aquarius mission and sea surface temperature (SST) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) for the years 2012-2014 are assimilated into the global Massachusetts Institute of Technology General Circulation Model (MITGCM). Investigation of the impact of assimilation of these two data sets on simulated mixed layer depth (MLD) and barrier layer thickness (BLT) forms the core of our study. The method of assimilation is the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter. Several assimilation runs are performed. Single-parameter assimilation, as well as joint assimilation, is conducted. To begin with, the model simulated SST and SSS are compared with independent Argo observations of these two parameters. Use of latitudinally varying error variances, which is a novel feature of our study, gives rise to the significant improvement in the simulation of SSS and SST. The best result occurs when joint assimilation is performed. Afterward, simulated MLD and BLT are compared with the same parameters derived from Argo observations forming an independent validation data set. Comparisons are performed both in temporal and spatial domains. Significant positive impact of assimilation is found in all the cases studied, and joint assimilation is found to outperform single-parameter assimilation in each of the cases considered. It is found that simulations of MLD and BLT improve up to 24% and 29%, respectively, when a joint assimilation of SSS and SST is carried out.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of Ta-based diffusion barriers using tert-butylimido tris(diethylamido) tantalum metal organic precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keechan

    Ta-N and Ta-Al-N Cu diffusion barriers were deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tert-butylimido tris(diethylamido) tantalum (TBTDET)/tri-ethyl aluminum (TEA) metal organic precursors. The effect of NH3 addition on film properties during TaN CVD from TBTDET was examined. As the NH3 flow was increased at constant TBTDET flow, the film density, nitrogen content, and grain size increased, while resistivity and carbon content decreased as compared to films deposited with TBTDET alone. These property changes are attributed, in part, to transamination reaction between the diethylamido ligands in TBTDET and NH3. The higher film density and nitrogen content produced TaN films that exhibited superior diffusion barrier performance compared to those deposited without NH3 addition. TaN was also successfully deposited by ALD with alternating exposure to TBTDET and NH3. TBTDET adsorption was shown to be self-limiting with a single monolayer growth rate of 2.6 A/cycle over the process temperature window of 200 to 300°C. An incubation period exists during the initial cycles as evidenced by a non-linear relationship between film thickness and cycle number. Ultra-thin ALD-TaN layers, as thin as 38 A, effectively blocked Cu diffusion during a 30 min anneal at 500°C. Ternary Ta-Al-N films were deposited from TBTDET and TEA to promote formation of an amorphous film and increasing the recrystallization temperature. The Al mole fraction was linearly dependent on the TEA exposure time suggesting growth was self-limiting. Although Al insertion into TaN promoted an amorphous structure, it also lowered the overall film density. A comparative study of the diffusion barrier performance showed that failure occurred for both TaN and Ta-Al-N films at the same thickness, suggesting the increased amorphous content by adding Al was offset by the lower film density. Selecting a different reactant exposure sequence produced different film properties. A

  1. Performance of two-layer thermal barrier systems on directionally solidified Ni-Al-Mo and comparative effects of alloy thermal expansion on system life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1980-01-01

    A promising two-layer thermal barrier coating system (TBS), Ni-16.4Cr-5.1A1-0.15Y/ZrO2-6.1Y2O3 (all in weight percent), was identified for directionally solidified Ni-Al-Mo (gamma/gamma' alpha). In cyclic furnace tests at 1095 C this system on gamma/gamma' alpha was better than Ni-16. 4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y/ZrO2-7.8Y2O3 by about 50 percent. In natural gas - oxygen torch rig tests at 1250 C the ZrO2-6.1Y2O3 coating was better than the ZrO2-7.8Y2O3 coating by 95 percent, on MAR-M509 substrates and by 60 percent on gamma/gamma' alpha substrates. Decreasing the coefficient of thermal expansion of the substrate material from 17-18x10 to the -6 power/C (MAR-M200 + Hf and MAR-M509) to 11x10 to the -6 power/C (gamma/gamma' alpha) also resulted in improved TBS life. For example, in natural gas - oxygen torch rig tests at 1250 C, the life of Ni-16.4Cr-5.1Al-0.15Y/ZrO26.1Y2O3 was about 30 percent better on gamma/gamma' alpha than on MAR-M509 substrates. Thus compositional changes in the bond and thermal barrier coatings were shown to have a greater effect on TBS life than does the coefficient of thermal expansion.

  2. A ten-element array of individually addressable channeled-substrate-planar AlGaAs diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, D. B.; Goldstein, B.; Bednarz, J. P.; Harvey, M. G.; Dinkel, N. A.

    1987-01-01

    The fabrication of arrays of channeled-substrate-planar (CSP) AlGaAs diode lasers which emit up to 150 mW CW in a single spatial mode and are applicable to mulitchannel optical recording systems is described. The CSP diode lasers are incorporated in ten-array geometry, and each array is 1.95 nm in width and 100 microns in thickness and is cleaved to have a cavity length of 200 microns and coated to produce 90-percent reflectivity on the back facet and 10-percent reflectivity on the front facet. The array is attached to a thermoelectrically cooled submount. The optical output power versus input current characteristics for the array are evaluated, and the lateral far-field intensity profiles for each of the lasers (at 30 mW CW) and CW spectra of the lasers are analyzed.

  3. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOEpatents

    Saha, Anuj J.; Grant, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  4. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Analytical charge control model for AlGaN/GaN MIS-HFETs including an undepleted barrier layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenghui, Lu; Jiangfeng, Du; Qian, Luo; Qi, Yu; Wei, Zhou; Jianxin, Xia; Mohua, Yang

    2010-09-01

    An analytical charge control model considering the insulator/AlGaN interface charge and undepleted Al-GaN barrier layer is presented for AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterostructure field effect transistors (MIS-HFETs) over the entire operation range of gate voltage. The whole process of charge control is analyzed in detail and partitioned into four regions: I—full depletion, II—partial depletion, III—neutral region and IV—electron accumulation at the insulator/AlGaN interface. The results show that two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) saturates at the boundary of region II/III and the gate voltage should not exceed the 2DEG saturation voltage in order to keep the channel in control. In addition, the span of region II accounts for about 50% of the range of gate voltage before 2DEG saturates. The good agreement of the calculated transfer characteristic with the measured data confirms the validity of the proposed model.

  5. A High Performance In0.7Ga0.3As MOSFET with an InP Barrier Layer for Radio-Frequency Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hu-Dong; Liu, Gui-Ming; Sun, Bing; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Wen-Xin; Liu, Hong-Gang

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a high performance implant-free n-type In0.7Ga0.3As channel MOSFET with a 4-nm InP barrier layer fabricated on a semi-insulating substrate employing a 10-nm Al2O3 as gate dielectric. The maximum effective channel mobility is 1862 cm2/V·s extracted by the split C—V method. Devices with 0.8 μm gate length exhibit a peak extrinsic transconductance of 85 mS/mm and a drive current of more than 200 mA/mm. A short-circuit current gain cutoff frequency fT of 24.5 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency fmax of 54 GHz are achieved for the 0.8 μm gate-length device. The research is helpful to obtain higher performance In0.7Ga0.3As MOSFETs for radio-frequency applications.

  6. Persistent photoconductivity in AlGaN/GaN heterojunction channels caused by the ionization of deep levels in the AlGaN barrier layer

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, H.; Akiyama, Y.; Niwa, R.; Sakashita, H.; Sakaki, H.; Kachi, T.; Sugimoto, M.

    2013-12-04

    Time-dependent responses of drain current (I{sub d}) in an AlGaN/GaN HEMT under UV (3.3 eV) and red (2.0 eV) light illumination have been studied at 300 K and 250 K. UV illumination enhances I{sub d} by about 10 %, indicating that the density of two-dimensional electrons is raised by about 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. When UV light is turned off at 300 K, a part of increased I{sub d} decays quickly but the other part of increment is persistent, showing a slow decay. At 250 K, the majority of increment remains persistent. It is found that such a persistent increase of I{sub d} at 250 K can be partially erased by the illumination of red light. These photo-responses are explained by a simple band-bending model in which deep levels in the AlGaN barrier get positively charged by the UV light, resulting in a parabolic band bending in the AlGaN layer, while some potion of those deep levels are neutralized by the red light.

  7. The influence of Sb doping on the growth and electronic properties of GaAs(100) and AlGaAs(100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, K. D.; Chen, H. C.; Bensaoula, A.; Lim, W.; Trombetta, L.

    1989-01-01

    Isoelectronic doping using antimony has been shown to reduce traps and improve material properties during epitaxial growth of Si doped GaAs(100) and AlGaAs(100). In this study, the effect of the antimony dopant on the optimal growth temperature is examined with the aim of producing high-quality heterostructures at lower temperatues. High-quality films of GaAs and AlGaAs have been grown by molecular-beam epitaxy at the normal growth temperatures of 610 and 700 C, respectively, and 50-100 C below this temperature using varying small amounts of Sb as a dopant. Electrical properties of the films were then examined using Hall mobility measurements and deep-level transient spectroscopy.

  8. Enhanced 1.53 μm photoluminescence from Er-doped AlGaAs wet thermal native oxides by postoxidation implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Hall, D. C.

    2007-10-01

    A significant enhancement in the 300K, cw photoluminescence (PL) from Er-doped Al0.3Ga0.7As native oxide films is achieved by incorporating the Er after (relative to before) wet thermal oxidation of the AlGaAs. Postoxidation Er ion implantation (1015cm-2 and 300keV) prevents the formation of nonradiative ErAs complexes, leading to a relatively long 1.53μm fluorescence lifetime τ =6.1ms (an approximately seven times improvement) with approximately three times enhancement in the PL intensity. The data suggest that Er-doped AlGaAs native oxides formed using postoxidation implantation may be a viable active media for monolithic optoelectronic integration of waveguide amplifiers on GaAs substrates.

  9. Optical reflection and contactless electroreflection from GaAlAs layers with periodically arranged GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Chaldyshev, V. V. Shkol'nik, A. S.; Evtikhiev, V. P.; Holden, T.

    2006-12-15

    Optical reflection and electroreflection for the AlGaAs layers containing the periodically arranged GaAs quantum wells of different thickness are studied at photon energies ranging from 1 to 2 eV. It is established that the spectral dependence of the reflectance involves three different contributions made by (i) the reflection from the medium-air interface; (ii) the interference reflection due to the periodically modulated refractive index, since the materials of the wells and barriers have different refractive indices; and (iii) the reflection produced by the interaction of electromagnetic waves with the excition states in the quantum wells. Analysis of the reflection spectra shows that these contributions are characterized by different behavior with variations in temperature, angle of incidence of light, and polarization; however, quantitative separation of the spectra into individual contributions presents a rather difficult problem. To separate the contribution originating from the interaction of light with the exciton states from the optical spectra, a special approach based on contactless measurements of the optical electroreflectance over a certain spectral region is developed. It is shown that this method provides a means for determining the parameters of the exciton states in the quantum wells.

  10. Cu diffusion in single-crystal and polycrystalline TiN barrier layers: A high-resolution experimental study supported by first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Mühlbacher, Marlene; Bochkarev, Anton S.; Mendez-Martin, Francisca; Schalk, Nina; Mitterer, Christian; Sartory, Bernhard; Chitu, Livia; Popov, Maxim N.; Spitaler, Jürgen; Puschnig, Peter; Ding, Hong; Lu, Jun; Hultman, Lars

    2015-08-28

    Dense single-crystal and polycrystalline TiN/Cu stacks were prepared by unbalanced DC magnetron sputter deposition at a substrate temperature of 700 °C and a pulsed bias potential of −100 V. The microstructural variation was achieved by using two different substrate materials, MgO(001) and thermally oxidized Si(001), respectively. Subsequently, the stacks were subjected to isothermal annealing treatments at 900 °C for 1 h in high vacuum to induce the diffusion of Cu into the TiN. The performance of the TiN diffusion barrier layers was evaluated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping and atom probe tomography. No Cu penetration was evident in the single-crystal stack up to annealing temperatures of 900 °C, due to the low density of line and planar defects in single-crystal TiN. However, at higher annealing temperatures when diffusion becomes more prominent, density-functional theory calculations predict a stoichiometry-dependent atomic diffusion mechanism of Cu in bulk TiN, with Cu diffusing on the N sublattice for the experimental N/Ti ratio. In comparison, localized diffusion of Cu along grain boundaries in the columnar polycrystalline TiN barriers was detected after the annealing treatment. The maximum observed diffusion length was approximately 30 nm, yielding a grain boundary diffusion coefficient of the order of 10{sup −16} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} at 900 °C. This is 10 to 100 times less than for comparable underdense polycrystalline TiN coatings deposited without external substrate heating or bias potential. The combined numerical and experimental approach presented in this paper enables the contrasting juxtaposition of diffusion phenomena and mechanisms in two TiN coatings, which differ from each other only in the presence of grain boundaries.

  11. Sorption of Pb(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), As(III) to peat, and utilization of the sorption properties in industrial waste landfill hydraulic barrier layers.

    PubMed

    Koivula, Minna P; Kujala, Kauko; Rönkkömäki, Hannu; Mäkelä, Mauri

    2009-05-15

    The low conductivity landfill barrier layers protect the groundwater and soil by limiting the water flow through the bottom layers of the landfill material. Many materials used in hydraulic barrier layers also have sorption properties which could be used to reduce environmental risks. The adsorption of lead, chromium, copper, and arsenic to peat was studied with a batch-type test and a column test for compacted peat, both without pH adjustment in acidic conditions. Peat adsorbed all the metals well, 40000mg/kg of lead, 13000mg/kg of chromium, and 8400mg/kg of copper in the column test. Arsenic was only tested in a batch-type test, and in that peat adsorbed 60mg/kg of arsenic. The column test showed heavy metals to be adsorbed on the surface layers of the compacted peat sample, on the first centimeter of the sample. The adsorption was much greater in the column test than in the batch-type test, partly due to the different pH conditions and the buffer capacity of the peat in the column test. The liquid/solid ratio of the column experiment represented a time period of approximately 40 years in a landfill, under Finnish climate conditions. The hydraulic conductivity of the peat decreased as it was compressed, but it already met the hydraulic conductivity limits set by European Union legislation for the hydraulic barrier layer (1x10(-9)m/s at a pressure of 150kPa for a 5-m layer), with a pressure of 50kPa. The results show that peat would be an excellent material to construct compacted, low hydraulic conductivity layers with adsorption properties in, e.g. industrial waste landfills.

  12. Giant barrier layer capacitance effects in the lithium ion conducting material La0.67Li0.25Ti0.75Al0.25O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Martín, Susana; Morata-Orrantia, Ainhoa; Aguirre, Myriam H.; Alario-Franco, Miguel Á.

    2005-01-01

    High dielectric permittivity (ɛ'˜500000) has been observed in polycrystalline samples of La0.67Li0.25Ti0.75Al0.25O3 over a large frequency range (˜10barrier layer capacitor associated with grain boundary effects in the ion conducting material.

  13. Influence of the Thickness of the Barrier Layer in Nanoheterostructures and the Gate-Drain Capacitance on the Microwave and Noise Parameters of Field-Effect AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylovich, S. V.; Fedorov, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    We perform a computational and analytical study of how the thickness of the barrier layer in nanoheterostructures and the gate-drain capacitance C gd influence the microwave parameters (limiting frequency of current amplification and maximum generation frequency) and noise parameters (noise factor) of a field-effect AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor. The results of complex measurements of the parameters of such transistors based on nanoheterostructures with a barrier layer thickness of 3.5-15.7 nm, which were performed within the framework of four technological routes in the range 0.1-67 GHz, are presented. It is shown that in order to reduce the noise ratio and improve the microwave parameters, it is necessary to optimize both the parameters of nanoheterostructures and the manufacturing techniques. In particular, the thickness of the barrier layer should be reduced, and the gate length should be chosen such as to maximize the product of the squared maximum current amplification frequency in the interior of the transistor and the output impedance between the drain and the source. Additionally, attention should be given to the shape of the gate to reduce the capacitance C gd. Under certain conditions of manufacture of nitride field-effect HEMT, one can achieve a lower noise factor compared with the transistors based on arsenide nanoheterostructures.

  14. Modulation characteristics of AlGaAs DH lasers in frequency region of 6 to 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Yamada, H.

    1981-10-01

    The modulation characteristics in the frequency region of 0.5 to 2.4 GHz and 5.9 to 10 GHz were measured for both TJS (Kumabe et al., 1978) and BH (Nagano et al., 1978) AlGaAs DH lasers. Modulation of the light output was examined on an optical frequency region with a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Incident microwave power was less than 32 mW at 10 GHz. Results indicate that the modulation mechanism is caused by driving of the injected-carrier-density, even at such high frequency. Theoretical calculations by the rate equation give less than 14 dB as the increase of the incident microwave power (P/i/) varies from 1 to 10 GHz to obtain a main intensity to sideband intensity ratio of 1/6; experimental data for an increase of P(i) were about 50 dB. The microwave power will be reduced if impedance is matched to the microwave and the sideband signal is optically tuned in the laser cavity

  15. AlGaAs top solar cell for mechanical attachment in a multi-junction tandem concentrator solar cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Hannon, M. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Mcneeley, J. B.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1990-01-01

    Free-standing, transparent, tunable bandgap AlxGa1-xAs top solar cells have been fabricated for mechanical attachment in a four terminal tandem stack solar cell. Evaluation of the device results has demonstrated 1.80 eV top solar cells with efficiencies of 18 percent (100 X, and AM0) which would yield stack efficiencies of 31 percent (100 X, AM0) with a silicon bottom cell. When fully developed, the AlxGa1-xAs/Si mechanically-stacked two-junction solar cell concentrator system can provide efficiencies of 36 percent (AM0, 100 X). AlxGa1-xAs top solar cells with bandgaps from 1.66 eV to 2.08 eV have been fabricated. Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) growth techniques have been used and LPE has been found to yield superior AlxGa1-xAs material when compared to molecular beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It is projected that stack assembly technology will be readily applicable to any mechanically stacked multijunction (MSMJ) system. Development of a wide bandgap top solar cell is the only feasible method for obtaining stack efficiencies greater than 40 percent at AM0. System efficiencies of greater than 40 percent can be realized when the AlGaAs top solar cell is used in a three solar cell mechanical stack.

  16. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  17. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  18. Characteristics of WN{sub x}C{sub y} films deposited using remote plasma atomic layer deposition with ({sup Me}Cp)W(CO){sub 2}(NO) for Cu diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Heeyoung; Jang, Woochool; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Yuh, Junhan

    2015-09-15

    Diffusion barrier characteristics of tungsten–nitride–carbide (WN{sub x}C{sub y}) thin films interposed between Cu and SiO{sub 2} layers were studied. The WN{sub x}C{sub y} films were deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition (RPALD) using a metal organic source, ({sup Me}Cp)W(CO){sub 2}(NO), and ammonia. Auger electron spectroscopy analysis indicated the WN{sub x}C{sub y} films consisted of tungsten, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the film deposited at 350 °C was nanocrystalline. The resistivity of WN{sub x}C{sub y} film deposited by RPALD was very low compared to that in previous research because of the lower nitrogen content and different crystal structures of the WN{sub x}C{sub y}. To verify the diffusion barrier characteristics of the WN{sub x}C{sub y} film, Cu films were deposited by physical vapor deposition after WN{sub x}C{sub y} film was formed by RPALD on Si substrate. The Cu/WN{sub x}C{sub y}/Si film stack was annealed in a vacuum by rapid thermal annealing at 500 °C. Cu diffusion through the barrier layer was verified by XRD. Stable film properties were observed up to 500 °C, confirming that WN{sub x}C{sub y} film is suitable as a Cu diffusion barrier in microelectronic circuits.

  19. Schottky barrier solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating a Schottky barrier solar cell is described. The cell consists of a thin substrate of low cost material with at least the top surface of the substrate being electrically conductive. A thin layer of heavily doped n-type polycrystalling germanium is deposited on the substrate after a passivation layer is deposited to prevent migration of impurities into the polycrystalline germanium. The polycrystalline germanium is recrystallized to increase the crystal sizes to serve as a base layer on which a thin layer of gallium arsenide is vapor-epitaxilly grown followed by a thermally-grown oxide layer. A metal layer is deposited on the oxide layer and a grid electrode is deposited to be in electrical contact with the top surface of the metal layer.

  20. Schottky barrier solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stirn, R.J.; Yeh, Y.C.M.

    1981-07-01

    A method of fabricating a Schottky barrier solar cell is described. The cell consists of a thin substrate of low cost material with at least the top surface of the substrate being electrically conductive. A thin layer of heavily doped n-type polycrystalling germanium is deposited on the substrate after a passivation layer is deposited to prevent migration of impurities into the polycrystalline germanium. The polycrystalline germanium is recrystallized to increase the crystal sizes to serve as a base layer on which a thin layer of gallium arsenide is vapor-epitaxilly grown followed by a thermally-grown oxide layer. A metal layer is deposited on the oxide layer and a grid electrode is deposited to be in electrical contact with the top surface of the metal layer. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  1. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  2. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  3. Finite element simulation of stress distribution and development in 8YSZ and double-ceramic-layer La2Zr2O7/8YSZ thermal barrier coatings during thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L. Wang; Wang, Y.; Zhang, W. Q.; Sun, X. G.; He, J. Q.; Pan, Z. Y.; Wang, C. H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the thermal stress of the double-ceramic-layer (DCL) La2Zr2O7/8YSZ thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) during thermal shock has been calculated. The residual stress of the coating after being sprayed has been regarded as the initial condition of the first thermal cycle. The characteristic of the stress development during the thermal cycle has been discussed, and the influence of the defects on the failure mode during the thermal cycle has also been discussed systematically. Finite element simulation results show that there exist higher radial thermal shock stresses on the ceramic layer surface of these two coatings. There also exist higher thermal stress gradient at the interface between the ceramic layer and the metallic layer. Higher thermal stress in 8YSZ/NiCoCrAlY coating lead to the decrease of thermal shock property as compared to that of LZ/8YSZ/NiCoCrAlY coating. The addition of LZ ceramic layer can increase the insulation temperature, impede the oxygen transferring to the bond coating and can also reduce the thermal stress. Considering from the aspects of thermal insulation ability and the thermal shock resistance ability, DCL type LZ/8YSZ TBCs is a more promising coating material compared with the single-ceramic-layer (SCL) type 8YSZ TBCs for the application.

  4. Optimization of barrier layer thickness in MgSe/CdSe quantum wells for intersubband devices in the near infrared region

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guopeng; Shen, Aidong; Tamargo, Maria C.

    2015-10-28

    The authors report the optimization of MgSe barrier thickness in CdSe/MgSe multiple quantum well structures and its effect on structural, optical qualities and intersubband (ISB) transition characteristics. Three samples with the MgSe thicknesses of 2 nm, 3 nm, and 4 nm were grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements showed that the thinner the MgSe barrier thickness the better the structural quality. However, ISB absorption was only observed in the sample with a MgSe thickness of 3 nm. Failing to observe ISB absorption in the sample with a thicker MgSe barrier (≥4 nm) is due to the deteriorated material quality while the missing of ISB transition in the sample with thinner barrier (≤2 nm) is due to the tunneling of electrons out of the CdSe wells. The optimized MgSe barrier thickness of around 3 nm is found to be able to suppress the electron tunneling while maintaining a good material quality of the overall structure.

  5. Temperature-dependent capacitance-voltage and current-voltage characteristics of Pt/Ga2O3 (001) Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on n--Ga2O3 drift layers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiwaki, Masataka; Konishi, Keita; Sasaki, Kohei; Goto, Ken; Nomura, Kazushiro; Thieu, Quang Tu; Togashi, Rie; Murakami, Hisashi; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Monemar, Bo; Koukitu, Akinori; Kuramata, Akito; Yamakoshi, Shigenobu

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the temperature-dependent electrical properties of Pt/Ga2O3 Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) fabricated on n--Ga2O3 drift layers grown on single-crystal n+-Ga2O3 (001) substrates by halide vapor phase epitaxy. In an operating temperature range from 21 °C to 200 °C, the Pt/Ga2O3 (001) Schottky contact exhibited a zero-bias barrier height of 1.09-1.15 eV with a constant near-unity ideality factor. The current-voltage characteristics of the SBDs were well-modeled by thermionic emission in the forward regime and thermionic field emission in the reverse regime over the entire temperature range.

  6. Thermally stable AuBe-based ohmic contacts to p-type GaP for AlGaInP-based light-emitting diode by using a tungsten barrier layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kang, Daesung; Park, Jae-Seong; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how a tungsten diffusion barrier layer affected the electrical properties of AuBe/Au contacts to a p-GaP window layer (na = 5 × 1019 cm-3) for an AlGaInP-based light emitting diode. All of the as-deposited samples were ohmic. After annealing at 500 °C, the AuBe/Au contacts were electrically degraded with a specific contact resistivity of 1.0 × 10-4 Ωcm2. However, the electrical properties of the W-based contacts were improved, having a contact resistivity of 5.0 × 10-6 Ωcm2. The X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that the Ga 2 p core level for the annealed AuBe/Au contacts shifted to the high binding-energy side. On the other hand, that for the AuBe/W/Au contacts shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. For the AuBe/Au contacts, both Be and P atoms were shown to be outdiffused into the metal contact after annealing. However, for the AuBe/W/Au contacts, the outdiffusion of Be atoms was prevented by the W barrier layer, and the Be atoms were indiffused into GaP. Based on the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and electrical results, the annealing-induced electrical degradation and improvement are described and discussed.

  7. Chemical changes accompanying facet degradation of AlGaAs quantum well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, F. A.; Neiman, D. L.; Tang, W. C.; Rosen, H. J.

    1992-11-01

    Detailed measurements are reported using high-resolution scanning Auger microscopy of the chemical state of uncoated quantum well (QW) laser facets after brief and intermediate operating times. Analyses or uncoated facets which have suffered catastrophic optical damage (COD) under various operating conditions are described. The data show clearly that initial facet compositions are variable and far from ideal. After operation for as little as 2-10 min, the composition of the facet regions of the active/graded index and cladding layer change markedly, but no single type of change can be linked to COD. In particular, facet oxidation is not uniform or extensive, and facets which suffer COD are not necessarily more oxidized than those which have not. Composition changes are not limited to the facet surface, indicating that elemental redistribution during laser operation is very fast. These results suggest that the process of facet degradation plays a complex role in laser degradation.

  8. The DX center and other tin-related defects in AlGaAs semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, S. H.; Greco, L. A.; Williamson, D. L.

    1994-12-01

    Al x Ga1-xAs semiconductors doped with both natural and enriched119Sn have been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) to help to determine the atomic-scale nature of a deleterious, deep-level defect known as the DX center. Spectra have been acquired in the dark at 76 K and under sub-bandgap illumination at 4 or 10 K to distinguish the DX center from the substitutional shallow donor defect. Although electrical differences are clearly detected in these two states, no difference in the Mössbauer spectra are observed. Unexpected high Sn contents, determined by quantitative MS, demonstrate a large non-electrically active Sn fraction in some samples and this may be obscuring the observation of the DX center by both X-ray absorption spectroscopy and MS. Grinding the single-crystal layers into fine powders leads to an Sn defect that is attributed to a surface-oxidized site.

  9. A highly selective, chlorofluorocarbon-free GaAs on AlGaAs etch

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.E. . Solid State Technology Center)

    1993-07-01

    A highly selective reactive ion etching process using SiCl[sub 4], CF[sub 4], O[sub 2], and He is reported. The selectivity of the etch, which is adjustable, ranges from 308:1 to 428:1 for GaAs to Al[sub 0.11]Ga[sub 0.89]As. This variability in selectivity is achieved by adjusting the helium flow rate. One very attractive feature of this etch is that it uses no chlorofluorocarbons and therefore complies with future bans on these substances imposed at both federal and corporate levels. The etch is demonstrated on a GaAs field effect transistor structure with an underlying Al[sub 0.11]Ga[sub 0.89]As stop-etch layer. The etch can be used for both anisotropic and isotropic applications.

  10. Analyses of 2-DEG characteristics in GaN HEMT with AlN/GaN super-lattice as barrier layer grown by MOCVD.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peiqiang; Jiang, Yang; Chen, Yao; Ma, Ziguang; Wang, Xiaoli; Deng, Zhen; Li, Yan; Jia, Haiqiang; Wang, Wenxin; Chen, Hong

    2012-02-20

    GaN-based high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with AlN/GaN super-lattices (SLs) (4 to 10 periods) as barriers were prepared on (0001) sapphire substrates. An innovative method of calculating the concentration of two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) was brought up when AlN/GaN SLs were used as barriers. With this method, the energy band structure of AlN/GaN SLs was analyzed, and it was found that the concentration of 2-DEG is related to the thickness of AlN barrier and the thickness of the period; however, it is independent of the total thickness of the AlN/GaN SLs. In addition, we consider that the sheet carrier concentration in every SL period is equivalent and the 2-DEG concentration measured by Hall effect is the average value in one SL period. The calculation result fitted well with the experimental data. So, we proposed that our method can be conveniently applied to calculate the 2-DEG concentration of HEMT with the AlN/GaN SL barrier.

  11. Analyses of 2-DEG characteristics in GaN HEMT with AlN/GaN super-lattice as barrier layer grown by MOCVD

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    GaN-based high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with AlN/GaN super-lattices (SLs) (4 to 10 periods) as barriers were prepared on (0001) sapphire substrates. An innovative method of calculating the concentration of two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) was brought up when AlN/GaN SLs were used as barriers. With this method, the energy band structure of AlN/GaN SLs was analyzed, and it was found that the concentration of 2-DEG is related to the thickness of AlN barrier and the thickness of the period; however, it is independent of the total thickness of the AlN/GaN SLs. In addition, we consider that the sheet carrier concentration in every SL period is equivalent and the 2-DEG concentration measured by Hall effect is the average value in one SL period. The calculation result fitted well with the experimental data. So, we proposed that our method can be conveniently applied to calculate the 2-DEG concentration of HEMT with the AlN/GaN SL barrier. PMID:22348545

  12. Doping and dopant behavior in (Al,Ga)As grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuech, T. F.; Tischler, M. A.; Potemski, R.; Cardone, F.; Scilla, G.

    1989-11-01

    The controlled doping of n- and p-type Al xGa 1-xAs has been studied for the dopant elements, C, Zn, Si, and Sn. Both the incorporation characteristics and the electrical properties of these dopants are reviewed and discussed fo Al xGa 1-xAs grown by th metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) technique. The incorporation of Si from SiH 4 and Si 2H 6 is dominated by heterogeneous and homogenous reactions respectively and represents the best understood of the doping systems. Zinc and carbon both possess complex dependencies on the MOVPE growth system parameters. The electrical behavior of n-Al xGa 1- xAs is dominated by the presence of the DX center. The relationship between this center and the electrical behavior of the material must be understood in order to properly characterize the doping behavior in Al xGa 1-xAs layers and structures.

  13. Thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  14. Schottky barrier height reduction for metal/n-InP by inserting ultra-thin atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Shan; Yang, Wen; Sun, Qing-Qing E-mail: linchen@fudan.edu.cn; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Peng-Fei; Wei Zhang, David; Chen, Lin; Xiao, Fei

    2013-12-23

    Fermi level pinning at metal/n-InP interface and effective Schottky barrier height (Φ{sub B,eff}) were optimized by inserting ultrathin dielectrics in this work. Comparing the inserted monolayer and bilayer high-k dielectrics, we demonstrated that the introduction of bilayer dielectrics can further reduce Φ{sub B,eff} (from 0.49 eV to 0.22 eV) than the monolayer dielectric (from 0.49 eV to 0.32 eV) even though the overall dielectric thickness was thicker. The additional dipole formed at high-k/high-k interfaces could be used to expound the mechanism. This work proposed an effective solution to reduce resistance contacts for InP based transistors and Schottky barrier transistors.

  15. Highly (110)- and (111)-oriented BiFeO3 films on BaPbO3 electrode with Ru or Pt /Ru barrier layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Ching; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Hsiung, Chang-Po

    2007-04-01

    Highly (110)- and (111)-oriented BiFeO3 (BFO) films were fabricated with BaPbO3 (BPO )/Ru and BPO /Pt/Ru as electrode/barrier on Si substrates by rf-magnetron sputtering. The BPO /Ru and BPO /Pt/Ru stacks both induce oriented BFO films and act as diffusion barriers. The (110)- and (111)-oriented BFO films possess excellent ferroelectric properties with only minor leakage. The values of remnant polarization are almost the same, about 42μC/cm2, for (110)- and (111)-oriented BFO films. However, polarization measured under varying pulse widths demonstrates that the switching polarization in (111)-oriented BFO films is higher than in (110)-oriented films. Additionally, (111)-oriented BFO films exhibit better retention properties than (110)-oriented films.

  16. Performance improvement of GaN-based near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN superlattices strain relief layer and AlGaN barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chuanyu; Yu, Tongjun; Feng, Xiaohui; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Guoyi

    2016-09-01

    The carrier confinement effect and piezoelectric field-induced quantum-confined stark effect of different GaN-based near-UV LED samples from 395 nm to 410 nm emission peak wavelength were investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is found that near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) active region have higher output power than those with InGaN/GaN MQWs for better carrier confinement effect. However, as emission peak wavelength is longer than 406 nm, the output power of the near-UV LEDs with AlGaN barrier is lower than that of the LEDs with GaN barrier due to more serious spatial separation of electrons and holes induced by the increase of piezoelectric field. The N-doped InGaN/AlGaN superlattices (SLs) were adopted as a strain relief layer (SRL) between n-GaN and MQWs in order to suppress the polarization field. It is demonstrated the output power of near-UV LEDs is increased obviously by using SLs SRL and AlGaN barrier for the discussed emission wavelength range. Besides, the forward voltage of near-UV LEDs with InGaN/AlGaN SLs SRL is lower than that of near-UV LEDs without SRL.

  17. Guided bone regeneration by poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) grafted hyaluronic acid bi-layer films for periodontal barrier applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Kyu; Yeom, Junseok; Oh, Eun Ju; Reddy, Mallikarjuna; Kim, Jong Young; Cho, Dong-Woo; Lim, Hyun Pil; Kim, Nam Sook; Park, Sang Won; Shin, Hong-In; Yang, Dong Jun; Park, Kwang Bum; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2009-11-01

    A novel protocol for the synthesis of biocompatible and degradation controlled poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) grafted hyaluronic acid (HA-PLGA) was successfully developed for periodontal barrier applications. HA was chemically modified with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) in the mixed solvent of water and ethanol, which resulted in a high degree of HA modification up to 85 mol.%. The stability of HA-ADH to enzymatic degradation by hyaluronidase increased with ADH content in HA-ADH. When the ADH content in HA-ADH was higher than 80 mol.%, HA-ADH became soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide and could be grafted to the activated PLGA with N,N'-dicyclohexyl carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide. The resulting HA-PLGA was used for the preparation of biphasic periodontal barrier membranes in chloroform. According to in vitro hydrolytic degradation tests in phosphate buffered saline, HA-PLGA/PLGA blend film with a weight ratio of 1/2 degraded relatively slowly compared to PLGA film and HA coated PLGA film. Four different samples of a control, OSSIX(TM) membrane, PLGA film, and HA-PLGA/PLGA film were assessed as periodontal barrier membranes for the calvarial critical size bone defects in SD rats. Histological and histomorphometric analyses revealed that HA-PLGA/PLGA film resulted in the most effective bone regeneration compared to other samples with a regenerated bone area of 63.1% covering the bone defect area. PMID:19477304

  18. Y0.08Sr0.88TiO3-CeO2 composite as a diffusion barrier layer for stainless-steel supported solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Kim, Sun Jae; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    A new diffusion barrier layer (DBL) is proposed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) supported on stainless-steel where DBL prevents inter-diffusion of atoms between anode and stainless steel (STS) support during fabrication and operation of STS-supported SOFCs. Half cells consisting of dense yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, porous Ni-YSZ anode layer, and ferritic STS support, with or without Y0.08Sr0.88TiO3-CeO2 (YST-CeO2) composite DBL, are prepared by tape casting and co-firing at 1250 and 1350 °C, respectively, in reducing (H2) atmosphere. The porous YST-CeO2 layer (t ∼ 60 μm) blocks inter-diffusion of Fe and Ni, and captures the evaporated Cr during cell fabrication (1350 °C). The cell with DBL and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode achieved a maximum power density of ∼220 mW cm-2 which is stable at 700 °C. In order to further improve the power performance, Ni coarsening in anode during co-firing must be prevented or alternative anode which is resistive to coarsening is suggested. This study demonstrates that the new YST-CeO2 layer is a promising as a DBL for stainless-steel-supported SOFCs fabricated with co-firing process.

  19. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  20. Polyelectrolyte/Graphene Oxide Barrier Film for Flexible OLED.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Yeol; Park, Jongwhan; Kim, Yong-Seog

    2015-10-01

    Ultra-thin flexible nano-composite barrier layer consists of graphene oxide and polyelectrolyte was prepared using the layer-by-layer processing method. Microstructures of the barrier layer was optimized via modifying coating conditions and inducing chemical reactions. Although the barrier layer consists of hydrophilic polyelectrolyte was not effective in blocking the water vapor permeation, the chemical reduction of graphene oxide as well as conversion of polyelectrolyte to hydrophobic nature were very effective in reducing the permeation.

  1. Microbial barriers.

    PubMed

    Gutwein, Luke G; Panigrahi, Mousumee; Schultz, Gregory S; Mast, Bruce A

    2012-07-01

    Barrier wound therapy is commonplace in the health care environment and functions to limit bacterial colonization and infection in both acute wounds and recalcitrant chronic wounds. This article reviews the nature of acute and chronic wounds and their available adjunctive barrier therapies.

  2. Anisotropic capillary barrier for waste site surface covers

    DOEpatents

    Stormont, John C.

    1996-01-01

    Waste sites are capped or covered upon closure. The cover structure incorporates a number of different layers each having a contributory function. One such layer is the barrier layer. Traditionally the barriers have been compacted soil and geosynthetics. These types of barriers have not been successfully implemented in unsaturated ground conditions like those found in dry climates. Capillary barriers have been proposed as barrier layers in dry environments, but the divergence length of these barriers has been found to be inadequate. An alternative to the capillary barrier is a anisotropic capillary barrier. An anisotropic capillary barrier has an increased divergence length which results in more water being diverted laterally preventing the majority of water from percolating in a downward direction through the barrier.

  3. Anisotropic capillary barrier for waste site surface covers

    DOEpatents

    Stormont, J.C.

    1996-08-27

    Waste sites are capped or covered upon closure. The cover structure incorporates a number of different layers each having a contributory function. One such layer is the barrier layer. Traditionally the barriers have been compacted soil and geosynthetics. These types of barriers have not been successfully implemented in unsaturated ground conditions like those found in dry climates. Capillary barriers have been proposed as barrier layers in dry environments, but the divergence length of these barriers has been found to be inadequate. An alternative to the capillary barrier is a anisotropic capillary barrier. An anisotropic capillary barrier has an increased divergence length which results in more water being diverted laterally preventing the majority of water from percolating in a downward direction through the barrier. 10 figs.

  4. Interfacial reactions in epitaxial Al/TiN(111) model diffusion barriers: Formation of an impervious self-limited wurtzite-structure AIN(0001) blocking layer

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, J.-S.; Desjardins, P.; Lavoie, C.; Shin, C.-S.; Cabral, C.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2001-06-15

    Single-crystal TiN(111) layers, 45 nm thick, were grown on MgO(111) by ultrahigh vacuum reactive magnetron sputter deposition in pure N{sub 2} discharges at T{sub s}=700{degree}C. Epitaxial Al(111) overlayers, 160 nm thick, were then deposited at T{sub s}=100{degree}C in Ar without breaking vacuum. Interfacial reactions and changes in bilayer microstructure due to annealing at 620 and 650{degree}C were investigated using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The interfacial regions of samples annealed at 620{degree}C consist of continuous {approx_equal}7-nm-thick epitaxial wurtzite-structure AlN(0001) layers containing a high density of stacking faults, with {approx_equal}22 nm thick tetragonal Al{sub 3}Ti(112) overlayers. Surprisingly, samples annealed at the higher temperature are more stable against Al{sub 3}Ti formation. TEM analyses of bilayers annealed at 650{degree}C (10{degree}C below the Al melting point!) reveal only the self-limited growth of an {approx_equal}3-nm-thick interfacial layer of perfect smooth epitaxial wurtzite-structure AlN(0001) which serves as an extremely effective deterrent for preventing further interlayer reactions. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Monte Carlo Modeling of Hot Electron Transport in Bulk AlAs, AlGaAs and GaAs at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, H.; Khalvati, M. R.; Rokn-Abadi, M. Rezaee

    The results of an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation of electron drift velocity response on the application field in bulk AlAs, AlGaAs and GaAs are presented. All dominant scattering mechanisms in the structure considered have been taken into account. For all materials, it is found that electron velocity overshoot only occurs when the electric field is increased to a value above a certain critical field, unique to each material. This critical field is strongly dependent on the material parameters. Transient velocity overshoot has also been simulated, with the sudden application of fields up to 1600 kVm-1, appropriate to the gate-drain fields expected within an operational field effect transistor. The electron drift velocity relaxes to the saturation value of ~105 ms-1 within 4 ps, for all crystal structures. The steady state and transient velocity overshoot characteristics are in fair agreement with other recent calculations.

  6. Low resistance wavelength-reproducible [ital p]-type (Al,Ga)As distributed Bragg reflectors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, S.A.; Lear, K.L.; Killeen, K.P. )

    1993-04-05

    We report the reproducible molecular beam epitaxial growth of Be-doped piecewise linearly graded (Al,Ga)As distributed Bragg reflectors that have vertical series resistivities near bulk values. For mirrors with three linear segments per interface, the center wavelength reproducibility is 0.1% and the series resistivity is as low as 1.8[times]10[sup [minus]5] [Omega] cm[sup 2] for hole concentrations of 5[times]10[sup 18] cm[sup [minus]3]. Measured reflectivities of 6.0% per interface are comparable to conventional single-linear-grade mirrors. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers incorporating these mirrors exhibit record-low voltage thresholds of less than 1.5 V.

  7. Tuning the g-factor of neutral and charged excitons confined to self-assembled (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Corfdir, P. Van Hattem, B.; Phillips, R. T.; Fontana, Y.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Heiss, M.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study the neutral exciton (X) and charged exciton (CX) transitions from (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots located in core-shell nanowires, in the presence of a magnetic field. The g-factors and the diamagnetic coefficients of both the X and the CX depend on the orientation of the field with respect to the nanowire axis. The aspect ratio of the X wavefunction is quantified based on the anisotropy of the diamagnetic coefficient. For specific orientations of the magnetic field, it is possible to cancel the g-factor of the bright states of the X and the CX by means of an inversion of the sign of the hole's g-factor, which is promising for quantum information processing applications.

  8. Electrical properties of bulk-barrier diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, H.

    1982-11-01

    Like Schottky-barrier diodes, bulk-barrier diodes (BBD's) are majority-carrier devices and can, therefore, be used up to very high frequencies. In both types of diodes, charge-carrier transportation is determined by an energy barrier. In Schottky-barrier diodes the barrier is located at the metal/semiconductor boundary, whereas in BBD's it is found inside the semiconductor and is the result of a space-charge zone in a three-layered n-p-n or p-n-p structure with a very thin base region. The height of the barrier is determined by technological parameters such as doping density and layer thickness. As the current in BBD's, just as in Schottky-barrier diodes, is an exponential function of barrier height, the current-voltage characteristic can be adjusted by technological means.

  9. Effect of GaAsP barrier layers on the parameters of InGaAs/AlGaAs laser diodes emitting in the 1050-1100-nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Padalitsa, A A; Petrovskii, A V; Ryaboshtan, Yu L; Sumarokov, M A; Sukharev, A V

    2005-10-31

    To improve the parameters of laser diodes emitting in the 1000-1070-nm spectral range and develop highly efficient laser diodes emitting in the 1070-1100-nm range, it is proposed to introduce GaAsP barrier layers into the active region of the quantum-well InGaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, which compensate for enhanced mechanical stresses. This considerably improves the luminescence characteristics of heterostructures and changes conditions for generating misfit dislocations. The long-wavelength lasing at 1100 nm becomes possible due to an increase in the thickness of quantum wells and in the molar fraction of InAs in them. The manufactured laser diodes emitting in the 1095-1100-nm range have low threshold currents, the high output power and high reliability. (lasers)

  10. Origin(s) of the apparent high permittivity in CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics: clarification on the contributions from internal barrier layer capacitor and sample-electrode contact effects

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ming; Feteira, Antonio; Sinclair, Derek C.; West, Anthony R.; Shen Zhijian; Nygren, Mats

    2009-11-15

    CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics with a range of resistivities have been prepared using both conventional sintering and spark plasma sintering. For all cases, the high effective permittivity is associated primarily with an internal barrier layer capacitor mechanism. Additional polarization associated with the electrode-sample interface may appear but its visibility depends on the grain boundary resistivity (R{sub gb}) of the ceramic. If the R{sub gb} is large, the electrode polarization is obscured by sample-related effects; if the R{sub gb} is small, a separate impedance associated with the electrode polarization may be seen. Discrepancies in the literature regarding the magnitude and origin of the high effective permittivity are attributed to a combination of differences in processing conditions, electrode contact material and measuring frequency range.

  11. Origin(s) of the apparent high permittivity in CaCu3Ti4O12 ceramics: clarification on the contributions from internal barrier layer capacitor and sample-electrode contact effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Shen, Zhijian; Nygren, Mats; Feteira, Antonio; Sinclair, Derek C.; West, Anthony R.

    2009-11-01

    CaCu3Ti4O12 ceramics with a range of resistivities have been prepared using both conventional sintering and spark plasma sintering. For all cases, the high effective permittivity is associated primarily with an internal barrier layer capacitor mechanism. Additional polarization associated with the electrode-sample interface may appear but its visibility depends on the grain boundary resistivity (Rgb) of the ceramic. If the Rgb is large, the electrode polarization is obscured by sample-related effects; if the Rgb is small, a separate impedance associated with the electrode polarization may be seen. Discrepancies in the literature regarding the magnitude and origin of the high effective permittivity are attributed to a combination of differences in processing conditions, electrode contact material and measuring frequency range.

  12. Moisture barrier and chemical corrosion protection of silver-based telescope mirrors using aluminum oxide films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryauf, David M.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2013-09-01

    An urgent demand remains in astronomy for high-reflectivity silver mirrors that can withstand years of exposure in observatory environments. The University of California Observatories Astronomical Coatings Lab has undertaken development of protected silver coatings suitable for telescope mirrors that maintain high reflectivity at wavelengths from 340 nm through the mid-infrared spectrum. We present initial results of an investigation into whether plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) can produce superior protective layers of transparent dielectrics. Several novel coating recipes have been developed with ion-assisted electron beam deposition (IAEBD) of materials including yttrium fluoride, and oxides of yttrium, hafnium, and titanium. Samples of these mirror coatings were covered with conformal layers of aluminum oxide (AlOx) deposited by PEALD using trimethylaluminum as a metal precursor and oxygen as an oxidant gas activated by remote plasma. Samples of coating recipes with and without PEALD oxide undergo aggressive environmental testing, including high temperature/high humidity (HTHH), in which samples were exposed to an environment of 80% humidity at 80°C for ten days in a simple test set-up. HTHH testing show visible results suggesting that the PEALD oxide offers enhanced robust protection against chemical corrosion and moisture from an accelerated aging environment. Mirror samples are further characterized by reflectivity/absorption and atomic force microscopy before and after deposition of oxide coatings. AlOx is suitable for many applications and has been the initial material choice for this study, although we also tried TiOx and HfOx. Further experimentation based on these initial results is on-going.

  13. Temperature-dependent electron microscopy study of Au thin films on Si (1 0 0) with and without a native oxide layer as barrier at the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, A.; Dash, J. K.; Juluri, R. R.; Rosenauer, A.; Satyam, P. V.

    2011-03-01

    Real-time electron microscopy observation on morphological changes in gold nanostructures deposited on Si (1 0 0) surfaces as a function of annealing temperatures has been reported. Two types of interfaces with silicon substrates were used prior to gold thin film deposition: (i) without native oxide and on ultra-clean reconstructed Si surfaces and (ii) with native oxide covered Si surfaces. For ≈2.0 nm thick Au films deposited on reconstructed Si (1 0 0) surfaces using the molecular beam epitaxy method under ultra-high vacuum conditions, aligned four-fold symmetric nanogold silicide structures formed at relatively lower temperatures (compared with the one with native oxide at the interface). For this system, 82% of the nanostructures were found to be nanorectangle-like structures with an average length of ≈27 nm and aspect ratio of 1.13 at ≈700 °C. For ≈5.0 nm thick Au films deposited on Si (1 0 0) surface with native oxide at the interface, the formation of a rectangular structure was observed at higher temperatures (≈850 °C). At these high temperatures, desorption of gold silicide followed the symmetry of the substrate. Native oxide at the interface was found to act like a barrier for the inter-diffusion phenomena. Structural characterization was carried out using advanced electron microscopy methods.

  14. A Study on the Growth Behavior and Stability of Molecular Layer Deposited Alucone Films Using Diethylene Glycol and Trimethyl Aluminum Precursors, and the Enhancement of Diffusion Barrier Properties by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Capping.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Won; Yoo, Mi; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Park, Jozeph; Kim, Hyun You; Park, Jin-Seong

    2016-05-18

    As a route to the production of organic-inorganic hybrid multilayers, the growth behavior of molecular layer deposited (MLD) alucone and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films on top of each other was examined. MLD alucone films were prepared using trimethyl aluminum and diethylene glycol precursors, the latter resulting in faster growth rates than ethylene glycol precursors. The sensitivity of individual alucone films with respect to ambient exposure was found to be related to moisture permeation and hydration reactions, of which the mechanism is studied by density functional theory calculations. Deleterious effects such as thickness reduction over time could be suppressed by applying a protective Al2O3 layer on top of alucone. A preliminary nucleation period was required in the ALD process of Al2O3 films on alucone surfaces, prior to reaching a linear regime where the thickness increases linearly with respect to the number of ALD cycles. The same behavior was observed for alucone growing on Al2O3. The protective Al2O3 films were found to effectively suppress moisture permeation, thus isolating the underlying alucone from the surrounding environment. The water vapor transmission rate was greatly reduced when an Al2O3/alucone/Al2O3 multilayer stack was formed, which suggests that proper combinations of organic/inorganic hybrid structures may provide chemically stable platforms, especially for mechanically flexible applications. PMID:27117392

  15. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  16. Correlation between the performance of double-barrier quantum-well infrared photodetectors and their microstructure: On the origin of the photovoltaic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, E.; Trampert, A.; Guzmán, A.; Calleja, E.

    2005-08-01

    In this work we show clear evidences that silicon segregation out of quantum wells (QWs) is the mechanism responsible for the unexpected photovoltaic (PV) effect exhibited by AlGaAs /AlAs/GaAs double-barrier quantum-well infrared photodetectors. Our results are based on the combined analysis of the detectors' microstructure [obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)] and their electro-optical characteristics (dark current and responsivity versus bias). A TEM image intensity analysis yields the result of an unintentional asymmetry between the two AlAs barriers adjacent to the QW attributed to the presence of segregated Si at the interface. Moreover, we find that the higher this compositional asymmetry, the higher the asymmetries in the electro-optical response of the detector. Additionally we show here direct evidences of how the growth-induced nonequivalence of the AlAs tunnel barriers can be ruled out as the origin of the PV effect.

  17. Environmental barrier material for organic light emitting device and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Graff, Gordon L [West Richland, WA; Gross, Mark E [Pasco, WA; Affinito, John D [Kennewick, WA; Shi, Ming-Kun [Richland, WA; Hall, Michael [West Richland, WA; Mast, Eric [Richland, WA

    2003-02-18

    An encapsulated organic light emitting device. The device includes a first barrier stack comprising at least one first barrier layer and at least one first polymer layer. There is an organic light emitting layer stack adjacent to the first barrier stack. A second barrier stack is adjacent to the organic light emitting layer stack. The second barrier stack has at least one second barrier layer and at least one second polymer layer. A method of making the encapsulated organic light emitting device is also provided.

  18. Effect of the Si-doped In0.49Ga0.51P barrier layer on the device performance of In0.4Ga0.6As MOSFETs grown on semi-insulating GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hu-Dong; Sun, Bing; Xue, Bai-Qing; Liu, Gui-Ming; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Liu, Hong-Gang

    2013-07-01

    In0.4Ga0.6As channel metal—oxide—semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with and without an Si-doped In0.49Ga0.51P barrier layer grown on semi-insulating GaAs substrates have been investigated for the first time. Compared with the In0.4Ga0.6As MOSFETs without an In0.49Ga0.51P barrier layer, In0.4Ga0.6As MOSFETs with an In0.49Ga0.51P barrier layer show higher drive current, higher transconductance, lower gate leakage current, lower subthreshold swing, and higher effective channel mobility. These In0.4Ga0.6As MOSFETs (gate length 2 μm) with an In0.49Ga0.51P barrier layer exhibit a high drive current of 117 mA/mm, a high transconductance of 71.9 mS/mm, and a maximum effective channel mobility of 1266 cm2/(V·s).

  19. Barrier infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  20. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) Contact Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CBIRD detector is enhanced by using new device contacting methods that have been developed. The detector structure features a narrow gap adsorber sandwiched between a pair of complementary, unipolar barriers that are, in turn, surrounded by contact layers. In this innovation, the contact adjacent to the hole barrier is doped n-type, while the contact adjacent to the electron barrier is doped p-type. The contact layers can have wider bandgaps than the adsorber layer, so long as good electrical contacts are made to them. If good electrical contacts are made to either (or both) of the barriers, then one could contact the barrier(s) directly, obviating the need for additional contact layers. Both the left and right contacts can be doped either n-type or ptype. Having an n-type contact layer next to the electron barrier creates a second p-n junction (the first being the one between the hole barrier and the adsorber) over which applied bias could drop. This reduces the voltage drop over the adsorber, thereby reducing dark current generation in the adsorber region.

  1. Study of barrier layer capacitance effect in lead free Ba0.95Sr0.05(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3-BaZr0.1Ti0.9O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Patel, Piyush; Yadav, K. L.

    2014-11-01

    Lead-free Ba0.95Sr0.05(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3-BaZr0.1Ti0.9O3 (50/50) ceramic, a material with potential applications for energy storage, are investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns show a single phase perovskite structure in all the samples. Sintering temperature affects the microstructural and dielectric properties of the ceramics. Microstructural analysis showed the uniformly distributed and highly packed grains in all the samples. We obtained high dielectric constant with low dielectric loss due to the controlled sintering. Giant dielectric constant (~19496) with low dielectric loss (~0.32) was obtained for 1250 °C sintered sample at room temperature and 1 kHz frequency. Complex impedance analysis confirms that the grain boundary effect (barrier layer formation) is responsible for such a high value of dielectric constant. Another interesting feature of this ceramic is the appearance of room temperature magnetodielectric response (1.9%, 8 kOe) at 100 Hz frequency.

  2. Free-Energy Barriers and Reaction Mechanisms for the Electrochemical Reduction of CO on the Cu(100) Surface, Including Multiple Layers of Explicit Solvent at pH 0.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2015-12-01

    The great interest in the photochemical reduction from CO2 to fuels and chemicals has focused attention on Cu because of its unique ability to catalyze formation of carbon-containing fuels and chemicals. A particular goal is to learn how to modify the Cu catalysts to enhance the production selectivity while reducing the energy requirements (overpotential). To enable such developments, we report here the free-energy reaction barriers and mechanistic pathways on the Cu(100) surface, which produces only CH4 (not C2H4 or CH3OH) in acid (pH 0). We predict a threshold potential for CH4 formation of -0.52 V, which compares well to experiments at low pH, -0.45 to -0.50 V. These quantum molecular dynamics simulations included ∼5 layers of explicit water at the water/electrode interface using enhanced sampling methodology to obtain the free energies. We find that that chemisorbed hydroxyl-methylene (CH-OH) is the key intermediate determining the selectivity for methane over methanol. PMID:26562750

  3. Dry etching of Al-rich AlGaAs with silicon nitride masks for photonic crystal fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyu; Togano, Yuji; Hashimura, Kentaro; Morifuji, Masato; Kondow, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    We investigate inductively coupled plasma (ICP) deep dry etching of Al0.8Ga0.2As for photonic crystal (PC) fabrication using a Cl2/BCl3/CH4 gas mixture. On the basis of our previous report [Y. Kitabayashi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 52, 04CG07 (2013)], we obtained a PC structure having air holes deeper than 1.5 µm and a diameter of 120 nm by adjusting the gas flow rate and increasing the process pressure. In this study, silicon nitride (SiNx) and SiO2 were both used as the mask layer. Furthermore, samples with SiNx and SiO2 masks for ICP deep dry etching were also fabricated and compared. The vertical profile of the PC structure with the SiNx mask layer displayed a rounded shape that was caused by the charge up in the mask layer. Then, a thinner mask layer was used to ease the effects of mask retardation and charge up. As a result, a PC structure with a SiNx mask layer having air holes deeper than 1.7 µm and a diameter of 190 nm was successfully fabricated.

  4. High-power low-threshold graded-index separate confinement heterostructure AlGaAs single quantum well lasers on Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lang, Robert J.; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Katz, Joseph; Narayanan, Authi A.

    1989-01-01

    A high-power low-threshold graded-index separate confinement heterostructure AlGaAs single quantum well laser on Si substrates has been demonstrated for the first time by a hybrid growth of migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy followed by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The quantum well laser showed an output power of more than 400 mW per facet under pulsed conditions. A room-temperature threshold current of 300 mA was obtained with a differential quantum efficiency of 40 percent without facet coating. The threshold current density was 550 A/sq cm for a cavity length of 500 microns. These results show the highest peak power reported to date for low-threshold lasers on Si substrates. The full width at half maximum of the far-field pattern parallel to the junction was 6 deg. Threshold current densities as low as 250 A/sq cm were obtained for lasers on GaAs substrates.

  5. Direct detection optical intersatellite link at 220 Mbps using AlGaAs laser diode and silicon APD with 4-ary PPM signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed 220 Mbps free-space 4-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) direct detection optical communication system is described. High speed GaAs integrated circuits were used to construct the PPM encoder and receiver electronic circuits. Both PPM slot and word timing recovery were provided in the PPM receiver. The optical transmitter consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (Mitsubishi ML5702A, lambda=821nm) and a high speed driver unit. The photodetector consisted of a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) (RCA30902S) preceded by an optical interference filter (delta lambda=10nm). Preliminary tests showed that the self-synchronized PPM receiver could achieve a receiver bit error rate of less than 10(exp -6) at 25 nW average received optical signal power or 360 photons per transmitted information bit. The relatively poor receiver sensitivity was believed to be caused by the insufficient electronic bandwidth of the APD preamplifier and the poor linearity of the preamplifier high frequency response.

  6. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, James R.; Cohen, Marshall J.

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  7. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  8. Fracture mechanism of a thermal barrier coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenko, V. M.; Ravilov, R. G.; Drevnyak, V. V.; Petrova, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The fracture mechanism of the thermal barrier coating of gas turbine blades is studied. The causes of the fracture of the ceramic layer are discussed and the possible ways to increase the fatigue life of the thermal barrier coating are considered.

  9. Thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne

    2010-06-22

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  10. Investigation of electrochemical etch differences in AlGaAs heterostructures using Cl{sub 2} ion beam assisted etching

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, Kevin Goodhue, William D.; Swint, Reuel B.; Porter, Jeanne

    2015-03-15

    A deeply etched, anisotropic 45° and 90° mirror technology is developed for Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As heterostructures using a Cl{sub 2} ion beam assisted etching system. When etching vertically, using a conductive low-erosion Ni mask, electrochemical etch differences between layers with various Al mole fractions caused nonuniform sidewall profiles not seen in semi-insulating GaAs test samples. These variations, based on alloy composition, were found to be negligible when etching at a 45°. A Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Ni etch mask is designed in order to electrically isolate charge buildup caused by the incoming Ar{sup +} ion beam to the Ni layer, preventing conduction to the underlying epitaxial layers. This modification produced smoothly etched facets, up to 8 μm in depth, enabling fabrication of substrate–surface-emitting slab-coupled optical waveguide lasers and other optoelectronic devices.

  11. In vitro porcine blood-brain barrier model for permeability studies: pCEL-X software pKa(FLUX) method for aqueous boundary layer correction and detailed data analysis.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Siti R; Avdeef, Alex; Abbott, N Joan

    2014-12-18

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models from primary brain endothelial cells can closely resemble the in vivo BBB, offering valuable models to assay BBB functions and to screen potential central nervous system drugs. We have recently developed an in vitro BBB model using primary porcine brain endothelial cells. The model shows expression of tight junction proteins and high transendothelial electrical resistance, evidence for a restrictive paracellular pathway. Validation studies using small drug-like compounds demonstrated functional uptake and efflux transporters, showing the suitability of the model to assay drug permeability. However, one limitation of in vitro model permeability measurement is the presence of the aqueous boundary layer (ABL) resulting from inefficient stirring during the permeability assay. The ABL can be a rate-limiting step in permeation, particularly for lipophilic compounds, causing underestimation of the permeability. If the ABL effect is ignored, the permeability measured in vitro will not reflect the permeability in vivo. To address the issue, we explored the combination of in vitro permeability measurement using our porcine model with the pKa(FLUX) method in pCEL-X software to correct for the ABL effect and allow a detailed analysis of in vitro (transendothelial) permeability data, Papp. Published Papp using porcine models generated by our group and other groups are also analyzed. From the Papp, intrinsic transcellular permeability (P0) is derived by simultaneous refinement using a weighted nonlinear regression, taking into account permeability through the ABL, paracellular permeability and filter restrictions on permeation. The in vitro P0 derived for 22 compounds (35 measurements) showed good correlation with P0 derived from in situ brain perfusion data (r(2)=0.61). The analysis also gave evidence for carrier-mediated uptake of naloxone, propranolol and vinblastine. The combination of the in vitro porcine model and the software

  12. An In situ all-laser process for deposition of Y sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. film on stainless steel involving use of Y-ZrO sub 2 -Ag composite as a barrier layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ogale, S.B.; Koinkar, V.N.; Viswanathan, R.; Roy, S.D.; Kanetkar, S.M. )

    1991-10-07

    Highly {ital c}-axis oriented good-quality ({ital T}{sub {ital c}} of 88 K and {ital J}{sub {ital c}} of 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 20 K) thin films of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} have been deposited on stainless-steel substrates by an {ital in} {ital situ} all-laser process involving use of laser-deposited Y-ZrO{sub 2}-Ag composite film as a barrier layer. These results are compared with those obtained for the case of the use of a bilayer configuration of Ag and Y-ZrO{sub 2} to emphasize the importance of employing a composite film as a barrier layer.

  13. Thermally accelerated life testing of single mode, double-heterostructure, AlGaAs laser diodes operated pulsed at 50 mW peak power

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, J.D.; Archambeault, W.J.; Dye, R.A.; Einhorn, A.J.; Mecherle, G.S.; Nelson, P.

    1985-04-01

    Single spatial mode, double-heterostructure, channel-substrate-planar AlGaAs laser diodes have been life tested under thermally accelerated conditions to characterize the reliability of the diodes in a digital, optical communication system intended for space application. The diodes were operated pulsed under constant drive current conditions at 50 mW peak power, 25 ns pulse width, and 1 percent duty cycle in a dry, inert environment at ambient test temperatures at 40, 55, and 70/sup 0/C. Diode performance parameters as related to the space application, such as pulsewidth, peak power, wavelength spectrum, spatial mode, and threshold current, were periodically monitored. Tests have continued for over 14 000 h. The test results for all diodes with failure defined by power degradation alone is compared to the test results for single mode diodes with failure defined by power degradation, wavelength shift and spatial mode changes. It is found that the life test results are substantially equivalent but differ from earlier published reports for laser diodes operated CW. An activation energy of about 0.39 eV is deduced with a predicted median life of about 5 X 10/sup 4/ h at 20/sup 0/C. These values are somewhat lower than those found for diodes operated CW and are attributed to the use of single mode laser diodes here. It is concluded that thermally accelerated life testing for single spatial mode laser diodes must incorporate a means to separate bulk material, current, and optical density induced degradation effects. A test scheme is proposed.

  14. Metallic seal for thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is particularly concerned with sealing thermal barrier coating systems of the type in use and being contemplated for use in diesel and other internal combustion engines. The invention also would find application in moderately high temperature regions of gas turbine engines and any other application employing a thermal barrier coating at moderate temperatures. Ni-35Cr-6Al-1Y, Ni-35Cr-6Al-1Yb, or other metallic alloy denoted as MCrAlx is applied over a zirconia-based thermal barrier overlayer. The close-out layer is glass-bead preened to densify its surface. This seals and protects the thermal barrier coating system.

  15. Temperature dependence of equilibrium electron density in AlGaAs governed by Sn-related DX centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ždánský, K.

    1994-10-01

    Capacitance and conductance of AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructures with an Sn-doped Al0.35Ga0.65As layer and with a p-n junction was measured as a function of frequency and temperature. The temperature dependence of the free-electron density n was determined from the measurement. A theoretical relation for n governed by two independent DX centers was derived. The experimental results were explained by the presence of two types of Sn-related DX centers. The binding energies of the two DX centers were determined and found to be in good accord with values, both experimental and theoretical, reported previously by other authors.

  16. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development.

    PubMed

    Brøchner, Christian B; Holst, Camilla B; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6-21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer.

  17. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    PubMed Central

    Brøchner, Christian B.; Holst, Camilla B.; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6–21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer. PMID:25852456

  18. Oxygen-Barrier Coating for Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Unnam, Jalaiah

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen-barrier coating for titanium developed to provide effective and low-cost means for protecting titanium alloys from oxygen in environment when alloys used in high-temperature mechanical or structural applications. Provides protective surface layer, which reduces extent of surface oxidation of alloy and forms barrier to diffusion of oxygen, limiting contamination of substrate alloy by oxygen. Consists of submicron layer of aluminum deposited on surface of titanium by electron-beam evaporation, with submicron layer of dioxide sputtered onto aluminum to form coat.

  19. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  20. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  1. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. We demonstrate successful tunneling, charge, and spin transport with a fluorinated graphene tunnel barrier on a graphene channel. We show that while spin transport stops short of room temperature, spin polarization efficiency values are the highest of any graphene spin devices. We also demonstrate that hydrogenation of graphene can also be used to create a tunnel barrier. We begin with a four-layer stack of graphene and hydrogenate the top few layers to decouple them from the graphene transport channel beneath. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies. The measured spin polarization efficiencies for hydrogenated graphene are higher than most oxide tunnel barriers on graphene, but not as high as with fluorinated graphene tunnel barriers. However, here we show that spin transport persists up to room temperature. Our results for the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barriers are compared with fluorinated tunnel barriers and we discuss the

  2. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

  3. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  4. Thermal barrier research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1990-03-07

    The thermal barrier region in the TARA device is a complex arrangement combining ion-plugging by sloshing ions with an ECRH-generated thermal barrier plasma. An axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio magnetic field, adjacent to the central cell, provides the confinement of the thermal barrier plasma and sloshing ions. This paper discusses research being done in this thermal barrier region.

  5. [Recent studies on corneal epithelial barrier function].

    PubMed

    Liu, F F; Li, W; Liu, Z G; Chen, W S

    2016-08-01

    Corneal epithelium, the outermost layer of eyeball, is the main route for foreign materials to enter the eye. Under physiological conditions, the corneal epithelial superficial cells form a functionally selective permeability barrier. Integral corneal epithelial barrier function not only ensures the enrolling of nutrients which is required for regular metabolism, but also prevents foreign bodies, or disease-causing microorganism invasion. Recently, a large number of clinical and experimental studies have shown that abnormal corneal epithelial barrier function is the pathological basis for many ocular diseases. In addition, some study found that corneal epithelial barrier constitutes a variety of proteins involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and a series of physiological and pathological processes. This paper reviewed recent studies specifically on the corneal epithelial barrier, highlights of its structure, function and influence factors. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 631-635). PMID:27562284

  6. Combination Thermal Barrier And Wear Coatings For Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingart, Mike; Moller, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Thermal-barrier layers covered with self-lubricating surface layers. Zirconia thermal-barrier coat applied to surface of combustion chamber in engine by plasma-arc spraying. Then PS-200 plasma-arc sprayed onto zirconia. Self-lubricating coat prevents sliding contact between thermal barrier and piston ring, effectively preventing both wear and production of additional heat via friction. Other combinations of thermal-barrier and self-lubricating, wear-resistant coating materials used as long as two materials adhere to each other, applied by use of similar or compatible processes, have similar coefficients of thermal expansion, sufficiently strong at high temperatures, and affordable.

  7. Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Kramer

    1999-11-17

    The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and

  8. Pratt & Whitney thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, N.; Marcin, J.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems. The operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic with fewer transients-compared with those for aircraft gas turbine engines. Therefore, creep rather than thermal fatigue, becomes primary life-limiting for hot section components. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the program. TBCs allow surface temperatures to increase without compromising the structural properties of the alloy. TBCs typically consist of a ceramic insulating layer, deposited onto the substrate with an intervening metallic layer, which imparts oxidation protection to the substrate and provides a surface to which the ceramic layer can adhere.

  9. Interlayer exchange coupling across a ferroelectric barrier.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, M Ye; Vedyayev, A V; Tsymbal, E Y

    2010-09-01

    A new magnetoelectric effect is predicted originating from the interlayer exchange coupling between two ferromagnetic layers separated by an ultrathin ferroelectric barrier. It is demonstrated that ferroelectric polarization switching driven by an external electric field leads to a sizable change in the interlayer exchange coupling. The effect occurs in asymmetric ferromagnet/ferroelectric/ferromagnet junctions due to a change in the electrostatic potential profile across the junction affecting the interlayer coupling. The predicted phenomenon indicates the possibility of switching the magnetic configuration by reversing the polarization of the ferroelectric barrier layer. PMID:21403276

  10. Holographic recording medium employing a photoconductive layer and a low molecular weight microcrystalline polymeric layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, Robert Allen (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A holographic recording medium comprising a conductive substrate, a photoconductive layer and an electrically alterable layer of a linear, low molecular weight hydrocarbon polymer has improved fatigue resistance. An acrylic barrier layer can be interposed between the photoconductive and electrically alterable layers.

  11. Planar doped barrier subharmonic mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. H.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Planar Doped Barrier (PDB) diode is a device consisting of a p(+) doping spike between two intrinsic layers and n(+) ohmic contacts. This device has the advantages of controllable barrier height, diode capacitance and forward to reverse current ratio. A symmetrically designed PDB has an anti-symmetric current vs. voltage characteristic and is ideal for use as millimeter wave subharmonic mixers. We have fabricated such devices with barrier heights of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 volts from GaAs and InGaAs using a multijunction honeycomb structure with junction diameters between one and ten microns. Initial RF measurements are encouraging. The 0.7 volt barrier height 4 micron GaAs devices were tested as subharmonic mixers at 202 GHz with an IF frequency of 1 GHz and had 18 dB of conversion loss. The estimated mismatch loss was 7 dB and was due to higher diode capacitance. The LO frequency was 100.5 GHz and the pump power was 8 mW.

  12. Functional barriers: properties and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, A; Dole, P; Aucejo, S; Dainelli, D; De la Cruz Garcia, C; Hankemeier, T; N'Gono, Y; Papaspyrides, C D; Paseiro, P; Pastorelli, S; Pavlidou, S; Pennarun, P Y; Saillard, P; Vidal, L; Vitrac, O; Voulzatis, Y

    2005-10-01

    Functional barriers are multilayer structures deemed to prevent migration of some chemicals released by food-contact materials into food. In the area of plastics packaging, different migration behaviours of mono- and multilayer structures are assessed in terms of lag time and of their influence of the solubility of the migrants in food simulants. Whereas barriers to oxygen or to aromas must prevent the diffusion of these compounds under conditions of use, a functional barrier must also be efficient under processing conditions, to prevent diffusion of substances when the polymer layers are in contact at high (processing) temperatures. Diffusion in melted polymers at high temperatures is much slower for glassy polymers, than in polymers that are rubbery at ambient temperature. To evaluate the behaviour of functional barriers under conditions of use, a set of reference diffusion coefficients in the 40-60 degrees C range were determined for 14 polymers. Conditions for accelerated migration tests are proposed based on worst-case activation energy in the 40-60 degrees C range. For simulation of migration, numerical models are available. The rules derived from the models can be used both by industry (to optimize a material in terms of migration) or by risk assessors. Differences in migration behaviour between mono- and multilayer materials are discussed. PMID:16227179

  13. Functional barriers: properties and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, A; Dole, P; Aucejo, S; Dainelli, D; De la Cruz Garcia, C; Hankemeier, T; N'Gono, Y; Papaspyrides, C D; Paseiro, P; Pastorelli, S; Pavlidou, S; Pennarun, P Y; Saillard, P; Vidal, L; Vitrac, O; Voulzatis, Y

    2005-10-01

    Functional barriers are multilayer structures deemed to prevent migration of some chemicals released by food-contact materials into food. In the area of plastics packaging, different migration behaviours of mono- and multilayer structures are assessed in terms of lag time and of their influence of the solubility of the migrants in food simulants. Whereas barriers to oxygen or to aromas must prevent the diffusion of these compounds under conditions of use, a functional barrier must also be efficient under processing conditions, to prevent diffusion of substances when the polymer layers are in contact at high (processing) temperatures. Diffusion in melted polymers at high temperatures is much slower for glassy polymers, than in polymers that are rubbery at ambient temperature. To evaluate the behaviour of functional barriers under conditions of use, a set of reference diffusion coefficients in the 40-60 degrees C range were determined for 14 polymers. Conditions for accelerated migration tests are proposed based on worst-case activation energy in the 40-60 degrees C range. For simulation of migration, numerical models are available. The rules derived from the models can be used both by industry (to optimize a material in terms of migration) or by risk assessors. Differences in migration behaviour between mono- and multilayer materials are discussed.

  14. Barrier Integrity of Electroless Diffusion Barriers and Organosilane Monolayer against Copper Diffusion under Bias Temperature Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumori, Akiyoshi; Fujishima, Shota; Ueno, Kazuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Barrier integrity of electroless NiB and CoWP/NiB thin layers against copper (Cu) diffusion was evaluated by time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) under bias temperature stress (BTS) using metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) test structures. The BTS tests were carried out also for an approximately 2.2-nm-thick organosilane monolayer (OSML), which has been used as the underlayer of the electroless barrier layers (EBLs). It was found that the barrier integrity of the EBLs was NiB 40 nm > NiB 10 nm > CoWP/NiB 40 nm = CoWP/NiB 10 nm in this order. The field acceleration parameter of the TDDB lifetime was almost the same for all EBLs. Initial failures and wide lifetime distributions were observed for CoWP/NiB when the NiB catalyst layer for CoWP was not thick enough, which is considered to be due to the large surface roughness. In addition, the OSML was found to have some barrier properties. Although the reliability of OSML was inferior to electroless NiB and CoWP/NiB barrier layers, it is considered that the barrier integrity of the EBLs was partially supported by the OSML.

  15. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  16. Fabrication of novel electrolyte-layer free fuel cell with semi-ionic conductor (Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ- Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9) and Schottky barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Saleemi, Mohsin; Wang, Baoyuan; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Wei; He, Yunjuan; Jayasuriya, Jeevan; Zhu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Perovskite Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) is synthesized via a chemical co-precipitation technique for a low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) (300-600 °C) and electrolyte-layer free fuel cell (EFFC) in a comprehensive study. The EFFC with a homogeneous mixture of samarium doped ceria (SDC): BSCF (60%:40% by weight) which is rather similar to the cathode (SDC: BSCF in 50%:50% by weight) used for a three layer SOFC demonstrates peak power densities up to 655 mW/cm2, while a three layer (anode/electrolyte/cathode) SOFC has reached only 425 mW/cm2 at 550 °C. Chemical phase, crystal structure and morphology of the as-prepared sample are characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances of 3-layer SOFC and EFFC are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As-prepared BSCF has exhibited a maximum conductivity above 300 S/cm at 550 °C. High performance of the EFFC device corresponds to a balanced combination between ionic and electronic (holes) conduction characteristic. The Schottky barrier prevents the EFFC from the electronic short circuiting problem which also enhances power output. The results provide a new way to produce highly effective cathode materials for LTSOFC and semiconductor designs for EFFC functions using a semiconducting-ionic material.

  17. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  18. The Barriers Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confederation Coll. of Applied Arts and Technology, Thunder Bay (Ontario).

    In 1987, the Barriers Project was initiated by Confederation College of Applied Arts and Technology to engage 31 selected community colleges in Canada in an organized self-appraisal of institutional barriers to the enrollment of part-time credit students. From the outset, colleges were encouraged to limit their investigation to barriers over which…

  19. Ocean barrier layers’ effect on tropical cyclone intensification

    PubMed Central

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R.; Leung, L. Ruby; Xu, Zhao; Li, Mingkui; Hsieh, Jen-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Improving a tropical cyclone’s forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone’s path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are “quasi-permanent” features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity. PMID:22891298

  20. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  1. Optimized capping layers for EUV multilayers

    DOEpatents

    Bajt, Sasa; Folta, James A.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    2004-08-24

    A new capping multilayer structure for EUV-reflective Mo/Si multilayers consists of two layers: A top layer that protects the multilayer structure from the environment and a bottom layer that acts as a diffusion barrier between the top layer and the structure beneath. One embodiment combines a first layer of Ru with a second layer of B.sub.4 C. Another embodiment combines a first layer of Ru with a second layer of Mo. These embodiments have the additional advantage that the reflectivity is also enhanced. Ru has the best oxidation resistance of all materials investigated so far. B.sub.4 C is an excellent barrier against silicide formation while the silicide layer formed at the Si boundary is well controlled.

  2. Interface analysis of diffusion barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delarosa, Mark J.

    2000-10-01

    The utilization of thin films has enabled the success for much of modern technology. One goal of the research encompassed by this thesis was to monitor the interface of thin films and investigate ways to ensure their integrity, in spite of their propensity to react or diffuse. The materials selected for investigation were fluorinated dielectrics and copper. Fluorinated films have been integrated into an extensive range of applications, due to the relative inertness of many fluorinated polymers at low temperatures. Copper has long been the material of choice for electrical conduction due to its low resistivity and high thermal conductivity. Cobalt, cobalt-silicon, tantalum and tantalum-silicon were investigated as diffusion barrier materials to stabilize the interfaces. Co-Si and Ta-Si were found to be effective diffusion barriers on the fluorinated polymers PFCB and Pa-F up to the thermal degradation temperature of these materials. Incorporated in the current thesis research was the use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) to provide extremely thin, conformal, and pinhole-free diffusion barrier films. We were able to deposit cobalt films using ALD, including a dramatic breakthrough allowing the ALD of metals onto oxidized substrates at low temperatures (300°C). The ALD of Co on Ta and Cu on Co on SiO:F were performed to demonstrate this technique. To compliment the use of ALD for fabricating thin, dense diffusion barrier films, surface science analytical techniques were incorporated in this study, including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and grazing angle x-ray diffraction. The ion beam techniques of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were also used to analyze the diffusion barrier interfaces.

  3. Extremal surface barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C.

    2014-03-01

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  4. Thick thermal barrier coatings for diesel components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonushonis, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    An engineered thick thermal barrier coating consisting of multiple layers of zirconia and CoCrAlY with a zirconia top layer and having a system thermal conductance less than 410 w/m(exp 2)K exceeded the 100 hour engine durability goals set forth in this program. The thermal barrier coatings were intact at the test conclusion. Back to back single cylinder research engine tests were conducted with watercooled, metal hardware and oil-cooled, thermal barrier coating insulated hardware to determine apparent heat release and fuel economy. Apparent heat release data revealed that the insulated engine had a shorter ignition delay and a longer combustion duration than the metal engine. The insulated engine fuel economy was approximately two percent worse on average for this series of tests. There was no attempt to optimize engine efficiency of the insulated engine by modifying the engine timing, coating, or other techniques.

  5. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers.

  6. Method Producing an SNS Superconducting Junction with Weak Link Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a high temperature superconductor Josephson element and an improved SNS weak link barrier element is provided. A YBaCuO superconducting electrode film is deposited on a substrate at a temperature of approximately 800 C. A weak link barrier layer of a nonsuperconducting film of N-YBaCuO is deposited over the electrode at a temperature range of 520 C. to 540 C. at a lower deposition rate. Subsequently a superconducting counter-electrode film layer of YBaCuO is deposited over the weak link barrier layer at approximately 800 C. The weak link barrier layer has a thickness of approximately 50 A and the SNS element can be constructed to provide an edge geometry junction.

  7. Water-retaining barrier and method of construction

    DOEpatents

    Adams, M.R.; Field, J.G.

    1996-02-20

    An agricultural barrier is disclosed which provides a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface. The barrier is disposed on native soil of the region. The barrier includes a first porous layer composed of pieces of basalt, and is in contact with the native soil. There is a less porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel. The second layer overlies the first layer. A third layer, less porous than the second layer, contains soil which favors plant growth. The third layer overlies the second layer and has an exposed upper surface. The porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer. 2 figs.

  8. Water-retaining barrier and method of construction

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Melvin R.; Field, Jim G.

    1996-01-01

    An agricultural barrier providing a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface, the barrier being disposed on native soil of the region, the barrier including: a first layer composed of pieces of basalt, the first layer being porous and being in contact with the native soil; a porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel, the second layer being less porous than, and overlying, the first layer; and a porous third layer containing soil which favors plant growth, the third layer being less porous than, and overlying, the second layer and having an exposed upper surface, wherein the porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer.

  9. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1987-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor, that support these conclusions are detailed.

  10. Skin barrier in atopic dermatitis: beyond filaggrin.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Mariana Colombini; Samorano, Luciana Paula; Orfali, Raquel Leão; Aoki, Valéria

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex pathogenesis, where changes in skin barrier and imbalance of the immune system are relevant factors. The skin forms a mechanic and immune barrier, regulating water loss from the internal to the external environment, and protecting the individual from external aggressions, such as microorganisms, ultraviolet radiation and physical trauma. Main components of the skin barrier are located in the outer layers of the epidermis (such as filaggrin), the proteins that form the tight junction (TJ) and components of the innate immune system. Recent data involving skin barrier reveal new information regarding its structure and its role in the mechanic-immunological defense; atopic dermatitis (AD) is an example of a disease related to dysfunctions associated with this complex. PMID:27579743

  11. Pharmaceutical Nanoparticles and the Mucin Biopolymer Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Aljayyoussi, Ghaith; Abdulkarim, Muthanna; Griffiths, Peter; Gumbleton, Mark

    2012-01-01

    S U M M A R Y Mucus in the gastrointestinal tract remains a tenacious barrier that restricts the passage of many orally administered compounds into the GIT’s epithelial layer and consequently into the systemic circulation. This results in significant decreases in the oral bioavailability of many therapeutic molecules. Nanoparticles offer an avenue to surpass this mucus barrier. They can be used as drug carriers to improve the bioavailability of many compounds that are restricted by mucus. Nanoparticles achieve penetration of the mucus barrier through a multitude of properties that they possess as their size, charge density, and surface functional groups which can all be tailored to achieve optimal penetration of the thick and fibrous mucus barrier. This article offers a quick review about the use of nanoparticles as drug carriers to increase mucus penetration in the gastro intestinal tract. PMID:23678457

  12. Skin barrier in atopic dermatitis: beyond filaggrin*

    PubMed Central

    Zaniboni, Mariana Colombini; Samorano, Luciana Paula; Orfali, Raquel Leão; Aoki, Valéria

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex pathogenesis, where changes in skin barrier and imbalance of the immune system are relevant factors. The skin forms a mechanic and immune barrier, regulating water loss from the internal to the external environment, and protecting the individual from external aggressions, such as microorganisms, ultraviolet radiation and physical trauma. Main components of the skin barrier are located in the outer layers of the epidermis (such as filaggrin), the proteins that form the tight junction (TJ) and components of the innate immune system. Recent data involving skin barrier reveal new information regarding its structure and its role in the mechanic-immunological defense; atopic dermatitis (AD) is an example of a disease related to dysfunctions associated with this complex. PMID:27579743

  13. Method of making dense, conformal, ultra-thin cap layers for nanoporous low-k ILD by plasma assisted atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-05-24

    Barrier layers and methods for forming barrier layers on a porous layer are provided. The methods can include chemically adsorbing a plurality of first molecules on a surface of the porous layer in a chamber and forming a first layer of the first molecules on the surface of the porous layer. A plasma can then be used to react a plurality of second molecules with the first layer of first molecules to form a first layer of a barrier layer. The barrier layers can seal the pores of the porous material, function as a diffusion barrier, be conformal, and/or have a negligible impact on the overall ILD k value of the porous material.

  14. Surface barrier research at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Ward, A.L.; Fayer, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    At the DOE Hanford Site, a field-scale prototype surface barrier was constructed in 1994 over an existing waste site as a part of a CERCLA treatability test. The above-grade barrier consists of a fine-soil layer overlying coarse layers of sands, gravels, basalt rock (riprap), and a low permeability asphalt layer. Two sideslope configurations, clean-fill gravel on a 10:1 slope and basalt riprap on a 2:1 slope, were built and are being tested. Design considerations included: constructability; drainage and water balance monitoring, wind and water erosion control and monitoring; surface revegetation and biotic intrusion; subsidence and sideslope stability, and durability of the asphalt layer. The barrier is currently in the final year of a three-year test designed to answer specific questions related to stability and long-term performance. One half of the barrier is irrigated such that the total water applied, including precipitation, is 480 mm/yr (three times the long-term annual average). Each year for the past two years, an extreme precipitation event (71 mm in 8 hr) representing a 1,000-yr return storm was applied in late March, when soil water storage was at a maximum. While the protective sideslopes have drained significant amounts of water, the soil cover (2-m of silt-loam soil overlying coarse sand and rock) has never drained. During the past year there was no measurable surface runoff or wind erosion. This is attributed to extensive revegetation of the surface. In addition, the barrier elevation has shown a small increase of 2 to 3 cm that is attributed to a combination of root proliferation and freeze/thaw activity. Testing will continue through September 1997. Performance data from the prototype barrier will be used by DOE in site-closure decisions at Hanford.

  15. High Operating Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector with Tailorable Cutoff Wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Seibel, Alexander (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith Y. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A barrier infrared detector with absorber materials having selectable cutoff wavelengths and its method of manufacture is described. A GaInAsSb absorber layer may be grown on a GaSb substrate layer formed by mixing GaSb and InAsSb by an absorber mixing ratio. A GaAlAsSb barrier layer may then be grown on the barrier layer formed by mixing GaSb and AlSbAs by a barrier mixing ratio. The absorber mixing ratio may be selected to adjust a band gap of the absorber layer and thereby determine a cutoff wavelength for the barrier infrared detector. The absorber mixing ratio may vary along an absorber layer growth direction. Various contact layer architectures may be used. In addition, a top contact layer may be isolated into an array of elements electrically isolated as individual functional detectors that may be used in a detector array, imaging array, or focal plane array.

  16. Self-Aligned Guard Rings For Schottky-Barrier Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1990-01-01

    Proposed self-aligned guard ring increases active area of Schottky-barrier infrared detector. Concept developed for silicide Schottky-barrier diodes in which platinum silicide or iridium silicide Schottky-contacts provide cutoff wavelengths of about 6 or 10 micrometers. Grid of silicon dioxide doped with phosphorus etched on silicon wafer, and phosphorus from grid diffused into substrate, creating n-type guard rings. Silicide layers formed in open areas of grid. Overlap of guard rings and silicide layers small.

  17. In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-01-13

    A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

  18. A double barrier memristive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, M.; Ziegler, M.; Kolberg, L.; Soni, R.; Dirkmann, S.; Mussenbrock, T.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present a quantum mechanical memristive Nb/Al/Al2O3/NbxOy/Au device which consists of an ultra-thin memristive layer (NbxOy) sandwiched between an Al2O3 tunnel barrier and a Schottky-like contact. A highly uniform current distribution for the LRS (low resistance state) and HRS (high resistance state) for areas ranging between 70 μm2 and 2300 μm2 were obtained, which indicates a non-filamentary based resistive switching mechanism. In a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis we show evidence that resistive switching originates from oxygen diffusion and modifications of the local electronic interface states within the NbxOy layer, which influences the interface properties of the Au (Schottky) contact and of the Al2O3 tunneling barrier, respectively. The presented device might offer several benefits like an intrinsic current compliance, improved retention and no need for an electric forming procedure, which is especially attractive for possible applications in highly dense random access memories or neuromorphic mixed signal circuits.

  19. Surface stability test plan for protective barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of buried waste have been identified as integral components of a plan to isolate a number of Hanford defense waste sites. Standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance will mandate a barrier surface layer that is resistant to the eolian erosion processes of wind erosion (deflation) and windborne particle deposition (formation of sand dunes). Thus, experiments are needed to measure rates of eolian erosion processes impacting those surfaces under different surface and climatological conditions. Data from these studies will provide information for use in the evaluation of selected surface layers as a means of providing stable cover over waste sites throughout the design life span of protective barriers. The multi-year test plan described in this plan is directed at understanding processes of wind erosion and windborne particle deposition, providing measurements of erosion rates for models, and suggesting construction materials and methods for reducing the effect of long-term eolian erosion on the barrier. Specifically, this plan describes possible methods to measure rates of eolian erosion, including field and laboratory procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of laboratory (wind tunnel) tests are discussed, and continued wind tunnel tests are recommended for wind erosion studies. A comparison between field and wind tunnel erosive forces is discussed. Plans for testing surfaces are described. Guidance is also presented for studying the processes controlling sand dune and blowout formation. 24 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Thermal barrier coating system with intermetallic overlay bond coat

    SciTech Connect

    Duderstadt, E.C.; Nagaraj, B A.

    1993-08-24

    A superalloy article is described having a thermal barrier coating system thereon, comprising: a substrate made of a material selected from the group consisting of a nickel-based superalloy and a cobalt-based superalloy; and a thermal barrier coating system on the substrate, the thermal barrier coating system including an intermetallic bond coat overlying the substrate, the bond coat being selected from the group consisting of a nickel aluminide and a platinum aluminide intermetallic compound, a thermally grown aluminum oxide layer overlying the intermetallic bond coat, and a ceramic topcoat overlying the aluminum oxide layer.

  1. Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier

    DOEpatents

    Van Der Beck, R.R.; Bond, J.A.

    1994-03-29

    A high-voltage electrical insulator for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall of a heat exchanger filled with liquid lithium while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl[sub 2]O[sub 3], sapphire) with a niobium foil layer bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal facing the heat exchanger wall, and a molybdenum layer bonded to the niobium layer to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface. 3 figures.

  2. Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier

    DOEpatents

    Van Der Beck, Roland R.; Bond, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-voltage electrical insulator (21) for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module (17) in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall (11) of a heat exchanger (13) filled with liquid lithium (16) while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator (21) has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl.sub.2 O.sub.3, sapphire) with a niobium foil layer (32) bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal (26) facing the heat exchanger wall (11), and a molybdenum layer (31) bonded to the niobium layer (32) to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface.

  3. Biointrusion test plan for the Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Cadwell, L.L.; Brandt, C.A.; Downs, J.L.; Rossi, R.E.; Gee, G.W.

    1994-04-01

    This document provides a testing and monitoring plan for the biological component of the prototype barrier slated for construction at the Hanford Site. The prototype barrier is an aboveground structure engineered to demonstrate the basic features of an earthen cover system. It is designed to permanently isolate waste from the biosphere. The features of the barrier include multiple layers of soil and rock materials and a low-permeability asphalt sublayer. The surface of the barrier consists of silt loam soil, covered with plants. The barrier sides are reinforced with rock or coarse earthen-fill to protect against wind and water erosion. The sublayers inhibit plant and animal intrusion and percolation of water. A series of tests will be conducted on the prototype barrier over the next several years to evaluate barrier performance under extreme climatic conditions. Plants and animals will play a significant role in the hydrologic and water and wind erosion characteristics of the prototype barrier. Studies on the biological component of the prototype barrier will include work on the initial revegetation of the surface, continued monitoring of the developing plant community, rooting depth and dispersion in the context of biointrusion potential, the role of plants in the hydrology of the surface and toe regions of the barrier, the role of plants in stabilizing the surface against water and wind erosion, and the role of burrowing animals in the hydrology and water and wind erosion of the barrier.

  4. OVERCOMING CULTURAL BARRIERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARRUTIA, RICHARD

    THE RELATIONSHIP OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT TO CULTURAL BARRIERS AND THE TEACHING OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES IS DISCUSSED IN THIS ARTICLE. VARIOUS VIEWS OF THE MEANING OF CULTURE ARE MENTIONED IN ORDER TO SINGLE OUT ANTHROPOLOGICAL CULTURE AS A MAIN FOCAL POINT. INTERCULTURAL DIFFERENCES ARE SPELLED OUT WITH EXAMPLES OF LINGUISTIC BARRIERS, AND…

  5. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  6. Application of Extremely Thin ZrN Film as Diffusion Barrier between Cu and SiOC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masaru; Takeyama, Mayumi B.; Aoyagi, Eiji; Noya, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    As an extremely thin diffusion barrier applicable to Cu interconnects for the 45 nm technology nodes, we propose a barrier material without interface layers that can become a cause of barrier consumption owing to solid-phase reaction and/or intermixing. We examine the barrier properties of a reactively sputtered ZrN barrier as thin as 5 nm between Cu and SiOC. The ZrN barrier with a slightly N-rich composition tolerates annealing at 500 °C for 30 min. Transmission electron microscopy indicates the absence of interface layers adjoining the barrier. Using the ZrN barrier, we can demonstrate the effectiveness of the interface-layer-free characteristics for an extremely thin barrier of high performance.

  7. Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Wronski, Christopher R.

    1979-01-01

    A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

  8. The influence of artificial sealing on the capillary barrier's function.

    PubMed

    Trpkosová, Dagmar; Mls, Jirí

    2010-01-01

    Regulations for the sealing of landfill sites require two independent sealing components. To satisfy this requirement, the combined capillary barrier was developed using impermeable sheeting placed between the capillary layer and the capillary block of the traditional capillary barrier. In this study, a numerical model is introduced based on hydraulic characteristics obtained by means of measurements of samples of capillary barrier materials. To make a comparison possible, samples of a laboratory investigated barrier were measured. Two laboratory experiments with a simple and a combined capillary barrier were repeated using the developed numerical model and good agreement between computed and measured results was found. Subsequently, the model was used for investigating the effect of failure of the artificial sheeting on the capillary barrier's efficiency. The obtained results are presented and discussed. PMID:19853432

  9. High voltage, high current Schottky barrier solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A Schottky barrier solar cell was described, which consists of a layer of wide band gap semiconductor material on which a very thin film of semitransparent metal was deposited to form a Schottky barrier. The layer of the wide band gap semiconductor material is on top of a layer of narrower band gap semiconductor material, to which one of the cell's contacts may be attached directly or through a substrate. The cell's other contact is a grid structure which is deposited on the thin metal film.

  10. Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coating includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX, and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer, or a diameter of less than 5 microns. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate, and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of die invention, a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  11. All-optical amplitude-phase transmultiplexing of RZ-OOK and RZ-BPSK to RZ-QPSK by polarization-insensitive XPM using a nonlinear birefringent AlGaAs waveguide.

    PubMed

    Cannon, B M; Mahmood, T; Astar, W; Apiratikul, P; Porkolab, G; Boudra, P; Mohsenin, T; Richardson, C J K; Carter, G M

    2013-08-26

    Polarization-insensitive (PI) phase-transmultiplexing (PTM) of a 10-Gb/s return-to-zero ON-OFF keying (RZ-OOK) pump and a 10-Gb/s RZbinary phase-shift keying (RZ-BPSK) probe to 20-Gb/s RZ-quadrature-PSK (RZ-QPSK) has been successfully demonstrated for the first time in a passive, birefringent AlGaAs waveguide, utilizing PI cross-phase modulation (PI-XPM). For differential QPSK (DQPSK)-detection, a 10 − 9-BER pre-amplified receiver sensitivity penalty of ≈ 2.5 dB for the in-phase component and ≈ 4.9 dB for the quadrature component were found. The penalties were relative to the FPGA-precoded RZ-DQPSK baseline for a pump-probe detuning of ≈ 12 nm, when the probe state of polarization was scrambled and the pump was launched off-axis into the waveguide.

  12. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  13. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment, and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  14. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper. 2 tabs.

  15. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; Wowczuk, Andrew; Vellenoweth, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides, Infections and the Skin Barrier.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Agner, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The skin serves as a strong barrier protecting us from invading pathogens and harmful organisms. An important part of this barrier comes from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are small peptides expressed abundantly in the skin. AMPs are produced in the deeper layers of the epidermis and transported to the stratum corneum, where they play a vital role in the first line of defense against potential pathogens. Numerous AMPs exist, and they have a broad antibiotic-like activity against bacteria, fungi and viruses. They also act as multifunctional effector molecules, linking innate and adaptive immune responses. AMPs play an essential part in maintaining an optimal and functional skin barrier - not only by direct killing of pathogens, but also by balancing immune responses and interfering in wound healing, cell differentiation, reepithelialization and their synergistic interplay with the skin microflora. PMID:26844896

  17. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  18. Highway noise barrier perceived benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. N.; Osman, M. M.

    1980-05-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed in which 82 subjects judged the benefit of a noise barrier by listening to tape recordings of before-barrier and after-barrier traffic noise. These perceived benefit judgments were related by regression analysis to the barrier attenuation, the before-barrier traffic sound level, and a music background level, all of which were varied over the course of the experiment. Prediction equations were developed for barrier benefit in terms of these sound levels, their purpose being to provide a model for barrier benefit that can be used in barrier site selection and design. An unexpected finding was that barrier benefit was highest when before-barrier sound levels were lowest: i.e., subjects preferred a noise barrier that solved a moderate noise problem over an equally-attenuating barrier that only partially solved a more severe noise problem.

  19. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  20. The role of plants on isolation barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Waugh, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Surface barriers are used to isolate buried wastes from the environment. Most have been built for short-term isolation. The need to isolate radioactive wastes from the environment requires that the functional integrity of a barrier be maintained for thousands of years. Barrier function strongly depends on vegetation. Plants reduce wind and water erosion and minimize drainage, but may transport contaminants if roots extend into buried wastes. Our review of the function of plants on surface barriers focuses on the role of plants across mesic to arid environments and gives special consideration to studies done at Hanford. The Hanford Barrier Development Program was created to design and test an earthen cover system to inhibit water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion, while isolating buried wastes for at least 1000 years. Studies at the Hanford have shown that plants will significantly interact with the barrier. Plants transpire soil water back into the atmosphere. Deep-rooted perennials best recycle water; soil water may drain through the root zone of shallow-rooted annuals. Lysimeter studies indicate that a surface layer of fine soil with deep-rooted plants precludes drainage even with three times normal precipitation. The presence of vegetation greatly reduces water and wind erosion, but deep-rooted plants pose a threat of biointrusion and contaminant transport. The Hanford barrier includes a buried rock layer and asphalt layer to prevent biointrusion.

  1. Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2002-01-01

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

  2. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.; van't Erve, Olaf M. J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Whitener, Keith E.; Jonker, Berend T.

    2016-05-01

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenation or fluorination of graphene can be used to create a tunnel barrier. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures, and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect. We compare the results for hydrogenated and fluorinated tunnel and we discuss the possibility that ferromagnetic moments in the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barrier affect the spin transport of our devices.

  3. Breakdown and Protection of ALD Moisture Barrier Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Nehm, Frederik; Klumbies, Hannes; Richter, Claudia; Singh, Aarti; Schroeder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas; Mönch, Tobias; Hoßbach, Christoph; Albert, Matthias; Bartha, Johann W; Leo, Karl; Müller-Meskamp, Lars

    2015-10-14

    The water vapor barrier properties of low-temperature atomic layer deposited (ALD) AlOx thin-films are observed to be unstable if exposed directly to high or even ambient relative humidities. Upon exposure to humid atmospheres, their apparent barrier breaks down and their water vapor transmission rates (WVTR), measured by electrical calcium tests, deteriorate by several orders of magnitude. These changes are accompanied by surface roughening beyond the original thickness, observed by atomic force microscopy. X-ray reflectivity investigations show a strong decrease in density caused by only 5 min storage in a 38 °C, 90% relative humidity climate. We show that barrier stabilities required for device applications can be achieved by protection layers which prevent the direct contact of water condensing on the surface, i.e., the sensitive ALD barrier. Nine different protection layers of either ALD materials or polymers are tested on the barriers. Although ALD materials prove to be ineffective, applied polymers seem to provide good protection independent of thickness, surface free energy, and deposition technique. A glued-on PET foil stands out as a low-cost, easily processed, and especially stable solution. This way, 20 nm single layer ALD barriers for organic electronics are measured. They yield reliable WVTRs down to 2×10(-5) g(H2O) m(-2) day(-1) at 38 °C and 90% relative humidity, highlighting the great potential of ALD encapsulation.

  4. Overcoming Intercultural Communication Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an activity that helps students overcome the multicultural barriers that might be encountered in dealing with people from various cultures in a global economy. Outlines instructions, reporting procedures, principles to emphasize, and time required for the exercise. (HB)

  5. Barriers to Effective Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the following barriers which interfere with listening efficiency: content, speaker, medium, distractions, mindset, language, listening speed, and feedback. Suggests ways to combat these obstacles to accurate comprehension. (MM)

  6. Barrier Island Hazard Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkey, Orrin H.; Neal, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes efforts to evaluate and map the susceptibility of barrier islands to damage from storms, erosion, rising sea levels and other natural phenomena. Presented are criteria for assessing the safety and hazard potential of island developments. (WB)

  7. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  8. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  9. Plastic Schottky-barrier solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, J.R.; Cohen, M.J.

    1981-12-30

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a metallic area electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates a magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film. With the proper selection and location of elements a photovoltaic cell structure and solar cell are obtained.

  10. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  11. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; McQueen, Miles A.

    1996-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

  12. Methods for fabricating a micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-01-06

    Methods for fabricating a highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  13. Apparatus and method of manufacture for an imager equipped with a cross-talk barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An imager apparatus and associated starting material are provided. In one embodiment, an imager is provided including a silicon layer of a first conductivity type acting as a junction anode. Such silicon layer is adapted to convert light to photoelectrons. Also included is a semiconductor well of a second conductivity type formed in the silicon layer for acting as a junction cathode. Still yet, a barrier is formed adjacent to the semiconductor well. In another embodiment, a starting material is provided including a first silicon layer and an oxide layer disposed adjacent to the first silicon layer. Also included is a second silicon layer disposed adjacent to the oxide layer opposite the first silicon layer. Such second silicon layer is further equipped with an associated passivation layer and/or barrier.

  14. Dense, layered membranes for hydrogen separation

    DOEpatents

    Roark, Shane E.; MacKay, Richard; Mundschau, Michael V.

    2006-02-21

    This invention provides hydrogen-permeable membranes for separation of hydrogen from hydrogen-containing gases. The membranes are multi-layer having a central hydrogen-permeable layer with one or more catalyst layers, barrier layers, and/or protective layers. The invention also relates to membrane reactors employing the hydrogen-permeable membranes of the invention and to methods for separation of hydrogen from a hydrogen-containing gas using the membranes and reactors. The reactors of this invention can be combined with additional reactor systems for direct use of the separated hydrogen.

  15. Kinetics of Initial Layer-by-Layer Oxidation of Si(001) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Kato, Koichi; Uda, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Ken; Ichikawa, Masakazu; Kawamura, Takaaki; Terakura, Kiyoyuki

    1998-01-01

    Layer-by-layer oxidation of Si(001) surfaces has been studied by scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM). The oxidation kinetics of the top and second layers were independently investigated from the change in oxygen Auger peak intensity calibrated from the SREM observation. A barrierless oxidation of the first subsurface layer, as well as oxygen chemisorption onto the top layer, occurs at room temperature. The energy barrier of the second-layer oxidation was found to be 0.3 eV. The initial oxidation kinetics are discussed based on first-principles calculations.

  16. A Typology of Career Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Hee; Yu, Kumlan; Lee, Sang Min

    2008-01-01

    While most studies have focused primarily on the correlates of career barriers, research examining specific career barrier typology experienced among college students remains limited. Employing cluster analysis, this study explored the career barrier typology of 318 college students using the Korean college students' Career Barrier Inventory…

  17. InGaP Heterojunction Barrier Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, Roger E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A new solar cell structure called a heterojunction barrier solar cell is described. As with previously reported quantum-well and quantum-dot solar cell structures, a layer of narrow band-gap material, such as GaAs or indium-rich InGaP, is inserted into the depletion region of a wide band-gap PN junction. Rather than being thin, however, the layer of narrow band-gap material is about 400-430 nm wide and forms a single, ultrawide well in the depletion region. Thin (e.g., 20-50 nm), wide band-gap InGaP barrier layers in the depletion region reduce the diode dark current. Engineering the electric field and barrier profile of the absorber layer, barrier layer, and p-type layer of the PN junction maximizes photogenerated carrier escape. This new twist on nanostructured solar cell design allows the separate optimization of current and voltage to maximize conversion efficiency.

  18. The formation mechanism of aluminum oxide tunnel barriers.

    SciTech Connect

    Cerezo, A.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Larson, D. J.; Pinitsoontorn, S.; Singleton, E. W.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Oxford; Seagate Tech.

    2006-01-01

    The functional properties of magnetic tunnel junctions are critically dependant on the nanoscale morphology of the insulating barrier (usually only a few atomic layers thick) that separates the two ferromagnetic layers. Three-dimensional atom probe analysis has been used to study the chemistry of a magnetic tunnel junction structure comprising an aluminium oxide barrier formed by in situ oxidation, both in the under-oxidized and fully oxidized states and before and after annealing. Low oxidation times result in discrete oxide islands. Further oxidation leads to a more continuous, but still non-stoichiometric, barrier with evidence that oxidation proceeds along the top of grain boundaries in the underlying CoFe layer. Post-deposition annealing leads to an increase in the barrier area, but only in the case of the fully oxidized and annealed structure is a continuous planar layer formed, which is close to the stoichiometric Al:O ratio of 2:3. These results are surprising, in that the planar layers are usually considered unstable with respect to breaking up into separate islands. Analysis of the various driving forces suggests that the formation of a continuous layer requires a combination of factors, including the strain energy resulting from the expansion of the oxide during internal oxidation on annealing.

  19. Observations and consequences of nonuniform aluminum concentrations in the channel regions of AlGaAs channeled-substrate-planar lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Gary A.; Goldstein, Bernard; Butler, Jerome K.

    1987-01-01

    Compositional changes in the n-clad layer within the channel region of channel substrate planar (CSP) type semiconductor lasers have been observed. As a consequece, a large optical cavity (LOC) or an enhanced substrate loss (ESL) version of the CSP geometry may result, both of which may have significantly different characteristics from those of a conventional CSP laser. The CSP-LOC generally has a larger near-field spot size, while the ESL-CSP is characterized by an off-axis, asymmetric far-field pattern.

  20. Grain boundary electrical barriers in positive temperature coefficient thermistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Katsuro; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Sakuma, Taketo

    1999-09-01

    Resistance-temperature, current-voltage, and capacitance-voltage characteristics have been measured in niobium-doped barium titanate bicrystals. The analysis by device simulation reveals that potential barrier with a semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor structure can consistently interpret the observed characteristics rather than the double Schottky barrier. Absence of sub-ohmic behavior in the current-voltage characteristics and excess low-frequency capacitance at zero bias are caused by the spatially distributed traps at the insulating layer.

  1. Electrical characteristics and interface structure of magnetic tunnel junctions with hafnium oxyfluoride barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.Y.; Kim, D.S.; Char, K.

    2004-12-01

    We have studied the effects of fluorine inclusion on the electrical transport characteristics and interface structure of the hafnium oxide barrier in a magnetic tunnel junction. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and resistance-area (RA) as a function of oxidation time show that the TMR ratio of the hafnium oxyfluoride barrier is higher (8.3%) than that of the hafnium oxide barrier (5.7%) at their optimum conditions, and the oxyfluoride barrier junctions maintain a high TMR ratio even when the RA product increases by three orders of magnitude. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that the fluorine atoms in the oxyfluoride barrier play an important role in the formation of a barrier with uniform composition. We believe that the initial fluoride layer is causing the subsequent oxygen diffusion to slow down, resulting in the formation of a defect-free hafnium oxide layer. These results are consistent with what we have found for aluminum oxyfluoride barriers.

  2. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  3. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    PubMed Central

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  4. Skin barrier in rosacea.

    PubMed

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  5. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature oxidation resistant, thermal barrier coating system is disclosed for a nickel cobalt, or iron base alloy substrate. An inner metal bond coating contacts the substrate, and a thermal barrier coating covers the bond coating. NiCrAlR, FeCrAlR, and CoCrAlR alloys are satisfactory as bond coating compositions where R=Y or Yb. These alloys contain, by weight, 24.9-36.7% chromium, 5.4-18.5% aluminum, and 0.05 to 1.55% yttrium or 0.05 to 0.53% ytterbium. The coatings containing ytterbium are preferred over those containing yttrium. An outer thermal barrier coating of partial stabilized zirconium oxide (zirconia) which is between 6% and 8%, by weight, of yttrium oxide (yttria) covers the bond coating. Partial stabilization provides a material with superior durability. Partially stabilized zirconia consists of mixtures of cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases.

  6. Metallographic techniques for evaluation of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of ceramic thermal barrier coatings is strongly dependent on the amount and shape of the porosity in the coating. Current metallographic techniques do not provide polished surfaces that are adequate for a repeatable interpretation of the coating structures. A technique recently developed at NASA-Lewis for preparation of thermal barrier coating sections combines epoxy impregnation, careful sectioning and polishing, and interference layering to provide previously unobtainable information on processing-induced porosity. In fact, increased contrast and less ambiguous structure developed by the method make automatic quantitative metallography a viable option for characterizing thermal barrier coating structures.

  7. Effect of wet oxidized AlxGa1-xAs layer on the interdiffusion of InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Joong-Seon; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Choe, Byung-Doo; Lim, H.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of wet oxidized AlAs cap layer and AlGaAs interlayer on the thermal stability of In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs quantum well (QW) is studied. The QW interdiffusion rate is observed to increase with the Al composition of the AlxGa1-xAs interlayer until x reaches about 0.5 and then saturate for x⩾0.5. When the oxidation is performed at 380 °C for 15 min, the threshold value of x for the enhancement of QW interdiffusion is found to be 0.3. It is also confirmed that the QW interdiffusion can only be explained when the strain effect in InGaAs is taken into account.

  8. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  9. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  10. Ice barrier construction

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, R. G.; Jahns, H. O.

    1985-06-18

    A method is provided for constructing spray ice barriers to protect offshore structures in a frigid body of water from mobile ice, waves and currents. Water is withdrawn from the body of water and is sprayed through ambient air which is below the freezing temperature of the water so that a substantial amount of the water freezes as it passes through the air. The sprayed water is directed to build up a mass of ice having a size and shape adapted to protect the offshore structure. Spray ice barriers can also be constructed for the containment of pollutant spills.

  11. Environmental barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Vartabedian, Ara; Collins, William T.; Woolley, David; Bateman, Charles

    2012-12-18

    The present invention relates generally to a multi-layered article suitable for service in severe environments. The article may be formed of a substrate, such as silicon carbide and/or silicon nitride. The substrate may have a first layer of a mixture of a rare earth silicate and Cordierite. The substrate may also have a second layer of a rare earth silicate or a mixture of a rare earth silicate and cordierite.

  12. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  13. Conceptual barriers to understanding physical barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lingaraju, Amulya; Long, Tiha M.; Wang, Yitang; Austin, Jotham R.; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2015-01-01

    The members of the large family of claudin proteins regulate ion and water flux across the tight junction. Many claudins, e.g. claudins 2 and 15, accomplish this by forming size- and charge-selective paracellular channels. Claudins also appear to be essential for genesis of tight junction strands and recruitment of other proteins to these sites. What is less clear is whether claudins also form the paracellular seal. While this seal is defective when claudins are disrupted, some results, including ultrastructural and biochemical data, suggest that lipid structures are an important component of tight junction strands and may be responsible for the paracellular seal. This review highlights the current knowledge of claudins to barrier function and tight junction structure and suggests a model by which claudins and other tight junction proteins can drive assembly and stabilization of a lipid-based strand structure. PMID:26003050

  14. Simulation of phosphorene Schottky-barrier transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Runlai; Cao, Xi; Guo, Jing

    2014-10-01

    Schottky barrier field-effect transistors (SBFETs) based on few and mono layer phosphorene are simulated by the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. It is shown that scaling down the gate oxide thickness results in pronounced ambipolar I-V characteristics and significant increase of the minimal leakage current. The problem of leakage is especially severe when the gate insulator is thin and the number of layer is large, but can be effectively suppressed by reducing phosphorene to mono or bilayer. Different from two-dimensional graphene and layered dichalcogenide materials, both the ON-current of the phosphorene SBFETs and the metal-semiconductor contact resistance between metal and phosphorene strongly depend on the transport crystalline direction.

  15. GaAs and AlGaAs APDs with GaSb absorption regions in a separate absorption and multiplication structure using a hetero-lattice interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A. R. J.; Craig, A. P.; Reyner, C. J.; Huffaker, D. L.

    2015-05-01

    Interfacial misfit (IMF) arrays were used to create two APD structures, allowing GaSb absorption layers to be combined with wide-gap multiplication regions, grown using GaAs and Al0.8Ga0.2As, respectively. The GaAs APD represents a proof-of-principle, which is developed in the Al0.8Ga0.2As APD to achieve reduced dark currents, of 5.07 μA cm-2 at 90% of the breakdown voltage, and values for effective k = β/α below 0.2. A random-path-length (RPL) simulation was used to model the excess noise in both structures, taking into account the effects of dead space. It is envisaged that the GaSb absorption regions could be replaced with other materials from the 6.1 Å family, allowing for long-wavelength APDs with reduced dark currents and excess noise.

  16. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Research and development into thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines is reviewed critically. The type of coating systems developed for aircraft applications are found to be preferred for clear fuel electric utility applications. These coating systems consists of a layer of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria ceramic over a layer of MCrAly bond coat. They are not recommended for use when molten salts are presented. Efforts to understand coating degradation in dirty environments and to develop corrosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  17. Thin Oxides as a Cu Diffusion Barrier for NIF Be Ablator Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Kelly P.; Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Hayes, J.; Moreno, K. A.; Wu, J. J.; Nikroo, A.; Alford, C. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Wang, Y. M.; Wu, K. J.

    2013-03-01

    The NIF point design uses a five-layer capsule to modify the X-ray absorption in order to achieve optimized shock timing. A stepped copper dopant design defines the layer structure. The production of the capsule involves pyrolysis to remove the inner plastic mandrel. Copper atoms diffuse radially and azimuthally throughout the capsule during pyrolysis. This diffusion significantly diminishes the capsule performance during implosion. Thermal and coated oxide barrier layers employed between layers mitigate the diffusion of copper during the mandrel removal process. The copper atoms do not diffuse through this barrier during pyrolysis. A capsule fabrication method that produces a capsule with a thin oxide layer will be discussed.

  18. Ceramic with preferential oxygen reactive layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An article comprises a silicon-containing substrate and an external environmental/thermal barrier coating. The external environmental/thermal barrier coating is permeable to diffusion of an environmental oxidant and the silicon-containing substrate is oxidizable by reaction with oxidant to form at least one gaseous product. The article comprises an intermediate layer/coating between the silicon-containing substrate and the environmental/thermal barrier coating that is oxidizable to a nongaseous product by reaction with the oxidant in preference to reaction of the silicon-containing substrate with the oxidant. A method of forming an article, comprises forming a silicon-based substrate that is oxidizable by reaction with oxidant to at least one gaseous product and applying an intermediate layer/coating onto the substrate, wherein the intermediate layer/coating is oxidizable to a nongaseous product by reaction with the oxidant in preference to reaction of the silicon-containing substrate with the oxidant.

  19. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  20. Research barriers in psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Cole, J O

    1977-08-01

    The author discusses barriers to psychopahrmacological research, including attacks by vocal human rights groups, regulation by local review boards, and Department of Health, Education, and Welfare restrictions. He suggests that those patients least able to give informed consent are most in need of the benefits of research on new drugs.

  1. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxide thermal barrier coating comprises ZrO3-Yb2O3 that is plasma sprayed onto a previously applied bond coating. The zirconia is partially stabilized with about 124 w/o ytterbia to insure cubic, monoclinic, and terragonal phases.

  2. Barrier Free Site Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Richard K., Ed.

    The booklet provides information for the design and evaluation of a barrier free outdoor environment for handicapped individuals. Section 1 discusses the scope of the study, defines terms, cites pertinent laws and legislation, describes cost/benefit factors, and surveys population statistics. Section 2 considers recommended design details in the…

  3. Barrier infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.; Rogalski, A.

    2014-06-01

    In 1959, Lawson and co-workers publication triggered development of variable band gap Hg1-xCdxTe (HgCdTe) alloys providing an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Over the five decades, this material system has successfully fought off major challenges from different material systems, but despite that it has more competitors today than ever before. It is interesting however, that none of these competitors can compete in terms of fundamental properties. They may promise to be more manufacturable, but never to provide higher performance or, with the exception of thermal detectors, to operate at higher temperatures. In the last two decades a several new concepts of photodetectors to improve their performance have been proposed including trapping detectors, barrier detectors, unipolar barrier photodiodes, and multistage detectors. This paper describes the present status of infrared barrier detectors. It is especially addressed to the group of III-V compounds including type-II superlattice materials, although HgCdTe barrier detectors are also included. It seems to be clear that certain of these solutions have merged as a real competitions of HgCdTe photodetectors.

  4. Breaking Down Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Beverly T.

    1994-01-01

    Faculty at 11 higher education institutions in California, New Mexico, Texas, and northern Mexico have been experimenting with computer conferencing on the BESTNET (Bilingual English-Spanish Telecommunications Network). The growing system is credited with creating an international student-faculty community that crosses cultural barriers for…

  5. Barriers Regarding Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekenoogen, John Russell

    2014-01-01

    The University of Florida (UF) used an open-source course management system (CMS) called Sakai. Sakai was the fourth CMS the university has used to help teach live, blended (or hybrid), and online courses over the past ten years. The objective of this dissertation was to identify what barriers may be preventing university personnel from using…

  6. Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  7. Spallanzani Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    31 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a layered, light-toned mesa among other layered materials exposed in a mound that covers much of the floor of Spallanzani Crater.

    Location near: 58.3oS, 273.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  8. Apparatus and method of manufacture for depositing a composite anti-reflection layer on a silicon surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and associated method are provided. A first silicon layer having at least one of an associated passivation layer and barrier is included. Also included is a composite anti-reflection layer including a stack of layers each with a different thickness and refractive index. Such composite anti-reflection layer is disposed adjacent to the first silicon layer.

  9. Application of diffusion barriers to high modulus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veltri, R. D.; Douglas, F. C.; Paradis, E. L.; Galasso, F. S.

    1977-01-01

    Barrier layers were coated onto high-modulus fibers, and nickel and titanium layers were overcoated as simulated matrix materials. The objective was to coat the high-strength fibers with unreactive selected materials without degrading the fibers. The fibers were tungsten, niobium, and single-crystal sapphire, while the materials used as barrier coating layers were Al2O3, Y2O3, TiC, ZrC, WC with 14% Co, and HfO2. An ion-plating technique was used to coat the fibers. The fibers were subjected to high-temperature heat treatments to evaluate the effectiveness of the barrier layer in preventing fiber-metal interactions. Results indicate that Al2O3, Y2O3, and HfO2 can be used as barrier layers to minimize the nickel-tungsten interaction. Further investigation, including thermal cycling tests at 1090 C, revealed that HfO2 is probably the best of the three.

  10. On the performance of capillary barriers as landfill cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, M.; Montenegro, H.

    Landfills and waste heaps require an engineered surface cover upon closure. The capping system can vary from a simple soil cover to multiple layers of earth and geosynthetic materials. Conventional design features a compacted soil layer, which suffers from drying out and cracking, as well as root and animal intrusion. Capillary barriers consisting of inclined fine-over-coarse soil layers are investigated as an alternative cover system. Under unsaturated conditions, the textural contrast delays vertical drainage by capillary forces. The moisture that builds up above the contact will flow downdip along the interface of the layers. Theoretical studies of capillary barriers have identified the hydraulic properties of the layers, the inclination angle, the length of the field and the infiltration rate as the fundamental characteristics of the system. However, it is unclear how these findings can lead to design criteria for capillary barriers. To assess the uncertainty involved in such approaches, experiments have been carried out in a 8 m long flume and on large scale test sites (40 m x 15 m). In addition, the ability of a numerical model to represent the relevant flow processes in capillary barriers has been examined.

  11. Stability of barrier buckets with short barrier separations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    A barrier bucket with very short or zero rf-barrier separation (relative to the barrier widths) has its synchrotron tune decreasing from a very large value towards the bucket boundary. As a result, chaotic region may form near the bucket center and extends outward under increasing modulation of rf voltage and/or rf phase. Application is made to those barrier buckets used in momentum mining at the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  12. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  13. Chaotic correlations in barrier billiards with arbitrary barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbaldestin, A. H.; Adamson, L. N. C.

    2013-06-01

    We study autocorrelation functions in symmetric barrier billiards for golden mean trajectories with arbitrary barriers. Renormalization analysis reveals the presence of a chaotic invariant set and thus that, for a typical barrier, there are chaotic correlations. The chaotic renormalization set is the analogue of the so-called orchid that arises in a generalized Harper equation.

  14. Schottky barrier diode and method thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid (Inventor); Franz, David (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Pt/n.sup.-GaN Schottky barrier diodes are disclosed that are particularly suited to serve as ultra-violet sensors operating at wavelengths below 200 nm. The Pt/n.sup.-GaN Schottky barrier diodes have very large active areas, up to 1 cm.sup.2, which exhibit extremely low leakage current at low reverse biases. Very large area Pt/n.sup.-GaN Schottky diodes of sizes 0.25 cm.sup.2 and 1 cm.sup.2 have been fabricated from n.sup.-/n.sup.+ GaN epitaxial layers grown by vapor phase epitaxy on single crystal c-plane sapphire, which showed leakage currents of 14 pA and 2.7 nA, respectively for the 0.25 cm.sup.2 and 1 cm.sup.2 diodes both configured at a 0.5V reverse bias.

  15. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-04-23

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  16. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S.; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2010-04-06

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  17. Channel cracks in atomic-layer and molecular-layer deposited multilayer thin film coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Rong; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-06-21

    Metal oxide thin film coatings produced by atomic layer deposition have been shown to be an effective permeation barrier. The primary failure mode of such coatings under tensile loads is the propagation of channel cracks that penetrate vertically into the coating films. Recently, multi-layer structures that combine the metal oxide material with relatively soft polymeric layers produced by molecular layer deposition have been proposed to create composite thin films with desired properties, including potentially enhanced resistance to fracture. In this paper, we study the effects of layer geometry and material properties on the critical strain for channel crack propagation in the multi-layer composite films. Using finite element simulations and a thin-film fracture mechanics formalism, we show that if the fracture energy of the polymeric layer is lower than that of the metal oxide layer, the channel crack tends to penetrate through the entire composite film, and dividing the metal oxide and polymeric materials into thinner layers leads to a smaller critical strain. However, if the fracture energy of the polymeric material is high so that cracks only run through the metal oxide layers, more layers can result in a larger critical strain. For intermediate fracture energy of the polymer material, we developed a design map that identifies the optimal structure for given fracture energies and thicknesses of the metal oxide and polymeric layers. These results can facilitate the design of mechanically robust permeation barriers, an important component for the development of flexible electronics.

  18. Apoplastic diffusion barriers in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nawrath, Christiane; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-12-27

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented.

  19. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  20. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  1. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  2. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  3. Skin Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Like other inflammatory dermatoses, the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) has been largely attributed to abnormalities in adaptive immunity. T helper (Th) cell types 1 and 2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling are thought to account for the chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes AD. Not surprisingly, therapy has been directed toward ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and pruritus. Here, we review emerging evidence that inflammation in AD occurs downstream to inherited and acquired insults to the barrier. Therapy based upon this new view of pathogenesis should emphasize approaches that correct the primary abnormality in barrier function, which drives downstream inflammation and allows unrestricted antigen access. PMID:18606081

  4. Can-Filled Crash Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Crash barrier composed largely of used aluminum beverage cans protects occupants of cars in collisions with poles or trees. Lightweight, can-filled barrier very effective in softening impact of an automobile in head-on and off-angle collisions. Preliminary results indicate barrier is effective in collisions up to 40 mi/h (64 km/h).

  5. Fluctuations in Schottky barrier heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    1984-02-01

    A double Schottky barrier is often formed at the grain boundary in polycrystalline semiconductors. The barrier height is shown to fluctuate in value due to the random nature of the impurity positions. The magnitude of the fluctuations is 0.1 eV, and the fluctuations cause the barrier height measured by capacitance to differ from the one measured by electrical conductivity.

  6. Barrier breaching device

    DOEpatents

    Honodel, C.A.

    1983-06-01

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  7. Barrier breaching device

    DOEpatents

    Honodel, Charles A.

    1985-01-01

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  8. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a slope upon which are exposed some of the layered materials that underlie the south polar cap of Mars. The layers are generally considered to be sediments--perhaps dust--that may have been cemented by water ice.

    Location near: 84.1oS, 343.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  9. Acoustic-phonon propagation in rectangular semiconductor nanowires with elastically dissimilar barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokatilov, E. P.; Nika, D. L.; Balandin, A. A.

    2005-09-01

    We have theoretically studied acoustic phonon spectra and phonon propagation in rectangular nanowires embedded within elastically dissimilar materials. As example systems, we have considered GaN nanowires with AlN and plastic barrier layers. It has been established that the acoustically mismatched barriers dramatically influence the quantized phonon spectrum of the nanowires. The barriers with lower sound velocity compress the phonon energy spectrum and reduce the phonon group velocities in the nanowire. The barriers with higher sound velocity have an opposite effect. The physical origin of this effect is related to redistribution of the elastic deformations in the acoustically mismatched nanowires. In the case of the “acoustically slow” barriers, the elastic deformation waves are squeezed in the barrier layer. The effect predicted for the nanowires embedded with elastically dissimilar materials could be used for reengineering phonon spectrum in nanostructures.

  10. Protective barrier program: Test plan for plant community dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, M.R.; Chatters, J.C.; Link, S.O.; Brandt, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are jointly developing protective barriers for the long term isolation of low-level radioactive defense waste for the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Arid Sites. Protective barriers have been identified as an integral part of the overall final disposal strategy for low-level defense waste at the Arid Sites (DOE 1987). At present, the conceptual design of the Arid Site protective barrier is a multilayer structure that will minimize waster infiltration into and through the underlying waste, and will prevent intrusion into the waste by plant roots, animals, and humans. This multilayer system consists of a fine soil layer overlying a coarse sand and/or gravel geo-filter overlying a layer of large cobbles or basalt riprap. Plants contribute several crucial functions to the overall performance of the protective barrier.Through transpiration, plants are capable of removing considerably more moisture from a given volume of soil than the physical process of evaporation alone. This becomes especially important after periods of excessive precipitation when the possibility of saturation of the textural break and leeching to the buried waste is increased. Plants also function in significantly reducing the amount of wind and water erosion that would be expected to occur on the barrier surface. In addition to these physical functions, plants also influence other biotic effects on barrier performance.

  11. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Wei, Guodan

    2010-07-06

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

  12. Failure mechanism of Ta diffusion barrier between Cu and Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurila, Tomi; Zeng, Kejun; Kivilahti, Jorma K.; Molarius, Jyrki; Suni, Ilkka

    2000-09-01

    The reaction mechanisms in the Si/Ta/Cu metallization system and their relation to the microstructure of thin films are discussed on the basis of experimental results and the assessment of the ternary Si-Ta-Cu phase diagram at 700 °C. With the help of sheet resistance measurements, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, a scanning electron microscope, and a transmission electron microscope, the Ta barrier layer was observed to fail at temperatures above 650 °C due to the formation of TaSi2, the diffusion of Cu through the silicide layer, and the resulting formation of Cu3Si precipitates. However, in order for the TaSi2 phase to form first, the Ta diffusion barrier layer must be thick enough (e.g., 50-100 nm) to prevent Cu diffusion into the Si substrate up to the temperature of TaSi2 formation (˜650 °C). Independent of the Ta layer thickness, Cu3Si was present as large nodules, whereas the TaSi2 existed as a uniform layer. The resulting reaction structure was found to be in local equilibrium on the basis of the assessed Si-Ta-Cu phase diagram at 700 °C, and therefore no further reactions were expected. The role of oxygen was also found to be important in the reactions and it seems to have a strong effect on the thermal stability of the barrier layer.

  13. Dielectric barrier discharge processing of aerospace materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Figgures, C. C.; Dixon, D. G.

    2004-08-01

    We report the use of atmospheric pressure, air based, dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) to treat materials commonly used in the aerospace industries. The material samples were processed using a test-bed of a conventional DBD configuration in which the sample formed one of the electrodes and was placed in close proximity to a ceramic electrode. The discharges generated a powerful, cold oxidizing environment which was able to remove organic contaminants, etch primer and paint layers, oxidize aluminium and roughen carbon fibre composites by the selective removal of resin.

  14. In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

  15. The diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Alex O; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2010-03-01

    Using the biogeochemical model CCBATCH, which we expanded to include transport processes, we study a novel approach for the treatment of aquifers contaminated with toxic concentrations of metals, the diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier (DAPRB), which is based on generation of sulfide by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) as the groundwater moves through a layered treatment zone. In the DAPRB, layers of low conductivity (low-K) containing reactive materials are intercalated between layers of high conductivity (high-K) that transport the groundwater across the barrier. Because diffusion dominates transport in the reactive layers, microbial communities can take advantage there of the chemical-gradient mechanism for protection from toxicants. The ideal sulfidic DAPRB design includes particulate organic matter (POM) and solid sulfate mineral inside the reactive (low-K) layer. This leads to sulfate reduction and the formation of sulfide ligands that complex with toxic metals, such as Zn(2+) in the high-K layer. We perform a theoretical biogeochemical analysis of the ideal configuration of a DAPRB for treatment of Zn-contaminated groundwater. Our analysis using the expanded CCBATCH confirms the gradient-resistance mechanism for bio-protection, with the ZnS bio-sink forming at the intersection of the Zn and sulfide plumes inside the high-K layers of the DAPRB. The detailed DAPRB analysis also shows that total alkalinity and pH distributions are representative footprints of the two key biogeochemical processes taking place, sulfidogenesis and Zn immobilization as sulfide mineral. This is so because these two reactions consume or produce acidic hydrogen and alkalinity. Additionally, because Zn immobilization is due to ZnS mineral precipitation, the ZnS mineral distribution is a good indicator for the bio-sink. Bio-sinks are located for the most part within the high-K layers, and their exact position depends on the relative magnitude of metal and sulfide fluxes. Finally

  16. Methods for improving the gas barrier properties of polymeric containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, G.J.

    1984-10-23

    Methods are disclosed for the treatment of food, beverage, and medicine containers and the like, which are made of organic polymeric resins, to greatly increase the gas barrier properties thereof. The containers are ion-plated with a very thin flexible layer of an inorganic oxide.

  17. Surface Leakage Mechanisms in III-V Infrared Barrier Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidor, D. E.; Savich, G. R.; Wicks, G. W.

    2016-09-01

    Infrared detector epitaxial structures employing unipolar barriers exhibit greatly reduced dark currents compared to simple pn-based structures. When correctly positioned within the structure, unipolar barriers are highly effective at blocking bulk dark current mechanisms. Unipolar barriers are also effective at suppressing surface leakage current in infrared detector structures employing absorbing layers that possess the same conductivity type in their bulk and at their surface. When an absorbing layer possesses opposite conductivity types in its bulk and at its surface, unipolar barriers are not solutions to surface leakage. This work reviews empirically determined surface band alignments of III-V semiconductor compounds and modeled surface band alignments of both gallium-free and gallium-containing type-II strained layer superlattice material systems. Surface band alignments are used to predict surface conductivity types in several detector structures, and the relationship between surface and bulk conductivity types in the absorbing layers of these structures is used as the basis for explaining observed surface leakage characteristics.

  18. Educational Opportunity: El Salvador's Barriers to Achieving Equality Persist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosekrans, Kristin

    This paper analyzes barriers to educational equality in El Salvador, using a multi-layered framework of educational opportunity. To improve educational opportunity and give the most marginalized sectors of society the possibility of changing their life circumstances requires policies that go beyond mere access to formal schooling. The model…

  19. Barrier and Mechanical Properties of Starch-Clay Nanocomposite Films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poor barrier and mechanical properties of biopolymer-based food packaging can potentially be enhanced by the use of layered silicates (nanoclay) to produce nanocomposites. In this study, starch-clay nano-composites were synthesized by a melt extrusion method. Natural (MMT) and organically modifi...

  20. Molecular assemblies as protective barriers and adhesion promotion interlayer

    DOEpatents

    King, D.E.; Czanderna, A.W.; Kennedy, C.E.

    1996-01-30

    A protective diffusion barrier having adhesive qualities for metalized surfaces is provided by a passivating agent having the formula HS--(CH{sub 2}){sub 11}--COOH which forms a very dense, transparent organized molecular assembly or layer that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack metal surfaces. 8 figs.