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Sample records for algaas window layers

  1. DX center analysis in Sn-doped AlGaAs layer of double heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniewski, J.; Kaniewska, M.; Ždánský, K.

    1987-12-01

    Capacitance as well as photovoltage methods have been used to analyze deep centers in an n-type AlGaAs:Sn layer of double heterostructures. It is suggested that the trap with thermal activation energy equal to ΔE2=0.33±0.02 eV is associated with the L minimum of AlGaAs and could be interpreted as a DX center related to Sn. The observed changes of deep center concentration in double heterostructures are due to different Al contents within the depletion region.

  2. Recombination-current suppression in GaAs p-n junctions grown on AlGaAs buffer layers by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancour, D. P.; Melloch, M. R.; Pierret, R. F.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Klausmeier-Brown, M. E.; Kyono, C. S.

    1987-08-01

    n+pp+GaAs and n+pP+ GaAs/GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As mesa diodes have been fabricated from films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The diodes made from films employing an AlGaAs buffer layer show marked improvements (a factor of 5 reduction) in recombination current densities. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements moreover indicate that deep level concentrations are reduced by the AlGaAs buffer.

  3. Deep level transient spectroscopy assessment of silicon contamination in AlGaAs layers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, E.; Sanchez, F.; Muñoz, E.; Gibart, P.; Powell, A.; Roberts, J. S.

    1995-08-01

    A systematic silicon contamination has been detected by deep level transient spectroscopy in undoped and n-type doped (Te, Se, Sn) AlGaAs layers, grown in two different metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy reactors. DX center generation by substitutional donors, with very specific capture and emission thermal barriers (fingerprints), is the key to unambiguously identifying their presence, with detection limits well below the standard secondary ion mass spectroscopy capability. We comment on the potential sources of Si contamination (most common in this epitaxial technique), and on the relevance of such contamination to interpreting correctly experimental data related to the microscopic structure of DX centers.

  4. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-10-04

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  5. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-02-01

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  6. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  7. Efficient AlGaAs shallow-homojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R.P.; Fan, J.C.C.; Turner, G.W.; Chapman, R.L.; Pantano, J.V.

    1984-03-15

    Shallow-homojunction n/sup +//p/p/sup +/ solar cells with one-sun, AM1 conversion efficiencies as high as 12.9% have been fabricated in Al/sub 0.2/Ga/sub 0.8/As epitaxial layers grown by organometallic chemical vapor deposition on single-crystal GaAs substrates. For these cells, which have n/sup +/ layers thinned by anodic oxidation to about 500 A, the quantum efficiencies in the short-wavelength portion of the spectrum are as high as the best reported for AlGaAs cells with high band-gap window layers.

  8. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  9. Frequency stabilization of algaas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, M.; Tsuchida, H.; Tako, T.

    1982-01-01

    Performances of semiconductor lasers have been remarkably improved by the demand of the optical communications industry. Recently, a single longitudinal mode, CW oscillation at room temperature has been realized. The price of each laser has been reduced as low as $250. These lasers are mostly oscillated in the near-infrared, and the coherent lights of 0.83 micrometers and 1.3-1.6 micrometers in wavelengths are obtained by AlGaAs lasers and InGaAsP lasers, respectively. Since few number of other kind of lasers oscillates in these wavelength regions, these semiconductor lasers could be conveniently used not only in optical communications but in many fields of application, e.g., laser spectroscopy, optical pumping, frequency and length standards, laser radar, air-borne gyroscope, etc.

  10. Selective thermal terahertz emission from GaAs and AlGaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Požela, K. Širmulis, E.; Kašalynas, I.; Šilėnas, A.; Požela, J.; Jucienė, V.

    2014-09-01

    The selective thermally stimulated terahertz (THz) radiation emission from GaAs and AlGaAs alloys are experimentally observed at frequencies of coupled oscillations of free electron plasma and different branches of interface AlGaAs optical phonons. The effect of strong absorption of incident radiation with large oblique angle (26°) by heated GaAs and AlGaAs is revealed. The coherent THz radiation emission with the frequency of 7.6 THz from the heated high conductivity GaAs (n = 4 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) layer is observed. The results are highly relevant to application in optoelectronic THz devices.

  11. APCVD Transition Metal Oxides - Functional Layers in "Smart windows"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesheva, K. A.; Ivanova, T. M.; Bodurov, G. K.

    2014-11-01

    Transition metal oxides (TMO) exhibit electrochromic effect. Under a small voltage they change their optical transmittance from transparent to collored (absorbing) state. The individual material can manifest its electrochromic properties only when it is part of electrochromic (EC) multilayer system. Smart window is controlling the energy of solar flux entering the building or car and makes the interiors comfortable and energy utilization more effective. Recently the efforts of material researchers in this field are directed to price decreasing. APCVD technology is considered as promissing as this process permits flowthrough large-scale production process. The paper presents results on device optimization based on WO3-MoO3 working electrode. Extensive research reveals that WO3-MoO3 structure combines positive features of single oxides: excellent electrochromic performance of WO3 and better kinetic properties of MoO3 deposition. The achieved color efficiency of APCVD WO3-MoO3 films is 200cm2/C and optical modulation of 65-70% are practically favorable electrochromic characteristics. To respond to low cost requirement, the expensive hexacarbonyl can be replaced with acetylacetonate. We have started with this precursor to fabricate mixed WxV1-xO3 films. The films possess excellent surface coverage and high growth-rate. CVD deposition of VO2, a promissing thermochromic thin film material is also presented.

  12. Effect of InAlAs window layer on efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide bandgap, lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In(0.52)Al(0.48)As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated by using the numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improved significantly with the use of the window layer. No improvement was seen for the n(+)p InP cells. The cell results were explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction band energy discontinuity. The calculated current voltage and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrated that In(0.52)Al(0.48)As is a very promising candidate for a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  13. Effect of InAlAs window layer on the efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Landis, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide-bandgap lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In0.52Al0.48As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated using a numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improves significantly with the use of a window layer. No improvement is seen for n(+)p InP cells. Cell results are explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction-band energy discontinuity. The calculated I-V and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrate that In0.52Al0.48As is a promising candidate as a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  14. Passivating Window/First Layer AR Coating for Space Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Wheeler, D. R.; Matesscu, G.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemically grown oxides, if well designed, offer excellent surface passivation of the emitter surface of space solar cells and can be used as effective passivating window/first layer AR coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a simple room temperature wet chemical technique to grow cost effective passivating layers on solar cell front surfaces after the front grid metallization step. These passivating layers can be grown both on planar and porous surfaces. Our results show that these oxide layers: (i) can effectively passivate the from the surface, (ii) can serve as an effective optical window/first layer AR coating, (iii) are chemically, thermally and UV stable, and (iv) have the potential of improving the BOL and especially the EOL efficiency of space solar cells. The potential of using this concept to simplify the III-V based space cell heterostructures while increasing their BOL and EOL efficiency is also discussed.

  15. Theoretical Study of the Effect of an AlGaAs Double Heterostructure on Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetector Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Ali F.; Smith, Arlynn W.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1994-01-01

    The impulse and square-wave input response of different GaAs metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector (MSM) designs are theoretically examined using a two dimensional drift- diffusion numerical calculation with a thermionic-field emission boundary condition model for the heterojunctions. The rise time and the fall time of the output signal current are calculated for a simple GaAs, epitaxially grown, MSM device as well as for various double-heterostructure barrier devices. The double heterostructure devices consist of an AlGaAs layer sandwiched between the top GaAs active, absorption layer and the bottom GaAs substrate. The effect of the depth of the AlGaAs layer on the speed and responsivity of the MSM devices is examined. It is found that there is an optimal depth, at fixed applied bias, of the AlGaAs layer within the structure that provides maximum responsivity at minimal compromise in speed.

  16. The influence of doping and post-treatment on optical-electrical properties of novel window layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingzuo; Shen, Jiesheng; Zhao, Yue

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, vacuum thermal evaporation and direct current magnetron sputtering technique are used to produce a novel window layer with the structure of i-ZnO/AZO/Ag(In):AZO. Based on the traditional i-ZnO/AZO window layer, the metal Ag (In) thin film is deposited on the surface of this double-layer thin film to form a new window layer with the structure of i-ZnO/AZO/Ag (In):AZO. Comparing with the traditional i-ZnO/AZO window layer, the deposited metal Ag (In) thin film on the surface of traditional i-ZnO/AZO window layer may lead to the reduction in resistivity and transmittance, which can be attributed to high conductivity and high reflectivity of deposited metal Ag (In) thin film. After annealing, the resistance of novel window layer with the structure of i-ZnO/AZO/In:AZO has a large reduction, but the change of resistance of novel i-ZnO/AZO/Ag:AZO window layer shows a opposite trend. This phenomenon may be related to the different number of valence electron of doping element. Furthermore, the annealing process promotes the recrystallization process to decrease the internal stress and the crystal structure defects, which leads to an obvious decrease in the transmittance and the carrier scattering rate of novel window layer.

  17. Single photon emission from impurity centers in AlGaAs epilayers on Ge and Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Minari, S.; Cavigli, L.; Sarti, F.; Abbarchi, M.; Accanto, N.; Munoz Matutano, G.; Vinattieri, A.; Gurioli, M.; Bietti, S.; Sanguinetti, S.

    2012-10-22

    We show that the epitaxial growth of thin layers of AlGaAs on Ge and Si substrates allows to obtain single photon sources by exploiting the sparse and unintentional contamination with acceptors of the AlGaAs. Very bright and sharp single photoluminescence lines are observed in confocal microscopy. These lines behave very much as single excitons in quantum dots, but their implementation is by far much easier, since it does not require 3D nucleation. The photon antibunching is demonstrated by time resolved Hanbury Brown and Twiss measurements.

  18. Multiexciton complex from extrinsic centers in AlGaAs epilayers on Ge and Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sarti, F.; Muñoz Matutano, G.; Bauer, D.; Dotti, N.; Vinattieri, A.; Gurioli, M.; Bietti, S.; Sanguinetti, S.; Isella, G.

    2013-12-14

    The multiexciton properties of extrinsic centers from AlGaAs layers on Ge and Si substrates are addressed. The two photon cascade is found both in steady state and in time resolved experiments. Polarization analysis of the photoluminescence provides clearcut attribution to neutral biexciton complexes. Our findings demonstrate the prospect of exploiting extrinsic centers for generating entangled photon pairs on a Si based device.

  19. Anisotropic photoluminescence behaviour of vertical AlGaAs structures grown on gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeire, G.; Yu, Z. Q.; Vermaerke, F.; Buydens, L.; Van Daele, P.; Demeester, P.

    1992-11-01

    The formation of vertical AlGaAs quantum wells during MOVPE growth of AlGaAs layers on submicron gratings has been investigated. The influence of the growth temperature, growth velocity, V/III ratio and the overall Al content has been examined and explained using surface diffusion effects of the group III atoms (or reactant species). 77 K PL measurements show a polarization anisotropy and indicate lateral quantum confinement. Also the growth of QWWs on submicron gratings is reported, showing very large PL intensities and polarization anisotropy. Finally the realization of QWWs has been proposed by growing Al xGa 1- xAs/Al yGa 1- yAs QWs on gratings and based on the different surface mobilities of Ga and Al.

  20. The role of buffer layers and double windows layers in a solar cell CZTS performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebarkia, C.; Dib, D.; Zerfaoui, H.; Belghit, R.

    2016-07-01

    In the overall context of the diversification of the use of natural resources, the use of renewable energy including solar photovoltaic has become increasingly indispensable. As such, the development of a new generation of photovoltaic cells based on CuZnSnS4 (CZTS) looks promising. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a new film absorber, with good physical properties (band gap energy 1.4-1.6 eV with a large absorption coefficient over 104 cm-1). Indeed, the performance of these cells exceeded 30% in recent years. In the present paper, our work based on modeling and numerical simulation, we used SCAPS to study the performance of solar cells based on Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and thus evaluate the electrical efficiency η for typical structures of n-ZnO:Al / i-ZnO / n-CdS / p-CZTS and n-ITO / n-ZnO:Al / n-CdS /p-CZTS. Furthermore, the influence of the change of CdS by ZnSeand In2S3buffer layer was treated in this paper.

  1. Monolithic AlGaAs second-harmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gili, V. F.; Carletti, L.; Locatelli, A.; Rocco, D.; Finazzi, M.; Ghirardini, L.; Favero, I.; Gomez, C.; Lemaître, A.; Celebrano, M.; De Angelis, C.; Leo, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate monolithic aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) optical anoantennas. Using a selective oxidation technique, we fabricate such epitaxial semiconductor nanoparticles on an aluminum oxide substrate. Second harmonic generation from an AlGaAs nanocylinder of height h=400 nm and varying radius pumped with femtosecond pulses delivered at 1554-nm wavelength has been measured, revealing a peak conversion efficiency exceeding 10-5 for nanocylinders with an otpimized geometry.

  2. Monolithic AlGaAs second-harmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Gili, V F; Carletti, L; Locatelli, A; Rocco, D; Finazzi, M; Ghirardini, L; Favero, I; Gomez, C; Lemaître, A; Celebrano, M; De Angelis, C; Leo, G

    2016-07-11

    We demonstrate monolithic aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) optical nanoantennas. Using a selective oxidation technique, we fabricated epitaxial semiconductor nanocylinders on an aluminum oxide substrate. Second harmonic generation from AlGaAs nanocylinders of 400 nm height and varying radius pumped with femtosecond pulses delivered at 1554-nm wavelength has been measured, revealing a peak conversion efficiency exceeding 10-5 for nanocylinders with an optimized geometry. PMID:27410864

  3. Full chip two-layer CD and overlay process window analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rachit; Shang, Shumay; Sturtevant, John

    2015-03-01

    In-line CD and overlay metrology specifications are typically established by starting with design rules and making certain assumptions about error distributions which might be encountered in manufacturing. Lot disposition criteria in photo metrology (rework or pass to etch) are set assuming worst case assumptions for CD and overlay respectively. For example poly to active overlay specs start with poly endcap design rules and make assumptions about active and poly lot average and across lot CDs, and incorporate general knowledge about poly line end rounding to ensure that leakage current is maintained within specification. There is an opportunity to go beyond generalized guard band design rules to full-chip, design-specific, model-based exploration of worst case layout locations. Such an approach can leverage not only the above mentioned coupling of CD and overlay errors, but can interrogate all layout configurations for both layers to help determine lot-specific, design-specific CD and overlay dispositioning criteria for the fab. Such an approach can elucidate whether for a specific design layout there exist asymmetries in the response to misalignment which might be exploited in manufacturing. This paper will investigate an example of two-layer model-based analysis of CD and overlay errors. It is shown, somewhat non-intuitively, that there can be small preferred misalignment asymmetries which should be respected to protect yield. We will show this relationship for via-metal overlap. We additionally present a new method of displaying edge placement process window variability, akin to traditional CD process window analysis.

  4. Lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  5. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Anderson, Ren

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  6. Electrodeposition of ZnO-doped films as window layer for Cd-free CIGS-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsin, Fabien; Vénérosy, Amélie; Hildebrandt, Thibaud; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Naghavi, Negar; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2016-02-01

    The Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cell technology has made a steady progress within the last decade reaching efficiency up to 22.3% on laboratory scale, thus overpassing the highest efficiency for polycrystalline silicon solar cells. High efficiency CIGS modules employ a so-called buffer layer of cadmium sulfide CdS deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD), which presence and Cd-containing waste present some environmental concerns. A second potential bottleneck for CIGS technology is its window layer made of i-ZnO/ZnO:Al, which is deposited by sputtering requiring expensive vacuum equipment. A non-vacuum deposition of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) relying on simpler equipment with lower investment costs will be more economically attractive, and could increase competitiveness of CIGS-based modules with the mainstream silicon-based technologies. In the frame of Novazolar project, we have developed a low-cost aqueous solution photo assisted electrodeposition process of the ZnO-based window layer for high efficiency CIGS-based solar cells. The window layer deposition have been first optimized on classical CdS buffer layer leading to cells with efficiencies similar to those measured with the sputtered references on the same absorber (15%). The the optimized ZnO doped layer has been adapted to cadmium free devices where the CdS is replaced by chemical bath deposited zinc oxysulfide Zn(S,O) buffer layer. The effect of different growth parameters has been studied on CBD-Zn(S,O)-plated co-evaporated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 substrates provided by the Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW). This optimization of the electrodeposition of ZnO:Cl on CIGS/Zn(S,O) stacks led to record efficiency of 14%, while the reference cell with a sputtered (Zn,Mg)O/ZnO:Al window layer has an efficiency of 15.2%.

  7. THz laser based on quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, K V

    2013-06-30

    The use of quasi-periodic AlGaAs superlattices as an active element of a quantum cascade laser of terahertz range is proposed and theoretically investigated. A multi-colour emission, having from three to six peaks of optical gain, is found in Fibonacci, Thue-Morse, and figurate superlattices in electric fields of intensity F = 11 - 13 kV cm{sup -1} in the frequency range f = 2 - 4 THz. The peaks depend linearly on the electric field, retain the height of 20 cm{sup -1}, and strongly depend on the thickness of the AlGaAs-layers. (lasers)

  8. [The impact of ZnS/CdS composite window layer on the quantun efficiency of CdTe solar cell in short wavelength].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-xiang; Feng, Liang-huan; Wang, Wen-wu; Xu, Hang; Wu, Li-li; Zhang, Jing-quan; Li, Wei; Zeng, Guang-gen

    2015-02-01

    ZnS/CdS composite window layer was prepared by magnetron sputtering method and then applied to CdTe solar cell. The morphology and structure of films were measured. The data of I-V in light and the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with different window layers were also measured. The effect of ZnS films prepared in different conditions on the performance of CdTe solar cells was researched. The effects of both CdS thickness and ZnS/CdS composite layer on the transmission in short wavelength were studied. Particularly, the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer was measured. The results show as follows. With the thickness of CdS window layer reducing from 100 to 50 nm, the transmission increase 18.3% averagely in short wavelength and the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells increase 27.6% averagely. The grain size of ZnS prepared in 250 degrees C is smaller than prepared at room temperature. The performance of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer is much better if ZnS deposited at 250 degrees C. This indicates grain size has some effect on the electron transportation. When the CdS holds the same thickness, the transmission of ZnS/CdS window layer was improved about 2% in short wavelength compared with CdS window layer. The quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer was also improved about 2% in short wavelength compared with that based on CdS window layer. These indicate ZnS/CdS composite window layer can increase the photon transmission in short wavelength so that more photons can be absorbed by the absorbent layer of CdTe solar cells.

  9. Strong dependence of the tetragonal Mn2.1Ga thin film crystallization temperature window on seed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyang; Jiang, Xin; Samant, Mahesh G.; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2013-07-01

    For spintronic applications, such as magnetic memory and logic, magnetic thin films with high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and spin polarization are needed. An attractive candidate material is the Heusler compound Mn3-xGa (x varying from 0 to 2). We show that there is a correlation between the degree of crystallization of thin films of Mn3-xGa (x ˜ 0.9) and the magnitude of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Moreover, we find that the crystallization temperature window varies with the seed layer on which the Mn3-xGa films are deposited. Seed layers of Pt, Cr, Ru, Mo and SrTiO3 were considered and the largest crystallization window was found for Pt(100) layers.

  10. Graded-bandgap AlGaAs solar cells for AlGaAs/Ge cascade cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmons, M. L.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Colpitts, T. S.; Hills, J. S.; Hutchby, J. A.; Iles, P. A.; Chu, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Some p/n graded-bandgap Al(x)Ga(1-x)As solar cells were fabricated and show AMO conversion efficiencies in excess of 15 percent without antireflection (AR) coatings. The emitters of these cells are graded between 0.008 is less than or equal to x is less than or equal to 0.02 during growth of 0.25 to 0.30 micron thick layers. The keys to achieving this performance were careful selection of organometallic sources and scrubbing oxygen and water vapor from the AsH3 source. Source selection and growth were optimized using time-resolved photoluminescence. Preliminary radiation-resistance measurements show AlGaAs cells degraded less than GaAs cells at high 1 MeV electron fluences, and AlGaAs cells grown on GaAs and Ge substrates degrade comparably.

  11. The 1.1 micrometer and visible emission semiconductor diode lasers. [(AlGa)As lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Nuese, C. J.; Kressel, H.

    1978-01-01

    In (AlGa)As, the first of three alloy systems studied, Continuous Wave (CW) operation was obtained at room temperature at a wavelength as low as 7260 A. Reliability in this system was studied in the incoherent mode. Zinc doped devices had significant degradation, whereas Ge or Ge plus Zi doped devices had none. The Al2O3 facet coatings were shown to significantly reduce facet deterioration in all types of lasers, longer wavelength units of that type having accumulated (at the time of writing) 22,000 hours with little if any degradation. A CL study of thin (AlGa)As layers revealed micro fluctuation in composition. A macro-scale fluctuation was observed by electroreflectance. An experimental and theoretical study of the effect of stripe width on the threshold current was carried out. Emission below 7000 A was obtained in VPE grown Ga(AsP) (In,Ga)P with CW operation at 10 C. Lasers and LED's were made by LPE in (InGa) (AsP). Laser thresholds of 5 kA/cm2 were obtained, while LED efficiences were on the order of 2%. Incoherent life test over 6000 hours showed no degradation.

  12. Impact of an AlAs window layer upon the optical properties of Al x Ga1-x As photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, T.; Chen, X. J.; Johnson, E. B.; Christian, J. F.; Lee, K.; Hammig, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed advanced scintillators, which have the ability to distinguish gamma-ray interaction events from those that accompany neutron impact, require improved quantum efficiency in the blue to near UV region of the spectrum. We utilize GaAs/Al0.8Ga0.2As photodiode elements as components in a wide band-gap solid-state photomultiplier as a lower-cost, lower logistical burden, and higher quantum efficiency replacement for the photomultiplier tube. An AlAs window layer is employed as a means to increase the diode’s optical performance. Relative to structures absent the window layer, simulations and measurements demonstrate that the AlAs layer produces a spatial coincidence between regions of large drift fields with regions of high photon absorption. In addition to the AlAs layer, secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements show that an unexpected high degree of inter-diffusion of GaAs and AlAs quenches the photon-detection efficiency, a decrease that can be avoided by its post-growth removal. With the AlAs layer, the peak external quantum efficiency of 49% is achieved at 450 nm with 10 V reverse bias, which does not fully deplete the device. Simulations show that full depletion can result in efficiencies exceeding 90%. In order to enhance the optical response, a simple anti-reflective coating layer is designed using the existing passivation layer components that successfully minimizes the reflection at the wavelength range of interest (300 nm-500 nm).

  13. Shape control of AlGaAs selective oxidation by intermixing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gi, Tetsu; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Shape control of AlGaAs selective oxidation regions by heterointerface intermixing was investigated. The oxidation rate dependence on the intermixing conditions was characterized. Under 880 °C with three hours of intermixing, the oxidation rate was reduced to half that of the usual oxidation without intermixing. The thicknesses of a GaAs capping layer and a deposited SiO2 layer affected the oxidation rate. A detailed analysis of the oxidation after intermixing was carried out by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) measurement. On the basis of the oxidation characteristics with intermixing, in-plane shape control was demonstrated. This result will be helpful in the fabrication of complicated device shapes.

  14. High-efficiency nanostructured window GaAs solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Kang, Yangsen; Huo, Yijie; Chen, Yusi; Cui, Yi; Harris, James S

    2013-10-01

    Nanostructures have been widely used in solar cells due to their extraordinary optical properties. In most nanostructured cells, high short circuit current has been obtained due to enhanced light absorption. However, most of them suffer from lowered open circuit voltage and fill factor. One of the main challenges is formation of good junction and electrical contact. In particular, nanostructures in GaAs only have shown unsatisfactory performances (below 5% in energy conversion efficiency) which cannot match their ideal material properties and the record photovoltaic performances in industry. Here we demonstrate a completely new design for nanostructured solar cells that combines nanostructured window layer, metal mesa bar contact with small area, high quality planar junction. In this way, we not only keep the advanced optical properties of nanostructures such as broadband and wide angle antireflection, but also minimize its negative impact on electrical properties. High light absorption, efficient carrier collection, leakage elimination, and good lateral conductance can be simultaneously obtained. A nanostructured window cell using GaAs junction and AlGaAs nanocone window demonstrates 17% energy conversion efficiency and 0.982 V high open circuit voltage.

  15. Two-layer critical dimensions and overlay process window characterization and improvement in full-chip computational lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtevant, John L.; Liubich, Vlad; Gupta, Rachit

    2016-04-01

    Edge placement error (EPE) was a term initially introduced to describe the difference between predicted pattern contour edge and the design target for a single design layer. Strictly speaking, this quantity is not directly measurable in the fab. What is of vital importance is the relative edge placement errors between different design layers, and in the era of multipatterning, the different constituent mask sublayers for a single design layer. The critical dimensions (CD) and overlay between two layers can be measured in the fab, and there has always been a strong emphasis on control of overlay between design layers. The progress in this realm has been remarkable, accelerated in part at least by the proliferation of multipatterning, which reduces the available overlay budget by introducing a coupling of overlay and CD errors for the target layer. Computational lithography makes possible the full-chip assessment of two-layer edge to edge distances and two-layer contact overlap area. We will investigate examples of via-metal model-based analysis of CD and overlay errors. We will investigate both single patterning and double patterning. For single patterning, we show the advantage of contour-to-contour simulation over contour to target simulation, and how the addition of aberrations in the optical models can provide a more realistic CD-overlay process window (PW) for edge placement errors. For double patterning, the interaction of 4-layer CD and overlay errors is very complex, but we illustrate that not only can full-chip verification identify potential two-layer hotspots, the optical proximity correction engine can act to mitigate such hotspots and enlarge the joint CD-overlay PW.

  16. Preparation and characterization of pulsed laser deposited a novel CdS/CdSe composite window layer for CdTe thin film solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Bo; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jingquan; Li, Wei; Wu, Lili; Feng, Lianghuan

    2016-03-01

    A novel CdS/CdSe composite window structure was designed and then the corresponding films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition as an improved window layer for CdTe-based solar cells. Two types of this composite window structure with 5 cycles and 10 cycles CdS/CdSe respectively both combined with CdS layers were prepared at 200 °C compared with pure CdS window layer and finally were applied into CdTe thin film solar cells. The cross section and surface morphology of the two composite window layers were monitored by using scanning electron microscopy and the result shows that the pulsed laser deposited composite window layers with good crystallinity are stacking together as the design. The devices based on CdS/CdSe composite window layers have demonstrated the enhanced photocurrent collection from both short and long wavelength regions compared to CdS/CdTe solar cell. The efficiency of the best reference CdS/CdTe solar cell was 10.72%. And the device with 5 cycles CdS/CdSe composite window showed efficiency of 12.61% with VOC of 772.92 mV, JSC of 25.11 mA/cm2 and FF of 64.95%. In addition, there are some differences which exist within the optical transmittance spectra and QE curves between the two CdS/CdSe composite window samples, indicating that the volume proportion of CdSe may influence the performance of CdTe thin film solar cell.

  17. Narrow growth window for stoichiometric, layer-by-layer growth of LaAlO3 thin films using pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golalikhani, M.; Lei, Q. Y.; Wolak, M. A.; Davidson, B. A.; Xi, X. X.

    2016-06-01

    We study the structure and surface morphology of the 100 nm homoepitaxial LaAlO3 films grown by pulsed laser deposition in a broad range of growth parameters. We show that there is a narrow window of growth conditions in which the stoichiometric, bulk-like structure is obtained while maintaining a 2-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth mode. In our system, these optimum growth conditions are 100 mTorr background pressure with laser energy density 1.5-2 J/cm2. The sensitivity to growth conditions of the stoichiometry and structure of LaAlO3 films can have a crucial role in the 2-D electron gas formed at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface.

  18. High reflectance Cr/V multilayer with B(4)C barrier layer for water window wavelength region.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiushi; Fei, Jiani; Liu, Yang; Li, Pin; Wen, Mingwu; Xie, Chun; Jonnard, Philippe; Giglia, Angelo; Zhang, Zhong; Wang, Kun; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-02-15

    To develop the high reflectance mirror for the short wavelength range of the water window region (λ=2.42-2.73  nm), Cr/V multilayers with B4C barrier layers are studied. The grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry results show that the multilayer interface widths are significantly reduced down to 0.21-0.31 nm, after the introduction of 0.1 nm B4C barrier layers at both interfaces. The [B4C/Cr/B4C/V] multilayer with a large number of bilayers of N=300 maintains the same small interface widths while the surface roughness is only 0.2 nm. According to the transmission electron microscope measurements, the layer structure improvement with barrier layers can be attributed to the suppression of the crystallization of vanadium inside the structure. Using the interface engineered multilayer, a maximum soft x-ray reflectance of 24.3% is achieved at λ=2.441  nm, under the grazing incidence of 42°. PMID:26872167

  19. Development of electrodeposited ZnTe layers as window materials in ZnTe/CdTe/CdHgTe multi-layer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A.B.M.O. Chaure, N.B.; Wellings, J.; Tolan, G.; Dharmadasa, I.M.

    2009-02-15

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) thin films have been deposited on glass/conducting glass substrates using a low-cost electrodeposition method. The resulting films have been characterized using various techniques in order to optimize growth parameters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been used to identify the phases present in the films. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell and optical absorption measurements have been performed to determine the electrical conductivity type, and the bandgap of the layers, respectively. It has been confirmed by XRD measurement that the deposited layers mainly consist of ZnTe phases. The PEC measurements indicate that the ZnTe layers are p-type in electrical conduction and optical absorption measurements show that their bandgap is in the range 2.10-2.20 eV. p-Type ZnTe window materials have been used in CdTe based solar cell structures, following new designs of graded bandgap multi-layer solar cells. The structures of FTO/ZnTe/CdTe/metal and FTO/ZnTe/CdTe/CdHgTe/metal have been investigated. The results are presented in this paper using observed experimental data.

  20. Layer-by-layer assembled fluorescent probes in the second near-infrared window for systemic delivery and detection of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiangnan; Gu, Li; Qi, Jifa; Correa, Santiago; Zhang, Geran; Belcher, Angela M; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-05-10

    Fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II, 1,000-1,700 nm) features deep tissue penetration, reduced tissue scattering, and diminishing tissue autofluorescence. Here, NIR-II fluorescent probes, including down-conversion nanoparticles, quantum dots, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and organic dyes, are constructed into biocompatible nanoparticles using the layer-by-layer (LbL) platform due to its modular and versatile nature. The LbL platform has previously been demonstrated to enable incorporation of diagnostic agents, drugs, and nucleic acids such as siRNA while providing enhanced blood plasma half-life and tumor targeting. This work carries out head-to-head comparisons of currently available NIR-II probes with identical LbL coatings with regard to their biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and toxicities. Overall, rare-earth-based down-conversion nanoparticles demonstrate optimal biological and optical performance and are evaluated as a diagnostic probe for high-grade serous ovarian cancer, typically diagnosed at late stage. Successful detection of orthotopic ovarian tumors is achieved by in vivo NIR-II imaging and confirmed by ex vivo microscopic imaging. Collectively, these results indicate that LbL-based NIR-II probes can serve as a promising theranostic platform to effectively and noninvasively monitor the progression and treatment of serous ovarian cancer. PMID:27114520

  1. Role of Arsenic During Aluminum Droplet Etching of Nanoholes in AlGaAs.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Christian; Zocher, Michel; Schnüll, Sandra; Hansen, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Self-assembled nanoholes are drilled into (001) AlGaAs surfaces during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using local droplet etching (LDE) with Al droplets. It is known that this process requires a small amount of background arsenic for droplet material removal. The present work demonstrates that the As background can be supplied by both a small As flux to the surface as well as by the topmost As layer in an As-terminated surface reconstruction acting as a reservoir. We study the temperature-dependent evaporation of the As topmost layer with in situ electron diffraction and determine an activation energy of 2.49 eV. After thermal removal of the As topmost layer droplet etching is studied under well-defined As supply. We observe with decreasing As flux four regimes: planar growth, uniform nanoholes, non-uniform holes, and droplet conservation. The influence of the As supply is discussed quantitatively on the basis of a kinetic rate model. PMID:27671015

  2. Role of Arsenic During Aluminum Droplet Etching of Nanoholes in AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyn, Christian; Zocher, Michel; Schnüll, Sandra; Hansen, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Self-assembled nanoholes are drilled into (001) AlGaAs surfaces during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using local droplet etching (LDE) with Al droplets. It is known that this process requires a small amount of background arsenic for droplet material removal. The present work demonstrates that the As background can be supplied by both a small As flux to the surface as well as by the topmost As layer in an As-terminated surface reconstruction acting as a reservoir. We study the temperature-dependent evaporation of the As topmost layer with in situ electron diffraction and determine an activation energy of 2.49 eV. After thermal removal of the As topmost layer droplet etching is studied under well-defined As supply. We observe with decreasing As flux four regimes: planar growth, uniform nanoholes, non-uniform holes, and droplet conservation. The influence of the As supply is discussed quantitatively on the basis of a kinetic rate model.

  3. AlGaAs diode pumped tunable chromium lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    An all-solid-state laser system is disclosed wherein the laser is pumped in the longwave wing of the pump absorption band. By utilizing a laser material that will accept unusually high dopant concentrations without deleterious effects on the crystal lattice one is able to compensate for the decreased cross section in the wing of the absorption band, and the number of pump sources which can be used with such a material increases correspondingly. In a particular embodiment a chromium doped colquiriite-structure crystal such as Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 is the laser material. The invention avoids the problems associated with using AlGaInP diodes by doping the Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 heavily to enable efficient pumping in the longwave wing of the absorption band with more practical AlGaAs diodes.

  4. The effects of high temperature processing on the structural and optical properties of oxygenated CdS window layers in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Naba R.; Grice, Corey R.; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-07-28

    High efficiency CdTe solar cells typically use oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) window layers. We synthesize CdS:O window layers at room temperature (RT) and 270 °C using reactive sputtering. The band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at RT increase when O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios in the deposition chamber increase. On the other hand, the band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at 270 °C decrease as the O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios increase. Interestingly, however, our high temperature closed-space sublimation (CSS) processed CdTe solar cells using CdS:O window layers deposited at RT and 270 °C exhibit very similar cell performance, including similar short-circuit current densities. To understand the underlying reasons, CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C are annealed at temperatures that simulate the CSS process of CdTe deposition. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy characterization of the annealed films reveals that the CdS:O films deposited at RT undergo grain regrowth and/or crystallization and exhibit reduced band gaps after the annealing. Our results suggest that CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C should exhibit similar optical properties after the deposition of CdTe layers, explaining the similar cell performance.

  5. High-power single spatial mode AlGaAs channeled-substrate-planar semiconductor diode lasers for spaceborne communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. C.; Carlin, D. B.; Ettenberg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A high power single spatial mode channeled substrate planar AlGaAs semiconductor diode laser was developed. The emission wavelength was optimized at 860 to 880 nm. The operating characteristics (power current, single spatial mode behavior, far field radiation patterns, and spectral behavior) and results of computer modeling studies on the performance of the laser are discussed. Reliability assessment at high output levels is included. Performance results on a new type of channeled substrate planar diode laser incorporating current blocking layers, grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, to more effectively focus the operational current to the lasing region was demonstrated. The optoelectronic behavior and fabrication procedures for this new diode laser are discussed. The highlights include single spatial mode devices with up to 160 mW output at 8600 A, and quantum efficiencies of 70 percent (1 W/amp) with demonstrated operating lifetimes of 10,000 h at 50 mW.

  6. AlGaAs phased array laser for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    Phased locked arrays of multiple AlGaAs diode laser emitters were investigated both in edge emitting and surface emitting configurations. CSP edge emitter structures, coupled by either evanescent waves or Y-guides, could not achieve the required powers (greater than or similar to 500 mW) while maintaining a diffraction limited, single lobed output beam. Indeed, although the diffraction limit was achieved in this type of device, it was at low powers and in the double lobed radiation pattern characteristic of out-of-phase coupling. Grating surface emitting (GSE) arrays were, therefore, investigated with more promising results. The incorporation of second order gratings in distribute Bragg reflector (DBR) structures allows surface emission, and can be configured to allow injection locking and lateral coupling to populate 2-D arrays that should be able to reach power levels commensurate with the needs of high performance, free space optical communications levels. Also, a new amplitude modulation scheme was developed for GSE array operation.

  7. Alternative group V sources for growth of GaAs and AlGaAs by MOMBE (CBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathy, C. R.; Wisk, P. W.; Pearton, S. J.; Ren, F.; Bohling, D. A.; Muhr, G. T.

    1992-11-01

    We have investigated the use of phenylarsine (PhAsH 2) and trisdimethylaminoarsenic (DMAAs) as potential replacements for AsH 3 during growth by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE), alternatively known as chemical beam epitaxy (CBE). PhAsH 2 was found to decompose rather inefficiently on the surface at a growth temperature of 525°C. However, GaAs and AlGaAs growth rates up to ˜ 95 Å/min could still be obtained at this temperature without incurring any degradation in morphology. The hydrogen generated by the decomposition of the PhAsH 2 did not appear to getter carbon from the surface as both GaAs and AlGaAs grown from PhAsH 2 contained ten times more carbon than layers grown under the same flux of AsH 3. By contrast, DMAAs was found to decompose readily on the wafer surface allowing growth rates up to 220 Å/min and growth temperatures as low as 375°C. Furthermore, DMAAs was found to getter carbon more efficiently than cracked AsH 3, probably as a result of tertiary amine formation at the wafer surface. As a result, comparable carbon backgrounds were obtained at 525°C from either TEG or TMG. By using these sources in tandem, it appears that AsH 3 may no longer be required for growth of GaAs or AlGaAs by MOMBE. In addition, these sources allow new flexibility for selective growth as well. The stability of PhAsH 2 allows for selective deposition of pAlGaAs even at temperatures as low as 525°C. While the same effect is not observed for GaAs growth from TEG at these temperatures, it is possible through the use of DMAAs to deposit high purity GaAs selectivity from TMG since the DMAAs getters the carbon without inducing deposition on the mask. Thus the use of PhAsH 2 and DMAAs will allow selective deposition of device structures such as Pnp HBTs at their optimum growth temperature of ˜ 525°C.

  8. Impact of an AlAs window layer upon the optical properties of Al x Ga1‑x As photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, T.; Chen, X. J.; Johnson, E. B.; Christian, J. F.; Lee, K.; Hammig, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed advanced scintillators, which have the ability to distinguish gamma-ray interaction events from those that accompany neutron impact, require improved quantum efficiency in the blue to near UV region of the spectrum. We utilize GaAs/Al0.8Ga0.2As photodiode elements as components in a wide band-gap solid-state photomultiplier as a lower-cost, lower logistical burden, and higher quantum efficiency replacement for the photomultiplier tube. An AlAs window layer is employed as a means to increase the diode’s optical performance. Relative to structures absent the window layer, simulations and measurements demonstrate that the AlAs layer produces a spatial coincidence between regions of large drift fields with regions of high photon absorption. In addition to the AlAs layer, secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements show that an unexpected high degree of inter-diffusion of GaAs and AlAs quenches the photon-detection efficiency, a decrease that can be avoided by its post-growth removal. With the AlAs layer, the peak external quantum efficiency of 49% is achieved at 450 nm with 10 V reverse bias, which does not fully deplete the device. Simulations show that full depletion can result in efficiencies exceeding 90%. In order to enhance the optical response, a simple anti-reflective coating layer is designed using the existing passivation layer components that successfully minimizes the reflection at the wavelength range of interest (300 nm–500 nm).

  9. Inside storm window

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.I.

    1980-11-01

    The work effort to design, build, install, and evaluate an inside storm window is presented. The ISW, made of two separated layers of mylar (like a thermopane window) which when not in use can be rolled up in a shade, is described. The work effort included: development of a prototype model; the development of production facilities to turn out a small number (50) of ISW's; the production of the windows; the installation of the windows into buildings; the building of a test chamber to determine the R value of the ISW and the subsequent determination of the R value; and a survey to determine how the residents of the homes in which ISW's were installed felt about the windows. Comments on each of these tasks are presented and some comments on initial steps towards commercialization are offered. (MCW)

  10. Impact of the deposition conditions of buffer and windows layers on lowering the metastability effects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Zn(S,O)-based solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghavi, Negar; Hildebrandt, Thibaud; Bouttemy, Muriel; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Lincot, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The highest and most reproducible (Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) based solar-cell efficiencies are obtained by use of a very thin n-type CdS layer deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD). However because of both Cadmium's adverse environmental impact and the narrow bandgap of CdS (2.4-2.5 eV) one of the major objectives in the field of CIGSe technology remains the development and implementation in the production line of Cd-free buffer layers. The CBDZn( S,O) remains one the most studied buffer layer for replacing the CdS in Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based solar cells and has already demonstrated its potential to lead to high-efficiency solar cells up to 22.3%. However one of the key issue to implement a CBD-Zn(S,O) process in a CIGSe production line is the cells stability, which depends both on the deposition conditions of CBD-Zn(S,O) and on a good band alignment between CIGSe/Zn(S,O)/windows layers. The most common window layers applied in CIGSe solar cells consist of two layers : a thin (50-100 nm) and highly resistive i-ZnO layer deposited by magnetron sputtering and a transparent conducting 300-500 nm ZnO:Al layer. In the case of CBD-Zn(S,O) buffer layer, the nature and deposition conditions of both Zn(S,O) and the undoped window layer can strongly influence the performance and stability of cells. The present contribution will be specially focused on the effect of condition growth of CBD-Zn(S,O) buffer layers and the impact of the composition and deposition conditions of the undoped window layers such as ZnxMgyO or ZnxSnyO on the stability and performance of these solar cells.

  11. Electrodeposition of Mg doped ZnO thin film for the window layer of CIGS solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mang; Yi, Jie; Yang, Sui; Cao, Zhou; Huang, Xiaopan; Li, Yuanhong; Li, Hongxing; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-09-01

    Mg doped ZnO (ZMO) film with the tunable bandgap can adjust the conduction band offset of the window/chalcopyrite absorber heterointerface to positive to reduce the interface recombination and resulting in an increasement of chalcopyrite based solar cell efficiency. A systematic study of the effect of the electrodeposition potential on morphology, crystalline structure, crystallographic orientation and optical properties of ZMO films was investigated. It is interestingly found that the prepared doped samples undergo a significant morphological change induced by the deposition potential. With negative shift of deposition potential, an obvious morphology evolution from nanorod structrue to particle covered films was observed. A possible growth mechanism for explaining the morphological change is proposed and briefly discussed. The combined optical techniques including absorption, transmission and photoluminescence were used to study the obtained ZMO films deposited at different potential. The sample deposited at -0.9 V with the hexagonal nanorods morphology shows the highest optical transparency of 92%. The photoluminescence spectra reveal that the crystallization of the hexagonal nanorod ZMO thin film deoposited at -0.9 V is much better than the particles covered ZMO thin film. Combining the structural and optical properties analysis, the obtained normal hexagonal nanorod ZMO thin film could potentially be useful in nanostructured chalcopyrite solar cells to improve the device performance.

  12. Effect of heat treatments and window layer processing on the characteristics of CuInGaSe{sub 2} thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, K.; Contreras, M.A.; Tuttle, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    Interaction between chemical bath deposited CdS and ZnO window layers are a focus of this paper. Low temperature anneals were used to follow the changes at the interface. Optical absorption spectra show that CdS and ZnO intermix upon annealing. When applied to ZnO/CdS/CuInGaSe{sub 2} thin film solar cells, changes in the short and long wavelength response were observed. The latter is attributed to an increase in the energy gap of the absorber by diffusion of S. The interdiffusion is shown to increase the short wavelength collection, and hence the current density of the devices. Photoluminescence data provides some indication of the quality of the interface.

  13. Properties of R.F. sputtered CdS window layers and the performance of CdS/InP solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutts, T. J.; Don, E. R.; Pearsall, N. M.; Naseem, S.; Cooper, R. R.; Himrane, F.

    Measurements of the electrical, optical, and structural properties of thin films of CdS used as window layers in conjunction with single-crystal InP and glass substrates are reported. RF-sputter deposition generally leads to films with a resistivity greater than 100,000 ohm cm. By cosputtering In, the resistivity can be reduced to about 100 ohm cm for a substrate temperature of 260 C. This is also the optimum temperature for optical and structural properties. Grain sizes in excess of 1 micron can be achieved. Efficiencies of about 7 percent have been achieved for solar cells using RF-sputter-deposited films of CdS on InP, and several obvious improvements are suggested. Damage to the extremely sensitive substrates does not appear to be the principal limitation, and the production of device-quality CdS by sputtering has been demonstrated.

  14. Highly conducting and wide band gap phosphorous doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC films as n-type window layers for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-05-01

    Nano-crystalline silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) embedded in the phosphorous doped amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) matrix has been successfully prepared at a low temperature (300 °C) by inductively coupled plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) system from (SiH4 + CH4)-plasma with PH3 as the doping gas. The effect of PH3 flow rate on structural, optical and electrical properties of the films has been studied. Phosphorous doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC films with high optical band gap (>1.9 eV) and superior conductivity (~10-2 S cm-1) are obtained, which could be appropriately used as n-type window layers for nc-Si solar cells in n-i-p configuration.

  15. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  16. The Effect of CeO2 Antireflection Layer on the Optical Properties of Thermochromic VO2 Film for Smart Window System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyun; Shin, Dongmin; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Ko, Kyeong-Eun; Chang, Se-Hong; Park, Chan

    2013-11-01

    CeO2-VO2 bilayer structure was fabricated to investigate the effect of depositing CeO2 film on the optical properties of VO2 film for smart window application. CeO2 was employed as an antireflection (AR) layer material of VO2 film because of its advantages which include high transparency in the visible-near infrared range and high refractive index. All the films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrate by pulsed laser deposition method. Optical calculations were carried out using transfer-matrix method for the purpose of designing CeO2-VO2 bilayer structure with enhanced integrated luminous transmittance (T lum) and switching efficiency (ΔT sol). The optical constants of VO2 and CeO2 films needed for the optical calculation were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometer. The curve of T lum the shape of which depends on the thickness of CeO2 layer, was calculated in each VO2 sample, which showed two maxima. The samples were divided into two groups; one for the highest enhancement of T lum and the other for balanced enhancement between T lum and ΔT sol. The sample with the structure of ~60 nm CeO2 AR layer on 39-nm thick VO2 film showed large increase of T lum (~27%) with ΔT sol of ~5%, which is the largest increase in T lum reported so far. Two samples in the other group showed the balanced enhancement in T lum (~57, ~50%) and ΔT sol (~9, ~10.5%). The effect of CeO2 AR layer on the optical properties of VO2 film was confirmed with the optical calculation and the experimental results. CeO2-VO2 bilayer structure showed notable improvement of optical properties compared to the single VO2 film, indicating that CeO2 layer can be effectively used as the antireflection layer while working as a protective layer that can prevent the oxidation of VO2 layer as well.

  17. High-Performance Electron Injection Layers with a Wide Processing Window from an Amidoamine-Functionalized Polyfluorene.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Sebastian; Petzoldt, Martin; Dück, Sebastian; Sendner, Michael; Bunz, Uwe H F; Lemmer, Uli; Hamburger, Manuel; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo

    2016-05-25

    In this work, we present organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) utilizing a novel amidoamine-functionalized polyfluorene (PFCON-C) as an electron injection layer (EIL). PFCON-C consists of a polyfluorene backbone to which multiple tertiary amine side chains are connected via an amide group. The influence of molecular characteristics on electronic performance and morphological properties was tested and compared to that of the widely used, literature known amino-functionalized polyfluorene (PFN) and polyethylenimine (PEI). PFCON-C reduces the turn-on voltage (VON) of poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV)-based OLEDs from ∼5 to ∼3 V and increases the maximum power efficiency from <2 to >5 lm W(-1) compared to that of PFN. As a result of its semiconducting backbone, PFCON-C is significantly less sensitive to the processing parameters than PEI, and comparable power efficiencies are achieved for devices where thicknesses of PFCON-C are between 15 and 35 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements indicate that the presence of nonpolar side chains in the EIL material is important for its film-forming behavior, while Kelvin probe measurements suggest that the amount of amine groups in the side chains influences the work-function shift induced by the EIL material. These results are used to suggest strategies for the design of polymeric electron injection layers.

  18. Electrodeposition of ZnO window layer for an all-atmospheric fabrication process of chalcogenide solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsin, Fabien; Venerosy, Amélie; Vidal, Julien; Collin, Stéphane; Clatot, Johnny; Lombez, Laurent; Paire, Myriam; Borensztajn, Stephan; Broussillou, Cédric; Grand, Pierre Philippe; Jaime, Salvador; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the low cost electrodeposition of a transparent and conductive chlorine doped ZnO layer with performances comparable to that produced by standard vacuum processes. First, an in-depth study of the defect physics by ab-initio calculation shows that chlorine is one of the best candidates to dope the ZnO. This result is experimentally confirmed by a complete optical analysis of the ZnO layer deposited in a chloride rich solution. We demonstrate that high doping levels (>1020 cm-3) and mobilities (up to 20 cm2 V-1 s-1) can be reached by insertion of chlorine in the lattice. The process developed in this study has been applied on a CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 p-n junction produced in a pilot line by a non vacuum process, to be tested as solar cell front contact deposition method. As a result efficiency of 14.3% has been reached opening the way of atmospheric production of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cell.

  19. Electrodeposition of ZnO window layer for an all-atmospheric fabrication process of chalcogenide solar cell.

    PubMed

    Tsin, Fabien; Venerosy, Amélie; Vidal, Julien; Collin, Stéphane; Clatot, Johnny; Lombez, Laurent; Paire, Myriam; Borensztajn, Stephan; Broussillou, Cédric; Grand, Pierre Philippe; Jaime, Salvador; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2015-03-10

    This paper presents the low cost electrodeposition of a transparent and conductive chlorine doped ZnO layer with performances comparable to that produced by standard vacuum processes. First, an in-depth study of the defect physics by ab-initio calculation shows that chlorine is one of the best candidates to dope the ZnO. This result is experimentally confirmed by a complete optical analysis of the ZnO layer deposited in a chloride rich solution. We demonstrate that high doping levels (>10(20) cm(-3)) and mobilities (up to 20 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) can be reached by insertion of chlorine in the lattice. The process developed in this study has been applied on a CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 p-n junction produced in a pilot line by a non vacuum process, to be tested as solar cell front contact deposition method. As a result efficiency of 14.3% has been reached opening the way of atmospheric production of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cell.

  20. Electrodeposition of ZnO window layer for an all-atmospheric fabrication process of chalcogenide solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Tsin, Fabien; Venerosy, Amélie; Vidal, Julien; Collin, Stéphane; Clatot, Johnny; Lombez, Laurent; Paire, Myriam; Borensztajn, Stephan; Broussillou, Cédric; Grand, Pierre Philippe; Jaime, Salvador; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the low cost electrodeposition of a transparent and conductive chlorine doped ZnO layer with performances comparable to that produced by standard vacuum processes. First, an in-depth study of the defect physics by ab-initio calculation shows that chlorine is one of the best candidates to dope the ZnO. This result is experimentally confirmed by a complete optical analysis of the ZnO layer deposited in a chloride rich solution. We demonstrate that high doping levels (>1020 cm−3) and mobilities (up to 20 cm2 V−1 s−1) can be reached by insertion of chlorine in the lattice. The process developed in this study has been applied on a CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 p-n junction produced in a pilot line by a non vacuum process, to be tested as solar cell front contact deposition method. As a result efficiency of 14.3% has been reached opening the way of atmospheric production of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cell. PMID:25753657

  1. High-Performance Electron Injection Layers with a Wide Processing Window from an Amidoamine-Functionalized Polyfluorene.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Sebastian; Petzoldt, Martin; Dück, Sebastian; Sendner, Michael; Bunz, Uwe H F; Lemmer, Uli; Hamburger, Manuel; Hernandez-Sosa, Gerardo

    2016-05-25

    In this work, we present organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) utilizing a novel amidoamine-functionalized polyfluorene (PFCON-C) as an electron injection layer (EIL). PFCON-C consists of a polyfluorene backbone to which multiple tertiary amine side chains are connected via an amide group. The influence of molecular characteristics on electronic performance and morphological properties was tested and compared to that of the widely used, literature known amino-functionalized polyfluorene (PFN) and polyethylenimine (PEI). PFCON-C reduces the turn-on voltage (VON) of poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV)-based OLEDs from ∼5 to ∼3 V and increases the maximum power efficiency from <2 to >5 lm W(-1) compared to that of PFN. As a result of its semiconducting backbone, PFCON-C is significantly less sensitive to the processing parameters than PEI, and comparable power efficiencies are achieved for devices where thicknesses of PFCON-C are between 15 and 35 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements indicate that the presence of nonpolar side chains in the EIL material is important for its film-forming behavior, while Kelvin probe measurements suggest that the amount of amine groups in the side chains influences the work-function shift induced by the EIL material. These results are used to suggest strategies for the design of polymeric electron injection layers. PMID:27160328

  2. Average power constraints in AlGaAs semiconductor lasers under pulse-position-modulation conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    In some optical communications systems there are advantages to using low duty-cycle pulsed modulation formats such as pulse-position-modulation. However, because of intrinsic limitations of AlGaAs semiconductor lasers, the average power that they can deliver in a pulsed mode of operation is lower than in a CW mode. The magnitude of this problem and its implications are analyzed in this letter, and one possible solution is mentioned.

  3. Enhanced second-harmonic generation driven from magnetic dipole resonance in AlGaAs nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carletti, Luca; Rocco, Davide; Locatelli, Andrea; Gili, Valerio; Leo, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Costantino

    2016-04-01

    We model the linear and nonlinear optical response of disk-shaped AlGaAs nanoantennas. We design nanoantennas with a magnetic dipole resonant mode in the near-infrared wavelength range, and we analyze volume second-harmonic generation driven by a magnetic dipole resonance by predicting a conversion efficiency exceeding 10-3 with 1 GW/cm2 of pump intensity.

  4. Altimetry and lidar using AlGaAs lasers modulated with pseudo-random codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Manizade, Serdar S.

    1992-01-01

    We have demonstrated a prototype laser altimeter and lidar which uses a low power AlGaAs laser modulated with a pseudorandom noise (PN) code, a 20 cm diameter telescope, and a photon counting receiver. Measurements to tree canopies over a 400 m horizontal path show strong signals with 5.3 mW average power and a 6.4 msec averaging time. Computer simulations predict lidar performance for various types of scattering performance.

  5. Thickness Effect of Al-Doped ZnO Window Layer on Damp Heat Stability of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.; DeHart, C.; Glick, S. H.; Yan, F.; Noufi, R.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the damp heat (DH) stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells as a function of thickness of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) window layer from the 'standard' 0.12 μm to a modest 0.50 μm over an underlying 0.10-μm intrinsic ZnO buffer layer. The CIGS cells were prepared with external electrical contact using fine Au wire to the tiny 'standard' Ni/Al (0.05 μm/3 μm) metal grid contact pads. Bare cell coupons and sample sets encapsulated in a specially designed, Al-frame test structure with an opening for moisture ingress control using a TPT backsheet were exposed to DH at 85oC and 85% relative humidity, and characterized by current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). The results show that bare cells exhibited rapid degradation within 50-100 h, accompanied by film wrinkling and delamination and corrosion of Mo and AlNi grid, regardless of AZO thickness. In contrast, the encapsulated cells did not show film wrinkling, delamination, and Mo corrosion after 168 h DH exposure; but the trend of efficiency degradation rate showed a weak correlation to the AZO thickness.

  6. CAVE WINDOW

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, M.

    1960-10-25

    A cave window is described. It is constructed of thick glass panes arranged so that interior panes have smaller windowpane areas and exterior panes have larger areas. Exterior panes on the radiation exposure side are remotely replaceable when darkened excessively. Metal shutters minimize exposure time to extend window life.

  7. Self-assembled Ge QDs Formed by High-Temperature Annealing on Al(Ga)As (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William A.; Qi, Meng; Yan, Lifan; Stephenson, Chad A.; Protasenko, Vladimir; Xing, Huili; Millunchick, Joanna M.; Wistey, Mark A.

    2015-05-01

    This work studies the spontaneous self-assembly of Ge QDs on AlAs, GaAs and AlGaAs by high-temperature in situ annealing using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The morphology of Ge dots formed on AlAs were observed by atom probe tomography, which revealed nearly spherical QDs with diameters approaching 10 nm and confirmed the complete absence of a wetting layer. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy of Ge annealed under similar conditions on GaAs and Al0.3Ga0.7As surfaces revealed the gradual suppression of QD formation with decreasing Al-content of the buffer. To investigate the prospects of using encapsulated Ge dots for upconverting photovoltaics, in which photocurrent can still be generated from photons with energy less than the host bandgap, Ge QDs were embedded into the active region of III-V PIN diodes by MBE. It was observed that orders of magnitude higher short-circuit current is obtained at photon energies below the GaAs bandgap compared with a reference PIN diode without Ge QDs. These results demonstrate the promise of Ge QDs for upconverting solar cells and the realization of device-quality integration of group IV and III-V semiconductors.

  8. AlGaAs ridge laser with 33% wall-plug efficiency at 100 °C based on a design of experiments approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecioru, Alin; Boohan, Niall; Justice, John; Gocalinska, Agnieszka; Pelucchi, Emanuele; Gubbins, Mark A.; Mooney, Marcus B.; Corbett, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Upcoming applications for semiconductor lasers present limited thermal dissipation routes demanding the highest efficiency devices at high operating temperatures. This paper reports on a comprehensive design of experiment optimisation for the epitaxial layer structure of AlGaAs based 840 nm lasers for operation at high temperature (100 °C) using Technology Computer-Aided Design software. The waveguide thickness, Al content, doping level, and quantum well thickness were optimised. The resultant design was grown and the fabricated ridge waveguides were optimised for carrier injection and, at 100 °C, the lasers achieve a total power output of 28 mW at a current of 50 mA, a total slope efficiency 0.82 W A-1 with a corresponding wall-plug efficiency of 33%.

  9. Efficiency enhancement using a Zn1- x Ge x -O thin film as an n-type window layer in Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Nishi, Yuki; Miyata, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Efficiency enhancement was achieved in Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells fabricated with a zinc-germanium-oxide (Zn1- x Ge x -O) thin film as the n-type window layer and a p-type Na-doped Cu2O (Cu2O:Na) sheet prepared by thermally oxidizing Cu sheets. The Ge content (x) dependence of the obtained photovoltaic properties of the heterojunction solar cells is mainly explained by the conduction band discontinuity that results from the electron affinity difference between Zn1- x Ge x -O and Cu2O:Na. The optimal value of x in Zn1- x Ge x -O thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition was observed to be 0.62. An efficiency of 8.1% was obtained in a MgF2/Al-doped ZnO/Zn0.38Ge0.62-O/Cu2O:Na heterojunction solar cell.

  10. Rigid thin windows for vacuum applications

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Glenn Allyn; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Myers, Booth Richard; Chen, Hao-Lin; Wakalopulos, George

    1999-01-01

    A thin window that stands off atmospheric pressure is fabricated using photolithographic and wet chemical etching techniques and comprises at least two layers: an etch stop layer and a protective barrier layer. The window structure also comprises a series of support ribs running the width of the window. The windows are typically made of boron-doped silicon and silicon nitride and are useful in instruments such as electron beam guns and x-ray detectors. In an electron beam gun, the window does not impede the electrons and has demonstrated outstanding gun performance and survivability during the gun tube manufacturing process.

  11. High-power AlGaAs channeled substrate planar diode lasers for spaceborne communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. C.; Goldstein, B.; Pultz, G. N.; Slavin, S. E.; Carlin, D. B.; Ettenberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    A high power channeled substrate planar AlGaAs diode laser with an emission wavelength of 8600 to 8800 A was developed. The optoelectronic behavior (power current, single spatial and spectral behavior, far field characteristics, modulation, and astigmatism properties) and results of computer modeling studies on the performance of the laser are discussed. Lifetest data on these devices at high output power levels is also included. In addition, a new type of channeled substrate planar laser utilizing a Bragg grating to stabilize the longitudinal mode was demonstrated. The fabrication procedures and optoelectronic properties of this new diode laser are described.

  12. Single-hole transistor in p-type GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbić, Boris; Leturcq, Renaud; Ensslin, Klaus; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2005-12-01

    A single-hole transistor is patterned in a p-type, C-doped GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructure by scanning probe oxidation lithography. Clear Coulomb blockade resonances have been observed at Thole=300mK. A charging energy of ˜1.5meV is extracted from Coulomb diamond measurements, in agreement with the lithographic dimensions of the dot. The absence of excited states in Coulomb diamond measurements, as well as the temperature dependence of Coulomb peak heights indicate that the dot is in the multilevel transport regime. Fluctuations in peak spacings larger than the estimated mean single-particle level spacing are observed.

  13. Photon pair sources in AlGaAs: from electrical injection to quantum state engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autebert, C.; Boucher, G.; Boitier, F.; Eckstein, A.; Favero, I.; Leo, G.; Ducci, S.

    2015-11-01

    Integrated quantum photonics is a very active field of quantum information, communication, and processing. One of the main challenges to achieve massively parallel systems for complex operations is the generation, manipulation, and detection of many qubits within the same chip. Here, we present our last achievements on AlGaAs quantum photonic devices emitting nonclassical states of light at room temperature by spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC). The choice of this platform combines the advantages of a mature fabrication technology, a high nonlinear coefficient, a SPDC wavelength in the C-telecom band and the possibility of electrical injection.

  14. Direct Evidence for the DX Center Being a Substitutional Donor in AlGaAs Alloy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Masashi; Tachikawa, Masami; Kukimoto, Hiroshi; Minomura, Shigeru

    1985-02-01

    An experimental result that the DX center appears in GaAs:Si and GaAsd:Sn under hydrostatic pressure of about 30 kbars has been obtained for the first time. This indicates clearly that the DX center in the AlGaAs alloy system is due to a substitutional donor itself (not a complex referred to as “DX”). The change in nature from the the shallow donor to the deep DX center is discussed based on the complex multivalley conduction band structure of GaAs under various pressures and of AlGaAs with various compositions.

  15. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records frommore » IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of

  16. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    SciTech Connect

    Curcija, Dragan Charlie; Zhu, Ling; Czarnecki, Stephen; Mitchell, Robin D.; Kohler, Christian; Vidanovic, Simon V.; Huizenga, Charlie

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records from IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of the

  17. [Aortopulmonary window].

    PubMed

    González-Marín, María Arántzazu; Jiménez-Díaz, Javier; Centeno-Jiménez, Miriam; García-Cabezas, M Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The aortopulmonary window is a rare cause of heart failure in the neonate. It must be ruled out if there are signs of pulmonary edema without the most frequent left-right shunts. We report the echocardiographic images of a newborn who was admitted with symptoms of heart failure at our institution.

  18. Liquid Phase Chemical Enhanced Oxidation on AlGaAs and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuan-Wei; Wang, Yeong-Her; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2004-07-01

    A new method named the liquid phase chemical enhanced oxidation (LPCEO) technique has been proposed for the oxidation of aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) near room temperature. The initial stage of AlGaAs oxidation by this method has been investigated. The native oxide film composition is determined on the basis of the results of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. Based on current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure, the leakage current density is approximately 5× 10-9 A/cm2 at the electric field of 1 MV/cm, and the breakdown field is at least 10 MV/cm after rapid temperature annealing. In addition, the oxide film properties can be improved after thermal annealing based on capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. Finally, the application of the new method to the AlGaAs/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor pseudomorphic high-electronic-mobility transistor (MOS-PHEMT) is demonstrated.

  19. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  20. Off state breakdown behavior of AlGaAs / InGaAs field plate pHEMTs

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, John; Mil'shtein, Samson

    2014-05-15

    Off-state breakdown voltage, V{sub br}, is an important parameter determining the maximum power output of microwave Field Effect Transistors (FETs). In recent years, the use of field plates has been widely adopted to significantly increase V{sub br}. This important technological development has extended FET technologies into new areas requiring these higher voltages and power levels. Keeping with this goal, field plates were added to an existing AlGaAs / InGaAs pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistor (pHEMT) process with the aim of determining the off-state breakdown mechanism and the dependency of V{sub br} on the field plate design. To find the mechanism responsible for breakdown, temperature dependent off-state breakdown measurements were conducted. It was found that at low current levels, the temperature dependence indicates thermionic field emission at the Schottky gate and at higher current levels, impact ionization is indicated. The combined results imply that impact ionization is ultimately the mechanism that is responsible for the breakdown in the tested transistors, but that it is preceded by thermionic field emission from the gate. To test the dependence of V{sub br} upon the field plate design, the field plate length and the etch depth through the highly-doped cap layer under the field plate were varied. Also, non-field plate devices were tested along side field plate transistors. It was found that the length of the etched region under the field plate is the dominant factor in determining the off-state breakdown of the more deeply etched devices. For less deeply etched devices, the length of the field plate is more influential. The influence of surface states between the highly doped cap layer and the passivation layer along the recess are believed to have a significant influence in the case of the more deeply etched examples. It is believed that these traps spread the electric field, thus raising the breakdown voltage. Three terminal breakdown

  1. Two-window InSbBi quantum-dot photodetector.

    PubMed

    Dwara, Sana N; Al-Khursan, Amin H

    2016-07-20

    Quantum efficiency (QE) was modeled for an n-type doping InSb1-xBix quantum-dot (QD) photodetector with a p-type doping AlGaAs bulk region. First, the relations of the electron and hole contributions to the current were stated. The absorption coefficient was calculated for the structure, and two windows were predicted in the quantum efficiency spectrum, which is important in the detection applications. High quantum efficiency was obtained due to the Bi inclusion in the structure of the photodetector.

  2. High power master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) AlGaAs laser for intersatellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration has been developed using an anti-reflection-coated AlGaAs semiconductor broad area laser in a reflective amplifier mode. For CW injection, the MOPA produced 340 mW of diffraction-limited power. The semiconductor MOPA configuration also produced peak diffraction-limited powers of 360 mW and 320 mW for quaternary pulse position Q-PPM modulation rates of 50 Mbps and 325 Mbps, respectively, for a peak injected power of 100 mW. Angular beamsteering during modulation was minimized by collimating the injected beam. The diffraction-limited peak power was limited by the frequency chirp of the master oscillator and also by the coupling losses of the injected beam.

  3. AlGaAs laser diode FM spectrum: Phased array antenna application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, Martin; Tetu, Michel

    Preliminary results are presented on the use of an AlGaAs laser diode to generate microwave signals suitable for application with phased array antennas. The relative intensity noise (RIN) was measured under various operating conditions to give an indication of the frequency response limitation of the laser diode. The frequency response to intensity modulation was also measured directly at microwave frequencies. Finally, the FM spectrum was observed using a heterodyne technique and compared with an empirical model. The spectrum of intensity fluctuations shows a peak near the relaxation oscillation frequency. This is a good indication of the cutoff frequency for direct current modulation of the laser diode. The behavior of the modulated laser diode is well characterized by the simultaneous intensity and frequency modulation taking into account a phase difference between the two.

  4. Use of admittance spectroscopy to probe the DX-centers in AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, S.; Chakravarty, S.; Anand, S.; Arora, B. M.

    1991-02-01

    We have used admittance spectroscopy to characterize the DX centers in Sn doped A1GaAs and Si doped A1GaAs samples. Three peaks in conductance and the corresponding steps in capacitance are observed in the admittance spectra of Sn doped samples. It is shown that these peaks arise from the multiple states of the same physical center rather than to three different types of defects. The deepest state corresponds to the conventional DX state in the Sn doped AlGaAs probed by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The other two states are not normally observed in DLTS experiments due to experimental limitations. In the case of Si doped A1GaAs samples only one peak which is broad or slightly asymmetric is observed and it corresponds to the main DLTS peak of the Si-DX center.

  5. Interfacial atomic composition and Schottky barrier heights at the Al/GaAs(001) interface

    SciTech Connect

    Dandrea, R.G.; Duke, C.B.

    1993-07-01

    The influence of different interfacial chemical compositions on the Schottky barrier heights across the Al/GaAs(001) interface is studied using first-principles local density functional calculations. The barrier heights are calculated for seven different interfacial chemical compositions, including the chemically abrupt As-terminated and Ga-terminated interfaces, and also several other interfaces related by Al{leftrightarrow}Ga place exchange or containing As antisites. We find p-type barrier heights {phi}p that vary by 0.4 eV, demonstrating a significant influence of the interface composition on the resulting barrier heights. The barrier height variation is explained by the different chemical bonding at the interface in the various cases. The metal induced gap states (MIGS) of two structures with different barrier heights are compared in order to demonstrate why such states do not result in barrier heights independent of interfacial chemical composition.

  6. AlGaAs growth by OMCVD using an excimer laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Wilt, David M.; Pouch, John J.; Aron, Paul R.

    1986-01-01

    AlGaAs has been grown on GaAs by laser assisted OMCVD using an excimer laser, wavelength 193 nm, and a Cambridge OMCVD reactor. Films were grown at temperatures of 450 and 500 C with the laser beam parallel to the surface and impinging onto the surface at 15 deg from parallel. The samples were heated by RF coils while the laser beam was perpendicular to the gas flow. Typical gas flow parameters are 12 slm of H2, 15 sccm of Ga(CH3)3, 13 sccm of Al(CH3)3, and a pressure of 250 mbar. The initial energy density of the beam at the surface was 40 mJ/sq cm, the pulse rate was 20 pps, and the growth time was 7 min. The films were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy for the aluminum concentration and by TEM for the surface morphology.

  7. Proof-of-concept experiment for on-line laser induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of impurity layer deposited on optical window and other plasma facing components of Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Maurya, Gulab Singh; Kumar, Rohit; Rai, Awadhesh Kumar; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-12-15

    In the present manuscript, we demonstrate the design of an experimental setup for on-line laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of impurity layers deposited on specimens of interest for fusion technology, namely, plasma-facing components (PFCs) of a tokamak. For investigation of impurities deposited on PFCs, LIBS spectra of a tokamak wall material like a stainless steel sample (SS304) have been recorded through contaminated and cleaned optical windows. To address the problem of identification of dust and gases present inside the tokamak, we have shown the capability of the apparatus to record LIBS spectra of gases. A new approach known as “back collection method” to record LIBS spectra of impurities deposited on the inner surface of optical window is presented.

  8. Proof-of-concept experiment for on-line laser induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of impurity layer deposited on optical window and other plasma facing components of Aditya tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Gulab Singh; Kumar, Rohit; Kumar, Ajai; Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    In the present manuscript, we demonstrate the design of an experimental setup for on-line laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of impurity layers deposited on specimens of interest for fusion technology, namely, plasma-facing components (PFCs) of a tokamak. For investigation of impurities deposited on PFCs, LIBS spectra of a tokamak wall material like a stainless steel sample (SS304) have been recorded through contaminated and cleaned optical windows. To address the problem of identification of dust and gases present inside the tokamak, we have shown the capability of the apparatus to record LIBS spectra of gases. A new approach known as "back collection method" to record LIBS spectra of impurities deposited on the inner surface of optical window is presented.

  9. Proof-of-concept experiment for on-line laser induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of impurity layer deposited on optical window and other plasma facing components of Aditya tokamak.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Gulab Singh; Kumar, Rohit; Kumar, Ajai; Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    In the present manuscript, we demonstrate the design of an experimental setup for on-line laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of impurity layers deposited on specimens of interest for fusion technology, namely, plasma-facing components (PFCs) of a tokamak. For investigation of impurities deposited on PFCs, LIBS spectra of a tokamak wall material like a stainless steel sample (SS304) have been recorded through contaminated and cleaned optical windows. To address the problem of identification of dust and gases present inside the tokamak, we have shown the capability of the apparatus to record LIBS spectra of gases. A new approach known as "back collection method" to record LIBS spectra of impurities deposited on the inner surface of optical window is presented.

  10. Fine Structure in the Electron Emission Process for Two DX-Like Centers in Sn-Doped AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hua-han; Kang, Jun-yong; Huang, Qi-sheng

    1998-01-01

    Fine structure in the electron emission process for DX(Sn) centers in AlGaAs has been studied with high resolution Laplace defect spectroscopy. The influence of the different local configuration of Al and Ga atoms around the centers on the electron thermal emissions was observed. An experimental evidence for the microscopic structure of two DX-like centers in Sn-doped AlGaAs is provided.

  11. The stained glass window of the southern transept of St. Anthony's Basilica (Padova, Italy): study of glasses and grisaille paint layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberta, Silvestri; Gianmario, Molin; Valentina, Pomero

    2011-01-01

    This work reports results from a chemico-physical study of the stained glass window of the southern transept of St. Anthony's Basilica (Padova, Italy), dated to the late 19th century AD. Selected samples of glass with or without grisailles were characterised by means of various X-ray spectrometric techniques, such as wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence, electron microprobe, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, coupled, in some cases, with X-ray powder diffraction. Integration of analytical results revealed many types of glass related to different phases of the "life" of stained glass, and the production technology of grisailles. In addition, the degree of damage undergone throughout the last century due to materials used in the production of windows was studied, to design and optimise a combined conservation and restoration strategy. Lastly, another important aim of the present study was to amplify the database on 19th-century stained glass windows, little documented in the literature.

  12. AlGaAs top solar cell for mechanical attachment in a multi-junction tandem concentrator solar cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Hannon, M. H.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    The AstroPower self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs top solar cell can be stacked upon any well-developed bottom solar cell for improved system performance. This is an approach to improve the performance and scale of space photovoltaic power systems. Mechanically stacked tandem solar cell concentrator systems based on the AlGaAs top concentrator solar cell can provide near term efficiencies of 36 percent (AMO, 100x). Possible tandem stack efficiencies greater than 38 percent (100x, AMO) are feasible with a careful selection of materials. In a three solar cell stack, system efficiencies exceed 41 percent (100x, AMO). These device results demonstrate a practical solution for a state-of-the-art top solar cell for attachment to an existing, well-developed solar cell.

  13. Low-temperature laser assisted CBE-growth of AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothilingam, R.; Farrell, T.; Joyce, T. B.; Goodhew, P. J.

    1998-06-01

    We report preliminary studies of low-temperature (335-400°C) chemical beam epitaxial (CBE) growth of Al xGa 1- xAs on GaAs(0 0 1) using triethylgallium (TEG), trimethylaminealane (TMAA) and thermally precracked Arsine (AsH 3) as precursors. We also report results of Ar + laser assisted chemical beam epitaxial growth over the same temperature range. The growth rate for both assisted and unassisted growth as a function of substrate temperature, laser power and precursor beam pressures was determined using laser reflectometry in which the Ar + laser was also used as the probe. In the nonlaser assisted growth Al incorporation is observed to be significantly higher than would be expected at the normal growth temperature of 500°C. With laser assistance the Al concentration, while higher than that at normal growth temperatures, is less than that without laser assistance and the growth rate is higher. These observations, which extended Abernathy's early results to higher nominal Al concentration, are discussed in terms of the relative enhancement of the decomposition of TEG and the alane during laser assistance. Using literature values of the refractive index of AlGaAs alloys at the growth temperature, laser reflectometry was used to monitor both composition and growth rate over a range of growth temperatures. Reflectometry data were compared with the results of Auger Electron Microscopy (AES) and Dektak stylus profiling.

  14. Quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices for neuromorphic networks and nonlinear control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, K. V.

    2015-01-28

    The application of quasiperiodic AlGaAs superlattices as a nonlinear element of the FitzHugh–Nagumo neuromorphic network is proposed and theoretically investigated on the example of Fibonacci and figurate superlattices. The sequences of symbols for the figurate superlattices were produced by decomposition of the Fibonacci superlattices' symbolic sequences. A length of each segment of the decomposition was equal to the corresponding figurate number. It is shown that a nonlinear network based upon Fibonacci and figurate superlattices provides better parallel filtration of a half-tone picture; then, a network based upon traditional diodes which have cubic voltage-current characteristics. It was found that the figurate superlattice F{sup 0}{sub 11}(1) as a nonlinear network's element provides the filtration error almost twice less than the conventional “cubic” diode. These advantages are explained by a wavelike shape of the decreasing part of the quasiperiodic superlattice's voltage-current characteristic, which leads to multistability of the network's cell. This multistability promises new interesting nonlinear dynamical phenomena. A variety of wavy forms of voltage-current characteristics opens up new interesting possibilities for quasiperiodic superlattices and especially for figurate superlattices in many areas—from nervous system modeling to nonlinear control systems development.

  15. Nanohole formation on AlGaAs surfaces by local droplet etching with gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyn, Ch.; Stemmann, A.; Hansen, W.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled generation of nanoholes on AlGaAs surfaces by local droplet etching (LDE). For the etching process, Ga is deposited on the surface, where liquid droplets are formed in a Volmer-Weber-like growth mode. The etching takes place locally at the interface between droplets and substrate and removes a significant amount of substrate material. The structural properties of the LDE nanoholes are studied with atomic force microscopy as function of etching temperature and Ga coverage. A bimodal depth distribution with flat and deep holes is observed. The formation of flat holes can be almost suppressed by optimized etching parameters. The depth of deep holes was adjusted by the process parameters up to a maximum depth of 15 nm. The density of deep holes is in the range 5×10 -7-1×10 -8 cm -2 and depends only slightly on the etching parameters. However, the density can be significantly increased by repeated etching.

  16. Formation of Transparent SiO2 Protective Layer on Polycarbonate by 157 nm F2 Laser for Lightweight Automobile Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Yoshihiko; Okoshi, Masayuki; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Narumi

    2010-07-01

    A transparent, hard silica glass (SiO2) layer was formed on a conventional protective coat made of silicone ([SiO(CH3)2]n) on a polycarbonate plate by the 157 nm F2 laser-induced photochemical modification of silicone into SiO2. An optimum laser irradiation time of the F2 laser was found to form a crack-free SiO2 layer. The high optical transparency of the samples in the visible light region remained unchanged after the F2 laser irradiation. In the Taber abrasion test, the SiO2 layer markedly reduced the number of scratches, resulting in a low haze value. The haze values of the samples also depend on the thickness of the silicone protective coat underneath the SiO2 protective layer. As a result, the difference of haze value (δHz) was successfully reduced to 3.6%, compared with these of the nonirradiated sample and a bare polycarbonate plate of approximately 11.3 and 41.3%, respectively, which is comparable to the case of a bare silica glass of approximately 1.6%. In addition, the thickness of the SiO2 protective layer was estimated to be approximately 0.44 µm for the 30-s laser irradiation by immersing the samples in 1 wt % hydrogen fluoride aqueous solution and measuring the depth using a surface profilometer.

  17. Formation of Transparent SiO2 Protective Layer on Polycarbonate by 157 nm F2 Laser for Lightweight Automobile Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihiko Nojima,; Masayuki Okoshi,; Hidetoshi Nojiri,; Narumi Inoue,

    2010-07-01

    A transparent, hard silica glass (SiO2) layer was formed on a conventional protective coat made of silicone ([SiO(CH3)2]n) on a polycarbonate plate by the 157 nm F2 laser-induced photochemical modification of silicone into SiO2. An optimum laser irradiation time of the F2 laser was found to form a crack-free SiO2 layer. The high optical transparency of the samples in the visible light region remained unchanged after the F2 laser irradiation. In the Taber abrasion test, the SiO2 layer markedly reduced the number of scratches, resulting in a low haze value. The haze values of the samples also depend on the thickness of the silicone protective coat underneath the SiO2 protective layer. As a result, the difference of haze value (δHz) was successfully reduced to 3.6%, compared with these of the nonirradiated sample and a bare polycarbonate plate of approximately 11.3 and 41.3%, respectively, which is comparable to the case of a bare silica glass of approximately 1.6%. In addition, the thickness of the SiO2 protective layer was estimated to be approximately 0.44 μm for the 30-s laser irradiation by immersing the samples in 1 wt % hydrogen fluoride aqueous solution and measuring the depth using a surface profilometer.

  18. On the improvement of photovoltaic action of ZnO/P3HT:PCBM by controlling roughness of window layer

    SciTech Connect

    Geethu, R. Menon, M. R. Rajesh Kartha, C. Sudha Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2014-04-24

    Polymer solar cells with configuration ITO/ZnO/P3HT:PCBM/Ag were fabricated using cost effective chemical spray pyrolysis and spin coating techniques. When surface of ZnO layer was modified with a second layer so as to increase the roughness, considerable improvement in cell parameters were observed. Optimum conditions for the required roughness were identified and changes in cell parameters with variation in surface roughness were studied. Major enhancements were observed in the open circuit voltage and in the cell efficiency.

  19. Two-Band, Low-Loss Microwave Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, Michael; Franco, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    A window for a high-sensitivity microwave receiving system allows microwave radiation to pass through to a cryogenically cooled microwave feed system in a vacuum chamber, while keeping ambient air out of the chamber and helping to keep the interior of the chamber cold. The microwave feed system comprises a feed horn and a low-noise amplifier, both of which are required to be cooled to a temperature of 15 K during operation. The window is designed to exhibit very little microwave attenuation in two frequency bands: 8 to 9 GHz and 30 to 40 GHz. The window is 15 cm in diameter. It includes three layers (see figure): 1) The outer layer is made of a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) film 0.025 mm thick. This layer serves primarily to reflect and absorb solar ultraviolet radiation to prolong the life of the underlying main window layer, which is made of a polyimide that becomes weakened when exposed to ultraviolet. The poly(tetrafluoroethylene) layer also protects the main window layer against abrasion. Moreover, the inherent hydrophobicity of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) helps to prevent the highly undesirable accumulation of water on the outer surface. 2) The polyimide main window layer is 0.08 mm thick. This layer provides the vacuum seal for the window. 3) A 20-mm-thick layer of ethylene/ propylene copolymer foam underlies the main polyimide window layer. This foam layer acts partly as a thermal insulator: it limits radiational heating of the microwave feed horn and, concomitantly, limits radiational cooling of the window. This layer has high compressive strength and provides some mechanical support for the main window layer, reducing the strength required of the main window layer. The ethylene/propylene copolymer foam layer is attached to an aluminum window ring by means of epoxy. The outer poly(tetrafluoroethylene) film and the main polyimide window layer are sandwiched together and pressed against the window ring by use of a bolted clamp ring. The window has been found to

  20. A three solar cell system based on a self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs top solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negley, Gerald H.; Rhoads, Sandra L.; Terranova, Nancy E.; Mcneely, James B.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a three solar cell stack can lead to practical efficiencies greater than 30 percent (1x,AM0). A theoretical efficiency limitation of 43.7 percent at AM0 and one sun is predicted by this model. Including expected losses, a practical system efficiency of 36.8 percent is anticipated. These calculations are based on a 1.93eV/1.43eV/0.89eV energy band gap combination. AlGaAs/GaAs/GaInAsP materials can be used with a six-terminal wiring configuration. The key issues for multijunction solar cells are the top and middle solar cell performance and the sub-bandgap transparency. AstroPower has developed a technique to fabricate AlGaAs solar cells on rugged, self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs substrates. Top solar cell efficiencies greater than 11 percent AM0 have been achieved. State-of-the-art GaAs or InP devices will be used for the middle solar cell. GaInAsP will be used to fabricate the bottom solar cell. This material is lattice-matched to InP and offers a wide range of bandgaps for optimization of the three solar cell stack. Liquid phase epitaxy is being used to grow the quaternary material. Initial solar cells have shown open-circuit voltages of 462 mV for a bandgap of 0.92eV. Design rules for the multijunction three solar cell stack are discussed. The progress in the development of the self-supporting AlGaAs top solar cell and the GaInAsP bottom solar cell is presented.

  1. Electrical behavior on n-type dopants in AlGaAs alloys: Shallow levels and DX centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Elias

    1990-11-01

    The electrical properties of n-type Al(x)Ga(1-x)As are governed by deep donor states, formerly called DX centers, and created by the isolated donor atoms. At very low Al compositions, such deep donors become resonant with the gamma minimum. For GaAs compositions, the electron thermal emission was studied under hydrostatic pressure. It is suggested that deep donors show a discrete structure of energy levels, revealed in their thermal emission kinetics. An analysis of the capacitance behavior of AlGaAs n-type regions (x greater than 0.2) was performed for Si and Sn donors. Electron capture kinetics was modeled.

  2. Highly conducting and preferred <220> oriented boron doped nc-Si films for window layers in nc-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Praloy; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-05-01

    Growth and optimization of the boron dopednanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) films have been studied by varyingthe gaspressure applied to the hydrogendiluted silane plasma in RF (13.56 MHz) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system, using diborane (B2H6) as the dopant gas. High magnitudeof electrical conductivity (~102 S cm-1) and<220>orientedcrystallographic lattice planes have been obtained with high crystalline volume fraction (~86 %) at an optimum pressure of 2.5 Torr. XRD and Raman studies reveal good crystallinity with preferred orientation, suitable for applications in stacked layer devices, particularly in nc-Si solar cells.

  3. Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. J.; Jeong, T. S.; Youn, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature-dependent photoresponse characteristics of MnAl2S4 layers have been investigated, for the first time, by use of photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy. Three peaks were observed at all temperatures. The electronic origin of these peaks was associated with band-to-band transitions from the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y) to the conduction-band state Γ1( s). On the basis of the relationship between PC-peak energy and temperature, the optical band gap could be well expressed by the expression E g( T) = E g(0) - 2.80 × 10-4 T 2/(287 + T), where E g(0) was estimated to be 3.7920 eV, 3.7955 eV, and 3.8354 eV for the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y), respectively. Results from PC spectroscopy revealed the crystal-field and spin-orbit splitting were 3.5 meV and 39.9 meV. The gradual decrease of PC intensity with decreasing temperature can be explained on the basis of trapping centers associated with native defects in the MnAl2S4 layers. Plots of log J ph, the PC current density, against 1/ T, revealed a dominant trap level in the high-temperature region. By comparing PC and the Hall effect results, we confirmed that this trap level is a shallow donor 18.9 meV below the conduction band.

  4. PREFACE: INERA Workshop: Transition Metal Oxide Thin Films-functional Layers in "Smart windows" and Water Splitting Devices. Parallel session of the 18th International School on Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The Special issue presents the papers for the INERA Workshop entitled "Transition Metal Oxides as Functional Layers in Smart windows and Water Splitting Devices", which was held in Varna, St. Konstantin and Elena, Bulgaria, from the 4th-6th September 2014. The Workshop is organized within the context of the INERA "Research and Innovation Capacity Strengthening of ISSP-BAS in Multifunctional Nanostructures", FP7 Project REGPOT 316309 program, European project of the Institute of Solid State Physics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. There were 42 participants at the workshop, 16 from Sweden, Germany, Romania and Hungary, 11 invited lecturers, and 28 young participants. There were researchers present from prestigious European laboratories which are leaders in the field of transition metal oxide thin film technologies. The event contributed to training young researchers in innovative thin film technologies, as well as thin films characterization techniques. The topics of the Workshop cover the field of technology and investigation of thin oxide films as functional layers in "Smart windows" and "Water splitting" devices. The topics are related to the application of novel technologies for the preparation of transition metal oxide films and the modification of chromogenic properties towards the improvement of electrochromic and termochromic device parameters for possible industrial deployment. The Workshop addressed the following topics: Metal oxide films-functional layers in energy efficient devices; Photocatalysts and chemical sensing; Novel thin film technologies and applications; Methods of thin films characterizations; From the 37 abstracts sent, 21 manuscripts were written and later refereed. We appreciate the comments from all the referees, and we are grateful for their valuable contributions. Guest Editors: Assoc. Prof. Dr.Tatyana Ivanova Prof. DSc Kostadinka Gesheva Prof. DSc Hassan Chamatti Assoc. Prof. Dr. Georgi Popkirov Workshop Organizing Committee Prof

  5. Batteries: Widening voltage windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kang; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-10-01

    The energy output of aqueous batteries is largely limited by the narrow voltage window of their electrolytes. Now, a hydrate melt consisting of lithium salts is shown to expand such voltage windows, leading to a high-energy aqueous battery.

  6. Hall Effect Studies of AlGaAs Grown by Liquid-Phase Epitaxy for Tandem Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Montgomery, Kyle H.; Woodall, Jerry M.

    2014-11-01

    We report results from Hall effect studies on Al x Ga1- x As ( x = 0.23-0.24) with bandgap energies of 1.76 ± 0.01 eV grown by liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE). Room-temperature Hall measurements on unintentionally doped AlGaAs revealed p-type background doping for concentrations in the range 3.7-5.2 × 1016 cm-3. Sn, Te, Ge, and Zn-doped AlGaAs were also characterized to study the relationship between doping concentrations and the atomic fractions of the dopants in the melt. Temperature-dependent Hall measurements were performed to determine the activation energies of the four dopants. Deep donor levels (DX centers) were dominant for Sn-doped Al0.24Ga0.76As, but not for Te-doped Al0.24Ga0.76As. Comparison of the temperature-dependent Hall effect results for unintentionally and intentionally doped Al0.24Ga0.76As indicated that the impurity contributing to the p-type background doping had the same activation energy as Mg. We thus suggest a Te-doped emitter and an undoped or Ge-doped base to maximize the efficiency of Al x Ga1- x As ( x ˜ 0.23) solar cells grown by LPE.

  7. A redox-flow electrochromic window.

    PubMed

    Jennings, James R; Lim, Wei Yang; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Wang, Qing

    2015-02-01

    A low-cost electrochromic (EC) window based on a redox-flow system that does not require expensive transparent conductive oxide (TCO) substrates is introduced and demonstrated for the first time. An aqueous I3–/I– redox electrolyte is used in place of a TCO to oxidize/reduce a molecular layer of an EC triphenylamine derivative that is anchored to a mesoporous TiO2 scaffold on the inner faces of a double-paned window. The redox electrolyte is electrochemically oxidized/reduced in an external two-compartment cell and circulated through the window cavity using an inexpensive peristaltic pump, resulting in coloration or decoloration of the window due to reaction of the redox solution with the triphenylamine derivative. The absorption characteristics, coloration/decoloration times, and cycling stability of the prototype EC window are evaluated, and prospects for further development are discussed. PMID:25584903

  8. Noise Transmission Characteristics of Damped Plexiglas Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Klos, Jacob; Brown, Sherilyn A.

    2002-01-01

    Most general aviation aircraft utilize single layer plexiglas material for the windshield and side windows. Adding noise control treatments to transparent panels is a challenging problem. In this paper, damped plexiglas windows are evaluated for replacement of conventional windows in general aviation aircraft to reduce the structure-borne and airborne noise transmitted into the interior. In contrast to conventional solid windows, the damped plexiglas window panels are fabricated using two or three layers of plexiglas with transparent viscoelastic damping material sandwiched between the layers. Results from acoustic tests conducted in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility are used to compare different designs of the damped plexiglas panels with solid windows of the same nominal thickness. Comparisons of the solid and damped plexiglas panels show reductions in the radiated sound power of up to 8 dB at low frequency resonances and as large as 4.5 dB over a 4000 Hz bandwidth. The weight of the viscoelastic treatment was approximately 1% of the panel mass. Preliminary FEM/BEM modeling shows good agreement with experimental results for radiated sound power.

  9. Efficiency enhancement using a Zn1‑ x Ge x -O thin film as an n-type window layer in Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Nishi, Yuki; Miyata, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Efficiency enhancement was achieved in Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells fabricated with a zinc–germanium-oxide (Zn1‑ x Ge x -O) thin film as the n-type window layer and a p-type Na-doped Cu2O (Cu2O:Na) sheet prepared by thermally oxidizing Cu sheets. The Ge content (x) dependence of the obtained photovoltaic properties of the heterojunction solar cells is mainly explained by the conduction band discontinuity that results from the electron affinity difference between Zn1‑ x Ge x -O and Cu2O:Na. The optimal value of x in Zn1‑ x Ge x -O thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition was observed to be 0.62. An efficiency of 8.1% was obtained in a MgF2/Al-doped ZnO/Zn0.38Ge0.62-O/Cu2O:Na heterojunction solar cell.

  10. A ten-element array of individually addressable channeled-substrate-planar AlGaAs diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, D. B.; Goldstein, B.; Bednarz, J. P.; Harvey, M. G.; Dinkel, N. A.

    1987-01-01

    The fabrication of arrays of channeled-substrate-planar (CSP) AlGaAs diode lasers which emit up to 150 mW CW in a single spatial mode and are applicable to mulitchannel optical recording systems is described. The CSP diode lasers are incorporated in ten-array geometry, and each array is 1.95 nm in width and 100 microns in thickness and is cleaved to have a cavity length of 200 microns and coated to produce 90-percent reflectivity on the back facet and 10-percent reflectivity on the front facet. The array is attached to a thermoelectrically cooled submount. The optical output power versus input current characteristics for the array are evaluated, and the lateral far-field intensity profiles for each of the lasers (at 30 mW CW) and CW spectra of the lasers are analyzed.

  11. Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Nils Petermann

    2010-02-28

    The project goals covered both the residential and commercial windows markets and involved a range of audiences such as window manufacturers, builders, homeowners, design professionals, utilities, and public agencies. Essential goals included: (1) Creation of 'Master Toolkits' of information that integrate diverse tools, rating systems, and incentive programs, customized for key audiences such as window manufacturers, design professionals, and utility programs. (2) Delivery of education and outreach programs to multiple audiences through conference presentations, publication of articles for builders and other industry professionals, and targeted dissemination of efficient window curricula to professionals and students. (3) Design and implementation of mechanisms to encourage and track sales of more efficient products through the existing Window Products Database as an incentive for manufacturers to improve products and participate in programs such as NFRC and ENERGY STAR. (4) Development of utility incentive programs to promote more efficient residential and commercial windows. Partnership with regional and local entities on the development of programs and customized information to move the market toward the highest performing products. An overarching project goal was to ensure that different audiences adopt and use the developed information, design and promotion tools and thus increase the market penetration of energy efficient fenestration products. In particular, a crucial success criterion was to move gas and electric utilities to increase the promotion of energy efficient windows through demand side management programs as an important step toward increasing the market share of energy efficient windows.

  12. Color Wheel Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a painting and drawing lesson which was inspired by the beautiful circular windows found in cathedrals and churches (also known as "rose windows"). This two-week lesson would reinforce both the concept of symmetry and students' understanding of the color wheel. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  13. TRNSYS for windows packages

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.J.; Beckman, W.A.; Klein, S.A.; Mitchell, J.W.

    1996-09-01

    TRNSYS 14.1 was released in 1994. This package represents a significant step forward in usability due to several graphical utility programs for DOS. These programs include TRNSHELL, which encapsulates TRNSYS functions, PRESIM, which allows the graphical creation of a simulation system, and TRNSED, which allows the easy sharing of simulations. The increase in usability leads to a decrease in the time necessary to prepare the simulation. Most TRNSYS users operate on PC computers with the Windows operating system. Therefore, the next logical step in increased usability was to port the current TRNSYS package to the Windows operating system. Several organizations worked on this conversion that has resulted in two distinct Windows packages. One package closely resembles the DOS version and includes TRNSHELL for Windows and PRESIM for Windows. The other package incorporates a general front-end, called IISIBat, that is a general simulation tool front-end. 8 figs.

  14. Multi-functional windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Nagendra; Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    The requirements for modern aircraft are driving the need for conformal windows for future sensor systems. However, limitations on optical systems and the physical properties of optically transparent materials currently limit the geometry of existing windows and window assemblies to faceted assemblies of flat windows held in weight bearing frames. Novel material systems will have to be developed which combine different materials (e.g. ductile metals with transparent ceramics) into structures that combine transparency with structural integrity. Surmet's demonstrated ability to produce novel transparent ceramic/metal structures will allow us to produce such structures in the types of conformal shapes required for future aircraft applications. Furthermore, the ability to incorporate transparencies into such structures also holds out the promise of creating multi-functional windows which provide a broad range of capabilities that might include RF antennas and de-icing in addition to transparency. Recent results in this area will be presented.

  15. Selecting windows for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    New window technologies have increased energy benefits and comfort, and have provided more practical options for consumers. This selection guide will help homeowners, architects, and builders take advantage of the expanding window market. The guide contains three sections: an explanation of energy-related window characteristics, a discussion of window energy performance ratings, and a convenient checklist for window selection.

  16. The influence of Sb doping on the growth and electronic properties of GaAs(100) and AlGaAs(100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, K. D.; Chen, H. C.; Bensaoula, A.; Lim, W.; Trombetta, L.

    1989-01-01

    Isoelectronic doping using antimony has been shown to reduce traps and improve material properties during epitaxial growth of Si doped GaAs(100) and AlGaAs(100). In this study, the effect of the antimony dopant on the optimal growth temperature is examined with the aim of producing high-quality heterostructures at lower temperatues. High-quality films of GaAs and AlGaAs have been grown by molecular-beam epitaxy at the normal growth temperatures of 610 and 700 C, respectively, and 50-100 C below this temperature using varying small amounts of Sb as a dopant. Electrical properties of the films were then examined using Hall mobility measurements and deep-level transient spectroscopy.

  17. Enhanced 1.53 μm photoluminescence from Er-doped AlGaAs wet thermal native oxides by postoxidation implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Hall, D. C.

    2007-10-01

    A significant enhancement in the 300K, cw photoluminescence (PL) from Er-doped Al0.3Ga0.7As native oxide films is achieved by incorporating the Er after (relative to before) wet thermal oxidation of the AlGaAs. Postoxidation Er ion implantation (1015cm-2 and 300keV) prevents the formation of nonradiative ErAs complexes, leading to a relatively long 1.53μm fluorescence lifetime τ =6.1ms (an approximately seven times improvement) with approximately three times enhancement in the PL intensity. The data suggest that Er-doped AlGaAs native oxides formed using postoxidation implantation may be a viable active media for monolithic optoelectronic integration of waveguide amplifiers on GaAs substrates.

  18. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  19. High-R window technology development. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, D.

    1991-01-01

    Of all building envelope elements, windows always have had the highest heat loss rates. However, recent advances in window technologies such as low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low- conductivity gas fillings have begun to change the status of windows in the building energy equation, raising the average R-value (resistance to heat flow) from 2 to 4 h-ft{sup 2}-{degrees}F/Btu. Building on this trend and using a novel combination of low-E coatings, gas-fills, and three glazing layers, the authors developed a design concept for R-6 to R-10 ``super`` windows. Three major window manufacturers produced prototype superwindows based this design for testing and demonstration in three utility-sponsored and -monitored energy-conserving homes in northwestern Montana. This paper discusses the design and tested performance of these three windows and identifies areas requiring further research if these window concepts are to be successfully developed for mass markets.

  20. High-R Window Technology Development : Phase II Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, Dariush

    1991-01-01

    Of all building envelope elements, windows always have had the highest heat loss rates. However, recent advances in window technologies such as low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low- conductivity gas fillings have begun to change the status of windows in the building energy equation, raising the average R-value (resistance to heat flow) from 2 to 4 h-ft{sup 2}-{degrees}F/Btu. Building on this trend and using a novel combination of low-E coatings, gas-fills, and three glazing layers, the authors developed a design concept for R-6 to R-10 super'' windows. Three major window manufacturers produced prototype superwindows based this design for testing and demonstration in three utility-sponsored and -monitored energy-conserving homes in northwestern Montana. This paper discusses the design and tested performance of these three windows and identifies areas requiring further research if these window concepts are to be successfully developed for mass markets.

  1. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  2. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  3. Energy-efficient windows

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This fact sheet describes energy efficient windows for the reduction of home heating and cooling energy consumption. It discusses controlling air leaks by caulking and weatherstripping and by replacing window frames. Reducing heat loss and condensation is discussed by describing the types of glazing materials, the number of glass and air spaces, frame and spacer materials, and the use of movable insulation (shutters, drapes, etc.). A resource list is provided for further information.

  4. High Performance Window Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Hun, Diana E; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2013-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Traco partnered to develop high-performance windows for commercial building that are cost-effective. The main performance requirement for these windows was that they needed to have an R-value of at least 5 ft2 F h/Btu. This project seeks to quantify the potential energy savings from installing these windows in commercial buildings that are at least 20 years old. To this end, we are conducting evaluations at a two-story test facility that is representative of a commercial building from the 1980s, and are gathering measurements on the performance of its windows before and after double-pane, clear-glazed units are upgraded with R5 windows. Additionally, we will use these data to calibrate EnergyPlus models that we will allow us to extrapolate results to other climates. Findings from this project will provide empirical data on the benefits from high-performance windows, which will help promote their adoption in new and existing commercial buildings. This report describes the experimental setup, and includes some of the field and simulation results.

  5. Modeling Windows in Energy Plus with Simple Performance Indices

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, Dariush; Kohler, Christian; Griffith, Brent

    2009-10-12

    The building energy simulation program, Energy Plus (E+), cannot use standard window performance indices (U, SHGC, VT) to model window energy impacts. Rather, E+ uses more accurate methods which require a physical description of the window. E+ needs to be able to accept U and SHGC indices as window descriptors because, often, these are all that is known about a window and because building codes, standards, and voluntary programs are developed using these terms. This paper outlines a procedure, developed for E+, which will allow it to use standard window performance indices to model window energy impacts. In this 'Block' model, a given U, SHGC, VT are mapped to the properties of a fictitious 'layer' in E+. For thermal conductance calculations, the 'Block' functions as a single solid layer. For solar optical calculations, the model begins by defining a solar transmittance (Ts) at normal incidence based on the SHGC. For properties at non-normal incidence angles, the 'Block' takes on the angular properties of multiple glazing layers; the number and type of layers defined by the U and SHGC. While this procedure is specific to E+, parts of it may have applicability to other window/building simulation programs.

  6. Damped Windows for Aircraft Interior Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Klos, Jacob; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2004-01-01

    Windows are a significant path for structure-borne and air-borne noise transmission into aircraft. To improve the acoustical performance, damped windows were fabricated using two or three layers of plexiglas with transparent viscoelastic damping material sandwiched between the layers. In this paper, numerical and experimental results are used to evaluate the acoustic benefits of damped windows. Tests were performed in the Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to measure the transmission loss for diffuse acoustic excitation and radiated sound power for point force excitation. Comparisons between uniform and damped plexiglas windows showed increased transmission loss of 6 dB at the first natural frequency, 6 dB at coincidence, and 4.5 dB over a 50 to 4k Hz range. Radiated sound power was reduced up to 7 dB at the lower natural frequencies and 3.7 dB over a 1000 Hz bandwidth. Numerical models are presented for the prediction of radiated sound power for point force excitation and transmission loss for diffuse acoustic excitation. Radiated sound power and transmission loss predictions are in good agreement with experimental data. A parametric study is presented that evaluates the optimum configuration of the damped plexiglas windows for reducing the radiated sound power.

  7. Highly transparent light-harvesting window film.

    PubMed

    Cocilovo, Byron; Hashimura, Aki; Tweet, Douglas J; Voutsas, Tolis; Norwood, Robert A

    2015-10-20

    We have simulated unique textured window films that capture solar radiation without compromising the window's transparency by scattering infrared light toward photovoltaic strips located at the edges of the window. These films are ideal for powering electrochromic glass, which is difficult to install as each window requires its own power source. Our most promising design consists of an embedded array of 35° cones coated with a five-layer SiO2-Ag stack that was simulated to direct 1.4% of the incident light toward the edges and generate 1 W of power under a collimated 1000  W/m2 AM1.5G source at 60° and an average of 0.5 W over a full year when applied to a 1  m×1  m window. The internal visible transmittance of the window with the applied film is 95% at normal incidence, and remains above 85% for viewing angles up to 60°. The haze is 0.6% at normal incidence and 3.9% at 60°. PMID:26560389

  8. Window for radiation detectors and the like

    DOEpatents

    Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ogle, J.C.

    1975-10-28

    An improved x- and gamma-radiation and particle transparent window for the environment-controlling enclosure of various types of radiation and particle detectors is provided by a special graphite foil of a thickness of from about 0.1 to 1 mil. The graphite must have very parallel hexagonal planes with a mosaic spread no greater than 5$sup 0$ to have the necessary strength in thin sections to support one atmosphere or more of pressure. Such graphite is formed by hot- pressing and annealing pyrolytically deposited graphite and thereafter stripping off layers of sufficient thickness to form the window.

  9. Modulation characteristics of AlGaAs DH lasers in frequency region of 6 to 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Yamada, H.

    1981-10-01

    The modulation characteristics in the frequency region of 0.5 to 2.4 GHz and 5.9 to 10 GHz were measured for both TJS (Kumabe et al., 1978) and BH (Nagano et al., 1978) AlGaAs DH lasers. Modulation of the light output was examined on an optical frequency region with a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Incident microwave power was less than 32 mW at 10 GHz. Results indicate that the modulation mechanism is caused by driving of the injected-carrier-density, even at such high frequency. Theoretical calculations by the rate equation give less than 14 dB as the increase of the incident microwave power (P/i/) varies from 1 to 10 GHz to obtain a main intensity to sideband intensity ratio of 1/6; experimental data for an increase of P(i) were about 50 dB. The microwave power will be reduced if impedance is matched to the microwave and the sideband signal is optically tuned in the laser cavity

  10. AlGaAs top solar cell for mechanical attachment in a multi-junction tandem concentrator solar cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Hannon, M. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Mcneeley, J. B.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1990-01-01

    Free-standing, transparent, tunable bandgap AlxGa1-xAs top solar cells have been fabricated for mechanical attachment in a four terminal tandem stack solar cell. Evaluation of the device results has demonstrated 1.80 eV top solar cells with efficiencies of 18 percent (100 X, and AM0) which would yield stack efficiencies of 31 percent (100 X, AM0) with a silicon bottom cell. When fully developed, the AlxGa1-xAs/Si mechanically-stacked two-junction solar cell concentrator system can provide efficiencies of 36 percent (AM0, 100 X). AlxGa1-xAs top solar cells with bandgaps from 1.66 eV to 2.08 eV have been fabricated. Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) growth techniques have been used and LPE has been found to yield superior AlxGa1-xAs material when compared to molecular beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It is projected that stack assembly technology will be readily applicable to any mechanically stacked multijunction (MSMJ) system. Development of a wide bandgap top solar cell is the only feasible method for obtaining stack efficiencies greater than 40 percent at AM0. System efficiencies of greater than 40 percent can be realized when the AlGaAs top solar cell is used in a three solar cell mechanical stack.

  11. High performance sapphire windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.; Liou, Larry

    1993-01-01

    High-quality, wide-aperture optical access is usually required for the advanced laser diagnostics that can now make a wide variety of non-intrusive measurements of combustion processes. Specially processed and mounted sapphire windows are proposed to provide this optical access to extreme environment. Through surface treatments and proper thermal stress design, single crystal sapphire can be a mechanically equivalent replacement for high strength steel. A prototype sapphire window and mounting system have been developed in a successful NASA SBIR Phase 1 project. A large and reliable increase in sapphire design strength (as much as 10x) has been achieved, and the initial specifications necessary for these gains have been defined. Failure testing of small windows has conclusively demonstrated the increased sapphire strength, indicating that a nearly flawless surface polish is the primary cause of strengthening, while an unusual mounting arrangement also significantly contributes to a larger effective strength. Phase 2 work will complete specification and demonstration of these windows, and will fabricate a set for use at NASA. The enhanced capabilities of these high performance sapphire windows will lead to many diagnostic capabilities not previously possible, as well as new applications for sapphire.

  12. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of

  13. Single level microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-09

    A package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The integral window is bonded directly to the package without having a separate layer of adhesive material disposed in-between the window and the package. The device can be a semiconductor chip, CCD chip, CMOS chip, VCSEL chip, laser diode, MEMS device, or IMEMS device. The package can be formed of a multilayered LTCC or HTCC cofired ceramic material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined to the package during cofiring. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip interconnected so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A glob-top encapsulant or protective cover can be used to protect the microelectronic device and electrical interconnections. The result is a compact, low profile package having an integral window that is hermetically sealed to the package prior to mounting and interconnecting the microelectronic device.

  14. Bi-level microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2004-01-06

    A package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The integral window is bonded directly to the package without having a separate layer of adhesive material disposed in-between the window and the package. The device can be a semiconductor chip, CCD chip, CMOS chip, VCSEL chip, laser diode, MEMS device, or IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a LTCC or HTCC cofired ceramic material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined to the package during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. The package has at least two levels of circuits for making electrical interconnections to a pair of microelectronic devices. The result is a compact, low-profile package having an integral window that is hermetically sealed to the package prior to mounting and interconnecting the microelectronic device(s).

  15. Sliding window construction

    SciTech Connect

    Klompenburg, M.V.

    1987-07-28

    A window assembly is described in a window frame. The frame includes a head, a sill, and opposite jambs, the assembly comprising: first and second sashes each having interior and exterior surfaces, a top, a bottom, and opposite first and second sides extending between the top and the bottom: the first sash being laterally movably within the window frame between a closed position and an open position wherein the first sash is substantially in a non-planar position relative to the second sash; track means extending along one of the sill or head of the window frame; first track follower means connected to one of the top or the bottom of the first sash adjacent the first side and cooperating with the track means for supporting and guiding the first sash during lateral movement between the open and closed positions; and the track means having an opening for releasing the track follower means for cooperation only when the first sash is in the open position such that the first sash is pivotal about a vertical axis adjacent the second side between the open position and a maintenance position.

  16. Migration to Windows NT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doles, Daniel T.

    In the constantly changing world of technology, migration is not only inevitable but many times necessary for survival, especially when the end result is simplicity for both users and IT support staff. This paper describes the migration at Franklin College (Indiana). It discusses the reasons for selecting Windows NT, the steps taken to complete…

  17. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  18. Exploring Shop Window Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopoulou, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Using visual resources from everyday life in art lessons can enrich students' knowledge about the creation of visual images, artifacts, and sites, and develop their critical understanding about the cultural impact of these images and their effects on people's lives. Through examining an exhibition in the windows of Selfridges department store in…

  19. Candles in Our Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    "Candles in Our Windows"--also titled "Nightlights"--is a play developed for elementary and middle school students about how residents in Billings, Montana, took a stand against hate. Last March, the 6th-grade students of Woodland Elementary School in New Jersey performed an early version of the play based on a children's book, "The Christmas…

  20. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third is a more…

  1. Opening the Literature Window

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jago, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Great literature gives students a window to other places and times, but it often requires students to step outside their comfort zones and take on challenges they wouldn't usually attempt. Unfortunately, research shows that many schools are not assigning literature that pushes students beyond their current reading level. Jago encourages teachers…

  2. Windows and lighting program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity -- factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout the indoor environment, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Windows and lighting are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program. Despite important achievements in reducing building energy consumption over the past decade, significant additional savings are still possible. These will come from two complementary strategies: (1) improve building designs so that they effectively apply existing technologies and extend the market penetration of these technologies; and (2) develop advanced technologies that increase the savings potential of each application. Both the Windows and Daylighting Group and the Lighting System Research Group have made substantial contributions in each of these areas, and continue to do so through the ongoing research summarized here. 23 refs., 16 figs.

  3. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  4. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  5. Labyrinthine window rupture.

    PubMed

    Fraser, J G; Harborow, P C

    1975-01-01

    Some cases of sensorineural deafness are due to labyrinthine window rupture. Three cases have been presented to illustrate different aspects of diagnosis and managment of this condition. The indications for surgical intervention have been discussed. The importance of making the diagnosis is that operation can relieve vertigo and restore the hearing.

  6. Windows to Art Excitement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley; Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that aimed to bring more attention to an art program. Explains that the students created themed murals on the windows of the art classroom, such as a "Jungle,""Ocean,""Masterpiece Paintings," and "Rainforest Tree Frogs." Discusses how the murals were created. (CMK)

  7. VIEW OF THREE NORTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THREE NORTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ARE LOCATED JUST BELOW THE CHOIR LOFT. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Chapel, Corner of Oakley & Nimitz Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. VIEW OF THREE NORTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THREE NORTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ARE LOCATED ADJACENT TO THE ALTAR. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Chapel, Corner of Oakley & Nimitz Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. VIEW OF THREE SOUTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THREE SOUTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ARE LOCATED ADJACENT TO THE ALTER. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Chapel, Corner of Oakley & Nimitz Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Solid state electrochromic smart windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-03-01

    The structure under development at EIC Laboratories consists of a multilayer stack of thin films, incorporating the two principal electrochemically active elements, the electrochromic (EC) and counter electrode (CE) layers, respectively. The EC layer changes from colorless to a state of reduced transmission on reduction while the CE layer has the opposite (complementary) behavior (or is colorless in both oxidized and reduced states). These are separated by an ion conducting electrolyte. The stack is completed with top and bottom transparent electrodes. The major achievements are as follows: (1) Tunable thermal emittance for the EC layer over a range of 0.2 to 0.8 was demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of surfaces with adjustable heat transfer properties. (2) Thin film ion conductors based on the Li2O/B2O3 and LiNbO3 were developed using thermal and electron beam evaporation with ionic conductivities greater than 10(exp -8) S/cm, fulfilling a major requirement for this component. (3) A variety of improved vanadium oxide-based counter electrode materials were demonstrated and patented which undergo reversible electrochemical Li insertion reactions and which increase their solar transmission on reduction. (4) Devices incorporating a laminated Li+ conducting polymer electrolyte were demonstrated with bleached state visible transmittance of greater than 65 percent and colored state transmittance of less than 15 percent. These devices were tested for greater than 10(exp 4) complete cycles. (5) An all thin film solid state device was demonstrated with a visible transmission range of 65/13 percent, using the component materials developed on this program. The device was tested for greater than 3000 complete cycles without degradation. A fabrication sequence was specified which forms the basis of initial production cost estimates. (6) Window modeling studies have been used to compare the relative performance of amorphous and crystalline WO3-based electrochromic

  11. Modeling and Validation of Damped Plexiglas Windows for Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Klos, Jacob; Mazur, Marina

    2003-01-01

    Windows are a significant path for structure-borne and air-borne noise transmission in general aviation aircraft. In this paper, numerical and experimental results are used to evaluate damped plexiglas windows for the reduction of structure-borne and air-borne noise transmitted into the interior of an aircraft. In contrast to conventional homogeneous windows, the damped plexiglas windows were fabricated using two or three layers of plexiglas with transparent viscoelastic damping material sandwiched between the layers. Transmission loss and radiated sound power measurements were used to compare different layups of the damped plexiglas windows with uniform windows of the same nominal thickness. This vibro-acoustic test data was also used for the verification and validation of finite element and boundary element models of the damped plexiglas windows. Numerical models are presented for the prediction of radiated sound power for a point force excitation and transmission loss for diffuse acoustic excitation. Radiated sound power and transmission loss predictions are in good agreement with experimental data. Once validated, the numerical models were used to perform a parametric study to determine the optimum configuration of the damped plexiglas windows for reducing the radiated sound power for a point force excitation.

  12. Process window metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausschnitt, Christopher P.; Chu, William; Hadel, Linda M.; Ho, Hok; Talvi, Peter

    2000-06-01

    This paper is the third of a series that defines a new approach to in-line lithography control. The first paper described the use of optically measurable line-shortening targets to enhance signal-to-noise and reduce measurement time. The second described the dual-tone optical critical dimension (OCD) measurement and analysis necessary to distinguish dose and defocus. Here we describe the marriage of dual-tone OCD to SEM-CD metrology that comprises what we call 'process window metrology' (PWM), the means to locate each measured site in dose and focus space relative to the allowed process window. PWM provides in-line process tracking and control essential to the successful implementation of low-k lithography.

  13. Latchup window tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarewicz, J.; Hardwick, W.

    1983-02-01

    This report addresses the very important issue of latchup windows in integrated circuits. This is a serious problem and requires careful consideration in each individual case of system design. Latchup may cause system failure through burnout of the device or through an upset of the circuit in which latchup occurs. The existence of a latchup window was first reported by researchers performing latchup testing of MOS integrated circuits (Refs. 1,2). It was found that latchup would occur in some devices for only a small range of dose rates. At dose rates below a critical value, the device would not experience latchup. A second higher dose rate range was found where latchup would again not occur. These tests were performed using high-energy electrons (Linac) and were performed on CMOS, CD4000 series devices.

  14. Chemical changes accompanying facet degradation of AlGaAs quantum well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, F. A.; Neiman, D. L.; Tang, W. C.; Rosen, H. J.

    1992-11-01

    Detailed measurements are reported using high-resolution scanning Auger microscopy of the chemical state of uncoated quantum well (QW) laser facets after brief and intermediate operating times. Analyses or uncoated facets which have suffered catastrophic optical damage (COD) under various operating conditions are described. The data show clearly that initial facet compositions are variable and far from ideal. After operation for as little as 2-10 min, the composition of the facet regions of the active/graded index and cladding layer change markedly, but no single type of change can be linked to COD. In particular, facet oxidation is not uniform or extensive, and facets which suffer COD are not necessarily more oxidized than those which have not. Composition changes are not limited to the facet surface, indicating that elemental redistribution during laser operation is very fast. These results suggest that the process of facet degradation plays a complex role in laser degradation.

  15. The DX center and other tin-related defects in AlGaAs semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, S. H.; Greco, L. A.; Williamson, D. L.

    1994-12-01

    Al x Ga1-xAs semiconductors doped with both natural and enriched119Sn have been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) to help to determine the atomic-scale nature of a deleterious, deep-level defect known as the DX center. Spectra have been acquired in the dark at 76 K and under sub-bandgap illumination at 4 or 10 K to distinguish the DX center from the substitutional shallow donor defect. Although electrical differences are clearly detected in these two states, no difference in the Mössbauer spectra are observed. Unexpected high Sn contents, determined by quantitative MS, demonstrate a large non-electrically active Sn fraction in some samples and this may be obscuring the observation of the DX center by both X-ray absorption spectroscopy and MS. Grinding the single-crystal layers into fine powders leads to an Sn defect that is attributed to a surface-oxidized site.

  16. A highly selective, chlorofluorocarbon-free GaAs on AlGaAs etch

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.E. . Solid State Technology Center)

    1993-07-01

    A highly selective reactive ion etching process using SiCl[sub 4], CF[sub 4], O[sub 2], and He is reported. The selectivity of the etch, which is adjustable, ranges from 308:1 to 428:1 for GaAs to Al[sub 0.11]Ga[sub 0.89]As. This variability in selectivity is achieved by adjusting the helium flow rate. One very attractive feature of this etch is that it uses no chlorofluorocarbons and therefore complies with future bans on these substances imposed at both federal and corporate levels. The etch is demonstrated on a GaAs field effect transistor structure with an underlying Al[sub 0.11]Ga[sub 0.89]As stop-etch layer. The etch can be used for both anisotropic and isotropic applications.

  17. A Window-Washing Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Skyscrapers sure do have a lot of windows, and these windows are cleaned and checked regularly. All this takes time, money, and puts workers at potential risk. Might there be a better way to do it? In this article, the author discusses a window-washing challenge and describes how students can tackle this task, pick up the challenge, and creatively…

  18. Windows: The Benefits Are Clear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the importance of specifying windows in a school renovation or building project in order to energize a campus. Explains how windows are psychologically uplifting, how glass accentuates excitement and its shapes signal stability, and how windows convey the institution's confidence in the present. (GR)

  19. Doping and dopant behavior in (Al,Ga)As grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuech, T. F.; Tischler, M. A.; Potemski, R.; Cardone, F.; Scilla, G.

    1989-11-01

    The controlled doping of n- and p-type Al xGa 1-xAs has been studied for the dopant elements, C, Zn, Si, and Sn. Both the incorporation characteristics and the electrical properties of these dopants are reviewed and discussed fo Al xGa 1-xAs grown by th metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) technique. The incorporation of Si from SiH 4 and Si 2H 6 is dominated by heterogeneous and homogenous reactions respectively and represents the best understood of the doping systems. Zinc and carbon both possess complex dependencies on the MOVPE growth system parameters. The electrical behavior of n-Al xGa 1- xAs is dominated by the presence of the DX center. The relationship between this center and the electrical behavior of the material must be understood in order to properly characterize the doping behavior in Al xGa 1-xAs layers and structures.

  20. Efficient Adjustable Reflectivity Smart Window

    SciTech Connect

    D. Morgan Tench

    2005-12-01

    This project addressed the key technical issues for development of an efficient smart window based on reversible electrochemical transfer of silver between a mirror electrode and a localized counter electrode. Effort to provide uniform switching over large areas focused on use of a resistive transparent electrode innerlayer to increase the interelectrode resistance. An effective edge seal was developed in collaboration with adhesive suppliers and an electrochromic device manufacturer. Work to provide a manufacturable counter electrode focused on fabricating a dot matrix electrode without photolithography by electrodeposition of Pt nuclei on inherent active sites on a transparent oxide conductor. An alternative counter electrode based on a conducting polymer and an ionic liquid electrolyte was also investigated. Work in all of these areas was successful. Sputtered large-bandgap oxide innerlayers sandwiched between conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) layers were shown to provide sufficient cross-layer resistance (>300 ohm/cm{sup 2}) without significantly affecting the electrochemical properties of the ITO overlayer. Two edge seal epoxies, one procured from an epoxy manufacturer and one provided by an electrochromic device manufacturer in finished seals, were shown to be effective barriers against oxygen intrusion up to 80 C. The optimum density of nuclei for the dot matrix counter electrode was attained without use of photolithography by electrodeposition from a commercial alkaline platinum plating bath. Silver loss issues for cells with dot matrix electrodes were successfully addressed by purifying the electrolyte and adjusting the cell cycling parameters. More than 30K cycles were demonstrated for a REM cell (30-cm square) with a dot matrix counter electrode. Larger cells (30-cm square) were successfully fabricated but could not be cycled since the nucleation layers (provided by an outside supplier) were defective so that mirror deposits could not be produced.

  1. Compound curvature laser window development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless compound curvature laser windows. These windows represent a major part of specialized, nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems used in a variety of compressor and turbine research test facilities. This report summarizes the main aspects of compound curvature laser window development. It is an overview of the methodology and the peculiarities associated with the formulation of these windows. Included in this discussion is new information regarding procedures for compound curvature laser window development.

  2. Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic Window System

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, F,A; Byker,H, J

    2006-10-27

    Pleotint has embarked on a novel approach with our Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic, SRT™, windows. We are integrating dynamic sunlight control, high insulation values and low solar heat gain together in a high performance window. The Pleotint SRT window is dynamic because it reversibly changes light transmission based on thermochromics activated directly by the heating effect of sunlight. We can achieve a window package with low solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), a low U value and high insulation. At the same time our windows provide good daylighting. Our innovative window design offers architects and building designers the opportunity to choose their desired energy performance, excellent sound reduction, external pane can be self-cleaning, or a resistance to wind load, blasts, bullets or hurricanes. SRT windows would provide energy savings that are estimated at up to 30% over traditional window systems. Glass fabricators will be able to use existing equipment to make the SRT window while adding value and flexibility to the basic design. Glazing installers will have the ability to fit the windows with traditional methods without wires, power supplies and controllers. SRT windows can be retrofit into existing buildings,

  3. Windows on animal minds.

    PubMed

    Griffin, D R

    1995-06-01

    The simple kinds of conscious thinking that probably occur in nonhuman animals can be studied objectively by utilizing the same basic procedure that we use every day to infer what our human companions think and feel. This is to base such inferences on communicative behavior, broadly defined to include human language, nonverbal communication, and semantic communication in apes, dolphins, parrots, and honeybees. It seems likely that animals often experience something similar to the messages they communicate. Although this figurative window on other minds is obviously imperfect, it is already contributing significantly to our growing understanding and appreciation of animal mentality.

  4. An acoustic window for sustainable buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Brocklesby, Martin; Li, Zhemin; Oldham, David J.

    2005-04-01

    Encouraging the use of natural ventilation is an important tendency in the green building movement, but opening windows can often cause noise problems. This research develops a window system which allows natural ventilation while reducing noise transmission. The core idea is to create a ventilation path by staggering two layers of glass and using micro-perforated absorbers (MPA) along the path created to reduce noise. The MPA are made from transparent materials so that daylighting is relatively unaffected. Starting with a brief introduction of the MPA theory and its application in ducts, the paper presents a series of numerical simulations using finite element method based software FEMLAB, and experiment results measured between a semi-anechoic chamber and a reverberation chamber. Performance in acoustics, ventilation and daylighting are all taken into account. A basic window configuration is first considered, studying the effectiveness of various window parameters. A number of strategic designs are then examined, including external hoods and louvers in the sound path. There is generally a good agreement between simulation and measurement, and the noise reduction can be as good as a single glazing, with air movement to achieve occupant comfort, rather than just for minimum air exchange. [Work supported by EPSRC.

  5. Windows on the axion

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    Peccei-Quinn symmetry with attendant axion is a most compelling, and perhaps the most minimal, extension of the standard model, as it provides a very elegant solution to the nagging strong CP-problem associated with the THETA vacuum structure of QCD. However, particle physics gives little guidance as to the axion mass; a priori, the plausible values span the range: 10/sup /minus/12/ eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 10/sup 6/ eV, some 18 orders-of-magnitude. Axions have a host of interesting astrophysical and cosmological effects, including, modifying the evolution of stars of all types (our sun, red giants, white dwarfs, and neutron stars), contributing significantly to the mass density of the Universe today, and producing detectable line radiation through the decays of relic axions. Consideration of these effects has probed 14 orders-of-magnitude in axion mass, and has left open only two windows for further exploration: 10/sup /minus/6/ eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 10/sup /minus/3/ eV and 1 eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 5 eV (hadronic axions only). Both these windows are accessible to experiment, and a variety of very interesting experiments, all of which involve ''heavenly axions,'' are being planned or are underway. 58 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Window defect planar mapping technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, F. R.; Minton, U. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method of planar mapping defects in a window having an edge surface and a planar surface. The method is comprised of steps for mounting the window on a support surface. Then a light sensitive paper is placed adjacent to the window surface. A light source is positioned adjacent to the window edge. The window is then illuminated with the source of light for a predetermined interval of time. Defects on the surface of the glass, as well as in the interior of the glass are detected by analyzing the developed light sensitive paper. The light source must be in the form of optical fibers or a light tube whose light transmitting ends are placed near the edge surface of the window.

  7. Window Observational Research Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelfrey, Joseph; Sledd, Annette

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document concerns the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) Rack, a unique facility designed for use with the US Lab Destiny Module window. WORF will provide valuable resources for Earth Science payloads along with serving the purpose of protecting the lab window. The facility can be used for remote sensing instrumentation test and validation in a shirt sleeve environment. WORF will also provide a training platform for crewmembers to do orbital observations of other planetary bodies. WORF payloads will be able to conduct terrestrial studies utilizing the data collected from utilizing WORF and the lab window.

  8. Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Clear, Robert; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Lee, Eleanor

    2006-03-03

    Forty-three subjects worked in a private office with switchable electrochromic windows, manually-operated Venetian blinds, and dimmable fluorescent lights. The electrochromic window had a visible transmittance range of approximately 3-60%. Analysis of subject responses and physical data collected during the work sessions showed that the electrochromic windows reduced the incidence of glare compared to working under a fixed transmittance (60%) condition. Subjects used the Venetian blinds less often and preferred the variable transmittance condition, but used slightly more electric lighting with it than they did when window transmittance was fixed.

  9. INTERIOR DETAIL, RETRACTABLE WINDOW SHUTTERS, VENETIAN WINDOW IN THE SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL, RETRACTABLE WINDOW SHUTTERS, VENETIAN WINDOW IN THE SOUTHEAST CABINET. (NOTE THE MIRRORED PANEL IN THE FORWARD SHUTTER’S LOWER SECTION. DURING THE HAMILTONIAN OCCUPANCY, MIRRORS LIKE THESE WERE USED LIBERALLY THROUGHOUT THE HOUSE’S PUBLIC ROOMS - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. What Becomes a Window Most: Perceptual Tuning of Virtual Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Stone, Lee (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Viewing a scene through an optical window provides observers with numerous visual properties. In order to create a 'virtual window' that is perceptually compelling, it must be determined which properties are most critical to preserve. We have examined several properties, both static and dynamic, and will discuss which have the greatest impact on apparent realism (and user performance).

  11. Study of the shape of an optical window in a super-resolution state by electromagnetic-thermal coupled simulation: Effects of melting of an active layer in an optical disc

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Haruyuki; Shima, Takayuki; Kuwahara, Masashi; Fujita, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Munehisa; Aono, Yoshiyuki

    2014-04-21

    We performed a multi-physics simulation for the propagation of electromagnetic waves and heat conduction in a super-resolution optical disc that includes an active layer of InSb. Because the change in the optical constant of InSb due to the phase transition is taken into account, the melting of the active layer can be realistically simulated in our calculation. It was found that in the case of an incident light power (P) of 2 mW, a profile of the electric field intensity transmitted through the InSb layer has an asymmetric shape with a narrow peak. This beam-narrowing was suggested to be an essential mechanism of the super-resolution, because a narrower light beam allows the detection of a smaller pit structure than the optical diffraction limit. This beam-narrowing was found to be originating from a small molten region produced in the InSb layer, which works as a mask for light exposure.

  12. Increased single-photon emission from InP/AlGaInP quantum dots grown on AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßbach, R.; Schulz, W.-M.; Reischle, M.; Beirne, G. J.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.

    2008-11-01

    InP/GaInP quantum dots emitting in the red spectral range have been grown on an AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflector in order to increase the single-photon emission efficiency. We have observed an increase in ensemble photoluminescence by a factor of 28 in comparison to the reference InP/GaInP quantum dots grown without such a reflector underneath. Photon correlation measurements performed under pulsed excitation show a clear antibunching behavior ( g(0)=0.17) as expected for a single-photon emitter. Using aluminum containing barriers to surround the quantum dots the ensemble luminescence intensity could be increased by a factor of 500 at 240 K in comparison to the reference sample at 240 K.

  13. Monte Carlo Modeling of Hot Electron Transport in Bulk AlAs, AlGaAs and GaAs at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, H.; Khalvati, M. R.; Rokn-Abadi, M. Rezaee

    The results of an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation of electron drift velocity response on the application field in bulk AlAs, AlGaAs and GaAs are presented. All dominant scattering mechanisms in the structure considered have been taken into account. For all materials, it is found that electron velocity overshoot only occurs when the electric field is increased to a value above a certain critical field, unique to each material. This critical field is strongly dependent on the material parameters. Transient velocity overshoot has also been simulated, with the sudden application of fields up to 1600 kVm-1, appropriate to the gate-drain fields expected within an operational field effect transistor. The electron drift velocity relaxes to the saturation value of ~105 ms-1 within 4 ps, for all crystal structures. The steady state and transient velocity overshoot characteristics are in fair agreement with other recent calculations.

  14. GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells with indirect-gap AlGaAs barriers for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, T. Otto, L. M.; Elborg, M.; Jo, M.; Mano, T.; Kawazu, T.; Han, L.; Sakaki, H.

    2014-03-24

    We have fabricated GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) solar cells in which 3 nm-thick QWs and indirect-gap Al{sub 0.78}Ga{sub 0.22}As barriers are embedded, and we studied extraction processes of photogenerated carriers in this QW system. The photocurrent under 700 nm light illumination at voltages close to the open-circuit voltage shows only a small reduction, indicating that the carrier recombination inside QWs is largely suppressed. We attribute this result to an efficient extraction of electrons from the QWs through the X-valley of AlGaAs. The insertion of QWs is shown to be effective in extending the absorption wavelengths and in enhancing the photocurrent. The use of indirect-gap materials as barriers is found to enhance carrier extraction processes, and result in an improved performance of QW solar cells.

  15. Low resistance wavelength-reproducible [ital p]-type (Al,Ga)As distributed Bragg reflectors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, S.A.; Lear, K.L.; Killeen, K.P. )

    1993-04-05

    We report the reproducible molecular beam epitaxial growth of Be-doped piecewise linearly graded (Al,Ga)As distributed Bragg reflectors that have vertical series resistivities near bulk values. For mirrors with three linear segments per interface, the center wavelength reproducibility is 0.1% and the series resistivity is as low as 1.8[times]10[sup [minus]5] [Omega] cm[sup 2] for hole concentrations of 5[times]10[sup 18] cm[sup [minus]3]. Measured reflectivities of 6.0% per interface are comparable to conventional single-linear-grade mirrors. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers incorporating these mirrors exhibit record-low voltage thresholds of less than 1.5 V.

  16. Tuning the g-factor of neutral and charged excitons confined to self-assembled (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Corfdir, P. Van Hattem, B.; Phillips, R. T.; Fontana, Y.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Heiss, M.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study the neutral exciton (X) and charged exciton (CX) transitions from (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots located in core-shell nanowires, in the presence of a magnetic field. The g-factors and the diamagnetic coefficients of both the X and the CX depend on the orientation of the field with respect to the nanowire axis. The aspect ratio of the X wavefunction is quantified based on the anisotropy of the diamagnetic coefficient. For specific orientations of the magnetic field, it is possible to cancel the g-factor of the bright states of the X and the CX by means of an inversion of the sign of the hole's g-factor, which is promising for quantum information processing applications.

  17. Prism Window for Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    A prism window has been devised for use, with an autocollimator, in aligning optical components that are (1) required to be oriented parallel to each other and/or at a specified angle of incidence with respect to a common optical path and (2) mounted at different positions along the common optical path. The prism window can also be used to align a single optical component at a specified angle of incidence. Prism windows could be generally useful for orienting optical components in manufacture of optical instruments. "Prism window" denotes an application-specific unit comprising two beam-splitter windows that are bonded together at an angle chosen to obtain the specified angle of incidence.

  18. Destiny's Earth Observation Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-110 mission commander, looks through the Earth observation window in the Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-zero) truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 Truss, weighing in at 27,000 pounds, was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the STS-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  19. Switchable Solar Window Devices Based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Ma, Dakang; Munday, Jeremy

    Windows are an interesting target for photovoltaics due to the potential for large area of deployment and because glass is already a ubiquitous component of solar cell devices. Many demonstrations of solar windows in recent years have used photovoltaic devices which are semitransparent in the visible region. Much research has focused on enhancing device absorption in the UV and IR ranges as a means to circumvent the basic tradeoff between efficiency and transparency to visible light. Use of switchable solar window is a less investigated alternative approach; these windows utilize the visible spectrum but can toggle between high transparency and high efficiency as needed. We present a novel switchable solar window device based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals (PDLC). By applying an electric field to the PDLC layer, the device can be switched from an opaque, light diffusing, efficient photovoltaic cell to a clear, transparent window. In the off state (i.e. scattering state), these devices have the added benefits of increased reflectivity for reduced lighting and cooling costs and haze for privacy. Further, we demonstrate that these windows have the potential for self-powering due to the very low power required to maintain the on, or high transparency, state. Support From: University of Maryland and Maryland Nano-center and its Fablab.

  20. Tokamak physics experiment: Diagnostic windows study

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.; Wurden, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    We detail the study of diagnostic windows and window thermal stress remediation in the long-pulse, high-power Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) operation. The operating environment of the TPX diagnostic windows is reviewed, thermal loads on the windows estimated, and cooling requirements for the windows considered. Applicable window-cooling technology from other fields is reviewed and its application to the TPX windows considered. Methods for TPX window thermal conditioning are recommended, with some discussion of potential implementation problems provided. Recommendations for further research and development work to ensure performance of windows in the TPX system are presented.

  1. Method for making photovoltaic devices using oxygenated semiconductor thin film layers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, James Neil; Albin, David Scott; Feldman-Peabody, Scott; Pavol, Mark Jeffrey; Gossman, Robert Dwayne

    2014-12-16

    A method for making a photovoltaic device is presented. The method includes steps of disposing a window layer on a substrate and disposing an absorber layer on the window layer. Disposing the window layer, the absorber layer, or both layers includes introducing a source material into a deposition zone, wherein the source material comprises oxygen and a constituent of the window layer, of the absorber layer or of both layers. The method further includes step of depositing a film that comprises the constituent and oxygen.

  2. High-power testing of PEP-II RF cavity windows

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    We describe the high power testing of RF cavity windows for the PEP-II B factory. The window is designed for continuous operation at 476 MHz with up to 500 kW throughput and has been tested to full power using a modified PEP Klystron. The windows use an anti-multipactor coating on the vacuum side and the application and processing of this layer is discussed. The high power test configuration, RF processing history and high power performance are described.

  3. Hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ostenak, C.A.; Mackay, H.A.

    1985-07-18

    A hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication are disclosed. The composite window comprises a window having first and second sides. The first side is oriented towards an environment containing hydrofluoric acid. An adhesive is applied to the first side. A layer of transparent hydrofluoric acid-resistant material, such as Mylar, is applied to the adhesive and completely covers the first side. The adhesive is then cured.

  4. Hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ostenak, Carl A.; Mackay, Harold A.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrofluoric acid-resistant composite window and method for its fabrication are disclosed. The composite window comprises a window having first and second sides. The first side is oriented towards an environment containing hydrofluoric acid. An adhesive is applied to the first side. A layer of transparent hydrofluoric acid-resistant material, such as Mylar, is applied to the adhesive and completely covers the first side. The adhesive is then cured.

  5. Imaging Microscope For "Water-Window" X Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed microscope operates in "water-window" part of x-ray spectrum. Contains spherical-mirror substrates coated with multiple thin layers of material exhibiting Bragg reflection at wavelength at which water transparent. Suited for making high-resolution, high-contrast images for microbiological research.

  6. Window-closing safety system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-08-26

    A safety device includes a wire loop embedded in the glass of a passenger car window and routed near the closing leading-edge of the window. The wire loop carries microwave pulses around the loop to and from a transceiver with separate output and input ports. An evanescent field only an inch or two in radius is created along the wire loop by the pulses. Just about any object coming within the evanescent field will dramatically reduce the energy of the microwave pulses received back by the transceiver. Such a loss in energy is interpreted as a closing area blockage, and electrical interlocks are provided to halt or reverse a power window motor that is actively trying to close the window. 5 figs.

  7. Window-closing safety system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A safety device includes a wire loop embedded in the glass of a passenger car window and routed near the closing leading-edge of the window. The wire loop carries microwave pulses around the loop to and from a transceiver with separate output and input ports. An evanescent field only and inch or two in radius is created along the wire loop by the pulses. Just about any object coming within the evanescent field will dramatically reduce the energy of the microwave pulses received back by the transceiver. Such a loss in energy is interpreted as a closing area blockage, and electrical interlocks are provided to halt or reverse a power window motor that is actively trying to close the window.

  8. A window on urban sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Stigt, Rien van; Driessen, Peter P.J.; Spit, Tejo J.M.

    2013-09-15

    Sustainable urban development requires the integration of environmental interests in urban planning. Although various methods of environmental assessment have been developed, plan outcomes are often disappointing due to the complex nature of decision-making in urban planning, which takes place in multiple arenas within multiple policy networks involving diverse stakeholders. We argue that the concept of ‘decision windows’ can structure this seemingly chaotic chain of interrelated decisions. First, explicitly considering the dynamics of the decision-making process, we further conceptualized decision windows as moments in an intricate web of substantively connected deliberative processes where issues are reframed within a decision-making arena, and interests may be linked within and across arenas. Adopting this perspective in two case studies, we then explored how decision windows arise, which factors determine their effectiveness and how their occurrence can be influenced so as to arrive at more sustainable solutions. We conclude that the integration of environmental interests in urban planning is highly dependent on the ability of the professionals involved to recognize and manipulate decision windows. Finally, we explore how decision windows may be opened. -- Highlights: • Decision-making about sustainable urban development occurs in networks. • The concept of ‘decision windows’ was further elaborated. • Decision windows help understand how environmental interests enter decision-making. • Decision windows can, to some extent, be influenced.

  9. Switchable Materials for Smart Windows.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Runnerstrom, Evan L; Milliron, Delia J

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the basic principles of and recent developments in electrochromic, photochromic, and thermochromic materials for applications in smart windows. Compared with current static windows, smart windows can dynamically modulate the transmittance of solar irradiation based on weather conditions and personal preferences, thus simultaneously improving building energy efficiency and indoor human comfort. Although some smart windows are commercially available, their widespread implementation has not yet been realized. Recent advances in nanostructured materials provide new opportunities for next-generation smart window technology owing to their unique structure-property relations. Nanomaterials can provide enhanced coloration efficiency, faster switching kinetics, and longer lifetime. In addition, their compatibility with solution processing enables low-cost and high-throughput fabrication. This review also discusses the importance of dual-band modulation of visible and near-infrared (NIR) light, as nearly 50% of solar energy lies in the NIR region. Some latest results show that solution-processable nanostructured systems can selectively modulate the NIR light without affecting the visible transmittance, thus reducing energy consumption by air conditioning, heating, and artificial lighting. PMID:27023660

  10. Switchable Materials for Smart Windows.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Runnerstrom, Evan L; Milliron, Delia J

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the basic principles of and recent developments in electrochromic, photochromic, and thermochromic materials for applications in smart windows. Compared with current static windows, smart windows can dynamically modulate the transmittance of solar irradiation based on weather conditions and personal preferences, thus simultaneously improving building energy efficiency and indoor human comfort. Although some smart windows are commercially available, their widespread implementation has not yet been realized. Recent advances in nanostructured materials provide new opportunities for next-generation smart window technology owing to their unique structure-property relations. Nanomaterials can provide enhanced coloration efficiency, faster switching kinetics, and longer lifetime. In addition, their compatibility with solution processing enables low-cost and high-throughput fabrication. This review also discusses the importance of dual-band modulation of visible and near-infrared (NIR) light, as nearly 50% of solar energy lies in the NIR region. Some latest results show that solution-processable nanostructured systems can selectively modulate the NIR light without affecting the visible transmittance, thus reducing energy consumption by air conditioning, heating, and artificial lighting.

  11. Music@Microsoft.Windows: Composing Ambience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    It is well known, of course, that all Windows versions except for 3.1 have a brief (four to six second) piece of music indicating that Windows is booted and ready for use. While the music may indicate Windows has booted, it bears no immediately discernable relation to the various uses we might actually put Windows to--working, gaming,…

  12. Transparent ceramics for spacecraft windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical properties of several transparent ceramics were investigated to determine if their use might lighten next generation spacecraft windows. The measured fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters were used as inputs to functions describing the required mass for a desired window life. Transparent magnesium aluminate (spinel, MgAlO4) and AlON exhibit superior slow crack resistance relative to fused silica, which is the historical material of choice. For spinel, slow crack growth, strength and fracture toughness are significantly influenced by the grain size, and alumina rich phases and porosity at the grain boundaries lead to intergranular fracture in coarse grain spinel. The results imply that transparent ceramics can lighten window panes from a slow crack growth perspective.

  13. Dry etching of Al-rich AlGaAs with silicon nitride masks for photonic crystal fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyu; Togano, Yuji; Hashimura, Kentaro; Morifuji, Masato; Kondow, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    We investigate inductively coupled plasma (ICP) deep dry etching of Al0.8Ga0.2As for photonic crystal (PC) fabrication using a Cl2/BCl3/CH4 gas mixture. On the basis of our previous report [Y. Kitabayashi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 52, 04CG07 (2013)], we obtained a PC structure having air holes deeper than 1.5 µm and a diameter of 120 nm by adjusting the gas flow rate and increasing the process pressure. In this study, silicon nitride (SiNx) and SiO2 were both used as the mask layer. Furthermore, samples with SiNx and SiO2 masks for ICP deep dry etching were also fabricated and compared. The vertical profile of the PC structure with the SiNx mask layer displayed a rounded shape that was caused by the charge up in the mask layer. Then, a thinner mask layer was used to ease the effects of mask retardation and charge up. As a result, a PC structure with a SiNx mask layer having air holes deeper than 1.7 µm and a diameter of 190 nm was successfully fabricated.

  14. Method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    A method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window for providing optical access through an aperture in the package. The package is made of a multilayered insulating material, e.g., a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC). The window is inserted in-between personalized layers of ceramic green tape during stackup and registration. Then, during baking and firing, the integral window is simultaneously bonded to the sintered ceramic layers of the densified package. Next, the microelectronic device is flip-chip bonded to cofired thick-film metallized traces on the package, where the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. Finally, a cover lid is attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, flip-chip bonded, hermetically-sealed package having an integral window.

  15. High-power low-threshold graded-index separate confinement heterostructure AlGaAs single quantum well lasers on Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lang, Robert J.; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Katz, Joseph; Narayanan, Authi A.

    1989-01-01

    A high-power low-threshold graded-index separate confinement heterostructure AlGaAs single quantum well laser on Si substrates has been demonstrated for the first time by a hybrid growth of migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy followed by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The quantum well laser showed an output power of more than 400 mW per facet under pulsed conditions. A room-temperature threshold current of 300 mA was obtained with a differential quantum efficiency of 40 percent without facet coating. The threshold current density was 550 A/sq cm for a cavity length of 500 microns. These results show the highest peak power reported to date for low-threshold lasers on Si substrates. The full width at half maximum of the far-field pattern parallel to the junction was 6 deg. Threshold current densities as low as 250 A/sq cm were obtained for lasers on GaAs substrates.

  16. Direct detection optical intersatellite link at 220 Mbps using AlGaAs laser diode and silicon APD with 4-ary PPM signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed 220 Mbps free-space 4-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) direct detection optical communication system is described. High speed GaAs integrated circuits were used to construct the PPM encoder and receiver electronic circuits. Both PPM slot and word timing recovery were provided in the PPM receiver. The optical transmitter consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (Mitsubishi ML5702A, lambda=821nm) and a high speed driver unit. The photodetector consisted of a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) (RCA30902S) preceded by an optical interference filter (delta lambda=10nm). Preliminary tests showed that the self-synchronized PPM receiver could achieve a receiver bit error rate of less than 10(exp -6) at 25 nW average received optical signal power or 360 photons per transmitted information bit. The relatively poor receiver sensitivity was believed to be caused by the insufficient electronic bandwidth of the APD preamplifier and the poor linearity of the preamplifier high frequency response.

  17. Counter tube window and X-ray fluorescence analyzer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertel, R.; Holm, M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the best design tube window and X-ray fluorescence analyzer for quantitative analysis of Venusian dust and condensates. The principal objective of the project was to develop the best counter tube window geometry for the sensing element of the instrument. This included formulation of a mathematical model of the window and optimization of its parameters. The proposed detector and instrument has several important features. The instrument will perform a near real-time analysis of dust in the Venusian atmosphere, and is capable of measuring dust layers less than 1 micron thick. In addition, wide dynamic measurement range will be provided to compensate for extreme variations in count rates. An integral pulse-height analyzer and memory accumulate data and read out spectra for detail computer analysis on the ground.

  18. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  19. Total Library Computerization for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Joseph, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a general review of features of version 2.1 of Total Library Computerization (TLC) for Windows from On Point, Inc. Includes information about pricing, hardware and operating systems, modules/functions available, user interface, security, on-line catalog functions, circulation, cataloging, and documentation and online help. A table…

  20. Notes on UHV beryllium windows

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.L.

    1986-10-01

    Techniques are described for making large ultrahigh vacuum beryllium windows for use in synchrotron radiation installations. Procedures are given for affecting both hard brazed seals and demountable seals involving either lead or copper gaskets. Brazed seals can be made to either stainless steel or copper. Possible alternative methods are suggested.

  1. Low mass large aperture vacuum window development at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, C.

    1995-04-01

    Large aperture low mass vacuum windows are being developed for the HMS (High Momentum Spectrometer) and SOS (Short Orbit Spectrometer) spectrometers in Hall C at CEBAF. Because multiple scattering degrades the performance of a spectrometer it is important that the volume be evacuated and that the entrance and exit windows be as low mass as possible. The material used for such windows must be thin and light enough so as to have minimum effect of the beam, and at the same time, be thick and strong enough to operate reliably and safely. To achieve these goals, composite vacuum windows have been constructed of a thin sheet of Mylar with a reinforcing fabric. Reinforcing fabrics such as Kevlar and Spectra are available with tensile strengths significantly greater than that of Mylar. A thin layer of Myler remains necessary since the fabrics cannot achieve any sort of vacuum seal. The design, fabrication, testing, and operating experience with such composite windows for the Hall C spectrometers will be discussed.

  2. Investigation of electrochemical etch differences in AlGaAs heterostructures using Cl{sub 2} ion beam assisted etching

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, Kevin Goodhue, William D.; Swint, Reuel B.; Porter, Jeanne

    2015-03-15

    A deeply etched, anisotropic 45° and 90° mirror technology is developed for Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As heterostructures using a Cl{sub 2} ion beam assisted etching system. When etching vertically, using a conductive low-erosion Ni mask, electrochemical etch differences between layers with various Al mole fractions caused nonuniform sidewall profiles not seen in semi-insulating GaAs test samples. These variations, based on alloy composition, were found to be negligible when etching at a 45°. A Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Ni etch mask is designed in order to electrically isolate charge buildup caused by the incoming Ar{sup +} ion beam to the Ni layer, preventing conduction to the underlying epitaxial layers. This modification produced smoothly etched facets, up to 8 μm in depth, enabling fabrication of substrate–surface-emitting slab-coupled optical waveguide lasers and other optoelectronic devices.

  3. Removable Window System for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, James P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A window system for a platform comprising a window pane, a retention frame, and a biasing system. The window pane may be configured to contact a sealing system. The retention frame may be configured to contact the sealing system and hold the window pane against the support frame. The biasing system may be configured to bias the retention frame toward the support frame while the support frame and the retention frame are in a configuration that holds the window pane. Removal of the biasing system may cause the retention frame and the window pane to be removable.

  4. Measured winter performance of storm windows

    SciTech Connect

    Klems, Joseph H.

    2002-08-23

    Direct comparison measurements were made between various prime/storm window combinations and a well-weatherstripped, single-hung replacement window with a low-E selective glazing. Measurements were made using an accurate outdoor calorimetric facility with the windows facing north. The doublehung prime window was made intentionally leaky. Nevertheless, heat flows due to air infiltration were found to be small, and performance of the prime/storm combinations was approximately what would be expected from calculations that neglect air infiltration. Prime/low-E storm window combinations performed very similarly to the replacement window. Interestingly, solar heat gain was not negligible, even in north-facing orientation.

  5. Windows Program Information Files. How Windows and Non-Windows Programs Cooperate through PIFs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmion, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Describes Program Information Files (PIFs), which run on DOS operating systems with Microsoft Windows to help run other programs. Options available in the standard mode and in the enhanced mode are explained, multitasking options are discussed, and memory options and application shortcut keys are described. (LRW)

  6. Efficient spin injection through a crystalline AlOx tunnel barrier prepared by the oxidation of an ultra-thin Al epitaxial layer on GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, N.; Munekata, H.

    2013-07-01

    We report that an ultra-thin, post-oxidized aluminum epilayer grown on the AlGaAs surface works as a high-quality tunnel barrier for spin injection from a ferromagnetic metal to a semiconductor. One of the key points of the present oxidation method is the formation of the crystalline AlOx template layer without oxidizing the AlGaAs region near the Al/AlGaAs interface. The oxidized Al layer is not amorphous but show well-defined single crystalline feature reminiscent of the spinel γ-AlOx phase. A spin-light emitting diode consisting of a Fe layer, a crystalline AlOx barrier layer, and an AlGaAs-InGaAs double hetero-structure has exhibited circularly polarized electroluminescence with circular polarization of PEL ˜ 0.145 at the remnant magnetization state of the Fe layer, indicating the relatively high spin injection efficiency (≡2PEL/PFe) of 0.63.

  7. Windows in the Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, William H.; Tacconi-Garman, Lowell Evan; Boulanger, Francois; Okumura, Koryo

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were twofold: (1) to study the IRAS emission levels in the vicinity of Baade's Window and in other optically transparent regions near the Galactic Center; and (2) to study the IRAS emission levels along sightlines in the Milky Way that exhibit very little CO emission. Tests were attempted to see whether the optically transparent 'windows' near the Galactic center can be identified (as FIR-weak regions) in the IRAS data base; and if so, whether the CO weak regions found elsewhere in the Milky Way represent similarly FIR weak and thus optically transparent sightlines through the Galaxy. The CO weak regions were also targeted in an effort to study the diffuse intercloud dust and its warming by the interstellar radiation field.

  8. Electrochromic Windows: Advanced Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    SAGE Electrochromics, Inc

    2006-12-13

    This project addresses the development of advanced fabrication capabilities for energy saving electrochromic (EC) windows. SAGE EC windows consist of an inorganic stack of thin films deposited onto a glass substrate. The window tint can be reversibly changed by the application of a low power dc voltage. This property can be used to modulate the amount of light and heat entering buildings (or vehicles) through the glazings. By judicious management of this so-called solar heat gain, it is possible to derive significant energy savings due to reductions in heating lighting, and air conditioning (HVAC). Several areas of SAGE’s production were targeted during this project to allow significant improvements to processing throughput, yield and overall quality of the processing, in an effort to reduce the cost and thereby improve the market penetration. First, the overall thin film process was optimized to allow a more robust set of operating points to be used, thereby maximizing the yield due to the thin film deposition themselves. Other significant efforts aimed at improving yield were relating to implementing new procedures and processes for the manufacturing process, to improve the quality of the substrate preparation, and the quality of the IGU fabrication. Furthermore, methods for reworking defective devices were developed, to enable devices which would otherwise be scrapped to be made into useful product. This involved the in-house development of some customized equipment. Finally, the improvements made during this project were validated to ensure that they did not impact the exceptional durability of the SageGlass® products. Given conservative estimates for cost and market penetration, energy savings due to EC windows in residences in the US are calculated to be of the order 0.026 quad (0.026×1015BTU/yr) by the year 2017.

  9. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  10. Rugged Ceramic Window for RF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Michael; Johnson, Rolland P.; Rimmer, Robert; Elliot, Tom; Stirbet, Mircea

    2009-05-04

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  11. Thermally accelerated life testing of single mode, double-heterostructure, AlGaAs laser diodes operated pulsed at 50 mW peak power

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, J.D.; Archambeault, W.J.; Dye, R.A.; Einhorn, A.J.; Mecherle, G.S.; Nelson, P.

    1985-04-01

    Single spatial mode, double-heterostructure, channel-substrate-planar AlGaAs laser diodes have been life tested under thermally accelerated conditions to characterize the reliability of the diodes in a digital, optical communication system intended for space application. The diodes were operated pulsed under constant drive current conditions at 50 mW peak power, 25 ns pulse width, and 1 percent duty cycle in a dry, inert environment at ambient test temperatures at 40, 55, and 70/sup 0/C. Diode performance parameters as related to the space application, such as pulsewidth, peak power, wavelength spectrum, spatial mode, and threshold current, were periodically monitored. Tests have continued for over 14 000 h. The test results for all diodes with failure defined by power degradation alone is compared to the test results for single mode diodes with failure defined by power degradation, wavelength shift and spatial mode changes. It is found that the life test results are substantially equivalent but differ from earlier published reports for laser diodes operated CW. An activation energy of about 0.39 eV is deduced with a predicted median life of about 5 X 10/sup 4/ h at 20/sup 0/C. These values are somewhat lower than those found for diodes operated CW and are attributed to the use of single mode laser diodes here. It is concluded that thermally accelerated life testing for single spatial mode laser diodes must incorporate a means to separate bulk material, current, and optical density induced degradation effects. A test scheme is proposed.

  12. Use of UV-protective windows and window films to aid in the prevention of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Cox, Mary Jude; Becker, Daniel G; Horowitz, Jed H; Nichter, Larry S; Britt, L D; Long, William B; Edlic, Elizabeth C

    2004-01-01

    People are exposed to ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation throughout their daily routine, intentionally and unintentionally. Cumulative and excessive exposure to UV radiation is the behavioral cause to skin cancers, skin damage, premature skin aging, and sun-related eye disorders. More than one million new cases of skin cancer were diagnosed in the United States this year. UV radiates directly and diffusely scattered by the various environmental and atmospheric conditions and has access to the skin from all directions. Because of this diffuse UV radiation, a person situated under a covering, such as the roof of a car or house, is not completely protected from the sun's rays. Because shade structures do not protect effectively against UV radiation, there have been major advances in photoprotection of glass by the development of specially designed photoprotective windows and films. It is the purpose of this collective review to highlight the photoprotective windows and films that should be incorporated into residential, commercial, and school glass windows to reduce sun exposure. Low-emittence (low-E) coatings are microscopically thin, virtually invisible, metal or metallic oxide layers deposited on a window or skylight glazing surface to reduce the U-factor by suppressing radiative heat flow as well as to limit UV radiation. The exclusive Thermaflect coating uses the most advanced, double-layer soft coat technology to continue to deliver top performance for UV protection as well as prevent heat loss in the home. This product blocks 87% of UV radiation and has an Energy Star certification in all climate zones. Tints and films have been another important advance in glass photoprotection, especially in automobiles. Quality widow film products are high-tech laminates of polyester and metallized coatings bonded by distortion-free adhesives. The International Window Film Association provides members with accreditation in solar control films, safety films, and

  13. Use of UV-protective windows and window films to aid in the prevention of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Cox, Mary Jude; Becker, Daniel G; Horowitz, Jed H; Nichter, Larry S; Britt, L D; Long, William B; Edlic, Elizabeth C

    2004-01-01

    People are exposed to ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation throughout their daily routine, intentionally and unintentionally. Cumulative and excessive exposure to UV radiation is the behavioral cause to skin cancers, skin damage, premature skin aging, and sun-related eye disorders. More than one million new cases of skin cancer were diagnosed in the United States this year. UV radiates directly and diffusely scattered by the various environmental and atmospheric conditions and has access to the skin from all directions. Because of this diffuse UV radiation, a person situated under a covering, such as the roof of a car or house, is not completely protected from the sun's rays. Because shade structures do not protect effectively against UV radiation, there have been major advances in photoprotection of glass by the development of specially designed photoprotective windows and films. It is the purpose of this collective review to highlight the photoprotective windows and films that should be incorporated into residential, commercial, and school glass windows to reduce sun exposure. Low-emittence (low-E) coatings are microscopically thin, virtually invisible, metal or metallic oxide layers deposited on a window or skylight glazing surface to reduce the U-factor by suppressing radiative heat flow as well as to limit UV radiation. The exclusive Thermaflect coating uses the most advanced, double-layer soft coat technology to continue to deliver top performance for UV protection as well as prevent heat loss in the home. This product blocks 87% of UV radiation and has an Energy Star certification in all climate zones. Tints and films have been another important advance in glass photoprotection, especially in automobiles. Quality widow film products are high-tech laminates of polyester and metallized coatings bonded by distortion-free adhesives. The International Window Film Association provides members with accreditation in solar control films, safety films, and

  14. Beryllium window for an APS diagnostics beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Yang, B.X.; Sharma, Y.S.

    1997-09-01

    A beryllium (Be) window for an Advanced Photon Source (APS) diagnostics beamline has been designed and built. The window, which has a double concave axisymmetrical profile with a thickness of 0.5 mm at the center, receives 160 W/mm{sup 2} (7 GeV/100 mA stored beam) from an undulator beam. The window design as well as thermal and thermomechanical analyses, including thermal buckling of the Be window, are presented.

  15. 16 CFR 455.3 - Window form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Window form. 455.3 Section 455.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES USED MOTOR VEHICLE TRADE REGULATION RULE § 455.3 Window form. (a) Form given to buyer. Give the buyer of a used vehicle sold by you the window...

  16. 16 CFR 455.3 - Window form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Window form. 455.3 Section 455.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES USED MOTOR VEHICLE TRADE REGULATION RULE § 455.3 Window form. (a) Form given to buyer. Give the buyer of a used vehicle sold by you the window...

  17. 16 CFR 455.3 - Window form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Window form. 455.3 Section 455.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES USED MOTOR VEHICLE TRADE REGULATION RULE § 455.3 Window form. (a) Form given to buyer. Give the buyer of a used vehicle sold by you the window...

  18. 16 CFR 455.3 - Window form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Window form. 455.3 Section 455.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES USED MOTOR VEHICLE TRADE REGULATION RULE § 455.3 Window form. (a) Form given to buyer. Give the buyer of a used vehicle sold by you the window...

  19. 16 CFR 455.3 - Window form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Window form. 455.3 Section 455.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES USED MOTOR VEHICLE TRADE REGULATION RULE § 455.3 Window form. (a) Form given to buyer. Give the buyer of a used vehicle sold by you the window...

  20. Temperature dependence of equilibrium electron density in AlGaAs governed by Sn-related DX centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ždánský, K.

    1994-10-01

    Capacitance and conductance of AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructures with an Sn-doped Al0.35Ga0.65As layer and with a p-n junction was measured as a function of frequency and temperature. The temperature dependence of the free-electron density n was determined from the measurement. A theoretical relation for n governed by two independent DX centers was derived. The experimental results were explained by the presence of two types of Sn-related DX centers. The binding energies of the two DX centers were determined and found to be in good accord with values, both experimental and theoretical, reported previously by other authors.

  1. Three-dimensional laser window formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhoff, Vincent G.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and implemented a unique process for forming flawless three-dimensional laser windows. These windows represent a major part of specialized, nonintrusive laser data acquisition systems used in a variety of compressor and turbine research test facilities. This report discusses in detail the aspects of three-dimensional laser window formation. It focuses on the unique methodology and the peculiarities associated with the formation of these windows. Included in this discussion are the design criteria, bonding mediums, and evaluation testing for three-dimensional laser windows.

  2. Purged window apparatus utilizing heated purge gas

    DOEpatents

    Ballard, Evan O.

    1984-01-01

    A purged window apparatus utilizing tangentially injected heated purge gases in the vicinity of electromagnetic radiation transmitting windows, and a tapered external mounting tube to accelerate these gases to provide a vortex flow on the window surface and a turbulent flow throughout the mounting tube. Use of this apparatus prevents backstreaming of gases under investigation which are flowing past the mouth of the mounting tube which would otherwise deposit on the windows. Lengthy spectroscopic investigations and analyses can thereby be performed without the necessity of interrupting the procedures in order to clean or replace contaminated windows.

  3. Developmental time windows for axon growth influence neuronal network topology.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sol; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-04-01

    Early brain connectivity development consists of multiple stages: birth of neurons, their migration and the subsequent growth of axons and dendrites. Each stage occurs within a certain period of time depending on types of neurons and cortical layers. Forming synapses between neurons either by growing axons starting at similar times for all neurons (much-overlapped time windows) or at different time points (less-overlapped) may affect the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks. Here, we explore the extreme cases of axon formation during early development, either starting at the same time for all neurons (parallel, i.e., maximally overlapped time windows) or occurring for each neuron separately one neuron after another (serial, i.e., no overlaps in time windows). For both cases, the number of potential and established synapses remained comparable. Topological and spatial properties, however, differed: Neurons that started axon growth early on in serial growth achieved higher out-degrees, higher local efficiency and longer axon lengths while neurons demonstrated more homogeneous connectivity patterns for parallel growth. Second, connection probability decreased more rapidly with distance between neurons for parallel growth than for serial growth. Third, bidirectional connections were more numerous for parallel growth. Finally, we tested our predictions with C. elegans data. Together, this indicates that time windows for axon growth influence the topological and spatial properties of neuronal networks opening up the possibility to a posteriori estimate developmental mechanisms based on network properties of a developed network.

  4. A robust smart window: reversibly switching from high transparency to angle-independent structural color display.

    PubMed

    Ge, Dengteng; Lee, Elaine; Yang, Lili; Cho, Yigil; Li, Min; Gianola, Daniel S; Yang, Shu

    2015-04-17

    A smart window is fabricated from a composite consisting of elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) embedded with a thin layer of quasi-amorphous silica nanoparticles. The smart window can be switched from the initial highly transparent state to opaqueness and displays angle-independent structural color via mechanical stretching. The switchable optical property can be fully recovered after 1000 stretching/releasing cycles. PMID:25732127

  5. Preparation of different protected bimetallic nanoelectrodes with 30nm gapwidth and access window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronholz, Stephan; Karthäser, Silvia; Waser, Rainer

    2006-03-01

    Reproducible fabrication of 30 nm metallic nanogaps on silicon chips and their electrochemical characterization are presented. The fabrication of the chip is a combination of an optical lithography step and two electron-beam (e-beam) steps. An optimized adhesion layer/metal layer combination (Ti/Pt/Au) and an adopted two layer e-beam resist are used. Specifically the chip has been covered with different protection layers, except of an access window located on top of the nanogaps, calibration electrodes and contact pads, respectively (Fig.1). After characterising the gaps and of the protection layer by cyclical voltammetry in 0.1 M H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte, the deposition of Cu onto the nanogaps will be presented. Fig.1: Different Nanoelectrode Strcutures with access window on top covered by SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 used as protection layer.

  6. Interferometer for Space Station Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    Inspection of space station windows for micrometeorite damage would be a difficult task insitu using current inspection techniques. Commercially available optical profilometers and inspection systems are relatively large, about the size of a desktop computer tower, and require a stable platform to inspect the test object. Also, many devices currently available are designed for a laboratory or controlled environments requiring external computer control. This paper presents an approach using a highly developed optical interferometer to inspect the windows from inside the space station itself using a self- contained hand held device. The interferometer would be capable as a minimum of detecting damage as small as one ten thousands of an inch in diameter and depth while interrogating a relatively large area. The current developmental state of this device is still in the proof of concept stage. The background section of this paper will discuss the current state of the art of profilometers as well as the desired configuration of the self-contained, hand held device. Then, a discussion of the developments and findings that will allow the configuration change with suggested approaches appearing in the proof of concept section.

  7. Downsampling Photodetector Array with Windowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patawaran, Ferze D.; Farr, William H.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Sahasrabudhe, Adit

    2012-01-01

    In a photon counting detector array, each pixel in the array produces an electrical pulse when an incident photon on that pixel is detected. Detection and demodulation of an optical communication signal that modulated the intensity of the optical signal requires counting the number of photon arrivals over a given interval. As the size of photon counting photodetector arrays increases, parallel processing of all the pixels exceeds the resources available in current application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and gate array (GA) technology; the desire for a high fill factor in avalanche photodiode (APD) detector arrays also precludes this. Through the use of downsampling and windowing portions of the detector array, the processing is distributed between the ASIC and GA. This allows demodulation of the optical communication signal incident on a large photon counting detector array, as well as providing architecture amenable to algorithmic changes. The detector array readout ASIC functions as a parallel-to-serial converter, serializing the photodetector array output for subsequent processing. Additional downsampling functionality for each pixel is added to this ASIC. Due to the large number of pixels in the array, the readout time of the entire photodetector is greater than the time between photon arrivals; therefore, a downsampling pre-processing step is done in order to increase the time allowed for the readout to occur. Each pixel drives a small counter that is incremented at every detected photon arrival or, equivalently, the charge in a storage capacitor is incremented. At the end of a user-configurable counting period (calculated independently from the ASIC), the counters are sampled and cleared. This downsampled photon count information is then sent one counter word at a time to the GA. For a large array, processing even the downsampled pixel counts exceeds the capabilities of the GA. Windowing of the array, whereby several subsets of pixels are designated

  8. High-impact resistance optical sensor windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askinazi, Joel; Ceccorulli, Mark L.; Goldman, Lee

    2011-06-01

    Recent field experience with optical sensor windows on both ground and airborne platforms has shown a significant increase in window fracturing from foreign object debris (FOD) impacts and as a by-product of asymmetrical warfare. Common optical sensor window materials such as borosilicate glass do not typically have high impact resistance. Emerging advanced optical window materials such as aluminum oxynitride offer the potential for a significant improvement in FOD impact resistance due to their superior surface hardness, fracture toughness and strength properties. To confirm the potential impact resistance improvement achievable with these emerging materials, Goodrich ISR Systems in collaboration with Surmet Corporation undertook a set of comparative FOD impact tests of optical sensor windows made from borosilicate glass and from aluminum oxynitride. It was demonstrated that the aluminum oxynitride windows could withstand up to three times the FOD impact velocity (as compared with borosilicate glass) before fracture would occur. These highly encouraging test results confirm the utility of this new highly viable window solution for use on new ground and airborne window multispectral applications as well as a retrofit to current production windows. We believe that this solution can go a long way to significantly reducing the frequency and life cycle cost of window replacement.

  9. Effects of thermally grown native oxides on the luminescence properties of compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. R.; Dupuis, R. D.; Curtis, A. P.; Stillman, G. E.

    1996-08-01

    Data are presented on the luminescence characteristics of GaAs layers adjacent to native-oxide regions derived from epitaxial AlGaAs and InAlP films. The native-oxide ``window'' layers capping the epitaxial structures are formed by the oxidation of the exposed Al0.9Ga0.1As and In0.48Al0.52P cladding layers. Extensive photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence studies performed at 300 K show that both the luminescence intensity and lifetime from GaAs ``active regions'' drop dramatically when the adjacent AlGaAs window layer is oxidized completely. However, there is a marked increase in the efficiency and decay time of the luminescence with the oxidation of InAlP window layers which are grown immediately above the GaAs layer.

  10. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Paul R.; Shapira, Hanna B.

    1981-01-01

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  11. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

    1979-12-07

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  12. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    A slab window is defined as an 'hole' in the subducting lithosphere. In the classical view, slab windows develop where a spreading ridge intersects a subduction zone. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. In this work, we perform dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models, to evaluate how the opening of a window in the subducting panel influences the geometry and the kinematics of the slab, the mantle circulation pattern and, finally, the overriding plate dynamic topography. The adopted setup consists in a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the roll-back of a fixed subducting plate (simulated using silicone putty) into the upper mantle (simulated using glucose syrup). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We find that the geometry and the kinematics of the slab are only minorly affected by the opening of a slab window. On the contrary, slab induced mantle circulation, quantified using Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified and produces a peculiar non-isostatic topographic signal on the overriding plate. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compare them to the Patagonian subduction zone finding that anomalous backarc volcanism that developed since middle Miocene could result from the lateral flowage of subslab mantle, and that part of the Patagonian uplift could be dynamically supported.

  13. Lithography process window analysis with calibrated model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhan; Yu, Jin; Lo, James; Liu, Johnson

    2004-05-01

    As critical-dimension shrink below 0.13 μm, the SPC (Statistical Process Control) based on CD (Critical Dimension) control in lithography process becomes more difficult. Increasing requirements of a shrinking process window have called on the need for more accurate decision of process window center. However in practical fabrication, we found that systematic error introduced by metrology and/or resist process can significantly impact the process window analysis result. Especially, when the simple polynomial functions are used to fit the lithographic data from focus exposure matrix (FEM), the model will fit these systematic errors rather than filter them out. This will definitely impact the process window analysis and determination of the best process condition. In this paper, we proposed to use a calibrated first principle model to do process window analysis. With this method, the systematic metrology error can be filtered out efficiently and give a more reasonable window analysis result.

  14. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  15. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  16. Laser with a transmitting window.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, M. B.; Lamb, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of transmission of radiation through one mirror of a laser is investigated. For a laser oscillator the result is to change the effective resonance frequency and Q of the cavity. Using the same model for the cavity, a signal is injected into the active medium through the transmitting window, and its effect on the system studied. When the external signal is strong enough and sufficiently close to the natural frequency of the laser oscillator, the laser locks its frequency to the input signal. The equations describing the system are solved over the range of input frequencies where the laser is locked, and the resulting gain found. In the high-intensity limit the medium saturates, and the gain tends to that of a lossy cavity. As the input intensity vanishes, the gain approaches infinity and the system tends to a laser oscillator.

  17. UW: A Macintosh UNIX window interface. [Macintosh

    SciTech Connect

    Bruner, J.D.

    1985-09-25

    A window interface to a 4.2 BSD UNIX system has been implemented on an Apple Macintosh personal computer. This interface supports a maximum of seven independent terminal sessions, each in its own window. Each window simulates a ''smart'' cursor-addressible 24 x 80 terminal. The implementation requires no changes to the UNIX kernel and imposes so little overhead as to be useful even at the low baud rates of dial-up lines.

  18. Window Observational Rack Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Developed by Boeing, at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Space Station Manufacturing building, the Window Observational Rack Facility (WORF) will help Space Station crews take some of the best photographs ever snapped from an orbiting spacecraft by eliminating glare and allowing researchers to control their cameras and other equipment from the ground. The WORF is designed to make the best possible use of the high-quality research window in the Space Station's U.S. Destiny laboratory module. Engineers at the MSFC proposed a derivative of the EXPRESS (Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station) Rack already used on the Space Station and were given the go-ahead. The EXPRESS rack can hold a wide variety of experiments and provide them with power, communications, data, cooling, fluids, and other utilities - all the things that Earth-observing experiment instruments would need. WORF will supply payloads with power, data, cooling, video downlink, and stable, standardized interfaces for mounting imaging instruments. Similar to specialized orbital observatories, the interior of the rack is sealed against light and coated with a special low-reflectant black paint, so payloads will be able to observe low-light-level subjects such as the faint glow of auroras. Cameras and remote sensing instruments in the WORF can be preprogrammed, controlled from the ground, or operated by a Station crewmember by using a flexible shroud designed to cinch tightly around the crewmember's waist. The WORF is scheduled to be launched aboard the STS-114 Space Shuttle mission in the year 2003.

  19. Performance tests of large thin vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Hall Crannell

    2011-02-01

    Tests of thin composition vacuum windows of the type used for the Tagger in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are described. Three different tests have been performed. These include: (1) measurement of the deformation and durability of a window under long term (>8 years) almost continuous vacuum load, (2) measurement of the deformation as a function of flexing of the window as it is cycled between vacuum and atmosphere, and (3) measurement of the relative diffusion rate of gas through a variety of thin window membranes.

  20. Window type: 2x3 fixed multipaned steel window flanked by 1x3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window type: 2x3 fixed multipaned steel window flanked by 1x3 multipaned steel casements. Concrete sill and spandrel also illustrated. Building 43, facing east - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Thermally insulated window sash construction for a casement window

    SciTech Connect

    Biro, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    A window sash member is described comprising: first and second generally parallel sidewalls; first and second spaced, generally parallel transverse walls connecting the first and second sidewalls, extending between and oriented generally perpendicular to the first and second sidewalls to define a first hollow chamber; a third transverse wall, located without the first hollow chamber adjacent to and generally parallel to the first transverse wall, extending from the first sidewall and terminating short of the second sidewall; a first interior wall extending from the third transverse wall to the first transverse wall and oriented generally parallel to the first sidewall to define a second hollow chamber; a fourth transverse wall, located without the first hollow chamber adjacent to and generally to the second transverse wall, extending from the first sidewall and terminating short of the second sidewall; and a second interior wall extending from the fourth transverse wall to the second transverse wall and oriented generally parallel to the second sidewall to define a third hollow chamber.

  2. GaAs/AlGaAs resonant tunneling diodes with a GaInNAs absorption layer for telecommunication light sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, F.; Langer, F.; Bisping, D.; Musterer, A.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Forchel, A.; Worschech, L.

    2012-04-01

    Al0.6Ga0.4As/GaAs/Al0.6Ga0.4As double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes (RTD) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy with a nearby, lattice-matched Ga0.89In0.11N0.04As0.96 absorption layer. RTD mesas with ring contacts and an aperture for optical excitation of charge carriers were fabricated on the epitaxial layers. Electrical and optical properties of the RTDs were investigated for different thicknesses of a thin GaAs spacer layer incorporated between the AlGaAs tunnel barrier adjacent to the GaInNAs absorption layer. Illumination of the RTDs with laser light of 1.3 μm wavelength leads to a pronounced photo-effect with a sensitivities of around 103 A/W.

  3. Glass-windowed ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Tostein; Gilja, Odd Helge; Cochran, Sandy; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2016-05-01

    In research and industrial processes, it is increasingly common practice to combine multiple measurement modalities. Nevertheless, experimental tools that allow the co-linear combination of optical and ultrasonic transmission have rarely been reported. The aim of this study was to develop and characterise a water-matched ultrasound transducer architecture using standard components, with a central optical window larger than 10 mm in diameter allowing for optical transmission. The window can be used to place illumination or imaging apparatus such as light guides, miniature cameras, or microscope objectives, simplifying experimental setups. Four design variations of a basic architecture were fabricated and characterised with the objective to assess whether the variations influence the acoustic output. The basic architecture consisted of a piezoelectric ring and a glass disc, with an aluminium casing. The designs differed in piezoelectric element dimensions: inner diameter, ID=10 mm, outer diameter, OD=25 mm, thickness, TH=4 mm or ID=20 mm, OD=40 mm, TH=5 mm; glass disc dimensions OD=20-50 mm, TH=2-4 mm; and details of assembly. The transducers' frequency responses were characterised using electrical impedance spectroscopy and pulse-echo measurements, the acoustic propagation pattern using acoustic pressure field scans, the acoustic power output using radiation force balance measurements, and the acoustic pressure using a needle hydrophone. Depending on the design and piezoelectric element dimensions, the resonance frequency was in the range 350-630 kHz, the -6 dB bandwidth was in the range 87-97%, acoustic output power exceeded 1 W, and acoustic pressure exceeded 1 MPa peak-to-peak. 3D stress simulations were performed to predict the isostatic pressure required to induce material failure and 4D acoustic simulations. The pressure simulations indicated that specific design variations could sustain isostatic pressures up to 4.8 MPa.The acoustic simulations were able to

  4. Glass-windowed ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Tostein; Gilja, Odd Helge; Cochran, Sandy; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2016-05-01

    In research and industrial processes, it is increasingly common practice to combine multiple measurement modalities. Nevertheless, experimental tools that allow the co-linear combination of optical and ultrasonic transmission have rarely been reported. The aim of this study was to develop and characterise a water-matched ultrasound transducer architecture using standard components, with a central optical window larger than 10 mm in diameter allowing for optical transmission. The window can be used to place illumination or imaging apparatus such as light guides, miniature cameras, or microscope objectives, simplifying experimental setups. Four design variations of a basic architecture were fabricated and characterised with the objective to assess whether the variations influence the acoustic output. The basic architecture consisted of a piezoelectric ring and a glass disc, with an aluminium casing. The designs differed in piezoelectric element dimensions: inner diameter, ID=10 mm, outer diameter, OD=25 mm, thickness, TH=4 mm or ID=20 mm, OD=40 mm, TH=5 mm; glass disc dimensions OD=20-50 mm, TH=2-4 mm; and details of assembly. The transducers' frequency responses were characterised using electrical impedance spectroscopy and pulse-echo measurements, the acoustic propagation pattern using acoustic pressure field scans, the acoustic power output using radiation force balance measurements, and the acoustic pressure using a needle hydrophone. Depending on the design and piezoelectric element dimensions, the resonance frequency was in the range 350-630 kHz, the -6 dB bandwidth was in the range 87-97%, acoustic output power exceeded 1 W, and acoustic pressure exceeded 1 MPa peak-to-peak. 3D stress simulations were performed to predict the isostatic pressure required to induce material failure and 4D acoustic simulations. The pressure simulations indicated that specific design variations could sustain isostatic pressures up to 4.8 MPa.The acoustic simulations were able to

  5. Measured Rattle Threshold of Residential House Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizov, Natalia; Schultz, Troy; Hobbs, Christopher; Klos, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Window rattle is a common indoor noise effect in houses exposed to low frequency noise from such sources as railroads, blast noise and sonic boom. Human perception of rattle can be negative that is a motivating factor of the current research effort to study sonic boom induced window rattle. A rattle study has been conducted on residential houses containing windows of different construction at a variety of geographic locations within the United States. Windows in these houses were excited by a portable, high-powered loudspeaker and enclosure specifically designed to be mounted on the house exterior to cover an entire window. Window vibration was measured with accelerometers placed on different window components. Reference microphones were also placed inside the house and inside of the loudspeaker box. Swept sine excitation was used to identify the vibration threshold at which the response of the structure becomes non-linear and begins to rattle. Initial results from this study are presented and discussed. Future efforts will continue to explore the rattle occurrence in windows of residential houses exposed to sonic booms.

  6. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  7. Windows for X-ray Cryostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavoni, Michael L.; Mulders, Norbert; Lurio, Laurence; Paetkau, Mark; Jemian, Pete R.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec

    2006-09-01

    We have measured the small angle x-ray scattering from Kapton and Mylar films used as cryostat windows. Both Mylar and Kapton can be used to make very simple, demountable, superfluid tight windows using indium o-ring seals. Aluminized Mylar offers the advantage of effectively blocking infrared radiation while simultaneously reducing helium diffusion rates at room temperature by a factor of 25.

  8. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery. PMID:27583011

  9. Mouse Driven Window Graphics for Network Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makinson, G. J.; And Others

    Computer enhanced teaching of computational mathematics on a network system driving graphics terminals is being redeveloped for a mouse-driven, high resolution, windowed environment of a UNIX work station. Preservation of the features of networked access by heterogeneous terminals is provided by the use of the X Window environment. A dmonstrator…

  10. Measure Guideline: Window Repair, Rehabilitation, and Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.

    2012-12-01

    This measure guideline provides information and guidance on rehabilitating, retrofitting, and replacing existing window assemblies in residential construction. The intent is to provide information regarding means and methods to improve the energy and comfort performance of existing wood window assemblies in a way that takes into consideration component durability, in-service operation, and long term performance of the strategies.

  11. A monolithic thin film electrochromic window

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, R.B.; Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Haas, T.E.; Wong, K.K.; Wei, G.; Yu, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    Three closely related thin film solid state ionic devices that are potentially important for applications are: electrochromic smart windows, high energy density thin film rechargeable batteries, and thin film electrochemical sensors. Each usually has at least on mixed ion/electron conductor, an electron-blocking ion conductor, and an ion-blocking electron conductor, and many of the technical issues associated with thin film solid state ionics are common to all three devices. Since the electrochromic window has the added technical requirement of electrically-controlled optical modulation, (over the solar spectrum), and since research at the authors` institution has focused primarily on the window structure, this paper will address the electrochromic window, and particularly a monolithic variable reflectivity electrochromic window, as an illustrative example of some of the challenges and opportunities that are confronting the thin film solid state ionics community. 33 refs.

  12. A monolithic thin film electrochromic window

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, R.B.; Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Haas, T.E.; Wong, K.K. . Electro-Optics Technology Center); Wei, G. ); Yu, P.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Three closely related thin film solid state ionic devices that are potentially important for applications are: electrochromic smart windows, high energy density thin film rechargeable batteries, and thin film electrochemical sensors. Each usually has at least on mixed ion/electron conductor, an electron-blocking ion conductor, and an ion-blocking electron conductor, and many of the technical issues associated with thin film solid state ionics are common to all three devices. Since the electrochromic window has the added technical requirement of electrically-controlled optical modulation, (over the solar spectrum), and since research at the authors' institution has focused primarily on the window structure, this paper will address the electrochromic window, and particularly a monolithic variable reflectivity electrochromic window, as an illustrative example of some of the challenges and opportunities that are confronting the thin film solid state ionics community. 33 refs.

  13. THERM 5 / WINDOW 5 NFRC simulation manual

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Robin; Kohler, Christian; Arasteh, Dariush; Carmody, John; Huizenga, Charlie; Curcija, Dragan

    2003-06-01

    This document, the ''THERM 5/WINDOW 5 NFRC Simulation Manual', discusses how to use the THERM and WINDOW programs to model products for NFRC certified simulations and assumes that the user is already familiar with those programs. In order to learn how to use these programs, it is necessary to become familiar with the material in both the ''THERM User's Manual'' and the ''WINDOW User's Manual''. In general, this manual references the User's Manuals rather than repeating the information. If there is a conflict between either of the User Manual and this ''THERM 5/''WINDOW 5 NFRC Simulation Manual'', the ''THERM 5/WINDOW 5 NFRC Simulation Manual'' takes precedence. In addition, if this manual is in conflict with any NFRC standards, the standards take precedence. For example, if samples in this manual do not follow the current taping and testing NFRC standards, the standards not the samples in this manual, take precedence.

  14. Reliability study of TWT output RF window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocci, Peter J.

    1990-05-01

    Rome Air Development Center Computer-Aided Systems Engineering Branch (RBES) has documented an in-house effort to evaluate the structural reliability of the output waveguides window on a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT). This window acts as a seal between the TWT's vacuum envelope and output waveguide. Its purpose is to prevent any loss due to leakage of the vacuum while allowing passage of the microwave signal. This particular disk-shaped window is constructed of a ceramic material, beryllia, and contains an inner ring of copper and an outer ring of Monel K-500 (70 to 30 nickle-copper). It was suspected that excessive thermal stresses associated with the very high operating temperatures by this window has caused it to fail. Finite element analyses, along with material failure theories were used to determine the window's response to a time-dependent heat source and operating heat sink temperature.

  15. Study of periodic surface profile on improving the window capacity at single and repetitive pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. S.; Zhang, X. W.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Shao, H.; Wang, Y.; Liu, W. Y.; Ke, C. F.; Chen, C. H.; Liang, Y. Q.; Wu, X. L.; Guo, L. T.; Chang, C.

    2015-09-15

    The surface breakdown of dielectric windows seriously limits the transmission of high power microwaves (HPM), and has blocked the development of microwave technology in recent decades. In this paper, X-band HPM experiments of window breakdown at the vacuum/dielectric interface and the atmosphere/dielectric interface at single and repetitive pulses were conducted. The cross-linked polystyrene (CLPS) dielectric window with a periodic surface profile can significantly improve the breakdown threshold at single and repetitive pulses. Furthermore, the flat surface layer of CLPS was discovered to be carbonized to a depth of several millimeters and filled with electrical trees at repetitive pulses. Theoretical models were built to understand the underlying physics behind the phenomena in experiments. With the analysis of the electron resonance process breaking the molecular bond and the temperature rise caused by the traversing current in the dielectric material, a microscopic explanation for the carbonization of the dielectric window was introduced.

  16. Long-term imaging in awake mice using removable cranial windows

    PubMed Central

    Glickfeld, Lindsey L.; Kerlin, Aaron M.; Reid, R. Clay; Bonin, Vincent; Schafer, Dorothy P.; Andermann, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Cranial window implants in head-fixed rodents are becoming a preparation of choice for stable optical access to large areas of cortex over extended periods of time. Here, we provide a highly detailed and reliable surgical protocol for a cranial window implantation procedure for chronic widefield and cellular imaging in awake, head-fixed mice, which enables subsequent window removal and replacement in the weeks and months following the initial craniotomy. This protocol has facilitated awake, chronic imaging in adolescent as well as adult mice over several months from a large number of cortical brain regions; targeted virus and tracer injections from data obtained using prior awake functional mapping; and functionally-targeted two-photon imaging across all cortical layers in awake mice using a microprism attachment to the cranial window. Collectively, these procedures extend the reach of chronic imaging of cortical function and dysfunction in behaving animals. PMID:25275789

  17. Visual and energy performance of switchable windows with antireflection coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, Andreas; Roos, Arne

    2010-08-15

    The aim of this project was to investigate how the visual appearance and energy performance of switchable or smart windows can be improved by using antireflective coatings. For this study clear float glass, low-e glass and electrochromic glass were treated with antireflection (AR) coatings. Such a coating considerably increases the transmittance of solar radiation in general and the visible transmittance in particular. For switchable glazing based on absorptive electrochromic layers in their dark state it is necessary to use a low-emissivity coating on the inner pane of a double glazed window in order to reject the absorbed heat. In principle all surfaces can be coated with AR coatings, and it was shown that a thin AR coating on the low-e surface neither influences the thermal emissivity nor the U-value of the glazing. The study showed that the use of AR coatings in switchable glazing significantly increases the light transmittance in the transparent state. It is believed that this is important for a high level of user acceptance of such windows. (author)

  18. Double window configuration as a low cost microwave waveguide window for plasma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.

    1997-12-01

    Waveguide windows are major components of a transmission line used in microwave plasma devices. The function of the waveguide window is to provide vacuum isolation of the source side from the plasma chamber while transmitting microwaves with minimum attenuation. Commonly a single thin dielectric plate is sandwiched between a choke type flange and a flat flange and is used as a waveguide window. To arrive at a better window configuration in terms of the low power reflection coefficient, the voltage standing wave ratio calculation is carried out for different window configurations (single window and double window) and for various window thicknesses. It is found that the power reflection is the minimum in the case of double window configuration. The minimum power reflection is as low as 0.8{percent} for a combination of alumina and a quartz plate each of 1 cm thickness in the double window configuration. Also, it is more advantageous to use radial microwave coupling than axial coupling in order to increase the life time of the microwave waveguide window. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Window Insulation: How to Sort Through the Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara

    This two-part report explores the efforts of businesses and individuals to improve the thermal performance of windows. Part I discusses the basics of what makes a window product insulate or save energy. Topic areas addressed include saving energy lost through windows, key components of window insulation, three basic types of window insulation,…

  20. Air leakage of newly instaled residential windows

    SciTech Connect

    Weidt, J.; Weidt, J.

    1980-06-01

    The air-leakage characteristics of five major window designs were measured in a field survey conducted in Twin Cities, Minnesota. A total of 192 windows (16 manufacturers) were tested at 58 sites representing a cross-section of single-family homes, townhouses, low- and high-rise apartments, and condominiums. Air-leakage measurements of the installed windows were compared with the current standard used by industry and government of 0.50 ft/sup 3//min/linear ft of crack. Other parameters studied were: effect of sash and frame material, effect of leakage between window frame and wall, differences among the product lines of a single manufacturer and between manufacturers, effect of installation practices, effect of cold weather on performance, change in performance over time for older windows, and performance of fixed glazing. Based on industry and government standards, 40% of all windows tested showed air-leakage characteristics higher than the 0.50 cfm/lfc standard, and 60% exceeded manufacturers' specifications for performance which in some cases were lower than the general industry standard. Analysis of the impact of various parameters on air-leakage performance showed that the operational design of the window was the most critical determinant although the ranking changes if performance is expressed in cfm/unit area or cfm/opening area. Air leakage was measured using a portable pressurization chamber. Smoke pencils, thermographic techniques and extensive photographic documentation provided additional data as to the location and cause of air leakage problems.

  1. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  2. AN ASSESSMENT OF MCNP WEIGHT WINDOWS

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. HENDRICKS; C. N. CULBERTSON

    2000-01-01

    The weight window variance reduction method in the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code MCNPTM has recently been rewritten. In particular, it is now possible to generate weight window importance functions on a superimposed mesh, eliminating the need to subdivide geometries for variance reduction purposes. Our assessment addresses the following questions: (1) Does the new MCNP4C treatment utilize weight windows as well as the former MCNP4B treatment? (2) Does the new MCNP4C weight window generator generate importance functions as well as MCNP4B? (3) How do superimposed mesh weight windows compare to cell-based weight windows? (4) What are the shortcomings of the new MCNP4C weight window generator? Our assessment was carried out with five neutron and photon shielding problems chosen for their demanding variance reduction requirements. The problems were an oil well logging problem, the Oak Ridge fusion shielding benchmark problem, a photon skyshine problem, an air-over-ground problem, and a sample problem for variance reduction.

  3. The conformal window from the worldline formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armoni, Adi

    2010-02-01

    We use the worldline formalism to derive a universal relation for the lower boundary of the conformal window in non-supersymmetric QCD-like theories. The derivation relies on the convergence of the expansion of the fermionic determinant in terms of Wilson loops. The expansion shares a similarity with the lattice strong coupling expansion and the genus expansion in string theory. Our result relates the lower boundary of the conformal window in theories with different representations and different gauge groups. Finally, we use SQCD to estimate the boundary of the conformal window in QCD-like theories and compare it with other approaches.

  4. DETAIL OF GROUND, MEZZANINE, AND FIRST FLOOW WINDOW OPENINGS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF GROUND, MEZZANINE, AND FIRST FLOOW WINDOW OPENINGS AT CORNER OF CLAY AND 15TH STREETS. WINDOWS AND WINDOW FRAMES REMOVED - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. Field Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, S. Craig; Kohler, Christian; Minen, Stefanie

    2007-07-11

    A field evaluation comparing the performance of low emittance (low-e) storm windows with both standard clear storm windows and no storm windows was performed in a cold climate. Six homes with single-pane windows were monitored over the period of one heating season. The homes were monitored with no storm windows and with new storm windows. The storm windows installed on four of the six homes included a hard coat, pyrolitic, low-e coating while the storm windows for the other two homeshad traditional clear glass. Overall heating load reduction due to the storm windows was 13percent with the clear glass and 21percent with the low-e windows. Simple paybacks for the addition of the storm windows were 10 years for the clear glass and 4.5 years forthe low-e storm windows.

  6. Design considerations of CareWindows, a Windows 3.0-based graphical front end to a Medical Information Management System using a pass-through-requester architecture.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, R. E.; Purves, T.; Feldman, M.; Schiffman, R. M.; Barry, S.; Christner, M.; Kipa, G.; McCarthy, B. D.; Stiphout, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Care Windows development project demonstrated the feasibility of an approach designed to add the benefits of an event-driven, graphically-oriented user interface to an existing Medical Information Management System (MIMS) without overstepping economic and logistic constraints. The design solution selected for the Care Windows project incorporates three important design features: (1) the effective de-coupling of severs from requesters, permitting the use of an extensive pre-existing library of MIMS servers, (2) the off-loading of program control functions of the requesters to the workstation processor, reducing the load per transaction on central resources and permitting the use of object-oriented development environments available for microcomputers, (3) the selection of a low end, GUI-capable workstation consisting of a PC-compatible personal computer running Microsoft Windows 3.0, and (4) the development of a highly layered, modular workstation application, permitting the development of interchangeable modules to insure portability and adaptability. PMID:1807665

  7. Design considerations of CareWindows, a Windows 3.0-based graphical front end to a Medical Information Management System using a pass-through-requester architecture.

    PubMed

    Ward, R E; Purves, T; Feldman, M; Schiffman, R M; Barry, S; Christner, M; Kipa, G; McCarthy, B D; Stiphout, R

    1991-01-01

    The Care Windows development project demonstrated the feasibility of an approach designed to add the benefits of an event-driven, graphically-oriented user interface to an existing Medical Information Management System (MIMS) without overstepping economic and logistic constraints. The design solution selected for the Care Windows project incorporates three important design features: (1) the effective de-coupling of severs from requesters, permitting the use of an extensive pre-existing library of MIMS servers, (2) the off-loading of program control functions of the requesters to the workstation processor, reducing the load per transaction on central resources and permitting the use of object-oriented development environments available for microcomputers, (3) the selection of a low end, GUI-capable workstation consisting of a PC-compatible personal computer running Microsoft Windows 3.0, and (4) the development of a highly layered, modular workstation application, permitting the development of interchangeable modules to insure portability and adaptability.

  8. NREL Electrochromic Window Research Wins Award

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Winners of the CO-LABS Governor's Award for High-Impact Research in Energy Efficiency, Dr. Satyen Deb at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that a small electrical charge can change the opacity of tungsten oxide from clear to tinted. He, Dr. Dane Gillaspie, and their fellow scientists at NREL then applied this knowledge to develop and transfer the technologies required to construct an electrochromic window, which can switch between clear and heavily tinted states. Electrochromic windows allow natural light in while adding tint to reduce summer heat and glare, and going clear to allow sunlight through in the winter. Broad adaptation of these windows could reduce US total energy use by four percent and reduce building cooling loads by 20%, much of this during expensive peak hours. Windows based on these discoveries are now being installed worldwide.

  9. The window of opportunity for treatment withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dominic

    2011-03-01

    Physicians sometimes refer to a "window of opportunity" for withdrawing life-sustaining treatment in patients with acute severe brain injury. There is a period of critical illness and physiological instability when treatment withdrawal is likely to be followed by death but prognosis is uncertain. If decisions are delayed, greater prognostic certainty can be achieved, but with the risk that the patient is no longer dependent on life support and survives with very severe disability. In this article I draw on the example of birth asphyxia and highlight the role that the window of opportunity sometimes plays in decisions about life-sustaining treatment in intensive care. I outline the potential arguments in favor of and against taking the window into account. I argue that it is, at least sometimes, ethical and appropriate for physicians and parents to be influenced by the window of opportunity in their decisions about life-sustaining treatment.

  10. NREL Electrochromic Window Research Wins Award

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Winners of the CO-LABS Governor's Award for High-Impact Research in Energy Efficiency, Dr. Satyen Deb at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that a small electrical charge can change the opacity of tungsten oxide from clear to tinted. He, Dr. Dane Gillaspie, and their fellow scientists at NREL then applied this knowledge to develop and transfer the technologies required to construct an electrochromic window, which can switch between clear and heavily tinted states. Electrochromic windows allow natural light in while adding tint to reduce summer heat and glare, and going clear to allow sunlight through in the winter. Broad adaptation of these windows could reduce US total energy use by four percent and reduce building cooling loads by 20%, much of this during expensive peak hours. Windows based on these discoveries are now being installed worldwide.

  11. Holographic window for solar power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasezawa, Toshihiro; Horimai, Hideyoshi; Tabuchi, Hiroshi; Shimura, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    A new photovoltaic generation unit based on the application of holographic technologies called a Holo-Window is proposed in this work. The basic principle and the optical configuration used for the basic experimental unit are described. Suitable fabrication technology for a hologram with the broadband spectrum required to provide the appropriate sunlight capture capability is then discussed. Finally, a laboratory-prototype Holo-Window unit was developed and its performance was evaluated.

  12. Electrochromic sun control coverings for windows

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D K; Tracy, C E

    1990-04-01

    The 2 billion square meters (m{sup 2}) of building windows in the United States cause a national energy drain almost as large as the energy supply of the Alaskan oil pipeline. Unlike the pipeline, the drain of energy through windows will continue well into the 21st century. A part of this energy drain is due to unwanted sun gain through windows. This is a problem throughout the country in commercial buildings because they generally require air conditioning even in cold climates. New commercial windows create an additional 1600 MW demand for peak electric power in the United States each year. Sun control films, widely used in new windows and as retrofits to old windows, help to mitigate this problem. However, conventional, static solar control films also block sunlight when it is wanted for warmth and daylighting. New electrochromic, switchable, sun-gain-control films now under development will provide more nearly optimal and automatic sun control for added comfort, decreased building operating expense, and greater energy saving. Switchable, electrochromic films can be deposited on polymers at high speeds by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) in a process that may be suitable for roll coating. This paper describes the electrochromic coatings and the PECVD processes, and speculates about their adaptability to high-speed roll coating. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Window Size Impact in Human Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Banos, Oresti; Galvez, Juan-Manuel; Damas, Miguel; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Signal segmentation is a crucial stage in the activity recognition process; however, this has been rarely and vaguely characterized so far. Windowing approaches are normally used for segmentation, but no clear consensus exists on which window size should be preferably employed. In fact, most designs normally rely on figures used in previous works, but with no strict studies that support them. Intuitively, decreasing the window size allows for a faster activity detection, as well as reduced resources and energy needs. On the contrary, large data windows are normally considered for the recognition of complex activities. In this work, we present an extensive study to fairly characterize the windowing procedure, to determine its impact within the activity recognition process and to help clarify some of the habitual assumptions made during the recognition system design. To that end, some of the most widely used activity recognition procedures are evaluated for a wide range of window sizes and activities. From the evaluation, the interval 1–2 s proves to provide the best trade-off between recognition speed and accuracy. The study, specifically intended for on-body activity recognition systems, further provides designers with a set of guidelines devised to facilitate the system definition and configuration according to the particular application requirements and target activities. PMID:24721766

  14. Window size impact in human activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Banos, Oresti; Galvez, Juan-Manuel; Damas, Miguel; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Signal segmentation is a crucial stage in the activity recognition process; however, this has been rarely and vaguely characterized so far. Windowing approaches are normally used for segmentation, but no clear consensus exists on which window size should be preferably employed. In fact, most designs normally rely on figures used in previous works, but with no strict studies that support them. Intuitively, decreasing the window size allows for a faster activity detection, as well as reduced resources and energy needs. On the contrary, large data windows are normally considered for the recognition of complex activities. In this work, we present an extensive study to fairly characterize the windowing procedure, to determine its impact within the activity recognition process and to help clarify some of the habitual assumptions made during the recognition system design. To that end, some of the most widely used activity recognition procedures are evaluated for a wide range of window sizes and activities. From the evaluation, the interval 1-2 s proves to provide the best trade-off between recognition speed and accuracy. The study, specifically intended for on-body activity recognition systems, further provides designers with a set of guidelines devised to facilitate the system definition and configuration according to the particular application requirements and target activities. PMID:24721766

  15. Windowed multipole for cross section Doppler broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josey, C.; Ducru, P.; Forget, B.; Smith, K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an in-depth analysis on the accuracy and performance of the windowed multipole Doppler broadening method. The basic theory behind cross section data is described, along with the basic multipole formalism followed by the approximations leading to windowed multipole method and the algorithm used to efficiently evaluate Doppler broadened cross sections. The method is tested by simulating the BEAVRS benchmark with a windowed multipole library composed of 70 nuclides. Accuracy of the method is demonstrated on a single assembly case where total neutron production rates and 238U capture rates compare within 0.1% to ACE format files at the same temperature. With regards to performance, clock cycle counts and cache misses were measured for single temperature ACE table lookup and for windowed multipole. The windowed multipole method was found to require 39.6% more clock cycles to evaluate, translating to a 7.9% performance loss overall. However, the algorithm has significantly better last-level cache performance, with 3 fewer misses per evaluation, or a 65% reduction in last-level misses. This is due to the small memory footprint of the windowed multipole method and better memory access pattern of the algorithm.

  16. Scale up of large ALON windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Kashalikar, Uday; Foti, Robyn; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALON® Optical Ceramic) combines broadband transparency with excellent mechanical properties. ALON's cubic structure means that it is transparent in its polycrystalline form, allowing it to be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques. Surmet has established a robust manufacturing process, beginning with synthesis of ALON® powder, continuing through forming/heat treatment of blanks, and ending with optical fabrication of ALON® windows. Surmet has made significant progress in our production capability in recent years. Additional scale up of Surmet's manufacturing capability, for larger sizes and higher quantities, is currently underway. ALON® transparent armor represents the state of the art in protection against armor piercing threats, offering a factor of two in weight and thickness savings over conventional glass laminates. Tiled and monolithic windows have been successfully produced and tested against a range of threats. Large ALON® window are also of interest to a range of visible to Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) sensor applications. These applications often have stressing imaging requirements which in turn require that these large windows have optical characteristics including excellent homogeneity of index of refraction and very low stress birefringence. Surmet is currently scaling up its production facility to be able to make and deliver ALON® monolithic windows as large as ~19x36-in. Additionally, Surmet has plans to scale up to windows ~3ftx3ft in size in the coming years. Recent results with scale up and characterization of the resulting blanks will be presented.

  17. Dynamics of Mantle Circulation Associated with Slab Window Formation: Insights from 3D Laboratory Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, B.; Funiciello, F.; Moroni, M.; Faccenna, C.; Martinod, J.

    2009-12-01

    Slab window can form either by the intersection of a spreading ridge with a subduction zone or because of internal deformation of the slab that leads to its disruption. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. We performed laboratory models of a two-layer linear viscous slab (silicone putty)-upper mantle (glucose syrup) system to quantitatively investigate the pattern of mantle circulation within the slab window (using Feature Tracking image analysis technique) and its influence on the kinematics of the system. Two different geometries have been tested considering a window located (a) at slab edges or (b) within the slab. Kinematic consequences of slab window have been explored to understand the dynamics of the mantle-slab interaction. Configuration (a) implies a reduction of the slab width (W) during subduction and is characterized by toroidal fluxes around the slab edges. The abrupt opening of lateral slab windows produces an acceleration of the trench retreat and subduction velocity, such as 40% for a three-fold width reduction. We interpret this behavior as mostly due to the decrease in the toroidal flow inside subduction windows, scaling with W2. Configuration (b) has been designed to explore the pattern of mantle flow within the window in the case of a laterally constrained subduction system. Slab window, which had a width (Ww) fixed to 15 % of the slab width, opened in the trench-perpendicular direction. It produced the formation of two toroidal mantle cells, centered on the slab midpoint and laterally growing as the slab window enlarged. Particles extruded through the slab window did not mix with particles located in the mantle wedge, the boundary between both reaching distances from the trench up to 3×Ww in the trench-perpendicular direction, and up to 1.5×Ww from the window edge in

  18. Electrochromic Windows: Process and Fabrication Improvements for Lower Total Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Burdis; Neil Sbar

    2007-03-31

    The overall goal with respect to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to achieve significant national energy savings through maximized penetration of EC windows into existing markets so that the largest cumulative energy reduction can be realized. The speed with which EC windows can be introduced and replace current IGU's (and current glazings) is clearly a strong function of cost. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate possible improvements to the SageGlass{reg_sign} EC glazing products to facilitate both process and fabrication improvements resulting in lower overall costs. The project was split into four major areas dealing with improvements to the electrochromic layer, the capping layer, defect elimination and general product improvements. Significant advancements have been made in each of the four areas. These can be summarized as follows: (1) Plasma assisted deposition for the electrochromic layer was pursued, and several improvements made to the technology for producing a plasma beam were made. Functional EC devices were produced using the new technology, but there are still questions to be answered regarding the intrinsic properties of the electrochromic films produced by this method. (2) The capping layer work was successfully implemented into the existing SageGlass{reg_sign} product, thereby providing a higher level of transparency and somewhat lower reflectivity than the 'standard' product. (3) Defect elimination is an ongoing effort, but this project spurred some major defect reduction programs, which led to significant improvements in yield, with all the implicit benefits afforded. In particular, major advances were made in the development of a new bus bar application process aimed at reducing the numbers of 'shorts' developed in the finished product, as well as making dramatic improvements in the methods used for tempering the glass, which had previously been seen to produce a defect which appeared as a pinhole. (4) Improvements have

  19. Fixed-rate layered multicast congestion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Zhang; Bing, Yuan; Zengji, Liu

    2006-10-01

    A new fixed-rate layered multicast congestion control algorithm called FLMCC is proposed. The sender of a multicast session transmits data packets at a fixed rate on each layer, while receivers each obtain different throughput by cumulatively subscribing to deferent number of layers based on their expected rates. In order to provide TCP-friendliness and estimate the expected rate accurately, a window-based mechanism implemented at receivers is presented. To achieve this, each receiver maintains a congestion window, adjusts it based on the GAIMD algorithm, and from the congestion window an expected rate is calculated. To measure RTT, a new method is presented which combines an accurate measurement with a rough estimation. A feedback suppression based on a random timer mechanism is given to avoid feedback implosion in the accurate measurement. The protocol is simple in its implementation. Simulations indicate that FLMCC shows good TCP-friendliness, responsiveness as well as intra-protocol fairness, and provides high link utilization.

  20. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Area-A beam window heat transfer alalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, D.

    1997-07-01

    Several analyses that investigate heat transfer in the Area-A beam window were conducted. It was found that the Area-A window should be able to withstand the 1-mA, 3-cm beam of the accelerator production of tritium materials test, but that the margins to failure are small. It was also determined that when the window is subjected to the 1-mA, 3-cm beam, the inner window thermocouples should read higher than the current temperature limit of 900{degrees}C, although it is possible that the thermocouples may fail before they reach these temperatures. Another finding of this study was that the actual beam width before April 1997 was 20 to 25% greater than the harp-wire printout indicated. Finally, the effect of a copper-oxide layer on the window coolant passage was studied. The results did not indicate the presence of a large copper-oxide layer; however, the results were not conclusive.

  1. Investigation of heat transfer in a triple-glazing type window at greek climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrachopoulos, Michalis; Koukou, Maria; Filos, George; Moraitis, Christos

    2013-12-01

    Heat loss through building windows has a major effect on the energy efficiency of the buildings. The window studied in this paper is a triple-glazing type window pane in which spaces contain dry air. The window is placed in a specially developed test chamber at the Energy and Environmental Research Laboratory of Central Greece University of Applied Sciences at Chalkida. At one side of the test chamber variable temperature environment for different temperature waving scenarios (20-30°C, 25-35°C, 20-35°C) adequate for Greek climate and at the other side steady constant temperature environment (20°C, 25°C) representing indoors conditions were created. Glass surface temperatures at both sides of the tested window pane and heat flux through it were measured. For triple-glazing thermal transmittance calculation a model of equations in visual basic was developed which accounts for the equations of conduction, convection and radiation in every layer of window pane. A sufficient agreement between the experimental results and the results of the model is noticed.

  2. Transforming the market for residential windows: design considerations for DOE's Efficient Window Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, J.; Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.

    1998-08-01

    Market adoption of recent, commercially available technological advances that improve the energy performance of windows will lead to immediate economic and energy savings benefits to the nation. This paper is a scoping study intended to inform the design of a major DOE initiative to accelerate market adoption of these windows in the residential sector. We describe the structure of the US residential window market and the interests of the various market players. We then briefly review five recent market transformation initiatives. Finally, we summarize our findings in a list of considerations we believe will be important for the DOE's initiative to transform the US residential window market.

  3. The design and testing of a highly insulating glazing system for use with conventional window systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Wolfe, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    In most areas of the United States, windows are by far the poorest insulating material used in buildings. As a result, approximately 3 percent of the nation's energy use is used to offset heat lost through windows. Under cold conditions, conventional double glazings create uncomfortable spaces and collect condensation. However, with the recent introduction of low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low/conductivity gas filling to respectively reduce radiative and conductive/convective heat transfer between glazing layers, some manufacturers are beginning to offer windows with R-values (resistance to heat transfer) of 4 hr-ft/sup 2/-F/Btu (0.70m/sup 2/-C/W). This papers presents designs for and analysis and test results of an insulated glass unit with a center-of-glass R-value of 8-10; approximately twice as good as gas-filled low-E units, and four times that of conventional double glazing. This high-R design starts with a conventional insulated-glass unit and adds two low-emissivity coatings, a thin glass middle glazing layer, and a Krypton or Krypton/Argon gas fill. The unit's overall width is 1 in. (25 mm) or less, consistent with most manufacturers' frame and sash design requirements. Using state-of-the-art low-emissivity coatings does not significantly degrade the solar heat gain potential or visible transmittance of the window. Work to date has substantiated this concept of a high-R window although specific components require further research and engineering development. Demonstration projects, in conjunction with utilities and several major window manufacturers, are planned. This high-R window design is the subject of a DOE patent application.

  4. Improving the thermal performance of vinyl-framed windows

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1992-10-01

    Over the last five years, vinyl-framed windows have gained an increased market share in both new and retrofit residential construction. This success has been mainly due to their low manufacturing cost and relatively good thermal performance (i.e., total window U-values with double glazing between 0.50 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F [2.86 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K] and 0.30 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F [1.70 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K]). Turning such windows into superwindows,'' windows with a U-value of 0.20 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F (1.14 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K) or less that can act as passive solar elements even on north-facing orientations in cold climates, requires further significant decreases in heat transfer through both the glazing system and the frame/edge. Three-layer glazing systems (those with two low-emissivity coatings and a low-conductivity gas fill) offer center-of-glass U-values as low as 0.10 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F (0.57 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K); such glazings are being manufactured today and can be incorporated into existing or new vinyl frame profiles. This paper focuses on the use of a state-of the-art infrared imaging system and a two-dimensional finite-difference model to improve the thermal performance of commercially available vinyl profiles and glazing edge systems. Such evaluation tools are extremely useful in identifying exactly which components and design features limit heat transfer and which act as thermal short circuits. Such an analysis is not possible with conventional whole-window testing in hot boxes where testing uncertainties with superwindows are often greater than proposed improvements.

  5. Improving the thermal performance of vinyl-framed windows

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1992-10-01

    Over the last five years, vinyl-framed windows have gained an increased market share in both new and retrofit residential construction. This success has been mainly due to their low manufacturing cost and relatively good thermal performance (i.e., total window U-values with double glazing between 0.50 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F [2.86 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K] and 0.30 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F [1.70 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K]). Turning such windows into ``superwindows,`` windows with a U-value of 0.20 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F (1.14 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K) or less that can act as passive solar elements even on north-facing orientations in cold climates, requires further significant decreases in heat transfer through both the glazing system and the frame/edge. Three-layer glazing systems (those with two low-emissivity coatings and a low-conductivity gas fill) offer center-of-glass U-values as low as 0.10 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F (0.57 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K); such glazings are being manufactured today and can be incorporated into existing or new vinyl frame profiles. This paper focuses on the use of a state-of the-art infrared imaging system and a two-dimensional finite-difference model to improve the thermal performance of commercially available vinyl profiles and glazing edge systems. Such evaluation tools are extremely useful in identifying exactly which components and design features limit heat transfer and which act as thermal short circuits. Such an analysis is not possible with conventional whole-window testing in hot boxes where testing uncertainties with superwindows are often greater than proposed improvements.

  6. Window contamination on Expose-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demets, R.; Bertrand, M.; Bolkhovitinov, A.; Bryson, K.; Colas, C.; Cottin, H.; Dettmann, J.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Elsaesser, A.; Jaramillo, E.; Lebert, M.; van Papendrecht, G.; Pereira, C.; Rohr, T.; Saiagh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Expose is a multi-user instrument for astrobiological and astrochemical experiments in space. Installed at the outer surface of the International Space Station, it enables investigators to study the impact of the open space environment on biological and biochemical test samples. Two Expose missions have been completed so far, designated as Expose-E (Rabbow et al. 2012) and Expose-R (Rabbow et al. this issue). One of the space-unique environmental factors offered by Expose is full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV)-rich electromagnetic radiation from the Sun. This paper describes and analyses how on Expose-R, access of the test samples to Solar radiation degraded during space exposure in an unpredicted way. Several windows in front of the Sun-exposed test samples acquired a brown shade, resulting in a reduced transparency in visible light, UV and vacuum UV (VUV). Post-flight investigations revealed the discolouration to be caused by a homogenous film of cross-linked organic polymers at the inside of the windows. The chemical signature varied per sample carrier. No such films were found on windows from sealed, pressurized compartments, or on windows that had been kept out of the Sun. This suggests that volatile compounds originating from the interior of the Expose facility were cross-linked and photo-fixed by Solar irradiation at the rear side of the windows. The origin of the volatiles was not fully identified; most probably there was a variety of sources involved including the biological test samples, adhesives, plastics and printed circuit boards. The outer surface of the windows (pointing into space) was chemically impacted as well, with a probable effect on the transparency in VUV. The reported analysis of the window contamination on Expose-R is expected to help the interpretation of the scientific results and offers possibilities to mitigate this problem on future missions - in particular Expose-R2, the direct successor of Expose-R.

  7. Low-resistivity photon-transparent window attached to photo-sensitive silicon detector

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2000-02-15

    The invention comprises a combination of a low resistivity, or electrically conducting, silicon layer that is transparent to long or short wavelength photons and is attached to the backside of a photon-sensitive layer of silicon, such as a silicon wafer or chip. The window is applied to photon sensitive silicon devices such as photodiodes, charge-coupled devices, active pixel sensors, low-energy x-ray sensors and other radiation detectors. The silicon window is applied to the back side of a photosensitive silicon wafer or chip so that photons can illuminate the device from the backside without interference from the circuit printed on the frontside. A voltage sufficient to fully deplete the high-resistivity photosensitive silicon volume of charge carriers is applied between the low-resistivity back window and the front, patterned, side of the device. This allows photon-induced charge created at the backside to reach the front side of the device and to be processed by any circuitry attached to the front side. Using the inventive combination, the photon sensitive silicon layer does not need to be thinned beyond standard fabrication methods in order to achieve full charge-depletion in the silicon volume. In one embodiment, the inventive backside window is applied to high resistivity silicon to allow backside illumination while maintaining charge isolation in CCD pixels.

  8. Development of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Carini, G.A.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2009-10-01

    A new set of thin-window silicon drift detectors composed of an array of hexagonal shaped detectors has been designed, constructed and tested for X-ray spectroscopy. Each individual ThinWinSDD has a thin entrance window on one side and a spiral shaped hexagonal cathode around a center anode on the other side. To produce the thin entrance window a 10 keV implantation of boron through a 500 A silicon dioxide was used. The implantation was followed by an annealing at 700 C for 30 min and a reactive ion etching step to ensure the removal of silicon dioxide from the smallest feature (5 mum). An aluminum layer is coated in the same vacuum system after back-sputtering. This step involves removing the native oxide that has formed on the top of the silicon substrate and then sputtering a 1100 A thick layer of aluminum onto the X-ray entrance window. The aluminum layer must be thick enough to block visible light, but thin enough to be transparent to soft X-rays down to 280 eV. We discuss first test results that include detector leakage current measurements and the response for multiple detectors exposed to the National Synchrotron Light Source's UV beam line U3C located at Brookhaven National Laboratory for X-ray energies as low as 280 eV.

  9. X-Windows Socket Widget Class

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.

    2006-01-01

    The X-Windows Socket Widget Class ("Class" is used here in the object-oriented-programming sense of the word) was devised to simplify the task of implementing network connections for graphical-user-interface (GUI) computer programs. UNIX Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) socket programming libraries require many method calls to configure, operate, and destroy sockets. Most X Windows GUI programs use widget sets or toolkits to facilitate management of complex objects. The widget standards facilitate construction of toolkits and application programs. The X-Windows Socket Widget Class encapsulates UNIX TCP/IP socket-management tasks within the framework of an X Windows widget. Using the widget framework, X Windows GUI programs can treat one or more network socket instances in the same manner as that of other graphical widgets, making it easier to program sockets. Wrapping ISP socket programming libraries inside a widget framework enables a programmer to treat a network interface as though it were a GUI.

  10. Rugged sensor window materials for harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayya, Shyam; Villalobos, Guillermo; Kim, Woohong; Sanghera, Jasbinger; Hunt, Michael; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.

    2014-09-01

    There are several military or commercial systems operating in very harsh environments that require rugged windows. On some of these systems, windows become the single point of failure. These applications include sensor or imaging systems, high-energy laser weapons systems, submarine photonic masts, IR countermeasures and missiles. Based on the sea or land or air based platforms the window or dome on these systems must withstand wave slap, underwater or ground based explosions, or survive flight through heavy rain and sand storms while maintaining good optical transmission in the desired wavelength range. Some of these applications still use softer ZnS or fused silica windows because of lack of availability of rugged materials in shapes or sizes required. Sapphire, ALON and spinel are very rugged materials with significantly higher strengths compared to ZnS and fused silica. There have been recent developments in spinel, ALON and sapphire materials to fabricate in large sizes and conformal shapes. We have been developing spinel ceramics for several of these applications. We are also developing β-SiC as a transparent window material as it has higher hardness, strength, and toughness than sapphire, ALON and spinel. This paper gives a summary of our recent findings.

  11. Microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for packaging of microelectronic devices, including an integral window. The microelectronic device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can include a cofired ceramic frame or body. The package can have an internal stepped structure made of one or more plates, with apertures, which are patterned with metallized conductive circuit traces. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded on the plate to these traces, and oriented so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A cover lid can be attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, having an integral window that can be hermetically-sealed. The package body can be formed by low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the window being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. Multiple chips can be located within a single package. The cover lid can include a window. The apparatus is particularly suited for packaging of MEMS devices, since the number of handling steps is greatly reduced, thereby reducing the potential for contamination.

  12. The Moving Window Technique: A Window into Developmental Changes in Attention during Facial Emotion Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birmingham, Elina; Meixner, Tamara; Iarocci, Grace; Kanan, Christopher; Smilek, Daniel; Tanaka, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The strategies children employ to selectively attend to different parts of the face may reflect important developmental changes in facial emotion recognition. Using the Moving Window Technique (MWT), children aged 5-12 years and adults ("N" = 129) explored faces with a mouse-controlled window in an emotion recognition task. An…

  13. Window type: 4x4 multipaned steel window flanked by 1x4 multipaned ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window type: 4x4 multipaned steel window flanked by 1x4 multipaned steel, casements. Concrete stoop, entry overhang and pipe rail detail also illustrated. Building 36, facing northwest - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Window type: paired 2x4 multipaned steel windows flanked by 1x4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window type: paired 2x4 multipaned steel windows flanked by 1x4 multipaned steel casements, breaking building corner. Raised panel door front entry also illustrated. Ground floor detail Building 19, facing north - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Window type: paired 3x2 multipaned steel window flanked by 1x3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window type: paired 3x2 multipaned steel window flanked by 1x3 multipaned steel casements, breaking building corner. Broad overhanging eave also illustrated. Second story detail. Building 13, facing east - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 46 CFR 127.440 - Operability of window coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operability of window coverings. 127.440 Section 127.440... ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.440 Operability of window coverings. Any covering or protection placed over a window or porthole that could be used as a means...

  17. 49 CFR 238.113 - Emergency window exits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency window exits. 238.113 Section 238.113... § 238.113 Emergency window exits. (a) Number and location. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(3) of... window exits. At least one emergency window exit shall be located in each side of each end (half) of...

  18. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  19. 30 CFR 18.30 - Windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Windows and lenses. 18.30 Section 18.30 Mineral... § 18.30 Windows and lenses. (a) MSHA may waive testing of materials for windows or lenses except headlight lenses. When tested, material for windows or lenses shall meet the test requirements prescribed...

  20. 46 CFR 127.440 - Operability of window coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operability of window coverings. 127.440 Section 127.440... ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.440 Operability of window coverings. Any covering or protection placed over a window or porthole that could be used as a means...

  1. 49 CFR 238.114 - Rescue access windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue access windows. 238.114 Section 238.114... § 238.114 Rescue access windows. (a) Number and location. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(1)(ii) of... rescue access windows. At least one rescue access window shall be located in each side of the...

  2. 46 CFR 127.440 - Operability of window coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operability of window coverings. 127.440 Section 127.440... ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.440 Operability of window coverings. Any covering or protection placed over a window or porthole that could be used as a means...

  3. 46 CFR 127.440 - Operability of window coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operability of window coverings. 127.440 Section 127.440... ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.440 Operability of window coverings. Any covering or protection placed over a window or porthole that could be used as a means...

  4. 46 CFR 127.440 - Operability of window coverings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operability of window coverings. 127.440 Section 127.440... ARRANGEMENTS Construction of Windows, Visibility, and Operability of Coverings § 127.440 Operability of window coverings. Any covering or protection placed over a window or porthole that could be used as a means...

  5. Combined Pressure and Thermal Window System for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svartstrom, Kirk Nils (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A window system for a vehicle comprising a pressure and thermal window pane, a seal system, and a retainer system. The pressure and thermal window pane may be configured to provide desired pressure protection and desired thermal protection when exposed to an environment around the vehicle during operation of the vehicle. The pressure and thermal window pane may have a desired ductility. The seal system may be configured to contact the pressure and thermal window pane to seal the pressure and thermal window pane. The retainer system may be configured to hold the seal system and the pressure and thermal window pane.

  6. High-Temperature Optical Window Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeloffs, Norman; Taranto, Nick

    1995-01-01

    A high-temperature optical window is essential to the optical diagnostics of high-temperature combustion rigs. Laser Doppler velocimetry, schlieren photography, light sheet visualization, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy are a few of the tests that require optically clear access to the combustor flow stream. A design was developed for a high-temperature window that could withstand the severe environment of the NASA Lewis 3200 F Lean Premixed Prevaporized (LPP) Flame Tube Test Rig. The development of this design was both time consuming and costly. This report documents the design process and the lessons learned, in an effort to reduce the cost of developing future designs for high-temperature optical windows.

  7. Fused silica windows for solar receiver applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Johannes; Uhlig, Ralf; Söhn, Matthias; Schenk, Christian; Helsch, Gundula; Bornhöft, Hansjörg

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive study of optical and mechanical properties of quartz glass (fused silica) with regard to application in high temperature solar receivers is presented. The dependence of rupture strength on different surface conditions as well as high temperature is analyzed, focussing particularly on damage by devitrification and sandblasting. The influence of typical types of contamination in combination with thermal cycling on the optical properties of fused silica is determined. Cleaning methods are compared regarding effectiveness on contamination-induced degradation for samples with and without antireflective coating. The FEM-aided design of different types of receiver windows and their support structure is presented. A large-scale production process has been developed for producing fused silica dome shaped windows (pressurized window) up to a diameter of 816 mm. Prototypes were successfully pressure-tested in a test bench and certified according to the European Pressure Vessel Directive.

  8. Integral window hermetic fiber optic components

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, R.D.; Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.; Waker, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam.

  9. Apparatus for insulating windows and the like

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for insulating window openings through walls and the like includes a thermal shutter, a rail for mounting the shutter adjacent to the window opening and a coupling for connecting the shutter to the rail. The thermal shutter includes an insulated panel adhered to frame members which surround the periphery of the panel. The frame members include a hard portion for providing the frame and a soft portion for providing a seal with that portion of the wall adjacent to the periphery of the opening. The coupling means is preferably integral with the attachment rail. According to a preferred embodiment, the coupling means includes a continuous hinge of reduced thickness. The thermal shutter can be permanently attached, hinged, bi-folded, or sliding with respect to the window and wall. A distribution method is to market the apparatus in "kit" form.

  10. Integration Window Position Estimation in TR Receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F; Spiridon, A

    2005-03-15

    Transmitted-reference (TR) receivers avoid the stringent synchronization requirements that exist in conventional pulse detection schemes. However, the performance of such receivers is highly sensitive to precise timing acquisition and tracking as well as the length of their integration window. This window in TR receivers defines the limits of the finite integrator prior to the final decision making block. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that allows us to extract the timing information of the integration window very accurately in UWB-TR receivers in the presence of channel noise. The principles of the method are presented and the BER performance of a modified UWB-TR receiver is investigated by computer simulation. Our studies show that the proposed estimation technique adds value to the conventional TR receiver structure with modest increase in complexity.

  11. Radcalc for Windows. Volume 2: Technical manual

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-09-27

    Radcalc for Windows is a user-friendly menu-driven Windows-compatible software program with applications in the transportation of radioactive materials. It calculates the radiolytic generation of hydrogen gas in the matrix of low-level and high-level radioactive waste using NRC-accepted methodology. It computes the quantity of a radionuclide and its associated products for a given period of time. In addition, the code categorizes shipment quantities as radioactive, Type A or Type B, limited quantity, low specific activity, highway route controlled, and fissile excepted using DOT definitions and methodologies, as outlined in 49 CFR Subchapter C. The code has undergone extensive testing and validation. Volume I is a User`s Guide, and Volume II is the Technical Manual for Radcalc for Windows

  12. Interior and Exterior Low-E Storm Window Installation

    SciTech Connect

    Witters, Sarah

    2014-09-03

    Until recently, energy-efficient window retrofit options have largely been limited to repair or replacement; leaving the homeowner to decide between affordability and deeper energy savings. A new and improved low-e storm window boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of window replacement. A recent whole-home experiment performed by PNNL suggests that attaching low-e storm windows can result in as much energy savings replacing the windows.

  13. Experimental study of the plasma window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ben-Liang; Huang, Sheng; Zhu, Kun; Lu, Yuan-Rong

    2014-01-01

    The plasma window is an advanced apparatus that can work as the interface between a vacuum and a high pressure region. It can be used in many applications that need atmosphere-vacuum interface, such as a gas target, electron beam welding, synchrotron radiation and a spallation neutron source. A test bench of the plasma window is constructed in Peking University. A series of experiments and the corresponding parameter measurements have been presented in this article. The experiment result indicates the feasibility of such a facility acting as an interface between a vacuum and a high pressure region.

  14. Quantum well infrared photodetector simultaneously working in two atmospheric windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Y. H.; Ma, W. Q.; Zhang, Y. H.; Chen, L. H.; Shi, Y. L.

    2010-08-01

    We have demonstrated a two-contact quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) exhibiting simultaneous photoresponse in both the mid- and the long-wavelength atmospheric windows of 3-5 μm and of 8-12 μm. The structure of the device was achieved by sequentially growing a mid-wavelength QWIP part followed by a long-wavelength QWIP part separated by an n-doped layer. Compared with the conventional dual-band QWIP device utilizing three ohmic contacts, our QWIP is promising to greatly facilitate two-color focal plane array (FPA) fabrication by reducing the number of the indium bumps per pixel from three to one just like a monochromatic FPA fabrication and to increase the FPA fill factor by reducing one contact per pixel; another advantage may be that this QWIP FPA boasts broadband detection capability in the two atmospheric windows while using only a monochromatic readout integrated circuit. We attributed this simultaneous broadband detection to the different distributions of the total bias voltage between the mid- and long-wavelength QWIP parts.

  15. Aberration and boresight error correction for conformal aircraft windows using the inner window surface and tilted fixed correctors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunzhu; Cui, Qingfeng; Mao, Shan

    2016-04-01

    A static solution to aberrations and boresight error for tilted conformal aircraft windows at different look angles is reported. The solution uses the inner window surface to correct the window aberrations at a 0° look angle and uses fixed correctors behind the window to correct the residual window aberrations at other look angles. Then, the boresight error for the window at different look angles is corrected by tilting the fixed correctors. The principle of the solution is discussed, and a design example shows that the solution is effective in correcting the aberrations and boresight error for a tilted conformal aircraft window at different look angles.

  16. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening: Insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models that have been conducted to improve our understanding of the influence of slab window opening on subduction dynamics, mantle flow and associated dynamic topography over geological time scales. The adopted setup consists of a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the subduction of a fixed plate of silicone (lithosphere) under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We found that the opening of a slab window does not produce consistent changes of the geometry and the kinematics of the slab. On the contrary, slab-induced mantle circulation, quantified both in the vertical and horizontal sections using the Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified. In particular, rollback subduction and the opening of the slab window generate a complex mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of poloidal and toroidal components, with the importance of each evolving according to kinematic stages. Mantle coming from the oceanic domain floods through the slab window, indenting the supra-slab mantle zone and producing its deformation without any mixing between mantle portions. The opening of the slab window and the upwelling of sub-slab mantle produce a regional-scale non-isostatic topographic uplift of the overriding plate that would correspond to values ranging between ca. 1 and 5 km in nature. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compared them to the tectonics and volcanism of the Patagonian subduction zone. We found that the anomalous backarc volcanism that has been developing since the middle Miocene could result from the lateral flow of sub

  17. Considerations When Upgrading and Renovating Window Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gille, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Today's educational facilities managers face many challenges. As stewards of their campus' physical assets, these professionals are charged with improving students' learning environments, saving money, and maintaining the historical and aesthetic integrity of their buildings. For schools and universities that have not replaced their windows in…

  18. Schools Facing the Expiration of Windows XP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Microsoft's plans to end support for Windows XP, believed to be the dominant computer operating system in K-12 education, could pose big technological and financial challenges for districts nationwide--issues that many school systems have yet to confront. The giant software company has made it clear for years that it plans to stop supporting XP…

  19. Windows 8: What Educators Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    In October 2012, Microsoft will release the commercial version of its next operating system, presently called "Windows 8." This version represents a significant departure from the past. Microsoft wants this operating system to meet user needs regardless of physical platform (e.g., desktop, notebook, tablet, mobile phone). As part of this mission,…

  20. Inexpensive anti-fog coating for windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmin, D. L., Jr.; Morrison, H. D.

    1971-01-01

    Coating applications include anti-fog protection for deep-sea diving equipment, fire protection helmets, and windows of vehicles used in hazardous environments. Basic coating composition includes liquid detergent, deionized water, and oxygen compatible fire-resistant oil. Composition prevents visor fogging under maximum metabolic load for 5 hours and longer.

  1. Window of Opportunity? Adolescence, Music, and Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmrich, Barbara H.

    2010-01-01

    Research has suggested that musicians process music in the same cortical regions that adolescents process algebra. An early adolescence synaptogenesis might present a window of opportunity during middle school for music to create and strengthen enduring neural connections in those regions. Six school districts across Maryland provided scores from…

  2. [Medical image automatic adjusting window and segmentation].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenhuan; Chen, Siping; Tao, Duchun; Chen, Xinhai

    2005-04-01

    Image guided surgical navigation system is the most advanced surgical apparatus, which develops most rapidly and has great application prospects in neurosurgery, orthopaedics, E.N.T. department etc. In current surgical navigation systems, windowing, segmenting and registration of medical images all depend on manual operation, and automation of image processing is urgently needed. This paper proposes the algorithm which realizes very well automatic windowing and segmentation of medical images: first, we analyze a lot of MRI and CT images and propose corresponding windowing algorithm according to their common features of intensity distribution. Experiments show that the effects of windowing of most MRI and CT images are optimized. Second, we propose the seed growing algorithm based on intensity connectivity,which can segment tumor and its boundary exactly by simply clicking the mouse, and control dynamically the results in real time. If computer memory permits, the algorithm can segment 3D images directly. Tests show that this function is able to shorten the time of surgical planning, lower the complexity, and improve the efficiency in navigation surgery. PMID:15884547

  3. Implications of Windowing Techniques for CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heines, Jesse M.; Grinstein, Georges G.

    This paper discusses the use of a technique called windowing in computer assisted instruction to allow independent control of functional areas in complex CAI displays and simultaneous display of output from a running computer program and coordinated instructional material. Two obstacles to widespread use of CAI in computer science courses are…

  4. The battle between Unix and Windows NT.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H J

    1997-02-01

    For more than a decade, Unix has been the dominant back-end operating system in health care. But that prominent position is being challenged by Windows NT, touted by its developer, Microsoft Corp., as the operating system of the future. CIOs and others are attempting to figure out which system is the best choice in the long run.

  5. SOT: A rapid prototype using TAE windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Mark; Eike, David; Harris, Elfrieda; Miller, Dana

    1986-01-01

    The development of the window interface extension feature of the Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) is discussed. This feature is being used to prototype a space station payload interface in order to demonstrate and assess the benefits of using windows on a bit mapped display and also to convey the concept of telescience, the control and operation of space station payloads from remote sites. The prototype version of the TAE with windows operates on a DEC VAXstation 100. This workstation has a high resolution 19 inch bit mapped display, a keyboard and a three-button mouse. The VAXstation 100 is not a stand-alone workstation, but is controlled by software executing on a VAX/8600. A short scenario was developed utilizing the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) as an example payload. In the scenario the end-user station includes the VAXstation 100 plus an image analysis terminal used to display the CCD images. The layout and use of the prototype elements, i.e., the root menu, payload status window, and target acquisition menu is described.

  6. New Window into the Human Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Michael Vannier, MD, a former NASA engineer, recognized the similarity between NASA's computerized image processing technology and nuclear magnetic resonance. With technical assistance from Kennedy Space Center, he developed a computer program for Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology enabling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to scan body tissue for earlier diagnoses. Dr. Vannier feels that "satellite imaging" has opened a new window into the human body.

  7. Effect of Split Gate Size on the Electrostatic Potential and 0.7 Anomaly within Quantum Wires on a Modulation-Doped GaAs /AlGaAs Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Thomas, K. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    2016-04-01

    We study 95 split gates of different size on a single chip using a multiplexing technique. Each split gate defines a one-dimensional channel on a modulation-doped GaAs /AlGaAs heterostructure, through which the conductance is quantized. The yield of devices showing good quantization decreases rapidly as the length of the split gates increases. However, for the subset of devices showing good quantization, there is no correlation between the electrostatic length of the one-dimensional channel (estimated using a saddle-point model) and the gate length. The variation in electrostatic length and the one-dimensional subband spacing for devices of the same gate length exceeds the variation in the average values between devices of different lengths. There is a clear correlation between the curvature of the potential barrier in the transport direction and the strength of the "0.7 anomaly": the conductance value of the 0.7 anomaly reduces as the barrier curvature becomes shallower. These results highlight the key role of the electrostatic environment in one-dimensional systems. Even in devices with clean conductance plateaus, random fluctuations in the background potential are crucial in determining the potential landscape in the active device area such that nominally identical gate structures have different characteristics.

  8. All-optical amplitude-phase transmultiplexing of RZ-OOK and RZ-BPSK to RZ-QPSK by polarization-insensitive XPM using a nonlinear birefringent AlGaAs waveguide.

    PubMed

    Cannon, B M; Mahmood, T; Astar, W; Apiratikul, P; Porkolab, G; Boudra, P; Mohsenin, T; Richardson, C J K; Carter, G M

    2013-08-26

    Polarization-insensitive (PI) phase-transmultiplexing (PTM) of a 10-Gb/s return-to-zero ON-OFF keying (RZ-OOK) pump and a 10-Gb/s RZbinary phase-shift keying (RZ-BPSK) probe to 20-Gb/s RZ-quadrature-PSK (RZ-QPSK) has been successfully demonstrated for the first time in a passive, birefringent AlGaAs waveguide, utilizing PI cross-phase modulation (PI-XPM). For differential QPSK (DQPSK)-detection, a 10 − 9-BER pre-amplified receiver sensitivity penalty of ≈ 2.5 dB for the in-phase component and ≈ 4.9 dB for the quadrature component were found. The penalties were relative to the FPGA-precoded RZ-DQPSK baseline for a pump-probe detuning of ≈ 12 nm, when the probe state of polarization was scrambled and the pump was launched off-axis into the waveguide.

  9. Influence of the observation window size on the performance of multilayer traffic engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiang; De Maesschalck, Sophie; Colle, Didier; Puype, Bart; Lievens, Ilse; Pickavet, Mario; Demeester, Piet

    2003-08-01

    Although the Optical Transport Network, based on technologies such as Wavelength Division Multiplexing and Optical Cross-Connects, offers tremendous transportation capacity, its management requires frequent manual intervention. However, as the traffic pattern offered to today's transport networks is subject to continuous changes due to the Internet traffic dominance, an optical transport network with a smart, automatic and real-time control system, denoted as Intelligent Optical Network (ION) or Automatic Switched Optical Network (ASON), is desired by network operators. Duly and correctly retrieving the changing traffic load information is a very important factor for the successful deployment of an ION. In this paper, we discuss the influence of the observation window size used for collecting the traffic load information, on the performance of an ION. By comparing the performance of an ION using different traffic observation window sizes, we show that a smaller observation window harms the network stability; while a too large observation window worsens the network reliability. We demonstrate that a suitable traffic observation window size improves the offered Quality of Service (QoS) by reconfiguring the logical layer network at the right time and in the right way.

  10. Characteristics of red-emitting broad area stripe laser diodes with zinc diffused window structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Tomoki; Takiguchi, Mikio; Wakabayashi, Kazuya; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Naganuma, Kaori; Ohara, Maho; Ito, Satoshi; Hirata, Shoji

    2010-02-01

    We have applied zinc diffused window structures to 640 nm broad area stripe laser diodes (BALDs) for the first time. A solid-phase zinc diffusion technique was used for a thick single quantum well (SQW) in GaInP employing the short wavelength and disordered active layer possessed a blue shift of 58 nm in photoluminescence spectrum. We fabricated 10 mm arrays including twenty-five BALDs and each BALD consists of a 60 μm ridge stripe and a 1000 μm cavity. An initial catastrophic optical damage (COD) level of the window laser was increased by four times of a conventional none-window laser. A long-term reliability under automatic current control was investigated for initial output powers of 13W and 15W which overcome a previous demonstration of 7.2 W. Measured degradations within a period of 1000-hours were 5 % or less, in contrast a half-life period of our conventional none-window laser with an initial output power of 10 W was only 120-hours. Therefore the window structure improved the BALD in terms of the COD level and the long-term reliability.

  11. Sphere-cone-polynomial special window with good aberration characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xin; Qu, He-Meng; Wang, Ling-Jie; Wang, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Optical windows with external surfaces shaped to satisfy operational environment needs are known as special windows. A novel special window, a sphere-cone-polynomial (SCP) window, is proposed. The formulas of this window shape are given. An SCP MgF2 window with a fineness ratio of 1.33 is designed as an example. The field-of-regard (FOR) angle is ±75°. From the window system simulation results obtained with the calculated fluid dynamics (CFD) and optical design software, we find that compared to the conventional window forms, the SCP shape can not only introduce relatively less drag in the airflow, but also have the minimal effect on imaging. So the SCP window optical system can achieve a high image quality across a super wide FOR without adding extra aberration correctors. The tolerance analysis results show that the optical performance can be maintained with a reasonable fabricating tolerance to manufacturing errors.

  12. Low-level water vapor fields from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) 'split window' channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Uccellini, L. W.; Robinson, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    A simple physical algorithm is presented which calculates the water vapor content of the lower troposphere from the 11 and 12 micron (split window) channels on the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites. The algorithm is used to analyze a time series of VAS split window radiances observed at 15 km horizontal resolution over eastern North America during a 12 hr period on 13 July 1981. Results of the color coded images of the derived precipitable water fields are found to show vivid water vapor features whose broad structure and evolution are verified by the radiosonde and surface networks. The satellite moisture fields also show significant mesoscale features and rapid developments which are not resolved by the conventional networks. The VAS split window is determined to clearly differentiate those areas in which water vapor extends over a deep layer and is more able to support convective cells from those areas in which water vapor is confined to a shallow layer and is therefore less able to support convection. It is concluded that the VAS split windows can be used operationally to monitor mesoscale developments in the low-level moisture fields over relatively cloud-free areas of the United States.

  13. Process window control using CDU master

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Tomoharu; Toki, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Daishi; Sato, Maki; Kosugi, Junichi; Tanaka, Rika; Sakasai, Naruo; Ohashi, Toshio; Nakasone, Ryoko; Tokui, Akira

    2012-03-01

    As double patterning techniques such as spacer double/quadruple patterning mature, ArF water immersion lithography is expected to be applied down to the 1x nm hp node or beyond. This will necessitate precise process control solutions to accommodate extremely small process windows. In the case of spacer double/quadruple patterning in particular, CD uniformity of the final feature is strongly related to the lithography performance of the initial pre-spacer feature. CD uniformity of the resist image is affected by many sources. In the case of the exposure tool, CD error on the reticle, as well as exposure dose and focus errors are the key factors. For the resist process, heterogeneity of the stacked resist film thickness, post exposure bake (PEB) plate temperature, and development all have an impact. Furthermore, the process wafer also has error sources that include under-layer non-uniformities or wafer flatness. Fortunately, the majorities of these non-uniformities are quite stable in a volume production process. To improve and maintain the CD uniformity, a technique to calculate exposure dose and focus correction values simultaneously using the measured resist image feature was reported previously [1]. Further, a demonstration of a correction loop using a neural network calculation model was reported in SPIE 2010 [2], and the corrected CD uniformity was less than 1.5 nm (3 sigma) within a wafer. For further improvement, a demonstration of precise dose and focus control using high order field-by-field correction was then reported at SPIE 2011[3]. In that work, the interand intra-field CD uniformities reported were less than 1 nm (3 sigma) respectively. A key aspect of this method is the simultaneous compensation of dose and focus offsets, which successfully maximizes the process margin of a target pattern. The Nikon CDU Master then derives the optimal control parameters for each compensation function in the scanner using the exposure dose and focus correction data

  14. WxWindows Interface for CALE

    SciTech Connect

    Amala, P; Egner, C; Hagelberg, J

    2004-11-24

    wxWindows is an Open Source, platform independent, User Interface (UI) which has been in development for over eleven years (http://www.wxwindows.org). Currently wxWindows is actively supported for the Linux/Unix (X11, Motif and GTK+), Mac OS 9 and X, all Win32 OSes, MGL, and OS/2 operating systems. wxWindows is written in C++ using an object oriented programming framework; it is a reasonably lightweight API (called wxWidgets) sitting over the native graphics packages of the various platforms it supports. The original version of CALE was written for the basic target platform of Unix using X11 as the graphics package. There have been separate efforts to port the code to Mac OS 9, Mac OS X, Win32, Windows Services for Unix (SFU) and CygWin. Each of these used a variety of different graphical interface approaches and build/make systems. For instance Windows SFU and CygWin could still only use X11 graphics. So could the Win32 version, if a X11 server library and client software were installed. A native Win32 version of CALE was contemplated, but never started. The Macintosh versions were completed but never widely distributed to the users. Given the growing code version support issues, and the slow deviation from the portable code model CALE originally started with, it was desired to come up with a simple graphical UI that would be cross platform portable with only a single code base and build system. During the past two summers, two Laboratory summer students and a CALE team code physicist have worked on porting CALE to the wxWidgets UI. In the summer of 2003 Jeffery Hagelberg (formerly Purdue University, now at the University of California-Davis) started the project. During the spring & summer of 2004 Christopher Egner (Rochester Institute of Technology) completed the work. Paul Amala (A/X-Program at LLNL) supervised the students for their combined 30 weeks of effort. This poster session describes the wxWindows interface as it is implemented in CALE, the level of

  15. WINDOW 4.0: Documentation of calculation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Finlayson, E.U.; Arasteh, D.K.; Huizenga, C.; Rubin, M.D.; Reilly, M.S.

    1993-07-01

    WINDOW 4.0 is a publicly available IBM PC compatible computer program developed by the Building Technologies Group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for calculating the thermal and optical properties necessary for heat transfer analyses of fenestration products. This report explains the calculation methods used in WINDOW 4.0 and is meant as a tool for those interested in understanding the procedures contained in WINDOW 4.0. All the calculations are discussed in the International System of units (SI). WINDOW 4.0 is the latest in a series of programs released by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The WINDOW program has its roots in a paper detailing a method for calculating heat transfer through windows [Rubin, 1982]. WINDOW 4.0 replaces the widely used 3.1 version. Although WINDOW 4.0 is a major revision, many of the algorithms used in WINDOW 4.0 build upon those previously documented [Arasteh, 1989b], [Furler, 1991]. This report documents the calculations that are unchanged from WINDOW 3.1, as well as those calculations that are new to WINDOW 4.0. This report uses the organization of the WINDOW 4.0 program. Results displayed on a WINDOW 4.0 screen are discussed in a section describing that screen. In the conclusion the aspects of the calculation method currently slated for revision are discussed. A glossary of variables used throughout the report is found in Section 11.

  16. A theoretical investigation of effective surface recombination velocity in AlGaAs/GaAs heteroface solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.; Drummond, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    An AlGaAs window layer is used in high-efficiency GaAs solar cells to reduce carrier recombination at the front surface. Free surfaces of III-V semiconductors have a high density of surface states that serve as recombination sites and create a depletion region at the front surface. We have performed a theoretical investigation of front-surface recombination that includes the effect of a surface space-charge layer. It was found that the surface space-charge layer can have a profound effect on front-surface recombination for thin or lightly doped window layers. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Advances in glazing materials for windows

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    No one type of glazing is suitable for every application. Many materials are available that serve different purposes. Moreover, consumers may discover that they need two types of glazing for a home because of the directions that the windows face and the local climate. To make wise purchases, consumers should first examine their heating and cooling needs and prioritize desired features such as daylighting, solar heating, shading, ventilation, and aesthetic value. Research and development into types of glazing have created a new generation of materials that offer improved window efficiency and performance for consumers. While this new generation of glazing materials quickly gains acceptance in the marketplace, the research and development of even more efficient technology continues.

  18. OBSERVATIONAL WINDOW FUNCTIONS IN PLANET TRANSIT SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Von Braun, Kaspar; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R. E-mail: skane@ipac.caltech.edu

    2009-09-01

    The probability that an existing planetary transit is detectable in one's data is sensitively dependent upon the window function of the observations. We quantitatively characterize and provide visualizations of the dependence of this probability as a function of orbital period upon several observing strategy and astrophysical parameters, such as length of observing run, observing cadence, length of night, transit duration and depth, and the minimum number of sampled transits. The ability to detect a transit is directly related to the intrinsic noise of the observations. In our simulations of observational window functions, we explicitly address noncorrelated (Gaussian or white) noise and correlated (red) noise and discuss how these two noise components affect transit detectability in fundamentally different manners, especially for long periods and/or small transit depths. We furthermore discuss the consequence of competing effects on transit detectability, elaborate on measures of observing strategies, and examine the projected efficiency of different transit survey scenarios with respect to certain regions of parameter space.

  19. Rupture of the round window membrane.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P H; Bicknell, P G

    1976-01-01

    A case of sudden deafness due to rupture of the round window membrane is presented. Nineteen similar cases have previously been reported in the literature. In a review of these twenty patients, it is noted that a history of concurrent physical effort or barotrauma was present in eighteen. This supports the view that the injury is produced by pressure changes acting either along the cochlear aqueduct (the explosive route) or, directly on the middle ear structures (the implosive route). At operation, the rupture may be difficult to see, and a separate leak from the oval window may be present. The timing of any surgical intervention is important. The authors recommend that this should be deferred for one week after the onset of symptoms, as the fistula may heal spontaneously. If no definite improvement has occurred at the end of this time, then tympanotomy should be undertaken during the next week.

  20. Diamondlike carbon protective coatings for optical windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited on infrared transmitting optical windows and were evaluated as protective coatings for these windows exposed to particle and rain erosion. The DLC films were deposited on zinc selenide (ZnSe) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) by three different ion beam methods: (1) sputter deposition from a carbon target using an 8-cm argon ion source; (2) direct deposition by a 30-cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon gas in argon; and (3) dual beam direct deposition by the 30-cm hollow cathode ion source and an 8-cm argon ion source. In an attempt to improve the adherence of the DLC films on ZnSc and ZnS, ion beam cleaning, ion implantation with helium and neon ions, or sputter deposition of a thin, ion beam intermediate coating was employed prior to deposition of the DLC film. The protection that the DLC films afforded the windows from particle and rain erosion was evaluated, along with the hydrogen content, adherence, intrinsic stress, and infrared transmittance of the films. Because of the elevated stress levels in the ion beam sputtered DLC films and in those ion beam deposited with butane, films thicker than 0.1 micron and with good adherence on ZnS and ZnSe could not be generated. An intermediate coating of germanium successfully allowed the DLC films to remain adherent to the optical windows and caused only negligible reduction in the specular transmittance of the ZnS and ZnSe at 10 microns.

  1. 13. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST PHOTO TOWER WITH WINDOW OPEN; ELECTRICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR OF NORTHEAST PHOTO TOWER WITH WINDOW OPEN; ELECTRICAL POWER BOX BELOW WINDOW - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. Evaluation criteria and test methods for electrochromic windows

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A.W. ); Lampert, C.M. )

    1990-07-01

    Report summarizes the test methods used for evaluating electrochromic (EC) windows, and summarizes what is known about degradation of their performance, and recommends methods and procedures for advancing EC windows for buildings applications. 77 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. 12. TRIPLE WINDOW, FIRST FLOOR, SOUTH SIDE. Typical for all ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. TRIPLE WINDOW, FIRST FLOOR, SOUTH SIDE. Typical for all triple windows on first and second floors. Note single swing jib door - John Joyner Smith House, 400 Wilmington Street, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  4. 23. CORNICES AND WINDOW ARCHITRAVES OF SOUTHEAST AND SOUTHWEST ROOMS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORNICES AND WINDOW ARCHITRAVES OF SOUTHEAST AND SOUTHWEST ROOMS, FIRST FLOOR. Door architraves similar to window architraves. - John Joyner Smith House, 400 Wilmington Street, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  5. DETAIL VIEW, OXEYE WINDOW, SOUTH WALL OF SOUTH GARRET. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW, OX-EYE WINDOW, SOUTH WALL OF SOUTH GARRET. THE MUNTIN PATTERN USED IN THIS WINDOW WAS REFERRED TO AS “GOTHIC” IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. 10. TYPICAL SIDE WALL WINDOW AND WATER TABLE. The water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. TYPICAL SIDE WALL WINDOW AND WATER TABLE. The water table is an extension of the order base, and the lower torus breaks for ventilation, which applies to all windows. - Westminster Presbyterian Church, 273 Meeting Street, Charleston, Charleston County, SC

  7. WINDOW WITH ORIGINAL PANELED FOLDING SHUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR FRONT ROOM, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WINDOW WITH ORIGINAL PANELED FOLDING SHUTTERS, SECOND FLOOR FRONT ROOM, LOOKING OUT WALNUT STREET (SOUTH). NOTE ALTERED LOWER SECTION MADE CA. 1840. Compare window in PA-1436 A-37 - Kid-Chandler House, 323 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. 27. June 1962 WINDOW JAMB MOLDING DETAILMOLDING CAN BE REMOVED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. June 1962 WINDOW JAMB MOLDING DETAIL--MOLDING CAN BE REMOVED BY TURNING WOODEN THUMBSCREWS; WINDOW FRAMES CAN THEN BE REMOVED FOR CLEANING, ETC. - Shaker Church Family Main Dwelling House, U.S. Route 20, Hancock, Berkshire County, MA

  9. 17. LARGE WINDOWS ON NORTH WALL. THE PROTECTIVE WIRE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. LARGE WINDOWS ON NORTH WALL. THE PROTECTIVE WIRE ON THE INTERIOR CAN BE SEEN. THE WINDOWS HAVE BEEN BOARDED OVER THE EXTERIOR - Kodiak Naval Operating Base, Gymnasium, U.S. Coast Guard Station, Kodiak, Kodiak Island Borough, AK

  10. 35. DETAIL VIEW, WEST WINDOW IN WEST ELEVATION GABLE (NOTE: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. DETAIL VIEW, WEST WINDOW IN WEST ELEVATION GABLE (NOTE: THE MOLDED STRINGCOURSE THAT PROJECTS FROM THE BASE OF THE FIRST FLOOR WINDOW ARCH AND VISIBLE WATERTABLE) - Kenworthy Hall, State Highway 14 (Greensboro Road), Marion, Perry County, AL

  11. DETAIL, EAST ELEVATION. THIS LUNETTE WINDOW POSITIONED IN A BLIND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, EAST ELEVATION. THIS LUNETTE WINDOW POSITIONED IN A BLIND ARCH ECHOES A SIMILAR TREATMENT OF THE VENETIAN WINDOWS IN THE HOUSE - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. 44. Interior detail, stone sill, east study window. This is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Interior detail, stone sill, east study window. This is the only stone window sill in the house. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Energy and Power Evaluation Program for Windows

    2000-06-27

    ENPEP for windows has its origins in the DOS version of the software, however, the Windows release is significantly modified and rather different in structure and capabilities from the older DOS version of ENPEP. ENPEP for Windows provides the user with a graphical interface for designing a comprehensive model of the energy system of a country or region. The BALANCE submodel processes a representative network of all energy production, conversion, transport, distribution, and utilization activitiesmore » in a country (or region) as well as the flows of energy and fuels among these activities. The objective of the model is to simulate energy market and determine energy supply and demand balance over a long-term period of up to 75 years. The environmental aspect is also taken into account by calculating the emissions of various pollutants. In addition to the energy costs, the environmental costs are also calculated by the model. These costs can be used to affect the solution found by the market equilibrium algorithm. The main purpose of the software is to provide analytical capability and tools for the various analyses of energy and environmental systems, as well as for development of long-term energy strategy of a country or region.« less

  14. Unsupervised brain segmentation using T2 window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyassin, Abdal M.; Cline, Harvey E.

    2002-05-01

    Measurement of brain structures could lead to important diagnostic information and could indicate the success or failure of a certain pharmaceutical drug. We have developed a totally unsupervised technique that segments and quantifies brain structures from T2 dual echo MR images. The technique classified four different tissue clusters in a scatter plot (air, CSF, brain, and face). Several novel image-processing techniques were implemented to reduce the spread of these clusters and subsequently generate tissue based T2 windows. These T2 windows encompassed all the information needed to segment and subsequently quantify the corresponding tissues in an automatic fashion. We have applied the technique on nineteen MR data sets (16 normal and 3 Alzheimer diseased [AD] patients). The measurements from the T2 window technique differentiated AD patients from normal subjects. The mean value of the %CSF from total the brain was %29.2 higher for AD patients from the %CSF for normal subjects. Furthermore, the technique ran under 30 seconds per data set on a PC with 550 MHz dual processors.

  15. Tuning vibrational mode localization with frequency windowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaolu; Talbot, Justin J.; Steele, Ryan P.

    2016-09-01

    Local-mode coordinates have previously been shown to be an effective starting point for anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy calculations. This general approach borrows techniques from localized-orbital machinery in electronic structure theory and generates a new set of spatially localized vibrational modes. These modes exhibit a well-behaved spatial decay of anharmonic mode couplings, which, in turn, allows for a systematic, a priori truncation of couplings and increased computational efficiency. Fully localized modes, however, have been found to lead to unintuitive mixtures of characteristic motions, such as stretches and bends, and accordingly large bilinear couplings. In this work, a very simple, tunable localization frequency window is introduced, in order to realize the transition from normal modes to fully localized modes. Partial localization can be achieved by localizing only pairs of modes within this traveling frequency window, which allows for intuitive interpretation of modes. The optimal window size is suggested to be a few hundreds of wave numbers, based on small- to medium-sized test systems, including water clusters and polypeptides. The new sets of partially localized coordinates retain their spatial coupling decay behavior while providing a reduced number of potential energy evaluations for convergence of anharmonic spectra.

  16. Microwave Plasma Window Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, Andrew; Zheng, Peng; Franzi, Matthew; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Plasma, Pulsed Power,; Microwave Laboratory Team

    2011-10-01

    The microwave plasma window is an experiment designed to promote RF breakdown in a controlled vacuum-gas environment using a DC bias. Experimental data has shown that this DC bias will significantly reduce the RF power required to yield breakdown, a feature also shown in recent simulation. The cross-polarized conducting array is biased at (100's V) DC on the surface of a Lucite vacuum window. Microwave power is supplied to the window's surface by a single 1-kW magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz CW. The goal of this project is to establish controllable characteristics relating vacuum pressure, DC bias, RF power required for surface breakdown, as well as RF transmission after the formation of plasma. Experimental data will be compared with multipactor susceptibility curves generated using a Monte Carlo simulation which incorporates an applied DC bias and finite pressures of air and argon. Research supported by an AFOSR grant on the Basic Physics of Distributed Plasma Discharge, AFRL, L-3 Communications, and Northrop Grumman.

  17. Examination of the technical potential of near-infrared switching thermochromic windows for commercial building applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Sabine; Lee, Eleanor S.; Clavero, César

    2014-01-29

    Current thermochromic windows modulate solar transmission primarily within the visible range, resulting in reduced space-conditioning energy use but also reduced daylight, thereby increasing lighting energy use compared to conventional static, near-infrared selective, low-emittance windows. To better understand the energy savings potential of improved thermochromic devices, a hypothetical near-infrared switching thermochromic glazing was defined based on guidelines provided by the material science community. In this paper, EnergyPlus simulations were conducted on a prototypical large office building and a detailed analysis was performed showing the progression from switching characteristics to net window heat flow and perimeter zone loads and then to perimeter zone heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and lighting energy use for a mixed hot/cold climate and a hot, humid climate in the US. When a relatively high daylight transmission is maintained when switched (Tsol=0.10–0.50 and Tvis=0.30–0.60) and if coupled with a low-e inboard glazing layer (e=0.04), the hypothetical thermochromic window with a low critical switching temperature range (14–20 °C) achieved reductions in total site annual energy use of 14.0–21.1 kW h/m2-floor-yr or 12–14% for moderate- to large-area windows (WWR≥0.30) in Chicago and 9.8–18.6 kW h/m2-floor-yr or 10–17% for WWR≥0.45 in Houston compared to an unshaded spectrally-selective, low-e window (window E1) in south-, east-, and west-facing perimeter zones. Finally, if this hypothetical thermochromic window can be offered at costs that are competitive to conventional low-e windows and meet esthetic requirements defined by the building industry and end users, then the technology is likely to be a viable energy-efficiency option for internal load dominated commercial buildings.

  18. Transmission windows in Titan's lower troposphere: Implications for IR spectrometers aboard future aerial and surface missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, George D.; Corlies, Paul M.; Wray, James J.; Hofgartner, Jason D.; Hörst, Sarah M.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Liuzzo, Lucas R.; Buffo, Jacob J.

    2015-11-01

    Titan's thick atmosphere contains a 1.5 - 5.7% methane mole fraction. Methane's possession of fundamental, overtone, and combination bands across much of the near and mid IR results in significant absorption in the atmosphere across this spectral region. The consequence is spectral windowing, such that Titan's surface can only be observed at a handful of methane transmission windows. The narrow width of these windows for observations from the top of the atmosphere (ToA) make only multispectral imaging of the surface possible. This limits the information that can be gleaned about the surface composition, which remains largely unknown. From ToA, there is effectively zero transmission at most wavelengths between the windows, so that improvements to the detectors or telescopes of IR spectrometers aboard orbital or flyby missions would not result in any appreciable widening of the windows. Only decreasing the methane column through which observations are made, with a future mission operating near or on the surface, would result in any widening of the windows. We present a new line-by-line radiative transfer model to quantify the window widths for an IR spectrometer aboard an aerial or surface mission to Titan. We take spectral line parameters from the HITRAN database (Rothmann et al. 2013) for methane and six trace gases, include N2-N2 and N2-H2 collision-induced absorptions as measured by McKellar 1989, and the haze extinction measured in situ by Huygens DISR. The number of vertical layers in the model is chosen to correspond with the high cadence of measurements of the physical conditions of Titan's atmosphere by Huygens HASI. We find that the transmission windows do not widen appreciably for an aerial mission operating at altitudes on the order of kilometers above the surface. For surface missions observing at distances of order 10 m, the windows widen considerably to encompass regions where absorptions from hydrated minerals, sulfates, and pentane and higher order

  19. Window area and development drive spatial variation in bird-window collisions in an urban landscape.

    PubMed

    Hager, Stephen B; Cosentino, Bradley J; McKay, Kelly J; Monson, Cathleen; Zuurdeeg, Walt; Blevins, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Collisions with windows are an important human-related threat to birds in urban landscapes. However, the proximate drivers of collisions are not well understood, and no study has examined spatial variation in mortality in an urban setting. We hypothesized that the number of fatalities at buildings varies with window area and habitat features that influence avian community structure. In 2010 we documented bird-window collisions (BWCs) and characterized avian community structure at 20 buildings in an urban landscape in northwestern Illinois, USA. For each building and season, we conducted 21 daily surveys for carcasses and nine point count surveys to estimate relative abundance, richness, and diversity. Our sampling design was informed by experimentally estimated carcass persistence times and detection probabilities. We used linear and generalized linear mixed models to evaluate how habitat features influenced community structure and how mortality was affected by window area and factors that correlated with community structure. The most-supported model was consistent for all community indices and included effects of season, development, and distance to vegetated lots. BWCs were related positively to window area and negatively to development. We documented mortalities for 16/72 (22%) species (34 total carcasses) recorded at buildings, and BWCs were greater for juveniles than adults. Based on the most-supported model of BWCs, the median number of annual predicted fatalities at study buildings was 3 (range = 0-52). These results suggest that patchily distributed environmental resources and levels of window area in buildings create spatial variation in BWCs within and among urban areas. Current mortality estimates place little emphasis on spatial variation, which precludes a fundamental understanding of the issue. To focus conservation efforts, we illustrate how knowledge of the structural and environmental factors that influence bird-window collisions can be used to

  20. Window area and development drive spatial variation in bird-window collisions in an urban landscape.

    PubMed

    Hager, Stephen B; Cosentino, Bradley J; McKay, Kelly J; Monson, Cathleen; Zuurdeeg, Walt; Blevins, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Collisions with windows are an important human-related threat to birds in urban landscapes. However, the proximate drivers of collisions are not well understood, and no study has examined spatial variation in mortality in an urban setting. We hypothesized that the number of fatalities at buildings varies with window area and habitat features that influence avian community structure. In 2010 we documented bird-window collisions (BWCs) and characterized avian community structure at 20 buildings in an urban landscape in northwestern Illinois, USA. For each building and season, we conducted 21 daily surveys for carcasses and nine point count surveys to estimate relative abundance, richness, and diversity. Our sampling design was informed by experimentally estimated carcass persistence times and detection probabilities. We used linear and generalized linear mixed models to evaluate how habitat features influenced community structure and how mortality was affected by window area and factors that correlated with community structure. The most-supported model was consistent for all community indices and included effects of season, development, and distance to vegetated lots. BWCs were related positively to window area and negatively to development. We documented mortalities for 16/72 (22%) species (34 total carcasses) recorded at buildings, and BWCs were greater for juveniles than adults. Based on the most-supported model of BWCs, the median number of annual predicted fatalities at study buildings was 3 (range = 0-52). These results suggest that patchily distributed environmental resources and levels of window area in buildings create spatial variation in BWCs within and among urban areas. Current mortality estimates place little emphasis on spatial variation, which precludes a fundamental understanding of the issue. To focus conservation efforts, we illustrate how knowledge of the structural and environmental factors that influence bird-window collisions can be used to

  1. Window Area and Development Drive Spatial Variation in Bird-Window Collisions in an Urban Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Stephen B.; Cosentino, Bradley J.; McKay, Kelly J.; Monson, Cathleen; Zuurdeeg, Walt; Blevins, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Collisions with windows are an important human-related threat to birds in urban landscapes. However, the proximate drivers of collisions are not well understood, and no study has examined spatial variation in mortality in an urban setting. We hypothesized that the number of fatalities at buildings varies with window area and habitat features that influence avian community structure. In 2010 we documented bird-window collisions (BWCs) and characterized avian community structure at 20 buildings in an urban landscape in northwestern Illinois, USA. For each building and season, we conducted 21 daily surveys for carcasses and nine point count surveys to estimate relative abundance, richness, and diversity. Our sampling design was informed by experimentally estimated carcass persistence times and detection probabilities. We used linear and generalized linear mixed models to evaluate how habitat features influenced community structure and how mortality was affected by window area and factors that correlated with community structure. The most-supported model was consistent for all community indices and included effects of season, development, and distance to vegetated lots. BWCs were related positively to window area and negatively to development. We documented mortalities for 16/72 (22%) species (34 total carcasses) recorded at buildings, and BWCs were greater for juveniles than adults. Based on the most-supported model of BWCs, the median number of annual predicted fatalities at study buildings was 3 (range = 0–52). These results suggest that patchily distributed environmental resources and levels of window area in buildings create spatial variation in BWCs within and among urban areas. Current mortality estimates place little emphasis on spatial variation, which precludes a fundamental understanding of the issue. To focus conservation efforts, we illustrate how knowledge of the structural and environmental factors that influence bird-window collisions can be used

  2. 14 CFR 29.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Windshields and windows. 29.775 Section 29.775 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Accommodations § 29.775 Windshields and windows. Windshields and windows must be made of material that will...

  3. 14 CFR 25.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Windshields and windows. 25.775 Section 25... § 25.775 Windshields and windows. (a) Internal panes must be made of nonsplintering material. (b.... (d) The design of windshields and windows in pressurized airplanes must be based on factors...

  4. 14 CFR 29.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Windshields and windows. 29.775 Section 29.775 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Accommodations § 29.775 Windshields and windows. Windshields and windows must be made of material that will...

  5. 30 CFR 18.66 - Tests of windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests of windows and lenses. 18.66 Section 18... Tests § 18.66 Tests of windows and lenses. (a) Impact tests. A 4-pound cylindrical weight with a 1-inch-diameter hemispherical striking surface shall be dropped (free fall) to strike the window or lens in...

  6. 14 CFR 27.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Windshields and windows. 27.775 Section 27.775 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.775 Windshields and windows. Windshields and windows must be made of material that will not...

  7. 14 CFR 27.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Windshields and windows. 27.775 Section 27.775 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 27.775 Windshields and windows. Windshields and windows must be made of material that will not...

  8. Nonuniform Effects of Reinstatement within the Time Window

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galluccio, Llissa; Rovee-Collier, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    A time window is a limited period after an event initially occurs in which additional information can be integrated with the memory of that event. It shuts when the memory is forgotten. The time window hypothesis holds that the impact of a manipulation at different points within the time window is nonuniform. In two operant conditioning…

  9. 15. INTERIOR VIEW OF GEAROPERATED WINDOW NEAR SECOND FLOOR STAIRWELL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR VIEW OF GEAR-OPERATED WINDOW NEAR SECOND FLOOR STAIRWELL. THE UPPER HALF OF THE WINDOW OPENS OUTWARD WHEN THE CRANK LOCATED AT THE CENTER OF THE WINDOW IS OPERATED. THE CRANK IS ATTACHED TO A GEAR BOX WITH SCREW GEAR - Kodiak Naval Operating Base, Gymnasium, U.S. Coast Guard Station, Kodiak, Kodiak Island Borough, AK

  10. The Video Window: My Life with a Ludic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaver, William W.

    The Video Window is a video screen hanging next to a window on my bedroom wall, showing the image from a camera mounted to show the skyline from outside the same window. This chapter describes the appeal of living with such a system, and the intermingled aesthetic, utilitarian and practical issues involved in its creation and the experience it offers.

  11. Inspection of integrated circuit database through reticle and wafer simulation: the lithography process window performance monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bo; Verma, Gaurav; Volk, William; Ahmadian, Mohsen; Du, Hong; Vikram, Abhishek; Andrews, Scott; Cheng, Yung Feng; Chou, Yueh Lin; Yang, Chuen Huei; Lin, ChinLung

    2005-11-01

    Approaches to verify post-OPC designs for manufacturing have evolved from a number of separate inspection strategies. OPC decorations are verified by design rule or optical rule checkers, the reticle is verified by a reticle inspection system, and the patterned wafers are verified by wafer inspection and metrology tools. Each verification step looks at a different representation of the desired device pattern with very little data flowing between them. Previously, we reported a new paradigm in design verification, moving the OPC verification from the design plane to the wafer plane where it really matters. The DesignScanTM system inspects the OPC decorated design by simulating how the design will be transferred to the reticle layer and how that reticle will be imaged into resist across the full focus-exposure calibration window, which can be up to twice as large as the process window. DesignScanTM first simulates the resist images at the nominal conditions (the best focus/exposure-F0E0) and compares them to pre-OPC design to detect unacceptable variations. Then it simulates resist images across the focus-exposure window and compares them to the best focus/exposure reference. Defect detection algorithms are applied to determine if any unacceptable variation in the pattern occurs within the nominal process window. In this paper we will propose a new methodology on process window monitoring for OPC databases using DesignScan and report results for a chip. We will also report newly developed 2D defect detectors: line end shortening (LES) and interlayer overlap (ILO). New applications will be discussed and reported; such as, determination of the reticle target CD specification through process window simulation across a range of target CDs by biasing the post-OPC data by a few nanometers in both directions (+ and -). Pattern dependent reticle CD specifications are possible by identifying the weak structures.

  12. Observations and consequences of nonuniform aluminum concentrations in the channel regions of AlGaAs channeled-substrate-planar lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Gary A.; Goldstein, Bernard; Butler, Jerome K.

    1987-01-01

    Compositional changes in the n-clad layer within the channel region of channel substrate planar (CSP) type semiconductor lasers have been observed. As a consequece, a large optical cavity (LOC) or an enhanced substrate loss (ESL) version of the CSP geometry may result, both of which may have significantly different characteristics from those of a conventional CSP laser. The CSP-LOC generally has a larger near-field spot size, while the ESL-CSP is characterized by an off-axis, asymmetric far-field pattern.

  13. Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-01

    This report documents the development, execution outcomes and lessons learned of the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase (WVP) Program carried out over a three-year period from 2009 through 2012. The primary goals of the program were met: 1) reduce the incremental cost of highly insulating windows compared to ENERGY STAR windows; and 2) raise the public and potential buyers’ awareness of highly insulating windows and their benefits. A key outcome of the program is that the 2013 ENERGY STAR Most Efficient criteria for primary residential windows were adopted from the technical specifications set forth in the WVP program.

  14. Measure Guideline. Energy-Efficient Window Performance and Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, John; Haglund, Kerry

    2012-11-01

    This document provides guidelines for the selection of energy-efficient windows in new and existing residential construction in all U.S. climate zones. It includes information on window products, their attributes and performance. It provides cost/benefit information on window energy savings as well as information on non-energy benefits such as thermal comfort and reduced HVAC demands. The report also provides information on energy impacts of design decisions such as window orientation, total glazing area and shading devices and conditions. Information on resources for proper window installation is included as well.

  15. Effect of wet oxidized AlxGa1-xAs layer on the interdiffusion of InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Joong-Seon; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Choe, Byung-Doo; Lim, H.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of wet oxidized AlAs cap layer and AlGaAs interlayer on the thermal stability of In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs quantum well (QW) is studied. The QW interdiffusion rate is observed to increase with the Al composition of the AlxGa1-xAs interlayer until x reaches about 0.5 and then saturate for x⩾0.5. When the oxidation is performed at 380 °C for 15 min, the threshold value of x for the enhancement of QW interdiffusion is found to be 0.3. It is also confirmed that the QW interdiffusion can only be explained when the strain effect in InGaAs is taken into account.

  16. Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Arild; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Curcija, Charlie; Kohler, Christian

    2008-09-11

    While window frames typically represent 20-30% of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows that incorporate very low-conductance glazing. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. Based on a literature review and an evaluation of current methods of modeling heat transfer through window frames, we conclude that current procedures specified in ISO standards are not sufficiently adequate for accurately evaluating heat transfer through the low-conductance frames. We conclude that the near-term priorities for improving the modeling of heat transfer through low-conductance frames are: (1) Add 2D view-factor radiation to standard modeling and examine the current practice of averaging surface emissivity based on area weighting and the process of making an equivalent rectangular frame cavity. (2) Asses 3D radiation effects in frame cavities and develop recommendation for inclusion into the design fenestration tools. (3) Assess existing correlations for convection in vertical cavities using CFD. (4) Study 2D and 3D natural convection heat transfer in frame cavities for cavities that are proven to be deficient from item 3 above. Recommend improved correlations or full CFD modeling into ISO standards and design fenestration tools, if appropriate. (5) Study 3D hardware short-circuits and propose methods to ensure that these effects are incorporated into ratings. (6) Study the heat transfer effects of ventilated frame cavities and propose updated correlations.

  17. Two Cases of Malleostapedotomy in Congenital Oval Window Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Da Hee; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomaly of the oval window with an abnormal facial nerve course is an uncommon embryological defect, which is related to the underdevelopment of second branchial arch derivatives. Some treatments for improving hearing levels are available; these include hearing aids, vestibulotomy, neo-oval window formation, and stapes surgeries, including incudostapedotomy and malleostapedotomy. However, surgery for congenital anomalies of the oval window has rarely been described, usually in very small series of patients. We describe two cases of congenital anomalies of the oval window with aberrant facial nerve courses. One was a 40-year-old male diagnosed with unilateral congenital oval window atresia; the other was a 10-year-old male diagnosed with bilateral congenital oval window atresia. We also describe the clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes of malleostapedotomy for congenital anomalies of the oval window with aberrant facial nerve courses. PMID:24653925

  18. Adaptive explanations for sensitive windows in development.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Tim W; Frankenhuis, Willem E

    2015-01-01

    Development in many organisms appears to show evidence of sensitive windows-periods or stages in ontogeny in which individual experience has a particularly strong influence on the phenotype (compared to other periods or stages). Despite great interest in sensitive windows from both fundamental and applied perspectives, the functional (adaptive) reasons why they have evolved are unclear. Here we outline a conceptual framework for understanding when natural selection should favour changes in plasticity across development. Our approach builds on previous theory on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity, which relates individual and population differences in plasticity to two factors: the degree of uncertainty about the environmental conditions and the extent to which experiences during development ('cues') provide information about those conditions. We argue that systematic variation in these two factors often occurs within the lifetime of a single individual, which will select for developmental changes in plasticity. Of central importance is how informational properties of the environment interact with the life history of the organism. Phenotypes may be more or less sensitive to environmental cues at different points in development because of systematic changes in (i) the frequency of cues, (ii) the informativeness of cues, (iii) the fitness benefits of information and/or (iv) the constraints on plasticity. In relatively stable environments, a sensible null expectation is that plasticity will gradually decline with age as the developing individual gathers information. We review recent models on the evolution of developmental changes in plasticity and explain how they fit into our conceptual framework. Our aim is to encourage an adaptive perspective on sensitive windows in development. PMID:26816521

  19. Window and dome technologies and materials II; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 11-13, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klocek, Paul

    Various papers on window and dome technologies and materials are presented. Individual topics addressed include: large diameter sapphire dome, strength of sapphire as a function of temperature and crystal orientation, mechanical evaluation of yttria, nondoped Y2O3 for 3-5 micron IR transmission, imaging performance of crystalline and polycrystalline oxides, refractory sulfides as IR window materials, solid solution strengthening of ZnS, IR-transparent conductive diffused layers in Ge windows, minimization of IR absorption by Ge at elevated temperatures, mechanical enhancement of LWIR materials via coatings, diamond films for IR optical applications, rain erosion protection of IR materials using boron phosphide coatings, rain erosion resistance coating for ZnS domes, aerooptic performance of supersonic mixing layers. Also discussed are: heat transfer predictions for IR domes, hot IR domes, absolute and contrast IR signatures from missile noses, optical window systems, application of Taguchi methods to IR window design, multiparticle supersonic impact test program, single- and multiple-impact jet apparatus, erosion modeling and test of slip-cast fused silica.

  20. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  1. Ballistic Beloniformes attacking through Snell's Window.

    PubMed

    Day, R D; Mueller, F; Carseldine, L; Meyers-Cherry, N; Tibbetts, I R

    2016-02-01

    Needlefishes (Beloniformes) were observed employing a range of stalking and attacking behaviours to attack schools of bait fishes ranging from the use of tactics common to predatory fishes to a novel behaviour: the use of leaping, aerial attacks. These aerial attacks are suggested to serve two purposes: to extend the attack range of the needlefishes and to reduce their prey's potential for evasion. Furthermore, a third purpose is hypothesized that the needlefishes are taking advantage of Snell's Window, an optical effect which may mask their approach to their prey.

  2. X-Windows PVT Widget Class

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.

    2006-01-01

    The X-Windows Process Validation Table (PVT) Widget Class ( Class is used here in the object-oriented-programming sense of the word) was devised to simplify the task of implementing network registration services for Information Sharing Protocol (ISP) graphical-user-interface (GUI) computer programs. Heretofore, ISP PVT programming tasks have required many method calls to identify, query, and interpret the connections and messages exchanged between a client and a PVT server. Normally, programmers have utilized direct access to UNIX socket libraries to implement the PVT protocol queries, necessitating the use of many lines of source code to perform frequent tasks. Now, the X-Windows PVT Widget Class encapsulates ISP client server network registration management tasks within the framework of an X Windows widget. Use of the widget framework enables an X Windows GUI program to interact with PVT services in an abstract way and in the same manner as that of other graphical widgets, making it easier to program PVT clients. Wrapping the PVT services inside the widget framework enables a programmer to treat a PVT server interface as though it were a GUI. Moreover, an alternate subclass could implement another service in a widget of the same type. This program was written by Matthew R. Barry of United Space Alliance for Johnson Space Center. For further information, contact the Johnson Technology Transfer Office at (281) 483-3809. MSC-23582 Shuttle Data Center File- Processing Tool in Java A Java-language computer program has been written to facilitate mining of data in files in the Shuttle Data Center (SDC) archives. This program can be executed on a variety of workstations or via Web-browser programs. This program is partly similar to prior C-language programs used for the same purpose, while differing from those programs in that it exploits the platform-neutrality of Java in implementing several features that are important for analysis of large sets of time-series data

  3. "Virtual Cockpit Window" for a Windowless Aerospacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    A software system processes navigational and sensory information in real time to generate a three-dimensional-appearing image of the external environment for viewing by crewmembers of a windowless aerospacecraft. The design of the particular aerospacecraft (the X-38) is such that the addition of a real transparent cockpit window to the airframe would have resulted in unacceptably large increases in weight and cost. When exerting manual control, an aircrew needs to see terrain, obstructions, and other features around the aircraft in order to land safely. The X-38 is capable of automated landing, but even when this capability is utilized, the crew still needs to view the external environment: From the very beginning of the United States space program, crews have expressed profound dislike for windowless vehicles. The wellbeing of an aircrew is considerably promoted by a three-dimensional view of terrain and obstructions. The present software system was developed to satisfy the need for such a view. In conjunction with a computer and display equipment that weigh less than would a real transparent window, this software system thus provides a virtual cockpit window. The key problem in the development of this software system was to create a realistic three-dimensional perspective view that is updated in real time. The problem was solved by building upon a pre-existing commercial program LandForm C3 that combines the speed of flight-simulator software with the power of geographic-information-system software to generate real-time, three-dimensional-appearing displays of terrain and other features of flight environments. In the development of the present software, the pre-existing program was modified to enable it to utilize real-time information on the position and attitude of the aerospacecraft to generate a view of the external world as it would appear to a person looking out through a window in the aerospacecraft. The development included innovations in realistic

  4. Infrared window materials and their fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, D.L.; White, W.B.

    1984-07-24

    Process for making densified ternary sulfide ceramics as infrared window materials using sulfide compounds MLn/sub 2/S/sub 4/ belonging to the Th/sub 3/P/sub 4/, CaFe/sub 2/O/sub 4/ and spinel structure types. These refractory sulfides show good sinterability especially when fired in flowing hydrogen sulfide, and they can be densified by a combination of hot-pressing and hot-isostatic pressing into ceramic pieces approaching their theoretical density with closed pores and which have good transmission characteristics in the infrared region.

  5. Fused Silica and Other Transparent Window Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Several transparent ceramics, such as spinel and AlONs are now being produced in sufficient large areas to be used in space craft window applications. The work horse transparent material for space missions from Apollo to the International Space Station has been fused silica due in part to its low coefficient of expansion and optical quality. Despite its successful use, fused silica exhibits anomalies in its crack growth behavior, depending on environmental preconditioning and surface damage. This presentation will compare recent optical ceramics to fused silica and discuss sources of variation in slow crack growth behavior.

  6. Window taper functions for subaperture processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that the spectrum of a signal can be calculated with a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), where best resolution is achieved by processing the entire data set. However, in some situations it is advantageous to use a staged approach, where data is first processed within subapertures, and the results are then combined and further processed to a final result. An artifact of this approach is the creation of grating lobes in the final response. The nature of the grating lobes, including their amplitude and spacing, is an artifact of window taper functions, subaperture offsets, and subaperture processing parameters. We assess these factors and exemplify their effects.

  7. Mechanical charactization of sonar window materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S.J.; Groves, S.E.; Harwood, P.J.; Sanchez, R.J.

    1996-03-25

    The three-dimensional mechanical behavior of thick Spectra/epoxy sonar window materials containing various special materials is summarized in this report. Three different materials, which were fabricated by two companies known as `A` and `B` were received from the Naval Warfare Center. The three materials designated `A with microspheres (A micron),` `A without microspheres (A),` and `B` were measured for all properties. The total number of tests was reduced through the assumption that the two orthogonal, in-place directions were identical. Consequently, these materials should have only six independent elastic variables. The measured constants and strengths are given.

  8. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  9. Design and characterization of a durable and highly efficient energy-harvesting electrochromic window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amasawa, Eri

    With the growing global energy demands, electrochromic window (ECW) technology has attracted great attention for its ability to reversibly change the transmittance of incoming light through applied moderate potential. While ECW has a great potential to conserve energy from lighting and air conditioning in buildings, ECW still consumes energy; ECW should be self-powered for further energy conservation. In this study, a new design of energy-harvesting electrochromic window (EH-ECW) based on fusion of two technologies, organic electrochromic window and dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is presented. Unlike other self-powered smart windows such as photoelectrochromic device that only contains two states (i.e. closed circuit colored state and open circuit bleaching state), EH-ECW allows active tuning of transmittance through varying applied potential and function as a photovoltaic cell based on DSSC. The resulting device demonstrates fast switching rate of 1 second in both bleaching and coloring process through the use of electrochromic polymer as a counter electrode layer. In order to increase the transmittance of the device, cobalt redox couple and light colored yet efficient organic dye are employed. The organic dye utilized contains polymeric structure, which contributes to high cyclic stability. The device exhibits power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.5 % under AM 1.5 irradiation (100 mW/cm2), change in transmittance (Delta T = Tmax - Tmin) of 34 % upon applied potential, and shows only 3 % degradation in PCE after 5000 cycles.

  10. GaAs and AlGaAs APDs with GaSb absorption regions in a separate absorption and multiplication structure using a hetero-lattice interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A. R. J.; Craig, A. P.; Reyner, C. J.; Huffaker, D. L.

    2015-05-01

    Interfacial misfit (IMF) arrays were used to create two APD structures, allowing GaSb absorption layers to be combined with wide-gap multiplication regions, grown using GaAs and Al0.8Ga0.2As, respectively. The GaAs APD represents a proof-of-principle, which is developed in the Al0.8Ga0.2As APD to achieve reduced dark currents, of 5.07 μA cm-2 at 90% of the breakdown voltage, and values for effective k = β/α below 0.2. A random-path-length (RPL) simulation was used to model the excess noise in both structures, taking into account the effects of dead space. It is envisaged that the GaSb absorption regions could be replaced with other materials from the 6.1 Å family, allowing for long-wavelength APDs with reduced dark currents and excess noise.

  11. Dual ion beam assisted deposition of biaxially textured template layers

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, James R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Hammond, Robert H.

    2005-05-31

    The present invention is directed towards a process and apparatus for epitaxial deposition of a material, e.g., a layer of MgO, onto a substrate such as a flexible metal substrate, using dual ion beams for the ion beam assisted deposition whereby thick layers can be deposited without degradation of the desired properties by the material. The ability to deposit thicker layers without loss of properties provides a significantly broader deposition window for the process.

  12. Spallanzani Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    31 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a layered, light-toned mesa among other layered materials exposed in a mound that covers much of the floor of Spallanzani Crater.

    Location near: 58.3oS, 273.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  13. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  14. Evacuated Window Glazings for Energy Efficient Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, D. K.; Tracy, C. E.

    1985-12-01

    The design and fabrication of a highly insulating window glazing is being studied at SERI. Computer aided design analyses indicate that an all glass, edge sealed vacuum window with spherical glass interpane spacers and a low emittance, coating,on one internal surface could exhibit a thermal conductance of less than 0.6 W/m2K (thermal resistance, R > 10°F ft h/Btu). Cost effective means of mass-producing such a glazing have been explored. A CO2 laser has been used to produce a continuous, leak tight welded glass perimeter at 580°C, and this process appears to be a promising approach. However, at this temperature in vacuum, few low-emissivity coatings retain their desirable properties. Systemmatic measurements were made on tin oxide (fluorine doped) and indium-tin oxide low-e coatings. The indium-tin oxide was shown to be improved by vacuum heating. The ratio of solar weighted transmittance to emittance (313 K black-body weighted), a measure of performance in this application, is shown to have a sharply defined maximum at a coating sheet resistance of approximately 5 ohms per square in both of these oxide semiconductor coatings.

  15. Wide field camera observations of Baade's Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Light, R. M.; Baum, William A.; Worthey, Guy; Faber, S. M.; Hunter, Deidre A.; O'Neil, Earl J., Jr.; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Groth, E. J.; Westphal, James A.

    1993-01-01

    We have observed a field in Baade's Window using the Wide Field Camera (WFC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and obtain V- and I-band photometry down to V approximately 22.5. These data go several magnitudes fainter than previously obtained from the ground. The location of the break in the luminosity function suggests that there are a significant number of intermediate age (less than 10 Gyr) stars in the Galactic bulge. This conclusion rests on the assumptions that the extinction towards our field is similar to that seen in other parts of Baade's Window, that the distance to the bulge is approximately 8 kpc, and that we can determine fairly accurate zero points for the HST photometry. Changes in any one of these assumptions could increase the inferred age, but a conspiracy of lower reddening, a shorter distance to the bulge, and/or photometric zero-point errors would be needed to imply a population entirely older than 10 Gyr. We infer an initial mass function slope for the main-sequence stars, and find that it is consistent with that measured in the solar neighborhood; unfortunately, the slope is poorly constrained because we sample only a narrow range of stellar mass and because of uncertainties in the observed luminosity function at the faint end.

  16. Prediction of particulate contamination on aperture window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Aleck L.; Fong, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis to predict the effects of light scattering by surface particles on the sensor window of a missile during ascent flight. The particulate contaminant distribution on the window is calculated by tallying the number of particles in a set of size ranges. The particulate contamination at the end of the mission is predicted by adding the contributions from the events of ground and flight operations. The surface particle redistributions caused by vibroacoustically induced surface acceleration was found to contribute the most of the particulate surface contamination. The analytical surface obscuration calculation with a set of particle counts was compared to the results of image analyzer measurement. The analytical results, which were calculated with a given function of particle shape depending on the size, were more conservative than the measurement. A scattering calculation using a verified BSDF model showed that the scattering was less than 0.001 at 20 off the direction of the incident light in the mid IR wavelength when the surfaces were at Level 300 initially.

  17. Rupture of the round window membrane.

    PubMed

    Freeman, P

    1975-01-01

    Considerable interest has been displayed in sudden sensori-neural deafness in recent years, and especially since Blair Simmons postulated that this could be caused by mechanical disruption of the membranes in the inner ear. The literature concerning such reports is reviewed briefly and two cases of rupture of the round window membrane resulting from inner ear barotrauma are reported in detail. Both these cases were experienced divers who had had little difficulty in auto-inflation whilst diving. The first case had progressive sensori-neural deafness with mild vertigo, and tympanotomy revealed rupture of the round window membrane in both ears. These ruptures were repaired with plugs of fat, following which his hearing was restored. The second case developed marked vertigo following a dive and was thought to be suffering from decompression sickness. When the appropriate treatment did not help him, tympanotomy was performed and a rupture of the round membrane was found. This was plugged with fat with a most satisfactory result. Both of these cases had difficulty with autoinflation, and had been aware of such difficulties for some time. Nasal problems were responsible for this, and it is strongly recommended that all divers should have normal nasal function and that they should be educated in the technique of autoinflation, and, in particular, in the importance of avoiding forceful autoinflation at all times. A third case of rupture of the round membrane following an injury to the head is also reported.

  18. Portable Handheld Optical Window Inspection Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis; Dokos, Adam; Burns, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    The Portable Handheld Optical Window Inspection Device (PHOWID) is a measurement system for imaging small defects (scratches, pits, micrometeor impacts, and the like) in the field. Designed primarily for window inspection, PHOWID attaches to a smooth surface with suction cups, and raster scans a small area with an optical pen in order to provide a three-dimensional image of the defect. PHOWID consists of a graphical user interface, motor control subsystem, scanning head, and interface electronics, as well as an integrated camera and user display that allows a user to locate minute defects before scanning. Noise levels are on the order of 60 in. (1.5 m). PHOWID allows field measurement of defects that are usually done in the lab. It is small, light, and attaches directly to the test article in any orientation up to vertical. An operator can scan a defect and get useful engineering data in a matter of minutes. There is no need to make a mold impression for later lab analysis.

  19. Real time programming environment for Windows

    SciTech Connect

    LaBelle, D.R.

    1998-04-01

    This document provides a description of the Real Time Programming Environment (RTProE). RTProE tools allow a programmer to create soft real time projects under general, multi-purpose operating systems. The basic features necessary for real time applications are provided by RTProE, leaving the programmer free to concentrate efforts on his specific project. The current version supports Microsoft Windows{trademark} 95 and NT. The tasks of real time synchronization and communication with other programs are handled by RTProE. RTProE includes a generic method for connecting a graphical user interface (GUI) to allow real time control and interaction with the programmer`s product. Topics covered in this paper include real time performance issues, portability, details of shared memory management, code scheduling, application control, Operating System specific concerns and the use of Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools. The development of RTProE is an important step in the expansion of the real time programming community. The financial costs associated with using the system are minimal. All source code for RTProE has been made publicly available. Any person with access to a personal computer, Windows 95 or NT, and C or FORTRAN compilers can quickly enter the world of real time modeling and simulation.

  20. Environment resistant windows for space greenhouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B. K.; Kondyurin, A.; Bilek, M.; Latella, B. A.

    One of the ways of providing a self-sustainable environment in space is to provide food and life support systems through bio-regenerative power i e a greenhouse It is an essential structure because it provides oxygen and food in a controlled environment The windows and frames of a greenhouse are generally made from glass or polymer panels which allow sunlight to enter Polymers are useful because they are lightweight transparent corrosion resistant and inexpensive However windows which are made from polymeric materials or polymer-based composites suffer from accelerated erosion due to the presence of atomic oxygen in space environment A metal oxide deposited on the surface of the polymer will aid in the resistance of these polymers to chemical attack as well as improving surface hardness and wear resistance characteristics In this study we modified the surfaces of polycarbonate PC by deposition and implantation of thin and transparent aluminium oxide Al 2 O 3 coatings The Al 2 O 3 plasma was produced using a cathodic arc deposition system with a combination of plasma immersion ion implantation PIII The coatings were then tested for resistance to atomic oxygen environment These were carried out by monitoring the mass loss of the deposited samples exposed to an rf oxygen plasma The morphology and optical properties of the coatings before and after exposure to oxygen plasma were then examined using electron microscopy profilometry and ellipsometry Mechanical properties and adhesion characteristics of the coatings

  1. Materials And Devices In Electrochromic Window Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Anderson, Elizabeth J.; Plante, Timothy D.; Rauh, R. David

    1985-12-01

    Windows with switchable electrochromic glazings are potentially useful for regulating solar input to building interiors. In this article, we describe the structure and operation of a proposed solid-state electrochromic glazing based on crystalline LixWO3 (c-LiXWO3) and a low coloration efficiency counter electrode material such as amorphous Nb2O5 (a-Nb2O5). The importance of reversibility in electrochromic glazing operation is emphasized, and optical switching experiments that demonstrate reversible lithium insertion/extraction in c-LixW03, a-LixWO3, and a-LixNb2O5 are described. Additional optical switching experiments in tandem electrochromic cells comprised of c-LixWO3/a-Nb2O5 and a-LixWO3/a-Nb2O5 demonstrated the proposed design, indicating reversible optical switching over 500 and 200 complete cycles, respectively, without degradation. Optical data on the evolution of reflective and absorp-tive modulation in c-LixWO3 are presented and solar attenuation results are used to demon-strate the advantage of using crystalline electrochromics to conserve daylighting during electrochromic window operation.

  2. Energy Efficient Electrochromic Windows Incorporating Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheri Boykin; James Finley; Donald Anthony; Julianna Knowles; Richard Markovic; Michael Buchanan; Mary Ann Fuhry; Lisa Perrine

    2008-11-30

    One approach to increasing the energy efficiency of windows is to control the amount of solar radiation transmitted through a window by using electrochromic technology. What is unique about this project is that the electrochromic is based on the reduction/oxidation reactions of cathodic and anodic organic semi-conducting polymers using room temperature ionic liquids as ion transport electrolytes. It is believed that these types of coatings would be a lower cost alternative to traditional all inorganic thin film based electrochromic technologies. Although there are patents1 based on the proposed technology, it has never been reduced to practice and thoroughly evaluated (i.e. durability and performance) in a window application. We demonstrate that by using organic semi-conductive polymers, specific bands of the solar spectrum (specifically visible and near infrared) can be targeted for electrochemical variable transmittance responsiveness. In addition, when the technology is incorporated into an insulating glass unit, the energy parameters such as the solar heat gain coefficient and the light to solar gain ratio are improved over that of a typical insulating glass unit comprised of glass with a low emissivity coating. A minimum of {approx}0.02 quads of energy savings per year with a reduction of carbon emissions for electricity of {approx}320 MKg/yr benefit is achieved over that of a typical insulating glass unit including a double silver low-E coating. Note that these values include a penalty in the heating season. If this penalty is removed (i.e. in southern climates or commercial structures where cooling is predominate year-round) a maximum energy savings of {approx}0.05 quad per year and {approx}801 MKg/yr can be achieved over that of a typical insulating glass unit including a double silver low-E coating. In its current state, the technology is not durable enough for an exterior window application. The primary downfall is that the redox chemistry fails to

  3. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 μm. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 μm through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 μm of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  4. Current status of photoprotection by window glass, automobile glass, window films, and sunglasses.

    PubMed

    Almutawa, Fahad; Vandal, Robert; Wang, Steven Q; Lim, Henry W

    2013-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has known adverse effects on the skin and eyes. Practitioners are becoming more aware of the importance of outdoor photoprotection. However, little attention is directed to the exposure of the skin and eyes to UVR through the window glass or sunglasses. The amount of ultraviolet transmission through glass depends mainly on the type of the glass. All types of commercial and automobile glass block the majority of ultraviolet-B; however, the degree of ultraviolet-A transmission depends on the type of glass. Laminated glass offers better UVA protection than tempered glass; new safety regulations for automobiles may result in increased use of laminated glass for side windows. Window films can be applied to glass to increase UVR protection. Sunglasses need to be compliant with one of the national standards; a wraparound style or side shields offer the best protection. Increased understanding by practitioners on the transmission of UVR through glass, window films, and sunglasses would allow them to better educate the public and to better manage photosensitive patients.

  5. A Critical Time Window for Organismal Interactions in a Pelagic Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; McManus, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    To measure organismal coherence in a pelagic ecosystem, we used moored sensors to describe the vertical dynamics of each step in the food chain in shelf waters off the west shore of Oahu, Hawaii. Horizontally extensive, intense aggregations of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and micronekton exhibited strong diel patterns in abundance and vertical distribution, resulting in a highly variable potential for interaction amongst trophic levels. Only around dusk did zooplankton layers overlap with phytoplankton layers. Shortly after sunset, micronekton ascended from the deep, aggregating on the island's shelf. Short-lived departures in migration patterns were detected in depth, vertical distribution, density, and total abundance of micronekton when zooplankton layers were present with typical patterns resuming within one hour. Layers of zooplankton began to disappear within 20 minutes of the arrival of micronekton with no layers present after 50 minutes. The effects of zooplankton layers cascaded even further up the food chain, affecting many behaviors of dolphins observed at dusk including their depth, group size, and inter-individual spacing. As a result of these changes in behavior, during a 30-minute window just after dusk, the number of feeding events observed for each dolphin and consequently the feeding time for each individual more than doubled when zooplankton layers were present. Dusk is a critical period for interactions amongst species in this system from phytoplankton to top predators. Our observations that short time windows can drive the structure and function of a complex suite of organisms highlight the importance of explicitly adding a temporal dimension at a scale relevant to individual organisms to our descriptions of heterogeneity in ocean ecosystems. PMID:24844981

  6. Design of the beryllium window for Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, S.; Mapes, M.; Raparia, D.

    2015-11-01

    In the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) beam line, there were two Beryllium (Be) windows with an air gap to separate the high vacuum upstream side from low vacuum downstream side. There had been frequent window failures in the past which affected the machine productivity and increased the radiation dose received by workers due to unplanned maintenance. To improve the window life, design of Be window is reexamined. Detailed structural and thermal simulations are carried out on Be window for different design parameters and loading conditions to come up with better design to improve the window life. The new design removed the air gap and connect the both beam lines with a Be window in-between. The new design has multiple advantages such as 1) reduces the beam energy loss (because of one window with no air gap), 2) reduces air activation due to nuclear radiation and 3) increased the machine reliability as there is no direct pressure load during operation. For quick replacement of this window, an aluminum bellow coupled with load binder was designed. There hasn’t been a single window failure since the new design was implemented in 2012.

  7. Irradiation conditions of ADS beam window and implications for window material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, P.; Möslang, A.

    2006-09-01

    Accelerator driven systems (ADS) are aimed at incineration of long living radioactive isotopes of spent nuclear reactor fuel, thus providing a solution for nuclear waste utilization. The idea is to couple a subcritical nuclear reactor with a high-energy proton accelerator. Protons interacting with the liquid metal target inside the reactor will produce neutrons with energy sufficient to transform long living fuel isotopes to those with shorter decay time. In some design variants a proton beam guide and window separate the vacuum of the accelerator from the liquid metal target. The window appears to be the most critical component of the whole facility as besides liquid metal corrosion it undergoes irradiation damage from incident protons, from protons and neutrons produced by spallation inside the target as well as from fission neutrons generated in the reactor fuel assemblies. In the present work we have evaluated irradiation conditions of the ADS beam window using Monte Carlo neutron, photon and charged particle transport code MCNPX. The code and the detailed geometric model of the experimental ADS (XADS) facility allow a realistic simulation of the spallation process and transport of generated nucleons as well as evaluation of various damage and operational characteristics like displacement damage, heat deposition, gas and spallation element production rates. Present results based on the reduced beam parameters provide a hope that apart from the liquid metal corrosion (not considered in the present paper) the window material could sustain full operation during the period of 3-4 month between replacements. These results may allow reconsideration of pro and contra of the window and the windowless XADS concepts.

  8. Electrochromic window with high reflectivity modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, R.B.; Gerouki, A.; Liu, T.Y.; Goldner, M.A.; Haas, T.E.

    2000-07-25

    A multi-layered, active, thin film, solid-state electrochromic device having a high reflectivity in the near infrared in a colored state, a high reflectivity and transmissivity modulation when switching between colored and bleached states, a low absorptivity in the near infrared, and fast switching times, and methods for its manufacture and switching are provided. In one embodiment, a multi-layered device comprising a first indium tin oxide transparent electronic conductor, a transparent ion blocking layer, a tungsten oxide electrochromic anode, a lithium ion conducting-electrically resistive electrolyte, a complimentary lithium mixed metal oxide electrochromic cathode, a transparent ohmic contact layer, a second indium oxide transparent electronic conductor, and a silicon nitride encapsulant is provided. Through elimination of optional intermediate layers, simplified device designs are provided as alternative embodiments. Typical colored-state reflectivity of the multi-layered device is greater than 50% in the near infrared, bleached-state reflectivity is less than 40% in the visible, bleached-state transmissivity is greater than 60% in the near infrared and greater than 40% in the visible, and spectral absorbance is less than 50% in the range from 0.65-2.5 mum.

  9. Electrochromic window with high reflectivity modulation

    DOEpatents

    Goldner, Ronald B.; Gerouki, Alexandra; Liu, Te-Yang; Goldner, Mark A.; Haas, Terry E.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-layered, active, thin film, solid-state electrochromic device having a high reflectivity in the near infrared in a colored state, a high reflectivity and transmissivity modulation when switching between colored and bleached states, a low absorptivity in the near infrared, and fast switching times, and methods for its manufacture and switching are provided. In one embodiment, a multi-layered device comprising a first indium tin oxide transparent electronic conductor, a transparent ion blocking layer, a tungsten oxide electrochromic anode, a lithium ion conducting-electrically resistive electrolyte, a complimentary lithium mixed metal oxide electrochromic cathode, a transparent ohmic contact layer, a second indium oxide transparent electronic conductor, and a silicon nitride encapsulant is provided. Through elimination of optional intermediate layers, simplified device designs are provided as alternative embodiments. Typical colored-state reflectivity of the multi-layered device is greater than 50% in the near infrared, bleached-state reflectivity is less than 40% in the visible, bleached-state transmissivity is greater than 60% in the near infrared and greater than 40% in the visible, and spectral absorbance is less than 50% in the range from 0.65-2.5 .mu.m.

  10. Science objectives and performance of a radiometer and window design for atmospheric entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.; Davy, William C.; Whiting, Ellis E.

    1994-01-01

    The Radiative Heating Experiment, RHE, aboard the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, AFE, (now cancelled) was to make in-situ measurements of the stagnation region shock layer radiation during an aerobraking maneuver from geosynchronous to low earth orbit. The measurements were to provide a data base to help develop and validate aerothermodynamic computational models. Although cancelled, much work was done to develop the science requirements and to successfully meet RHE technical challenges. This paper discusses the RHE scientific objectives and expected science performance of a small sapphire window for the RHE radiometers. The spectral range required was from 170 to 900 nm. The window size was based on radiometer sensitivity requirements including capability of on-orbit solar calibration.

  11. Atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI): Status and the aerosol explanation for extra window region emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Revercomb, H.E.; Knuteson, R.O.; Best, F.A.; Dirkx, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    High spectral resolution observations of downwelling emission from 3 to 19 microns have been made by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Prototype at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiative Testbed (CART) site for over two years. The spectral data set from AERI provides a basis for improving clear sky radiative transfer; determining the radiative impact of clouds, including the derivation of cloud radiative properties; defining the influences of aerosols in the window regions; and retrieving boundary layer state properties, including temperature, water vapor, and other trace gases. The data stream of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated radiances is routinely provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to those science teams requesting it, and further information on the instrument and data characteristics is available in the ARM Science Team proceedings for 1993 and 1994 and in several conference publications. This paper describes the AERI status, calibration, field experiment wit a new AERI-01 and schedule, window region emissions, and future AERI plans.

  12. Graded multilayer mirrors for the carbon window Schwarzschild objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukov, Igor A.; Bugayev, Yegor A.; Devizenko, Oleksandr Y.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Kondratenko, Valeriy V.; Uspenski, Yuri A.; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Voronov, Dmytro L.

    2008-08-01

    The paper deals with the recent progress in fabrication of the graded multilayer mirrors to be used in a 21X Schwarzschild objective operating at the wavelengths about 4.5 nm ("carbon window" region). The graded Co/C reflective multilayer coatings were fabricated using DC-magnetron sputtering. Mask-assisted deposition was used to create the required radial variation of the multilayer period. Accuracy of the multilayer's parameter measurements and quality of nm-scale layer deposition were improved significantly with application of a number of new methods and approaches. The soft X-ray measurements were conducted at the ALS 6.3.2 beamline to quantify the graded periods on concave and convex mirrors of the Schwarzschild objective. They demonstrated that the reflectivity curves were adjusted with the accuracy of about 0.008 nm (0.3%) over the entire mirror surfaces. The total throughput of the objective with full working aperture (NA ~ 0.2) is estimated to be as high as 0.25%.

  13. Nanophotonics-enabled smart windows, buildings and wearables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoff; Gentle, Angus; Arnold, Matthew; Cortie, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Design and production of spectrally smart windows, walls, roofs and fabrics has a long history, which includes early examples of applied nanophotonics. Evolving nanoscience has a special role to play as it provides the means to improve the functionality of these everyday materials. Improvement in the quality of human experience in any location at any time of year is the goal. Energy savings, thermal and visual comfort indoors and outdoors, visual experience, air quality and better health are all made possible by materials, whose "smartness" is aimed at designed responses to environmental energy flows. The spectral and angle of incidence responses of these nanomaterials must thus take account of the spectral and directional aspects of solar energy and of atmospheric thermal radiation plus the visible and color sensitivity of the human eye. The structures required may use resonant absorption, multilayer stacks, optical anisotropy and scattering to achieve their functionality. These structures are, in turn, constructed out of particles, columns, ultrathin layers, voids, wires, pure and doped oxides, metals, polymers or transparent conductors (TCs). The need to cater for wavelengths stretching from 0.3 to 35 μm including ultraviolet-visible, near-infrared (IR) and thermal or Planck radiation, with a spectrally and directionally complex atmosphere, and both being dynamic, means that hierarchical and graded nanostructures often feature. Nature has evolved to deal with the same energy flows, so biomimicry is sometimes a useful guide.

  14. Sol-gel deposited electrochromic films for electrochromic smart window glass

    SciTech Connect

    Oezer, N.; Lampert, C.M.; Rubin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Electrochromic windows offer the ability to dynamically change the transmittance of a glazing. With the appropriate sensor and controls, this smart window can be used for energy regulation and glare control for a variety of glazing applications. The most promising are building and automotive applications. This work covers the use of sol-gel deposition processes to make active films for these windows. The sol-gel process offers a low-capital investment for the deposition of these active films. Sol-gel serves as an alternative to more expensive vacuum deposition processes. The sol-gel process utilizes solution coating followed by a hydrolysis and condensation. In this investigation the authors report on tungsten oxide and nickel oxide films made by the sol-gel process for electrochromic windows. The properties of the sol-gel films compare favorably to those of films made by other techniques. A typical laminated electrochromic window consists of two glass sheets coated with transparent conductors, which are coated with the active films. The two sheets are laminated together with an ionically conductive polymer. The range of visible transmission modulation of the tungsten oxide was 60% and for the nickel oxide was 20%. The authors used the device configuration of glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/W0{sub 3}/polymer/Li{sub Z}NiO{sub x}H{sub y}/SnO{sub 2}:F glass to test the films. The nickel oxide layer had a low level of lithiation and possibly contained a small amount of water. Lithiated oxymethylene-linked poly(ethylene oxide) was used as the laminating polymer. Commercially available SnO{sub 2}:F/glass (LOF-Tec glass) was used as the transparent conducting glass. The authors found reasonable device switching characteristics which could be used for devices.

  15. Large Acrylic Spherical Windows In Hyperbaric Underwater Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lones, Joe J.; Stachiw, Jerry D.

    1983-10-01

    Both acrylic plastic and glass are common materials for hyperbaric optical windows. Although glass continues to be used occasionally for small windows, virtually all large viewports are made of acrylic. It is easy to uderstand the wide use of acrylic when comparing design properties of this plastic with those of glass, and glass windows are relatively more difficult to fabricate and use. in addition there are published guides for the design and fabrication of acrylic windows to be used in the hyperbaric environment of hydrospace. Although these procedures for fabricating the acrylic windows are somewhat involved, the results are extremely reliable. Acrylic viewports are now fabricated to very large sizes for manned observation or optical quality instrumen tation as illustrated by the numerous acrylic submersible vehicle hulls for hu, an occupancy currently in operation and a 3600 large optical window recently developed for the Walt Disney Circle Vision under-water camera housing.

  16. Window classification of brain CT images in biomedical articles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L Rodney; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R

    2012-01-01

    Effective capability to search biomedical articles based on visual properties of article images may significantly augment information retrieval in the future. In this paper, we present a new method to classify the window setting types of brain CT images. Windowing is a technique frequently used in the evaluation of CT scans, and is used to enhance contrast for the particular tissue or abnormality type being evaluated. In particular, it provides radiologists with an enhanced view of certain types of cranial abnormalities, such as the skull lesions and bone dysplasia which are usually examined using the " bone window" setting and illustrated in biomedical articles using "bone window images". Due to the inherent large variations of images among articles, it is important that the proposed method is robust. Our algorithm attained 90% accuracy in classifying images as bone window or non-bone window in a 210 image data set.

  17. Measure Guideline: Energy-Efficient Window Performance and Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

    2012-11-01

    This document provides guidelines for the selection of energy-efficient windows in new and existing residential construction in all US climate zones. It includes information on window products, their attributes and performance. It provides cost/benefit information on window energy savings as well as information on non-energy benefits such as thermal comfort and reduced HVAC demands. The document also provides information on energy impacts of design decisions such as window orientation, total glazing area and shading devices and conditions. Information on resources for proper window installation is included as well. This document is for builders, homeowners, designers and anyone making decisions about selecting energy efficient window. It is intended to complement other Building America information and efforts.

  18. MAVIS III -- A Windows 95/NT Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, M.F.

    1997-12-01

    MAVIS (Modeling and Analysis of Explosive Valve Interactions) is a computer program that simulates operation of explosively actuated valve. MAVIS was originally written in Fortran in the mid 1970`s and was primarily run on the Sandia Vax computers in use through the early 1990`s. During the mid to late 1980`s MAVIS was upgraded to include the effects of plastic deformation and it became MAVIS II. When the Vax computers were retired, the Gas Transfer System (GTS) Development Department ported the code to the Macintosh and PC platforms, where it ran as a simple console application. All graphical output was lost during these ports. GTS code developers recently completed an upgrade that provides a Windows 95/NT MAVIS application and restores all of the original graphical output. This upgrade is called MAVIS III version 1.0. This report serves both as a user`s manual for MAVIS III v 1.0 and as a general software development reference.

  19. INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Arney, Ph.D.

    2002-12-31

    The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

  20. Launch window definition for sky target experiments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, N. H.

    1973-01-01

    This paper is a brief report on the computer program developed for the Extraterrestrial Physics Barium Ion Cloud (BIC) Project. The mathematical analysis developed for the program along with its programing characteristics are pointed out to show that this program is adaptable to similar sky target projects. Definite viewing constraints are specified so that the chosen ground tracking stations can photograph the behavior of the sky target after its release. Viewing factors include the illumination of the target by the sun, the relative elevation look angle to the target from each tracking station, the solar and lunar depression angles at each tracking station, and the total sky background brightness of the target relative to each tracking station. Numeric values are assigned to each factor through program input. The program output is flexible so that the results of the window calculations can be studied to the depth required.

  1. High efficiency novel window air conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the technical development of a high efficiency window air conditioner. In order to achieve higher energy efficiency ratio (EER), the original capacity of the R410A unit was downgraded by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity but higher EER compressor, while all heat exchangers and the chassis from the original unit were retained. The other subsequent major modifications included – the AC fan motor being replaced with a brushless high efficiency electronically commuted motor (ECM) motor, the capillary tube being replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, and R410A being replaced with drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (85% molar concentration)/R125 (15% molar concentration). All these modifications resulted in significant EER enhancement of the modified unit.

  2. High efficiency novel window air conditioner

    DOE PAGES

    Bansal, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the technical development of a high efficiency window air conditioner. In order to achieve higher energy efficiency ratio (EER), the original capacity of the R410A unit was downgraded by replacing the original compressor with a lower capacity but higher EER compressor, while all heat exchangers and the chassis from the original unit were retained. The other subsequent major modifications included – the AC fan motor being replaced with a brushless high efficiency electronically commuted motor (ECM) motor, the capillary tube being replaced with a needle valve to better control the refrigerant flow and refrigerant set points, andmore » R410A being replaced with drop-in environmentally friendly binary mixture of R32 (85% molar concentration)/R125 (15% molar concentration). All these modifications resulted in significant EER enhancement of the modified unit.« less

  3. Isocurvature forecast in the anthropic axion window

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, J.; Hannestad, S.; Raffelt, G.G.; Wong, Y.Y.Y. E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk E-mail: yvonne.wong@cern.ch

    2009-06-01

    We explore the cosmological sensitivity to the amplitude of isocurvature fluctuations that would be caused by axions in the ''anthropic window'' where the axion decay constant f{sub a} >> 10{sup 12} GeV and the initial misalignment angle Θ{sub i} << 1. In a minimal ΛCDM cosmology extended with subdominant scale-invariant isocurvature fluctuations, existing data constrain the isocurvature fraction to α < 0.09 at 95% C.L. If no signal shows up, Planck can improve this constraint to 0.042 while an ultimate CMB probe limited only by cosmic variance in both temperature and E-polarisation can reach 0.017, about a factor of five better than the current limit. In the parameter space of f{sub a} and H{sub I} (Hubble parameter during inflation) we identify a small region where axion detection remains within the reach of realistic cosmological probes.

  4. Low heat transfer, high strength window materials

    DOEpatents

    Berlad, Abraham L.; Salzano, Francis J.; Batey, John E.

    1978-01-01

    A multi-pane window with improved insulating qualities; comprising a plurality of transparent or translucent panes held in an essentially parallel, spaced-apart relationship by a frame. Between at least one pair of panes is a convection defeating means comprising an array of parallel slats or cells so designed as to prevent convection currents from developing in the space between the two panes. The convection defeating structures may have reflective surfaces so as to improve the collection and transmittance of the incident radiant energy. These same means may be used to control (increase or decrease) the transmittance of solar energy as well as to decouple the radiative transfer between the interior surfaces of the transparent panes.

  5. Supercomputers open window of opportunity for nursing.

    PubMed

    Meintz, S L

    1993-01-01

    A window of opportunity was opened for nurse researchers with the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) initiative in President Bush's 1992 fiscal-year budget. Nursing research moved into the high-performance computing environment through the University of Nevada Las Vegas/Cray Project for Nursing and Health Data Research (PNHDR). USing the CRAY YMP 2/216 supercomputer, the PNHDR established the validity of a supercomputer platform for nursing research. In addition, the research has identified a paradigm shift in statistical analysis, delineated actual and potential barriers to nursing research in a supercomputing environment, conceptualized a new branch of nursing science called Nurmetrics, and discovered new avenue for nursing research utilizing supercomputing tools.

  6. Porting salinas to the windows platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Garth M.; Wilson, Christopher Riley

    2006-06-01

    The ASC program has enabled significant development of high end engineering applications on massively parallel machines. There is a great benefit in providing these applications on the desktop of the analysts and designers, at least insofar as the small models may be run on these platforms, thus providing a tool set that spans the application needs. This effort documents the work of porting Salinas to the WINDOWS{trademark} platform. Selection of the tools required to compile, link, test and run Salinas in this environment is discussed. Significant problems encountered along the way are listed along with an estimation of the overall cost of the port. This report may serve as a baseline for streamlining further porting activities with other ASC codes.

  7. Some numbers on the SLAC klystron windows

    SciTech Connect

    Krienen, F.

    1984-03-01

    The attenuation in our standard copper rectangular wave guides at 10 cm wave length is known to be 0.7 db/100 ft. If the wave guide were made of 70/30 Cupro-nickel, the same alloy the window sleeve is made of, the attenuation constant would go up by the inverse square root of the ratio of the conductivities (skin effect formula). Thus the attenuation constant would be ..beta.. = 12.8 10/sup -3/ m/sup -1/. The length of the sleeve L = 23 mm. Hence a piece of rectangular wave guide of equal length would, at 50 kW incident average power, sustain resistive losses = 2 P ..beta.. L = 29.54 Watt.

  8. Managing coherence via put/get windows

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Ohmacht, Martin

    2011-01-11

    A method and apparatus for managing coherence between two processors of a two processor node of a multi-processor computer system. Generally the present invention relates to a software algorithm that simplifies and significantly speeds the management of cache coherence in a message passing parallel computer, and to hardware apparatus that assists this cache coherence algorithm. The software algorithm uses the opening and closing of put/get windows to coordinate the activated required to achieve cache coherence. The hardware apparatus may be an extension to the hardware address decode, that creates, in the physical memory address space of the node, an area of virtual memory that (a) does not actually exist, and (b) is therefore able to respond instantly to read and write requests from the processing elements.

  9. Managing coherence via put/get windows

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Ohmacht, Martin

    2012-02-21

    A method and apparatus for managing coherence between two processors of a two processor node of a multi-processor computer system. Generally the present invention relates to a software algorithm that simplifies and significantly speeds the management of cache coherence in a message passing parallel computer, and to hardware apparatus that assists this cache coherence algorithm. The software algorithm uses the opening and closing of put/get windows to coordinate the activated required to achieve cache coherence. The hardware apparatus may be an extension to the hardware address decode, that creates, in the physical memory address space of the node, an area of virtual memory that (a) does not actually exist, and (b) is therefore able to respond instantly to read and write requests from the processing elements.

  10. Maximum hydrocarbon window determination in South Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, W.G. )

    1993-03-29

    This is the third and final part of a three part article about the distribution of hydrocarbons in the Tertiary sands of South Louisiana. Based on many individual plots, it was found that hydrocarbon distribution will vary according to the depth of abnormal pressure and lithology. The relation of maximum hydrocarbon distribution to formation fracture strength or depth opens the door to the use of a maximum hydrocarbon window (MHW) technique. This MHW technique can be used as a decision making tool on how deep to drill a well, particularly how deep to drill a well below the top of abnormal pressure. The paper describes the benefits of the MHW technique and its future potential for exploration and development operations.

  11. Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantoglou, Maria; Jonsson, Jacob; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-06-22

    Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

  12. Development of High Reflective Multilayer Mirrors at “Water Window” Wavelengths in IPOE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haochuan; Zhu, Jingtao; Wang, Zhanshan

    Some X-ray sources for laboratory near "water window" wavelengths have been developed. High reflective multilayer mirrors are required. In this wavelength region, Cr/Sc, Cr/Ti, Cr/V and Cr/C are promising for high reflective multilayer mirror. The layer thickness is typically about 1.0 nm. We have deposited Cr/C and Cr/Sc multilayers for λ=4.48 nm and reflectance of 15.2 % was obtained for Cr/C at near normal incidence. We also show that the interface of Cr/Ti multilayers can be significantly improved by inserting B4C as diffusion barrier layer. In this report, high-reflective multilayer mirrors with and without barrier layer were deposited by using magnetron sputtering method. The reflective properties of the multilayer mirror were measured by using synchrotron radiation.

  13. Strengthened lithium for x-ray blast windows

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Imam, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    Lithium's high x-ray transparency makes it an attractive material for windows intended to protect soft x-ray diagnostics in high energy density experiments. Pure lithium is soft and weak, but lithium mixed with lithium hydride powder becomes harder and stronger, in principle without any additional x-ray absorption. A comparison with the standard material for x-ray windows, beryllium, suggests that lithium or lithium strengthened by lithium hydride may well be an excellent option for such windows.

  14. Rose windows and other details. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rose windows and other details. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Rose window; front windows; drinking fountain alcove; proscenium arch; stage door. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 12, job no. 692. Various scales. March 27, 1936. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, April 22, 1936. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered electrochromic window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Crandall, Richard S.; Deb, Satyendra K.; Stone, Jack L.

    1995-01-01

    A variable transmittance double pane window includes an electrochromic material that has been deposited on one pane of the window in conjunction with an array of photovoltaic cells deposited along an edge of the pane to produce the required electric power necessary to vary the effective transmittance of the window. A battery is placed in a parallel fashion to the array of photovoltaic cells to allow the user the ability to manually override the system when a desired transmittance is desired.

  16. Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered electrochromic window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Crandall, R.S.; Deb, S.K.; Stone, J.L.

    1995-01-24

    A variable transmittance double pane window includes an electrochromic material that has been deposited on one pane of the window in conjunction with an array of photovoltaic cells deposited along an edge of the pane to produce the required electric power necessary to vary the effective transmittance of the window. A battery is placed in a parallel fashion to the array of photovoltaic cells to allow the user the ability to manually override the system when a desired transmittance is desired. 11 figures.

  17. Strengthened lithium for x-ray blast windows.

    PubMed

    Pereira, N R; Imam, M A

    2008-05-01

    Lithium's high x-ray transparency makes it an attractive material for windows intended to protect soft x-ray diagnostics in high energy density experiments. Pure lithium is soft and weak, but lithium mixed with lithium hydride powder becomes harder and stronger, in principle without any additional x-ray absorption. A comparison with the standard material for x-ray windows, beryllium, suggests that lithium or lithium strengthened by lithium hydride may well be an excellent option for such windows.

  18. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a slope upon which are exposed some of the layered materials that underlie the south polar cap of Mars. The layers are generally considered to be sediments--perhaps dust--that may have been cemented by water ice.

    Location near: 84.1oS, 343.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  19. Critical windows for nutritional interventions against stunting.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Andrew M; Ward, Kate A; Goldberg, Gail R; Jarjou, Landing M; Moore, Sophie E; Fulford, Anthony J; Prentice, Ann

    2013-05-01

    An analysis of early growth patterns in children from 54 resource-poor countries in Africa and Southeast Asia shows a rapid falloff in the height-for-age z score during the first 2 y of life and no recovery until ≥5 y of age. This finding has focused attention on the period -9 to 24 mo as a window of opportunity for interventions against stunting and has garnered considerable political backing for investment targeted at the first 1000 d. These important initiatives should not be undermined, but the objective of this study was to counteract the growing impression that interventions outside of this period cannot be effective. We illustrate our arguments using longitudinal data from the Consortium of Health Oriented Research in Transitioning collaboration (Brazil, Guatemala, India, Philippines, and South Africa) and our own cross-sectional and longitudinal growth data from rural Gambia. We show that substantial height catch-up occurs between 24 mo and midchildhood and again between midchildhood and adulthood, even in the absence of any interventions. Longitudinal growth data from rural Gambia also illustrate that an extended pubertal growth phase allows very considerable height recovery, especially in girls during adolescence. In light of the critical importance of maternal stature to her children's health, our arguments are a reminder of the importance of the more comprehensive UNICEF/Sub-Committee on Nutrition Through the Life-Cycle approach. In particular, we argue that adolescence represents an additional window of opportunity during which substantial life cycle and intergenerational effects can be accrued. The regulation of such growth is complex and may be affected by nutritional interventions imposed many years previously.

  20. Windows on the axion. [quantum chromodynamics (QCD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Peccei-Quinn symmetry with attendant axion is a most compelling, and perhaps the most minimal, extension of the standard model, as it provides a very elegant solution to the nagging strong CP-problem associated with the theta vacuum structure of QCD. However, particle physics gives little guidance as to the axion mass; a priori, the plausible values span the range: 10(-12)eV is approx. less than m(a) which is approx. less than 10(6)eV, some 18 orders-of-magnitude. Laboratory experiments have excluded masses greater than 10(4)eV, leaving unprobed some 16 orders-of-magnitude. Axions have a host of interesting astrophysical and cosmological effects, including, modifying the evolution of stars of all types (our sun, red giants, white dwarfs, and neutron stars), contributing significantly to the mass density of the Universe today, and producting detectable line radiation through the decays of relic axions. Consideration of these effects has probed 14 orders-of-magnitude in axion mass, and has left open only two windows for further exploration: 10(-6)eV is approx. less than m(a) is approx. less than 10(-3)eV and 1eV is approx. less than m(a) is approx. less than 5eV (hadronic axions only). Both these windows are accessible to experiment, and a variety of very interesting experiments, all of which involve heavenly axions, are being planned or are underway.

  1. THE METABOLOMIC WINDOW INTO HEPATOBILIARY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Beyoğlu, Diren; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The emergent discipline of metabolomics has attracted considerable research effort in hepatology. Here we review the metabolomic data for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), hepatitis B and C, cholecystitis, cholestasis, liver transplantation and acute hepatotoxicity in animal models. A metabolomic window has permitted a view into the changing biochemistry occurring in the transitional phases between a healthy liver and hepatocellular carcinoma or cholangiocarcinoma. Whether provoked by obesity and diabetes, alcohol use or oncogenic viruses, the liver develops a core metabolomic phenotype (CMP) that involves dysregulation of bile acid and phospholipid homeostasis. The CMP commences at the transition between the healthy liver (Phase 0) and NAFLD/NASH, ALD or viral hepatitis (Phase 1). This CMP is maintained in the presence or absence of cirrhosis (Phase 2) and whether or not either HCC or CCA (Phase 3) develop. Inflammatory signalling in the liver triggers the appearance of the CMP. Many other metabolomic markers distinguish between Phases 0, 1, 2 and 3. A metabolic remodelling in HCC has been described but metabolomic data from all four Phases demonstrate that the Warburg shift from mitochondrial respiration to cytosolic glycolysis foreshadows HCC and may occur as early as Phase 1. The metabolic remodelling also involves an upregulation of fatty acid β-oxidation, also beginning in Phase 1. The storage of triglycerides in fatty liver provides high energy-yielding substrates for Phases 2 and 3 of liver pathology. The metabolomic window into hepatobiliary disease sheds new light on the systems pathology of the liver. PMID:23714158

  2. WORM - WINDOWED OBSERVATION OF RELATIVE MOTION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.

    1994-01-01

    The Windowed Observation of Relative Motion, WORM, program is primarily intended for the generation of simple X-Y plots from data created by other programs. It allows the user to label, zoom, and change the scale of various plots. Three dimensional contour and line plots are provided, although with more limited capabilities. The input data can be in binary or ASCII format, although all data must be in the same format. A great deal of control over the details of the plot is provided, such as gridding, size of tick marks, colors, log/semilog capability, time tagging, and multiple and phase plane plots. Many color and monochrome graphics terminals and hard copy printer/plotters are supported. The WORM executive commands, menu selections and macro files can be used to develop plots and tabular data, query the WORM Help library, retrieve data from input files, and invoke VAX DCL commands. WORM generated plots are displayed on local graphics terminals and can be copied using standard hard copy capabilities. Some of the graphics features of WORM include: zooming and dezooming various portions of the plot; plot documentation including curve labeling and function listing; multiple curves on the same plot; windowing of multiple plots and insets of the same plot; displaying a specific on a curve; and spinning the curve left, right, up, and down. WORM is written in PASCAL for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX computer operating under VMS 4.7 with a virtual memory requirement of approximately 392K of 8 bit bytes. It uses the QPLOT device independent graphics library included with WORM. It was developed in 1988.

  3. 7. DETAIL, WINDOWS AND SAFETY LADDER AT RECEIVING DEPARTMENT, NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL, WINDOWS AND SAFETY LADDER AT RECEIVING DEPARTMENT, NORTH SIDE, NEAR WEST END. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Inspection & Repair Shops, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  4. Vacuum window glazings for energy-efficient buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Smith, L.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Potter, T.; Christensen, C. ); Soule, D.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The technical feasibility of a patented, laser-welded, evacuated insulating window was studied. The window has two edge-sealed sheets of glass separated by 0.5-mm glass spheres spaced 30 mm apart in a regular array. A highly insulating frame is required and several designs were analyzed. The vacuum window's combination of high solar transmittance and low thermal conductance makes it superior to many other windows in cold climates. In the US Pacific Northwest, the vacuum window could save about 6 MJ of heating energy annually per square meter of window in comparison to conventional, double-glazed windows. A large, vacuum laser-welding facility was designed and installed to conduct glass welding experiments and to fabricate full-sized vacuum windows. Experiments confirmed the feasibility of laser-sealing glass in vacuum but identified two difficulties. Under some circumstances, bubbles of dissolved gases form during welding and weaken the seal. Glass also vaporizes and contaminates the laser beam steering mirror. A novel moving metal foil mirror was developed to circumvent the contamination problem, but it has not yet been used to complete welding experiments and fabricate full-sized vacuum windows. 63 refs., 53 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. 12. DETAIL, TYPICAL WINDOW BAY Delaware, Lackawanna & Western ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL, TYPICAL WINDOW BAY - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  6. Solar window collection and distribution module system. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The construction and monitoring of a solar window collection and distribution system are presented. One complete window module was purchased and assembled, including: the glass, the window frames, sealants, grills, vents and a mechanical damper device. Monitoring of the system operation was limited to measuring inside air temperature, outside air temperature, and circulation temperatures through the window module systems, as well as the actual tinted glass surface temperature. The system has produced a reduction in glare, fading of furniture, and control of solar gains to a building structure.

  7. 6. DETAIL OF CORNICE, ROOF AND WINDOWS, VIEW TO SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF CORNICE, ROOF AND WINDOWS, VIEW TO SOUTHEAST - Providence Sewage Treatment System, Ernest Street Pumping Station, Boiler House, Ernest Street & Allens Avenue, Providence, Providence County, RI

  8. Due-Window Assignment Scheduling with Variable Job Processing Times

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We consider a common due-window assignment scheduling problem jobs with variable job processing times on a single machine, where the processing time of a job is a function of its position in a sequence (i.e., learning effect) or its starting time (i.e., deteriorating effect). The problem is to determine the optimal due-windows, and the processing sequence simultaneously to minimize a cost function includes earliness, tardiness, the window location, window size, and weighted number of tardy jobs. We prove that the problem can be solved in polynomial time. PMID:25918745

  9. TENANT HOUSE, WINDOW DETAIL, NORTH FRONT, LOOKING SOUTH Irvine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TENANT HOUSE, WINDOW DETAIL, NORTH FRONT, LOOKING SOUTH - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Carillo Tenant House, Southwest of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  10. Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1996-01-01

    A window that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 .mu.m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons.

  11. Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1996-04-16

    A window is disclosed that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 {micro}m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons. 1 fig.

  12. Windows Program For Driving The TDU-850 Printer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Brett T.

    1995-01-01

    Program provides WYSIWYG compatibility between video display and printout. PDW is Microsoft Windows printer-driver computer program for use with Raytheon TDU-850 printer. Provides previously unavailable linkage between printer and IBM PC-compatible computers running Microsoft Windows. Enhances capabilities of Raytheon TDU-850 hardcopier by emulating all textual and graphical features normally supported by laser/ink-jet printers and makes printer compatible with any Microsoft Windows application. Also provides capabilities not found in laser/ink-jet printer drivers by providing certain Windows applications with ability to render high quality, true gray-scale photographic hardcopy on TDU-850. Written in C language.

  13. Layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  14. Sliding-window raptor codes for efficient scalable wireless video broadcasting with unequal loss protection.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Pasquale; Grangetto, Marco; Tillo, Tammam; Magli, Enrico; Olmo, Gabriella

    2010-06-01

    Digital fountain codes have emerged as a low-complexity alternative to Reed-Solomon codes for erasure correction. The applications of these codes are relevant especially in the field of wireless video, where low encoding and decoding complexity is crucial. In this paper, we introduce a new class of digital fountain codes based on a sliding-window approach applied to Raptor codes. These codes have several properties useful for video applications, and provide better performance than classical digital fountains. Then, we propose an application of sliding-window Raptor codes to wireless video broadcasting using scalable video coding. The rates of the base and enhancement layers, as well as the number of coded packets generated for each layer, are optimized so as to yield the best possible expected quality at the receiver side, and providing unequal loss protection to the different layers according to their importance. The proposed system has been validated in a UMTS broadcast scenario, showing that it improves the end-to-end quality, and is robust towards fluctuations in the packet loss rate.

  15. The Keck keyword layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. R.; Lupton, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Each Keck instrument presents a consistent software view to the user interface programmer. The view consists of a small library of functions, which are identical for all instruments, and a large set of keywords, that vary from instrument to instrument. All knowledge of the underlying task structure is hidden from the application programmer by the keyword layer. Image capture software uses the same function library to collect data for the image header. Because the image capture software and the instrument control software are built on top of the same keyword layer, a given observation can be 'replayed' by extracting keyword-value pairs from the image header and passing them back to the control system. The keyword layer features non-blocking as well as blocking I/O. A non-blocking keyword write operation (such as setting a filter position) specifies a callback to be invoked when the operation is complete. A non-blocking keyword read operation specifies a callback to be invoked whenever the keyword changes state. The keyword-callback style meshes well with the widget-callback style commonly used in X window programs. The first keyword library was built for the two Keck optical instruments. More recently, keyword libraries have been developed for the infrared instruments and for telescope control. Although the underlying mechanisms used for inter-process communication by each of these systems vary widely (Lick MUSIC, Sun RPC, and direct socket I/O, respectively), a basic user interface has been written that can be used with any of these systems. Since the keyword libraries are bound to user interface programs dynamically at run time, only a single set of user interface executables is needed. For example, the same program, 'xshow', can be used to display continuously the telescope's position, the time left in an instrument's exposure, or both values simultaneously. Less generic tools that operate on specific keywords, for example an X display that controls optical

  16. VIEW OF ORIGINAL WINDOWS (TYPICAL) OF BUILDING 445, FROM EXTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ORIGINAL WINDOWS (TYPICAL) OF BUILDING 445, FROM EXTERIOR OF THE BUILDING. THESE ORIGINAL STEEL SASHED WINDOWS ARE SHOWN WITH THE STEEL SHUTTERS OPEN. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Magazine Building, Kuakua Avenue near Wharf S-20, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. VIEW OF ORIGINAL WINDOWS (TYPICAL) OF BUILDING 416, FROM EXTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ORIGINAL WINDOWS (TYPICAL) OF BUILDING 416, FROM EXTERIOR OF THE BUILDING. THESE ORIGINAL STEEL SASHED WINDOWS ARE SHOWN WITH THE STEEL SHUTTERS OPEN. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Magazine Building, Kuakua Avenue near Wharf S-19, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 14 CFR 23.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... loadings and flight loads, or compliance with the fail-safe requirements of paragraph (d) of this section...-carrying element of the windshield, window panel, or canopy. (e) The windshield and side windows forward of the pilot's back when the pilot is seated in the normal flight position must have a...

  19. 14 CFR 23.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... loadings and flight loads, or compliance with the fail-safe requirements of paragraph (d) of this section...-carrying element of the windshield, window panel, or canopy. (e) The windshield and side windows forward of the pilot's back when the pilot is seated in the normal flight position must have a...

  20. 14 CFR 23.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... loadings and flight loads, or compliance with the fail-safe requirements of paragraph (d) of this section...-carrying element of the windshield, window panel, or canopy. (e) The windshield and side windows forward of the pilot's back when the pilot is seated in the normal flight position must have a...

  1. 14 CFR 23.775 - Windshields and windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... loadings and flight loads, or compliance with the fail-safe requirements of paragraph (d) of this section...-carrying element of the windshield, window panel, or canopy. (e) The windshield and side windows forward of the pilot's back when the pilot is seated in the normal flight position must have a...

  2. 9. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING ALUMINUM SLIDING GLASS WINDOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM SHOWING ALUMINUM SLIDING GLASS WINDOW FRONT DOOR, AND ORIGINAL 6-LIGHT OVER 1-LIGHT, DOUBLE-HUNG WINDOWS IN SINGLE AND DOUBLE ARRANGEMENTS. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  3. 22. DETAIL OF TRIPLE WINDOW, SOUTHEAST ROOM, FIRST FLOOR. Typical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL OF TRIPLE WINDOW, SOUTHEAST ROOM, FIRST FLOOR. Typical for all triple windows on first and second floors. Single swing jib door under center sash opening out. Door thickness measures from flush with exterior siding to 3/4' inside bottom sash. See also Photo 12. SC-291-12. - John Joyner Smith House, 400 Wilmington Street, Beaufort, Beaufort County, SC

  4. Interior of processing room showing the passthrough window from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of processing room showing the pass-through window from the shucking room. Tally board on the wall was used to keep track of the output of each shucker. Skimming table for rinsing the oyster meat is located under the pass-through window. - J.C. Lore Oyster House, 14430 Solomons Island Road, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  5. 25. VIEW FROM MAIN HALL THROUGH INTERIOR WINDOW TO SOLARIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW FROM MAIN HALL THROUGH INTERIOR WINDOW TO SOLARIUM Note how much light enters this interior space from the solarium. The hall also receives light from the lightwell window of the main stairs to the third floor, out of sight to the left. - Woodrow Wilson House, 2340 South S Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. FACILITY 713, LIVING ROOM SHOWING DIAMONDPANED WINDOWS FLANKING THE FIREPLACE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 713, LIVING ROOM SHOWING DIAMOND-PANED WINDOWS FLANKING THE FIREPLACE, AND LEADED-GLASS WINDOWS IN DINING ROOM IN RIGHT BACKGROUND, VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Central-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Bragg & Grime Streets near Ayres Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Field repair of AH-16 helicopter window cutting assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Army uses explosively actuated window cutting assemblies to provide emergency crew ground egress. Gaps between the system's explosive cords and acrylic windows caused a concern about functional reliability for a fleet of several hundred aircraft. A field repair method, using room temperature vulcanizing silicone compound (RTV), was developed and demonstrated to fill gaps as large as 0.250 inch.

  8. 29. May 1985. DETAIL OF INSCRIPTION IN WINDOW PANE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. May 1985. DETAIL OF INSCRIPTION IN WINDOW PANE IN SITTING ROOM (window is immediately south of front, or east, doors; inscription reads: 'Another May new buds new flowers Ah why has happiness no second spring' (author and date undetermined) - Borough House, West Side State Route 261, about .1 mile south side of junction with old Garners Ferry Road, Stateburg, Sumter County, SC

  9. 30 CFR 18.66 - Tests of windows and lenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Tests § 18.66 Tests of windows and lenses. (a) Impact tests. A 4-pound cylindrical weight with a 1-inch... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of windows and lenses. 18.66 Section 18... breakage the impact according to the following table: Lens diameter, (D), inches Height of fall, inches...

  10. Sound transmission loss of windows on high speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumei; Xiao, Xinbiao; Thompson, David; Squicciarini, Giacomo; Wen, Zefeng; Li, Zhihui; Wu, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The window is one of the main components of the high speed train car body structure through which noise can be transmitted. To study the windows’ acoustic properties, the vibration of one window of a high speed train has been measured for a running speed of 250 km/h. The corresponding interior noise and the noise in the wheel-rail area have been measured simultaneously. The experimental results show that the window vibration velocity has a similar spectral shape to the interior noise. Interior noise source identification further indicates that the window makes a contribution to the interior noise. Improvement of the window's Sound Transmission Loss (STL) can reduce the interior noise from this transmission path. An STL model of the window is built based on wave propagation and modal superposition methods. From the theoretical results, the window's STL property is studied and several factors affecting it are investigated, which provide indications for future low noise design of high speed train windows.

  11. 33. DETAIL VIEW OF THE WEST WINDOW AT THE FIRST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. DETAIL VIEW OF THE WEST WINDOW AT THE FIRST FLOOR LEVEL OF THE TOWER (NOTE LEVEL OF ARCHITECTURAL FINISH SEEN IN THE ROUNDHEADED WINDOW WITH ITS ROUND-ARCHED, BROWNSTONE HOOD THAT TERMINATES IN BRACKETS AS WELL AS IN THE STRINGCOURSE AND IN BRICK INSET-PANELING BELOW THE BROWNSTONE SILL) - Kenworthy Hall, State Highway 14 (Greensboro Road), Marion, Perry County, AL

  12. Interior view of the window wall of the enclosed office ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the window wall of the enclosed office area taken from the main warehouse area showing the metal sash windows, view facing west - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  13. DETAIL OF ORIGINAL WINDOWS ON SECOND FLOOR AT THE EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ORIGINAL WINDOWS ON SECOND FLOOR AT THE EAST END, SHOWING CLEARANCE BETWEEN WINDOW SASH AND PILASTER. VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHWEST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Aviation Storehouse, Vincennes Avenue at Simms Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Measure Guideline. Wood Window Repair, Rehabilitation, and Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.

    2012-12-01

    This measure guideline provides information and guidance on rehabilitating, retrofitting, and replacing existing window assemblies in residential construction. The intent is to provide information regarding means and methods to improve the energy and comfort performance of existing wood window assemblies in a way that takes into consideration component durability, in-service operation, and long term performance of the strategies.

  15. Radiation-transparent windows, method for imaging fluid transfers

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Wang, Jin

    2011-07-26

    A thin, x-ray-transparent window system for environmental chambers involving pneumatic pressures above 40 bar is presented. The window allows for x-ray access to such phenomena as fuel sprays injected into a pressurized chamber that mimics realistic internal combustion engine cylinder operating conditions.

  16. 43. Interior view, east study window from the parlor. Exposed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Interior view, east study window from the parlor. Exposed areas above and to the left of the window show remnants of decorative painting believed to date from early in the nineteenth century. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. 16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note condition of slates on tower skirt roof, missing section of gutter at left side of skirt roof, missing window panes; note also knee braces carried on masonry ancons; view to southwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  18. Emissive properties of SiO2 thin films through photonic windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D.; Garín, M.; Trifonov, T.; Rodríguez, A.; Alcubilla, R.

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we study the selective emission properties of silicon-based three-dimensional photonic crystals coated with thin films of silicon dioxide presenting temperature emission measurements at 600 K of oxidized macroporous silicon structures. The photonic band gap of the structure is centered at 9 μm with 2.5 μm bandwidth. Through this photonic window defined by the gap, a narrow emission peak arises from the oxide layer. We propose the given structure as a selective thermal source for infrared spectroscopy applications in the fingerprint spectral region (6-12 μm wavelength).

  19. BOREAS AFM-3 NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Flux and Moving Window Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Shanot, Al; Oncley, Steven P.; Cooper, Al; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-3 team used the NCAR Electra aircraft data to make measurements of the fluxes of momentum, sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide, and ozone over the entire BOREAS region to tie together measurements made in both the SSA and the NSA in 1994. These data were also used to study the planetary boundary layer using both in situ and remote sensing measurements. This data set contains both the aircraft flux and the moving window data. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  20. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02153 Polar Layers

    This image of the south polar region shows layered material. It is not known if the layers are formed yearly or if they form over the period of 10s to 100s of years or more.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.3N, Longitude 296.2E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. High-Reliability Waveguide Vacuum/Pressure Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, Michael J.; Hanson, Theodore R.; Long, Ezra M.; Montanez, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) uses commercial waveguide windows on the output waveguide of Ka-band (32 GHz) low-noise amplifiers. Mechanical failure of these windows resulted in an unacceptable loss in tracking time. To address this issue, a new Ka-band WR-28 waveguide window has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The window uses a slab of low-loss, low-dielectric constant foam that is bonded into a 1/2-wave-thick waveguide/flange. The foam is a commercially available, rigid, closed-cell polymethacrylimide. It has excellent electrical properties with a dielectric constant of 1.04, and a loss tangent of 0.01. It is relatively strong with a tensile strength of 1 MPa. The material is virtually impermeable to helium. The finished window exhibits a leak rate of less than 3x10(exp -3)cu cm/s with helium. The material is also chemically resistant and can be cleaned with acetone. The window is constructed by fabricating a window body by brazing a short length of WR-28 copper waveguide into a standard rectangular flange, and machining the resulting part to a thickness of 4.6 mm. The foam is machined to a rectangular shape with a dimension of 7.06x3.53 mm. The foam is bonded into the body with a two-part epoxy. After curing, the excess glue and foam are knife-trimmed by hand. The finished window has a loss of less than 0.08 dB (2%) and a return loss of greater than 25 dB at 32 GHz. This meets the requirements for the DSN application. The window is usable for most applications over the entire 26-to-40-GHz waveguide band. The window return loss can be tuned to a required frequency by var y in g the thickness of the window slightly. Most standard waveguide windows use a thin membrane of material bonded into a recess in a waveguide flange, or sandwiched between two flanges with a polymer seal. Designs using the recessed window are prone to mechanical failure over time due to constraints on the dimensions of the recess that allow the bond to fail. Designs using the

  2. Design options for low-conductivity window frames

    SciTech Connect

    Byars, N.; Arasteh, D.

    1990-10-01

    The window industry's commercialization of low-emissivity coatings and low-conductivity gas-filling over the past few years has helped to drastically reduce heat transfer rates through the glazed areas of windows. However, few changes have taken place in the design and construction of window frames and edges, leaving these elements to account for most of the heat transfer through today's state-of-the-art windows. This paper presents design and material requirements for the manufacture of low-conductivity window frames obtained through the use of finite element computer modeling. Such frames will compliment and not degrade today's most energy-efficient insulated glass units. 7 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Context Switching with Multiple Register Windows: A RISC Performance Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konsek, Marion B.; Reed, Daniel A.; Watcharawittayakul, Wittaya

    1987-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that a large file of overlapping register windows can greatly reduce procedure call/return overhead, the effects of register windows in a multiprogramming environment are poorly understood. This paper investigates the performance of multiprogrammed, reduced instruction set computers (RISCs) as a function of window management strategy. Using an analytic model that reflects context switch and procedure call overheads, we analyze the performance of simple, linearly self-recursive programs. For more complex programs, we present the results of a simulation study. These studies show that a simple strategy that saves all windows prior to a context switch, but restores only a single window following a context switch, performs near optimally.

  4. Multi-Window Controllers for Autonomous Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, B, J.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Multi-window controllers select between elementary linear controllers using nonlinear windows based on the amplitude and frequency content of the feedback error. The controllers are relatively simple to implement and perform much better than linear controllers. The commanders for such controllers only order the destination point and are freed from generating the command time-profiles. The robotic missions rely heavily on the tasks of acquisition and tracking. For autonomous and optimal control of the spacecraft, the control bandwidth must be larger while the feedback can (and, therefore, must) be reduced.. Combining linear compensators via multi-window nonlinear summer guarantees minimum phase character of the combined transfer function. It is shown that the solution may require using several parallel branches and windows. Several examples of multi-window nonlinear controller applications are presented.

  5. Design of large aperture, low mass vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, W.J.; Mapes, M.

    1993-01-01

    Large vacuum vessels are employed downstream of fixed targets in High Energy Physics experiments to provide a long path for particles to traverse without interacting with air molecules. These vessels generally have a large aperture opening known as a vacuum window which employs a thin membrane to preserve the vacuum environment yet allows the particles to pass through with a minimal effect on them. Several large windows have been built using a composite of Kevlar/Mylar including circular windows to a diameter of 96.5 cm and rectangular windows up to 193 cm x 86 cm. This paper describes the design, fabrication, testing and operating experience with these windows and relates the actual performance to theoretical predictions.

  6. Design of large aperture, low mass vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, W.J.; Mapes, M.

    1993-07-01

    Large vacuum vessels are employed downstream of fixed targets in High Energy Physics experiments to provide a long path for particles to traverse without interacting with air molecules. These vessels generally have a large aperture opening known as a vacuum window which employs a thin membrane to preserve the vacuum environment yet allows the particles to pass through with a minimal effect on them. Several large windows have been built using a composite of Kevlar/Mylar including circular windows to a diameter of 96.5 cm and rectangular windows up to 193 cm x 86 cm. This paper describes the design, fabrication, testing and operating experience with these windows and relates the actual performance to theoretical predictions.

  7. Design and Characterization of the ALMA Band 5 Vacuum Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroder, Arne; Murk, Axel; Yagoubov, Pavel; Patt, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the electromagnetic design process of the vacuum window for the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 5 (163-211 GHz). We have carried out investigations by means of numerical simulations as well as reflection and transmission measurements. Simulations were performed using the finite element method, an efficient quasi-analytical technique, and rigorous coupled-wave analysis. We used an injection-molded vacuum window prototype as a starting point of the design process and investigated deterioration in the electromagnetic performance caused by different types of manufacturing artifacts. Following these analyses, an optimization of the window has been performed based on simulations. We measured the reflectivity and transmittance of the newly designed window and this paper demonstrates that the optimized window exhibits a return loss better than -20 dB, as required by the ALMA specifications.

  8. Space station proximity operations windows: Human factors design guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1987-01-01

    Proximity operations refers to all activities outside the Space Station which take place within a 1-km radius. Since there will be a large number of different operations involving manned and unmanned vehicles, single- and multiperson crews, automated and manually controlled flight, a wide variety of cargo, and construction/repair activities, accurate and continuous human monitoring of these operations from a specially designed control station on Space Station will be required. Total situational awareness will be required. This paper presents numerous human factors design guidelines and related background information for control windows which will support proximity operations. Separate sections deal with natural and artificial illumination geometry; all basic rendezvous vector approaches; window field-of-view requirements; window size; shape and placement criteria; window optical characteristics as they relate to human perception; maintenance and protection issues; and a comprehensive review of windows installed on U.S. and U.S.S.R. manned vehicles.

  9. Effect of aftermarket automobile window tinting films on driver vision.

    PubMed

    LaMotte, J; Ridder, W; Yeung, K; De Land, P

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the level of automobile window tint that causes a significant reduction of vision for automobile drivers. Contrast sensitivity was measured on 20 participants, of whom 10 were age 20 to 29 years and 10 were age 60 to 69 years, through a stock automobile window (control) and two windows darkened with plastic film. For the younger drivers, a car window with 37% transmittance did not significantly reduce contrast sensitivity, but a darker tint of 18% transmittance reduced contrast sensitivity at higher spatial frequencies. For the older drivers, a tint of 37% transmittance significantly reduced mid-to- high spatial frequency contrast sensitivity. The typical state standard (no tint with less than 35% transmittance) would thus seem to be appropriate for younger drivers; however, further examination of the standard may be necessary in regard to older drivers. Actual or potential applications of this research include guidelines and regulations regarding tinting of automobile windows. PMID:11022888

  10. Dynamics of window glass fracture in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, E.K.; Matalucci, R.V.

    1998-05-01

    An exploratory study was conducted under the Architectural Surety Program to examine the possibility of modifying fracture of glass in the shock-wave environment associated with terrorist bombings. The intent was to explore strategies to reduce the number and severity of injuries resulting from those attacks. The study consisted of a series of three experiments at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology at Socorro, NM, in which annealed and tempered glass sheets were exposed to blast waves at several different levels of overpressure and specific impulse. A preliminary assessment of the response of tempered glass to the blast environment suggested that inducing early failure would result in lowering fragment velocity as well as reducing the loading from the window to the structure. To test that possibility, two different and novel procedures (indentation flaws and spot annealing) were used to reduce the failure strength of the tempered glass while maintaining its ability to fracture into small cube-shaped fragments. Each experiment involved a comparison of the performance of four sheets of glass with different treatments.

  11. Window technique for climate trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szentimrey, Tamás; Faragó, Tibor; Szalai, Sándor

    1992-01-01

    Climatic characteristics are affected by various systematic and occasional impacts: besides the changes in the observing system (locations of the stations of the meteorological network, instruments, observing procedures), the possible local-scale and global natural and antropogenic impacts on climatic conditions should be taken into account. Apart from the predictability problems, the phenomenological analysis of the climatic variability and the determination of past persistent climatic anomalies are significant problems, among other aspects, as evidence of the possible anomalous behavior of climate or for climate impact studies. In this paper, a special technique for the identification of such “shifts” in the observational series is presented. The existence of these significant shorter or longer term changes in the mean characteristics for the properly selected adjoining periods of time is the necessary condition for the formation of any more or less unidirectional climatic trends. Actually, the window technique is based on a complete set of orthogonal functions. The sensitivity of the proposed model on its main parameters is also investigated. This method is applied for hemispheric and Hungarian data series of the mean annual surface temperature.

  12. Orbiter Window Hypervelocity Impact Strength Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Lynda R.

    2011-01-01

    When the Space Shuttle Orbiter incurs damage on its windowpane during flight from particles traveling at hypervelocity speeds, it produces a distinctive damage that reduces the overall strength of the pane. This damage has the potential to increase the risk associated with a safe return to Earth. Engineers at Boeing and NASA/JSC are called to Mission Control to evaluate the damage and provide an assessment on the risk to the crew. Historically, damages like these were categorized as "accepted risk" associated with manned spaceflight, and as long as the glass was intact, engineers gave a "go ahead" for entry for the Orbiter. Since the Columbia accident, managers have given more scrutiny to these assessments, and this has caused the Orbiter window engineers to capitalize on new methods of assessments for these damages. This presentation will describe the original methodology that was used to asses the damages, and introduce a philosophy new to the Shuttle program for assessing structural damage, reliability/risk-based engineering. The presentation will also present a new, recently adopted method for assessing the damage and providing management with a reasonable assessment on the realities of the risk to the crew and vehicle for return.

  13. Characterization of an explosively bonded aluminum proton beam window for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Janney, Jim G; Parish, Chad M

    2014-01-01

    An effort is underway at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to change the design of the 1st Generation high-nickel alloy proton beam window (PBW) to one that utilizes aluminum for the window material. One of the key challenges to implementation of an aluminum PBW at the SNS was selection of an appropriate joining method to bond an aluminum window to the stainless steel bulk shielding of the PBW assembly. An explosively formed bond was selected as the most promising joining method for the aluminum PBW design. A testing campaign was conducted to evaluate the strength and efficacy of explosively formed bonds that were produced using two different interlayer materials: niobium and titanium. The characterization methods reported here include tensile testing, thermal-shock leak testing, optical microscopy, and advanced scanning electron microscopy. All tensile specimens examined failed in the aluminum interlayer and measured tensile strengths were all slightly greater than the native properties of the aluminum interlayer, while elongation values were all slightly lower. A leak developed in the test vessel with a niobium interlayer joint after repeated thermal-shock cycles, and was attributed to an extensive crack network that formed in a layer of niobium-rich intermetallics located on the bond interfaces of the niobium interlayer; the test vessel with a titanium interlayer did not develop a leak under the conditions tested. Due to the experience gained from these characterizations, the explosively formed bond with a titanium interlayer was selected for the aluminum PBW design at the SNS.

  14. Windows of Opportunity for Groundwater Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Brozovic, N.; Butler, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    To date, there has been little attention focused on how the value and effectiveness of groundwater management is influenced by the timing of regulatory intervention relative to aquifer depletion. To address this question, we develop an integrated framework that couples an agro-economic model of farmers' field-level irrigation decision-making with a model of a groundwater abstraction borehole. Unlike existing models that only consider the impact of aquifer depletion on groundwater extraction costs, our model also captures the dynamic changes in well productivity and how these in turn affect crop yields and farmer incomes. We use our model to analyze how the value of imposing groundwater quotas is affected by the prior level of depletion before regulations are introduced. Our results demonstrate that there is a range of aquifer conditions within which regulating groundwater use will deliver long-term economic benefits for farmers. In this range, restricting abstraction rates slows the rate of change in well yields and, as a result, increases agricultural production over the simulated planning horizon. Contrastingly, when current saturated thickness is outside this range, regulating groundwater use will provide negligible social benefits and will impose large negative impacts on farm-level profits. We suggest that there are 'windows of opportunity' for managing aquifer depletion that are a function of local hydrology as well as economic characteristics. Regulation that is too early will harm the rural economy needlessly, while regulation that is too late will be unable to prevent aquifer exhaustion. The insights from our model can be a valuable tool to help inform policy decisions about when, and at what level, regulations should be implemented in order to maximize the benefits obtained from limited groundwater resources.

  15. Tuning sum rules with window functions for optical constant evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis V.; Méndez, José A.; Larruquert, Juan I.

    2016-07-01

    Sum rules are a useful tool to evaluate the global consistency of a set of optical constants. We present a procedure to spectrally tune sum rules to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants. It enables enhancing the weight of a desired spectral range within the sum-rule integral. The procedure consists in multiplying the complex refractive index with an adapted function, which is named window function. Window functions are constructed through integration of Lorentz oscillators. The asymptotic decay of these window functions enables the derivation of a multiplicity of sum rules akin to the inertial sum rule, along with one modified version of f-sum rule. This multiplicity of sum rules combined with the free selection of the photon energy range provides a double way to tune the spectral contribution within the sum rule. Window functions were applied to reported data of SrF2 and of Al films in order to check data consistency over the spectrum. The use of window functions shows that the optical constants of SrF2 are consistent in a broad spectrum. Regarding Al, some spectral ranges are seen to present a lower consistency, even though the standard sum rules with no window function did not detect inconsistencies. Hence window functions are expected to be a helpful tool to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants.

  16. Photovoltaic devices comprising zinc stannate buffer layer and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xuanzhi; Sheldon, Peter; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    A photovoltaic device has a buffer layer zinc stannate Zn.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 disposed between the semiconductor junction structure and the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer to prevent formation of localized junctions with the TCO through a thin window semiconductor layer, to prevent shunting through etched grain boundaries of semiconductors, and to relieve stresses and improve adhesion between these layers.

  17. Multilayered microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for packaging of microelectronic devices is disclosed, wherein the package includes an integral window. The microelectronic device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can comprise, for example, a cofired ceramic frame or body. The package has an internal stepped structure made of a plurality of plates, with apertures, which are patterned with metallized conductive circuit traces. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded on the plate to these traces, and oriented so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A cover lid can be attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, having an integral window that can be hermetically-sealed. The package body can be formed by low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the window being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. Multiple chips can be located within a single package, according to some embodiments. The cover lid can include a window. The apparatus is particularly suited for packaging of MEMS devices, since the number of handling steps is greatly reduced, thereby reducing the potential for contamination. The integral window can further include a lens for optically transforming light passing through the window. The package can include an array of binary optic lenslets made integral with the window. The package can include an electrically-switched optical modulator, such as a lithium niobate window attached to the package, for providing a very fast electrically-operated shutter.

  18. AlGaAs heterojunction lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B.; Pultz, G. N.; Carlin, D. B.; Slavin, S. E.; Ettenberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The characterization of 8300 A lasers was broadened, especially in the area of beam quality. Modulation rates up to 2 Gbit/sec at output powers of 20 mW were observed, waveform fidelity was fully adequate for low BER data transmission, and wavefront measurements showed that phase aberrations were less than lamda/50. Also, individually addressable arrays of up to ten contiguous diode lasers were fabricated and tested. Each laser operates at powers up to 30 mW CW in single spatial mode. Shifting the operating wavelength of the basic CSP laser from 8300 A to 8650 A was accomplished by the addition of Si to the active region. Output power has reached 100 mW single mode, with excellent far field wave front properties. Operating life is currently approx. 1000 hrs at 35 mW CW. In addition, laser reliability, for operation at both 8300 A and 8650 A, has profited significantly from several developments in the processing procedures.

  19. Transistor memory devices with large memory windows, using multi-stacking of densely packed, hydrophobic charge trapping metal nanoparticle array.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ikjun; Kim, Beom Joon; Ryu, Sook Won; Cho, Jeong Ho; Cho, Jinhan

    2014-12-19

    Organic field-effect transistor (OFET) memories have rapidly evolved from low-cost and flexible electronics with relatively low-memory capacities to memory devices that require high-capacity memory such as smart memory cards or solid-state hard drives. Here, we report the high-capacity OFET memories based on the multilayer stacking of densely packed hydrophobic metal NP layers in place of the traditional transistor memory systems based on a single charge trapping layer. We demonstrated that the memory performances of devices could be significantly enhanced by controlling the adsorption isotherm behavior, multilayer stacking structure and hydrophobicity of the metal NPs. For this study, tetraoctylammonium (TOA)-stabilized Au nanoparticles (TOA-Au(NPs)) were consecutively layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with an amine-functionalized poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PAD). The formed (PAD/TOA-Au(NP))(n) films were used as a multilayer stacked charge trapping layer at the interface between the tunneling dielectric layer and the SiO2 gate dielectric layer. For a single AuNP layer (i.e. PAD/TOA-Au(NP))1) with a number density of 1.82 × 10(12) cm(-2), the memory window of the OFET memory device was measured to be approximately 97 V. The multilayer stacked OFET memory devices prepared with four Au(NP) layers exhibited excellent programmable memory properties (i.e. a large memory window (ΔV(th)) exceeding 145 V, a fast switching speed (1 μs), a high program/erase (P/E) current ratio (greater than 10(6)) and good electrical reliability) during writing and erasing over a relatively short time scale under an operation voltage of 100 V applied at the gate.

  20. Transistor memory devices with large memory windows, using multi-stacking of densely packed, hydrophobic charge trapping metal nanoparticle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ikjun; Kim, Beom Joon; Ryu, Sook Won; Cho, Jeong Ho; Cho, Jinhan

    2014-12-01

    Organic field-effect transistor (OFET) memories have rapidly evolved from low-cost and flexible electronics with relatively low-memory capacities to memory devices that require high-capacity memory such as smart memory cards or solid-state hard drives. Here, we report the high-capacity OFET memories based on the multilayer stacking of densely packed hydrophobic metal NP layers in place of the traditional transistor memory systems based on a single charge trapping layer. We demonstrated that the memory performances of devices could be significantly enhanced by controlling the adsorption isotherm behavior, multilayer stacking structure and hydrophobicity of the metal NPs. For this study, tetraoctylammonium (TOA)-stabilized Au nanoparticles (TOA-AuNPs) were consecutively layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with an amine-functionalized poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PAD). The formed (PAD/TOA-AuNP)n films were used as a multilayer stacked charge trapping layer at the interface between the tunneling dielectric layer and the SiO2 gate dielectric layer. For a single AuNP layer (i.e. PAD/TOA-AuNP)1) with a number density of 1.82 × 1012 cm-2, the memory window of the OFET memory device was measured to be approximately 97 V. The multilayer stacked OFET memory devices prepared with four AuNP layers exhibited excellent programmable memory properties (i.e. a large memory window (ΔVth) exceeding 145 V, a fast switching speed (1 μs), a high program/erase (P/E) current ratio (greater than 106) and good electrical reliability) during writing and erasing over a relatively short time scale under an operation voltage of 100 V applied at the gate.