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Sample records for algae fungi bacteria

  1. Biotechnological Applications of Marine Enzymes From Algae, Bacteria, Fungi, and Sponges.

    PubMed

    Parte, S; Sirisha, V L; D'Souza, J S

    2017-01-01

    Diversity is the hallmark of all life forms that inhabit the soil, air, water, and land. All these habitats pose their unique inherent challenges so as to breed the "fittest" creatures. Similarly, the biodiversity from the marine ecosystem has evolved unique properties due to challenging environment. These challenges include permafrost regions to hydrothermal vents, oceanic trenches to abyssal plains, fluctuating saline conditions, pH, temperature, light, atmospheric pressure, and the availability of nutrients. Oceans occupy 75% of the earth's surface and harbor most ancient and diverse forms of organisms (algae, bacteria, fungi, sponges, etc.), serving as an excellent source of natural bioactive molecules, novel therapeutic compounds, and enzymes. In this chapter, we introduce enzyme technology, its current state of the art, unique enzyme properties, and the biocatalytic potential of marine algal, bacterial, fungal, and sponge enzymes that have indeed boosted the Marine Biotechnology Industry. Researchers began exploring marine enzymes, and today they are preferred over the chemical catalysts for biotechnological applications and functions, encompassing various sectors, namely, domestic, industrial, commercial, and healthcare. Next, we summarize the plausible pros and cons: the challenges encountered in the process of discovery of the potent compounds and bioactive metabolites such as biocatalysts/enzymes of biomedical, therapeutic, biotechnological, and industrial significance. The field of Marine Enzyme Technology has recently assumed importance, and if it receives further boost, it could successfully substitute other chemical sources of enzymes useful for industrial and commercial purposes and may prove as a beneficial and ecofriendly option. With appropriate directions and encouragement, marine enzyme technology can sustain the rising demand for enzyme production while maintaining the ecological balance, provided any undesired exploitation of the marine

  2. Use of HPLC for the detection of iron chelators in cultures of bacteria, fungi, and algae. [E. coli; Bacillus megaterium; Ustilago sphaerogena; Anabaena flos-aqua

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, G.L.; Speirs, R.J.; Morse, P.D. )

    1990-06-01

    Iron is essential for the growth of living cells. To meet biochemical needs, microorganisms, including algae, produce high affinity chelators termed siderophores. These compounds solubilize Fe and increase its bioavailability. We have developed a new method to study siderophore formation in cultured and natural environments. Based on the fact siderophores tightly bind 55-Fe, the radioactive complexes can be separated by HPLC using an inert PRP-1 column and detected by scintillation counting. This method cleanly resolves several known siderophores, including ferrichrome A, ferrichrome, desferal, and rhodotorulic acid. The optimization of the method and its use for analysis of siderophore formation in bacteria (E. coli, and Bacillus megaterium), fungi (Ustilago sphaerogena), and cyanobacteria (Anabaena flos-aqua UTEX 1444 and Anabaena sp. ATCC 27898) will be presented.

  3. Bacteria, fungi and protozoa paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bacteria and fungi in source and treated drinking waterThis dataset is associated with the following publication:King , D., S. Pfaller , M. Donohue , S. Vesper , E. Villegas , M. Ware , S. Glassmeyer , M. Vogal, E. Furlong, and D. Kolpin. Microbial pathogens in source and treated waters from drinking water treatment plants in the United States and implications for human health. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier BV, AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS, 562: 987–995, (2016).

  4. Effects of Fungicides on Aquatic Fungi and Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conners, D. E.; Rosemond, A. D.; Black, M. C.

    2005-05-01

    Aquatic microorganisms play an important role in conditioning leaf litter that enters streams and serves as an important base of production for consumers. Contamination of streams by fungicides may adversely affect microorganisms and alter leaf litter processing rates. Unfortunately, microorganisms are rarely used in acute toxicity tests for fungicide evaluation and registration. We adapted the resazurin reduction assay, which is used in medical microbiology, to assess the acute toxicity of four fungicides (azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl and chlorothalonil) to aquatic fungi (Articulospora tetracladia) and bacteria (Cytophaga spp.), and investigated the ability of the toxicants to inhibit leaf breakdown in microcosms. Fungi were more sensitive to fungicides than many standard test organisms (cladocerans, green algae, trout), while bacteria were often the least sensitive. All of the fungicides except kresoxim-methyl, when added to microcosms at concentrations that inhibited the fungi by 90 percent in acute tests, reduced leaf breakdown rates by an average of 14.7 percent. Thus, aquatic fungi and their associated functions in streams may be relatively sensitive to fungicides applied terrestrially that enter streams through non-point sources. These data highlight the importance of including aquatic fungi in safety assessments of pesticides for protection of microbial function.

  5. Exploring the potential of algae/bacteria interactions.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-06-01

    Algae are primary producers in aquatic ecosystems, where heterotrophic bacteria grow on organics produced by algae and recycle nutrients. Ecological studies have identified the co-occurrence of particular species of algae and bacteria, suggesting the presence of their specific interactions. Algae/bacteria interactions are categorized into nutrient exchange, signal transduction and gene transfer. Studies have examined how these interactions shape aquatic communities and influence geochemical cycles in the natural environment. In parallel, efforts have been made to exploit algae for biotechnology processes, such as water treatment and bioenergy production, where bacteria influence algal activities in various ways. We suggest that better understanding of mechanisms underlying algae/bacteria interactions will facilitate the development of more efficient and/or as-yet-unexploited biotechnology processes.

  6. Ecotoxicological effects of carbon nanomaterials on algae, fungi and plants.

    PubMed

    Basiuk, Elena V; Ochoa-Olmos, Omar E; De la Mora-Estrada, León F

    2011-04-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of carbon nanomateriales (CNMs), namely fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, on algae, fungi and plants are analyzed. In different toxicity tests, both direct and indirect effects were found. The direct effects are determined by nanomaterial chemical composition and surface reactivity, which might catalyze redox reactions in contact with organic molecules and affect respiratory processes. Some indirect effects of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) are physical restraints or release of toxic ions. Accumulation of CNPs in photosynthetic organs provokes obstruction in stomata, foliar heating and alteration in physiological processes. The phytotoxicity studies of CNMs should be focused on determining phytotoxicity mechanisms, size distribution of CNPs in solution, uptake and translocation of nanoparticles by plants, on characterization of their physical and chemical properties in rhizosphere and on root surfaces. More studies on plants and algae, as a part of food chain, are needed to understand profoundly the toxicity and health risks of CNMs as ecotoxicological stressors. Correct and detailed physical and chemical characterization of CNMs is very important to establish the exposure conditions matching the realistic ones. Ecotoxicity experiments should include examinations of both short and long-term effects. One must take into account that real carbon nanomaterials are complex mixtures of carbon forms and metal residues of variable chemistry and particle size, and the toxicity reported may reflect these byproducts/residues/impurities rather than the primary material structure. One more recommendation is not only to focus on the inherent toxicity of nanoparticles, but also consider their possible interactions with existing environmental contaminants.

  7. Proposal to consistently apply the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP) to names of the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria), including those validly published under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN)/International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (ICN), and proposal to change Principle 2 of the ICNP.

    PubMed

    Pinevich, Alexander V

    2015-03-01

    This taxonomic note was motivated by the recent proposal [Oren & Garrity (2014) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 64, 309-310] to exclude the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) from the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), which entails unilateral coverage of these prokaryotes by the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN; formerly the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, ICBN). On the basis of key viewpoints, approaches and rules in the systematics, taxonomy and nomenclature of prokaryotes it is reciprocally proposed to apply the ICNP to names of cyanobacteria including those validly published under the ICBN/ICN. For this purpose, a change to Principle 2 of the ICNP is proposed to enable validation of cyanobacterial names published under the ICBN/ICN rules.

  8. Bioactive Compounds from Marine Bacteria and Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Debbab, Abdessamad; Aly, Amal H.; Lin, Wen H.; Proksch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Summary Marine bacteria and fungi are of considerable importance as new promising sources of a huge number of biologically active products. Some of these marine species live in a stressful habitat, under cold, lightless and high pressure conditions. Surprisingly, a large number of species with high diversity survive under such conditions and produce fascinating and structurally complex natural products. Up till now, only a small number of microorganisms have been investigated for bioactive metabolites, yet a huge number of active substances with some of them featuring unique structural skeletons have been isolated. This review covers new biologically active natural products published recently (2007–09) and highlights the chemical potential of marine microorganisms, with focus on bioactive products as well as on their mechanisms of action. PMID:21255352

  9. Algae-bacteria interactions: Evolution, ecology and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Rishiram; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Algae and bacteria have coexisted ever since the early stages of evolution. This coevolution has revolutionized life on earth in many aspects. Algae and bacteria together influence ecosystems as varied as deep seas to lichens and represent all conceivable modes of interactions - from mutualism to parasitism. Several studies have shown that algae and bacteria synergistically affect each other's physiology and metabolism, a classic case being algae-roseobacter interaction. These interactions are ubiquitous and define the primary productivity in most ecosystems. In recent years, algae have received much attention for industrial exploitation but their interaction with bacteria is often considered a contamination during commercialization. A few recent studies have shown that bacteria not only enhance algal growth but also help in flocculation, both essential processes in algal biotechnology. Hence, there is a need to understand these interactions from an evolutionary and ecological standpoint, and integrate this understanding for industrial use. Here we reflect on the diversity of such relationships and their associated mechanisms, as well as the habitats that they mutually influence. This review also outlines the role of these interactions in key evolutionary events such as endosymbiosis, besides their ecological role in biogeochemical cycles. Finally, we focus on extending such studies on algal-bacterial interactions to various environmental and bio-technological applications.

  10. Proposals to clarify and enhance the naming of fungi under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, David L

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-three proposals to modify the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants adopted in 2011 with respect to the provisions for fungi are made, in accordance with the wishes of mycologists expressed at the 10(th) International Mycological Congress in Bangkok in 2014, and with the support of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF), the votes of which are presented here. The proposals relate to: conditions for epitypification, registration of later typifications, protected lists of names, removal of exemptions for lichen-forming fungi, provision of a diagnosis when describing a new taxon, citation of sanctioned names, avoiding homonyms in other kingdoms, ending preference for sexually typified names, and treatment of conspecific names with the same epithet. These proposals are also being published in Taxon, will be considered by the Nomenclature Committee for Fungi and General Committee on Nomenclature, and voted on at the 19(th) International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China, in 2017.

  11. [Establishment of Assessment Method for Air Bacteria and Fungi Contamination].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-ling; Yao, Da-jun; Zhang, Yu; Fang, Zi-liang

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, in order to settle existing problems in the assessment of air bacteria and fungi contamination, the indoor and outdoor air bacteria and fungi filed concentrations by impact method and settlement method in existing documents were collected and analyzed, then the goodness of chi square was used to test whether these concentration data obeyed normal distribution at the significant level of α = 0.05, and combined with the 3σ principle of normal distribution and the current assessment standards, the suggested concentrations ranges of air microbial concentrations were determined. The research results could provide a reference for developing air bacteria and fungi contamination assessment standards in the future.

  12. ETV Tech Brief: Rapid Fungi and Bacteria Detection Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical brief that summarizes the results for Mycometer, Inc. Mycometer®-test and Bactiquant®-test, which are rapid detection technologies for fungi and bacteria. The brief summarizes the results of the verification report and statement.

  13. Interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miransari, Mohammad

    2011-02-01

    The soil environment is interesting and complicated. There are so many interactions taking place in the soil, which determine the properties of soil as a medium for the growth and activities of plants and soil microorganisms. The soil fungi, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), are in mutual and beneficial symbiosis with most of the terrestrial plants. AM fungi are continuously interactive with a wide range of soil microorganisms including nonbacterial soil microorganisms, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, mycorrhiza helper bacteria and deleterious bacteria. Their interactions can have important implications in agriculture. There are some interesting interactions between the AM fungi and soil bacteria including the binding of soil bacteria to the fungal spore, the injection of molecules by bacteria into the fungal spore, the production of volatiles by bacteria and the degradation of fungal cellular wall. Such mechanisms can affect the expression of genes in AM fungi and hence their performance and ecosystem productivity. Hence, consideration of such interactive behavior is of significance. In this review, some of the most important findings regarding the interactions between AM fungi and soil bacteria with some new insights for future research are presented.

  14. Impacts of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code) on the scientific names of plant pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent changes in the new International Code of Nomenclature (ICN) for algae, fungi and plants require that only one name be used for pleomorphic fungi many of which have two or more scientific names at present. It is necessary to decide which of two competing scientific names will be applied to one...

  15. Fungi outcompete bacteria under increased uranium concentration in culture media.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Saqib; Streten-Joyce, Claire; Parry, David L; McGuinness, Keith A; Lu, Ping; Gibb, Karen S

    2013-06-01

    As a key part of water management at the Ranger Uranium Mine (Northern Territory, Australia), stockpile (ore and waste) runoff water was applied to natural woodland on the mine lease in accordance with regulatory requirements. Consequently, the soil in these Land Application Areas (LAAs) presents a range of uranium concentrations. Soil samples were collected from LAAs with different concentrations of uranium and extracts were plated onto LB media containing no (0 ppm), low (3 ppm), medium (250 ppm), high (600 ppm) and very high (1500 ppm) uranium concentrations. These concentrations were similar to the range of measured uranium concentrations in the LAAs soils. Bacteria grew on all plates except for the very high uranium concentrations, where only fungi were recovered. Identifications based on bacterial 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that the dominant cultivable bacteria belonged to the genus Bacillus. Members of the genera Paenibacillus, Lysinibacillus, Klebsiella, Microbacterium and Chryseobacterium were also isolated from the LAAs soil samples. Fungi were identified by sequence analysis of the intergenic spacer region, and members of the genera Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, Penicillium and Curvularia were dominant on plates with very high uranium concentrations. Members of the Paecilomyces and Alternaria were also present but in lower numbers. These findings indicate that fungi can tolerate very high concentrations of uranium and are more resistant than bacteria. Bacteria and fungi isolated at the Ranger LAAs from soils with high concentrations of uranium may have uranium binding capability and hence the potential for uranium bioremediation.

  16. DNA Integrity and Shock Wave Transformation Efficiency of Bacteria and Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loske, Achim M.; Campos-Guillén, Juan; Fernández, Francisco; Pastrana, Xóchitl; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Ortíz-Vázquez, Elizabeth; Gómez-Lim, Miguel

    Delivery of DNA into bacteria and fungi is essential in medicine and biotechnology to produce metabolites, enzymes, antibiotics and proteins. So far, protocols to genetically transform bacteria and fungi are inefficient and have low reproducibility.

  17. Halophytes, Algae, and Bacteria Food and Fuel Feedstocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Bushnell, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    The constant, increasing demand for energy, freshwater, and food stresses our ability to meet these demands within reasonable cost and impact on climate while sustaining quality of life. This environmental Triangle of Conflicts between energy, food, and water--while provoked by anthropogenic monetary and power struggles--can be resolved through an anthropogenic paradigm shift in how we produce and use energy, water, and food. With world population (6.6 billion) projected to increase 40 percent in 40 to 60 yr, proper development of saline agriculture and aquaculture is required, as 43 percent of the Earth's landmass is arid or semi-arid and 97 percent of the Earth's water is seawater. In light of this, we seek fuel alternatives in plants that thrive in brackish and saltwater with the ability to survive in arid lands. The development and application of these plants (halophytes) become the primary focus. Herein we introduce some not-so-familiar halophytes and present a few of their benefits, cite a few research projects (including some on the alternatives algae and bacteria), and then set theoretical limits on biomass production followed by projections in terms of world energy demands. Based on diverse arid lands with a total size equivalent to the Sahara Desert (8.6(exp 8) ha, or 2.1(exp 9) acres), these projections show that halophyte agriculture and algae systems can provide for the projected world energy demand.

  18. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode–predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or ‘traps’. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator–prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms. PMID:25514608

  19. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-12-16

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode-predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or 'traps'. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator-prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms.

  20. Growth of saprotrophic fungi and bacteria in soil.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Johannes; Bååth, Erland

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial and fungal growth rate measurements are sensitive variables to detect changes in environmental conditions. However, while considerable progress has been made in methods to assess the species composition and biomass of fungi and bacteria, information about growth rates remains surprisingly rudimentary. We review the recent history of approaches to assess bacterial and fungal growth rates, leading up to current methods, especially focusing on leucine/thymidine incorporation to estimate bacterial growth and acetate incorporation into ergosterol to estimate fungal growth. We present the underlying assumptions for these methods, compare estimates of turnover times for fungi and bacteria based on them, and discuss issues, including for example elusive conversion factors. We review what the application of fungal and bacterial growth rate methods has revealed regarding the influence of the environmental factors of temperature, moisture (including drying/rewetting), pH, as well as the influence of substrate additions, the presence of plants and toxins. We highlight experiments exploring the competitive and facilitative interaction between bacteria and fungi enabled using growth rate methods. Finally, we predict that growth methods will be an important complement to molecular approaches to elucidate fungal and bacterial ecology, and we identify methodological concerns and how they should be addressed.

  1. The interactions of bacteria with fungi in soil: emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Haq, Irshad Ul; Zhang, Miaozhi; Yang, Pu; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the existing literature on bacterial-fungal interactions in soil, exploring the role fungi may play for soil bacteria as providers of hospitable niches. A focus is placed on the mycosphere, i.e., the narrow zone of influence of fungal hyphae on the external soil milieu, in which hypha-associated bacterial cells dwell. Evidence is brought forward for the contention that the hyphae of both mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi serve as providers of ecological opportunities in a grossly carbon-limited soil, as a result of their release of carbonaceous compounds next to the provision of a colonizable surface. Soil bacteria of particular nature are postulated to have adapted to such selection pressures, evolving to the extent that they acquired capabilities that allow them to thrive in the novel habitat created by the emerging fungal hyphae. The mechanisms involved in the interactions and the modes of genetic adaptation of the mycosphere dwellers are discussed, with an emphasis on one key mycosphere-adapted bacterium, Burkholderia terrae BS001. In this discussion, we interrogate the positive interactions between soil fungi and bacteria, and refrain from considering negative interactions.

  2. Fungi and bacteria involved in desert varnish formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor-George, S.; Palmer, F.; Staley, J. T.; Curtiss, B.; Adams, J. B.; Borns, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Desert varnish is a coating of ferromanganese oxides and clays that develops on rock surfaces in arid to semi-arid regions. Active respiration but not photosynthesis was detected on varnished rock surfaces from the Sonoran Desert. Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, and cultivation experiments indicate that both fungi, primarily dematiaceous hyphomycetes, and bacteria are found on and within desert varnish coatings from the arid regions studied. Some fungi grow as microcolonial fungi (MCF) on rocks, and microscopic observations suggest MCF become incorporated in the varnish coating. SEM-EDAX (energy dispersive X-ray systems) analyses indicate the MCF contain 3 of the characteristic elements of varnish: iron, aluminum, and silicon. In some locations, MCF are also enriched in manganese relative to the rock substratum. Furthermore, some of the dematiaceous hyphomycetes that have been cultivated are able to oxidize manganese under laboratory conditions. It is possible that manganese-oxidizing bacteria, which are found in varnish, also play an important role in varnish formation.

  3. Vanadium removal from LD converter slag using bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Mirazimi, S M J; Abbasalipour, Z; Rashchi, F

    2015-04-15

    Removal of vanadium from Linz-Donawits (LD) converter slag was investigated by means of three different species of microbial systems: Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (autotrophic bacteria), Pseudomonas putida (heterotrophic bacteria) and Aspergillus niger (fungi). The bioleaching process was carried out in both one-step and two-step process and the leaching efficiencies in both cases were compared. Formation of inorganic and organic acids during the leaching process caused mobilization of vanadium. In order to reduce toxic effects of the metal species on the above mentioned microorganisms, a prolonged adaptation process was performed. Both bacteria, A. thiooxidans and P. putida were able to remove more than 90% of vanadium at slag concentrations of 1-5 g L(-1) after 15 days. Also, the maximum achievable vanadium removal in the fungal system was approximately 92% at a slag concentration of 1 g L(-1) after 22 days.

  4. Biodegradation of lignin by fungi, bacteria and laccases.

    PubMed

    Asina, Fnu; Brzonova, Ivana; Voeller, Keith; Kozliak, Evguenii; Kubátová, Alena; Yao, Bin; Ji, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Indulin AT biodegradation by basidiomycetous fungi, actinobacteria and commercial laccases was evaluated using a suite of chemical analysis methods. The extent of microbial degradation was confirmed by novel thermal carbon analysis (TCA), as the treatments altered the carbon desorption and pyrolysis temperature profiles in supernatants. Laccase treatments caused only minor changes, though with increases occurring in the 850°C and char precursor fractions. After fungal treatments, lignin showed a similar change in the TCA profile, along with a gradual decrease of the total carbon, signifying lignin mineralization (combined with polymerization). By contrast, bacteria produced phenolic monomers without their further catabolism. After 54days of cultivation, a 20wt% weight loss was observed only for fungi, Coriolus versicolor, corroborating the near-80% carbon mass balance closure obtained by TCA. Compositional changes in lignin as a result of biodegradation were confirmed by thermal desorption (TD)-pyrolysis-GC-MS validating the carbon fractionation obtained by TCA.

  5. Method and apparatus for detecting phycocyanin-pigmented algae and bacteria from reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting phycocyanin algae or bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  6. Method and apparatus for detecting phycocyanin-pigmented algae and bacteria from reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting phycocyanin algae or bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  7. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: a review.

    PubMed

    Harding, Dylan P; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs compared to conventional herbicides and the identification of novel herbicidal mechanisms. This review focuses on examples from North America. Among fungi, the prominent genera to receive attention as bioherbicide candidates include Colletotrichum, Phoma, and Sclerotinia. Among bacteria, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas share this distinction. The available reports on the application of viruses to controlling weeds are also reviewed. Focus is given to the phytotoxic mechanisms associated with bioherbicide candidates. Achieving consistent suppression of weeds in field conditions is a common challenge to this control strategy, as the efficacy of a bioherbicide candidate is generally more sensitive to environmental variation than a conventional herbicide. Common themes and lessons emerging from the available literature in regard to this challenge are presented. Additionally, future directions for this crop protection strategy are suggested.

  8. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: a review

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Dylan P.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs compared to conventional herbicides and the identification of novel herbicidal mechanisms. This review focuses on examples from North America. Among fungi, the prominent genera to receive attention as bioherbicide candidates include Colletotrichum, Phoma, and Sclerotinia. Among bacteria, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas share this distinction. The available reports on the application of viruses to controlling weeds are also reviewed. Focus is given to the phytotoxic mechanisms associated with bioherbicide candidates. Achieving consistent suppression of weeds in field conditions is a common challenge to this control strategy, as the efficacy of a bioherbicide candidate is generally more sensitive to environmental variation than a conventional herbicide. Common themes and lessons emerging from the available literature in regard to this challenge are presented. Additionally, future directions for this crop protection strategy are suggested. PMID:26379687

  9. Uniform categorization of biocommunication in bacteria, fungi and plants

    PubMed Central

    Witzany, Günther

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a coherent biocommunication categorization for the kingdoms of bacteria, fungi and plants. The investigation further shows that, besides biotic sign use in trans-, inter- and intraorganismic communication processes, a common trait is interpretation of abiotic influences as indicators to generate an appropriate adaptive behaviour. Far from being mechanistic interactions, communication processes within organisms and between organisms are sign-mediated interactions. Sign-mediated interactions are the precondition for every cooperation and coordination between at least two biological agents such as cells, tissues, organs and organisms. Signs of biocommunicative processes are chemical molecules in most cases. The signs that are used in a great variety of signaling processes follow syntactic (combinatorial), pragmatic (context-dependent) and semantic (content-specific) rules. These three levels of semiotic rules are helpful tools to investigate communication processes throughout all organismic kingdoms. It is not the aim to present the latest empirical data concerning communication in these three kingdoms but to present a unifying perspective that is able to interconnect transdisciplinary research on bacteria, fungi and plants. PMID:21541001

  10. [The effect of chromium removal by algae-bacteria Bostrychia calliptera (Rhodomelaceae) consortia under laboratory conditions].

    PubMed

    Rengifo-Gallego, Ana Lucía; Peña-Salamanca, Enrique; Benitez-Campo, Neyla

    2012-09-01

    Water pollution is one of the most important environmental problems worldwide. Recently, biotechnology studies have oriented efforts to study algae-bacterium consortia with the aim to understand the mechanisms to find a possible solution in environmental sciences. This study determined the percentage of chromium removal by the alga-bacterium association exposed to a set of different chromium concentrations under controlled in vitro conditions. Wild plants of Bostrychia calliptera associated with bacterial populations were collected from Dagua River, Pacific coast of Colombia, and were monitored in the laboratory. The trial was conducted with synthetic seawater in bioreactors at two chromium levels: 5 and 10mg/L, and four different experimental treatments: i) algae-bacteria (AB), ii) algae with antibiotic (AA), iii) algal surface sediment, Natural Bacterial Consortium (CBN), and iv) the control without algae or bacteria. The experimental design followed a model of two factors (chromium concentration x combination types) with repeated measures using one factor. The microbial population behavior and the chromium concentration percentage were monitored by using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). According to the data, Algae-bacteria (AB) treatment was the most efficient combination at 10mg/L (87%), whereas the bacterial consortia (CBN) was the most efficient at 5mg/L (62.85%). The results showed significant differences of chromium uptake between algae-bacteria (AB) and natural bacterial consortia (CBN), meaning the importance of those treatments in the chromium removal from coastal waters.

  11. Role of Bacteria, Archaea and fungi involved in methane release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Sabrina; Krüger, Martin; Engelen, Bert; Cypionka, Heribert

    2010-05-01

    Abandoned coal mines release substantial amounts of methane which is largely biogenic. The aim of this study was to understand the microbial processes involved in mine-gas formation in two abandoned coal mines in Germany. Therefore, untreated coal- and mine timber samples and anaerobic enrichment cultures derived from them were subjected to DGGE analyses and quantitative PCR. The primers used were specific for Bacteria, Archaea, fungi, and the key functional genes for sulfate reduction (dsrA) and methanogenesis (mcrA). Original samples and enrichment cultures harboured a broad spectrum of facultative aerobes, fermenters, nitrate- and sulfate reducers belonging to all five groups (α - ɛ) of the Proteobacteria, as well as the Bacteroidetes, Tenericutes, Actinobacteria, Chlorobi and Chloroflexi. Only two groups of Archaea (representing 0.01% of the bacterial abundance) were detected. Based on specific 16 S-rRNA primer sets Methanosarcinales comprised 34% of these, corresponding to 45% detected with primers specific for the mcrA gene. The second group (55%) were uncultivated Crenarchaeota with an unknown metabolism. The detected Fungi (Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes) were typical wood degraders. To get a perception ofdevelop a metabolic model for the ongoing processes, we linked the detected phylogenetic groups to possible activities promoting methane release.

  12. Monocyte-mediated Defense against Bacteria, Fungi, and Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Lauvau, Gregoire; Loke, P’ng; Hohl, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating blood monocytes are a heterogeneous leukocyte population that contributes critical antimicrobial and regulatory functions during systemic and tissue-specific infections. These include patrolling vascular tissue for evidence of microbial invasion, infiltrating peripheral tissues and directly killing microbial invaders, conditioning the inflammatory milieu at sites of microbial tissue invasion, and orchestrating the activation of innate and adaptive immune effector cells. The central focus of this review is the in vivo mechanisms by which monocytes and their derivative cells promote microbial clearance and immune regulation. We include an overview of murine models to examine monocyte functions during microbial challenges and review our understanding of the functional roles of monocytes and their derivative cells in host defense against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. PMID:27021645

  13. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted in this part, each serial and subserial of live vaccine and each lot of Master Seed Virus and...

  14. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted in this part, each serial and subserial of live vaccine and each lot of Master Seed Virus and...

  15. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted in this part, each serial and subserial of live vaccine and each lot of Master Seed Virus and...

  16. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted in this part, each serial and subserial of live vaccine and each lot of Master Seed Virus and...

  17. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted in this part, each serial and subserial of live vaccine and each lot of Master Seed Virus and...

  18. Soil Bacteria and Fungi Respond on Different Spatial Scales to Invasion by the Legume Lespedeza cuneata

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-24

    Broz, et al. 2007) can reduce the abundance 76   and diversity of soil fungi that are important mutualists of native competitor plants (the 77...IN TERRESTRIAL MICROBIOLOGY Soil bacteria and fungi respond on different spatial scales to invasion by the legume Lespedeza cuneata Anthony...www.frontiersin.org Citation: Yannarell AC, Busby RR, Denight ML, Gebhart DL and Taylor SJ(2011) Soil bacteria and fungi respond on different spatial

  19. Exposure level and distribution characteristics of airborne bacteria and fungi in Seoul metropolitan subway stations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Youn; Kim, Yoon Shin; Kim, Daekeun; Kim, Hyeon Tae

    2011-01-01

    The exposure level and distribution characteristics of airborne bacteria and fungi were assessed in the workers' activity areas (station office, bedroom, ticket office and driver's seat) and passengers' activity areas (station precinct, inside the passenger carriage, and platform) of the Seoul metropolitan subway. Among investigated areas, the levels of airborne bacteria and fungi in the workers' bedroom and station precincts were relatively high. No significant difference was found in the concentration of airborne bacteria and fungi between the underground and above ground activity areas of the subway. The genera identified in all subway activity areas with a 5% or greater detection rate were Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Bacillus and Corynebacterium for airborne bacteria and Penicillium, Cladosporium, Chrysosporium, Aspergillus for airborne fungi. Staphylococcus and Micrococcus comprised over 50% of the total airborne bacteria and Penicillium and Cladosporium comprised over 60% of the total airborne fungi, thus these four genera are the predominant genera in the subway station.

  20. Phylogenetic congruence of lichenised fungi and algae is affected by spatial scale and taxonomic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Rafat, Arash; Ridden, Johnathon D.; Cruickshank, Robert H.; Ridgway, Hayley J.; Paterson, Adrian M.

    2014-01-01

    The role of species’ interactions in structuring biological communities remains unclear. Mutualistic symbioses, involving close positive interactions between two distinct organismal lineages, provide an excellent means to explore the roles of both evolutionary and ecological processes in determining how positive interactions affect community structure. In this study, we investigate patterns of co-diversification between fungi and algae for a range of New Zealand lichens at the community, genus, and species levels and explore explanations for possible patterns related to spatial scale and pattern, taxonomic diversity of the lichens considered, and the level sampling replication. We assembled six independent datasets to compare patterns in phylogenetic congruence with varied spatial extent of sampling, taxonomic diversity and level of specimen replication. For each dataset, we used the DNA sequences from the ITS regions of both the fungal and algal genomes from lichen specimens to produce genetic distance matrices. Phylogenetic congruence between fungi and algae was quantified using distance-based redundancy analysis and we used geographic distance matrices in Moran’s eigenvector mapping and variance partitioning to evaluate the effects of spatial variation on the quantification of phylogenetic congruence. Phylogenetic congruence was highly significant for all datasets and a large proportion of variance in both algal and fungal genetic distances was explained by partner genetic variation. Spatial variables, primarily at large and intermediate scales, were also important for explaining genetic diversity patterns in all datasets. Interestingly, spatial structuring was stronger for fungal than algal genetic variation. As the spatial extent of the samples increased, so too did the proportion of explained variation that was shared between the spatial variables and the partners’ genetic variation. Different lichen taxa showed some variation in their phylogenetic

  1. Phylogenetic congruence of lichenised fungi and algae is affected by spatial scale and taxonomic diversity.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Hannah L; Rafat, Arash; Ridden, Johnathon D; Cruickshank, Robert H; Ridgway, Hayley J; Paterson, Adrian M

    2014-01-01

    The role of species' interactions in structuring biological communities remains unclear. Mutualistic symbioses, involving close positive interactions between two distinct organismal lineages, provide an excellent means to explore the roles of both evolutionary and ecological processes in determining how positive interactions affect community structure. In this study, we investigate patterns of co-diversification between fungi and algae for a range of New Zealand lichens at the community, genus, and species levels and explore explanations for possible patterns related to spatial scale and pattern, taxonomic diversity of the lichens considered, and the level sampling replication. We assembled six independent datasets to compare patterns in phylogenetic congruence with varied spatial extent of sampling, taxonomic diversity and level of specimen replication. For each dataset, we used the DNA sequences from the ITS regions of both the fungal and algal genomes from lichen specimens to produce genetic distance matrices. Phylogenetic congruence between fungi and algae was quantified using distance-based redundancy analysis and we used geographic distance matrices in Moran's eigenvector mapping and variance partitioning to evaluate the effects of spatial variation on the quantification of phylogenetic congruence. Phylogenetic congruence was highly significant for all datasets and a large proportion of variance in both algal and fungal genetic distances was explained by partner genetic variation. Spatial variables, primarily at large and intermediate scales, were also important for explaining genetic diversity patterns in all datasets. Interestingly, spatial structuring was stronger for fungal than algal genetic variation. As the spatial extent of the samples increased, so too did the proportion of explained variation that was shared between the spatial variables and the partners' genetic variation. Different lichen taxa showed some variation in their phylogenetic congruence

  2. Bacteria in decomposing wood and their interactions with wood-decay fungi.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sarah R; Boddy, Lynne; Weightman, Andrew J

    2016-11-01

    The fungal community within dead wood has received considerable study, but far less attention has been paid to bacteria in the same habitat. Bacteria have long been known to inhabit decomposing wood, but much remains underexplored about their identity and ecology. Bacteria within the dead wood environment must interact with wood-decay fungi, but again, very little is known about the form this takes; there are indications of both antagonistic and beneficial interactions within this fungal microbiome. Fungi are hypothesised to play an important role in shaping bacterial communities in wood, and conversely, bacteria may affect wood-decay fungi in a variety of ways. This minireview considers what is currently known about bacteria in wood and their interactions with fungi, and proposes possible associations based on examples from other habitats. It aims to identify key knowledge gaps and pressing questions for future research.

  3. Indigenous bacteria and fungi drive traditional kimoto sake fermentations.

    PubMed

    Bokulich, Nicholas A; Ohta, Moe; Lee, Morgan; Mills, David A

    2014-09-01

    Sake (Japanese rice wine) production is a complex, multistage process in which fermentation is performed by a succession of mixed fungi and bacteria. This study employed high-throughput rRNA marker gene sequencing, quantitative PCR, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism to characterize the bacterial and fungal communities of spontaneous sake production from koji to product as well as brewery equipment surfaces. Results demonstrate a dynamic microbial succession, with koji and early moto fermentations dominated by Bacillus, Staphylococcus, and Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae, succeeded by Lactobacillus spp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae later in the fermentations. The microbiota driving these fermentations were also prevalent in the production environment, illustrating the reservoirs and routes for microbial contact in this traditional food fermentation. Interrogating the microbial consortia of production environments in parallel with food products is a valuable approach for understanding the complete ecology of food production systems and can be applied to any food system, leading to enlightened perspectives for process control and food safety.

  4. Indigenous Bacteria and Fungi Drive Traditional Kimoto Sake Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Ohta, Moe; Lee, Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Sake (Japanese rice wine) production is a complex, multistage process in which fermentation is performed by a succession of mixed fungi and bacteria. This study employed high-throughput rRNA marker gene sequencing, quantitative PCR, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism to characterize the bacterial and fungal communities of spontaneous sake production from koji to product as well as brewery equipment surfaces. Results demonstrate a dynamic microbial succession, with koji and early moto fermentations dominated by Bacillus, Staphylococcus, and Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae, succeeded by Lactobacillus spp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae later in the fermentations. The microbiota driving these fermentations were also prevalent in the production environment, illustrating the reservoirs and routes for microbial contact in this traditional food fermentation. Interrogating the microbial consortia of production environments in parallel with food products is a valuable approach for understanding the complete ecology of food production systems and can be applied to any food system, leading to enlightened perspectives for process control and food safety. PMID:24973064

  5. Digitization workflows for flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi1

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gil; Sweeney, Patrick; Wallace, Lisa E.; Rabeler, Richard K.; Allard, Dorothy; Brown, Herrick; Carter, J. Richard; Denslow, Michael W.; Ellwood, Elizabeth R.; Germain-Aubrey, Charlotte C.; Gilbert, Ed; Gillespie, Emily; Goertzen, Leslie R.; Legler, Ben; Marchant, D. Blaine; Marsico, Travis D.; Morris, Ashley B.; Murrell, Zack; Nazaire, Mare; Neefus, Chris; Oberreiter, Shanna; Paul, Deborah; Ruhfel, Brad R.; Sasek, Thomas; Shaw, Joey; Soltis, Pamela S.; Watson, Kimberly; Weeks, Andrea; Mast, Austin R.

    2015-01-01

    Effective workflows are essential components in the digitization of biodiversity specimen collections. To date, no comprehensive, community-vetted workflows have been published for digitizing flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi, even though latest estimates suggest that only 33% of herbarium specimens have been digitally transcribed, 54% of herbaria use a specimen database, and 24% are imaging specimens. In 2012, iDigBio, the U.S. National Science Foundation’s (NSF) coordinating center and national resource for the digitization of public, nonfederal U.S. collections, launched several working groups to address this deficiency. Here, we report the development of 14 workflow modules with 7–36 tasks each. These workflows represent the combined work of approximately 35 curators, directors, and collections managers representing more than 30 herbaria, including 15 NSF-supported plant-related Thematic Collections Networks and collaboratives. The workflows are provided for download as Portable Document Format (PDF) and Microsoft Word files. Customization of these workflows for specific institutional implementation is encouraged. PMID:26421256

  6. Digitization workflows for flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gil; Sweeney, Patrick; Wallace, Lisa E; Rabeler, Richard K; Allard, Dorothy; Brown, Herrick; Carter, J Richard; Denslow, Michael W; Ellwood, Elizabeth R; Germain-Aubrey, Charlotte C; Gilbert, Ed; Gillespie, Emily; Goertzen, Leslie R; Legler, Ben; Marchant, D Blaine; Marsico, Travis D; Morris, Ashley B; Murrell, Zack; Nazaire, Mare; Neefus, Chris; Oberreiter, Shanna; Paul, Deborah; Ruhfel, Brad R; Sasek, Thomas; Shaw, Joey; Soltis, Pamela S; Watson, Kimberly; Weeks, Andrea; Mast, Austin R

    2015-09-01

    Effective workflows are essential components in the digitization of biodiversity specimen collections. To date, no comprehensive, community-vetted workflows have been published for digitizing flat sheets and packets of plants, algae, and fungi, even though latest estimates suggest that only 33% of herbarium specimens have been digitally transcribed, 54% of herbaria use a specimen database, and 24% are imaging specimens. In 2012, iDigBio, the U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF) coordinating center and national resource for the digitization of public, nonfederal U.S. collections, launched several working groups to address this deficiency. Here, we report the development of 14 workflow modules with 7-36 tasks each. These workflows represent the combined work of approximately 35 curators, directors, and collections managers representing more than 30 herbaria, including 15 NSF-supported plant-related Thematic Collections Networks and collaboratives. The workflows are provided for download as Portable Document Format (PDF) and Microsoft Word files. Customization of these workflows for specific institutional implementation is encouraged.

  7. SOME FACTORS IN THE COMPETITION OR ANTAGONISM AMONG BACTERIA, ALGAE, AND AQUATIC WEEDS.

    PubMed

    Filzgerald, G P

    1969-12-01

    Field observations of changes in the populations of aquatic weeds and phytoplankton have confirmed that aquatic weeds have antagonistic activity toward phytoplankton. Nutritional studies in the laboratory indicate that cultures of the aquatic weeds, Myriophyllum sp., Ceratophyllum sp., and duckweed (Lemma minor L.); liquid cultures of barley (Hordeum vulgare L., Dickson variety); and cultures of the filamentous green algae, Cladophora sp. and Pithophora oedogonium (Mont.) Withrock, will remain relatively free of epiphytes or competing phytoplankton if the cultures are nitrogen-limited. Field observations of Cladophora sp. have confirmed that the growth of epiphytes on the Cladophora is related to conditions of surplus available nitrogen compounds. It is proposed that this antagonistic activity may be due to a "nitrogen sink" effect in which the aquatic weeds or filamentous green algae prevent the growth of contaminating algae by competition for the limited nitrogen compounds available. However, the presence of bacteria-sized organisms which have selective toxicity to certain algae indicates that perhaps multiple factors exist. Discussed are the ecological implications of associations of certain algae with bacteria that have selective toxicities for other species of algae under certain environmental conditions such as nitrogen-limited growth.

  8. Soil Bacteria And Fungi Respond On Different Spatial Scales To Invasion By The Legume Lespedeza Cuneata

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-03

    and diversity of soil fungi that are important mutualists of native competi- tor plants (the “degraded mutualisms” hypothesis; Vogelsang and Bever...ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE published: 03 June 2011 doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2011.00127 Soil bacteria and fungi respond on different spatial scales to...evidence of responding at very local scales around individual plants. In contrast, soil fungi did not change significantly at the scale of entire sites

  9. Potential application of algicidal bacteria for improved lipid recovery with specific algae.

    PubMed

    Lenneman, Eric M; Wang, Ping; Barney, Brett M

    2014-05-01

    The utility of specific strains of natural algicidal bacteria isolated from shallow wetland sediments was evaluated against several strains of algae with potential immediate or future commercial value. Two strains of bacteria, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes AD6 and Aeromonas hydrophila AD9, were identified and demonstrated to have algicidal activity against the microalgae Neochloris oleoabundans and Dunaliella tertiolecta. These bacteria were further evaluated for the potential to improve lipid extraction using a mild solvent extraction approach. Aeromonas hydrophila AD9 showed a nearly 12-fold increase in lipid extraction with D. tertiolecta, while both bacteria showed a sixfold improvement in lipid extraction with N. oleoabundans.

  10. Development of algae-bacteria granular consortia in photo-sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Fan, Hongyong; Liu, Yuhong; Liu, Chaoxiang; Huang, Xu

    2017-05-01

    The development and properties of algae-bacteria granular consortia, which cultivated with the algae (Chlorella and Scenedesmus) and aerobic granules, was investigated in this experiment. The results indicated that the granular consortia could be successfully developed by selection pressure control, and the algal biomass and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) concentration in the consortia showed notable correlation with the operating parameters of reactor. The maximum specific removal rates of total nitrogen and phosphate were obtained from the granular consortia with the highest algal biomass, yet the correlation between the fatty acid methyl esters yield and the algal biomass in the consortia was not markedly observed. The seed algae maintained dominance in the phototroph community, whereas the cyanobacteria only occupied a small proportion (5.2-6.5%). Although the bacterial communities with different operational strategies showed significant difference, the dominated bacteria (Comamonadaceae, 18.79-36.25%) in the mature granular consortia were similar.

  11. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-07

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs.

  12. Marine bacteria associated with the Korean brown alga, Undaria pinnatifida.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Kyung; Jung, Hyun Jung; Lee, Hong Kum

    2006-12-01

    Several marine bacterial strains were isolated from Undaria pinnatifida (Miyok in Korean). Sixty-six strains were isolated on R2A agar media at 10 degrees and identified by a phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences. They were grouped into 10 different sequence types based on the initial sequence analysis of the 5' domain of the gene (approximately 500 bp). Full sequences of 16S rRNA gene were obtained from one strain in each sequence type and the species-affiliation was determined using phylogenetic and sequence similarity analyses. The results of the analyses indicated that they were closely related to Psychrobacter aquimaris, P. celer, P. nivimaris, P. pulmonis, Psychromonas arctica or Bacillus psychrodurans. These bacteria are marine or psychrotrophic bacteria. Because the sporophytes of U.pinnatifida are cultured on the costal area during winter, the U. pinnatifida-associated bacteria appeared to grow at low temperatures. U. pinnatifida sporophytes can be a good source for the isolation of psychrotrophic bacteria.

  13. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles against bacteria, yeast, and algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorobantu, Loredana S.; Fallone, Clara; Noble, Adam J.; Veinot, Jonathan; Ma, Guibin; Goss, Greg G.; Burrell, Robert E.

    2015-04-01

    The toxicity mechanism employed by silver nanoparticles against microorganisms has captivated scientists for nearly a decade and remains a debatable issue. The question most frequently asked is whether silver nanoparticles exert specific effects on microorganisms beyond the well-documented antimicrobial activity of Ag+. Here, we study the effects of citrate- (d = 17.5 ± 9.4 nm) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (d = 38.8 ± 3.6 nm)-capped silver nanoparticles on microorganisms belonging to various genera. The antimicrobial effect of Ag+ was distinguished from that of nanosilver by monitoring microbial growth in the presence and absence of nanoparticles and by careful comparison of the responses of equimolar silver nitrate solution. The results show that when using equimolar silver solutions, silver nitrate has higher toxic potential on all microorganisms than both nanoparticles tested. Furthermore, some microorganisms are more susceptible to silver than others and the choice of capping agent is relevant in the toxicity. Atomic force microscopy disclosed that AgNO3 had a destructive effect on algae. The antimicrobial activity of nanosilver could be exploited to prevent microbial colonization of medical devices and to determine the fate of nanoparticles in the environment.

  14. Sargassopenillines A–G, 6,6-Spiroketals from the Alga-Derived Fungi Penicillium thomii and Penicillium lividum

    PubMed Central

    Zhuravleva, Olesya I.; Sobolevskaya, Maria P.; Afiyatullov, Shamil Sh.; Kirichuk, Natalya N.; Denisenko, Vladimir A.; Dmitrenok, Pavel S.; Yurchenko, Ekaterina A.; Dyshlovoy, Sergey A.

    2014-01-01

    Seven new 6,6-spiroketals, sargassopenillines A–G (1–7) were isolated from the alga-derived fungi Penicillium thomii KMM 4645 and Penicillium lividum KMM 4663. The structures of these metabolites were determined by HR-MS and 1D and 2D NMR. The absolute configurations of compounds 1, 5 and 6 were assigned by the modified Mosher’s method and by CD data. Sargassopenilline C (3) inhibited the transcriptional activity of the oncogenic nuclear factor AP-1 with an IC50 value of 15 µM. PMID:25501795

  15. Impact of Summer Cattle Grazing on the Sierra Nevada Watershed: Aquatic Algae and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Derlet, Robert W.; Richards, John R.; Tanaka, Lidia L.; Hayden, Curtis; Ger, K. Ali; Goldman, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We evaluated periphytic algal and microbial communities to assess the influence of human and cattle impact on Sierra water quality. Methods. 64 sites (lakes and streams from Lake Tahoe to Sequoia National Park, California) were sampled for suspended indicator bacteria and algae following standardized procedures. The potential for nonpoint pollution was divided into three categories: cattle-grazing areas (C), recreation use areas (R), or remote wildlife areas (W). Results. Periphyton was found at 100% of C sites, 89% of R sites, but only 25% of W sites. Eleven species of periphytic algae were identified, including Zygnema, Ulothrix, Chlorella, Spirogyra, mixed Diatoms, and Cladophoria. Mean benthic algae coverage was 66% at C sites compared to 2% at W sites (P < 0.05). The prevalence of E. coli associated with periphyton was 100% at C sites, 25% of R sites, and 0% of W sites. Mean E. coli CFU/gm of algae detected was: C = 173,000, R = 700, W = 0. (P < 0.05). Analysis of neighboring water for E. coli bacteria >100 CFU/100 mL: C = 91%, R = 8%, W = 0 (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Higher periphytic algal biomass and uniform presence of periphyton-attached E. coli corresponded to watersheds exposed to summer cattle grazing. These differences suggest cattle grazing compromises water quality. PMID:22505950

  16. Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Frommlet, Jörg C; Sousa, Maria L; Alves, Artur; Vieira, Sandra I; Suggett, David J; Serôdio, João

    2015-05-12

    Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium are commonly recognized as invertebrate endosymbionts that are of central importance for the functioning of coral reef ecosystems. However, the endosymbiotic phase within Symbiodinium life history is inherently tied to a more cryptic free-living (ex hospite) phase that remains largely unexplored. Here we show that free-living Symbiodinium spp. in culture commonly form calcifying bacterial-algal communities that produce aragonitic spherulites and encase the dinoflagellates as endolithic cells. This process is driven by Symbiodinium photosynthesis but occurs only in partnership with bacteria. Our findings not only place dinoflagellates on the map of microbial-algal organomineralization processes but also point toward an endolithic phase in the Symbiodinium life history, a phenomenon that may provide new perspectives on the biology and ecology of Symbiodinium spp. and the evolutionary history of the coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

  17. Coral symbiotic algae calcify ex hospite in partnership with bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Frommlet, Jörg C.; Sousa, Maria L.; Alves, Artur; Vieira, Sandra I.; Suggett, David J.; Serôdio, João

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium are commonly recognized as invertebrate endosymbionts that are of central importance for the functioning of coral reef ecosystems. However, the endosymbiotic phase within Symbiodinium life history is inherently tied to a more cryptic free-living (ex hospite) phase that remains largely unexplored. Here we show that free-living Symbiodinium spp. in culture commonly form calcifying bacterial–algal communities that produce aragonitic spherulites and encase the dinoflagellates as endolithic cells. This process is driven by Symbiodinium photosynthesis but occurs only in partnership with bacteria. Our findings not only place dinoflagellates on the map of microbial–algal organomineralization processes but also point toward an endolithic phase in the Symbiodinium life history, a phenomenon that may provide new perspectives on the biology and ecology of Symbiodinium spp. and the evolutionary history of the coral–dinoflagellate symbiosis. PMID:25918367

  18. Fungi and bacteria. [fungicide and bactericide measures for spacecraft in tropical regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    Spacecraft equipment is usually protected from fungi and bacteria by incorporating a fungicide-bactericide in the material, by a fungicide-bactericide spray, or by reducing the relative humidity to a degree where growth will not take place. A unique method to protect delicate, expensive bearings in equipment was to maintain a pressure (with dry air or nitrogen) slightly above the outside atmosphere (few millibars) within the working parts of the equipment, thus preventing fungi from entering equipment.

  19. Discovery and Characterization of a New Family of Diterpene Cyclases in Bacteria and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Long; Zhang, Shasha; Ma, Ke; Xu, Yuxing; Tao, Qiaoqiao; Chen, Yihua; Chen, Juan; Guo, Shunxing; Ren, Jinwei; Wang, Wenzhao; Tao, Yong; Yin, Wen-Bing; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-04-18

    Diterpene cyclases from bacteria and basidiomycete fungi are seldom studied. Here, we presented the identification and verification of EriG, a member of the UbiA superfamily, as the enzyme responsible for the cyclization of the cyathane skeleton in the mushroom Hericium erinaceum. Genome mining using the EriG protein sequence as a probe led to the discovery of a new family of ubiquitous UbiA-related diterpene cyclases in bacteria and fungi. We successfully characterized seven new diterpene cyclases from bacteria or basidiomycete fungi with the help of an engineered Escherichia coli strain and determined the structures of their corresponding products. A new diterpene with an unusual skeleton was generated during this process. The discovery of this new family of diterpene cyclases provides new insight into the UbiA superfamily.

  20. Molecular bacteria-fungi interactions: effects on environment, food, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Scherlach, Kirstin; Graupner, Katharina; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on bacteria-fungi interactions mediated by secondary metabolites that occur in the environment and have implications for medicine and biotechnology. Bipartite interactions that affect agriculture as well as relationships involving additional partners (plants and animals) are discussed. The advantages of microbial interplay for food production and the risks regarding food safety are presented. Furthermore, recent developments in decoding the impact of bacteria-fungi interactions on infection processes and their implications for human health are highlighted. In addition, this reviews aims to demonstrate how the understanding of complex microbial interactions found in nature can be exploited for the discovery of new therapeutics.

  1. Diversity of bacteria and fungi associated with tarballs: Recent developments and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Varsha Laxman; Suneel, V; Shenoy, Belle Damodara

    2017-02-16

    Tarballs are formed by weathering of crude oil in marine environment. They are transported from open ocean to the shores by sea currents and waves. Tarball pollution is a major concern to global marine ecosystem. Microbes such as bacteria and fungi are known to be associated with tarballs. They presumably play an important role in tarball degradation and some are potential human and animal pathogens. This paper highlights the recent studies on tarball-associated bacteria and fungi. Future perspectives on diversity, ecology and possible applications of tarball-associated microbes in bioremediation of beached tarballs have been discussed.

  2. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of algae and bacteria from hydrothermal environments, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, Marilyn L. F.

    1984-03-01

    Stromatolites forming today on a small scale in hydrothermal environments are chemical and biological analogues of much larger Precambrian formations. Carbon isotopic composition varied as a function of CO 2 concentration, pH, and species composition. Stratiform, layered stromatolites grew in silica-depositing springs at 55° to 70°C; they consisted mainly of a unicellular alga, Synechococcus, and a filamentous, photosynthetic bacterium, Chloroflexus. These thermophiles become enriched in 12C as the concentration of carbon dioxide in the effluent waters increases. At a concentration of 40 ppm total inorganic C, and δ 13C of organic carbon was ˜ -12%., whereas at 900 ppm total inorganic C, the δ 13C of similar species was ˜ -25%.. Conical stromatolites or conophytons (principally a filamentous, blue-green alga Phormidium and Chloroflexus) grew at 40°-55°C. In older, broader conophytons, Chloroflexus was the dominant organism. Their δ 13C values were ˜ -18%. in a variety of hot springs. In carbonate-depositing springs, i.e., carbon dioxide saturated, conophytons and stromatolites consisting of a variety of blue-green algae and photosynthetic bacteria had the most negative δ 13C values (to -30%.). These carbon isotope ratios are directly comparable to carbon isotope ratios of kerogen from Precambrian stromatolites. The presence and activity of methanogenic bacteria or heterotrophic, aerobic and anaerobic bacteria did not alter significantly the δ 13C of the original organic matter. The hydrogen isotopic fractionation between thermophilic organisms and water is 0 to -74 for temperatures of 85° to 46°C, respectively. Acidophilic algae fractionated hydrogen isotopes to a lesser extent than did the photosynthetic organisms inhabiting neutral pH springs. Because organic matter retains some of its original isotopic signature, relationships of CO 2 levels, pH, temperature, and species composition between modern stromatolites and their environment and those of

  3. [Occupational exposure to airborne fungi and bacteria in a household recycled container sorting plant ].

    PubMed

    Solans, Xavier; Alonso, Rosa María; Constans, Angelina; Mansilla, Alfonso

    2007-06-01

    Several studies have showed an association between the work in waste treatment plants and occupational health problems such as irritation of skin, eyes and mucous membranes, pulmonary diseases, gastrointestinal problems and symptoms of organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS). These symptoms have been related to bioaerosol exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate the occupational exposure to biological agents in a plant sorting source-separated packages (plastics materials, ferric and non-ferric metals) household waste. Airborne samples were collected with M Air T Millipore sampler. The concentration of total fungi and bacteria and gram-negative bacteria were determined and the most abundant genera were identified. The results shown that the predominant airborne microorganisms were fungi, with counts greater than 12,000 cfu/m(3) and gram-negative bacteria, with a environmental concentration between 1,395 and 5,280 cfu/m(3). In both cases, these concentrations were higher than levels obtained outside of the sorting plant. Among the fungi, the predominant genera were Penicillium and Cladosporium, whereas the predominant genera of gram-negative bacteria were Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella and Serratia. The present study shows that the workers at sorting source-separated packages (plastics materials, ferric and non-ferric metals) domestic waste plant may be exposed to airborne biological agents, especially fungi and gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Sampling, extraction and measurement of bacteria, endotoxin, fungi and inflammatory potential of settling indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Matthiesen, Christoffer B; Frederiksen, Margit W; Frederiksen, Marie; Frankel, Mika; Spilak, Michal; Gunnarsen, Lars; Timm, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Selection of sampling device, sampling location and period are important first steps in the measurement of exposure to bioaerosols in indoor air. The steps following the sampling include treatment of samples and laboratory analysis. In this study, settling bacteria, endotoxin, fungi and serine protease have been measured in Danish homes using Electrostatic Dust Fall Collectors (EDCs). The effects of the presence of occupants, sampling on open surfaces versus in bookcases and treatment of samples have been studied. Concentrations of bacteria and endotoxin were significantly higher when occupants were at home than when they were absent. Across homes, higher concentrations of fungi were found in spring than in winter, as was the total inflammatory potential, while higher concentrations of protease were found in winter than in spring. The placement of the EDCs in bookcases versus on an open surface significantly affected the measured concentrations of bacteria and endotoxin. Direct extraction of EDC cloths caused a higher measured concentration of bacteria, fungi and serine protease than if EDC cloths were extracted post-storage at -20 °C. Extraction of EDC cloths caused an average of 51% and 58% extraction of bacteria and fungi respectively. In conclusion, EDCs should be placed on open surfaces during the sampling, how much occupants are present in their home during sampling and sampling season should be considered, EDC cloths should not be stored in a freezer before extraction of microorganisms, but extraction suspensions can be stored at -80 °C without affecting the number of microorganisms significantly.

  5. Plant expansins in bacteria and fungi: evolution by horizontal gene transfer and independent domain fusion.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Doran, Nicole; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been described as a common mechanism of transferring genetic material between prokaryotes, whereas genetic transfers from eukaryotes to prokaryotes have been rarely documented. Here we report a rare case of HGT in which plant expansin genes that code for plant cell-wall loosening proteins were transferred from plants to bacteria, fungi, and amoebozoa. In several cases, the species in which the expansin gene was found is either in intimate association with plants or is a known plant pathogen. Our analyses suggest that at least two independent genetic transfers occurred from plants to bacteria and fungi. These events were followed by multiple HGT events within bacteria and fungi. We have also observed that in bacteria expansin genes have been independently fused to DNA fragments that code for an endoglucanase domain or for a carbohydrate binding module, pointing to functional convergence at the molecular level. Furthermore, the functional similarities between microbial expansins and their plant xenologs suggest that these proteins mediate microbial-plant interactions by altering the plant cell wall and therefore may provide adaptive advantages to these species. The evolution of these nonplant expansins represents a unique case in which bacteria and fungi have found innovative and adaptive ways to interact with and infect plants by acquiring genes from their host. This evolutionary paradigm suggests that despite their low frequency such HGT events may have significantly contributed to the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species.

  6. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  7. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  8. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  9. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  10. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  11. Ratio of Fungi:Bacteria as an indicator of change in soil quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The removal of corn residue from cropland is of interest for ethanol production. To fully understand the implications of this residue removal on soil quality multi-discipline research is required, including microbiological investigation. This study measured the ratio of fungi to bacteria in soils ...

  12. 9 CFR 113.25 - Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Culture media for detection of... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.25 Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi. (a... properties equal to or better than such media. The formulas for the composition of the culture...

  13. 9 CFR 113.25 - Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Culture media for detection of... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.25 Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi. (a... properties equal to or better than such media. The formulas for the composition of the culture...

  14. 9 CFR 113.25 - Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Culture media for detection of... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.25 Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi. (a... properties equal to or better than such media. The formulas for the composition of the culture...

  15. 9 CFR 113.25 - Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Culture media for detection of... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.25 Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi. (a... properties equal to or better than such media. The formulas for the composition of the culture...

  16. 9 CFR 113.25 - Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Culture media for detection of... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.25 Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi. (a... properties equal to or better than such media. The formulas for the composition of the culture...

  17. Effects of substrate concentrations on the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and algae in secondary facultative ponds.

    PubMed

    Kayombo, S; Mbwette, T S A; Katima, J H Y; Jorgensen, S E

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the effect of substrate concentration on the growth of a mixed culture of algae and heterotrophic bacteria in secondary facultative ponds (SFPs) utilizing settled domestic sewage as a sole source of organic carbon. The growth of the mixed culture was studied at the concentrations ranging between 200 and 800 mg COD/l in a series of batch chemostat reactors. From the laboratory data, the specific growth rate (micro) was determined using the modified Gompertz model. The maximum specific growth rate ( micro(max)) and half saturation coefficients (K(s)) were calculated using the Monod kinetic equation. The maximum observed growth rate ( micro(max)) for heterotrophic bacteria was 3.8 day(-1) with K(s) of 200 mg COD/l. The micro(max) for algal biomass based on suspended volatile solids was 2.7 day(-1) with K(s) of 110 mg COD/l. The micro(max) of algae based on the chlorophyll-a was 3.5 day(-1) at K(s) of 50mg COD/l. The observed specific substrate removal by heterotrophic bacteria varied between the concentrations of substrate used and the average value was 0.82 (mg COD/mg biomass). The specific substrate utilization rate in the bioreactors was direct proportional to the specific growth rate. Hence, the determined Monod kinetic parameters are useful for the definition of the operation of SFPs.

  18. Integrated microbioreactor for culture and analysis of bacteria, algae and yeast.

    PubMed

    Au, Sam H; Shih, Steve C C; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a micro-scale bioreactor for automated culture and density analysis of microorganisms. The microbioreactor is powered by digital microfluidics (DMF) and because it is used with bacteria, algae and yeast, we call it the BAY microbioreactor. Previous miniaturized bioreactors have relied on microchannels which often require valves, mixers and complex optical systems. In contrast, the BAY microbioreactor is capable of culturing microorganisms in distinct droplets on a format compatible with conventional bench-top analyzers without the use of valves, mixers or pumps. Bacteria, algae and yeast were grown for up to 5 days with automated semi-continuous mixing and temperature control. Cell densities were determined by measuring absorbances through transparent regions of the devices, and growth profiles were shown to be comparable to those generated in conventional, macro-scale systems. Cell growth and density measurements were integrated in the microbioreactor with a fluorescent viability assay and transformation of bacteria with a fluorescent reporter gene. These results suggest that DMF may be a useful new tool in automated culture and analysis of microorganisms for a wide range of applications.

  19. Shifting nutrient-mediated interactions between algae and bacteria in a microcosm: evidence from alkaline phosphatase assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huali; Zhou, Yiyong; Xiao, Wenjuan; Ji, Lei; Cao, Xiuyun; Song, Chunlei

    2012-05-20

    The impacts of different nutrient additions (N + P, N + P + C, 4N + P, 4N + P + C, N + 2P) on the growth of algae and bacteria were studied in a microcosm experiment. Since alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) provides an indication of phosphorus deficiency, the higher value for algal APA in the treatments with excess nitrogen and for bacterial APA in the treatments with excess carbon suggested that, algal and bacterial phosphorus-limited status were induced by abundant nitrogen and carbon input, respectively. Bacterial phosphorus-limited status was weakened due to higher bacterial competition for phosphorus, compared to algae. In comparison with the bacterial and specific bacterial APA, higher values of algal and specific algal APA were found, which showed a gradual increase that coincided with the increase of chlorophyll a concentration. This fact indicated not only a stronger phosphorus demand by algae than by bacteria, but also a complementary relationship for phosphorus demand between algae and bacteria. However, this commensalism could be interfered by glucose input resulting in the decline of chlorophyll a concentration. Furthermore, the correlation between bacterial numbers and chlorophyll a concentration was positive in treatments without carbon and blurry in treatments with carbon. These observations validate a hypothesis that carbon addition can stimulate bacterial growth justifying bacterial nutrient demand, which decreases the availability of nutrients to algae and affects nutrient relationship between algae and bacteria. However, this interference would terminate after algal and bacterial adaption to carbon input.

  20. In situ biodegradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands tailings pond water using indigenous algae-bacteria consortium.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Hamed; Prasad, Vinay; Liu, Yang; Ulrich, Ania C

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the biodegradation of total acid-extractable organics (TAOs), commonly called naphthenic acids (NAs), was investigated. An indigenous microbial culture containing algae and bacteria was taken from the surface of a tailings pond and incubated over the course of 120days. The influence of light, oxygen and the presence of indigenous algae and bacteria, and a diatom (Navicula pelliculosa) on the TAO removal rate were elucidated. The highest biodegradation rate was observed with bacteria growth only (without light exposure) with a half-life (t(1/2)) of 203days. The algae-bacteria consortium enhanced the detoxification process, however, bacterial biomass played the main role in toxicity reduction. Principal component analysis (PCA) conducted on FT-IR spectra, identified functional groups and bonds (representing potential markers for biotransformation of TAOs) as follows: hydroxyl, carboxyl and amide groups along with CH, arylH, arylOH and NH bonds.

  1. The leaves of green plants as well as a cyanobacterium, a red alga, and fungi contain insulin-like antigens.

    PubMed

    Silva, L B; Santos, S S S; Azevedo, C R; Cruz, M A L; Venâncio, T M; Cavalcante, C P; Uchôa, A F; Astolfi Filho, S; Oliveira, A E A; Fernandes, K V S; Xavier-Filho, J

    2002-03-01

    We report the detection of insulin-like antigens in a large range of species utilizing a modified ELISA plate assay and Western blotting. We tested the leaves or aerial parts of species of Rhodophyta (red alga), Bryophyta (mosses), Psilophyta (whisk ferns), Lycopodophyta (club mosses), Sphenopsida (horsetails), gymnosperms, and angiosperms, including monocots and dicots. We also studied species of fungi and a cyanobacterium, Spirulina maxima. The wide distribution of insulin-like antigens, which in some cases present the same electrophoretic mobility as bovine insulin, together with results recently published by us on the amino acid sequence of an insulin isolated from the seed coat of jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis) and from the developing fruits of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), suggests that pathways depending on this hormone have been conserved through evolution.

  2. Bacteria and fungi inactivation by photocatalysis under UVA irradiation: liquid and gas phase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Silva, Caio; Miranda, Sandra M; Lopes, Filipe V S; Silva, Mário; Dezotti, Márcia; Silva, Adrián M T; Faria, Joaquim L; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P; Pinto, Eugénia

    2016-06-29

    In the last decade, environmental risks associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have become a concern in the scientific community due to the absence of specific legislation governing the occupational exposure limits (OEL) for microorganisms present in indoor air. Thus, it is necessary to develop techniques to effectively inactivate microorganisms present in the air of WWTPs facilities. In the present work, ultraviolet light A radiation was used as inactivation tool. The microbial population was not visibly reduced in the bioaerosol by ultraviolet light A (UVA) photolysis. The UVA photocatalytic process for the inactivation of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi, ATCC strains and isolates from indoor air samples of a WWTP) using titanium dioxide (TiO2 P25) and zinc oxide (ZnO) was tested in both liquid-phase and airborne conditions. In the slurry conditions at liquid phase, P25 showed a better performance in inactivation. For this reason, gas-phase assays were performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolithic structures coated with P25. The survival rate of microorganisms under study decreased with the catalyst load and the UVA exposure time. Inactivation of fungi was slower than resistant bacteria, followed by Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. Graphical abstract Inactivation of fungi and bacteria in gas phase by photocatalitic process performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolith structures coated with TiO2.

  3. Effect of three nematicides on the growth of some phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    El-Khadem, M; Mehiar, F; Embabi, M S

    1977-01-01

    The effect of three nematicides, aldicarb, fensulfothion, and phenamiphos at four concentrations (1, 5, 25, and 125 ppm) was tested on the growth of five bacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Corynebacterium fascians, Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas solanacearum, and Streptomyces scabies and four fungi, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, Fusarium solani, Rhizoctonia solani, and Sclerotium bataticola. Of the bacteria, P. solanacearum was most affected by the chemicals at all concentrations, while E. carotovora was least affected. Fensulfothion was generally the most effective nematicide on the bacteria tested, while phenamiphos was the least effective. Similarly, the effect of the chemicals on the fungi tested varied greatly. F. solani and R. solani were generally most affected, followed by F. oxysporum, while S. bataticola was least affected. Of the chemicals tested, phenamiphos was generally the most effective, followed by fensulfothion, while aldicarb was the least effective.

  4. Iron encrustations on filamentous algae colonized by Gallionella-related bacteria in a metal-polluted freshwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J. F.; Neu, T. R.; Lu, S.; Händel, M.; Totsche, K. U.; Küsel, K.

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous macroscopic algae were observed in slightly acidic to circumneutral (pH 5.9-6.5), metal-rich stream water that leaked out from a former uranium mining district (Ronneburg, Germany). These algae differed in color and morphology and were encrusted with Fe-deposits. To elucidate their potential interaction with Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), we collected algal samples at three time points during summer 2013 and studied the algae-bacteria-mineral compositions via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and a 16S and 18S rRNA gene-based bacterial and algae community analysis. Surprisingly, sequencing analysis of 18S rRNA gene regions of green and brown algae revealed high homologies with the freshwater algae Tribonema (99.9-100 %). CLSM imaging indicated a loss of active chloroplasts in the algae cells, which may be responsible for the change in color in algae were fully encrusted with Fe-precipitates, the brown algae often exhibited discontinuous series of precipitates. This pattern was likely due to the intercalary growth of algal filaments which allowed them to avoid detrimental encrustation. 16S rRNA gene-targeted studies revealed that Gallionella-related FeOB dominated the bacterial RNA and DNA communities (70-97 and 63-96 %, respectively), suggesting their capacity to compete with the abiotic Fe-oxidation under the putative oxygen-saturated conditions that occur in association with photosynthetic algae. Quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) revealed even higher Gallionella-related 16S rRNA gene copy numbers on the surface of green algae compared to the brown algae. The latter harbored a higher microbial diversity, including

  5. Phytate degradation by fungi and bacteria that inhabit sawdust and coffee residue composts.

    PubMed

    Fathallh Eida, Mohamed; Nagaoka, Toshinori; Wasaki, Jun; Kouno, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Phytate is the primary source of organic phosphorus, but it cannot be directly utilized by plants and is strongly adsorbed by the soil, reducing bioavailability. Composting is a process used to improve the bioavailability of phytate in organic wastes through degradation by microorganisms. In this study, we aimed to investigate the phytate-degrading ability of fungi and bacteria that inhabit sawdust compost and coffee residue compost, and their contribution to the composting process. In the plate assay, the fungi that formed clear zones around their colonies belonged to the genera Mucor, Penicillium, Galactomyces, Coniochaeta, Aspergillus, and Fusarium, while the bacteria belonged to the genera Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Chitinophaga, and Rahnella. Eight fungal isolates (genera Mucor, Penicillium, Galactomyces, and Coniochaeta) and four bacterial isolates (genera Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, and Rahnella) were selected to evaluate phytase activity in their liquid culture and their ability to degrade phytate in organic materials composed of mushroom media residue and rice bran. The selected fungi degraded phytate in organic materials to varying degrees. Penicillium isolates showed the highest degradation ability and Coniochaeta isolate exhibited relatively high degradation ability. The clear zone diameters of these fungal isolates displayed significantly positive and negative correlations with inorganic and phytate phosphorus contents in the organic materials after incubation, respectively; however, none of the selected bacteria reduced phytate phosphorus in organic materials. It is therefore possible that fungi are major contributors to phytate degradation during composting.

  6. Phytate Degradation by Fungi and Bacteria that Inhabit Sawdust and Coffee Residue Composts

    PubMed Central

    Eida, Mohamed Fathallh; Nagaoka, Toshinori; Wasaki, Jun; Kouno, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Phytate is the primary source of organic phosphorus, but it cannot be directly utilized by plants and is strongly adsorbed by the soil, reducing bioavailability. Composting is a process used to improve the bioavailability of phytate in organic wastes through degradation by microorganisms. In this study, we aimed to investigate the phytate-degrading ability of fungi and bacteria that inhabit sawdust compost and coffee residue compost, and their contribution to the composting process. In the plate assay, the fungi that formed clear zones around their colonies belonged to the genera Mucor, Penicillium, Galactomyces, Coniochaeta, Aspergillus, and Fusarium, while the bacteria belonged to the genera Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Chitinophaga, and Rahnella. Eight fungal isolates (genera Mucor, Penicillium, Galactomyces, and Coniochaeta) and four bacterial isolates (genera Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, and Rahnella) were selected to evaluate phytase activity in their liquid culture and their ability to degrade phytate in organic materials composed of mushroom media residue and rice bran. The selected fungi degraded phytate in organic materials to varying degrees. Penicillium isolates showed the highest degradation ability and Coniochaeta isolate exhibited relatively high degradation ability. The clear zone diameters of these fungal isolates displayed significantly positive and negative correlations with inorganic and phytate phosphorus contents in the organic materials after incubation, respectively; however, none of the selected bacteria reduced phytate phosphorus in organic materials. It is therefore possible that fungi are major contributors to phytate degradation during composting. PMID:23100024

  7. Combined effects of pyrene and UV-light on algae and bacteria in an arctic sediment.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Dorthe Groth; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2007-05-01

    The phototoxicity potential of pyrene on natural algae and bacteria in an arctic sediment was evaluated and compared to that of pyrene treatment alone based on some functional and structural endpoints. Microcosms with arctic sediment from a shallow-water marine bay were incubated with pyrene under three different light regimes, natural sunlight with UV-light (Light(UV)), natural sunlight without UV-light (Light) and dark.Presence of pyrene directly affected the algal community measured as decreased (14)C-incorporation and decreased ammonium, nitrate and silicate uptake. These direct toxic effects from pyrene on the algae eventually led to indirect effects on the bacterial community observed as increased oxygen consumption. Besides the direct toxicity of pyrene to the benthic microbial community, indications of phototoxicity were found on the bacterial community detected as decreased oxygen consumption and increased bacterial diversity under Light(UV) compared to Light. No indication of phototoxicity of pyrene was found on the algae, which might be due to the high direct toxicity of pyrene. Our results indicate that shallow arctic marine areas might be affected by phototoxicity if concentrations of oil components in the sediments increase.

  8. Bacteria and fungi of marine mammals: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, R

    2000-01-01

    A list of the different bacterial and fungal agents isolated from marine mammals in different parts of the world is presented. Importance is given to some of the most recently identified bacterial agents, including Actinobacillus delphinicola, A. scotiae, and Brucella spp. A list, in alphabetical order, of bacteria recovered from different tissues or organs from marine mammals is presented for the integumentary, respiratory, digestive, genitourinary, and reticuloendothelial systems. Infectious bacterial agents associated with abscesses and with cases of septicemia are also listed. Information about the different fungal agents recovered from marine mammals is summarized. A section covering some of the zoonotic infectious agents recovered from marine mammals is included. PMID:10723596

  9. Biologically active substances produced by antarctic cryptoendolithic fungi.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R; Friedmann, E I

    1993-01-01

    Researchers report results of laboratory studies of over 200 microbial strains of fungi, algae, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophic bacteria collected in the Ross Desert region of Antarctica. All of the 35 fungal strains produced substances that inhibited the growth of cyanobacteria and algae. The inhibitory effect of the biologically active substance was evident in crushed cell extract but less in spent broth.

  10. Symbiotic interaction of endophytic bacteria with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and its antagonistic effect on Ganoderma boninense.

    PubMed

    Sundram, Shamala; Meon, Sariah; Seman, Idris Abu; Othman, Radziah

    2011-08-01

    Endophytic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UPMP3 and Burkholderia cepacia UMPB3), isolated from within roots of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) were tested for their presymbiotic effects on two arbuscular mcorrhizal fungi, Glomus intraradices UT126 and Glomus clarum BR152B). These endophytic bacteria were also tested for antagonistic effects on Ganoderma boninense PER 71, a white wood rot fungal pathogen that causes a serious disease in oil palm. Spore germination and hyphal length of each arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) pairing with endophytic bacteria was found to be significantly higher than spores plated in the absence of bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the endophytic bacteria were scattered, resting or embedded on the surface hyaline layer or on the degraded walls of AMF spores, possibly feeding on the outer hyaline spore wall. The antagonistic effect of the endophytic bacteria was expressed as severe morphological abnormalities in the hyphal structures of G. boninense PER 71. The effects of the endophytic bacteria on G. boninense PER 71 hyphal structures were observed clearly under SEM. Severe inter-twisting, distortion, lysis and shriveling of the hyphal structures were observed. This study found that the effect of endophytic bacteria on G. intraradices UT126 and G. clarum BR152B resembled that of a mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) association because the association significantly promoted AMF spore germination and hyphal length. However, the endophytic bacteria were extremely damaging to G. boninense PER 71.

  11. Human pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Panayidou, Stavria; Ioannidou, Eleni; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has been the invertebrate model organism of choice for the study of innate immune responses during the past few decades. Many Drosophila–microbe interaction studies have helped to define innate immunity pathways, and significant effort has been made lately to decipher mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Here we catalog 68 bacterial, fungal, and viral species studied in flies, 43 of which are relevant to human health. We discuss studies of human pathogens in flies revealing not only the elicitation and avoidance of immune response but also mechanisms of tolerance, host tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and predisposition to cancer. Prominent among those is the emerging pattern of intestinal regeneration as a defense response induced by pathogenic and innocuous bacteria. Immunopathology mechanisms and many microbial virulence factors have been elucidated, but their relevance to human health conventionally necessitates validation in mammalian models of infection. PMID:24398387

  12. A novel method for comparison of biocidal properties of nanomaterials to bacteria, yeasts and algae.

    PubMed

    Suppi, Sandra; Kasemets, Kaja; Ivask, Angela; Künnis-Beres, Kai; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Kurvet, Imbi; Aruoja, Villem; Kahru, Anne

    2015-04-09

    Toxicity testing of nanomaterials (NMs) is experimentally challenging because NMs may interfere with test environment and assay components. In this work we propose a simple and reliable method--a 'spot test' to compare biocidal potency of NMs to unicellular microorganisms such as bacteria, yeasts and algae. The assay is straightforward: cells are incubated in deionized water suspensions of NMs for up to 24h and then pipetted as a 'spot' on agarized medium. Altogether seven bacterial strains, yeast and a microalga were tested. CuO, TiO2 and two different Ag NPs, multi-wall C-nanotubes (MWCNTs), AgNO3, CuSO4, 3,5-dichlorophenol, triclosan and H2O2 were analyzed. The biocidal potency of tested substances ranged from 0.1mg/L to >1000 mg/L; whereas, the least potent NMs toward all test species were TiO2 NPs and MWCNTs and most potent Ag and CuO NPs. Based on the similar toxicity pattern of the tested chemicals on the nine unicellular organisms in deionized water we conclude that toxicity mechanism of biocidal chemicals seems to be similar, whatever the organism (bacteria, yeast, alga). Therefore, when the organisms are not 'protected' by their environment that usually includes various organic and inorganic supplements their tolerance to toxicants is chemical- rather than organism-dependent.

  13. Effect of Nanohexaconazole on Nitrogen Fixing Blue Green Algae and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gopal, Madhuban; Pabbi, Sunil; Paul, Sangeeta; Alam, Md Imteyaz; Yadav, Saurabh; Nair, Kishore Kumar; Chauhan, Neetu; Srivastava, Chitra; Gogoi, Robin; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Goswami, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    Nanohexaconazole is a highly efficient fungicide against Rhizoctonia solani. Nanoparticles are alleged to adversely affect the non-target organisms. In order to evaluate such concern, the present study was carried out to investigate the effect of nanohexaconazole and its commercial formulation on sensitive nitrogen fixing blue green algae (BGA) and bacteria. Various activities of algae and bacteria namely growth, N-fixation, N-assimilation, Indole acetic acid (IAA) production and phosphate solubilization were differently affected in the presence of hexaconazole. Although, there was stimulatory to slightly inhibitory effect on the growth measurable parameters of the organisms studied at the recommended dose of nanohexaconazole, but its higher dose was inhibitory to all these microorganisms. On the other hand, the recommended as well as higher dose of commercial hexaconazole showed much severe inhibition of growth and metabolic activity of these organisms as compared to the nano preparation. The uses of nanohexazconazole instead of hexaconazole as a fungicide will not only help to control various fungal pathogens but also sustain the growth and activity of these beneficial microorganisms for sustaining soil fertility and productivity.

  14. Heat stable antimicrobial activity of Allium ascalonicum against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Amin, M; Kapadnis, B P

    2005-08-01

    To study antimicrobial activity of shallot in comparison with that of garlic and onion against 23 strains of fungi and bacteria, water extracts of garlic, shallot and onion bulbs were prepared. Each extract was studied in different forms for their antimicrobial activity viz., fresh extract, dry extract and autoclaved extract. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal lethal concentrations of these extracts were determined against all organisms by broth dilution susceptibility test. Fresh extract of garlic showed greater antimicrobial activity as compared to similar extracts of onion and shallot. However, dried and autoclaved extracts of shallot showed more activity than similar extracts of onion and garlic. Fungi were more sensitive to shallot extract than bacteria. Amongst bacteria, B. cereus was most sensitive (MIC=5 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum bactericidal concentration of shallot extract amongst bacteria tested was 5 mg ml(-1) for B. cereus. Amongst fungi, Aureobasidium pullulans and Microsporum gypseum were most sensitive (MIC= 0.15 mg ml(-1)). The lowest minimum lethal concentration was 2.5 mg ml(-1) for Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. It was therefore, expected that the antimicrobial principle of shallot was different than the antimicrobial compounds of onion and garlic. In addition, the antimicrobial component of the shallot extract was stable at 121 degrees C.

  15. Levels of bacteria, fungi, and endotoxin in bulk and aerosolized corn silage.

    PubMed Central

    Dutkiewicz, J; Olenchock, S A; Sorenson, W G; Gerencser, V F; May, J J; Pratt, D S; Robinson, V A

    1989-01-01

    Three samples of silage taken from the surface of a silo and from depths of 20 and 45 cm in the silo were studied for identification of the potential agents causing symptoms of organic dust toxic syndrome. The samples were examined by dilution plating before and after aerosolization in an acoustical dust generator. Aerosol samples were collected by liquid impinger and filter cassettes. The samples were examined for total aerobic bacteria, anaerobic bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, lactobacilli, listeriae, thermophilic actinomycetes, fungi, and endotoxin. Very high levels of total aerobic bacteria and fungi were found in the surface sample (up to 10(9) CFU/g in the bulk sample and up to 10(9) CFU/m3 after aerosolization), whereas the corresponding values from the deepest site were 100 to 50,000 times lower. Aspergillus fumigatus predominated among the fungi, whereas Bacillus and gram-negative organisms (Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Citrobacter, and Klebsiella species) prevailed among bacteria. Thermophilic actinomycetes occurred in numbers up to 10(7) CFU/g in the bulk samples, whereas anaerobic bacteria, lactobacilli, and listeriae were only few or absent. The concentration of endotoxin was high in the surface sample (up to 211.4 Endotoxin Units/mg) and about 200-fold lower in the sample from the deepest site. The results show that contact with dust from the surface of silage carries the risk of exposure to high concentrations of microorganisms, of which A. fumigatus and endotoxin-producing bacteria are the most probable disease agents. PMID:2757375

  16. Bacteria, fungi and biokarst in Lechuguilla Cave, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K. I.; Northup, D. E.; Pollastro, R. M.; Wright, W. G.; Larock, E. J.

    1995-02-01

    Lechuguilla Cave is a deep, extensive, gypsumand sulfur-bearing hypogenic cave in Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico, most of which (>90%) lies more than 300 m beneath the entrance. Located in the arid Guadalupe Mountains, Lechuguilla's remarkable state of preservation is partially due to the locally continuous Yates Formation siltstone that has effectively diverted most vadose water away from the cave. Allocthonous organic input to the cave is therefore very limited, but bacterial and fungal colonization is relatively extensive: (1) Aspergillus sp. fungi and unidentified bacteria are associated with iron-, manganese-, and sulfur-rich encrustations on calcitic folia near the suspected water table 466 m below the entrance; (2) 92 species of fungi in 19 genera have been identified throughout the cave in oligotrophic (nutrient-poor) “soils” and pools; (3) cave-air condensate contains unidentified microbes; (4) indigenous chemoheterotrophic Seliberius and Caulobacter bacteria are known from remote pool sites; and (5) at least four genera of heterotrophic bacteria with population densities near 5×105 colony-forming units (CFU) per gram are present in ceiling-bound deposits of supposedly abiogenic condensation-corrosion residues. Various lines of evidence suggest that autotrophic bacteria are present in the ceiling-bound residues and could act as primary producers in a unique subterranean microbial food chain. The suspected autotrophic bacteria are probably chemolithoautotrophic (CLA), utilizing trace iron, manganese, or sulfur in the limestone and dolomitic bedrock to mechanically (and possibly biochemically) erode the substrate to produce residual floor deposits. Because other major sources of organic matter have not been detected, we suggest that these CLA bacteria are providing requisite organic matter to the known heterotrophic bacteria and fungi in the residues. The cavewide bacterial and fungal distribution, the large volumes of corrosion residues

  17. Effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal in wastewater-based algae cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaochen; Zhou, Wenguang; Fu, Zongqiang; Cheng, Yanling; Min, Min; Liu, Yuhuan; Zhang, Yunkai; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2014-09-01

    Centrate, a type of nutrient-rich municipal wastewater was used to determine the effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal efficiency in this study. The characteristics of algal and bacterial growth profiles, wastewater nutrient removal and effect of initial algal inoculums were systematically examined. The results showed that initial algal concentration had apparent effect on bacterial growth, and the presence of bacteria had a significant influence on algal growth pattern, suggesting symbiotic relationship between algae and bacteria at the initial stage of algae cultivation. The maximum algal biomass of 2.01 g/L with 0.1g/L initial algal inoculums concentration can be obtained during algae cultivation in raw centrate medium. The synergistic effect of centrate-borne bacteria and microalgae on algae growth and nutrient removal performance at initial fast growth stage has great potential to be applied to pilot-scale wastewater-based algae wastewater system cultivated in continuous or semi-continuous mode.

  18. Algae-bacteria association inferred by 16S rDNA similarity in established microalgae cultures.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Dagmar; Nohynek, Liisa; Rischer, Heiko

    2014-06-01

    Forty cultivable, visually distinct bacterial cultures were isolated from four Baltic microalgal cultures Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Scenedesmus obliquus, Isochrysis sp., and Nitzschia microcephala, which have been maintained for several years in the laboratory. Bacterial isolates were characterized with respect to morphology, antibiotic susceptibility, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence. A total of 17 unique bacterial strains, almost all belonging to one of three families, Rhodobacteraceae, Rhizobiaceae, and Erythrobacteraceae, were subsequently isolated. The majority of isolated bacteria belong to Rhodobacteraceae. Literature review revealed that close relatives of the bacteria isolated in this study are not only often found in marine environments associated with algae, but also in lakes, sediments, and soil. Some of them had been shown to interact with organisms in their surroundings. A Basic Local Alignment Search Tool study indicated that especially bacteria isolated from the Isochrysis sp. culture were highly similar to microalgae-associated bacteria. Two of those isolates, I1 and I6, belong to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, members of which are known to occur in close communities with microalgae. An UniFrac analysis revealed that the bacterial community of Isochrysis sp. significantly differs from the other three communities.

  19. Optimal media for use in air sampling to detect cultivable bacteria and fungi in the pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Weissfeld, Alice S; Joseph, Riya Augustin; Le, Theresa V; Trevino, Ernest A; Schaeffer, M Frances; Vance, Paula H

    2013-10-01

    Current guidelines for air sampling for bacteria and fungi in compounding pharmacies require the use of a medium for each type of organism. U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) chapter <797> (http://www.pbm.va.gov/linksotherresources/docs/USP797PharmaceuticalCompoundingSterileCompounding.pdf) calls for tryptic soy agar with polysorbate and lecithin (TSApl) for bacteria and malt extract agar (MEA) for fungi. In contrast, the Controlled Environment Testing Association (CETA), the professional organization for individuals who certify hoods and clean rooms, states in its 2012 certification application guide (http://www.cetainternational.org/reference/CAG-009v3.pdf?sid=1267) that a single-plate method is acceptable, implying that it is not always necessary to use an additional medium specifically for fungi. In this study, we reviewed 5.5 years of data from our laboratory to determine the utility of TSApl versus yeast malt extract agar (YMEA) for the isolation of fungi. Our findings, from 2,073 air samples obtained from compounding pharmacies, demonstrated that the YMEA yielded >2.5 times more fungal isolates than TSApl.

  20. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  1. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J. . Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  2. An Alternative Gelling Agent for Culture and Studies of Nematodes, Bacteria, Fungi, and Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ko, M. P.; Van Gundy, S. D.

    1988-01-01

    Pluronic F127 polyol, a block copolymer of propylene oxide and ethylene oxide, was studied as an alternative to agar in culture media for nematodes, bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, and plant tissues or seedlings, At a polyol concentration of 20% w/v, the culture media, semi-solid at room temperature (22 C) but liquid at lower temperatures, had minimal effects on the test organisms. Most of the fungi and bacteria grew as well in 20% polyol as in 1.5% agar media; however, various species of nematodes and plant seedlings or tissues exhibited differential sensitivities to different concentrations of the polyol. In cases where the organisms were unaffected, the polyol media had certain advantages over agar, including greater transparency and less contamination under nonaseptic conditions. Polyol media have potentially greater ease for recovery of embedded organisms or tissues inside the media by merely shifting to lower temperatures. PMID:19290241

  3. Antifungal Rhizosphere Bacteria Can increase as Response to the Presence of Saprotrophic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Wietse; Hundscheid, Maria P. J.; Klein Gunnewiek, Paulien J. A.; de Ridder-Duine, Annelies S.; Thion, Cecile; van Veen, Johannes A.; van der Wal, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge on the factors that determine the composition of bacterial communities in the vicinity of roots (rhizosphere) is essential to understand plant-soil interactions. Plant species identity, plant growth stage and soil properties have been indicated as major determinants of rhizosphere bacterial community composition. Here we show that the presence of saprotrophic fungi can be an additional factor steering rhizosphere bacterial community composition and functioning. We studied the impact of presence of two common fungal rhizosphere inhabitants (Mucor hiemalis and Trichoderma harzianum) on the composition of cultivable bacterial communities developing in the rhizosphere of Carex arenaria (sand sedge) in sand microcosms. Identification and phenotypic characterization of bacterial isolates revealed clear shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial community composition by the presence of two fungal strains (M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2), whereas another M. hiemalis strain did not show this effect. Presence of both M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2 resulted in a significant increase of chitinolytic and (in vitro) antifungal bacteria. The latter was most pronounced for M. hiemalis BHB1, an isolate from Carex roots, which stimulated the development of the bacterial genera Achromobacter and Stenotrophomonas. In vitro tests showed that these genera were strongly antagonistic against M. hiemalis but also against the plant-pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani. The most likely explanation for fungal-induced shifts in the composition of rhizosphere bacteria is that bacteria are being selected which are successful in competing with fungi for root exudates. Based on the results we propose that measures increasing saprotrophic fungi in agricultural soils should be explored as an alternative approach to enhance natural biocontrol against soil-borne plant-pathogenic fungi, namely by stimulating indigenous antifungal rhizosphere bacteria. PMID:26393509

  4. Antifungal Rhizosphere Bacteria Can increase as Response to the Presence of Saprotrophic Fungi.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Wietse; Hundscheid, Maria P J; Klein Gunnewiek, Paulien J A; de Ridder-Duine, Annelies S; Thion, Cecile; van Veen, Johannes A; van der Wal, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge on the factors that determine the composition of bacterial communities in the vicinity of roots (rhizosphere) is essential to understand plant-soil interactions. Plant species identity, plant growth stage and soil properties have been indicated as major determinants of rhizosphere bacterial community composition. Here we show that the presence of saprotrophic fungi can be an additional factor steering rhizosphere bacterial community composition and functioning. We studied the impact of presence of two common fungal rhizosphere inhabitants (Mucor hiemalis and Trichoderma harzianum) on the composition of cultivable bacterial communities developing in the rhizosphere of Carex arenaria (sand sedge) in sand microcosms. Identification and phenotypic characterization of bacterial isolates revealed clear shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial community composition by the presence of two fungal strains (M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2), whereas another M. hiemalis strain did not show this effect. Presence of both M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2 resulted in a significant increase of chitinolytic and (in vitro) antifungal bacteria. The latter was most pronounced for M. hiemalis BHB1, an isolate from Carex roots, which stimulated the development of the bacterial genera Achromobacter and Stenotrophomonas. In vitro tests showed that these genera were strongly antagonistic against M. hiemalis but also against the plant-pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani. The most likely explanation for fungal-induced shifts in the composition of rhizosphere bacteria is that bacteria are being selected which are successful in competing with fungi for root exudates. Based on the results we propose that measures increasing saprotrophic fungi in agricultural soils should be explored as an alternative approach to enhance natural biocontrol against soil-borne plant-pathogenic fungi, namely by stimulating indigenous antifungal rhizosphere bacteria.

  5. Inhibitory bacteria reduce fungi on early life stages of endangered Colorado boreal toads (Anaxyrus boreas)

    PubMed Central

    Kueneman, Jordan G; Woodhams, Douglas C; Van Treuren, Will; Archer, Holly M; Knight, Rob; McKenzie, Valerie J

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, host-associated microbiota are recognized to mediate pathogen establishment, providing new ecological perspectives on health and disease. Amphibian skin-associated microbiota interact with the fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), but little is known about microbial turnover during host development and associations with host immune function. We surveyed skin microbiota of Colorado's endangered boreal toads (Anaxyrus boreas), sampling 181 toads across four life stages (tadpoles, metamorphs, subadults and adults). Our goals were to (1) understand variation in microbial community structure among individuals and sites, (2) characterize shifts in communities during development and (3) examine the prevalence and abundance of known Bd-inhibitory bacteria. We used high-throughput 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) to characterize bacteria and microeukaryotes, respectively. Life stage had the largest effect on the toad skin microbial community, and site and Bd presence also contributed. Proteobacteria dominated tadpole microbial communities, but were later replaced by Actinobacteria. Microeukaryotes on tadpoles were dominated by the classes Alveolata and Stramenopiles, while fungal groups replaced these groups after metamorphosis. Using a novel database of Bd-inhibitory bacteria, we found fewer Bd-inhibitory bacteria in post-metamorphic stages correlated with increased skin fungi, suggesting that bacteria have a strong role in early developmental stages and reduce skin-associated fungi. PMID:26565725

  6. Fungi and bacteria inventory on soybean (Glycine max (L.) merill) planting media applied by local microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhsan, Ni'matuljannah; Vionita

    2017-02-01

    An experiment aimed to determine the effect of application of several types of local microorganisms (MOL) and the number of doses to the development of fungi and bacteria on soybean planting media, have been conducted in Samarinda for 3 (three) months. Factorial experiment arranged in a completely randomized design and repeated three times, was used in this experiment. The first factor was the type of MOL consisted of cow dung (m1), snails (m2), banana peel (m3) and bamboo roots (m4), and the second factor was the dose MOL zero mL (d0), 100 mL (d1), 200 mL (d2), 300 mL (d3), 400 mL (d4) analyzed with Anova and Least Significance Difference (LSD) at 5%. Fungi and bacteria contained in the local microorganisms (cow dung, snails, banana peel and bamboo root) are: fungus Aspergillus sp, Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp., cellulotic and lignolitic bacteria. An increase in the type and amount of fungus is happened for some genus. The dominant bacteria in the planting medium is a gram-negative bacteria. Cow dung seemed the best source at the dosages level of 400 ml.

  7. A short-term study on the interaction of bacteria, fungi and endosulfan in soil microcosm.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huijun; Gao, Fuwei; Tan, Wei; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2011-12-15

    Endosulfan is one of the few organic chlorine insecticides still in use today in many developing countries. It has medium toxicity for fish and aquatic invertebrates. In this study, we added different concentrations of endosulfan to a series of soil samples collected from Baihua Park in Jinan, Shandong Province, China. Interactions of exogenous endosulfan, bacteria and fungi were analyzed by monitoring the changes in microbe-specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), residual endosulfan and its metabolites which include; endosulfan sulfate, endosulfan lactone and endosulfan diol during a 9 days incubation period. Our results showed that endosulfan reduced fungi biomass by 47% on average after 9 days, while bacteria biomass increased 76% on average. In addition, we found that endosulfan degraded 8.62% in natural soil (NE), 5.51% in strepolin soil (SSE) and 2.47% in sterile soil (SE). Further analysis of the endosulfan metabolites in NE and SSE, revealed that the amount of endosulfan sulfate (ES) significantly increased and that of endosulfan lactone (EL) slightly decreased in both samples after 9 days. However, that of endosulfan diol (ED) increased in NE and decreased in SSE. After collective analysis our data demonstrated that fungi and bacteria responded differently to exogeous endosulfan, in a way that could promote the formation of endosulfan diol during endosulfan degradation.

  8. Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungi are seldom encountered in the archaeological record of foodstuffs but there are exceptions, especially for yeast. Excavated vessels contained identifiable residues of fermented beverages. Ancient ovens allow inferences on leavened breads. Mesopotamian clay tablets contain references to truffle...

  9. The capacity of some newly bacteria and fungi for biodegradation of herbicide trifluralin under agiated culture media.

    PubMed

    Erguven, G O; Bayhan, H; Ikizoglu, B; Kanat, G; Nuhoglu, Y

    2016-05-30

    Bioremediation is the use of microorganisms to degrade environmental contaminants (pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons etc.) into less toxic forms or compounds. In this study microbial biodegradation of trifluralin was performed in liquid media with 11 different types of identified fungi and bacteria cultures and their mixtures in agiated culture media. The isolated fungi and bacteria mixtures showed the highest degradation, reaching 93% in the chemical oxygen demand (COD) parameter in four days and 82% as trifluralin active ingredient in five days. Bacteria and fungi mixtures achieved 69% and 66% degradations of trifluralin active ingredient respectively. In the fungi studies, the best removal was achieved by M.Chlamydosporia at 80%, in the bacteria studies, the best removal was achieved by Bacillus simplex about 95% in five days. These different removal rates were due to the microbial differencies.

  10. Biodegradation of naphthalenesulphonate polymers: the potential of a combined application of fungi and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gullotto, Antonella; Lubello, Claudio; Mannucci, Alberto; Gori, Riccardo; Munz, Giulio; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The potential of several fungi and their synergy with bacterial biomasses were evaluated as a solution for the removal of 2-naphthalensulphonic acid polymers (2-NSAPs) from petrochemical wastewater, characterized by a chemical oxygen demand (COD) greater than 9000 mg/L. The ability of fungi to grow on 2-NSAP mixtures was preliminarily investigated using a solid medium, and then the action of the selected strains, both in suspended and immobilized form, was evaluated in terms of degradation, depolymerization, sorption and an increase in biodegradability of 2-NSAP. Among the 25 fungi evaluated two, in particular, Bjerkandera adusta and Pleurotus ostreatus, have been found to significantly depolymerize 2-NSAP yielding to the corresponding monomer (2-naphthalenesulphonic acid, 2-NSA), which has been further degraded by a bacterial consortia selected in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The fungal treatment alone was able to reduce the COD value up to 44%, while activated sludge removed only 9% of the initial COD. In addition, the combined treatment (fungi and bacteria) allowed an increase in the COD removal up to 62%.

  11. Detection of airborne psychrotrophic bacteria and fungi in food storage refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Altunatmaz, Sema Sandikci; Issa, Ghassan; Aydin, Ali

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiological air quality (psychrotrophic bacteria and airborne fungi) and distribution of fungi in different types of ready-to-eat (RTE) food-storage refrigerators (n=48) at selected retail stores in the city of Edirne, Turkey. Refrigerators were categorized according to the type of RTE food-storage: meat products, vegetables, desserts, or a mix of food types. Microbiological quality of air samples was evaluated by using a Mas-100 Eco Air Sampler. Four refrigerators (all containing meat products, 8.3%) produced air samples with undetectable microorganisms. The highest detected mean value of airborne psychrotrophic bacteria and fungi was 82.3 CFU/m(3) and 54.6 CFU/m(3), respectively and were found in mixed-food refrigerators. The dominant airborne fungal genera found were Penicillium (29.0%), Aspergillus (12.0%), Mucor (9%), Cladosporium (8%), Botyrtis (7%), and Acremonium (6%). By definition, RTE food does not undergo a final treatment to ensure its safety prior to consumption. Therefore, ensuring a clean storage environment for these foods is important to prevent food-borne disease and other health risks.

  12. The Cultivable Surface Microbiota of the Brown Alga Ascophyllum nodosum is Enriched in Macroalgal-Polysaccharide-Degrading Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martin, Marjolaine; Barbeyron, Tristan; Martin, Renee; Portetelle, Daniel; Michel, Gurvan; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria degrading algal polysaccharides are key players in the global carbon cycle and in algal biomass recycling. Yet the water column, which has been studied largely by metagenomic approaches, is poor in such bacteria and their algal-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. Even more surprisingly, the few published studies on seaweed-associated microbiomes have revealed low abundances of such bacteria and their specific enzymes. However, as macroalgal cell-wall polysaccharides do not accumulate in nature, these bacteria and their unique polysaccharidases must not be that uncommon. We, therefore, looked at the polysaccharide-degrading activity of the cultivable bacterial subpopulation associated with Ascophyllum nodosum. From A. nodosum triplicates, 324 bacteria were isolated and taxonomically identified. Out of these isolates, 78 (~25%) were found to act on at least one tested algal polysaccharide (agar, ι- or κ-carrageenan, or alginate). The isolates "active" on algal-polysaccharides belong to 11 genera: Cellulophaga, Maribacter, Algibacter, and Zobellia in the class Flavobacteriia (41) and Pseudoalteromonas, Vibrio, Cobetia, Shewanella, Colwellia, Marinomonas, and Paraglaceciola in the class Gammaproteobacteria (37). A major part represents likely novel species. Different proportions of bacterial phyla and classes were observed between the isolated cultivable subpopulation and the total microbial community previously identified on other brown algae. Here, Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria were found to be the most abundant and some phyla (as Planctomycetes and Cyanobacteria) frequently encountered on brown algae weren't identified. At a lower taxonomic level, twelve genera, well-known to be associated with algae (with the exception for Colwellia), were consistently found on all three A. nosodum samples. Even more interesting, 9 of the 11 above mentioned genera containing polysaccharolytic isolates were predominant in this common core. The cultivable fraction of

  13. The Cultivable Surface Microbiota of the Brown Alga Ascophyllum nodosum is Enriched in Macroalgal-Polysaccharide-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Marjolaine; Barbeyron, Tristan; Martin, Renee; Portetelle, Daniel; Michel, Gurvan; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria degrading algal polysaccharides are key players in the global carbon cycle and in algal biomass recycling. Yet the water column, which has been studied largely by metagenomic approaches, is poor in such bacteria and their algal-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. Even more surprisingly, the few published studies on seaweed-associated microbiomes have revealed low abundances of such bacteria and their specific enzymes. However, as macroalgal cell-wall polysaccharides do not accumulate in nature, these bacteria and their unique polysaccharidases must not be that uncommon. We, therefore, looked at the polysaccharide-degrading activity of the cultivable bacterial subpopulation associated with Ascophyllum nodosum. From A. nodosum triplicates, 324 bacteria were isolated and taxonomically identified. Out of these isolates, 78 (~25%) were found to act on at least one tested algal polysaccharide (agar, ι- or κ-carrageenan, or alginate). The isolates “active” on algal-polysaccharides belong to 11 genera: Cellulophaga, Maribacter, Algibacter, and Zobellia in the class Flavobacteriia (41) and Pseudoalteromonas, Vibrio, Cobetia, Shewanella, Colwellia, Marinomonas, and Paraglaceciola in the class Gammaproteobacteria (37). A major part represents likely novel species. Different proportions of bacterial phyla and classes were observed between the isolated cultivable subpopulation and the total microbial community previously identified on other brown algae. Here, Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria were found to be the most abundant and some phyla (as Planctomycetes and Cyanobacteria) frequently encountered on brown algae weren't identified. At a lower taxonomic level, twelve genera, well-known to be associated with algae (with the exception for Colwellia), were consistently found on all three A. nosodum samples. Even more interesting, 9 of the 11 above mentioned genera containing polysaccharolytic isolates were predominant in this common core. The cultivable

  14. Fungi, β-glucan, and bacteria in nasal lavage of greenhouse workers and their relation to occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Tendal, Kira; Thilsing, Trine; Frederiksen, Margit W; Baelum, Jesper; Hansen, Jørgen V

    2013-10-01

    The nose and mouth are the first regions of the respiratory tract in contact with airborne microorganisms. Occupational exposures to airborne microorganisms are associated with inflammation and different symptoms of the airways. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relation between occupational exposure to fungi, β-glucan, and bacteria and contents of fungi, β-glucan, and bacteria in nasal lavage (NAL) of greenhouse workers. We also studied whether contents of microorganisms in NAL were related to gender, time of the work week, and runny nose. NAL samples (n = 135) were taken Monday morning and Thursday at noon and personal exposure to inhalable bioaerosols was measured during a working day. The content of fungi and β-glucan in NAL of men was affected by their exposure to fungi and β-glucan. The content of fungi, β-glucan, and bacteria in NAL was higher Thursday at noon than Monday morning. The ratios of fungi in NAL between Thursday at noon and Monday morning were 14 (median value) for men and 3.5 for women. Gender had no effect on the exposure level but had a significant effect on the content of fungi, β-glucan, and bacteria in NAL, with the highest contents in NAL of men. On Thursdays, the median content of fungi in NAL samples of men without runny noses was 9408 cfu per NAL sample, whereas the same content for women was 595 cfu per NAL sample. Workers with runny noses had fewer fungi in NAL than workers without runny noses. A higher content of β-glucan per fungal spore was found in NAL than in the air. This indicates that mainly the larger fungal spores or pollen grains deposit in the nose. The difference between genders and the fact that the content of fungi in NAL was significantly affected by the exposure indicate that the two genders are affected by the same exposure level differently.

  15. Larval settlement of the common Australian sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma in response to bacteria from the surface of coralline algae.

    PubMed

    Huggett, Megan J; Williamson, Jane E; de Nys, Rocky; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Steinberg, Peter D

    2006-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are increasingly seen as important for the successful settlement of marine invertebrate larvae. Here we tested the effects of biofilms on settlement of the sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma. Larvae settled on many surfaces including various algal species, rocks, sand and shells. Settlement was reduced by autoclaving rocks and algae, and by treatment of algae with antibiotics. These results, and molecular and culture-based analyses, suggested that the bacterial community on plants was important for settlement. To test this, approximately 250 strains of bacteria were isolated from coralline algae, and larvae were exposed to single-strain biofilms. Many induced rates of settlement comparable to coralline algae. The genus Pseudoalteromonas dominated these highly inductive strains, with representatives from Vibrio, Shewanella, Photobacterium and Pseudomonas also responsible for a high settlement response. The settlement response to different bacteria was species specific, as low inducers were also dominated by species in the genera Pseudoalteromonas and Vibrio. We also, for the first time, assessed settlement of larvae in response to characterised, monospecific biofilms in the field. Larvae metamorphosed in higher numbers on an inducing biofilm, Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea, than on either a low-inducing biofilm, Pseudoalteromonas rubra, or an unfilmed control. We conclude that the bacterial community on the surface of coralline algae is important as a settlement cue for H. erythrogramma larvae. This study is also an example of the emerging integration of molecular microbiology and more traditional marine eukaryote ecology.

  16. Soil moisture and pH control relative contributions of fungi and bacteria to N2O production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaihai; Mothapo, Nape V; Shi, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Fungal N(2)O production has been progressively recognized, but its controlling factors remain unclear. This study examined the impacts of soil moisture and pH on fungal and bacterial N(2)O production in two ecosystems, conventional farming and plantation forestry. Four treatments, antibiotic-free soil and soil amended with streptomycin, cycloheximide, or both were used to determine N(2)O production of fungi versus bacteria. Soil moisture and pH effects were assessed under 65-90 % water-filled pore space (WFPS) and pH 4.0-9.0, respectively. Irrespective of antibiotic treatments, soil N(2)O fluxes peaked at 85-90 % WFPS and pH 7.0 or 8.0, indicating that both fungi and bacteria preferred more anoxic and neutral or slightly alkaline conditions in producing N(2)O. However, compared with bacteria, fungi contributed more to N(2)O production under sub-anoxic and acidic conditions. Real-time polymerase chain reaction of 16S, ITS rDNA, and denitrifying genes for quantifications of bacteria, fungi, and denitrifying bacteria, respectively, showed that fungi were more abundant at acidic pH, whereas total and denitrifying bacteria favored neutral conditions. Such variations in the abundance appeared to be related to the pH effects on the relative fungal and bacterial contribution to N(2)O production.

  17. Characterization of aerosolized bacteria and fungi from desert dust events in Mali, West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, C.A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Garrison, V.H.; Peak, K.K.; Royall, N.; Smith, R.R.; Shinn, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Millions of metric tons of African desert dust blow across the Atlantic Ocean each year, blanketing the Caribbean and southeastern United States. Previous work in the Caribbean has shown that atmospheric samples collected during dust events contain living microbes, including plant and opportunistic human pathogens. To better understand the potential downwind public health and ecosystem effects of the dust microbes, it is important to characterize the source population. We describe 19 genera of bacteria and 3 genera of fungi isolated from air samples collected in Mali, a known source region for dust storms, and over which large dust storms travel.

  18. Shaping the oral mycobiota: interactions of opportunistic fungi with oral bacteria and the host.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A

    2015-08-01

    The oral mycobiota is an important component of the oral microbiota that has only recently received increased attention. The diversity and complexity of the oral mycobiota in healthy humans is greater than any other body site. Dysbiotic imbalance of indigenous fungal communities in immunosuppressed hosts has been proposed to lead to oropharyngeal fungal infections. As in other body sites, to survive and thrive in the oral cavity fungi have to maintain mutually beneficial relationships with the resident bacterial microbiota and the host. Here we review our current understanding of the composition of the oral mycobiota and how it may be influenced by oral commensal bacteria and the host environment.

  19. Isolation and identification of soil bacteria growing at the expense of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, Julie; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2011-04-01

    Soil-microorganism symbioses are of fundamental importance for plant adaptation to the environment. Research in microbial ecology has revealed that some soil bacteria are associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). However, these interactions may be much more complex than originally thought. To assess the type of bacteria associated with AMF, we initially isolated spores of Glomus irregulare from an Agrostis stolonifera rhizosphere. The spores were washed with sterile water and plated onto G. irregulare mycelium growing in vitro in a root-free compartment of bicompartmented Petri dishes. We hypothesized that this system should select for bacteria closely associated with the fungus because the only nutrients available to the bacteria were those derived from the hyphae. Twenty-nine bacterial colonies growing on the AMF hyphae were subcultured and identified using 16S rRNA gene sequences. All bacterial isolates showed high sequence identity to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus simplex, Kocuria rhizophila, Microbacterium ginsengisoli, Sphingomonas sp. and Variovorax paradoxus. We also assessed bacterial diversity on the surface of spores by PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis. Finally, we used live cellular imaging to show that the bacteria isolated can grow on the surface of hyphae with different growing patterns in contrast to Escherichia coli as a control.

  20. Melting glacier impacts community structure of Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi in a Chilean Patagonia fjord.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Marcelo H; Galand, Pierre E; Moffat, Carlos; Pantoja, Silvio

    2015-10-01

    Jorge Montt glacier, located in the Patagonian Ice Fields, has undergone an unprecedented retreat during the past century. To study the impact of the meltwater discharge on the microbial community of the downstream fjord, we targeted Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi communities during austral autumn and winter. Our results showed a singular microbial community present in cold and low salinity surface waters during autumn, when a thicker meltwater layer was observed. Meltwater bacterial sequences were related to Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteriodetes previously identified in freshwater and cold ecosystems, suggesting the occurrence of microorganisms adapted to live in the extreme conditions of meltwater. For Fungi, representative sequences related to terrestrial and airborne fungal taxa indicated transport of allochthonous Fungi by the meltwater discharge. In contrast, bottom fjord waters from autumn and winter showed representative Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) related to sequences of marine microorganisms, which is consistent with current models of fjord circulation. We conclude that meltwater can significantly modify the structure of microbial communities and support the development of a major fraction of microorganisms in surface waters of Patagonian fjords.

  1. Ecotoxic heavy metals transformation by bacteria and fungi in aquatic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Amiy Dutt; Pal, Dharm; Penta, Santhosh; Kumar, Awanish

    2015-10-01

    Water is the most important and vital molecule of our planet and covers 75% of earth surface. But it is getting polluted due to high industrial growth. The heavy metals produced by industrial activities are recurrently added to it and considered as dangerous pollutants. Increasing concentration of toxic heavy metals (Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+)) in water is a severe threat for human. Heavy metal contaminated water is highly carcinogenic and poisonous at even relatively low concentrations. When they discharged in water bodies, they dissolve in the water and are distributed in the food chain. Bacteria and fungi are efficient microbes that frequently transform heavy metals and remove toxicity. The application of bacteria and fungi may offer cost benefit in water treatment plants for heavy metal transformation and directly related to public health and environmental safety issues. The heavy metals transformation rate in water is also dependent on the enzymatic capability of microorganisms. By transforming toxic heavy metals microbes sustain aquatic and terrestrial life. Therefore the application of microbiological biomass for heavy metal transformation and removal from aquatic ecosystem is highly significant and striking. This paper reviews the microbial transformation of heavy metal, microbe metal interaction and different approaches for microbial heavy metal remediation from water bodies.

  2. Interaction of Rhizosphere Bacteria, Fertilizer, and Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi with Sea Oats †

    PubMed Central

    Will, M. E.; Sylvia, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    Plants must be established quickly on replenished beaches in order to stabilize the sand and begin the dune-building process. The objective of this research was to determine whether inoculation of sea oats (Uniola paniculata L.) with bacteria (indigenous rhizosphere bacteria and N2 fixers) alone or in combination with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi would enhance plant growth in beach sand. At two fertilizer-N levels, Klebsiella pneumoniae and two Azospirillum spp. did not provide the plants with fixed atmospheric N; however, K. pneumoniae increased root and shoot growth. When a sparingly soluble P source (CaHPO4) was added to two sands, K. pneumoniae increased plant growth in sand with a high P content. The phosphorus content of shoots was not affected by bacterial inoculation, indicating that a mechanism other than bacterially enhanced P availability to plants was responsible for the growth increases. When sea oats were inoculated with either K. pneumoniae or Acaligenes denitrificans and a mixed Glomus inoculum, there was no consistent evidence of a synergistic effect on plant growth. Nonetheless, bacterial inoculation increased root colonization by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi when the fungal inoculum consisted of colonized roots but had no effect on colonization when the inoculum consisted of spores alone. K. pneumoniae was found to increase spore germination and hyphal growth of Glomus deserticola compared with the control. The use of bacterial inoculants to enhance establishment of pioneer dune plants warrants further study. PMID:16348236

  3. Continental-scale distributions of dust-associated bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Barberán, Albert; Ladau, Joshua; Leff, Jonathan W; Pollard, Katherine S; Menninger, Holly L; Dunn, Robert R; Fierer, Noah

    2015-05-05

    It has been known for centuries that microorganisms are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, where they are capable of long-distance dispersal. Likewise, it is well-established that these airborne bacteria and fungi can have myriad effects on human health, as well as the health of plants and livestock. However, we have a limited understanding of how these airborne communities vary across different geographic regions or the factors that structure the geographic patterns of near-surface microbes across large spatial scales. We collected dust samples from the external surfaces of ∼1,200 households located across the United States to understand the continental-scale distributions of bacteria and fungi in the near-surface atmosphere. The microbial communities were highly variable in composition across the United States, but the geographic patterns could be explained by climatic and soil variables, with coastal regions of the United States sharing similar airborne microbial communities. Although people living in more urbanized areas were not found to be exposed to distinct outdoor air microbial communities compared with those living in more rural areas, our results do suggest that urbanization leads to homogenization of the airborne microbiota, with more urban communities exhibiting less continental-scale geographic variability than more rural areas. These results provide our first insight into the continental-scale distributions of airborne microbes, which is information that could be used to identify likely associations between microbial exposures in outdoor air and incidences of disease in crops, livestock, and humans.

  4. Novel diesel-oil-degrading bacteria and fungi from the Ecuadorian Amazon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Maddela, N R; Masabanda, M; Leiva-Mora, M

    2015-01-01

    Isolating new diesel-oil-degrading microorganisms from crude-oil contaminated sites and evaluating their degradation capacities are vitally important in the remediation of oil-polluted environments and crude-oil exploitation. In this research, new hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and fungi were isolated from the crude-oil contaminated soil of the oil-fields in the Amazon rainforest of north-east Ecuador by using a soil enrichment technique. Degradation analysis was tracked by gas chromatography and a flame ionization detector. Under laboratory conditions, maximum degradability of the total n-alkanes reached up to 77.34 and 62.62 removal ratios after 30 days of incubation for the evaporated diesel oil by fungi (isolate-1) and bacteria (isolate-1), respectively. The 16S/18S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that the microorganisms were most closely (99-100%) related to Bacillus cereus (isolate-1), Bacillus thuringiensis (isolate-2), Geomyces pannorum (isolate-1), and Geomyces sp. (isolate-2). Therefore, these strains enable the degradation of hydrocarbons as the sole carbon source, and these findings will benefit these strains in the remediation of oil-polluted environments and oil exploitation.

  5. Bacteria and fungi can contribute to nutrients bioavailability and aggregate formation in degraded soils.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Shahzad, Tanvir; Almeelbi, Talal; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Intensive agricultural practices and cultivation of exhaustive crops has deteriorated soil fertility and its quality in agroecosystems. According to an estimate, such practices will convert 30% of the total world cultivated soil into degraded land by 2020. Soil structure and fertility loss are one of the main causes of soil degradation. They are also considered as a major threat to crop production and food security for future generations. Implementing safe and environmental friendly technology would be viable solution for achieving sustainable restoration of degraded soils. Bacterial and fungal inocula have a potential to reinstate the fertility of degraded land through various processes. These microorganisms increase the nutrient bioavailability through nitrogen fixation and mobilization of key nutrients (phosphorus, potassium and iron) to the crop plants while remediate soil structure by improving its aggregation and stability. Success rate of such inocula under field conditions depends on their antagonistic or synergistic interaction with indigenous microbes or their inoculation with organic fertilizers. Co-inoculation of bacteria and fungi with or without organic fertilizer are more beneficial for reinstating the soil fertility and organic matter content than single inoculum. Such factors are of great importance when considering bacteria and fungi inocula for restoration of degraded soils. The overview of presented mechanisms and interactions will help agriculturists in planning sustainable management strategy for reinstating the fertility of degraded soil and assist them in reducing the negative impact of artificial fertilizers on our environment.

  6. Network Analysis Reveals Ecological Links between N-Fixing Bacteria and Wood-Decaying Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Björn; Kahl, Tiemo; Karasch, Peter; Wubet, Tesfaye; Bauhus, Jürgen; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen availability in dead wood is highly restricted and associations with N-fixing bacteria are thought to enable wood-decaying fungi to meet their nitrogen requirements for vegetative and generative growth. We assessed the diversity of nifH (dinitrogenase reductase) genes in dead wood of the common temperate tree species Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies from differently managed forest plots in Germany using molecular tools. By incorporating these genes into a large compilation of published nifH sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analyses of deduced proteins we verified the presence of diverse pools corresponding to functional nifH, almost all of which are new to science. The distribution of nifH genes strongly correlated with tree species and decay class, but not with forest management, while higher fungal fructification was correlated with decreasing nitrogen content of the dead wood and positively correlated with nifH diversity, especially during the intermediate stage of wood decay. Network analyses based on non-random species co-occurrence patterns revealed interactions among fungi and N-fixing bacteria in the dead wood and strongly indicate the occurrence of at least commensal relationships between these taxa. PMID:24505405

  7. Network analysis reveals ecological links between N-fixing bacteria and wood-decaying fungi.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Björn; Kahl, Tiemo; Karasch, Peter; Wubet, Tesfaye; Bauhus, Jürgen; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen availability in dead wood is highly restricted and associations with N-fixing bacteria are thought to enable wood-decaying fungi to meet their nitrogen requirements for vegetative and generative growth. We assessed the diversity of nifH (dinitrogenase reductase) genes in dead wood of the common temperate tree species Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies from differently managed forest plots in Germany using molecular tools. By incorporating these genes into a large compilation of published nifH sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analyses of deduced proteins we verified the presence of diverse pools corresponding to functional nifH, almost all of which are new to science. The distribution of nifH genes strongly correlated with tree species and decay class, but not with forest management, while higher fungal fructification was correlated with decreasing nitrogen content of the dead wood and positively correlated with nifH diversity, especially during the intermediate stage of wood decay. Network analyses based on non-random species co-occurrence patterns revealed interactions among fungi and N-fixing bacteria in the dead wood and strongly indicate the occurrence of at least commensal relationships between these taxa.

  8. Continental-scale distributions of dust-associated bacteria and fungi

    PubMed Central

    Barberán, Albert; Ladau, Joshua; Pollard, Katherine S.; Menninger, Holly L.; Dunn, Robert R.; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    It has been known for centuries that microorganisms are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, where they are capable of long-distance dispersal. Likewise, it is well-established that these airborne bacteria and fungi can have myriad effects on human health, as well as the health of plants and livestock. However, we have a limited understanding of how these airborne communities vary across different geographic regions or the factors that structure the geographic patterns of near-surface microbes across large spatial scales. We collected dust samples from the external surfaces of ∼1,200 households located across the United States to understand the continental-scale distributions of bacteria and fungi in the near-surface atmosphere. The microbial communities were highly variable in composition across the United States, but the geographic patterns could be explained by climatic and soil variables, with coastal regions of the United States sharing similar airborne microbial communities. Although people living in more urbanized areas were not found to be exposed to distinct outdoor air microbial communities compared with those living in more rural areas, our results do suggest that urbanization leads to homogenization of the airborne microbiota, with more urban communities exhibiting less continental-scale geographic variability than more rural areas. These results provide our first insight into the continental-scale distributions of airborne microbes, which is information that could be used to identify likely associations between microbial exposures in outdoor air and incidences of disease in crops, livestock, and humans. PMID:25902536

  9. Fungi, bacteria and soil pH: the oxalate-carbonate pathway as a model for metabolic interaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gaëtan; Guggiari, Matteo; Bravo, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Cailleau, Guillaume; Aragno, Michel; Job, Daniel; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2012-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway involves the oxidation of calcium oxalate to low-magnesium calcite and represents a potential long-term terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO(2). In this pathway, bacterial oxalate degradation is associated with a strong local alkalinization and subsequent carbonate precipitation. In order to test whether this process occurs in soil, the role of bacteria, fungi and calcium oxalate amendments was studied using microcosms. In a model system with sterile soil amended with laboratory cultures of oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi, the addition of calcium oxalate induced a distinct pH shift and led to the final precipitation of calcite. However, the simultaneous presence of bacteria and fungi was essential to drive this pH shift. Growth of both oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi was confirmed by qPCR on the frc (oxalotrophic bacteria) and 16S rRNA genes, and the quantification of ergosterol (active fungal biomass) respectively. The experiment was replicated in microcosms with non-sterilized soil. In this case, the bacterial and fungal contribution to oxalate degradation was evaluated by treatments with specific biocides (cycloheximide and bronopol). Results showed that the autochthonous microflora oxidized calcium oxalate and induced a significant soil alkalinization. Moreover, data confirmed the results from the model soil showing that bacteria are essentially responsible for the pH shift, but require the presence of fungi for their oxalotrophic activity. The combined results highlight that the interaction between bacteria and fungi is essential to drive metabolic processes in complex environments such as soil.

  10. Immune defence mechanisms of triatomines against bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites.

    PubMed

    Flores-Villegas, A L; Salazar-Schettino, P M; Córdoba-Aguilar, A; Gutiérrez-Cabrera, A E; Rojas-Wastavino, G E; Bucio-Torres, M I; Cabrera-Bravo, M

    2015-10-01

    Triatomines are vectors that transmit the protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The aim of the current review is to provide a synthesis of the immune mechanisms of triatomines against bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites to provide clues for areas of further research including biological control. Regarding bacteria, the triatomine immune response includes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) such as defensins, lysozymes, attacins and cecropins, whose sites of synthesis are principally the fat body and haemocytes. These peptides are used against pathogenic bacteria (especially during ecdysis and feeding), and also attack symbiotic bacteria. In relation to viruses, Triatoma virus is the only one known to attack and kill triatomines. Although the immune response to this virus is unknown, we hypothesize that haemocytes, phenoloxidase (PO) and nitric oxide (NO) could be activated. Different fungal species have been described in a few triatomines and some immune components against these pathogens are PO and proPO. In relation to parasites, triatomines respond with AMPs, including PO, NO and lectin. In the case of T. cruzi this may be effective, but Trypanosoma rangeli seems to evade and suppress PO response. Although it is clear that three parasite-killing processes are used by triatomines - phagocytosis, nodule formation and encapsulation - the precise immune mechanisms of triatomines against invading agents, including trypanosomes, are as yet unknown. The signalling processes used in triatomine immune response are IMD, Toll and Jak-STAT. Based on the information compiled, we propose some lines of research that include strategic approaches of biological control.

  11. Characteristics of Fluorescence and Delayed Light Emission from Green Photosynthetic Bacteria and Algae

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Roderick K.

    1965-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria exhibit variations in the intensity of their fluorescence during illumination. The initial intensity of fluorescence, measured at the onset of illumination, has a spectrum in which the major pigment Chlorobium chlorophyll predominates. The minor pigment bacteriochlorophyll predominates in the spectrum of the time-varying part of the fluorescence. The spectrum of delayed light emission is identical to that of the time-varying fluorescence. The variations in fluorescence also resemble the delayed light in their kinetics and in their dependence on exciting light intensity. Similar results are obtained for the kinetics of prompt and delayed light emission in the algae Chlorella and Anacystis. These findings raise the possibility that the variations in fluorescence actually represent a fast component of delayed light emission, of intensity comparable to the intensity of fluorescence. In Anacystis there is an outburst of light emission that develops after the exciting light has been turned off, reaching a maximum intensity after 1 to 3 seconds. This emitted light has the spectrum of chlorophyll fluorescence. It appears to be a novel example of bioluminescence with singlet excited chlorophyll as the emitter. PMID:14324979

  12. Horizontal Gene Transfer of Phytochelatin Synthases from Bacteria to Extremophilic Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Sanna; Penacho, Vanessa; Puente-Sánchez, Fernando; Díaz, Silvia; Gonzalez-Pastor, José Eduardo; Aguilera, Angeles

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptomic sequencing together with bioinformatic analyses and an automated annotation process led us to identify novel phytochelatin synthase (PCS) genes from two extremophilic green algae (Chlamydomonas acidophila and Dunaliella acidophila). These genes are of intermediate length compared to known PCS genes from eukaryotes and PCS-like genes from prokaryotes. A detailed phylogenetic analysis gives new insight into the complicated evolutionary history of PCS genes and provides evidence for multiple horizontal gene transfer events from bacteria to eukaryotes within the gene family. A separate subgroup containing PCS-like genes within the PCS gene family is not supported since the PCS genes are monophyletic only when the PCS-like genes are included. The presence and functionality of the novel genes in the organisms were verified by genomic sequencing and qRT-PCR. Furthermore, the novel PCS gene in Chlamydomonas acidophila showed very strong induction by cadmium. Cloning and expression of the gene in Escherichia coli clearly improves its cadmium resistance. The gene in Dunaliella was not induced, most likely due to gene duplication.

  13. Synergistic Effect of Photosynthetic Bacteria and Isolated Bacteria in Their Antifungal Activities against Root Rot Fungi.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyi; Okunishi, Suguru; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kamei, Yuto; Dawwoda, Mahmoud A O; Santander-DE Leon, Sheila Mae S; Nuñal, Sharon Nonato; Maeda, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal bacteria (AB) in root rot fungus (RRF)-contaminated sweet potato farms were isolated, and seven strains were initially chosen as antagonistic candidates. An antagonistic test by using the mycelial disk placement method revealed that one AB strain by itself could inhibit the RRF growth. This AB strain was identified as Bacillus polyfermenticus based on phylogeny of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Two AB strains (Bacillus aerophilus) displayed high levels of antifungal activity when paired with photosynthetic bacterial strain A (a purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas faecalis). The results suggest the possible use of the isolates as agents for the biological control of the RRF infection of agricultural products in fields of cultivation.

  14. Characterization of tannase protein sequences of bacteria and fungi: an in silico study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amrita; Jana, Arijit; Pati, Bikash R; Mondal, Keshab C; Das Mohapatra, Pradeep K

    2012-04-01

    The tannase protein sequences of 149 bacteria and 36 fungi were retrieved from NCBI database. Among them only 77 bacterial and 31 fungal tannase sequences were taken which have different amino acid compositions. These sequences were analysed for different physical and chemical properties, superfamily search, multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction and motif finding to find out the functional motif and the evolutionary relationship among them. The superfamily search for these tannase exposed the occurrence of proline iminopeptidase-like, biotin biosynthesis protein BioH, O-acetyltransferase, carboxylesterase/thioesterase 1, carbon-carbon bond hydrolase, haloperoxidase, prolyl oligopeptidase, C-terminal domain and mycobacterial antigens families and alpha/beta hydrolase superfamily. Some bacterial and fungal sequence showed similarity with different families individually. The multiple sequence alignment of these tannase protein sequences showed conserved regions at different stretches with maximum homology from amino acid residues 389-469 and 482-523 which could be used for designing degenerate primers or probes specific for tannase producing bacterial and fungal species. Phylogenetic tree showed two different clusters; one has only bacteria and another have both fungi and bacteria showing some relationship between these different genera. Although in second cluster near about all fungal species were found together in a corner which indicates the sequence level similarity among fungal genera. The distributions of fourteen motifs analysis revealed Motif 1 with a signature amino acid sequence of 29 amino acids, i.e. GCSTGGREALKQAQRWPHDYDGIIANNPA, was uniformly observed in 83.3 % of studied tannase sequences representing its participation with the structure and enzymatic function.

  15. Altered Carbohydrates Allocation by Associated Bacteria-fungi Interactions in a Bark Beetle-microbe Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Lou, Qiaozhe; Wang, Bo; Xu, Letian; Cheng, Chihang; Lu, Min; Sun, Jianghua

    2016-02-03

    Insect-microbe interaction is a key area of research in multiplayer symbiosis, yet little is known about the role of microbe-microbe interactions in insect-microbe symbioses. The red turpentine beetle (RTB) has destroyed millions of healthy pines in China and forms context-dependent relationships with associated fungi. The adult-associated fungus Leptographium procerum have played key roles in RTB colonization. However, common fungal associates (L. procerum and Ophiostoma minus) with RTB larvae compete for carbohydrates. Here, we report that dominant bacteria associated with RTB larvae buffer the competition by inhibiting the growth and D-glucose consumption of O. minus. However, they didn't inhibit the growth of L. procerum and forced this fungus to consume D-pinitol before consuming D-glucose, even though D-glucose was available and a better carbon source not only for L. procerum but also for RTB larvae and associated bacteria. This suggests the most frequently isolated bacteria associated with RTB larvae could affect fungal growth and the sequence of carbohydrate consumption. Thus, this regulates carbohydrate allocation in the RTB larva-microbe community, which may in turn benefit RTB larvae development. We also discuss the mechanism of carbohydrate allocation in the RTB larva-microbe community, and its potential contribution to the maintenance of a symbiotic community.

  16. Altered Carbohydrates Allocation by Associated Bacteria-fungi Interactions in a Bark Beetle-microbe Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Lou, Qiaozhe; Wang, Bo; Xu, Letian; Cheng, Chihang; Lu, Min; Sun, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Insect-microbe interaction is a key area of research in multiplayer symbiosis, yet little is known about the role of microbe-microbe interactions in insect-microbe symbioses. The red turpentine beetle (RTB) has destroyed millions of healthy pines in China and forms context-dependent relationships with associated fungi. The adult-associated fungus Leptographium procerum have played key roles in RTB colonization. However, common fungal associates (L. procerum and Ophiostoma minus) with RTB larvae compete for carbohydrates. Here, we report that dominant bacteria associated with RTB larvae buffer the competition by inhibiting the growth and D-glucose consumption of O. minus. However, they didn’t inhibit the growth of L. procerum and forced this fungus to consume D-pinitol before consuming D-glucose, even though D-glucose was available and a better carbon source not only for L. procerum but also for RTB larvae and associated bacteria. This suggests the most frequently isolated bacteria associated with RTB larvae could affect fungal growth and the sequence of carbohydrate consumption. Thus, this regulates carbohydrate allocation in the RTB larva-microbe community, which may in turn benefit RTB larvae development. We also discuss the mechanism of carbohydrate allocation in the RTB larva-microbe community, and its potential contribution to the maintenance of a symbiotic community. PMID:26839264

  17. RNA shotgun metagenomic sequencing of northern California (USA) mosquitoes uncovers viruses, bacteria, and fungi.

    PubMed

    Chandler, James Angus; Liu, Rachel M; Bennett, Shannon N

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes, most often recognized for the microbial agents of disease they may carry, harbor diverse microbial communities that include viruses, bacteria, and fungi, collectively called the microbiota. The composition of the microbiota can directly and indirectly affect disease transmission through microbial interactions that could be revealed by its characterization in natural populations of mosquitoes. Furthermore, the use of shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) approaches could allow the discovery of unknown members of the microbiota. In this study, we use RNA SMS to characterize the microbiota of seven individual mosquitoes (species include Culex pipiens, Culiseta incidens, and Ochlerotatus sierrensis) collected from a variety of habitats in California, USA. Sequencing was performed on the Illumina HiSeq platform and the resulting sequences were quality-checked and assembled into contigs using the A5 pipeline. Sequences related to single stranded RNA viruses of the Bunyaviridae and Rhabdoviridae were uncovered, along with an unclassified genus of double-stranded RNA viruses. Phylogenetic analysis finds that in all three cases, the closest relatives of the identified viral sequences are other mosquito-associated viruses, suggesting widespread host-group specificity among disparate viral taxa. Interestingly, we identified a Narnavirus of fungi, also reported elsewhere in mosquitoes, that potentially demonstrates a nested host-parasite association between virus, fungi, and mosquito. Sequences related to 8 bacterial families and 13 fungal families were found across the seven samples. Bacillus and Escherichia/Shigella were identified in all samples and Wolbachia was identified in all Cx. pipiens samples, while no single fungal genus was found in more than two samples. This study exemplifies the utility of RNA SMS in the characterization of the natural microbiota of mosquitoes and, in particular, the value of identifying all microbes associated with a specific host.

  18. RNA shotgun metagenomic sequencing of northern California (USA) mosquitoes uncovers viruses, bacteria, and fungi

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, James Angus; Liu, Rachel M.; Bennett, Shannon N.

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes, most often recognized for the microbial agents of disease they may carry, harbor diverse microbial communities that include viruses, bacteria, and fungi, collectively called the microbiota. The composition of the microbiota can directly and indirectly affect disease transmission through microbial interactions that could be revealed by its characterization in natural populations of mosquitoes. Furthermore, the use of shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) approaches could allow the discovery of unknown members of the microbiota. In this study, we use RNA SMS to characterize the microbiota of seven individual mosquitoes (species include Culex pipiens, Culiseta incidens, and Ochlerotatus sierrensis) collected from a variety of habitats in California, USA. Sequencing was performed on the Illumina HiSeq platform and the resulting sequences were quality-checked and assembled into contigs using the A5 pipeline. Sequences related to single stranded RNA viruses of the Bunyaviridae and Rhabdoviridae were uncovered, along with an unclassified genus of double-stranded RNA viruses. Phylogenetic analysis finds that in all three cases, the closest relatives of the identified viral sequences are other mosquito-associated viruses, suggesting widespread host-group specificity among disparate viral taxa. Interestingly, we identified a Narnavirus of fungi, also reported elsewhere in mosquitoes, that potentially demonstrates a nested host-parasite association between virus, fungi, and mosquito. Sequences related to 8 bacterial families and 13 fungal families were found across the seven samples. Bacillus and Escherichia/Shigella were identified in all samples and Wolbachia was identified in all Cx. pipiens samples, while no single fungal genus was found in more than two samples. This study exemplifies the utility of RNA SMS in the characterization of the natural microbiota of mosquitoes and, in particular, the value of identifying all microbes associated with a specific host

  19. TRFLP analysis reveals that fungi rather than bacteria are associated with premature yeast flocculation in brewing.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Mandeep; Bowman, John P; Stewart, Doug C; Sheehy, Megan; Janusz, Agnieszka; Speers, R Alex; Koutoulis, Anthony; Evans, David E

    2012-12-01

    Premature yeast flocculation (PYF) is a sporadic fermentation problem in the brewing industry that results in incomplete yeast utilization of fermentable sugars in wort. Culture-independent, PCR-based fingerprinting techniques were applied in this study to identify the associations between the occurrence of the PYF problem during brewery fermentation with barley malt-associated microbial communities (both bacteria and fungi). Striking differences in the microbial DNA fingerprint patterns for fungi between PYF positive (PYF +ve) and negative (PYF -ve) barley malts were observed using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) technique. The presence of terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) of 360-460 bp size range, for fungal HaeIII restriction enzyme-derived TRFLP profiles appeared to vary substantially between PYF +ve and PYF -ve samples. The source of the barley malt did not influence the fungal taxa implicated in PYF. TRFLP analysis indicates bacterial taxa are unlikely to be important in causing PYF. Virtual digestion of fungal sequences tentatively linked HaeIII TRFs in the 360-460 bp size range to a diverse range of yeast/yeast-like species. Findings from this study suggest that direct monitoring of barley malt samples using molecular methods could potentially be an efficient and viable alternative for monitoring PYF during brewery fermentations.

  20. The immune response after stimulation with wall components of gram-positive bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Tsigou, Evdoxia; Aloizos, Stavros; Stavros, Aloizos; Myrianthefs, Pavlos; Pavlos, Myrianthefs; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Stavros, Gourgiotis; Tsakris, Athanassios; Athanassios, Tsakris; Baltopoulos, George; George, Baltopoulos

    2014-01-01

    Although several components of the microbial wall of gram-positive bacteria and fungi possess immunostimulatory properties, their pathogenetic role remains incompletely evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the basic immune status of patients susceptible to infections and their capability for cytokine production after stimulation with wall components of gram-positive bacteria and fungi. We measured serum cytokine levels as well as cytokine production after ex vivo lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and mannan stimulation of whole blood. The blood was taken from 10 healthy volunteers, 10 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), 10 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and 10 patients on their 2nd day of stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), who suffered from non septic systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and had an APACHE II score ≥25. We used 1 μg/ml LTA and 100 μg/ml mannan for an incubation period of 8 h to stimulate 100 μl aliquots of whole blood. All patient groups had higher baseline values of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10 compared to the control group, but only for ICU patients the difference was statistically significant. The ratio IL-10/IL-6 was found 0.33, 0.22, and 0.96 in healthy persons, ESRD, and DM patients respectively, and 1.32 in ICU patients. In all examined groups, the levels of cytokines significantly increased after stimulation by LTA and mannan, although in severely ill patients this change was considerably smaller, possibly reflecting a state of monocytes' depression and relative hyporesponsiveness. No significant differences between the LTA and the mannan stimulation were observed.

  1. Community structure of bacteria and fungi in aerosols of a pig confinement building.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Anja; Saunders, Aaron M; Hansen, Aviaja A; Nielsen, Per H; Nielsen, Jeppe L

    2012-05-01

    Modern intensive husbandry practices can create poor indoor air quality, with high levels of airborne dust, endotoxins, ammonia, and microorganisms. Air in a sow breeding barn was investigated to determine the biomass composition of bioaerosols using molecular methods supplemented with microscopic and cultivation-dependent approaches. A total of 2.7 ± 0.7 × 10(7)  bacterial cells m(-3) air and 1.2 ± 0.3 × 10(6)  fungi spores m(-3) were detected, corresponding to the fungal biovolume constituted 98% of the total microbial biovolume (fungal and bacterial). Fifty-two percent of all 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl indole-stained cells were detectable with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a general bacterial probe mixture. Quantitative FISH of the bacterial consortium revealed Firmicutes as the dominant group with Streptococcus as the major genus, while Actinobacteria constituted 10% of the detectable bacteria. Additionally, the study revealed an abundant and diverse fungal community including species not previously found in similar environments. The most abundant fungal 18S rRNA gene clone sequences identified affiliated with the Aspergillus-Eurotium cluster, but among others, species of Wallemia, Mucorales, and Russulales were detected. For both fungi and anaerobic bacteria, a hitherto undescribed diversity was found in bioaerosols from a modern sow breeding barn, which potentially could create poor indoor air quality, although their effect on the health of farmworkers and stock still is not resolved.

  2. Case study of the relationship between fungi and bacteria associated with high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuozhi; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo

    2012-05-01

    Although bacteria play dominant roles in microbial bioremediation, few of them have been reported that were capable of utilizing high-molecular-weight (HMW) organic pollutants as their sole sources of carbon and energy. However, many soil fungi can metabolize those of pollutants, although they rarely complete mineralization. In this paper, we investigated the dynamic relationship between fungi and bacteria associated with degradation of HMW-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Artificial fungal-bacterial mixed cultures were constructed to simulate the environment of actual polluted sites. Four bacterial strains and seven fungal strains were isolated that related to the removal of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene in the soil. Furthermore, these strains were used to create mixed culture of bacteria (Bact-mix), mixed culture of fungi (Fung-mix), fungal-bacterial co-cultures (Fung-Bact), respectively. The maximal pyrene removal rate (67%, 28days) was observed in the Fung-Bact, compared with cultures of Fung-mix (39%) and Bact-mix (56%). The same tendency was also indicated in the degradation of phenanthrene and fluoranthene. In addition, a dynamic relationship during the degradation process between fungi and bacteria was monitored through using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method.

  3. Rainforest Conversion to Rubber Plantation May Not Result in Lower Soil Diversity of Bacteria, Fungi, and Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Tripathi, Binu M; Dong, Ke; Go, Rusea; Adams, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Large areas of rainforest in Asia have been converted to plantations, with uncertain effects on soil biodiversity. Using standard metagenetic methods, we compared the soil biota of bacteria, fungi, and nematodes at three rainforest sites in Malaysia with two rubber plantation sites with similar soils and geology. We predicted the following: (1) that the rubber sites would have a lower α- and β-diversity than the rainforest sites, due to the monospecific canopy cover and intensive management with herbicides, pesticides, and fertilizers, and (2) that due to differences in the physical and biotic environment associated with cultivation, there would be distinct communities of bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. However, regarding (1), the results showed no consistent difference in α- and β-diversity of bacteria, fungi, or nematodes between rainforest and rubber plantation sites. It appears that conversion of rainforest to rubber plantations does not necessarily result in a decrease in diversity of soil biota. It may be that heterogeneity associated with the cultivation regimen compensates for loss of biotically imposed heterogeneity of the original rainforest. Regarding (2), as predicted there were statistically significant differences in community composition between rainforest and rubber plantation for bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. These differences could be related to a range of factors including light level, litter fall composition, pH, C and N, selecting a distinct set of soil taxa, and it is possible that this in itself would affect long-term soil function.

  4. Community analysis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and bacteria in the maize mycorrhizosphere in a long-term fertilization trial.

    PubMed

    Toljander, Jonas F; Santos-González, Juan C; Tehler, Anders; Finlay, Roger D

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of organic and mineral fertilizers on the community composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and bacteria in the mycorrhizosphere of maize in a field experiment established in 1956, in south-east Sweden. Roots and root-associated soil aggregates were sampled four times during the growing season in 2005, in control plots and in plots amended with calcium nitrate, ammonium sulphate, green manure, farmyard manure or sewage sludge. Fungi in roots were identified by cloning and sequencing, and bacteria in soil aggregates were analysed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, cloning and sequencing. The community composition of AM fungi and bacteria was significantly influenced by the different fertilizers. Changes in microbial community composition were mainly correlated with changes in pH induced by the fertilization regime. However, other factors, including phosphate and soil carbon content, also contributed significantly to these changes. Changes in bacterial community composition and a reduction in bacterial taxon richness throughout the growing season were also manifest. The results of this study highlight the importance and significant effects of the long-term application of different fertilizers on edaphic factors and specific groups of fungi and bacteria playing a key role in arable soils.

  5. Protection of the vehicle cab environment against bacteria, fungi and endotoxins in composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, O; Huyard, A; Rybacki, D; Do Quang, Z

    2012-06-01

    Microbial quality of air inside vehicle cabs is a major occupational health risk management issue in composting facilities. Large differences and discrepancies in protection factors between vehicles and between biological agents have been reported. This study aimed at estimating the mean protection efficiency of the vehicle cab environment against bioaerosols with higher precision. In-cab measurement results were also analysed to ascertain whether or not these protection systems reduce workers' exposure to tolerable levels. Five front-end loaders, one mobile mixer and two agricultural tractors pulling windrow turners were investigated. Four vehicles were fitted with a pressurisation and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration system. The four others were only equipped with pleated paper filter without pressurisation. Bacteria, fungi and endotoxins were measured in 72 pairs of air samples, simultaneously collected inside the cab and on the outside of the cab with a CIP 10-M sampler. A front-end loader, purchased a few weeks previously, fitted with a pressurisation and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration system, and with a clean cab, exhibited a mean protection efficiency of between 99.47% CI 95% [98.58-99.97%] and 99.91% [99.78-99.98%] depending on the biological agent. It is likely that the lower protection efficiency demonstrated in other vehicles was caused by penetration through the only moderately efficient filters, by the absence of pressurisation, by leakage in the filter-sealing system, and by re-suspension of particles which accumulated in dirty cabs. Mean protection efficiency in regards to bacteria and endotoxins ranged between 92.64% [81.87-97.89%] and 98.61% [97.41-99.38%], and between 92.68% [88.11-96.08%] and 98.43% [97.44-99.22%], respectively. The mean protection efficiency was the lowest when confronted with fungal spores, from 59.76% [4.19-90.75%] to 94.71% [91.07-97.37%]. The probability that in-cab exposure to fungi

  6. Triclosan causes toxic effects to algae in marine biofilms, but does not inhibit the metabolic activity of marine biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Johansson, C Henrik; Janmar, Lisa; Backhaus, Thomas

    2014-07-15

    Effects of the antimicrobial agent triclosan to natural periphyton communities (biofilms, comprising primarily microalgae and bacteria) were assessed in two independent experiments during spring and summer. For that purpose a semi-static test system was used in which periphyton was exposed to a concentration range of 5-9054 nmol/L triclosan. Effects on algae were analyzed as content and composition of photosynthetic pigments. The corresponding EC50 values were 39.25 and 302.45 nmol/L for the spring and summer experiment, respectively. Effects on periphytic bacteria were assessed as effects on carbon utilization patterns, using Biolog Ecoplates. No inhibition of either total carbon utilization or functional diversity was observed, indicating a pronounced triclosan tolerance of the marine bacteria. In contrast, a small stimulation of the total carbon utilization was observed at triclosan concentrations exceeding 100 nmol/L.

  7. The Antimicrobial Properties of Red Algae. The Fight of Your Life: Battling Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.; Warner, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research project in which a professor and a student collaborated in the screening of macroscopic algae for antimicrobial properties. Includes background information, materials and methods, results, and a discussion of the experiment. (SAH)

  8. Emission of bacteria and fungi in the air from wastewater treatment plants - a review.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    An increase in global population, coupled with intensive development of industry and agriculture, has resulted in the generation and accumulation of large amounts of waste around the world. The spread of pathogenic microorganisms, endotoxins, odours and dust particles in the air is an inevitable consequence of waste production and waste management. Thus, the risk of infections associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has become of a particular importance in recent decades. Sewage and unstable sludge contain various pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, and human and animal parasites. These microorganisms can be transmitted to the ambient air in wastewater droplets, which are generated during aeration or mechanical moving of the sewage. Bioaerosols generated during wastewater treatment may therefore pose a potential health hazard to workers of these plants or to habitants of their surroundings. The degree of human exposure to airborne bacteria, fungi, endotoxin and other allergens may vary significantly depending upon the type and the capacity of a plant, kind of the facilities, performed activities and meteorological conditions.

  9. Molecular identification of antagonistic bacteria from Tehran soils and evaluation of their inhibitory activities toward pathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbariyan, AR; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, M; Kalantari, S; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, M

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives To find antagonistic bacteria with potential antifungal activity against some pathogenic fungi, including Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, Fusarium moniliforme and Penicillium marneffei, a total of 148 agricultural soil samples from different sites of Tehran were examined. Materials and Methods Antagonistic soils were selected by screening against A. niger on glucose-yeast extract (GY) agar using a visual agar plate assay method. All growing bacteria were examined for antifungal activity, and antagonistic bacteria identified based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Among a total number of 97 bacteria isolated form inhibitory soils (36 samples), 16 bacteria were reported as strong growth inhibitors in co-cultures on GY agar with all tested fungi at variable degrees. Fungal growth inhibitory bacteria were cultured against all fungi and growth inhibition was measured and analyzed between test and control groups by statistical analysis (ANOVA). Results Molecular identification of antagonistic bacteria indicated that most bacterial isolates belonged to the genus Bacillus (81.25%), including B. subtilis (5 isolates), B. amyloliquefaciens (6 isolates) and B. valismortis (2 isolates), followed by one isolate (6.25%) from each Streptomyces sp., Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Acinetobacter baumannii. Based on the visual plate assay results, total fungal growth inhibition of all bacteria was reported in the range of 13.2 to 68.3%. P. chlororaphis S105 was reported as the most potent antagonistic bacterium which inhibited the growth of A. niger by 68.3%, followed by F. moniliforme (66.4%), A. flavus (64.7%) and P. marneffei (57.1%). Conclusion P. chlororaphis and some other inhibitory bacteria reported in the present study, they may be considered not only as a rich source of useful metabolites with potential application in antifungal drug discovery, but also as potential candidates for biological control programs. PMID:22347597

  10. Different forms of apolipophorin III in Galleria mellonella larvae challenged with bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Sowa-Jasiłek, Aneta; Stączek, Sylwia; Jakubowicz, Teresa; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2015-06-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), a lipid-binding protein and an insect homolog of human apolipoprotein E, plays an important role in lipid transport and immune response in insects. In the present study, we have demonstrated a correlation in time between changes in the apoLp-III abundance occurring in the hemolymph, hemocytes, and fat body after immunization of Galleria mellonella larvae with Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus, yeast Candida albicans, and a filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (IEF/SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting with anti-apoLp-III antibodies, the profile of apoLp-III forms in G. mellonella larvae challenged with the bacteria and fungi has been analyzed. Besides the major apoLp-III protein (pI=6.5), one and three additional apoLp-III forms differing in the pI value have been detected, respectively, in the hemolymph, hemocytes, and fat body of non-immunized insects. Also, evidence has been provided that particular apoLp-III-derived polypeptides appear after the immune challenge and are present mainly in the hemolymph and hemocytes. The time of their appearance and persistence in the hemolymph was dependent on the pathogen used. At least two of the apoLp-III forms detected in hemolymph bound to the microbial cell surface. The increasing number of hemolymph apoLp-III polypeptides and differences in their profiles observed in time after the challenge with different immunogens confirmed the important role of apoLp-III in discriminating between pathogens by the insect defense system and in antibacterial as well as antifungal immune response.

  11. [Infections of finger and toe nails due to fungi and bacteria].

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Paasch, U; Handrick, W

    2014-04-01

    Infections of the finger and the toe nails are most frequently caused by fungi, primarily dermatophytes. Causative agents of tinea unguium are mostly anthropophilic dermatophytes. Both in Germany, and worldwide, Trichophyton rubrum represents the main important causative agent of onychomycoses. Yeasts are isolated from fungal nail infections, both paronychia and onychomycosis far more often than generally expected. This can represent either saprophytic colonization as well as acute or chronic infection of the nail organ. The main yeasts causing nail infections are Candida parapsilosis, and Candida guilliermondii; Candida albicans is only in third place. Onychomycosis due to molds, or so called non-dermatophyte molds (NDM), are being increasingly detected. Molds as cause of an onychomycosis are considered as emerging pathogens. Fusarium species are the most common cause of NDM onychomycosis; however, rare molds like Onychocola canadensis may be found. Bacterial infections of the nails are caused by gram negative bacteria, usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa (recognizable because of green or black coloration of the nails) but also Klebsiella spp. and gram positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment of onychomycosis includes application of topical antifungal agents (amorolfine, ciclopirox). If more than 50 % of the nail plate is affected or if more than three out of ten nails are affected by the fungal infection, oral treatment using terbinafine (in case of dermatophyte infection), fluconazole (for yeast infections), or alternatively itraconazole are recommended. Bacterial infections are treated topically with antiseptic agents (octenidine), and in some cases with topical antibiotics (nadifloxacin, gentamicin). Pseudomonas infections of the nail organ are treated by ciprofloxacin; other bacteria are treated according to the results of culture and sensitivity testing.

  12. Anaerobic activities of bacteria and fungi in moderately acidic conifer and deciduous leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Reith, Frank; Drake, Harold L; Küsel, Kirsten

    2002-07-01

    Abstract The litter layer of forest soils harbors high amounts of labile organic matter, and anaerobic decomposition processes can be initiated when oxygen is consumed more rapidly than it is supplied by diffusion. In this study, two adjacent moderately acidic forest sites, a spruce and a beech-oak forest, were selected to compare the anaerobic bacterial and fungal activities and populations of conifer and deciduous leaf litter. Most probable number (MPN) estimates of general heterotrophic aerobes and anaerobes from conifer litter equaled those from deciduous leaf litter. H(2), ethanol, formate, and lactate were initially produced with similar rates in both anoxic conifer and deciduous leaf litter microcosms. These products were rapidly consumed in deciduous leaf but not in conifer litter microcosms. Supplemental ethanol and H(2) were consumed only by deciduous leaf litter and yielded additional amounts of acetate in stoichiometries indicative of ethanol- or H(2)-dependent acetogenesis. The negligible turnover of primary fermentation products in conifer litter might be due to the low numbers of acetogens and secondary fermenters present in conifer litter compared to deciduous leaf litter. Fungi capable of anaerobic growth made up only 0.01-0.1% of the total anaerobic microorganisms cultured from conifer and deciduous leaf litter, respectively. Metabolic product profiles obtained from the highest anoxic, growth-positive MPN dilutions supplemented with antibacterial agents indicated that the dominant population of fungi, apparently mainly yeast-like cells, produced H(2), ethanol, acetate, and lactate both in conifer and deciduous leaf litter. Thus, despite acidic conditions, bacteria appear to dominate in the decomposition of carbon in anoxic microsites of both conifer and deciduous leaf litter.

  13. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  14. Culture-independent characterization of bacteria and fungi in a poultry bioaerosol using pyrosequencing: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Nonnenmann, M W; Bextine, B; Dowd, S E; Gilmore, K; Levin, J L

    2010-12-01

    Work in animal production facilities often results in exposure to organic dusts. Previous studies have documented decreases in pulmonary function and lung inflammation among workers exposed to organic dust in the poultry industry. Bacteria and fungi have been reported as components of the organic dust produced in poultry facilities. To date, little is known about the diversity and concentration of bacteria and fungi inside poultry buildings. All previous investigations have utilized culture-based methods for analysis that identify only biota cultured on selected media. The bacterial tag-encoded flexible (FLX) amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) and fungal tag-encoded flexible (FLX) amplicon pyrosequencing (fTEFAP) are modern and comprehensive approaches for determining biodiversity of microorganisms and have not previously been used to provide characterization of exposure to microorganisms in an occupational environment. This article illustrates the potential application of this novel technique in occupational exposure assessment as well as other settings. An 8-hr area sample was collected using an Institute of Medicine inhalable sampler attached to a mannequin in a poultry confinement building. The sample was analyzed using bTEFAP and fTEFAP. Of the bacteria and fungi detected, 116 and 39 genera were identified, respectively. Among bacteria, Staphylococcus cohnii was present in the highest proportion (23%). The total inhalable bacteria concentration was estimated to be 7503 cells/m³. Among the fungi identified, Sagenomella sclerotialis was present in the highest proportion (37%). Aspergillus ochraceus and Penicillium janthinellum were also present in high proportions. The total inhalable fungi concentration was estimated to be 1810 cells/m³. These estimates are lower than what has been reported by others using standard epifluorescence microscope methods. However, no study has used non-culture-based techniques, such as bTEFAP and fTEFAP, to evaluate bacteria and

  15. Diagnostic value of PCR analysis of bacteria and fungi from blood in empiric-therapy-resistant febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akiko; Sugimoto, Yuka; Ohishi, Kohshi; Sugawara, Yumiko; Fujieda, Atsushi; Monma, Fumihiko; Suzuki, Kei; Masuya, Masahiro; Nakase, Kazunori; Matsushima, Yoshiko; Wada, Hideo; Katayama, Naoyuki; Nobori, Tsutomu

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the clinical utility of PCR for the analysis of bacteria and fungi from blood for the management of febrile neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. Using a PCR system able to detect a broad range of bacteria and fungi, we conducted a prospective pilot study of periodic analyses of blood from patients following intensive chemotherapy. When fever occurred, it was treated with empirical antibiotic therapy, basically without knowledge of the PCR results. In 23 febrile episodes during the neutropenic period, bacteria were detected by PCR in 11 cases, while the same species were identified by blood culture in 3 cases. In 10 out of 11 PCR-positive cases, fever could be managed by empirical therapy. In the empirical-therapy-resistant case, the identification of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia by PCR led to improvement of fever. No fungi were detected by PCR in febrile cases, while Aspergillus fumigatus was detected in one afebrile patient, several days before a clinical diagnosis was made. In subsequent sporadic PCR analyses in 15 cases of febrile neutropenia, bacteria were detected by both PCR and blood culture in 7 cases and by PCR alone in 6. Fungi were not detected. While fever was improved by empirical therapy in 12 out of the 13 PCR-positive cases, the identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by PCR in one therapy-resistant case contributed to the successful treatment of persistent fever. Our results indicate that PCR analysis of bacteria from blood provides essential information for managing empirical-therapy-resistant febrile neutropenia.

  16. Comparison of Light and Electron Microscopic Determinations of the Number of Bacteria and Algae in Lake Water

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Kerstin; Weibull, Claes; Cronberg, Gertrud

    1978-01-01

    Determinations of the number of microorganisms in lake water samples with the bright-field light microscope were performed using conventional counting chambers. Determinations with the fluorescence microscope were carried out after staining the organisms with acridine orange and filtering them onto Nuclepore filters. For transmission electron microscopy, a water sample was concentrated by centrifugation. The pellet was solidifed in agar, fixed, dehydrated, embedded in Epon, and cut into thin sections. The number and area of organism profiles per unit area of the sections were determined. The number of organisms per unit volume of the pellet was then calculated using stereological formulae. The corresponding number in the lake water was obtained from the ratio of volume of solidified pellet/volume of water sample. Control experiments with pure cultures of bacteria and algae showed good agreement between light and electron microscopic counts. This was also true for most lake water samples, but the electron microscopic preparations from some samples contained small vibrio-like bodies and ill-defined structures that made a precise comparison more difficult. Bacteria and small blue-green and green algae could not always be differentiated with the light microscope, but this was easily done by electron microscopy. Our results show that transmission electron microscopy can be used for checking light microscopic counts of microorganisms in lake water. Images PMID:16345279

  17. Network analysis reveals that bacteria and fungi form modules that correlate independently with soil parameters.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Richardson, Alan E; Toscas, Peter; Farrell, Mark; Macdonald, Lynne M; Baker, Geoff; Wark, Tim; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-08-01

    Network and multivariate statistical analyses were performed to determine interactions between bacterial and fungal community terminal restriction length polymorphisms as well as soil properties in paired woodland and pasture sites. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that shifts in woodland community composition correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon, while changes in pasture community composition correlated with moisture, nitrogen and phosphorus. Weighted correlation network analysis detected two distinct microbial modules per land use. Bacterial and fungal ribotypes did not group separately, rather all modules comprised of both bacterial and fungal ribotypes. Woodland modules had a similar fungal : bacterial ribotype ratio, while in the pasture, one module was fungal dominated. There was no correspondence between pasture and woodland modules in their ribotype composition. The modules had different relationships to soil variables, and these contrasts were not detected without the use of network analysis. This study demonstrated that fungi and bacteria, components of the soil microbial communities usually treated as separate functional groups as in a CCA approach, were co-correlated and formed distinct associations in these adjacent habitats. Understanding these distinct modular associations may shed more light on their niche space in the soil environment, and allow a more realistic description of soil microbial ecology and function.

  18. "Green preservatives": combating fungi in the food and feed industry by applying antifungal lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Agata M; Zannini, Emanuele; Coffey, Aidan; Arendt, Elke K

    2012-01-01

    Fungal food spoilage plays a pivotal role in the deterioration of food and feed systems and some of them are also able to produce toxic compounds for humans and animals. The mycotoxins produced by fungi can cause serious health hazards, including cancerogenic, immunotoxic, teratogenic, neurotoxic, nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic effects, and Kashin-Beck disease. In addition to this, fungal spoilage/pathogens are causing losses of marketable quality and hygiene of foodstuffs, resulting in major economic problem throughout the world. Nowadays, food spoilage can be prevented using physical and chemical methods, but no efficient strategy has been proposed so far to reduce the microbial growth ensuring public health. Therefore, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can play an important role as natural preservatives. The protection of food products using LAB is mainly due to the production of antifungal compounds such as carboxylic acids, fatty acids, ethanol, carbon dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, and bacteriocins. In addition to this, LAB can also positively contribute to the flavor, texture, and nutritional value of food products. This review mainly focuses on the use of LAB for food preservation given their extensive industrial application in a wide range of foods and feeds. The attention points out the several industrial patents concerning the use of antifungal LAB as biocontrol agent against spoilage organisms in different fermented foods and feeds.

  19. Contrasting primary successional trajectories of fungi and bacteria in retreating glacier soils.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shawn P; Jumpponen, Ari

    2014-02-01

    Early community assembly of soil microbial communities is essential for pedogenesis and development of organic legacies. We examined fungal and bacterial successions along a well-established temperate glacier forefront chronosequence representing ~70 years of deglaciation to determine community assembly. As microbial communities may be heavily structured by establishing vegetation, we included nonvegetated soils as well as soils from underneath four plant species with differing mycorrhizal ecologies (Abies lasiocarpa, ectomycorrhizal; Luetkea pectinata, arbuscular mycorrhizal; Phyllodoce empetriformis, ericoid mycorrhizal; Saxifraga ferruginea, nonmycorrhizal). Our main objectives were to contrast fungal and bacterial successional dynamics and community assembly as well as to decouple the effects of plant establishment and time since deglaciation on microbial trajectories using high-throughput sequencing. Our data indicate that distance from glacier terminus has large effects on biomass accumulation, community membership, and distribution for both fungi and bacteria. Surprisingly, presence of plants rather than their identity was more important in structuring bacterial communities along the chronosequence and played only a very minor role in structuring the fungal communities. Further, our analyses suggest that bacterial communities may converge during assembly supporting determinism, whereas fungal communities show no such patterns. Although fungal communities provided little evidence of convergence in community structure, many taxa were nonrandomly distributed across the glacier foreland; similar taxon-level responses were observed in bacterial communities. Overall, our data highlight differing drivers for fungal and bacterial trajectories during early primary succession in recently deglaciated soils.

  20. Manduca sexta gloverin binds microbial components and is active against bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Xia; Zhong, Xue; Yi, Hui-Yu; Yu, Xiao-Qiang

    2012-10-01

    Hyalophora gloveri gloverin is a glycine-rich and heat stable antimicrobial protein with activity mainly against Escherichia coli. However, Spodoptera exigua gloverin is active against a Gram-positive bacterium but inactive against E. coli. In this study, we investigated expression profile, binding ability and antimicrobial activity of Manduca sexta gloverin (MsGlv). Msglv transcript was detected in several tissues of naïve larvae with higher levels in the midgut and testis. Expression of Msglv mRNA in larvae was up-regulated by active Spätzle-C108 and peptidoglycans (PGs) of E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the activation was blocked by pre-injection of antibody to M. sexta Toll, suggesting that Msglv expression is regulated by the Toll-Spätzle pathway. Recombinant MsGlv bound to the O-specific antigen and outer core carbohydrate of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Gram-positive lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and PG, and laminarin, but not to E. coli PG or mannan. MsGlv was active against Bacillus cereus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Cryptococcus neoformans, but was almost inactive against E. coli and S. aureus. Our results suggest that gloverins are active against some bacteria and fungi.

  1. Toxicity of zinc to fungi, bacteria, and coliphages: influence of chloride ions.

    PubMed Central

    Babich, H; Stotzky, G

    1978-01-01

    A 10 mM concentration of Zn2+ decreased the survival of Escherichia coli; enhanced the survival of Bacillus cereus; did not significantly affect the survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Norcardia corallina, and T1, T7, P1, and phi80 coliphages; completely inhibited mycelial growth of Rhizoctonia solani; and reduced mycelial growth of Fusarium solani, Cunninghamella echinulata, Aspergillus niger, and Trichoderma viride. The toxicity of zinc to the fungi, bacteria, and coliphages was unaffected, lessened, or increased by the addition of high concentrations of NaCl. The increased toxicity of zinc in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl was not a result of a synergistic interaction between Zn2+ and elevated osmotic pressures but of the formation of complex anionic ZnCl species that exerted greater toxicities than did cationic Zn2+. Conversely, the decrease in zinc toxicity with increasing concentrations of NaCl probably reflected the decrease in the levels of Zn2+ due to the formation of Zn-Cl species, which was less inhibitory to these microbes than was Zn2+. A. niger tolerated higher concentrations of zinc in the presence of NaCl at 37 than at 25 degrees C. PMID:736544

  2. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and the productivity and structure of prairie grassland communities.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jonathan T; Kleczewski, Nathan M; Bever, James D; Clay, Keith; Reynolds, Heather L

    2012-12-01

    Due to their complementary roles in meeting plant nutritional needs, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (N(2)-fixers) may have synergistic effects on plant communities. Using greenhouse microcosms, we tested the effects of AMF, N(2)-fixers (symbiotic: rhizobia, and associative: Azospirillum brasilense), and their potential interactions on the productivity, diversity, and species composition of diverse tallgrass prairie communities and on the productivity of Panicum virgatum in monoculture. Our results demonstrate the importance of AMF and N(2)-fixers as drivers of plant community structure and function. In the communities, we found a positive effect of AMF on diversity and productivity, but a negative effect of N(2)-fixers on productivity. Both AMF and N(2)-fixers affected relative abundances of species. AMF shifted the communities from dominance by Elymus canadensis to Sorghastrum nutans, and seven other species increased in abundance with AMF, accounting for the increased diversity. N(2)-fixers led to increases in Astragalus canadensis and Desmanthus illinoense, two legumes that likely benefited from the presence of the appropriate rhizobia symbionts. Sorghastrum nutans declined 44 % in the presence of N(2)-fixers, with the most likely explanation being increased competition from legumes. Panicum monocultures were more productive with AMF, but showed no response to N(2)-fixers, although inference was constrained by low Azospirillum treatment effectivity. We did not find interactions between AMF and N(2)-fixers in communities or Panicum monocultures, indicating that short-term effects of these microbial functional groups are additive.

  3. Isolation of Bacteria with Antifungal Activity against the Phytopathogenic Fungi Stenocarpella maydis and Stenocarpella macrospora

    PubMed Central

    Petatán-Sagahón, Iván; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Silva-Rojas, Hilda Victoria; Arana-Cuenca, Ainhoa; Tellez-Jurado, Alejandro; Cárdenas-Álvarez, Isabel Oyuki; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2011-01-01

    Stenocarpella maydis and Stenocarpella macrospora are the causal agents of ear rot in corn, which is one of the most destructive diseases in this crop worldwide. These fungi are important mycotoxin producers that cause different pathologies in farmed animals and represent an important risk for humans. In this work, 160 strains were isolated from soil of corn crops of which 10 showed antifungal activity against these phytopathogens, which, were identified as: Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas spp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pantoea agglomerans by sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and the phylogenetic analysis. From cultures of each strain, extracellular filtrates were obtained and assayed to determine antifungal activity. The best filtrates were obtained in the stationary phase of B. subtilis cultures that were stable to the temperature and extreme pH values; in addition they did not show a cytotoxicity effect against brine shrimp and inhibited germination of conidia. The bacteria described in this work have the potential to be used in the control of white ear rot disease. PMID:22016606

  4. Induction of trap formation in nematode-trapping fungi by bacteria-released ammonia.

    PubMed

    Su, H N; Xu, Y Y; Wang, X; Zhang, K Q; Li, G H

    2016-04-01

    A total of 11 bacterial strains were assayed for bacteria-induced trap formation in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora YMF1·01883 with two-compartmented Petri dish. These strains were identified on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of eight isolates were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and their structures were identified based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). At the same time, all isolates were used for quantitative measurement of ammonia by the indophenol blue method. The effects of pure commercial compounds on inducement of trap formation in A. oligospora were tested. Taken together, results demonstrated that the predominant bacterial volatile compound inducing trap formation was ammonia. Meanwhile, ammonia also played a role in other nematode-trapping fungi, including Arthrobotrys guizhouensis YMF1·00014, producing adhesive nets; Dactylellina phymatopaga YMF1·01474, producing adhesive knobs; Dactylellina cionopaga YMF1·01472, producing adhesive columns and Drechslerella brochopaga YMF1·01829, producing constricting rings.

  5. The removal of thermo-tolerant coliform bacteria by immobilized waste stabilization pond algae.

    PubMed

    Pearson, H W; Marcon, A E; Melo, H N

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of laboratory- scale columns of immobilized micro-algae to disinfect effluents using thermo-tolerant coliforms (TTC) as a model system. Cells of a Chlorella species isolated from a waste stabilization pond complex in Northeast Brazil were immobilized in calcium alginate, packed into glass columns and incubated in contact with TTC suspensions for up to 24 hours. Five to six log removals of TTC were achieved in 6 hours and 11 log removals in 12 hours contact time. The results were similar under artificial light and shaded sunlight. However little or no TTC removal occurred in the light in columns of alginate beads without immobilized algae present or when the immobilized algae were incubated in the dark suggesting that the presence of both algae and light were necessary for TTC decay. There was a positive correlation between K(b) values for TTC and increasing pH in the effluent from the immobilized algal columns within the range pH 7.2 and 8.9. The potential of immobilized algal technology for wastewater disinfection may warrant further investigation.

  6. Bioremediation mechanisms of combined pollution of PAHs and heavy metals by bacteria and fungi: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Heng; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Lu-Hua; Tan, Xiao-Fei; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, knowledge in regard to bioremediation of combined pollution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals by bacteria and fungi has been widely developed. This paper reviews the species of bacteria and fungi which can tackle with various types of PAHs and heavy metals entering into environment simultaneously or successively. Microbial activity, pollutants bioavailability and environmental factors (e.g. pH, temperature, low molecular weight organic acids and humic acids) can all affect the bioremediation of PAHs and heavy metals. Moreover, this paper summarizes the remediation mechanisms of PAHs and heavy metals by microbes via elucidating the interaction mechanisms of heavy metals with heavy metals, PAHs/PAHs metabolites with PAHs and PAHs with heavy metals. Based on the above reviews, this paper also discusses the potential research needs for this field.

  7. Double-blind study of suppression of indoor fungi and bacteria by the PuriDyne biogenic air purifier.

    PubMed

    Nelson, H S; Skufca, R M

    1991-03-01

    The PuriDyne Air Purification System was studied in a double-blind trial for its ability to reduce the prevalence of bacteria and fungi in residential units. Twelve apartments were studied employing an Andersen Sampler for airborne fungi and Rodac plates for surface bacteria. Following determination of baseline levels, PuriDyne units with active filters were installed in six apartments, and units with inactive filters in six others. Sampling continued weekly for 1 month while the Air Purifiers were in place and at the end of 2 weeks following their removal. There was no statistically significant difference in airborne fungal or surface bacterial levels between baseline and treatment periods for apartments with either active or inactive units, nor were there significant differences between the two groups at any time.

  8. Beneficial role of plant growth promoting bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant responses to heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Gamalero, Elisa; Lingua, Guido; Berta, Graziella; Glick, Bernard R

    2009-05-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a major worldwide environmental concern that has recently motivated researchers to develop a variety of novel approaches towards its cleanup. As an alternative to traditional physical and chemical methods of environmental cleanup, scientists have developed phytoremediation approaches that include the use of plants to remove or render harmless a range of compounds. Both plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can be used to facilitate the process of phytoremediation and the growth of plants in metal-contaminated soils. This review focuses on the recent literature dealing with the effects of plant growth-promoting bacteria and AM fungi on the response of plants to heavy metal stress and points the way to strategies that may facilitate the practical realization of this technology.

  9. Molecular characterization by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi isolated from Luehea divaricata (Malvaceae) against plant pathogenic fungi and pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bernardi-Wenzel, J; Garcia, A; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2013-10-29

    Luehea divaricata is an important plant in popular medicine; it is used for its depurative, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic activities. We evaluated the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from leaves of L. divaricata against phytopathogens and pathogenic bacteria, and characterized the isolates based on amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The in vitro antagonistic activity of these endophytes against the phytopathogen Alternaria alternata was assayed by dual culture technique. Based on this evaluation of antimicrobial activity, we extracted secondary metabolites from nine endophytic fungi by partitioning in ethyl acetate and methanol. These were tested against the phytopathogens A. alternata, Colletotrichum sp and Moniliophthora perniciosa, and against the human pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular characterization by ARDRA technique was used for phylogenetic analysis, based on comparison with sequences in GenBank. The endophytes had varied effects on A. alternata. One isolate produced an inhibition halo against M. perniciosa and against E. coli. This antibiosis activity indicates a role in the protection of the plant against microbial pathogens in nature, with potential for pharmaceutical and agricultural applications. Based on ARDRA, the 13 isolates were grouped. We found three different haplotypes of Phomopsis sp, showing interspecific variability. It appears that examination of the microbial community associated with medicinal plants of tropical regions has potential as a useful strategy to look for species with biotechnological applications.

  10. Specific interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth-promoting bacteria--as revealed by different combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Jaderlund, Lotta; Arthurson, Veronica; Granhall, Ulf; Jansson, Janet K.

    2008-05-15

    The interactions between two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and Paenibacillus brasilensis PB177, two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices) and one pathogenic fungus (Microdochium nivale) were investigated on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cultivar Tarso) in a greenhouse trial. PB177, but not SBW25, had strong inhibitory effects on M. nivale in dual culture plate assays. The results from the greenhouse experiment show very specific interactions; e.g. the two AM fungi react differently when interacting with the same bacteria on plants. G. intraradices (single inoculation or together with SBW25) increased plant dry weight on M. nivale infested plants, suggesting that the pathogenic fungus is counteracted by G. intraradices, but PB177 inhibited this positive effect. This is an example of two completely different reactions between the same AM fungus and two species of bacteria, previously known to enhance plant growth and inhibit pathogens. When searching for plant growth promoting microorganisms it is therefore important to test for the most suitable combination of plant, bacteria and fungi in order to get satisfactory plant growth benefits.

  11. Does Initial Leaf Chemistry Affect the Contribution of Insects, Fungi, and Bacteria to Leaf Breakdown in a Lowland Tropical Stream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon, M.; Pringle, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    We examined effects of initial leaf chemistry of six common riparian species on the relative contribution of fungi, bacteria, and invertebrates to leaf breakdown in a lowland stream in Costa Rica. We hypothesized that fungi and bacteria would contribute more to the breakdown of species with low concentrations of secondary (tannins and phenolics) and structural (cellulose and lignin) compounds, while invertebrates would be more important in the processing of species with high concentrations of secondary and structural compounds. We incubated single species leaf bags of six common riparian species, representing a range in secondary and structural compounds, in a third-order stream at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. We measured leaf chemistry during the breakdown process. We determined fungal biomass using ergosterol methods, bacteria using DAPI counts, and invertebrate biomass using length-weight regressions. We then used biomass estimates for each group to determine their contribution to the overall breakdown process. Breakdown rates ranged from very fast (Trema integerima, k = 0.23 day-1) to slow (Zygia longifolia , k = 0.011 day-1). While analyses are still under way, preliminary results support our initial hypothesis that fungi contribute more to the break down of leaves from tree species with low concentrations of secondary and structural compounds.

  12. Treatment of gaseous toluene in three biofilters inoculated with fungi/bacteria: Microbial analysis, performance and starvation response.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuowei; Lu, Lichao; Kennes, Christian; Yu, Jianming; Chen, Jianmeng

    2016-02-13

    Bacteria and fungi are often utilized for the biodegradation of organic pollutants. This study compared fungal and/or bacterial biofiltration in treating toluene under both steady and unsteady states. Fungal biofilter (F-BF) removed less toluene than both bacterial biofilters (B-BF) and fungal & bacterial biofilters (F&B-BF) (<20% vs >60% vs >90%). The mineralization ratio was also lower in F-BF-levels were 2/3 and 1/2 of those values obtained by the other biofilters. Microbial analysis showed that richer communities were present in B-BF and F&B-BF, and that the Hypocreales genus which Trichoderma viride belongs to was much better represented in F&B-BF. The F&B-BF also supported enhanced robustness after 15-day starvation episodes; 1 day later the performance recovered to 80% of the original removal level. The combination of bacteria and fungi makes biofiltration a good option for VOC treatment including better removal and performance stability versus individual biofilters (bacteria or fungi dominated).

  13. Abundance and Diversity of CO2-Assimilating Bacteria and Algae Within Red Agricultural Soils Are Modulated by Changing Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongzhao; Ge, Tida; Chen, Xiangbi; Liu, Shoulong; Zhu, Zhenke; Wu, Xiaohong; Wei, Wenxue; Whiteley, Andrew Steven; Wu, Jinshui

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating the biodiversity of CO(2)-assimilating bacterial and algal communities in soils is important for obtaining a mechanistic view of terrestrial carbon sinks operating at global scales. "Red" acidic soils (Orthic Acrisols) cover large geographic areas and are subject to a range of management practices, which may alter the balance between carbon dioxide production and assimilation through changes in microbial CO(2)-assimilating populations. Here, we determined the abundance and diversity of CO(2)-assimilating bacteria and algae in acidic soils using quantitative PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the cbbL gene, which encodes the key CO(2) assimilation enzyme (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) in the Calvin cycle. Within the framework of a long-term experiment (Taoyuan Agro-ecosystem, subtropical China), paddy rice fields were converted in 1995 to four alternative land management regimes: natural forest (NF), paddy rice (PR), maize crops (CL), and tea plantations (TP). In 2012 (17 years after land use transformation), we collected and analyzed the soils from fields under the original and converted land management regimes. Our results indicated that fields under the PR soil management system harbored the greatest abundance of cbbL copies (4.33 × 10(8) copies g(-1) soil). More than a decade after converting PR soils to natural, rotation, and perennial management systems, a decline in both the diversity and abundance of cbbL-harboring bacteria and algae was recorded. The lowest abundance of bacteria (0.98 × 10(8) copies g(-1) soil) and algae (0.23 × 10(6) copies g(-1) soil) was observed for TP soils. When converting PR soil management to alternative management systems (i.e., NF, CL, and TP), soil edaphic factors (soil organic carbon and total nitrogen content) were the major determinants of bacterial autotrophic cbbL gene diversity. In contrast, soil phosphorus concentration was the major regulator

  14. Rapid Monitoring of Bacteria and Fungi aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, D.; Flores, G.; Effinger, M.; Maule, J.; Wainwright, N.; Steele, A.; Damon, M.; Wells, M.; Williams, S.; Morris, H.; Monaco, L.

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms within spacecraft have traditionally been monitored with culture-based techniques. These techniques involve growth of environmental samples (cabin water, air or surfaces) on agar-type media for several days, followed by visualization of resulting colonies or return of samples to Earth for ground-based analysis. Data obtained over the past 4 decades have enhanced our understanding of the microbial ecology within space stations. However, the approach has been limited by the following factors: i) Many microorganisms (estimated > 95%) in the environment cannot grow on conventional growth media; ii) Significant time lags (3-5 days for incubation and up to several months to return samples to ground); iii) Condensation in contact slides hinders colony counting by crew; and iv) Growth of potentially harmful microorganisms, which must then be disposed of safely. This report describes the operation of a new culture-independent technique onboard the ISS for rapid analysis (within minutes) of endotoxin and beta-1, 3-glucan, found in the cell walls of gramnegative bacteria and fungi, respectively. The technique involves analysis of environmental samples with the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay in a handheld device, known as the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS). LOCADPTS was launched to the ISS in December 2006, and here we present data obtained from Mach 2007 until the present day. These data include a comparative study between LOCADPTS analysis and existing culture-based methods; and an exploratory survey of surface endotoxin and beta-1, 3-glucan throughout the ISS. While a general correlation between LOCAD-PTS and traditional culture-based methods should not be expected, we will suggest new requirements for microbial monitoring based upon culture-independent parameters measured by LOCAD-PTS.

  15. Antimicrobial activities of chicken β-defensin (4 and 10) peptides against pathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Haitham A; Elazzazy, Ahmed M; Abuzinadah, Osama A H; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Mahmoud, Maged M; Harakeh, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Host Defense Peptides (HDPs) are small cationic peptides found in several organisms. They play a vital role in innate immunity response and immunomodulatory stimulation. This investigation was designed to study the antimicrobial activities of β-defensin peptide-4 (sAvBD-4) and 10 (sAvBD-4) derived from chickens against pathogenic organisms including bacteria and fungi. Ten bacterial strains and three fungal species were used in investigation. The results showed that the sAvBD-10 displayed a higher bactericidal potency against all the tested bacterial strains than that of sAvBD-4. The exhibited bactericidal activity was significant against almost the different bacterial strains at different peptide concentrations except for that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Streptococcus bovis (Str. bovis) strains where a moderate effect was noted. Both peptides were effective in the inactivation of fungal species tested yielding a killing rate of up to 95%. The results revealed that the synthetic peptides were resistant to salt at a concentration of 50 mM NaCl. However, they lost antimicrobial potency when applied in the presence of high salt concentrations. Based on blood hemolysis studies, a little hemolytic effect was showed in the case of both peptides even when applied at high concentrations. The data obtained from this study indicated that synthetic avian peptides exhibit strong antibacterial and antifungal activity. In conclusion, future work and research should be tailored to a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of those peptides and their potential use in the pharmaceutical industry to help reduce the incidence and impact of infectious agent and be marketed as a naturally occurring antibiotic.

  16. Effect of Various Organic Matter stimulates Bacteria and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Plantations on Eroded Slopes in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha Vaidya, G.; Shrestha, K.; Wallander, H.

    2009-04-01

    Erosion resulting from landslides is a serious problem in mountainous countries such as Nepal. To restore such sites it is essential to establish plant cover that protects the soil and reduces erosion. Trees and shrubs on the lower hillsides in Nepal form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and these fungi are important for the uptake of mineral nutrients from the soil. In addition, the mycelia formed by these fungi have an important function in stabilizing the soil. The success of plantations of these eroded slopes is therefore highly dependent on the extent of mycorrhizal colonization of the plants. Mycorrhizal fungi growing in symbiosis with plants are essential in this respect because they improve both plant and nutrient uptake and soil structure. We investigated the influence of organic matter and P amendment on recently produced biomass of bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in eroded slopes in Nepal. Eroded soil mixed with different types of organic matter was placed in mesh bags which were buried around the trees of Bauhinia purpurea and Leucaena diversifolia .This experiment were done in two seasons ( (the wet and the dry season). Signature fatty acids were used to determine bacterial and AM fungal biomass after the six month intervals. The amount and composition of AM fungal spores were analyzed in the mesh bags from the wet and dry seasons. More microbial biomass was produced during wet season than during dry season. Further more, organic matter addition enhanced the production of AM fungal and bacterial biomass during both seasons. The positive influence of organic matter addition on AM fungi could be an important contribution to plant survival, growth and nutrient composition in the soil in plantations on eroded slopes. Different AM spore communities and bacterial profiles were obtained with different organic amendments and this suggests a possible way of selecting for specific microbial communities in the management of eroded

  17. Cropping practices modulate the impact of glyphosate on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizosphere bacteria in agroecosystems of the semiarid prairie.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Min; Hamel, Chantal; Fernandez, Myriam R

    2012-08-01

    A growing body of evidence obtained from studies performed under controlled conditions suggests that glyphosate use can modify microbial community assemblages. However, few studies have examined the influence of glyphosate in agroecosystems. We examined 4 wheat-based production systems typical of the Canadian prairie over 2 years to answer the following question: Does preseeding of glyphosate impact soil rhizosphere microorganisms? If so, do cropping practices influence this impact? Glyphosate caused a shift in the species dominating the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community in the rhizosphere, possibly through the modification of host plant physiology. Glyphosate stimulated rhizobacterial growth while having no influence on saprotrophic fungi, suggesting a greater abundance of glyphosate-tolerant 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) in bacteria than in fungi. Glyphosate stimulated rhizosphere bacteria in pea but not in urea-fertilized durum wheat, which is consistent with inhibition of EPSPS tolerance to residual glyphosate through high ammonium levels. Mitigation of the effects of glyphosate on rhizosphere bacteria through tillage suggests a reduction in residual glyphosate activity through increased adsorption to soil binding sites upon soil mixing. The influence of glyphosate on Gram-negative bacteria was mitigated under drought conditions in 2007. Our experiment suggests that interactions between soil fertility, tillage, and cropping practices shape the influence of glyphosate use on rhizosphere microorganisms.

  18. Biofilms from a Brazilian water distribution system include filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, V M; Oliveira, H M B; Santos, C; Paterson, R R M; Gusmão, N B; Lima, N

    2013-03-01

    Filamentous fungi in drinking water can block water pipes, can cause organoleptic biodeterioration, and are a source of pathogens. There are increasing reports of the involvement of the organisms in biofilms. This present study describes a sampling device that can be inserted directly into pipes within water distribution systems, allowing biofilm formation in situ. Calcofluor White M2R staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization with morphological analyses using epifluorescent microscopy were used to analyse biofilms for filamentous fungi, permitting direct observation of the fungi. DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) was applied to detect bacteria. Filamentous fungi were detected in biofilms after 6 months on coupons exposed to raw water, decanted water and at the entrance of the water distribution system. Algae, yeast, and bacteria were also observed. The role of filamentous fungi requires further investigations.

  19. Efficiency assessment and pH effect in removing nitrogen and phosphorus by algae-bacteria combined system of Chlorella vulgaris and Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhijie; Liu, Yan; Ge, Fei; Xu, Yin; Tao, Nengguo; Peng, Fang; Wong, Minghung

    2013-08-01

    To achieve better removal of NH4(+) and TP in wastewater, a new algae-bacteria combined system of Chlorella vulgaris and Bacillus licheniformis was investigated in a 6-d experiment. The results showed that 78% of NH4(+) could be removed in the combined system, while 29% in single algae system and only 1% in single bacteria system. Approximately 92% of TP was removed in the combined system, compared with 55% and 78% in single algae and bacteria system, respectively. B. licheniformis was proven to be a growth-promoting bacterium for C. vulgaris by comparing Chl a concentrations in the single and combined systems. In the removal process, pH of the combined system was observed to reduce significantly from 7.0 to 3.5. Whereas with pH regulated to 7.0, higher removal efficiencies of NH4(+) (86%) and TP (93%) were achieved along with the recovery of algal cells and the increase of Chl a. These results suggest that nutrients in wastewater can be removed efficiently by the algae-bacteria combined system and pH control is crucial in the process.

  20. Lévy fluctuations and mixing in dilute suspensions of algae and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Irwin M; Dunkel, Jörn; Yeomans, Julia M

    2011-09-07

    Swimming micro-organisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a micro-organism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer's flow field. We show that the experimentally observed non-Gaussian tails are generic and arise owing to a combination of truncated Lévy statistics for the velocity field and algebraically decaying time correlations in the fluid. Our analytical considerations are illustrated through extensive simulations, implemented on graphics processing units to achieve the large sample sizes required for analysing the tails of the tracer distributions.

  1. Lévy fluctuations and mixing in dilute suspensions of algae and bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Irwin M.; Dunkel, Jörn; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2011-01-01

    Swimming micro-organisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a micro-organism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer's flow field. We show that the experimentally observed non-Gaussian tails are generic and arise owing to a combination of truncated Lévy statistics for the velocity field and algebraically decaying time correlations in the fluid. Our analytical considerations are illustrated through extensive simulations, implemented on graphics processing units to achieve the large sample sizes required for analysing the tails of the tracer distributions. PMID:21345857

  2. The antimicrobial potential of algicolous marine fungi for counteracting multidrug-resistant bacteria: phylogenetic diversity and chemical profiling.

    PubMed

    Gnavi, Giorgio; Palma Esposito, Fortunato; Festa, Carmen; Poli, Anna; Tedesco, Pietro; Fani, Renato; Monti, Maria Chiara; de Pascale, Donatella; D'Auria, Maria Valeria; Varese, Giovanna Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Marine fungi represent an important but still largely unexplored source of novel and potentially bioactive secondary metabolites. The antimicrobial activity of nine sterile mycelia isolated from the green alga Flabellia petiolata collected from the Mediterranean Sea was tested on four antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains using extracellular and intracellular extracts obtained from each fungal strain. The isolated fungi were identified at the molecular level and assigned to one of the Dothideomycetes, Sordariomycetes or Eurotiomycetes classes. Following assessment of inhibition of bacterial growth (IC50), all crude extracts were subjected to preliminary (1)H NMR and TLC analysis. According to preliminary pharmacologic and spectroscopic/chromatographic results, extracts of fungal strains MUT 4865, classified as Beauveria bassiana, and MUT 4861, classified as Microascacea sp.2, were selected for LC-HRMS analysis. Chemical profiling of antibacterial extracts from MUT 4861 and MUT 4865 by LC HRMS allowed identification of the main components of the crude extracts. Several sphingosine bases were identified, including a compound previously unreported from natural sources, which gave a rationale to the broad spectrum of antibacterial activity exhibited.

  3. Antimicrobial Activities of Bacteria Associated with the Brown Alga Padina pavonica

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Amel; Ktari, Leila; Ahmed, Mehboob; Bolhuis, Henk; Boudabbous, Abdellatif; Stal, Lucas J.; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; El Bour, Monia

    2016-01-01

    Macroalgae belonging to the genus Padina are known to produce antibacterial compounds that may inhibit growth of human- and animal pathogens. Hitherto, it was unclear whether this antibacterial activity is produced by the macroalga itself or by secondary metabolite producing epiphytic bacteria. Here we report antibacterial activities of epiphytic bacteria isolated from Padina pavonica (Peacocks tail) located on northern coast of Tunisia. Eighteen isolates were obtained in pure culture and tested for antimicrobial activities. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences the isolates were closely related to Proteobacteria (12 isolates; 2 Alpha- and 10 Gammaproteobacteria), Firmicutes (4 isolates) and Actinobacteria (2 isolates). The antimicrobial activity was assessed as inhibition of growth of 12 species of pathogenic bacteria (Aeromonas salmonicida, A. hydrophila, Enterobacter xiangfangensis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus sp., Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp., Vibrio alginoliticus, V. proteolyticus, V. vulnificus) and one pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans). Among the Firmicutes, isolate P8, which is closely related to Bacillus pumilus, displayed the largest spectrum of growth inhibition of the pathogenic bacteria tested. The results emphasize the potential use of P. pavonica associated antagonistic bacteria as producers of novel antibacterial compounds. PMID:27462308

  4. Differences in the sensitivity of fungi and bacteria to season and invertebrates affect leaf litter decomposition in a Mediterranean stream.

    PubMed

    Mora-Gómez, Juanita; Elosegi, Arturo; Duarte, Sofia; Cássio, Fernanda; Pascoal, Cláudia; Romaní, Anna M

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms are key drivers of leaf litter decomposition; however, the mechanisms underlying the dynamics of different microbial groups are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of seasonal variation and invertebrates on fungal and bacterial dynamics, and on leaf litter decomposition. We followed the decomposition of Populus nigra litter in a Mediterranean stream through an annual cycle, using fine and coarse mesh bags. Irrespective of the season, microbial decomposition followed two stages. Initially, bacterial contribution to total microbial biomass was higher compared to later stages, and it was related to disaccharide and lignin degradation; in a later stage, bacteria were less important and were associated with hemicellulose and cellulose degradation, while fungi were related to lignin decomposition. The relevance of microbial groups in decomposition differed among seasons: fungi were more important in spring, whereas in summer, water quality changes seemed to favour bacteria and slowed down lignin and hemicellulose degradation. Invertebrates influenced litter-associated microbial assemblages (especially bacteria), stimulated enzyme efficiencies and reduced fungal biomass. We conclude that bacterial and fungal assemblages play distinctive roles in microbial decomposition and differ in their sensitivity to environmental changes, ultimately affecting litter decomposition, which might be particularly relevant in highly seasonal ecosystems, such as intermittent streams.

  5. Seawater-based methane production from blue-green algae biomass by marine bacteria coculture

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.; Izumida, H.

    1984-01-01

    Marine-enriched culture NKM 004 produced methane from various carbohydrates, but methane production was inhibited by sulfate and acetate accumulated in the medium. On the other hand, marine methanogenic bacterium NKM 006 produced methane from acetate and methyltrophic substrates, and methane production was not inhibited by sulfate. The mixture of NKM 004 and NKM 006 continuously produced methane from marine blue-green algae Dermocarpa species NKBG 102B at 54 ..mu..mol/L medium/h for 200 h and the dry weight of the algal biomass was decreased to 25% of the initial weight in the natural seawater. Conversion of algal carbohydrate (glucose equivalent) to methane was 65%. Results indicate that this system is promising for methane production based on seawater and solar energy.

  6. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Freebury, Colin E.; Hamilton, Paul B.; Saarela, Jeffery M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah. PMID:27350765

  7. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah.

    PubMed

    Sokoloff, Paul C; Freebury, Colin E; Hamilton, Paul B; Saarela, Jeffery M

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah.

  8. Occurrence of heterotrophic bacteria and fungi in an aviation fuel handling system and its relationship with fuel fouling.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M D; Neirotti, E; Albornoz, C

    1998-01-01

    Clean, dry and contaminant-free fuel is necessary for safe and economical aircraft operation. Microbial growth in aviation fuel handling systems can alter the quality of the product. This paper reports the occurrence of heterotrophic bacteria and fungi in a handling system of jet A-1 aviation turbine fuel. A total of 350 samples were collected during 1990-1996. The aerobic microorganisms in fuel samples were mainly fungi, 85% of samples containing < or = 100 cfu/l (range 0 (< 1 cfu/l) to 2000 cfu/l). The predominant fungi were Cladosporium and Aspergillus. Water was observed mainly in samples extracted from the drainage pipes of two tanks used frequently as intermediate storage tanks. The aerobic heterotrophic microorganisms found in water samples were mostly bacteria, counts varying from 100 to 8.8 x 10(7) cfu/ml, with 85% of samples containing 10(4)-10(7) cfu/ml. There was a preponderance of Pseudomonas spp. Bacterial contaminants belonging to the genus Flavobacterium and Aeromonas were also identified. Sulphate reducing bacteria were detected in 80% of water samples. It was not possible to assign a maximum microbial contamination level above which maintenance is required and it is suggested that analysis of successive samples from the same site are necessary for this purpose. Microbial sludges produced in the laboratory and collected from a contaminated tank bottom were analysed chemically. The data are presented and discussed. Samples collected from the supply pipes of tanks and refueller trucks during the period surveyed always met the standard specifications.

  9. Attempts to reduce exposure to fungi, β-glucan, bacteria, endotoxin and dust in vegetable greenhouses and a packaging unit.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Tendal, Kira; Frederiksen, Margit W

    2014-01-15

    Indoor handling of large amounts of plant materials occurs in different occupational settings including greenhouses and causes exposure to bioaerosols. The bioaerosol components fungi, β-glucan, bacteria and endotoxin are involved in different airway symptoms and health effects can be dose-dependent. Therefore, there is a persistent need to reduce exposure. The aims of this study were to identify tasks causing exposure and to evaluate preventive measures aimed at reducing exposure of greenhouse workers to bioaerosols, and to study factors affecting the exposure. We have focused on different exposure scenarios; one with high short-term exposure found during clearing of old cucumber plants; the other with long-term, mid-level exposure found during tomato picking, leaf nipping, stringing up tomato plants, and packaging of cucumbers. Clearing of non-dried cucumber plants compared with clearing of dried cucumber plants significantly reduced the exposure to dust, endotoxin, bacteria, fungal spores and β-glucan. More endotoxin and fungi are emitted and more of the emitted particles were of respirable size if the leaves were dried. Along the cucumber packaging line, exposure levels were highly specific to each personal subtask. The subtask 'unloading of cucumbers' was the source of exposure making task ventilation or shielding of the process a possibility. Elimination of leaf debris on the floor reduced the exposure to fungi significantly. However, leaf debris on the floor did not contribute significantly to the exposure to dust, endotoxin and bacteria. Furthermore, to eliminate leaf debris, it had to be cleared away and this was associated with a higher exposure to dust and endotoxin. The age of the plants affected the exposure level to bioaerosols with higher exposures from old plants. In conclusion, different tasks and subtasks cause very different exposure levels. It is possible to reduce exposure by identifying subtasks causing the exposure and by modifying work

  10. Growth and death of bacteria and fungi underlie rainfall-induced carbon dioxide pulses from seasonally dried soil.

    PubMed

    Blazewicz, Steven J; Schwartz, Egbert; Firestone, Mary K

    2014-05-01

    The rapid increase in microbial activity that occurs when a dry soil is rewetted has been well documented and is of great interest due to implications of changing precipitation patterns on soil C dynamics. Several studies have shown minor net changes in microbial population diversity or abundance following wet-up, but the gross population dynamics of bacteria and fungi resulting from soil wet-up are virtually unknown. Here we applied DNA stable isotope probing with H218O coupled with quantitative PCR to characterize new growth, survival, and mortality of bacteria and fungi following the rewetting of a seasonally dried California annual grassland soil. Microbial activity, as determined by CO2 production, increased significantly within three hours of wet-up, yet new growth was not detected until after three hours, suggesting a pulse of nongrowth activity immediately following wet-up, likely due to osmo-regulation and resuscitation from dormancy in response to the rapid change in water potential. Total microbial abundance revealed little change throughout the seven-day post-wet incubation, but there was substantial turnover of both bacterial and fungal populations (49% and 52%, respectively). New growth was linear between 24 and 168 hours for both bacteria and fungi, with average growth rates of 2.3 x 10(8) bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies x [g dry mass](-1) x h(-1) and 4.3 x 10(7) fungal ITS copies x [g dry mass](-1) x h(-1). While bacteria and fungi differed in their mortality and survival characteristics during the seven-day incubation, mortality that occurred within the first three hours was similar, with 25% and 27% of bacterial and fungal gene copies disappearing from the pre-wet community, respectively. The rapid disappearance of gene copies indicates that cell death, occurring either during the extreme dry down period (preceding five months) or during the rapid change in water potential due to wet-up, generates a significant pool of available C that likely

  11. Assessment of the Antimicrobial Activity of Algae Extracts on Bacteria Responsible of External Otitis.

    PubMed

    Pane, Gianluca; Cacciola, Gabriele; Giacco, Elisabetta; Mariottini, Gian Luigi; Coppo, Erika

    2015-10-20

    External otitis is a diffuse inflammation around the external auditory canal and auricle, which is often occurred by microbial infection. This disease is generally treated using antibiotics, but the frequent occurrence of antibiotic resistance requires the development of new antibiotic agents. In this context, unexplored bioactive natural candidates could be a chance for the production of targeted drugs provided with antimicrobial activity. In this paper, microbial pathogens were isolated from patients with external otitis using ear swabs for over one year, and the antimicrobial activity of the two methanol extracts from selected marine (Dunaliella salina) and freshwater (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) microalgae was tested on the isolated pathogens. Totally, 114 bacterial and 11 fungal strains were isolated, of which Staphylococcus spp. (28.8%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (24.8%) were the major pathogens. Only three Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains and 11 coagulase-negative Staphylococci showed resistance to methicillin. The two algal extracts showed interesting antimicrobial properties, which mostly inhibited the growth of isolated S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella spp. with MICs range of 1.4 × 10⁸ to 2.2 × 10(10) cells/mL. These results suggest that the two algae have potential as resources for the development of antimicrobial agents.

  12. Assessment of the Antimicrobial Activity of Algae Extracts on Bacteria Responsible of External Otitis

    PubMed Central

    Pane, Gianluca; Cacciola, Gabriele; Giacco, Elisabetta; Mariottini, Gian Luigi; Coppo, Erika

    2015-01-01

    External otitis is a diffuse inflammation around the external auditory canal and auricle, which is often occurred by microbial infection. This disease is generally treated using antibiotics, but the frequent occurrence of antibiotic resistance requires the development of new antibiotic agents. In this context, unexplored bioactive natural candidates could be a chance for the production of targeted drugs provided with antimicrobial activity. In this paper, microbial pathogens were isolated from patients with external otitis using ear swabs for over one year, and the antimicrobial activity of the two methanol extracts from selected marine (Dunaliella salina) and freshwater (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) microalgae was tested on the isolated pathogens. Totally, 114 bacterial and 11 fungal strains were isolated, of which Staphylococcus spp. (28.8%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (24.8%) were the major pathogens. Only three Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains and 11 coagulase-negative Staphylococci showed resistance to methicillin. The two algal extracts showed interesting antimicrobial properties, which mostly inhibited the growth of isolated S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella spp. with MICs range of 1.4 × 109 to 2.2 × 1010 cells/mL. These results suggest that the two algae have potential as resources for the development of antimicrobial agents. PMID:26492256

  13. Fermentation properties of low-quality red alga Susabinori Porphyra yezoensis by intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Toshihiko; Ishihara, Kenji; Oyamada, Chiaki; Kunitake, Hiromi; Hirayama, Izumi; Kimura, Takeshi

    2008-07-01

    Susabinori (Porphyra yezoensis), a red alga, is cultured and processed into a sheet-style dried food, nori, in Japan. But significant amounts of cultured susabinori, which has a low protein content is discarded because of its low quality. The protein content of nori has been reported to be correlated inversely with the carbohydrate content. In this study, we examined the relationship between the protein content and the fermentation of nori by means of bfidobacteria. nori with a low protein content (25% on dry base) was strongly fermented by bifidobacteria, whereas nori with a high protein content (41% on dry base) was not. nori with a low protein content contained large amounts of glycerol galactoside (GG, floridoside: 2-O-glycerol-alpha-D-galactoside, isofloridoside: 1-O-glycerol-alpha-D-galactoside), more than 10% w/w in the dried condition, and GG was the main substrate for fermentation by bifidobacteria. GG was not digested by digestive enzymes, and was not absorbed in the small intestine. These results suggest that GG can be used as a substrate for fermentation by bifidobacteria, and possibility of GG as a prebiotic.

  14. Screening for antibacterial and antifungal activities in some marine algae from the Fujian coast of China with three different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Yin-Shan; Lu, Hai-Sheng

    2001-12-01

    Three different solvents viz ethanol, acetone and methanol-toluene (3:1) were used to extract antibiotics from 23 species of marine algae belonging to the Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta. Their crude extracts were tested for antibacterial and antifungal activities. Among them, the ethanol extract showed the strongest activity against the bacteria and fungi tested. Four species of the Rhodophyta ( Laurencia okamurai, Dasya scoparia, Grateloupia filicina and plocamium telfairiae) showed a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity. Every solvent extract from the four species was active against all the bacteria tested. The test bacterium Pseudomonas solancearum and the fungus Penicilium citrinum were most sensitive to the extracts of marine algae. In general, the extracts of seaweeds inhibited bacteria more strongly than fungi and species of the Rhodophyta showed the greatest activity against the bacteria and fungi tested.

  15. Development of a new real-time PCR system for simultaneous detection of bacteria and fungi in pathological samples.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Hitomi; Sato, Yuko; Hasegawa, Hideki; Saeki, Hidehisa; Katano, Harutaka

    2015-01-01

    A novel system for simultaneous detection of pathogenic bacteria and fungi in pathological samples was developed using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. This system, designated the "multi-microbial real-time PCR", has the potential to simultaneously detect 68 bacterial and 9 fungal species in a 96-well plate format. All probe-primer sets were designed to produce amplicons smaller than 210 bp using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples as input. The specificity and sensitivity of each probe-primer set were tested against DNA extracted from pure cultures of specific pathogens. The multi-microbial real-time PCR system revealed profiles of microorganism infection in lung samples collected at autopsy from 10 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common microbe detected (n=8), but with low copy numbers. High copy numbers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected in the lung samples with abscess (n=6). Enterococcus faecium (n=6), Elizabethkingia meningoseptica (n=4), and Candida albicans (n=4) were also frequently detected. In addition, a latent infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected in one case of pneumonia. In conclusion, this multi-microbial real-time PCR system can be useful for detecting bacteria and fungi in pathological specimens from patients with uncertain diagnoses.

  16. Impacts of flood damage on airborne bacteria and fungi in homes after the 2013 Colorado Front Range flood.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Joanne B; Keady, Patricia B; Brewer, Tess E; Clements, Nicholas; Morgan, Emily E; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Miller, Shelly L; Fierer, Noah

    2015-03-03

    Flood-damaged homes typically have elevated microbial loads, and their occupants have an increased incidence of allergies, asthma, and other respiratory ailments, yet the microbial communities in these homes remain under-studied. Using culture-independent approaches, we characterized bacterial and fungal communities in homes in Boulder, CO, USA 2-3 months after the historic September, 2013 flooding event. We collected passive air samples from basements in 50 homes (36 flood-damaged, 14 non-flooded), and we sequenced the bacterial 16S rRNA gene (V4-V5 region) and the fungal ITS1 region from these samples for community analyses. Quantitative PCR was used to estimate the abundances of bacteria and fungi in the passive air samples. Results indicate significant differences in bacterial and fungal community composition between flooded and non-flooded homes. Fungal abundances were estimated to be three times higher in flooded, relative to non-flooded homes, but there were no significant differences in bacterial abundances. Penicillium (fungi) and Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae (bacteria) were among the most abundant taxa in flooded homes. Our results suggest that bacterial and fungal communities continue to be affected by flooding, even after relative humidity has returned to baseline levels and remediation has removed any visible evidence of flood damage.

  17. Antimicrobial activities of polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride-based disinfectant against fungi isolated from cocoa beans and reference strains of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mathurin, Yao K; Koffi-Nevry, Rose; Guéhi, Simplice T; Tano, Kablan; Oulé, Mathias K

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the antibacterial and the antifungal activity of a polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMGH)-based disinfectant and to determine if it could be used as a disinfectant for the treatment of cocoa beans. The activity of PHMGH was tested in vitro for efficacy against five reference strains of pathogenic bacteria and six strains of fungi isolated from cocoa beans. All the strains tested were sensitive to the disinfectant. The MICs reported were between 0.01 and 1.9 mg/ml and equal to the MBC or minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) regardless of the strains of those microorganisms. The bacteria were more sensitive to PHMGH than were the fungi. Enterobacter cloacae was the most sensitive bacterium with a MIC and MBC of 0.01 mg/ml, whereas the genus Aspergillus was the least susceptible of the microorganisms tested, with a MIC and MFC from 1.0 to 1.9 mg/ml. The time required for the activity of PHMGH varies from 2 min for Enterobacter cloacae to 12 min for Aspergillus tamarii and generally increases with the MBC or the MFC. Through this in vitro study, the PHMGH has been proved to be bactericidal and fungicidal on the strains studied. Hence, it could probably serve as a fungicidal disinfectant for the treatment of cocoa beans after harvesting.

  18. Airborne fungi and bacteria in child daycare centers and the effectiveness of weak acid hypochlorous water on controlling microbes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nai-Tzu; Su, Yu-Min; Hsu, Nai-Yun; Wu, Pei-Chih; Su, Huey-Jen

    2012-10-26

    A three-week-long biological sampling scheme was conducted in two child daycare centers (CDCCs) in order to investigate interdiurnal and diurnal variations in indoor airborne microbes as well as the efficiency of weak acid hypochlorous water (WAHW) on disinfecting indoor microbes. During the second week of sampling, WAHW was sprayed using a fogger in the classroom after children had left and before they returned the next morning. An identical cycle of experiments was performed twice in the winter and spring. Without WAHW intervention, the respective mean of the indoor concentrations and I/O ratios were 8732-47581 CFU m(-3) and 0.96-2.53 for fungi, and 6706-28998 CFU m(-3) and 1.10-11.92 for bacteria, showing severe bio-contamination in the CDCCs. Moreover, a relatively high level of bacterial pollution was found at noon, whereas a greater fungal pollution could be detected in the morning and at noon. Among five school days, the fungal and bacterial pollution may be higher on Monday and on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, respectively. Furthermore, with WAHW intervention, the indoor microbial concentrations and I/O ratios were decreased significantly. The reduction of I/O ratios caused by WAHW disinfection was accomplished in the morning for bacteria and in the morning, at noon, and in the afternoon for fungi. In conclusion, this study clearly clarified the risky period during which children may be exposed to hazardous environments, and demonstrated the effectiveness of spraying WAHW the night before on decontaminating indoor airborne microbes on the following day, especially in the case of fungi.

  19. The Effects of Ultraviolet Radiation on Attached Wetland Algae and Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, V. K.; Kuehn, K. A.; Francoeur, S. N.

    2005-05-01

    Despite the well-known increases in ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) reaching the Earth's surface due to the destruction of the ozone layer, little is known about effects of UV-R on wetland periphyton. To study the effects of UV-R on wetland periphyton, artificial substrata were placed under acrylic mesocosms in the Paint Creek Wetland, Ypsilanti, MI. One treatment mesocosm excluded light in the UV range (<340nm) and the other allowed the passage of full light. Periphyton attached to artificial substrata was collected on 4 dates during August and September 2004 and analyzed for Chlorophyll a, ash-free dry mass (AFDM), bacterial density, colloidal extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and algal community composition. Over the length of the experiment the proportion of dead to live bacteria (p<0.02), EPS accrual (μgram glucose equivalents/cm2) (p=0.046), and the ratio of EPS to AFDM (p=0.027) were significantly greater in the UV-R-exposed treatment. These results suggest that ambient levels of UV-R damage periphytic bacteria and increase EPS production by periphyton.

  20. Algae as promising organisms for environment and health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Algae, like other plants, produce a variety of remarkable compounds collectively referred to as secondary metabolites. They are synthesized by these organisms at the end of the growth phase and/or due to metabolic alterations induced by environmental stress conditions. Carotenoids, phenolic compounds, phycobiliprotein pigments, polysaccharides and unsaturated fatty acids are same of the algal natural products, which were reported to have variable biological activities, including antioxidant activity, anticancer activity, antimicroabial activity against bacteria-virus-algae-fungi, organic fertilizer and bioremediation potentials. PMID:21862867

  1. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  2. Comparative study of the fungicide Benomyl toxicity on some plant growth promoting bacteria and some fungi in pure cultures

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Awad G.; Sherif, Ashraf M.; Elhussein, Adil A.

    2014-01-01

    Six laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the fungicide Benomyl on pure cultures of some plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) and some fungi. The highest LD50 was recorded for Bacillus circulans and proved to be the most resistant to the fungicide, followed by Azospirillum braziliense, while Penicillium sp. was the most affected microorganism. LD50 values for the affected microorganisms were in 21–240 orders of magnitude lower in comparison with the LD50 value for Azospirillum braziliense. The results indicate a strong selectivity for Benomyl against Rhizobium meliloti and Penicillium sp. when compared to other microorganisms tested. The highest safety coefficient was recorded for Bacillus circulans followed by Azospirillum braziliense, while Rhizobium meliloti, showed the lowest safety coefficient value compared to other bacteria. The lowest toxicity index was recorded for Bacillus circulans and Azospirillum braziliense. The slope of the curves for Bacillus sp. and Rhizobium meliloti was steeper than that of the other curves, suggesting that even a slight increase of the dose of the fungicide can cause a very strong negative effect. In conclusion, Benomyl could be applied without restriction when using inocula based on growth promoting bacteria such as symbiotic nitrogen fixers (Rhizobium meliloti), non-symbiotic nitrogen fixers (Azospirillum braziliense) or potassium solibilizers (Bacillus circulans), given that the fungicide is applied within the range of the recommended field dose. PMID:26038670

  3. Epizootiological characteristics of viable bacteria and fungi in indoor air from porcine, chicken, or bovine husbandry confinement buildings

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Katharine; Lim, Gyeong-Dong; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Shin, Kyung-Min; Song, Eun-Seob; Gautam, Ravi; Kim, Chang-Yul; Lee, Kyungsuk; Shin, Seungwon; Yoo, Han-Sang; Heo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms found in bioaerosols from animal confinement buildings not only foster the risk of spreading diseases among livestock buildings, but also pose health hazards to farm workers and nearby residents. This study identified the various microorganisms present in the air of swine, chicken, and cattle farms with different kinds of ventilation conditions in Korea. Microbial air samples were collected onto Petri dishes with bacterial or fungal growth media using a cascade impactor. Endotoxin levels in total dust were determined by the limulus amebocyte lysate kinetic QCL method. Prevalent Gram-positive bacteria were Staphylococcus (S.) lentus, S. chromogenes, Bacillus (B.) cereus, B. licheniformis, and Enterococcus faecalis, while the dominant fungi and Gram-negative bacteria were Candida albicans and Sphingomonas paucimobilis, respectively. Considering no significant relationship between the indoor dust endotoxin levels and the isolation of Gram-negative bacteria from the indoor air, monitoring the indoor airborne endotoxin level was found to be also critical for risk assessment on health for animals or workers. The present study confirms the importance of microbiological monitoring and control on animal husbandry indoor air to ensure animal and worker welfare. PMID:27456779

  4. Identification of non-pseudomonad bacteria from fruit bodies of wild agaricales fungi that detoxify tolaasin produced by Pseudomonas tolaasii.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Takanori; Murata, Hitoshi; Shirata, Akira

    2002-10-01

    Bacterial isolates from wild Agaricales fungi detoxified tolaasin, the inducer of brown blotch disease of cultivated mushrooms produced by Pseudomonas tolaasii. Mycetocola tolaasinivorans and Mycetocola lacteus were associated with fruit bodies of wild Pleurotus ostreatus and wild Lepista nuda, respectively. Tolaasin-detoxifying bacteria belonging to other genera were found in various wild mushrooms. An Acinetobacter sp. was isolated from fruit bodies of Tricholoma matsutake, Bacillus pumilus was isolated from Coprinus disseminatus, and Sphingobacterium multivorum was isolated from Clitocybe clavipes. A Pedobacter sp., which seemed not be identifiable as any known bacterial species, was isolated from a Clitocybe sp. Tolaasin-detoxifying bacteria identified thus far were attached to the surface of mycelia rather than residing within the fungal cells. M. tolaasinivorans, M. lacteus, B. pumilus, the Pedobacter sp., and S. multivorum efficiently detoxified tolaasin and strongly suppressed brown blotch development in cultivated P. ostreatus and Agaricus bisporus in vitro, but the Acinetobacter sp. did so less efficiently. These bacteria may be useful for the elucidation of mechanisms involved in tolaasin-detoxification, and may become biological control agents of mushroom disease.

  5. Epizootiological characteristics of viable bacteria and fungi in indoor air from porcine, chicken, or bovine husbandry confinement buildings.

    PubMed

    Roque, Katharine; Lim, Gyeong-Dong; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Shin, Kyung-Min; Song, Eun-Seob; Gautam, Ravi; Kim, Chang-Yul; Lee, Kyungsuk; Shin, Seungwon; Yoo, Han-Sang; Heo, Yong; Kim, Hyoung-Ah

    2016-12-30

    Microorganisms found in bioaerosols from animal confinement buildings not only foster the risk of spreading diseases among livestock buildings, but also pose health hazards to farm workers and nearby residents. This study identified the various microorganisms present in the air of swine, chicken, and cattle farms with different kinds of ventilation conditions in Korea. Microbial air samples were collected onto Petri dishes with bacterial or fungal growth media using a cascade impactor. Endotoxin levels in total dust were determined by the limulus amebocyte lysate kinetic QCL method. Prevalent Gram-positive bacteria were Staphylococcus (S.) lentus, S. chromogenes, Bacillus (B.) cereus, B. licheniformis, and Enterococcus faecalis, while the dominant fungi and Gram-negative bacteria were Candida albicans and Sphingomonas paucimobilis, respectively. Considering no significant relationship between the indoor dust endotoxin levels and the isolation of Gram-negative bacteria from the indoor air, monitoring the indoor airborne endotoxin level was found to be also critical for risk assessment on health for animals or workers. The present study confirms the importance of microbiological monitoring and control on animal husbandry indoor air to ensure animal and worker welfare.

  6. Distribution of bacteria and fungi in the earthworm Libyodrillus violaceous (Annelida: Oligochaeta), a native earthworm from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Idowu, A B; Edema, M O; Adeyi, A O

    2006-03-01

    Earthworms are soil invertebrates that play a key role in recycling organic matter in soils. In Nigeria, earthworms include Libyodrillus violaceous. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts, as well as fungal counts of viable microorganisms in soils and gut sections, were made on twenty L. violaceous collected from different sites on the campus of the University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria. The samples were collected between April and November, 2002. Numbers of microorganisms were higher in castings and gut sections than in un-ingested soil samples. The guts and their contents also had higher moisture and total nitrogen contents than the un-ingested soils. Bacteria and fungi isolated from the samples were identified by standard microbiological procedures on the bases of their morphological and biochemical characteristics. Isolated bacteria were identified as Staphylococcus, Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mutans, Clostridium, Spirocheata spp., Azotobacter spp., Micrococcus lylae, Acinetobacter spp., Halobacterium for bacteria. Yeast isolates were identified as Candida spp., Zygosaccharomyces spp., Pichia spp., and Saccharomyces spp while molds were identified as, Aspergillus spp., Pytium spp., Penicillium spp., Fusarium spp and Rhizopus spp. Of the five locations examined, the refuse dump area had the highest numbers of both aerobic and anaerobic organisms, followed by the arboretum while the cultivated land area recorded the lowest counts. The higher numbers of microorganisms observed in the gut sections and casts of the earthworms examined in this work reinforce the general concept that the gut and casts of earthworms show higher microbial diversity and activity than the surrounding soil.

  7. Mycorrhizal fungi and ectomycorrhiza associated bacteria isolated from an industrial desert soil protect pine seedlings against Cd(II) impact.

    PubMed

    Kozdrój, Jacek; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia; Krupa, Piotr

    2007-08-01

    Effects of mycorrhization with Amanita rubescens or Hebeloma sinapizans and dual inoculation with the fungi and ectomycorrhiza associated bacteria (EMAB) Pseudomonas putida or Bacillus cereus on seedling growth and accumulation of Cd(II) in Pinus sylvestris were studied. Both fungal and bacterial species were isolated from roots of pines growing in an industrial area polluted with high concentrations of heavy metals. During mycorrhization, A. rubescens colonized higher number of pine seedlings than H. sinapizans, especially when EMAB were co-inoculated. In addition, the seedling biometric characteristics (i.e. root and shoot lengths and biomass) were stimulated by treatment with the fungal species alone and dual inoculation with the fungi and EMAB. Amanita rubescens was more efficient in this stimulation than H. sinapizans. The increased growth of pine seedlings was especially seen for co-inoculation with P. putida. Furthermore, elevated accumulation of Cd(II), ranging from 56 microg g(-1) to 72 microg g(-1) dry weight, in underground parts of the inoculated seedlings was found. The seedlings treated with A. rubescens accumulated higher concentrations of the metal than those inoculated with H. sinapizans. Additional treatment of pine seedlings with P. putida resulted in the higher accumulation of Cd(II) in the roots as compared with those inoculated with B. cereus. The results suggest that the growth of pine seedlings in Cd(II)-polluted soil may depend on fungal species forming ectomycorrhizae, species-specific co-inoculation with EMAB and specificity of fungal-EMAB interactions.

  8. Assessment of bioaerosol contamination (bacteria and fungi) in the largest urban wastewater treatment plant in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Sadegh; Hassanvand, Mohammad Sadegh; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Nabavi, Samira; Faridi, Sasan; Dehghani, Asghar; Hoseini, Mohammad; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Mokamel, Adel; Kashani, Homa; Yarali, Navid; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-10-01

    Bioaerosol concentration was measured in wastewater treatment units in south of Tehran, the largest wastewater treatment plant in the Middle East. Active sampling was carried out around four operational units and a point as background. The results showed that the aeration tank with an average of 1016 CFU/m(3) in winter and 1973 CFU/m(3) in summer had the greatest effect on emission of bacterial bioaerosols. In addition, primary treatment had the highest impact on fungal emission. Among the bacteria, Micrococcus spp. showed the widest emission in the winter, and Bacillus spp. was dominant in summer. Furthermore, fungi such as Penicillium spp. and Cladosporium spp. were the dominant types in the seasons. Overall, significant relationship was observed between meteorological parameters and the concentration of bacterial and fungal aerosols.

  9. Characterization in the archaeological excavation site of heterotrophic bacteria and fungi of deteriorated wall painting of Herculaneum in Italy.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Olimpia; Palomba, Simona; Sannino, Luigi; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Ventorino, Valeria; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Villani, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Microbiological characterization of frescos in four different locations (Collegio degli Augustali, Casa del Colonnato Tuscanico, Casa dello Scheletro and Casa del Gran Portale) of excavation sites of Herculaneum was carried out. The use of infrared thermography allowed detecting sample points on frescos with greatest moisture not visible to the naked eye, resulting in structural damage. The microclimatic conditions provided perfect habitat for bacteria and fungi, particularly of spore forming and mould. In fact, heterotrophic bacteria were prevalent in all wall paintings monitored (ranging from 18 +/- 2 CFU 100 cm(-2) to 68 +/- 4 CFU 100 cm(-2)), whereas fungi were also detected but at lower levels (ranging from 9 +/- 2 CFU 100 cm(-2) to 45 +/- 3 CFU 100 cm(-2)). Cultural-based method allow us to identify by 16S and 26S rRNA partial sequence analysis heterotrophic microorganisms belonging to different genera of Bacillus and Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium together with the unusual genera as Microascus and Coprinus. By using this approach, Bacillus-related species (B. cereus/B. thuringiensis group, B. simplex/B. muralis group, B. megaterium and B. subtilis) were isolated in all sample points analysed with the exception of the Casa dello Scheletro in which Micrococcus luteus/Arthrobactersp. group and Streptomyces fragilis were found. DGGE analysis of PCR amplified V3 region of rDNA from DNA directly recovered from frescos samples, enabled identification of bacterial species not identified using culturable technology asthose closest related to Microbacterium group, often associated with Brevibacterium, Streptomyces and Stenotrophomonas. Combination of culture-dependent and independent methods provided better microbiology characterization of heterotrophic microbiota present on the surface of ancient frescos of this important archaeological site.

  10. The Ecological Role of Type Three Secretion Systems in the Interaction of Bacteria with Fungi in Soil and Related Habitats Is Diverse and Context-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Rashid; Mazurier, Sylvie; Yang, Pu; Lemanceau, Philippe; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi constitute important organisms in many ecosystems, in particular terrestrial ones. Both organismal groups contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling processes. Ecological theory postulates that bacteria capable of receiving benefits from host fungi are likely to evolve efficient association strategies. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanisms that underpin the bacterial interactions with fungi in soil and other systems, with special focus on the type III secretion system (T3SS). Starting with a brief description of the versatility of the T3SS as an interaction system with diverse eukaryotic hosts, we subsequently examine the recent advances made in our understanding of its contribution to interactions with soil fungi. The analysis used data sets ranging from circumstantial evidence to gene-knockout-based experimental data. The initial finding that the abundance of T3SSs in microbiomes is often enhanced in fungal-affected habitats like the mycosphere and the mycorrhizosphere is now substantiated with in-depth knowledge of the specific systems involved. Different fungal–interactive bacteria, in positive or negative associations with partner fungi, harbor and express T3SSs, with different ecological outcomes. In some particular cases, bacterial T3SSs have been shown to modulate the physiology of its fungal partner, affecting its ecological characteristics and consequently shaping its own habitat. Overall, the analyses of the collective data set revealed that diverse T3SSs have assumed diverse roles in the interactions of bacteria with host fungi, as driven by ecological and evolutionary niche requirements. PMID:28197129

  11. Bacteria influence mountain pine beetle brood development through interactions with symbiotic and antagonistic fungi: implications for climate-driven host range expansion.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Janet; Mason, Charles J; Cale, Jonathan A; Adams, Aaron; Aukema, Brian H; Currie, Cameron R; Raffa, Kenneth F; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2015-10-01

    Bark beetles are associated with diverse communities of symbionts. Although fungi have received significant attention, we know little about how bacteria, and in particular their interactions with fungi, affect bark beetle reproduction. We tested how interactions between four bacterial associates, two symbiotic fungi, and two opportunistic fungi affect performance of mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae) in host tissue. We compared beetle performance in phloem of its historical host, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and its novel host recently accessed through warming climate, jack pine (Pinus banksiana). Overall, beetles produced more larvae, and established longer ovipositional and larval galleries in host tissue predominantly colonized by the symbiotic fungi, Grosmannia clavigera, or Ophiostoma montium than by the opportunistic colonizer Aspergillus and to a lesser extent, Trichoderma. This occurred in both historical and naïve hosts. Impacts of bacteria on beetle reproduction depended on particular fungus-bacterium combinations and host species. Some bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas sp. D4-22 and Hy4T4 in P. contorta and Pseudomonas sp. Hy4T4 and Stenotrophomonas in P. banksiana, reduced antagonistic effects by Aspergillus and Trichoderma resulting in more larvae and longer ovipositional and larval galleries. These effects were not selective, as bacteria also reduced beneficial effects by symbionts in both host species. Interestingly, Bacillus enhanced antagonistic effects by Aspergillus in both hosts. These results demonstrate that bacteria influence brood development of bark beetles in host tissue. They also suggest that climate-driven range expansion of D. ponderosae through the boreal forest will not be significantly constrained by requirements of, or interactions among, its microbial associates.

  12. The Interaction between Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Endophytic Bacteria Enhances Plant Growth of Acacia gerrardii under Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Huqail, Asma A.; Wirth, Stephan; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza

    2016-01-01

    Microbes living symbiotically in plant tissues mutually cooperate with each other by providing nutrients for proliferation of the partner organism and have a beneficial effect on plant growth. However, few studies thus far have examined the interactive effect of endophytic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in hostile conditions and their potential to improve plant stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated how the synergistic interactions of endophytic bacteria and AMF affect plant growth, nodulation, nutrient acquisition and stress tolerance of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress. Plant growth varied between the treatments with both single inoculants and was higher in plants inoculated with the endophytic B. subtilis strain than with AMF. Co-inoculated A. gerrardii had a significantly greater shoot and root dry weight, nodule number, and leghemoglobin content than those inoculated with AMF or B. subtilis alone under salt stress. The endophytic B. subtilis could alleviate the adverse effect of salt on AMF colonization. The differences in nitrate and nitrite reductase and nitrogenase activities between uninoculated plants and those inoculated with AMF and B. subtilis together under stress were significant. Both inoculation treatments, either B. subtilis alone or combined with AMF, enhanced the N, P, K, Mg, and Ca contents and phosphatase activities in salt-stressed A. gerrardii tissues and reduced Na and Cl concentration, thereby protecting salt-stressed plants from ionic and osmotic stress-induced changes. In conclusion, our results indicate that endophytic bacteria and AMF contribute to a tripartite mutualistic symbiosis in A. gerrardii and are coordinately involved in the plant adaptation to salt stress tolerance. PMID:27486442

  13. The Interaction between Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Endophytic Bacteria Enhances Plant Growth of Acacia gerrardii under Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Abeer; Abd Allah, Elsayed F; Alqarawi, Abdulaziz A; Al-Huqail, Asma A; Wirth, Stephan; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza

    2016-01-01

    Microbes living symbiotically in plant tissues mutually cooperate with each other by providing nutrients for proliferation of the partner organism and have a beneficial effect on plant growth. However, few studies thus far have examined the interactive effect of endophytic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in hostile conditions and their potential to improve plant stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated how the synergistic interactions of endophytic bacteria and AMF affect plant growth, nodulation, nutrient acquisition and stress tolerance of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress. Plant growth varied between the treatments with both single inoculants and was higher in plants inoculated with the endophytic B. subtilis strain than with AMF. Co-inoculated A. gerrardii had a significantly greater shoot and root dry weight, nodule number, and leghemoglobin content than those inoculated with AMF or B. subtilis alone under salt stress. The endophytic B. subtilis could alleviate the adverse effect of salt on AMF colonization. The differences in nitrate and nitrite reductase and nitrogenase activities between uninoculated plants and those inoculated with AMF and B. subtilis together under stress were significant. Both inoculation treatments, either B. subtilis alone or combined with AMF, enhanced the N, P, K, Mg, and Ca contents and phosphatase activities in salt-stressed A. gerrardii tissues and reduced Na and Cl concentration, thereby protecting salt-stressed plants from ionic and osmotic stress-induced changes. In conclusion, our results indicate that endophytic bacteria and AMF contribute to a tripartite mutualistic symbiosis in A. gerrardii and are coordinately involved in the plant adaptation to salt stress tolerance.

  14. Nematode-trapping fungi and fungus-associated bacteria interactions: the role of bacterial diketopiperazines and biofilms on Arthrobotrys oligospora surface in hyphal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yang, Min; Luo, Jun; Qu, Qing; Chen, Ying; Liang, Lianming; Zhang, Keqin

    2016-11-01

    In soil, nematode-trapping fungi and bacteria often share microhabitats and interact with each other, but effects of fungus-associated bacteria on its trap formation are underestimated. We have ascertained the presence of Stenotrophomonas and Rhizobium genera associated with A. oligospora GJ-1. After A. oligospora GJ-1 without associated bacteria (cured Arthrobotrys) was co-cultivated with Stenotrophomonas and its supernatant extract, microscopic study of hyphae from co-cultivation indicated that bacterial biofilm formation on hyphae was related to trap formation in fungi and Stenotrophomonas supernatant extract. Four diketopiperazines (DKPs) were purified from Stenotrophomonas supernatant extract that could not induce traps in the cured Arthrobotrys. When cured Arthrobotrys was cultured with Stenotrophomonas and one of DKPs, polar attachment, bacterial biofilms on hyphae and trap formation in fungi were observed. After cured Arthrobotrys with bacterial biofilms was consecutively transferred several times on nutrient poor medium, trap formation disappeared with the disappearance of bacterial biofilms on hyphae. DKPs could facilitate chemotaxis of Stenotrophomonas towards fungal extract which was suggested to contribute to bacterial biofilms on hyphae. Furthermore, when cured Arthrobotrys was cultured with Stenotrophomonas and DKPs in soil, trap formation in fungi and bacterial biofilms on hyphae were also observed, and the fungal activity against nematode was enhanced.

  15. Response of endangered plant species to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zubek, Szymon; Turnau, Katarzyna; Tsimilli-Michael, Merope; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-02-01

    Three endangered plant species, Plantago atrata and Pulsatilla slavica, which are on the IUCN red list of plants, and Senecio umbrosus, which is extinct in the wild in Poland, were inoculated with soil microorganisms to evaluate their responsiveness to inoculation and to select the most effective microbial consortium for application in conservation projects. Individuals of these taxa were cultivated with (1) native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) isolated from natural habitats of the investigated species, (2) a mixture of AMF strains available in the laboratory, and (3) a combination of AMF lab strains with rhizobacteria. The plants were found to be dependent on AMF for their growth; the mycorrhizal dependency for P. atrata was 91%, S. umbrosus-95%, and P. slavica-65%. The applied inocula did not significantly differ in the stimulation of the growth of P. atrata and S. umbrosus, while in P. slavica, native AMF proved to be the less efficient. We therefore conclude that AMF application can improve the ex situ propagation of these three threatened taxa and may contribute to the success of S. umbrosus reintroduction. A multilevel analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients by the JIP test permitted an in vivo evaluation of plant vitality in terms of biophysical parameters quantifying photosynthetic energy conservation, which was found to be in good agreement with the results concerning physiological parameters. Therefore, the JIP test can be used to evaluate the influence of AMF on endangered plants, with the additional advantage of being applicable in monitoring in a noninvasive way the acclimatization of reintroduced species in nature.

  16. Urediospores of rust fungi are ice nucleation active at > -10 °C and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Glaux, C.; Samsatly, J.; Asaad, S.; Moukahel, A. R.; Gonçalves, F. L. T.; Bigg, E. K.

    2013-04-01

    Various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history. Based on this insight we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA) of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores) of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections of 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores from France, the USA and Brazil, and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active, having freezing onset temperatures as high as -4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores), but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. However, at cloud level convective activity leads to widely varying concentrations of particles of surface origin, so that mean concentrations can underestimate their possible effects on clouds. We propose that spatial and temporal concentrations of biological ice nucleators active at temperatures > -10

  17. Distinct Biogeographic Patterns for Archaea, Bacteria, and Fungi along the Vegetation Gradient at the Continental Scale in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Dai, Zhongmin; Wang, Haizhen; Dsouza, Melissa; Liu, Xingmei; He, Yan; Wu, Jianjun; Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Gilbert, Jack A; Brookes, Philip C; Xu, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    The natural forest ecosystem in Eastern China, from tropical forest to boreal forest, has declined due to cropland development during the last 300 years, yet little is known about the historical biogeographic patterns and driving processes for the major domains of microorganisms along this continental-scale natural vegetation gradient. We predicted the biogeographic patterns of soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities across 110 natural forest sites along a transect across four vegetation zones in Eastern China. The distance decay relationships demonstrated the distinct biogeographic patterns of archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities. While historical processes mainly influenced bacterial community variations, spatially autocorrelated environmental variables mainly influenced the fungal community. Archaea did not display a distance decay pattern along the vegetation gradient. Bacterial community diversity and structure were correlated with the ratio of acid oxalate-soluble Fe to free Fe oxides (Feo/Fed ratio). Fungal community diversity and structure were influenced by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and free aluminum (Ald), respectively. The role of these environmental variables was confirmed by the correlations between dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and edaphic variables. However, most of the dominant OTUs were not correlated with the major driving variables for the entire communities. These results demonstrate that soil archaea, bacteria, and fungi have different biogeographic patterns and driving processes along this continental-scale natural vegetation gradient, implying different community assembly mechanisms and ecological functions for archaea, bacteria, and fungi in soil ecosystems. IMPORTANCE Understanding biogeographic patterns is a precursor to improving our knowledge of the function of microbiomes and to predicting ecosystem responses to environmental change. Using natural forest soil samples from 110 locations, this study is

  18. Distinct Biogeographic Patterns for Archaea, Bacteria, and Fungi along the Vegetation Gradient at the Continental Scale in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bin; Dai, Zhongmin; Wang, Haizhen; Dsouza, Melissa; Liu, Xingmei; He, Yan; Wu, Jianjun; Gilbert, Jack A.; Brookes, Philip C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The natural forest ecosystem in Eastern China, from tropical forest to boreal forest, has declined due to cropland development during the last 300 years, yet little is known about the historical biogeographic patterns and driving processes for the major domains of microorganisms along this continental-scale natural vegetation gradient. We predicted the biogeographic patterns of soil archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities across 110 natural forest sites along a transect across four vegetation zones in Eastern China. The distance decay relationships demonstrated the distinct biogeographic patterns of archaeal, bacterial, and fungal communities. While historical processes mainly influenced bacterial community variations, spatially autocorrelated environmental variables mainly influenced the fungal community. Archaea did not display a distance decay pattern along the vegetation gradient. Bacterial community diversity and structure were correlated with the ratio of acid oxalate-soluble Fe to free Fe oxides (Feo/Fed ratio). Fungal community diversity and structure were influenced by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and free aluminum (Ald), respectively. The role of these environmental variables was confirmed by the correlations between dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and edaphic variables. However, most of the dominant OTUs were not correlated with the major driving variables for the entire communities. These results demonstrate that soil archaea, bacteria, and fungi have different biogeographic patterns and driving processes along this continental-scale natural vegetation gradient, implying different community assembly mechanisms and ecological functions for archaea, bacteria, and fungi in soil ecosystems. IMPORTANCE Understanding biogeographic patterns is a precursor to improving our knowledge of the function of microbiomes and to predicting ecosystem responses to environmental change. Using natural forest soil samples from 110 locations, this

  19. Human pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses in Drosophila: disease modeling, lessons, and shortcomings.

    PubMed

    Panayidou, Stavria; Ioannidou, Eleni; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2014-02-15

    Drosophila has been the invertebrate model organism of choice for the study of innate immune responses during the past few decades. Many Drosophila-microbe interaction studies have helped to define innate immunity pathways, and significant effort has been made lately to decipher mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Here we catalog 68 bacterial, fungal, and viral species studied in flies, 43 of which are relevant to human health. We discuss studies of human pathogens in flies revealing not only the elicitation and avoidance of immune response but also mechanisms of tolerance, host tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and predisposition to cancer. Prominent among those is the emerging pattern of intestinal regeneration as a defense response induced by pathogenic and innocuous bacteria. Immunopathology mechanisms and many microbial virulence factors have been elucidated, but their relevance to human health conventionally necessitates validation in mammalian models of infection.

  20. Source identification analysis for the airborne bacteria and fungi using a biomarker approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Lau, Arthur P. S.; Cheng, Jessica Y. W.; Fang, Ming; Chan, Chak K.

    Our recent studies have reported the feasibility of employing the 3-hydoxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) and ergosterol as biomarkers to determine the loading of the airborne endotoxin from the Gram-negative bacteria and fungal biomass in atmospheric aerosols, respectively [Lee, A.K.Y., Chan, C.K., Fang, K., Lau, A.P.S., 2004. The 3-hydroxy fatty acids as biomarkers for quantification and characterization of endotoxins and Gram-negative bacteria in atmospheric aerosols in Hong Kong. Atmospheric Environment 38, 6807-6317; Lau, A.P.S., Lee, A.K.Y., Chan, C.K., Fang, K., 2006. Ergosterol as a biomarker for the quantification of the fungal biomass in atmospheric aerosols. Atmospheric Environment 40, 249-259]. These quantified biomarkers do not, however, provide information on their sources. In this study, the year-long dataset of the endotoxin and ergosterol measured in Hong Kong was integrated with the common water-soluble inorganic ions for source identification through the principal component analysis (PCA) and backward air mass trajectory analysis. In the coarse particles (PM 2.5-10), the bacterial endotoxin is loaded in the same factor group with Ca 2+ and accounted for about 20% of the total variance of the PCA. This implies the crustal origin for the airborne bacterial assemblage. The fungal ergosterol in the coarse particles (PM 2.5-10) had by itself loaded in a factor group of 10.8% of the total variance in one of the sampling sites with large area of natural vegetative coverage. This suggests the single entity nature of the fungal spores and their independent emission to the ambient air upon maturation of their vegetative growth. In the fine particles (

  1. Is Predominant Clonal Evolution a Common Evolutionary Adaptation to Parasitism in Pathogenic Parasitic Protozoa, Fungi, Bacteria, and Viruses?

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, M; Ayala, F J

    2017-01-01

    We propose that predominant clonal evolution (PCE) in microbial pathogens be defined as restrained recombination on an evolutionary scale, with genetic exchange scarce enough to not break the prevalent pattern of clonal population structure. The main features of PCE are (1) strong linkage disequilibrium, (2) the widespread occurrence of stable genetic clusters blurred by occasional bouts of genetic exchange ('near-clades'), (3) the existence of a "clonality threshold", beyond which recombination is efficiently countered by PCE, and near-clades irreversibly diverge. We hypothesize that the PCE features are not mainly due to natural selection but also chiefly originate from in-built genetic properties of pathogens. We show that the PCE model obtains even in microbes that have been considered as 'highly recombining', such as Neisseria meningitidis, and that some clonality features are observed even in Plasmodium, which has been long described as panmictic. Lastly, we provide evidence that PCE features are also observed in viruses, taking into account their extremely fast genetic turnover. The PCE model provides a convenient population genetic framework for any kind of micropathogen. It makes it possible to describe convenient units of analysis (clones and near-clades) for all applied studies. Due to PCE features, these units of analysis are stable in space and time, and clearly delimited. The PCE model opens up the possibility of revisiting the problem of species definition in these organisms. We hypothesize that PCE constitutes a major evolutionary strategy for protozoa, fungi, bacteria, and viruses to adapt to parasitism.

  2. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) acting as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piruthiviraj, Prakash; Margret, Anita; Krishnamurthy, Poornima Priyadharsani

    2016-04-01

    Production of antimicrobial agents through the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using green technology has been extensively made consistent by various researchers; yet, this study uses the flower bud's aqueous extracts of Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) as a reducing agent for chloroauric acid (1 mM). After 30 min of incubation, synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) was observed by a change in extract color from pale yellow to purple color. Synthesis of AuNps was confirmed in UV-visible spectroscopy at the range of approximately 560 nm. The SEM analysis showed the average nanoparticles size of 12-22 nm. The antimicrobial activity of AuNps was analyzed by subjecting it to human pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Klebsiella pneumonia) and fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) using disc diffusion method. The broccoli-synthesized AuNps showed the efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity of above-mentioned microbes. It was confirmed that AuNps have the best antimicrobial agent compared to the standard antibiotics (Gentamicin and Fluconazole). When the concentrations of AuNps were increased (10, 25, and 50 µg/ml), the sensitivity zone also increased for all the tested microbes. The synthesized AuNps are capable of rendering high antimicrobial efficacy and, hence, have a great potential in the preparation of drugs used against major bacterial and fungal diseases in humans.

  3. Off-odor compounds produced in cork by isolated bacteria and fungi: a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry study.

    PubMed

    Prat, Chantal; Trias, Rosalia; Culleré, Laura; Escudero, Ana; Anticó, Enriqueta; Bañeras, Lluís

    2009-08-26

    The risk of development of specific olfactory profiles in cork was evaluated after inoculation of cork granules and agglomerated and natural cork stoppers with isolated bacteria and fungi. The highest incidence of off-odor development was found in assays when fungi were inoculated. Cork granules with musty-earthy, musty-earthy-TCA, and vegetative deviations were inspected by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sixteen odor zones were clearly recognized in the GC-O analyses. Among these, octanal, 2-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyrazine (MDMP), Z-2-nonenal, 2-methylisoborneol, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), geosmin, and guaiacol were the most significant odorants and helped in the discrimination of sensory deviations. Only TCA and guaiacol were detected above their respective detection limits by HS-SPME-GC-MS. The fungi Cryptococcus sp. isolate F020, Rhodotorula sp. isolate F025, Penicillium glabrum isolate F001, and Pennicillium variabile F003A and the bacterium Pseudomonas jessenii isolate A1 were found to produce TCA to a greater extent. Additionally, 13 of 38 isolated microorganisms (2 bacteria and 11 fungi) proved able to produce unpleasant musty-earthy or vegetative odors that were not related to a significant TCA accumulation.

  4. Summer season and long-term drought increase the richness of bacteria and fungi in the foliar phyllosphere of Quercus ilex in a mixed Mediterranean forest.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas, J; Rico, L; Ogaya, R; Jump, A S; Terradas, J

    2012-07-01

    We explored the changes in richness, diversity and evenness of epiphytic (on the leaf surface) and endophytic (within leaf tissues) bacteria and fungi in the foliar phyllosphere of Quercus ilex, the dominant tree species of Mediterranean forests. Bacteria and fungi were assessed during ontogenic development of the leaves, from the wet spring to the dry summer season in control plots and in plots subjected to drought conditions mimicking those projected for future decades. Our aim was to monitor succession in microbiota during the colonisation of plant leaves and its response to climate change. Ontogeny and seasonality exerted a strong influence on richness and diversity of the microbial phyllosphere community, which decreased in summer in the whole leaf and increased in summer in the epiphytic phyllosphere. Drought precluded the decrease in whole leaf phyllosphere diversity and increased the rise in the epiphytic phyllosphere. Both whole leaf bacterial and fungal richness decreased with the decrease in physiological activity and productivity of the summer season in control trees. As expected, the richness of epiphytic bacteria and fungi increased in summer after increasing time of colonisation. Under summer dry conditions, there was a positive relationship between TRF (terminal restriction fragments) richness and drought, both for whole leaf and epiphytic phyllosphere, and especially for fungal communities. These results demonstrate that changes in climate are likely to significantly alter microbial abundance and composition of the phyllosphere. Given the diverse functions and large number of phyllospheric microbes, the potential functional implications of such community shifts warrant exploration.

  5. Chemical ecology of fungi.

    PubMed

    Spiteller, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Fungi are widespread in nature and have conquered nearly every ecological niche. Fungi occur not only in terrestrial but also in freshwater and marine environments. Moreover, fungi are known as a rich source of secondary metabolites. Despite these facts, the ecological role of many of these metabolites is still unknown and the chemical ecology of fungi has not been investigated systematically so far. This review intends to present examples of the various chemical interactions of fungi with other fungi, plants, bacteria and animals and to give an overview of the current knowledge of fungal chemical ecology.

  6. Oligo-DNA Custom Macroarray for Monitoring Major Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria in the Phyllosphere of Apple Trees

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying-Hong; Isono, Sayaka; Shibuya, Makoto; Tsuji, Masaharu; Adkar Purushothama, Charith-Raj; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Sano, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Background To monitor the richness in microbial inhabitants in the phyllosphere of apple trees cultivated under various cultural and environmental conditions, we developed an oligo-DNA macroarray for major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of apple trees. Methods and Findings First, we isolated culturable fungi and bacteria from apple orchards by an agar-plate culture method, and detected 32 fungal and 34 bacterial species. Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium, Rhodotorula, Cystofilobasidium, and Epicoccum genera were predominant among the fungi, and Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Pantoea genera were predominant among the bacteria. Based on the data, we selected 29 major non-pathogenic and 12 phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria as the targets of macroarray. Forty-one species-specific 40-base pair long oligo-DNA sequences were selected from the nucleotide sequences of rDNA-internal transcribed spacer region for fungi and 16S rDNA for bacteria. The oligo-DNAs were fixed on nylon membrane and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes prepared for each species. All arrays except those for Alternaria, Bacillus, and their related species, were specifically hybridized. The array was sensitive enough to detect 103 CFU for Aureobasidium pullulans and Bacillus cereus. Nucleotide sequencing of 100 each of independent fungal rDNA-ITS and bacterial 16S-rDNA sequences from apple tree was in agreement with the macroarray data obtained using the same sample. Finally, we analyzed the richness in the microbial inhabitants in the samples collected from apple trees in four orchards. Major apple pathogens that cause scab, Alternaria blotch, and Marssonina blotch were detected along with several non-phytopathogenic fungal and bacterial inhabitants. Conclusions The macroarray technique presented here is a strong tool to monitor the major microbial species and the community structures in the phyllosphere of

  7. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Most biogeochemical models of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling include a simplified representation of the soil microbial community as a single pool, despite good evidence that shifts in the composition or relative abundance of microbial taxa can affect process rates. Incorporating a more realistic depiction of the microbial community in these models may increase their predictive accuracy, but this must be balanced against the feasibility of modeling the enormous diversity present in soil. We propose that explicitly including two major microbial functional groups with distinct physiologies, fungi and bacteria, will improve model predictions. To this end, we created the fungi and bacteria (FAB) model, building off previous enzyme-driven biogeochemical models that explicitly represent microbial physiology. We compared this model to a complementary biogeochemical model that does not include microbial community structure (';single-pool'). We also performed a cross-ecosystem meta-analysis of fungi-to-bacteria ratios to determine if model predictions of community structure matched empirical data. There were large differences in process rates and pool sizes between the single-pool and FAB models. In the FAB model, inorganic N pools were reduced by 5-95% depending on the soil C:N ratio due to bacterial immobilization of fungal mineralization products. This nitrogen subsidy also increased microbial biomass at some C:N ratios. Although there were changes in some components of respiration, particularly overflow respiration, there was no net effect of community structure on total respiration fluxes. The FAB model predicted a breakpoint in the relationship between the ratio of fungi to bacteria and soil C:N, after which the fungi-to-bacteria ratio should begin to increase. Break-point analysis of the meta-analysis data set revealed a consistent pattern and matched the slope of the change in F:B with soil C:N, but not the precise breakpoint. We argue that including microbial

  8. Nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater using single and mixed culture systems of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfeng; Cao, Lixiang; Tan, Hongming; Zhang, Renduo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of single and mixed culture of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria on nitrogen removal and N2O emission in treatment of wastewater. Denitrifying endophytes of Pseudomonas sp. B2, Streptomyces sp. A9, and Fusarium sp. F3 isolated from rice plants were utilized for treatment of synthetic wastewater containing nitrate and nitrite. Experiments were conducted under shaking and static conditions. Results showed that under the static condition, more than 97 % of nitrate removal efficiencies were reached in all the treatments containing B2. The nitrate removal rates within the first 12 h in the treatments of B2, B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 were 7.3, 9.8, 11, and 11 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. Under the shaking condition, 100 % of nitrite was removed in all the treatments containing B2. The presence of A9 and F3 with B2 increased the nitrite removal rates under both the shaking and static conditions. Compared to the B2 system, the mixed systems of B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 reduced N2O emission (78.4 vs. 19.4, 1.80, and 0.03 μM in 4 weeks, respectively). Our results suggested that B2 is an important strain that enhances nitrogen removal from wastewater. Mixed cultures of B2 with A9 and F3 can remove more nitrate and nitrite from wastewater and reduce nitrite accumulation and N2O emission in the denitrification process.

  9. Application of pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis to study bacteria and fungi in biofilms used for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Melucci, Dora; Fedi, Stefano; Locatelli, Marcello; Locatelli, Clinio; Montalbani, Simona; Cappelletti, Martina

    2013-08-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms adhering to a surface and embedded in an extracellular polymeric matrix, frequently associated with disease and contamination, and also used for engineering applications such as bioremediation. A mixed biofilm formed by bacteria and fungi may provide an optimal habitat for addressing contaminated areas. To exploit the potential of natural microbial communities consisting of bacteria and fungi, it is essential to understand and control their formation. In this work, a method to discriminate among bacteria of genera Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus with respect to the fungus Pleorotus in a biofilm by means of pyrolysis-gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis is reported. Methylated fatty acids were chosen as biomarkers of microorganisms in the pyrolysates. In situ thermal hydrolysis and methylation was applied. Pyrograms were used as fingerprints, thus allowing for the characterization of whole cells analyzed without any sample pretreatment. Normalized pyrographic peak areas were chosen as variables for chemometric data processing. Principal components analysis was applied as a data exploration tool. Satisfactory results were obtained in analyzing a real biofilm. The influence of growth medium on whole bacteria fatty acid cell composition was also explored.

  10. Xylanases from fungi: properties and industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Polizeli, M L T M; Rizzatti, A C S; Monti, R; Terenzi, H F; Jorge, J A; Amorim, D S

    2005-06-01

    Xylan is the principal type of hemicellulose. It is a linear polymer of beta-D-xylopyranosyl units linked by (1-4) glycosidic bonds. In nature, the polysaccharide backbone may be added to 4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronopyranosyl units, acetyl groups, alpha-L-arabinofuranosyl, etc., in variable proportions. An enzymatic complex is responsible for the hydrolysis of xylan, but the main enzymes involved are endo-1,4-beta-xylanase and beta-xylosidase. These enzymes are produced by fungi, bacteria, yeast, marine algae, protozoans, snails, crustaceans, insect, seeds, etc., but the principal commercial source is filamentous fungi. Recently, there has been much industrial interest in xylan and its hydrolytic enzymatic complex, as a supplement in animal feed, for the manufacture of bread, food and drinks, textiles, bleaching of cellulose pulp, ethanol and xylitol production. This review describes some properties of xylan and its metabolism, as well as the biochemical properties of xylanases and their commercial applications.

  11. Growth, Survival, and Death of Bacteria and Fungi Following Wet-up of Seasonally Dried Soil Revealed by Heavy Water Stable Isotope Probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazewicz, S.; Nuccio, E. E.; Lim, H.; Schwartz, E.; Brodie, E.; Firestone, M.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid increase in microbial activity that occurs when a dry soil is rewetted has been well documented and is of great interest due to implications of changing precipitation patterns on soil C dynamics. Several studies have shown minor net changes in microbial population diversity or abundance following wet-up, but the gross population dynamics of bacteria and fungi resulting from soil wet-up are virtually unknown due to the technical difficulties associated with such measurements. Here we applied DNA stable isotope probing with H218O coupled with quantitative PCR and high throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to characterize taxonomic composition of bacteria and to describe new growth, survival, and mortality of bacteria and fungi following the rewetting of a seasonally dried California annual grassland soil. Total microbial abundance revealed little change throughout the 7-day post-wet incubation, but there was substantial turnover of both bacterial and fungal populations (49 and 52% respectively). New growth was linear between 24 and 168 hours for both bacteria and fungi with average growth rates of 2.3 x 108 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies gdw-1 h-1 and 4.3 x 107 fungal ITS copies gdw-1 h-1. While bacteria and fungi differed in their mortality and survival characteristics during the 7-day incubation, mortality that occurred within the first 3 hours was similar with 25 and 27% of bacterial and fungal gene copies disappearing from the pre-wet community, respectively. The rapid disappearance of gene copies indicates that cell death, occurring either during the extreme dry down period (preceding 5 months) or during the rapid change in water-potential due to wet-up, generates a significant pool of available C that likely contributes to the large pulse in CO2 associated with wet-up. Sequential bacterial growth patterns observed at the phylum and order levels suggest that an ecologically coherent response was observable at coarse taxonomic levels with

  12. [Community diversity of bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the rhizosphere of eight plants in Liudaogou watershed on the Loess Plateau China].

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Tang, Ming; Chen, Hui; Cong, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was used to examine the community diversity of bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their interrelation in the rhizosphere of 8 plants in the Liudaogou watershed in Shenmu County. The objective was to obtain diversity indices and provide theoretical basis for ecological restoration. Results showed significant variations in the species and abundances of rhizospheric bacteria and AMF associated with 8 plants. Among these, the Shannon diversity index of rhizospheric bacteria was the highest for Robinia pseudoacacia (4.01) and the lowest for Salix babylonica (2.18), whereas the Shannon diversity index of rhizospheric AMF was the highest for Populus simonii (2.07) and the lowest for Hippophae rhamnoides (1.21). Cluster analysis and redundancy analysis indicated a significant difference in associated microbial community structure, while the similarity among community diversity of rhizospheric bacteria and AMF associated with specific plants was also found. There was a significant correlation between diversity indices of bacteria and AMF (P < 0.01). Associated microbial community diversity was influenced primarily by organic matter and total nitrogen content. Our work demonstrated strong impacts of plant species and rhizospheric environment on associated microbial community structure. Due to the high diversity indices of rhizospheric bacteria and AMF, R. pseudoacacia was considered to be a pioneer plant species for vegetation restoration in the Liudaogou watershed.

  13. Metagenomic analysis of medicinal Cannabis samples; pathogenic bacteria, toxigenic fungi, and beneficial microbes grow in culture-based yeast and mold tests.

    PubMed

    McKernan, Kevin; Spangler, Jessica; Helbert, Yvonne; Lynch, Ryan C; Devitt-Lee, Adrian; Zhang, Lei; Orphe, Wendell; Warner, Jason; Foss, Theodore; Hudalla, Christopher J; Silva, Matthew; Smith, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of bacteria and fungi in medicinal or recreational Cannabis poses a potential threat to consumers if those microbes include pathogenic or toxigenic species. This study evaluated two widely used culture-based platforms for total yeast and mold (TYM) testing marketed by 3M Corporation and Biomérieux, in comparison with a quantitative PCR (qPCR) approach marketed by Medicinal Genomics Corporation. Methods: A set of 15 medicinal Cannabis samples were analyzed using 3M and Biomérieux culture-based platforms and by qPCR to quantify microbial DNA. All samples were then subjected to next-generation sequencing and metagenomics analysis to enumerate the bacteria and fungi present before and after growth on culture-based media. Results: Several pathogenic or toxigenic bacterial and fungal species were identified in proportions of >5% of classified reads on the samples, including Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ralstonia pickettii, Salmonella enterica, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aspergillus ostianus, Aspergillus sydowii, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium steckii. Samples subjected to culture showed substantial shifts in the number and diversity of species present, including the failure of Aspergillus species to grow well on either platform. Substantial growth of Clostridium botulinum and other bacteria were frequently observed on one or both of the culture-based TYM platforms. The presence of plant growth promoting (beneficial) fungal species further influenced the differential growth of species in the microbiome of each sample. Conclusions: These findings have important implications for the Cannabis and food safety testing industries.

  14. Detection of bacteria and fungi in blood of patients with febrile neutropenia by real-time PCR with universal primers and probes.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Hideto; Ohzono, Nanae; Inamura, Norikazu; Kato, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Akaike, Hiroto; Terada, Kihei; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-03-01

    Febrile neutropenia is the main treatment-related cause of mortality in cancer patients. During June 2012 to April 2014, 97 blood culture samples were collected from patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancy and cancer with febrile neutropenia episodes (FNEs). The samples were examined for the presence of bacteria and fungi using real-time PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S and 18S rRNA genes. Bacteria were identified in 20 of 97 samples (20.6%) by the real-time PCR assay and in 10 of 97 (10.3%) samples by blood culture. In 6 blood culture-positive samples, the real-time PCR assay detected the same type of bacteria. No fungi were detected by the real-time PCR assay or blood culture. During antibiotic therapy, all samples were negative by blood culture, but the real-time PCR assay yielded a positive result in 2 cases of 2 (100%). The bacterial DNA copy number was not well correlated with the serum C-reactive protein titer of patients with FNEs. We conclude that a real-time PCR assay could provide better detection of causative microbes' in a shorter time, and with a smaller blood sample than blood culture. Using a real-time PCR assay in combination with blood culture could improve microbiological documentation of FNEs.

  15. Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Edra; Dorta, Fernando; Medina, Cristian; Ramírez, Alberto; Ramírez, Ingrid; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens. PMID:21673886

  16. [Effect of pH on suppressing the growth of other bacteria and fungi in culturing Phanerochaete chrysosporium in liquid medium].

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-wen; Wen, Xiang-hua; Zhou, Xiao-yan; Zeng, Yong-gang; Qian, Yi

    2005-11-01

    Effect of different pH value on suppressing the growth of other bacteria and fungi in culturing Phanerochaete chrysosporium in liquid medium under non-sterile were investigated in agitated Erlenmeyer flasks. Results showed that nitrogen-limited liquid medium with pH3.6 and pH4.4 were contaminated only by yeast fungi when the Phanerochaete chrysosporium was incubated with spore inoculation under non-sterile condition for one day; however, nitrogen-limited liquid medium with pH5.6 was contaminated not only by yeast, but also by bacteria. These contaminated yeast and bacteria reduced the dye decolorizing ability of Phanerochaete chrysosporium . If after the Phanerochaete chrysosporium was incubated under sterile condition for 5 days, it can decolorize over 70% of the reactive brilliant red K-2BP within 45 hours under non-sterile condition, and this removal rate was close to or even higher than that under sterile condition. Phanerochaete chrysosporium cultured in the liquid medium with pH4.4 have the best decolorizing effect under non-sterile condition, and can decolorize up to 80% of the reactive brilliant red K-2BP in 24 hours. In additions, it was observed that by using the Phanerochaete chrysosporium incubated in above nitrogen-limited liquid medium with different pH under sterile condition for 5 days, the system were also contaminated by the other bacteria and yeast during decolorizing reactive brilliant red K-2BP under non-sterile condition, but the amount of these bacteria and yeast in liquid medium were too little to influence the Phanerochaete chrysosporium decolorizing reactive brilliant red K-2BP. So that, when Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to decolorize reactive dyes under non-sterile condition, the incubation of Phanerochaete chrysosporium must be operated under sterile condition in order to achieve the higher decolorization.

  17. Contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and/or bacteria to enhancing plant drought tolerance under natural soil conditions: effectiveness of autochthonous or allochthonous strains.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, N; Armada, E; Duque, E; Roldán, A; Azcón, R

    2015-02-01

    Autochthonous microorganisms [a consortium of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)] were assayed and compared to Rhizophagus intraradices (Ri), Bacillus megaterium (Bm) or Pseudomonas putida (Psp) and non-inoculation on Trifolium repens in a natural arid soil under drought conditions. The autochthonous bacteria Bt and the allochthonous bacteria Psp increased nutrients and the relative water content and decreased stomatal conductance, electrolyte leakage, proline and APX activity, indicating their abilities to alleviate the drought stress. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly enhanced plant growth, nutrient uptake and the relative water content, particularly when associated with specific bacteria minimizing drought stress-imposed effects. Specific combinations of autochthonous or allochthonous inoculants also contributed to plant drought tolerance by changing proline and antioxidative activities. However, non-inoculated plants had low relative water and nutrients contents, shoot proline accumulation and glutathione reductase activity, but the highest superoxide dismutase activity, stomatal conductance and electrolyte leakage. Microbial activities irrespective of the microbial origin seem to be coordinately functioning in the plant as an adaptive response to modulated water stress tolerance and minimizing the stress damage. The autochthonous AM fungi with Bt or Psp and those allochthonous Ri with Bm or Psp inoculants increased water stress alleviation. The autochthonous Bt showed the greatest ability to survive under high osmotic stress compared to the allochthonous strains, but when single inoculated or associated with Ri or AM fungi were similarly efficient in terms of physiological and nutritional status and in increasing plant drought tolerance, attenuating and compensating for the detrimental effect of water limitation.

  18. Efficient nutrient removal from swine manure in a tubular biofilm photo-bioreactor using algae-bacteria consortia.

    PubMed

    González, C; Marciniak, J; Villaverde, S; León, C; García, P A; Muñoz, R

    2008-01-01

    Concentrated animals feeding operations (CAFOs) often pose a negative environmental impact due to the uncontrolled spreading of manure into soils that ends up in the release of organic matter and nutrients into water bodies. Conventional aerobic methods treating CAFOs wastewater require intensive oxygenation, which significantly increases the operational costs. The alternative proposed in this research is the application of micro-algae based systems by taking advantage of the cost-effective in situ oxygenation via photosynthesis. A 4.9 L enclosed tubular biofilm photo-bioreactor was inoculated with an algal-bacterial consortium formed by the micro-algae Chlorella sorokiniana and a mixed bacterial culture from an activated sludge process. C. sorokiniana delivers the O(2) necessary to accomplish both organic matter and ammonium oxidation. The reactor was fed with diluted swine wastewater containing 180, 15 and 2,000 mg/L of NH(4) (+)-N, soluble P and total COD, respectively. The photo-bioreactor exhibited good and sustained nutrient removal efficiencies (up to 99% and 86% for NH(4) (+) and PO(4) (3-), respectively) while total COD was removed up to 75% when the biofilm was properly established. Liquid superficial velocities up to 0.4 m/s (achieved by culture broth recirculation) hindered the formation of a stable biofilm, while operation at velocities lower than 0.1 m/s supported stable process performance. The high shear stress imposed by the centrifugal recirculation pump disintegrated the large aggregates detached from the biofilm, which resulted in a poor settling performance and therefore poor COD removal efficiencies. Enclosed biofilm photo-bioreactors therefore offer a potentially more economical alternative to conventional tertiary treatments process.

  19. Size-Dependent Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles to Bacteria, Yeast, Algae, Crustaceans and Mammalian Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ivask, Angela; Kurvet, Imbi; Kasemets, Kaja; Blinova, Irina; Aruoja, Villem; Suppi, Sandra; Vija, Heiki; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Titma, Tiina; Heinlaan, Margit; Visnapuu, Meeri; Koller, Dagmar; Kisand, Vambola; Kahru, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The concept of nanotechnologies is based on size-dependent properties of particles in the 1–100 nm range. However, the relation between the particle size and biological effects is still unclear. The aim of the current paper was to generate and analyse a homogenous set of experimental toxicity data on Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) of similar coating (citrate) but of 5 different primary sizes (10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 nm) to different types of organisms/cells commonly used in toxicity assays: bacterial, yeast and algal cells, crustaceans and mammalian cells in vitro. When possible, the assays were conducted in ultrapure water to minimise the effect of medium components on silver speciation. The toxic effects of NPs to different organisms varied about two orders of magnitude, being the lowest (∼0.1 mg Ag/L) for crustaceans and algae and the highest (∼26 mg Ag/L) for mammalian cells. To quantify the role of Ag ions in the toxicity of Ag NPs, we normalized the EC50 values to Ag ions that dissolved from the NPs. The analysis showed that the toxicity of 20–80 nm Ag NPs could fully be explained by released Ag ions whereas 10 nm Ag NPs proved more toxic than predicted. Using E. coli Ag-biosensor, we demonstrated that 10 nm Ag NPs were more bioavailable to E. coli than silver salt (AgNO3). Thus, one may infer that 10 nm Ag NPs had more efficient cell-particle contact resulting in higher intracellular bioavailability of silver than in case of bigger NPs. Although the latter conclusion is initially based on one test organism, it may lead to an explanation for “size-dependent“ biological effects of silver NPs. This study, for the first time, investigated the size-dependent toxic effects of a well-characterized library of Ag NPs to several microbial species, protozoans, algae, crustaceans and mammalian cells in vitro. PMID:25048192

  20. Isolation of Fungi and Bacteria Associated with the Guts of Tropical Wood-Feeding Coleoptera and Determination of Their Lignocellulolytic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Jiménez, Keilor; Hernández, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    The guts of beetle larvae constitute a complex system where relationships among fungi, bacteria, and the insect host occur. In this study, we collected larvae of five families of wood-feeding Coleoptera in tropical forests of Costa Rica, isolated fungi and bacteria from their intestinal tracts, and determined the presence of five different pathways for lignocellulolytic activity. The fungal isolates were assigned to three phyla, 16 orders, 24 families, and 40 genera; Trichoderma was the most abundant genus, detected in all insect families and at all sites. The bacterial isolates were assigned to five phyla, 13 orders, 22 families, and 35 genera; Bacillus, Serratia, and Pseudomonas were the dominant genera, present in all the Coleopteran families. Positive results for activities related to degradation of wood components were determined in 65% and 48% of the fungal and bacterial genera, respectively. Our results showed that both the fungal and bacterial populations were highly diverse in terms of number of species and their phylogenetic composition, although the structure of the microbial communities varied with insect host family and the surrounding environment. The recurrent identification of some lignocellulolytic-positive inhabitants suggests that particular microbial groups play important roles in providing nutritional needs for the Coleopteran host. PMID:26379709

  1. Monitoring toxicity of industrial wastewater and specific chemicals to a green alga, nitrifying bacteria and an aquatic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Eilersen, A M; Arvin, E; Henze, M

    2004-01-01

    Treatment plants may be exposed to a whole range of toxic organic and inorganic compounds that may inhibit the removal of organic matter and nitrogen. In order to secure maximum treatment efficiency, the plant manager has to monitor the toxicity of the influent sewage. With regard to the receiving water the manager also has to make sure that toxicity in the influent is significantly reduced during treatment. Because a whole range of chemicals may be present, chemical analysis may be insufficient and expensive as a control instrument. Instead, direct toxicity measurements are preferable to capture the complexity of the wastewater. The monitoring methods have to be relevant and sensitive for the processes in the treatment plant, i.e. removal of organic matter and nutrients. The methods also have to be simple and inexpensive. The paper reports on recent results from the application of nitrification, algae and Biotox tests, and summarises the experience with monitoring of toxicity. Although the sensitivity of the tests varies with respect to individual chemicals or group of chemicals, the application of a combination of the tests gives a high likelihood of detecting toxic impacts on treatment plants and receiving waters.

  2. Cohort Study of Airway Mycobiome in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Differences in Community Structure between Fungi and Bacteria Reveal Predominance of Transient Fungal Elements.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Rolf; Sauer-Heilborn, Annette; Welte, Tobias; Guzman, Carlos A; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Höfle, Manfred G

    2015-09-01

    The respiratory mycobiome is an important but understudied component of the human microbiota. Like bacteria, fungi can cause severe lung diseases, but their infection rates are much lower. This study compared the bacterial and fungal communities of sputum samples from a large cohort of 56 adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) during nonexacerbation periods and under continuous antibiotic treatment. Molecular fingerprinting based on single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis revealed fundamental differences between bacterial and fungal communities. Both groups of microorganisms were taxonomically classified by identification of gene sequences (16S rRNA and internal transcript spacer), and prevalences of single taxa were determined for the entire cohort. Major bacterial pathogens were frequently observed, whereas fungi of known pathogenicity in CF were detected only in low numbers. Fungal species richness increased without reaching a constant level (saturation), whereas bacterial richness showed saturation after 50 patients were analyzed. In contrast to bacteria, a large number of fungal species were observed together with high fluctuations over time and among patients. These findings demonstrated that the mycobiome was dominated by transient species, which strongly suggested that the main driving force was their presence in inhaled air rather than colonization. Considering the high exposure of human airways to fungal spores, we concluded that fungi have low colonization abilities in CF, and colonization by pathogenic fungal species may be considered a rare event. A comprehensive understanding of the conditions promoting fungal colonization may offer the opportunity to prevent colonization and substantially reduce or even eliminate fungus-related disease progression in CF.

  3. Larvicidal algae.

    PubMed

    Marten, Gerald G

    2007-01-01

    Although most algae are nutritious food for mosquito larvae, some species kill the larvae when ingested in large quantities. Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) that kill larvae do so by virtue of toxicity. While blue-green algae toxins may offer possibilities for delivery as larvicides, the toxicity of live blue-green algae does not seem consistent enough for live algae to be useful for mosquito control. Certain species of green algae in the order Chlorococcales kill larvae primarily because they are indigestible. Where these algae are abundant in nature, larvae consume them to the exclusion of other food and then starve. Under the right circumstances, it is possible to introduce indigestible algae into a breeding habitat so they become abundant enough to render it unsuitable for mosquito production. The algae can persist for years, even if the habitat dries periodically. The main limitation of indigestible algae lies in the fact that, under certain conditions, they may not replace all the nutritious algae in the habitat. More research on techniques to ensure complete replacement will be necessary before indigestible algae can go into operational use for mosquito control.

  4. Impact of elevated CO₂ and N addition on bacteria, fungi, and archaea in a marsh ecosystem with various types of plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seon-Young; Ding, Weixing; Kang, Hojeong

    2015-06-01

    The individual effects of either elevated CO2 or N deposition on soil microbial communities have been widely studied, but limited information is available regarding the responses of the bacteria, fungi, and archaea communities to both elevated CO2 and N in wetland ecosystems with different types of plants. Using a terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-Q-PCR), we compared communities of bacteria, fungi, and archaea in a marsh microcosm with one of seven macrophytes, Typha latifolia, Phragmites japonica, Miscanthus sacchariflorus, Scirpus lacustris, Juncus effusus, Phragmites australis, or Zizania latifolia, after exposing them to eCO2 and/or amended N for 110 days. Overall, our results showed that the elevated CO2 and N may affect the bacterial and archaeal communities, while they may not affect the fungal community in terms of both diversity and abundance. The effects of elevated CO2 and N on microbial community vary depending on the plant types, and each microbial community shows different responses to the elevated CO2 and N. In particular, elevated CO2 might force a shift in the archaeal community irrespective of the plant type, and the effect of elevated CO2 was enhanced when combined with the N effect. This study indicates that elevated CO2 and N addition could lead to changes in the community structures of bacteria and archaea. Our results also suggest that the fungal group is less sensitive to external changes, while the bacterial and archaeal groups are more sensitive to them. Finally, the characteristics of the plant type and relevant physicochemical factors induced by the elevated CO2 and N may be important key factors structuring the microbial community's response to environmental change, which implies the need for a more comprehensive approach to understanding the pattern of the wetland response to climate change.

  5. Metagenomic analysis of medicinal Cannabis samples; pathogenic bacteria, toxigenic fungi, and beneficial microbes grow in culture-based yeast and mold tests

    PubMed Central

    McKernan, Kevin; Spangler, Jessica; Helbert, Yvonne; Lynch, Ryan C.; Devitt-Lee, Adrian; Zhang, Lei; Orphe, Wendell; Warner, Jason; Foss, Theodore; Hudalla, Christopher J.; Silva, Matthew; Smith, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of bacteria and fungi in medicinal or recreational Cannabis poses a potential threat to consumers if those microbes include pathogenic or toxigenic species. This study evaluated two widely used culture-based platforms for total yeast and mold (TYM) testing marketed by 3M Corporation and Biomérieux, in comparison with a quantitative PCR (qPCR) approach marketed by Medicinal Genomics Corporation. Methods: A set of 15 medicinal Cannabis samples were analyzed using 3M and Biomérieux culture-based platforms and by qPCR to quantify microbial DNA. All samples were then subjected to next-generation sequencing and metagenomics analysis to enumerate the bacteria and fungi present before and after growth on culture-based media. Results: Several pathogenic or toxigenic bacterial and fungal species were identified in proportions of >5% of classified reads on the samples, including Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ralstonia pickettii, Salmonella enterica, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aspergillus ostianus, Aspergillus sydowii, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium steckii. Samples subjected to culture showed substantial shifts in the number and diversity of species present, including the failure of Aspergillus species to grow well on either platform. Substantial growth of Clostridium botulinum and other bacteria were frequently observed on one or both of the culture-based TYM platforms. The presence of plant growth promoting (beneficial) fungal species further influenced the differential growth of species in the microbiome of each sample. Conclusions: These findings have important implications for the Cannabis and food safety testing industries. PMID:27853518

  6. Microbial Deterioration of Hydrocarbon Fuels from Oil Shale, Coal, and Petroleum. II. Growth and Inhibition of Bacteria and Fungi.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    blackening, I = slightly grey, to 4 which was intense opaque black. Fungal Test Units Sources of fungi were as follows: (I) Cladosporium resinae DK was...isolated from JP-5 storage tank at Naval Air Station, Lemoore, CA. (2) Cladosporium resinae DK/adapted is the above C. resinae after being adapted to growth...in seawater. (3) Cladosporium resinae P-1 was isolated from sludge from a centri- fugal purifier on the USS PETERSON. (4) Cladosporium resinae APPC

  7. Purification and partial characterization of haloperoxidase from fresh water algae Cladophora glomerata.

    PubMed

    Verdel, E F; Kline, P C; Wani, S; Woods, A E

    2000-02-01

    Many haloperoxidases have been purified from diverse organisms, including lichen, fungi, bacteria, and marine algae. In this study a haloperoxidase was purified from the fresh water algae, Cladophora glomerata, by homogenization and centrifugation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Molecular weight was determined by SDS-PAGE and by size exclusion HPLC and found to be approximately 43 kDa. The isoelectric point was determined to be approximately 8.1 by isoelectric focusing. The UV spectrum of the peroxidase showed a strong absorbance in the Soret band indicating a heme protein, unlike vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases from marine algae. Fresh water algal haloperoxidase catalyzed the iodination of tyrosine at a pH of 3.1. This haloperoxidase also catalyzes the oxidation of guaiacol and oxidation of iodide as well as catalyzing a peroxide-dependent reaction in both the presence and absence of chloride and bromide ions.

  8. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  9. The plastid genome of some eustigmatophyte algae harbours a bacteria-derived six-gene cluster for biosynthesis of a novel secondary metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Yurchenko, Tatiana; Ševčíková, Tereza; Strnad, Hynek; Butenko, Anzhelika

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of genes by plastid genomes (plastomes) via horizontal gene transfer (HGT) seems to be a rare phenomenon. Here, we report an interesting case of HGT revealed by sequencing the plastomes of the eustigmatophyte algae Monodopsis sp. MarTras21 and Vischeria sp. CAUP Q 202. These plastomes proved to harbour a unique cluster of six genes, most probably acquired from a bacterium of the phylum Bacteroidetes, with homologues in various bacteria, typically organized in a conserved uncharacterized putative operon. Sequence analyses of the six proteins encoded by the operon yielded the following annotation for them: (i) a novel family without discernible homologues; (ii) a new family within the superfamily of metallo-dependent hydrolases; (iii) a novel subgroup of the UbiA superfamily of prenyl transferases; (iv) a new clade within the sugar phosphate cyclase superfamily; (v) a new family within the xylose isomerase-like superfamily; and (vi) a hydrolase for a phosphate moiety-containing substrate. We suggest that the operon encodes enzymes of a pathway synthesizing an isoprenoid–cyclitol-derived compound, possibly an antimicrobial or other protective substance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an expansion of the metabolic capacity of a plastid mediated by HGT into the plastid genome. PMID:27906133

  10. Site properties have a stronger influence than fire severity on ectomycorrhizal fungi and associated N-cycling bacteria in regenerating post-beetle-killed lodgepole pine forests.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nabla M; Robertson, Susan J; Green, D Scott; Scholefield, Scott R; Arocena, Joselito M; Tackaberry, Linda E; Massicotte, Hugues B; Egger, Keith N

    2015-09-01

    Following a pine beetle epidemic in British Columbia, Canada, we investigated the effect of fire severity on rhizosphere soil chemistry and ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) and associated denitrifying and nitrogen (N)-fixing bacteria in the root systems of regenerating lodgepole pine seedlings at two site types (wet and dry) and three fire severities (low, moderate, and high). The site type was found to have a much larger impact on all measurements than fire severity. Wet and dry sites differed significantly for almost all soil properties measured, with higher values identified from wet types, except for pH and percent sand that were greater on dry sites. Fire severity caused few changes in soil chemical status. Generally, bacterial communities differed little, whereas ECM morphotype analysis revealed ectomycorrhizal diversity was lower on dry sites, with a corresponding division in community structure between wet and dry sites. Molecular profiling of the fungal ITS region confirmed these results, with a clear difference in community structure seen between wet and dry sites. The ability of ECM fungi to colonize seedlings growing in both wet and dry soils may positively contribute to subsequent regeneration. We conclude that despite consecutive landscape disturbances (mountain pine beetle infestation followed by wildfire), the "signature" of moisture on chemistry and ECM community structure remained pronounced.

  11. Ascorbate oxidase: the unexpected involvement of a 'wasteful enzyme' in the symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Ott, Thomas; Güther, Mike; Bonfante, Paola; Udvardi, Michael K; De Tullio, Mario C

    2012-10-01

    Ascorbate oxidase (AO, EC 1.10.3.3) catalyzes the oxidation of ascorbate (AsA) to yield water. AO over-expressing plants are prone to ozone and salt stresses, whereas lower expression apparently confers resistance to unfavorable environmental conditions. Previous studies have suggested a role for AO as a regulator of oxygen content in photosynthetic tissues. For the first time we show here that the expression of a Lotus japonicus AO gene is induced in the symbiotic interaction with both nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. In this framework, high AO expression is viewed as a possible strategy to down-regulate oxygen diffusion in root nodules, and a component of AM symbiosis. A general model of AO function in plants is discussed.

  12. Mycophagous growth of Collimonas bacteria in natural soils, impact on fungal biomass turnover and interactions with mycophagous Trichoderma fungi.

    PubMed

    Höppener-Ogawa, Sachie; Leveau, Johan H J; van Veen, Johannes A; De Boer, Wietse

    2009-02-01

    Bacteria of the genus Collimonas are widely distributed in soils, although at low densities. In the laboratory, they were shown to be mycophagous, that is, they are able to grow at the expense of living hyphae. However, so far the importance of mycophagy for growth and survival of collimonads in natural soil habitats is unknown. Using a Collimonas-specific real-time PCR assay, we show here that the invasion of field soils by fungal hyphae (Absidia sp.) resulted in a short-term, significant increase (average fourfold) of indigenous collimonads. No such responses were observed for other soil bacteria studied (Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis patterns of total bacteria and Burkholderia). Hence, it appears that the stimulation of growth of Collimonas bacteria by fungal hyphae is not common among other soil bacteria. In the same field soils, Trichoderma, a fungal genus known for mycophagous (mycoparasitic) growth, increased upon introduction of Absidia hyphae. Hence, mycophagous growth by Collimonas and Trichoderma can occur in the same soils. However, in controlled experiments (sand microcosms), collimonads appeared to have a negative effect on mycophagous growth of a Trichoderma strain. The effect of mycophagous growth of collimonads on fungal biomass dynamics was studied in sand microcosms using the same Absidia sp. as a test fungus. The growth of collimonads did not cause a significant reduction in the Absidia biomass. Overall, the study indicates that mycophagous nutrition may be important for collimonads in natural soils, but the impact on fungal biomass turnover is likely to be minor.

  13. Bacteria and fungi respond differently to multifactorial climate change in a temperate heathland, traced with 13C-glycine and FACE CO2.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Louise C; Dungait, Jennifer A J; Bol, Roland; Selsted, Merete B; Ambus, Per; Michelsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    It is vital to understand responses of soil microorganisms to predicted climate changes, as these directly control soil carbon (C) dynamics. The rate of turnover of soil organic carbon is mediated by soil microorganisms whose activity may be affected by climate change. After one year of multifactorial climate change treatments, at an undisturbed temperate heathland, soil microbial community dynamics were investigated by injection of a very small concentration (5.12 µg C g(-1) soil) of (13)C-labeled glycine ((13)C2, 99 atom %) to soils in situ. Plots were treated with elevated temperature (+1°C, T), summer drought (D) and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (510 ppm [CO2]), as well as combined treatments (TD, TCO2, DCO2 and TDCO2). The (13)C enrichment of respired CO2 and of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) was determined after 24 h. (13)C-glycine incorporation into the biomarker PLFAs for specific microbial groups (Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria, actinobacteria and fungi) was quantified using gas chromatography-combustion-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Gram positive bacteria opportunistically utilized the freshly added glycine substrate, i.e. incorporated (13)C in all treatments, whereas fungi had minor or no glycine derived (13)C-enrichment, hence slowly reacting to a new substrate. The effects of elevated CO2 did suggest increased direct incorporation of glycine in microbial biomass, in particular in G(+) bacteria, in an ecosystem subjected to elevated CO2. Warming decreased the concentration of PLFAs in general. The FACE CO2 was (13)C-depleted (δ(13)C = 12.2‰) compared to ambient (δ(13)C = ∼-8‰), and this enabled observation of the integrated longer term responses of soil microorganisms to the FACE over one year. All together, the bacterial (and not fungal) utilization of glycine indicates substrate preference and resource partitioning in the microbial community, and therefore suggests a diversified response pattern

  14. Amino acid compositon and microbial contamination of spirulina maxima, a blue-green alga, grown on the effluent of different fermented animal wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.F.; Pond, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The nutrient compositions of various fermented manures were compared. Large differences in the mineral concentration were observed. There were no important differences among the amino acid composition of S. spirulina grown on the different nutrient media. All were low in methionine, but were rich in glutamic acid, aspartic acid, arginine, and leucine. The crude protein content was 71.8-60.1%. Considerable contamination of the waste-grown algae with yeast, fungi, and sporogenous bacteria was experienced.

  15. Inhibition of fungi and gram-negative bacteria by bacteriocin BacTN635 produced by Lactobacillus plantarum sp. TN635.

    PubMed

    Smaoui, Slim; Elleuch, Lobna; Bejar, Wacim; Karray-Rebai, Ines; Ayadi, Imen; Jaouadi, Bassem; Mathieu, Florence; Chouayekh, Hichem; Bejar, Samir; Mellouli, Lotfi

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 54 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains isolated from meat, fermented vegetables and dairy products for their capacity to produce antimicrobial activities against several bacteria and fungi. The strain designed TN635 has been selected for advanced studies. The supernatant culture of this strain inhibits the growth of all tested pathogenic including the four Gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella enterica ATCC43972, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 49189, Hafnia sp. and Serratia sp.) and the pathogenic fungus Candida tropicalis R2 CIP203. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of the strain TN635 (1,540 pb accession no FN252881) and the phylogenetic analysis, we propose the assignment of our new isolate bacterium as Lactobacillus plantarum sp. TN635 strain. Its antimicrobial compound was determined as a proteinaceous substance, stable to heat and to treatment with surfactants and organic solvents. Highest antimicrobial activity was found between pH 3 and 11 with an optimum at pH = 7. The BacTN635 was purified to homogeneity by a four-step protocol involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, centrifugal microconcentrators with a 10-kDa membrane cutoff, gel filtration Sephadex G-25, and C18 reverse-phase HPLC. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified BacTN635, revealed a single band with an estimated molecular mass of approximately 4 kDa. The maximum bacteriocin production (5,000 AU/ml) was recorded after a 16-h incubation in Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) medium at 30 degrees C. The mode of action of the partial purified BacTN635 was identified as bactericidal against Listeria ivanovii BUG 496 and as fungistatic against C. tropicalis R2 CIP203.

  16. The Study of Algae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  17. Novel mechanisms of biotransformation of p-tert-amylphenol by bacteria and fungi with special degradation abilities and simultaneous detoxification of the disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Rabea; Röder, Anja; Czekalski, Nadine; Gliesche, Daniel; Mikolasch, Annett; Schauer, Frieder

    2014-01-01

    The compound p-tert-amylphenol (p-(1,1-dimethylpropyl)phenol) is a widely used disinfectant belonging to the group of short branched-chain alkylphenols. It is produced in or imported into the USA with more than one million pounds per year and can be found in the environment in surface water, sediments, and soil. We have investigated for the first time the biotransformation of this disinfectant and the accumulation of metabolites by five bacterial strains, three yeast strains, and three filamentous fungi, selected because of their ability to transform either aromatic or branched-chain compounds. Of the 11 microorganisms tested, one yeast strain and three bacteria could not transform the disinfectant despite of a very low concentration applied (0.005%). None of the other seven organisms was able to degrade the short branched alkyl chain of p-tert-amylphenol. However, two yeast strains, two filamentous fungi, and two bacterial strains attacked the aromatic ring system of the disinfectant via the hydroxylated intermediate 4-(1,1-dimethyl-propyl)-benzene-1,2-diol resulting in two hitherto unknown ring fission products with pyran and furan structures, 4-(1,1-dimethyl-propyl)-6-oxo-6-H-pyran-2-carboxylic acid and 2-[3-(1,1-dimethyl-propyl)-5-oxo-2H-furan-2-yl]acetic acid. While the disinfectant was toxic to the organisms applied, one of the ring cleavage products was not. Thus, a detoxification of the disinfectant was achieved by ring cleavage. Furthermore, one filamentous fungus formed sugar conjugates with p-tert-amylphenol as another mechanism of detoxification of toxic environmental pollutants. With this work, we can also contribute to the allocation of unknown chemical compounds within environmental samples to their parent compounds.

  18. Strain-specific bioaccumulation and intracellular distribution of Cd²⁺ in bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere, ectomycorrhizae, and fruitbodies of ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Złoch, Michał; Kowalkowski, Tomasz; Baum, Christel; Niedojadło, Katarzyna; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2015-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of Cd(2+) in soil bacteria might represent an important route of metal transfer to associated mycorrhizal fungi and plants and may have potential as a tool to accelerate Cd(2+) extraction in the bioremediation of contaminated soils. The present study examined the bioaccumulation of Cd(2+) in 15 bacterial strains representing three phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) that were isolated from the rhizosphere, ectomycorrhizae, and fruitbody of ectomycorrhizal fungi. The strains Pseudomonas sp. IV-111-14, Variovorax sp. ML3-12, and Luteibacter sp. II-116-7 displayed the highest biomass productivity at the highest tested Cd(2+) concentration (2 mM). Microscopic analysis of the cellular Cd distribution revealed intracellular accumulation by strains Massilia sp. III-116-18, Pseudomonas sp. IV-111-14, and Bacillus sp. ML1-2. The quantities of Cd measured in the interior of the cells ranged from 0.87 to 1.31 weight % Cd. Strains originating from the rhizosphere exhibited higher Cd(2+) accumulation efficiencies than strains from ectomycorrhizal roots or fruitbodies. The high Cd tolerances of Pseudomonas sp. IV-111-16 and Bacillus sp. ML1-2 were attributed to the binding of Cd(2+) as cadmium phosphate. Furthermore, silicate binding of Cd(2+) by Bacillus sp. ML1-2 was observed. The tolerance of Massilia sp. III-116-18 to Cd stress was attributed to a simultaneous increase in K(+) uptake in the presence of Cd(2+) ions. We conclude that highly Cd-tolerant and Cd-accumulating bacterial strains from the genera Massilia sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Bacillus sp. might offer a suitable tool to improve the bioremediation efficiency of contaminated soils.

  19. Detection of bacteria and fungi and assessment of the molecular aspects and resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from confiscated passerines intended for reintroduction programs.

    PubMed

    Braconaro, Patricia; Saidenberg, André B S; Benites, Nilson R; Zuniga, Eveline; da Silva, Adriana M J; Sanches, Thais C; Zwarg, Ticiana; Brandão, Paulo E; Melville, Priscilla A

    2015-11-01

    Many native bird species are currently considered rare in Brazil because they have been indiscriminately collected by animal traffickers and commercialized, leading to dwindling numbers in their natural habitats. Confiscated animals are at times destined for reintroduction programs that must ensure these animals do not pose a risk to native populations. Healthy or sick wild passerines may carry a great diversity of microorganisms. Therefore, knowledge of the sanitary status of confiscated animals destined for reintroduction is critical to assess whether these animals act as microorganism carriers and to investigate the epidemiology of transmissible diseases, a crucial aspect for animal and human health preservation. This study examined the occurrence of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria and fungi in cloacal swabs collected from wild confiscated passerines intended for reintroduction programs. In vitro susceptibility tests of the most frequent isolates as well as studies of the molecular aspects of Escherichia coli isolates were also performed. There was microorganism growth in 62.5% of 253 samples. The microorganisms that were most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus spp. (15.0%), Micrococcus spp. (11.5%), E. coli (10.7%) and Klebsiella spp. (10.7%). Fifteen bacteria genera and seven fungi genera were isolated. Multidrug-resistance to antimicrobials was observed in Staphylococcus spp., Micrococcus spp., E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates. The high occurrence of Enterobacteria observed is possibly related to the sanitary conditions in which confiscated animals are usually kept. One E. coli sample (out of 27 isolates) was positive for the S-fimbrial adhesion encoding gene (sfa). Considering the low occurrence of genes that encode virulence factors, confiscated passerines may represent a low risk for the potential transmission of EPEC, APEC, UPEC and NMEC isolates to other animals or humans. The potential risk of intra- or inter-specific transmission of

  20. Changes in the microbial community structure of bacteria, archaea and fungi in response to elevated CO(2) and warming in an Australian native grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Helen L; Mele, Pauline M; Bougoure, Damian S; Allan, Claire Y; Norng, Sorn; Piceno, Yvette M; Brodie, Eoin L; Desantis, Todd Z; Andersen, Gary L; Williams, Amity L; Hovenden, Mark J

    2012-12-01

    The microbial community structure of bacteria, archaea and fungi is described in an Australian native grassland soil after more than 5 years exposure to different atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) (ambient, +550 ppm) and temperatures (ambient, + 2°C) under different plant functional types (C3 and C4 grasses) and at two soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm). Archaeal community diversity was influenced by elevated [CO2], while under warming archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers increased for C4 plant Themeda triandra and decreased for the C3 plant community (P < 0.05). Fungal community diversity resulted in three groups based upon elevated [CO2], elevated [CO2] plus warming and ambient [CO2]. Overall bacterial community diversity was influenced primarily by depth. Specific bacterial taxa changed in richness and relative abundance in response to climate change factors when assessed by a high-resolution 16S rRNA microarray (PhyloChip). Operational taxonomic unit signal intensities increased under elevated [CO2] for both Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, and increased under warming for Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. For the interaction of elevated [CO2] and warming there were 103 significant operational taxonomic units (P < 0.01) representing 15 phyla and 30 classes. The majority of these operational taxonomic units increased in abundance for elevated [CO2] plus warming plots, while abundance declined in warmed or elevated [CO2] plots. Bacterial abundance (16S rRNA gene copy number) was significantly different for the interaction of elevated [CO2] and depth (P < 0.05) with decreased abundance under elevated [CO2] at 5-10 cm, and for Firmicutes under elevated [CO2] (P < 0.05). Bacteria, archaea and fungi in soil responded differently to elevated [CO2], warming and their interaction. Taxa identified as significantly climate-responsive could show differing trends in the direction of response ('+' or '-') under elevated CO2 or warming, which could then not be used to

  1. LARVICIDAL TOXINS FROM BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SUBSPP. KURSTAKI, MORRISONI (STRAIN TENEBRIONIS), AND ISRAELENSIS HAVE NO MICROBICIDAL OR MICROBIOSTATIC ACTIVITY AGAINST SELECTED BACTERIA, FUNGI, AND ALGAE IN VITRO. (R826107)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. X-ray microanalytical studies of mineral elements in the tripartite symbiosis between lima bean, N2-fixing bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Rodak, Bruna Wurr; Freitas, Douglas Siqueira; Bamberg, Soraya Marx; Carneiro, Marco Aurélio Carbone; Guilherme, Luiz Roberto Guimarães

    2017-01-01

    The symbiosis between legumes, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and N2-fixing bacteria (NFB) provides mutual nutritional gains. However, assessing the nutritional status of the microorganisms is a difficult task. A methodology that could assess this status, in situ, could assist managing these organisms in agriculture. This study used X-ray microanalyses to quantify and locate mineral elements in structures formed in a tripartite symbiosis. Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L. Walp) was cultivated in pots under greenhouse conditions, to which we have added AM fungal isolates (Glomus macrocarpum and Acaulospora colombiana) and NFB (Bradyrhizobium japonicum) inocula. Uninoculated control plants were also included. Symbionts were evaluated at the onset of flowering. Quantification of the mineral elements in the symbiotic components was performed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to identify structures. EDX analysis detected 13 elements with the most abundant being N, Ca, and Se, occurring in all tissues, Fe in roots, Ni and Al in epidermis and P and Mo in nodules. Elemental quantification in fungal structures was not possible. The distribution of elements was related to their symbiotic function. X-ray microanalysis can be efficiently applied for nutritional diagnosis in tripartite symbiosis.

  3. Simultaneous profiling of seed-associated bacteria and fungi reveals antagonistic interactions between microorganisms within a shared epiphytic microbiome on Triticum and Brassica seeds.

    PubMed

    Links, Matthew G; Demeke, Tigst; Gräfenhan, Tom; Hill, Janet E; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2014-04-01

    In order to address the hypothesis that seeds from ecologically and geographically diverse plants harbor characteristic epiphytic microbiota, we characterized the bacterial and fungal microbiota associated with Triticum and Brassica seed surfaces. The total microbial complement was determined by amplification and sequencing of a fragment of chaperonin 60 (cpn60). Specific microorganisms were quantified by qPCR. Bacteria and fungi corresponding to operational taxonomic units (OTU) that were identified in the sequencing study were isolated and their interactions examined. A total of 5477 OTU were observed from seed washes. Neither total epiphytic bacterial load nor community richness/evenness was significantly different between the seed types; 578 OTU were shared among all samples at a variety of abundances. Hierarchical clustering revealed that 203 were significantly different in abundance on Triticum seeds compared with Brassica. Microorganisms isolated from seeds showed 99-100% identity between the cpn60 sequences of the isolates and the OTU sequences from this shared microbiome. Bacterial strains identified as Pantoea agglomerans had antagonistic properties toward one of the fungal isolates (Alternaria sp.), providing a possible explanation for their reciprocal abundances on both Triticum and Brassica seeds. cpn60 enabled the simultaneous profiling of bacterial and fungal microbiota and revealed a core seed-associated microbiota shared between diverse plant genera.

  4. Simultaneous profiling of seed-associated bacteria and fungi reveals antagonistic interactions between microorganisms within a shared epiphytic microbiome on Triticum and Brassica seeds

    PubMed Central

    Links, Matthew G; Demeke, Tigst; Gräfenhan, Tom; Hill, Janet E; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the hypothesis that seeds from ecologically and geographically diverse plants harbor characteristic epiphytic microbiota, we characterized the bacterial and fungal microbiota associated with Triticum and Brassica seed surfaces. The total microbial complement was determined by amplification and sequencing of a fragment of chaperonin 60 (cpn60). Specific microorganisms were quantified by qPCR. Bacteria and fungi corresponding to operational taxonomic units (OTU) that were identified in the sequencing study were isolated and their interactions examined. A total of 5477 OTU were observed from seed washes. Neither total epiphytic bacterial load nor community richness/evenness was significantly different between the seed types; 578 OTU were shared among all samples at a variety of abundances. Hierarchical clustering revealed that 203 were significantly different in abundance on Triticum seeds compared with Brassica. Microorganisms isolated from seeds showed 99–100% identity between the cpn60 sequences of the isolates and the OTU sequences from this shared microbiome. Bacterial strains identified as Pantoea agglomerans had antagonistic properties toward one of the fungal isolates (Alternaria sp.), providing a possible explanation for their reciprocal abundances on both Triticum and Brassica seeds. cpn60 enabled the simultaneous profiling of bacterial and fungal microbiota and revealed a core seed-associated microbiota shared between diverse plant genera. PMID:24444052

  5. Effect of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPR) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) inoculation on oats in saline-alkali soil contaminated by petroleum to enhance phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Xun, Feifei; Xie, Baoming; Liu, Shasha; Guo, Changhong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPR) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on phytoremediation in saline-alkali soil contaminated by petroleum, saline-alkali soil samples were artificially mixed with different amount of oil, 5 and 10 g/kg, respectively. Pot experiments with oat plants (Avena sativa) were conducted under greenhouse condition for 60 days. Plant biomass, physiological parameters in leaves, soil enzymes, and degradation rate of total petroleum hydrocarbon were measured. The result demonstrated that petroleum inhibited the growth of the plant; however, inoculation with PGPR in combination with AMF resulted in an increase in dry weight and stem height compared with noninoculated controls. Petroleum stress increased the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and free proline and the activities of the antioxidant enzyme such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase. Application of PGPR and AMF augmented the activities of three enzymes compared to their respective uninoculated controls, but decreased the MDA and free proline contents, indicating that PGPR and AMF could make the plants more tolerant to harmful hydrocarbon contaminants. It also improved the soil quality by increasing the activities of soil enzyme such as urease, sucrase, and dehydrogenase. In addition, the degradation rate of total petroleum hydrocarbon during treatment with PGPR and AMF in moderately contaminated soil reached a maximum of 49.73%. Therefore, we concluded the plants treated with a combination of PGPR and AMF had a high potential to contribute to remediation of saline-alkali soil contaminated with petroleum.

  6. Rapidly evolving genes in pathogens: methods for detecting positive selection and examples among fungi, bacteria, viruses and protists.

    PubMed

    Aguileta, Gabriela; Refrégier, Guislaine; Yockteng, Roxana; Fournier, Elisabeth; Giraud, Tatiana

    2009-07-01

    The ongoing coevolutionary struggle between hosts and pathogens, with hosts evolving to escape pathogen infection and pathogens evolving to escape host defences, can generate an 'arms race', i.e., the occurrence of recurrent selective sweeps that each favours a novel resistance or virulence allele that goes to fixation. Host-pathogen coevolution can alternatively lead to a 'trench warfare', i.e., balancing selection, maintaining certain alleles at loci involved in host-pathogen recognition over long time scales. Recently, technological and methodological progress has enabled detection of footprints of selection directly on genes, which can provide useful insights into the processes of coevolution. This knowledge can also have practical applications, for instance development of vaccines or drugs. Here we review the methods for detecting genes under positive selection using divergence data (i.e., the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates, d(N)/d(S)). We also review methods for detecting selection using polymorphisms, such as methods based on F(ST) measures, frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype structure. In the second part, we review examples where targets of selection have been identified in pathogens using these tests. Genes under positive selection in pathogens have mostly been sought among viruses, bacteria and protists, because of their paramount importance for human health. Another focus is on fungal pathogens owing to their agronomic importance. We finally discuss promising directions in pathogen studies, such as detecting selection in non-coding regions.

  7. Distribution and Diversity of Bacteria and Fungi Colonization in Stone Monuments Analyzed by High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Bingjian; He, Zhang; Yang, Xiaoru

    2016-01-01

    The historical and cultural heritage of Qingxing palace and Lingyin and Kaihua temple, located in Hangzhou of China, include a large number of exquisite Buddhist statues and ancient stone sculptures which date back to the Northern Song (960–1219 A.D.) and Qing dynasties (1636–1912 A.D.) and are considered to be some of the best examples of ancient stone sculpting techniques. They were added to the World Heritage List in 2011 because of their unique craftsmanship and importance to the study of ancient Chinese Buddhist culture. However, biodeterioration of the surface of the ancient Buddhist statues and white marble pillars not only severely impairs their aesthetic value but also alters their material structure and thermo-hygric properties. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was utilized to identify the microbial communities colonizing the stone monuments. The diversity and distribution of the microbial communities in six samples collected from three different environmental conditions with signs of deterioration were analyzed by means of bioinformatics software and diversity indices. In addition, the impact of environmental factors, including temperature, light intensity, air humidity, and the concentration of NO2 and SO2, on the microbial communities’ diversity and distribution was evaluated. The results indicate that the presence of predominantly phototrophic microorganisms was correlated with light and humidity, while nitrifying bacteria and Thiobacillus were associated with NO2 and SO2 from air pollution. PMID:27658256

  8. Distribution and Diversity of Bacteria and Fungi Colonization in Stone Monuments Analyzed by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Bingjian; He, Zhang; Yang, Xiaoru

    The historical and cultural heritage of Qingxing palace and Lingyin and Kaihua temple, located in Hangzhou of China, include a large number of exquisite Buddhist statues and ancient stone sculptures which date back to the Northern Song (960-1219 A.D.) and Qing dynasties (1636-1912 A.D.) and are considered to be some of the best examples of ancient stone sculpting techniques. They were added to the World Heritage List in 2011 because of their unique craftsmanship and importance to the study of ancient Chinese Buddhist culture. However, biodeterioration of the surface of the ancient Buddhist statues and white marble pillars not only severely impairs their aesthetic value but also alters their material structure and thermo-hygric properties. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was utilized to identify the microbial communities colonizing the stone monuments. The diversity and distribution of the microbial communities in six samples collected from three different environmental conditions with signs of deterioration were analyzed by means of bioinformatics software and diversity indices. In addition, the impact of environmental factors, including temperature, light intensity, air humidity, and the concentration of NO2 and SO2, on the microbial communities' diversity and distribution was evaluated. The results indicate that the presence of predominantly phototrophic microorganisms was correlated with light and humidity, while nitrifying bacteria and Thiobacillus were associated with NO2 and SO2 from air pollution.

  9. Algae Resources

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    Algae are highly efficient at producing biomass, and they can be found all over the planet. Many use sunlight and nutrients to create biomass, which contain key components—including lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates— that can be converted and upgraded to a variety of biofuels and products. A functional algal biofuels production system requires resources such as suitable land and climate, sustainable management of water resources, a supplemental carbon dioxide (CO2) supply, and other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus). Algae can be an attractive feedstock for many locations in the United States because their diversity allows for highpotential biomass yields in a variety of climates and environments. Depending on the strain, algae can grow by using fresh, saline, or brackish water from surface water sources, groundwater, or seawater. Additionally, they can grow in water from second-use sources such as treated industrial wastewater; municipal, agricultural, or aquaculture wastewater; or produced water generated from oil and gas drilling operations.

  10. Primary sodium plasma membrane ATPases in salt-tolerant algae: facts and fictions.

    PubMed

    Gimmler, H

    2000-07-01

    For thermodynamic reasons algae growing in media of both high salinity and high alkalinity require active export of sodium. However, experimental evidence for an active Na+-dependent cycle was scarce until recently, in contrast to the situation in marine bacteria (including cyanobacteria), fungi and animals. However, a review of literature reveals that some progress has been made in this respect, recently: data demonstrate that at least in two marine algae, Tetraselmis (Platymonas) viridis and Heterosigma akashiwo (syn. Olisthodiscus luteus), active Na+-export is carried out by means of a plasma membrane localized Na+-pump (apparent molecular mass 100-140 kDa). Biochemical characteristics of this vanadate-sensitive, but ouabain-resistant primary P-type Na+-ATPase are described and compared with the corresponding properties of Na+-ATPase from prokaryotes and animals. Alternative mechanisms for Na+-pumping are discussed.

  11. Mysterious Mycorrhizae? A Field Trip & Classroom Experiment to Demystify the Symbioses Formed between Plants & Fungi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nancy C.; Chaudhary, V. Bala; Hoeksema, Jason D.; Moore, John C.; Pringle, Anne; Umbanhowar, James A.; Wilson, Gail W. T.

    2009-01-01

    Biology curricula cover fungi in units on bacteria, protists, and primitive plants, but fungi are more closely related to animals than to bacteria or plants. Like animals, fungi are heterotrophs and cannot create their own food; but, like plants, fungi have cell walls, and are for the most part immobile. Most species of fungi have a filamentous…

  12. Polymerase-chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for the detection of bacteria and fungi in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Huttner, A; Emonet, S; Harbarth, S; Renzi, G; Kaiser, L; Schrenzel, J

    2014-12-01

    PLEX-ID uses polymerase chain reaction-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry for rapid identification of infectious agents in clinical samples. We evaluated its concordance with our centre's standard methods (SM) for bacterial and fungal detection in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in a prospective observational cohort study. The primary outcome was concordance (%) between SM and PLEX-ID. Secondary outcomes included concordance when excluding commensal oral flora, detection of resistance genes, and PLEX-ID's potential impact on clinical management, as determined by two independent reviewers. Included were 101 specimens from 94 patients. BALs were performed primarily for suspected pneumonia (76/101, 75%) and lung transplant work-ups (12/101, 12%). Most specimens yielded at least one organism by either method (92/101, 91%). Among all microorganisms detected (n = 218), 83% and 17% were bacterial and fungal, respectively. Overall concordance between SM and PLEX-ID was 45% (45/101). Concordance increased to 66% (67/101) when discordance for commensal flora was excluded. PLEX-ID failed to detect 21% of all 183 SM-identified organisms, while SM did not identify 28% of the 191 PLEX-ID-identified organisms (p <0.001). There was low concordance for mecA detection. Two infectious-disease specialists' analyses concluded that in most of the 31 discordant, non-commensal cases, PLEX-ID results would have had little or no impact on patient management; in eight cases, however, PLEX-ID would have led to 'wrong decision-making'. The tested version of PLEX-ID concurred weakly with standard methods in the detection of bacteria and fungi in BAL specimens, and is not likely to be useful as a standalone tool for microbiological diagnosis in suspected respiratory infections.

  13. Transmission of specific groups of bacteria through water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Grabińska-Łoniewska, Anna; Wardzyńska, Grazyna; Pajor, Elzbieta; Korsak, Dorota; Boryń, Krystyna

    2007-01-01

    Microbial contamination of a water distribution system was examined. The number and the taxonomy of non-pigmented and pigmented heterotrophic bacteria (HB), number of bacteria (Pseudomonas sp., Enterococcus sp., Campylobacter sp., Yersinia sp., representatives of the Enterobacteriaceae, coagulase-positive staphylococci, and C. pefringens) in the bulk water phase, biomass of zoogloeal aggregates of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa and rotifers (ZABFAPR) (separated from the above on 5 microm pore size filters) and in pipe sediments was determined. An increased number of HB occurred at the sampling sites situated as close as 4.2 km to the Water Treatment Plant (WTP), and was especially significant at 10.3 km. It was shown that the main reservoir of hygienically relevant bacteria did not occur in the water phase which is monitored in routine control analyses carried out by the WTP laboratories, but in the ZABFAPR biomass not monitored so far.

  14. Comparison of nitroethane, 2-nitro-1-propanol, lauric acid, Lauricidin and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, for potential broad-spectrum control of anaerobically grown lactic acid bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gastrointestinal tract of bovines often contains bacteria that contribute to disorders of the rumen and may also contain foodborne or opportunistic human pathogens as well as bacteria capable of causing mastitis in cows. Thus, there is a need to develop broad-spectrum therapies that are effecti...

  15. Marine Bacteria from Danish Coastal Waters Show Antifouling Activity against the Marine Fouling Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain S91 and Zoospores of the Green Alga Ulva australis Independent of Bacteriocidal Activity▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Gram, Lone

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters produce antifouling compounds and if antifouling bacteria could be ascribed to specific niches or seasons. We further assess if antibacterial effect is a good proxy for antifouling activity. We isolated 110 bacteria with anti-Vibrio activity from different sample types and locations during a 1-year sampling from Danish coastal waters. The strains were identified as Pseudoalteromonas, Phaeobacter, and Vibrionaceae based on phenotypic tests and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The numbers of bioactive bacteria were significantly higher in warmer than in colder months. While some species were isolated at all sampling locations, others were niche specific. We repeatedly isolated Phaeobacter gallaeciensis at surfaces from one site and Pseudoalteromonas tunicata at two others. Twenty-two strains, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva zoospores to less than 10% of the number settling on control surfaces. The antifouling alpP gene was detected only in P. tunicata strains (with purple and yellow pigmentation), so

  16. Comparison of nitroethane, 2-nitro-1-propanol, lauric acid, Lauricidin® and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, for potential broad-spectrum control of anaerobically grown lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Božic, Aleksandar K; Anderson, Robin C; Ricke, Steven C; Crandall, Philip G; O'Bryan, Corliss A

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of bovines often contains bacteria that contribute to disorders of the rumen, and may also contain foodborne or opportunistic human pathogens as well as bacteria capable of causing mastitis in cows. Thus there is a need to develop broad-spectrum therapies that are effective while not leading to unacceptably long antibiotic withdrawal times. The effects of the CH(4)-inhibitors nitroethane (2 mg/mL), 2-nitro-1-propanol (2 mg/mL), lauric acid (5 mg/mL), the commercial product Lauricidin® (5 mg/mL), and a finely ground product of the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros (10 mg/mL), were compared in pure cultures of Streptococcus agalactia, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus bovis, and in a mixed lactic acid rumen bacterial culture. Lauricidin® and lauric acid exhibited the most bactericidal acidity against all bacteria. These results suggest potential animal health benefits from supplementing cattle diets with lauric acid or Lauricidin® to improve the health of the rumen and help prevent shedding of human pathogens.

  17. Biological therapeutics of Pongamia pinnata coated zinc oxide nanoparticles against clinically important pathogenic bacteria, fungi and MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Malaikozhundan, Balasubramanian; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Vijayakumar, Sekar; Pandiselvi, Karuppiah; Kalanjiam, Mohamed Ali Rajamohamed; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    The overuse of antimicrobics and drugs has led to the development of resistance in a number of pathogens and parasites, which leads to great concerns for human health and the environment. Furthermore, breast cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women. MCF-7 is a widely used epithelial cancer cell line, derived from breast adenocarcinoma for in vitro breast cancer studies, since the cell line has retained several ideal characteristics particular to the mammary epithelium. In this scenario, the development of novel and eco-friendly drugs are of timely importance. Green synthesis of nanoparticles is cost effective, environmental friendly and does not involve the use of toxic chemicals or elevate energy inputs. This research focused on the anticancer activity of Pongamia pinnata seed extract-fabricated zinc oxide nanoparticles (Pp-ZnO NPs) on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells, antibiofilm activity against bacteria and fungi was also investigated. Nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Pp-ZnO NPs effectively inhibited the growth of Gram positive Bacillus licheniformis (zone of inhibition: 17.3 mm) at 25 μg ml(-1) followed by Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14.2 mm) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (12.2 mm). Pp-ZnO NPs also effectively inhibited the biofilm formation of C. albicans at 50 μg ml(-1). Cytotoxicity studies revealed that a single treatment with Pp-ZnO NPs significantly reduced the cell viability of breast cancer MCF-7 cells at doses higher than 50 μg ml(-1). Morphological changes in the Pp-ZnO NPs treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells were observed using phase contrast microscopy. This study concludes that the green synthesized Pp-ZnO NPs may be used as an effective antimicrobial and antibreast cancer agents.

  18. Phylogenetic relationship and antifouling activity of bacterial epiphytes from the marine alga Ulva lactuca.

    PubMed

    Egan, S; Thomas, T; Holmström, C; Kjelleberg, S

    2000-06-01

    It is widely accepted that bacterial epiphytes can inhibit the colonization of surfaces by common fouling organisms. However, little information is available regarding the diversity and properties of these antifouling bacteria. This study assessed the antifouling traits of five epiphytes of the common green alga, Ulva lactuca. All isolates were capable of preventing the settlement of invertebrate larvae and germination of algal spores. Three of the isolates also inhibited the growth of a variety of bacteria and fungi. Their phylogenetic positions were determined by 16S ribosomal subunit DNA sequencing. All isolates showed a close affiliation with the genus Pseudoalteromonas and, in particular, with the species P. tunicata. Strains of this bacterial species also display a variety of antifouling activities, suggesting that antifouling ability may be an important trait for members of this genus to be highly successful colonizers of animate surfaces and for such species to protect their host against fouling.

  19. The influence of extracellular compounds produced by selected Baltic cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates on growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żak, Adam; Kosakowska, Alicja

    2015-12-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by bacteria, fungi, algae and plants could affect the growth and development of biological and agricultural systems. This natural process that occurs worldwide is known as allelopathy. The main goal of this work was to investigate the influence of metabolites obtained from phytoplankton monocultures on the growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris. We selected 6 species occurring in the Baltic Sea from 3 different taxonomic groups: cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Planktothrix agardhii), diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana; Chaetoceros wighamii) and dinoflagellates (Alexandrium ostenfeldii; Prorocentrum minimum). In this study we have demonstrated that some of selected organisms caused allelopathic effects against microalgae. Both the negative and positive effects of collected cell-free filtrates on C. vulgaris growth, chlorophyll a concentration and fluorescence parameters (OJIP, QY, NPQ) have been observed. No evidence has been found for the impact on morphology and viability of C. vulgaris cells.

  20. [Effects of marine bacteria on the growth and toxin production of red-tide algae under different pH and salinities].

    PubMed

    Su, Jianqiang; Zheng, Tianling; Hu, Zhong; Xu, Jingsen; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian

    2003-07-01

    The effects of strain S10 isolated from sediments of Xiamen Western Sea Area on the growth and paralytic shellfish poison (PSP) production of Alexandrium tamarense at different pH and salinities were studied. The results showed that the alga grew well at pH 6-8 and at salinity of 20-34. The toxicity of A. tamarense varied markedly at different pH and salinities: it decreased with increasing pH, while increased with salinity and reached its peak value at the salinity of 30, and then declined. The strain S10 inhibited the growth and the PSP production of A. tamarense at different pH and salinities. It had the best inhibitory function on the growth of A. tamarense at pH 7 and salinity of 34. The best inhibitory function on the PSP production of A. tamarense was at pH 7, but this inhibitory function was not related to salinity.

  1. Errors When Extracting Oil from Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, E.; Treat, R.; Ichiuji, T.

    2014-12-01

    Oil is in popular demand, but the worldwide amount of oil is decreasing and prices for it are steadily increasing. Leading scientists have been working to find a solution of attaining oil in an economically and environmentally friendly way. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have determined that "a small mixture of algae and water can be turned into crude oil in less than an hour" (Sheehan, Duhahay, Benemann, Poessler). There are various ways of growing the algae, such as closed loop and open loop methods, as well as processes of extracting oil, such as hydrothermal liquefaction and the hexane-solvent method. Our objective was to grow the algae (C. reinhardtii) and extract oil from it using NaOH and HCl, because we had easy access to those specific chemicals. After two trials of attempted algae growth, we discovered that a bacteria was killing off the algae. This led us to further contemplation on how this dead algae and bacteria are affecting our environment, and the organisms within it. Eutrophication occurs when excess nutrients stimulate rapid growth of algae in an aquatic environment. This can clog waterways and create algal blooms in blue-green algae, as well as neurotoxic red tide phytoplankton. These microscopic algae die upon consumption of the nutrients in water and are degraded by bacteria. The bacteria respires and creates an acidic environment with the spontaneous conversion of carbon dioxide to carbonic acid in water. This process of degradation is exactly what occurred in our 250 mL flask. When the phytoplankton attacked our algae, it created a hypoxic environment, which eliminated any remaining amounts of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nutrients in the water, resulting in a miniature dead zone. These dead zones can occur almost anywhere where there are algae and bacteria, such as the ocean, and make it extremely difficult for any organism to survive. This experiment helped us realize the

  2. [Microbial resistance to formaldehyde. I. Comparative quantitative studies in some selected species of vegetative bacteria, bacterial spores, fungi, bacteriophages and viruses].

    PubMed

    Spicher, G; Peters, J

    1976-12-01

    The resistence of different microorganisms to formaldehyde was determined. As test objects served gram-negative and gram-positive vegetative germs (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella paratyphi-B, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis), bacterial spores (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus subtilis), fungi (Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans), bacteriophages (Escherichia coli phages, T1, T2, T3), and viruses (adenovirus, poliomyelitis virus, vaccinia virus). For the studies, suspensions of germs were exposed at identical temperature (20 degrees C) and pH (7.0). The microbicidal effect of formaldehyde was measured by the decrease of the proportion of germs capable of multiplication in the suspension (lg (N/N0); where: N0 equals initial number of germs capable of multiplication; N equals number of germs capable of multiplication after exposure to formaldehyde). For all germs the dependence of the microbicidal effect on the concentration of formaldehyde was determined. In all experiments, the duration of exposure was two hours. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella paratyphi-B were found to be more susceptible than Staphylococcus aureus (vf. Fig. 1 A). The strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa used were widely varying as to their susceptibility. To obtain equal microbicidal effects, concentrations of formaldehyde almost three times as high had to be used for the most resistant strain than were necessary for the most susceptible strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae examined were found to have an identical resistence to formaldehyde. Streptococcus faecalis was even more resistant to formaldehyde than Staphylococcus aureus. In the case of Streptococcus faecalis, a concentration of formaldehyde about three times as high had to be used to obtain microbicidal effects of identical magnitude. For the killing of Candida albicans cells concentrations of

  3. The ice nucleation activity of extremophilic algae.

    PubMed

    Kviderova, Jana; Hajek, Josef; Worland, Roger M

    2013-01-01

    Differences in the level of cold acclimation and cryoprotection estimated as ice nucleation activity in snow algae (Chlamydomonas cf. nivalis and Chloromonas nivalis), lichen symbiotic algae (Trebouxia asymmetrica, Trebouxia erici and Trebouxia glomerata), and a mesophilic strain (Chlamydomonas reinhardti) were evaluated. Ice nucleation activity was measured using the freezing droplet method. Measurements were performed using suspensions of cells of A750 (absorbance at 750 nm) ~ 1, 0.1, 0.01 and 0.001 dilutions for each strain. The algae had lower ice nucleation activity, with the exception of Chloromonas nivalis contaminated by bacteria. The supercooling points of the snow algae were higher than those of lichen photobionts. The supercooling points of both, mesophilic and snow Chlamydomonas strains were similar. The lower freezing temperatures of the lichen algae may reflect either the more extreme and more variable environmental conditions of the original localities or the different cellular structure of the strains examined.

  4. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  5. Lipophorins can adhere to dsRNA, bacteria and fungi present in the hemolymph of the desert locust: a role as general scavenger for pathogens in the open body cavity.

    PubMed

    Wynant, Niels; Duressa, Tewodros F; Santos, Dulce; Van Duppen, Joost; Proost, Paul; Huybrechts, Roger; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2014-05-01

    Desert locusts are characterized by a highly sensitive and effective RNA interference (RNAi) response. Moreover, delivery of dsRNA into the open body cavity will elicit potent silencing effects throughout the body. On the other hand, many other insect species, such as Bombyx mori and Drosophila melanogaster, lack the ability to efficiently spread the RNAi-signal. In this study, we demonstrated that, in the serum of the desert locust, lipophorins adhere to dsRNA-fragments. Lipophorins can be subdivided into high density and low density lipophorins (HDLp and LDLp), according to their buoyant density, and we showed that both types of lipophorins can interact with dsRNA fragments. Furthermore, in the presence of (gram-positive) bacteria or fungi, LDLp induce the formation of pathogen aggregates, while no clear aggregation effects were detected in the presence of HDLp.

  6. Preliminary survey of fungistatic properties of marine algae.

    PubMed

    WELCH, A M

    1962-01-01

    Welch, Ann Marie (U. S. Veterans Administration Hospital, Durham, N. C.). Preliminary survey of fungistatic properties of marine algae. J. Bacteriol. 83:97-99. 1962-Homogenized preparations of 35 marine algae were tested for inhibitory activity against 6 pathogenic or opportunistically pathogenic fungi with saturated filter-paper discs on seeded Sabouraud agar plates; 11 of these preparations produced wide zones of inhibition against 1 or more test organisms, and at least 4 of the 11 are considered to be worthy of further study. The results indicated that further search should be made for antifungal substances from marine algae.

  7. Magnetic separation of algae

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  8. Importance of saprotrophic freshwater fungi for pollen degradation.

    PubMed

    Wurzbacher, Christian; Rösel, Stefan; Rychła, Anna; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Fungi and bacteria are the major organic matter (OM) decomposers in aquatic ecosystems. While bacteria are regarded as primary mineralizers in the pelagic zone of lakes and oceans, fungi dominate OM decomposition in streams and wetlands. Recent findings indicate that fungal communities are also active in lakes, but little is known about their diversity and interactions with bacteria. Therefore, the decomposer niche overlap of saprotrophic fungi and bacteria was studied on pollen (as a seasonally recurring source of fine particulate OM) by performing microcosm experiments with three different lake types. Special emphasis was placed on analysis of fungal community composition and diversity. We hypothesized that (I) pollen select for small saprotrophic fungi and at the same time for typical particle-associated bacteria; (II) fungal communities form specific free-living and attached sub-communities in each lake type; (III) the ratio between fungi or bacteria on pollen is controlled by the lake's chemistry. Bacteria-to-fungi ratios were determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and bacterial and fungal diversity were studied by clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints. A protease assay was used to identify functional differences between treatments. For generalization, systematic differences in bacteria-to-fungi ratios were analyzed with a dataset from the nearby Baltic Sea rivers. High abundances of Chytridiomycota as well as occurrences of Cryptomycota and yeast-like fungi confirm the decomposer niche overlap of saprotrophic fungi and bacteria on pollen. As hypothesized, microbial communities consistently differed between the lake types and exhibited functional differences. Bacteria-to-fungi ratios correlated well with parameters such as organic carbon and pH. The importance of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen for bacteria-to-fungi ratios was supported by the Baltic Sea river dataset. Our findings highlight the fact that carbon

  9. Alkaloids in Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Güven, Kasım Cemal; Percot, Aline; Sezik, Ekrem

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the alkaloids found in green, brown and red marine algae. Algal chemistry has interested many researchers in order to develop new drugs, as algae include compounds with functional groups which are characteristic from this particular source. Among these compounds, alkaloids present special interest because of their pharmacological activities. Alkaloid chemistry has been widely studied in terrestrial plants, but the number of studies in algae is insignificant. In this review, a detailed account of macro algae alkaloids with their structure and pharmacological activities is presented. The alkaloids found in marine algae may be divided into three groups: 1. Phenylethylamine alkaloids, 2. Indole and halogenated indole alkaloids, 3. Other alkaloids. PMID:20390105

  10. Cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity of marine macro algae (Dictyotaceae and Ulvaceae) from the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Mashjoor, Sakineh; Yousefzadi, Morteza; Esmaeili, Mohamad Ali; Rafiee, Roya

    2016-10-01

    Pharmaceutical industry now accept the worlds ocean which contains a vast array of organisms with unique biological properties, as a major frontier for medical investigation. Bioactive compounds with different modes of action, such as, antiproliferative, antioxidant, antimicrotubule, have been isolated from marine sources, specifically macro and micro algae, and cyanobacteria. The aim of this work was to investigate antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of the extracts of marine macro algae Ulva flexuosa, Padina antillarum and Padina boergeseni from the northern coasts of the Persian Gulf, Qeshm Island, Iran, against three cell lines including MCF7, HeLa and Vero, as well as their inhibitory effects against a wide array (i.e. n = 11) of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Antimicrobial activity of the marine macro algal extracts was assessed using a disc diffusion method; an MTT cytotoxicity assay was employed to test the effects of the extracts on each cancer cell line. The algal extracts showed considerable antimicrobial activity against the majority of the tested bacteria and fungi. Both ethyl acetate and methanol extracts at the highest concentration (100 µg/ml) caused cell death, with the IC50 values calculated for each cell type and each algal extracts. Results are exhibited a higher decrease in the viability of the cells treated at the highest concentration of marine macro algal ethyl acetate extracts compared to the methanol extracts (78.9 % death in Vero cells by ethyl acetate extracts from U. flexuosa). Despite, the ethyl acetate extracts with lower dose- response of cells, exhibited better cytotoxic activity than methanol extracts (IC50: 55.26 μg/ml in Vero cells by ethyl acetate extracts from U. flexuosa). Based on the findings, it is concluded that the marine macro algal extracts from the Persian Gulf possess antibacterial and cytotoxic potential, which could be considered for future applications in medicine and identifying novel drugs from the

  11. [Alternative oxidase in industrial fungi].

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuai; Liu, Qiang; He, Hao; Li, Shuang

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have been used in industrial fermentation extensively. Based on non-phosphorylating electron transport process, alternative respiration pathway (ARP) acts as an energy overflow, which can balance carbon metabolism and electron transport, allow the continuance of tricarboxylic acid cycle without the formation of ATP, and permit the turnover of carbon skeletons. Alternative respiration pathway also plays an important role in the stress response of fungi and the physiological function of conditioned pathogen. Alternative oxidase (AOX) is the terminal oxidase responsible for the activity of alternative respiration pathway, which exists widely in higher plants, parts of fungi and algae. Owing to the property that alternative oxidase (AOX) is sensitive to salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) and insensitive to conventional inhibitors of cytochrome respiration, alternative respiration pathway by AOX is also named as cyanide-resistant respiration (CRR). In recent years, the study of the alternative respiration pathway and alternative oxidase has been a hot topic in the area involving cellular respiration metabolism. In this review we summarized the latest research advances about the functions of alternative respiration pathway and alternative oxidase in industrial fungi.

  12. Evaluation of commercial universal rRNA gene PCR plus sequencing tests for identification of bacteria and fungi associated with infectious endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Christian; Disqué, Claudia; Mühl, Helge; Orszag, Peter; Stiesch, Meike; Haverich, Axel

    2011-08-01

    Two new commercially available universal rRNA gene PCR plus sequencing tests, SepsiTest and universal microbe detection (UMD; Molzym, Bremen, Germany), were evaluated using blood specimens and heart valves from 30 patients with suspected infectious endocarditis (IE). The sensitivity of PCR (85%) was nearly twice as high as that of culture (45%), which in 10/20 IE cases presumably stayed negative as a consequence of growth inhibition of the pathogens by antibiotics. Further, PCR provided the basis for reclassification of 5/10 non-IE cases into IE cases. Culture-negative infections were identified by PCR, including single infections due to streptococci and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Haemophilus parainfluenzae) and mixed infections involving two Gram-positive bacteria or Candida spp. with Gram-positive bacteria. The new commercial tests proved to be of value for the rapid diagnosis of IE, particularly in cases of culture-negative infections. Issues regarding the feasibility of these tests for routine use are discussed.

  13. Fungi contamination of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Mohammad; Zheng, Tianling; Yu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic fungi commonly infest various aqueous environments and play potentially crucial roles in nutrient and carbon cycling. Aquatic fungi also interact with other organisms to influence food web dynamics. In recent decades, numerous studies have been conducted to address the problem of microorganism contamination of water. The major concern has been potential effects on human health from exposure to certain bacteria, viruses, and protozoa that inhabit water and the microbial metabolites,pigments, and odors which are produced in the water, and their effects on human health and animals. Fungi are potentially important contaminants because they produce certain toxic metabolites that can cause severe health hazards to humans and animals. Despite the potential hazard posed by fungi, relatively few studies on them as contaminants have been reported for some countries.A wide variety of fungi species have been isolated from drinking water, and some of them are known to be strongly allergenic and to cause skin irritation, or immunosuppression in immunocompromised individuals (e.g., AIDS, cancer, or organ transplant patients). Mycotoxins are naturally produced as secondary metabolites by some fungi species, and exposure of humans or animals to them can cause health problems. Such exposure is likely to occur from dietary intake of either food,water or beverages made with water. However, mycotoxins, as residues in water,may be aerosolized when showering or when being sprayed for various purposes and then be subject to inhalation. Mycotoxins, or at least some of them, are regarded to be carcinogenic. There is also some concern that toxic mycotoxins or other secondary metabolites of fungi could be used by terrorists as a biochemical weapon by adding amounts of them to drinking water or non drinking water. Therefore, actions to prevent mycotoxin contaminated water from affecting either humans or animals are important and are needed. Water treatment plants may serve to partially

  14. Novel fungal pelletization-assisted technology for algae harvesting and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenguang; Cheng, Yanling; Li, Yun; Wan, Yiqin; Liu, Yuhuan; Lin, Xiangyang; Ruan, Roger

    2012-05-01

    A novel fungi pelletization-assisted bioflocculation technology was developed for efficient algae harvesting and wastewater treatment. Microalga Chlorella vulgaris UMN235 and two locally isolated fungal species Aspergillus sp. UMN F01 and UMN F02 were used to study the effect of various cultural conditions on pelletization process for fungi-algae complex. The results showed that pH was the key factor affecting formation of fungi-algae pellet, and pH could be controlled by adjusting glucose concentration and fungal spore number added. The best pelletization happened when adding 20 g/L glucose and approximately 1.2E8/L spores in BG-11 medium, under which almost 100% of algal cells were captured onto the pellets with shorter retention time. The fungi-algae pellets can be easily harvested by simple filtration due to its large size (2-5 mm). The filtered fungi-algae pellets were reused as immobilized cells for treatment wastewaters and the nutrient removal rates of 100, 58.85, 89.83, and 62.53 % (for centrate) and 23.23, 44.68, 84.70, and 70.34% (for diluted swine manure wastewater) for ammonium, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and chemical oxygen demand, respectively, under both 1- and 2-day cultivations. The novel technology developed is highly promising compared with current algae harvesting and biological wastewater treatment technologies in the literature.

  15. Release of Dimethylsulfide from Dimethylsulfoniopropionate by Plant-Associated Salt Marsh Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Bacic, M. K.; Newell, S. Y.; Yoch, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    The range of types of microbes with dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) lyase capability (enzymatic release of dimethylsulfide [DMS] from DMSP) has recently been expanded from bacteria and eukaryotic algae to include fungi (a species of the genus Fusarium [M. K. Bacic and D. C. Yoch, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:106–111, 1998]). Fungi (especially ascomycetes) are the predominant decomposers of shoots of smooth cordgrass, the principal grass of Atlantic salt marshes of the United States. Since the high rates of release of DMS from smooth cordgrass marshes have a temporal peak that coincides with peak shoot death, we hypothesized that cordgrass fungi were involved in this DMS release. We tested seven species of the known smooth cordgrass ascomycetes and discovered that six of them exhibited DMSP lyase activity. We also tested two species of ascomycetes from other DMSP-containing plants, and both were DMSP lyase competent. For comparison, we tested 11 species of ascomycetes and mitosporic fungi from halophytes that do not contain DMSP; of these 11, only 3 were positive for DMSP lyase. A third group tested, marine oomycotes (four species of the genera Halophytophthora and Pythium, mostly from mangroves), showed no DMSP lyase activity. Two of the strains of fungi found to be positive for DMSP lyase also exhibited uptake of DMS, an apparently rare combination of capabilities. In conclusion, a strong correlation exists between a fungal decomposer’s ability to catabolize DMSP via the DMSP lyase pathway and the host plant’s production of DMSP as a secondary product. PMID:16349548

  16. Antioxidant and antimicrobial potential of the Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Horta, André; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Fino, Nádia; Silva, Joana; Fernandez, Sara; Rodrigues, Américo; Pedrosa, Rui

    2014-03-24

    Surface-associated marine bacteria are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine brown alga, Bifurcaria bifurcata, and the evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1) extraction. The antioxidant activity of extracts was performed by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Antimicrobial activities were evaluated against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. A total of 39 Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria were isolated and 33 were identified as Vibrio sp. (48.72%), Alteromonas sp. (12.82%), Shewanella sp. (12.26%), Serratia sp. (2.56%), Citricoccus sp. (2.56%), Cellulophaga sp. (2.56%), Ruegeria sp. (2.56%) and Staphylococcus sp. (2.56%). Six (15.38%) of the 39 bacteria Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria presented less than a 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) match, and some of those could be new. The highest antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity (against B. subtilis) was exhibited by strain 16 (Shewanella sp.). Several strains also presented high antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, mainly belonging to Alteromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. There were no positive results against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria were revealed to be excellent sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  17. Molecular evolution of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Urea amidolyase breaks down urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide in a two-step process, while another enzyme, urease, does this in a one step-process. Urea amidolyase has been found only in some fungal species among eukaryotes. It contains two major domains: the amidase and urea carboxylase domains. A shorter form of urea amidolyase is known as urea carboxylase and has no amidase domain. Eukaryotic urea carboxylase has been found only in several fungal species and green algae. In order to elucidate the evolutionary origin of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase, we studied the distribution of urea amidolyase, urea carboxylase, as well as other proteins including urease, across kingdoms. Results Among the 64 fungal species we examined, only those in two Ascomycota classes (Sordariomycetes and Saccharomycetes) had the urea amidolyase sequences. Urea carboxylase was found in many but not all of the species in the phylum Basidiomycota and in the subphylum Pezizomycotina (phylum Ascomycota). It was completely absent from the class Saccharomycetes (phylum Ascomycota; subphylum Saccharomycotina). Four Sordariomycetes species we examined had both the urea carboxylase and the urea amidolyase sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these two enzymes appeared to have gone through independent evolution since their bacterial origin. The amidase domain and the urea carboxylase domain sequences from fungal urea amidolyases clustered strongly together with the amidase and urea carboxylase sequences, respectively, from a small number of beta- and gammaproteobacteria. On the other hand, fungal urea carboxylase proteins clustered together with another copy of urea carboxylases distributed broadly among bacteria. The urease proteins were found in all the fungal species examined except for those of the subphylum Saccharomycotina. Conclusions We conclude that the urea amidolyase genes currently found only in fungi are the results of a horizontal gene transfer event from

  18. Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae

    SciTech Connect

    Tornabene, T.G.

    1980-12-01

    A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

  19. Isolation of a bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. from centrate wastewater and study of its cooperation with algae in nutrients removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Lu, Qian; Wang, Qin; Liu, Wen; Wei, Qian; Ren, Hongyan; Ming, Caibing; Min, Min; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2017-03-22

    Algae were able to grow healthy on bacteria-containing centrate wastewater in a pilot-scale bioreactor. The batch experiment indicated that the co-cultivation of algae and wastewater-borne bacteria improved the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand and total phosphorus in centrate wastewater to 93.01% and 98.78%, respectively. A strain of beneficial aerobic bacteria, Acinetobacter sp., was isolated and its biochemical characteristics were explored. Synergistic cooperation was observed in the growth of algae and Acinetobacter sp. Removal efficiencies of some nutrients were improved significantly by the co-cultivation of algae and Acinetobacter sp. After treatment, residual nutrients in centrate wastewater reached the permissible discharge limit. The cooperation between algae and Acinetobacter sp. was in part attributed to the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the algae and bacteria. This synergetic relationship between algae and Acinetobacter sp. provided a promising way to treat the wastewater by improving the nutrients removal and biomass production.

  20. Effect of DNA extraction procedure, repeated extraction and ethidium monoazide (EMA)/propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment on overall DNA yield and impact on microbial fingerprints for bacteria, fungi and archaea in a reference soil.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas O; Praeg, Nadine; Reitschuler, Christoph; Illmer, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Different DNA extraction protocols were evaluated on a reference soil. A wide difference was found in the total extractable DNA as derived from different extraction protocols. Concerning the DNA yield phenol-chloroform-isomyl alcohol extraction resulted in high DNA yield but also in a remarkable co-extraction of contaminants making PCR from undiluted DNA extracts impossible. By comparison of two different extraction kits, the Macherey&Nagel SoilExtract II kit resulted in the highest DNA yields when buffer SL1 and the enhancer solution were applied. The enhancer solution not only significantly increased the DNA yield but also the amount of co-extracted contaminates, whereas additional disintegration strategies did not. Although a three times repeated DNA extraction increased the total amount of extracted DNA, microbial fingerprints were merely affected. However, with the 5th extraction this changed. A reduction of total DGGE band numbers was observed for archaea and fungi, whereas for bacteria the diversity increased. The application of ethidium monoazide (EMA) or propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment aiming on the selective removal of soil DNA derived from cells lacking cell wall integrity resulted in a significant reduction of total extracted DNA, however, the hypothesized effect on microbial fingerprints failed to appear indicating the need for further investigations.

  1. Effect of DNA extraction procedure, repeated extraction and ethidium monoazide (EMA)/propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment on overall DNA yield and impact on microbial fingerprints for bacteria, fungi and archaea in a reference soil

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Andreas O.; Praeg, Nadine; Reitschuler, Christoph; Illmer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Different DNA extraction protocols were evaluated on a reference soil. A wide difference was found in the total extractable DNA as derived from different extraction protocols. Concerning the DNA yield phenol–chloroform–isomyl alcohol extraction resulted in high DNA yield but also in a remarkable co-extraction of contaminants making PCR from undiluted DNA extracts impossible. By comparison of two different extraction kits, the Macherey&Nagel SoilExtract II kit resulted in the highest DNA yields when buffer SL1 and the enhancer solution were applied. The enhancer solution not only significantly increased the DNA yield but also the amount of co-extracted contaminates, whereas additional disintegration strategies did not. Although a three times repeated DNA extraction increased the total amount of extracted DNA, microbial fingerprints were merely affected. However, with the 5th extraction this changed. A reduction of total DGGE band numbers was observed for archaea and fungi, whereas for bacteria the diversity increased. The application of ethidium monoazide (EMA) or propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment aiming on the selective removal of soil DNA derived from cells lacking cell wall integrity resulted in a significant reduction of total extracted DNA, however, the hypothesized effect on microbial fingerprints failed to appear indicating the need for further investigations. PMID:26339125

  2. Conserved and diversified gene families of monovalent cation/h(+) antiporters from algae to flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Chanroj, Salil; Wang, Guoying; Venema, Kees; Zhang, Muren Warren; Delwiche, Charles F; Sze, Heven

    2012-01-01

    All organisms have evolved strategies to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental and environmental cues. One strategy is mediated by monovalent cation-proton antiporters (CPA) that are classified in two superfamilies. Many CPA1 genes from bacteria, fungi, metazoa, and plants have been functionally characterized; though roles of plant CPA2 genes encoding K(+)-efflux antiporter (KEA) and cation/H(+) exchanger (CHX) families are largely unknown. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three clades of the CPA1 Na(+)-H(+) exchanger (NHX) family have been conserved from single-celled algae to Arabidopsis. These are (i) plasma membrane-bound SOS1/AtNHX7 that share ancestry with prokaryote NhaP, (ii) endosomal AtNHX5/6 that is part of the eukaryote Intracellular-NHE clade, and (iii) a vacuolar NHX clade (AtNHX1-4) specific to plants. Early diversification of KEA genes possibly from an ancestral cyanobacterium gene is suggested by three types seen in all plants. Intriguingly, CHX genes diversified from three to four members in one subclade of early land plants to 28 genes in eight subclades of Arabidopsis. Homologs from Spirogyra or Physcomitrella share high similarity with AtCHX20, suggesting that guard cell-specific AtCHX20 and its closest relatives are founders of the family, and pollen-expressed CHX genes appeared later in monocots and early eudicots. AtCHX proteins mediate K(+) transport and pH homeostasis, and have been localized to intracellular and plasma membrane. Thus KEA genes are conserved from green algae to angiosperms, and their presence in red algae and secondary endosymbionts suggest a role in plastids. In contrast, AtNHX1-4 subtype evolved in plant cells to handle ion homeostasis of vacuoles. The great diversity of CHX genes in land plants compared to metazoa, fungi, or algae would imply a significant role of ion and pH homeostasis at dynamic endomembranes in the vegetative and reproductive success of flowering plants.

  3. Conserved and Diversified Gene Families of Monovalent Cation/H+ Antiporters from Algae to Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chanroj, Salil; Wang, Guoying; Venema, Kees; Zhang, Muren Warren; Delwiche, Charles F.; Sze, Heven

    2012-01-01

    All organisms have evolved strategies to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental and environmental cues. One strategy is mediated by monovalent cation–proton antiporters (CPA) that are classified in two superfamilies. Many CPA1 genes from bacteria, fungi, metazoa, and plants have been functionally characterized; though roles of plant CPA2 genes encoding K+-efflux antiporter (KEA) and cation/H+ exchanger (CHX) families are largely unknown. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three clades of the CPA1 Na+–H+ exchanger (NHX) family have been conserved from single-celled algae to Arabidopsis. These are (i) plasma membrane-bound SOS1/AtNHX7 that share ancestry with prokaryote NhaP, (ii) endosomal AtNHX5/6 that is part of the eukaryote Intracellular-NHE clade, and (iii) a vacuolar NHX clade (AtNHX1–4) specific to plants. Early diversification of KEA genes possibly from an ancestral cyanobacterium gene is suggested by three types seen in all plants. Intriguingly, CHX genes diversified from three to four members in one subclade of early land plants to 28 genes in eight subclades of Arabidopsis. Homologs from Spirogyra or Physcomitrella share high similarity with AtCHX20, suggesting that guard cell-specific AtCHX20 and its closest relatives are founders of the family, and pollen-expressed CHX genes appeared later in monocots and early eudicots. AtCHX proteins mediate K+ transport and pH homeostasis, and have been localized to intracellular and plasma membrane. Thus KEA genes are conserved from green algae to angiosperms, and their presence in red algae and secondary endosymbionts suggest a role in plastids. In contrast, AtNHX1–4 subtype evolved in plant cells to handle ion homeostasis of vacuoles. The great diversity of CHX genes in land plants compared to metazoa, fungi, or algae would imply a significant role of ion and pH homeostasis at dynamic endomembranes in the vegetative and reproductive success of flowering plants. PMID:22639643

  4. The Shewanella algae strain YM8 produces volatiles with strong inhibition activity against Aspergillus pathogens and aflatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gong, An-Dong; Li, He-Ping; Shen, Lu; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Ai-Bo; He, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Qing-Song; He, Jing-De; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus fungi and associated aflatoxins are ubiquitous in the production and storage of food/feed commodities. Controlling these microbes is a challenge. In this study, the Shewanella algae strain YM8 was found to produce volatiles that have strong antifungal activity against Aspergillus pathogens. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling revealed 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from YM8, of which dimethyl trisulfide was the most abundant. We obtained authentic reference standards for six of the VOCs; these all significantly reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination in Aspergillus; dimethyl trisulfide and 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-phenol showed the strongest inhibitory activity. YM8 completely inhibited Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize and peanut samples stored at different water activity levels, and scanning electron microscopy revealed severely damaged conidia and a complete lack of mycelium development and conidiogenesis. YM8 also completely inhibited the growth of eight other agronomically important species of phytopathogenic fungi: A. parasiticus, A. niger, Alternaria alternate, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum, Monilinia fructicola, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This study demonstrates the susceptibility of Aspergillus and other fungi to VOCs from marine bacteria and indicates a new strategy for effectively controlling these pathogens and the associated mycotoxin production during storage and possibly in the field. PMID:26500631

  5. Algae Derived Biofuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, Kauser

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  6. Oomycetes and fungi: similar weaponry to attack plants.

    PubMed

    Latijnhouwers, Maita; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Govers, Francine

    2003-10-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are the two most important groups of eukaryotic plant pathogens. Fungi form a separate kingdom and are evolutionarily related to animals. Oomycetes are classified in the kingdom Protoctista and are related to heterokont, biflagellate, golden-brown algae. Fundamental differences in physiology, biochemistry and genetics between fungi and Oomycetes have been described previously. These differences are also reflected in the large variations observed in sensitivity to conventional fungicides. Recently, more pronounced differences have been revealed by genomics approaches. However, in this review we compare the mode of colonization of the two taxonomically distinct groups and show that their strategies have much in common.

  7. Recovery of fermented inulin fiber by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from inulin hydrolysate using fungi inulinase enzymes of Scopulariopsis sp.-CBS1 and class of Deuteromycetes-CBS4 as cholesterol binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilowati, Agustine; Melanie, Hakiki; Maryati, Yati; Aspiyanto

    2017-01-01

    Fermentation of Lactobacillus Acid Bacteria (LAB) which are mixtures of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacteriumbifidum, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophillus on hydrolysate as a result of inulin hydrolysis using inulinase enzymes obtained from endophytic fungi ofScopulariopsis sp.-CBS1 (inulin hydrolysate of S) and Class of Deuteromycetes-CBS4 (inulin hydrolysate of D) generate potential fermented inulin fiber as cholesterol binder. Fermentation process was conducted under concentrations of inulin hydrolysate 50% (w/v), LAB 15% (v/v) and skim milk 12.5% (w/v) at room temperature and 40°C for 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours, respectively. Result of experimental work showed that longer time of LAB fermentation increased total acids, TPC and CBC at pH 2, but decreased total sugar, reducing, IDF, SDF, CBC pH 2 and CBC pH 7. Based on Cholesterol Binding Capacity (CBC), optimization of fermentation process on inulin hydrolysate of S was achieved by combining treatment at 40°C for 24 hours resulted in CBC pH 2 of 19.11 mg/g TDF and inulin hydrolysate of D was achieved by fermentation at 40 °C for 48 hours resulted in CBC pH 2 of 24.28 mg/g TDF. Inulin hydrolysate of class of Deutrymecetes CBS4 fermented by LAB had better functional property as cholesterol binder than that inulin hydrolysate of S fermented by LAB. This is due to cholesterol binder and cholesterol derivatives as a result of degradation of LAB on digestive system (stomach) when compared to higher colon under optimal process condition.

  8. PCB metabolism by ectomycorrhizal fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, P.K.; Fletcher, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    Since 1976 the use of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been banned in the U.S. Prior to this, commercial mixtures (Aroclors) had been used extensively as an industrial lubricant because of their nonflammable, nonreactive properties. These same properties are responsible for their persistent in the environment where they bind to soil particles and resist biodegradation. Decontamination of PCB-laden soil is expensive with excavation followed by either storage or incineration as the primary means of remediation. The use of microorganisms for PCB bioremediation has been gaining popularity in the past few years. Bacteria and/or fungi isolated from environmental samples have been used to degrade PCBs under laboratory conditions, but in field trials they have not been as effective. The most common explanation for the poor performance of PCB-degrading organisms introduced at contaminated sites is that they do not compete well with the existing populations. Plant-ectomycorrhizal systems may overcome this problem. Introduction and cultivation of a known host plant at a contaminated site has the potential of providing a survival advantage for ectomycorrhizal fungi that normally colonize the roots of the introduced plant. Ectomycorrhizal fungi exist naturally in the soil and normally grow in association with the roots of a host plant in a mutualistic symbiotic relationship. Preliminary in vitro examination of this group of fungi for their ability to enzymatically degrade xenobiotics is very promising. In vivo studies have shown that some of these fungi have the ability to degrade chlorinated, aromatic compounds, such as 2,4-D and atrazine. The aspect of ectomycorrhizal metabolism was investigated further in the current study by determining the ability of 21 different fungi to metabolize 19 different PCB congeners with varying chlorine content and substitution patterns. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Study on algae removal by immobilized biosystem on sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong

    2006-10-01

    In this study, sponges were used to immobilize domesticated sludge microbes in a limited space, forming an immobilized biosystem capable of algae and microcystins removal. The removal effects on algae, microcystins and UV260 of this biosystem and the mechanism of algae removal were studied. The results showed that active sludge from sewage treatment plants was able to remove algae from a eutrophic lake’s water after 7 d of domestication. The removal efficiency for algae, organic matter and microcystins increased when the domesticated sludge was immobilized on sponges. When the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 5h, the removal rates of algae, microcystins and UV260 were 90%, 94.17% and 84%, respectively. The immobilized biosystem consisted mostly of bacteria, the Ciliata and Sarcodina protozoans and the Rotifer metazoans. Algal decomposition by zoogloea bacteria and preying by microcreatures were the two main modes of algal removal, which occurred in two steps: first, absorption by the zoogloea; second, decomposition by the zoogloea bacteria and the predacity of the microcreatures.

  10. Microbial community structures in high rate algae ponds for bioconversion of agricultural wastes from livestock industry for feed production.

    PubMed

    Mark Ibekwe, A; Murinda, Shelton E; Murry, Marcia A; Schwartz, Gregory; Lundquist, Trygve

    2017-02-15

    Dynamics of seasonal microbial community compositions in algae cultivation ponds are complex. However, there is very limited knowledge on bacterial communities that may play significant roles with algae in the bioconversion of manure nutrients to animal feed. In this study, water samples were collected during winter, spring, summer, and fall from the dairy lagoon effluent (DLE), high rate algae ponds (HRAP) that were fed with diluted DLE, and municipal waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluent which was included as a comparison system for the analysis of total bacteria, Cyanobacteria, and microalgae communities using MiSeq Illumina sequencing targeting the 16S V4 rDNA region. The main objective was to examine dynamics in microbial community composition in the HRAP used for the production of algal biomass. DNA was extracted from the different sample types using three commercially available DNA extraction kits; MoBio Power water extraction kit, Zymo fungi/bacterial extraction kit, and MP Biomedicals FastDNA SPIN Kit. Permutational analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) using distance matrices on each variable showed significant differences (P=0.001) in beta-diversity based on sample source. Environmental variables such as hydraulic retention time (HRT; P<0.031), total N (P<0.002), total inorganic N (P<0.002), total P (P<0.002), alkalinity (P<0.002), pH (P<0.022), total suspended solid (TSS; P<0.003), and volatile suspended solids (VSS; P<0.002) significantly affected microbial communities in DLE, HRAP, and WWTP. Of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified to phyla level, the dominant classes of bacteria identified were: Cyanobacteria, Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, Epsilon-, and Delta-proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Planctomycetes. Our data suggest that microbial communities were significantly affected in HRAP by different environmental variables, and care must be taken in extraction procedures when evaluating specific groups of microbial communities for

  11. Biotechnological and in situ food production of polyols by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Maria Eugenia; Bleckwedel, Juliana; Raya, Raúl R; Mozzi, Fernanda

    2013-06-01

    Polyols such as mannitol, erythritol, sorbitol, and xylitol are naturally found in fruits and vegetables and are produced by certain bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and algae. These sugar alcohols are widely used in food and pharmaceutical industries and in medicine because of their interesting physicochemical properties. In the food industry, polyols are employed as natural sweeteners applicable in light and diabetic food products. In the last decade, biotechnological production of polyols by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been investigated as an alternative to their current industrial production. While heterofermentative LAB may naturally produce mannitol and erythritol under certain culture conditions, sorbitol and xylitol have been only synthesized through metabolic engineering processes. This review deals with the spontaneous formation of mannitol and erythritol in fermented foods and their biotechnological production by heterofermentative LAB and briefly presented the metabolic engineering processes applied for polyol formation.

  12. Recent developments in the taxonomic affiliation and phylogenetic positioning of fungi: impact in applied microbiology and environmental biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Kerstin; Kirk, Paul M

    2011-04-01

    The goal of modern taxonomy is to understand the relationships of living organisms in terms of evolutionary descent. Thereby, the relationships between living organisms are understood in terms of nested clades--every time a speciation event takes place, two new clades are produced. Life comprises three domains of living organisms, these are the Bacteria, the Archaea and the Eukaryota. Within the eukaryotic domain, the fungi form a monophyletic group of the eukaryotic crown group and are thus high up in the evolutionary hierarchy of life. Fungus-like organisms possess certain morphological features of fungi, such as the hyphal organization of the Oomycota or the spores and reproductive structures inside a fructification of plasmodiophorids (Plasmodiophoromycota) and slime moulds (Mycetozoa). The first group are algae which secondarily lost their plastids during evolution and contain cellulose in their cell walls. Both osmotrophic phyla, the Oomycota and the Plasmidiophoromycota belong to the Chromista and Rhizaria, respectively, whereas the last group, the cellular and plasmodial slime moulds (Mycetozoa) are phagotrophic amoeboid protists belonging to the Amoebozoa. These fungus-like organisms are not considered further in this review. The Fungi sensu stricto comprise a heterogenous, often inconspicuous group of microorganisms which (1) are primarily heterotrophic with an (2) osmotrophic style of nutrition containing (3) chitin and its derivatives in the cell wall. This review discusses species concepts and current strategies in fungal taxonomy, phylogenetic affiliations of miscellaneous fungus-like groups like the microsporidia, perspectives of fungal nomenclature, and their impact on natural product research.

  13. International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Science requires a precise, stable, and simple system of nomenclature used by scientists in all countries of the world, dealing on the one hand with the terms that denote the ranks of taxonomic groups, and on the other with the scientific names that are applied to the individual taxonomic units of a...

  14. Microbial mats: an ecological niche for fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Sharon A.; Duval-Pérez, Lisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Fungi were documented in tropical hypersaline microbial mats and their role in the degradation of complex carbohydrates (exopolymeric substance – EPS) was explored. Fungal diversity is higher during the wet season with Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium among the more common genera. Diversity is also higher in the oxic layer and in young and transient mats. Enrichments with xanthan (a model EPS) show that without antibiotics (full community) degradation is faster than enrichments with antibacterial (fungal community) and antifungal (bacterial community) agents, suggesting that degradation is performed by a consortium of organisms (bacteria and fungi). The combined evidence from all experiments indicates that bacteria carried out approximately two-third of the xanthan degradation. The pattern of degradation is similar between seasons and layers but degradation is faster in enrichments from the wet season. The research suggests that fungi thrive in these hypersaline consortia and may participate in the carbon cycle through the degradation of complex carbohydrates. PMID:23577004

  15. Terpenoids from endophytic fungi.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jucimar Jorgeane; Vieira, Ivo José Curcino; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2011-12-19

    This work reviews the production of terpenoids by endophytic fungi and their biological activities, in period of 2006 to 2010. Sixty five sesquiterpenes, 45 diterpenes, five meroterpenes and 12 other terpenes, amounting to 127 terpenoids were isolated from endophytic fungi.

  16. Multi-marker metabarcoding of coral skeletons reveals a rich microbiome and diverse evolutionary origins of endolithic algae

    PubMed Central

    Marcelino, Vanessa Rossetto; Verbruggen, Heroen

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria, fungi and green algae are common inhabitants of coral skeletons. Their diversity is poorly characterized because they are difficult to identify with microscopy or environmental sequencing, as common metabarcoding markers have low phylogenetic resolution and miss a large portion of the biodiversity. We used a cost-effective protocol and a combination of markers (tufA, 16S rDNA, 18S rDNA and 23S rDNA) to characterize the microbiome of 132 coral skeleton samples. We identified a wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, many never reported in corals before. We additionally investigated the phylogenetic diversity of the green algae—the most abundant eukaryotic member of this community, for which previous literature recognizes only a handful of endolithic species. We found more than 120 taxonomic units (near species level), including six family-level lineages mostly new to science. The results suggest that the existence of lineages with an endolithic lifestyle predates the existence of modern scleractinian corals by ca. 250my, and that this particular niche was independently invaded by over 20 lineages in green algae evolution. These results highlight the potential of the multi-marker approach to assist in species discovery and, when combined with a phylogenetic framework, clarify the evolutionary origins of host-microbiota associations. PMID:27545322

  17. Antibiosis of vineyard ecosystem fungi against food-borne microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Carolina; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña; Salazar, Óscar; Vicente, M Francisca; Bills, Gerald F

    2011-12-01

    Fermentation extracts from fungi isolated from vineyard ecosystems were tested for antimicrobial activities against a set of test microorganisms, including five food-borne pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus EP167, Acinetobacter baumannii (clinically isolated), Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, Escherichia coli O157:H7 (CECT 5947) and Candida albicans MY1055) and two probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum LCH17 and Lactobacillus brevis LCH23). A total of 182 fungi was grown in eight different media, and the fermentation extracts were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 71 fungi produced extracts active against at least one pathogenic microorganism, but not against any probiotic bacteria. The Gram-positive bacterium S. aureus EP167 was more susceptible to antimicrobial fungi broth extracts than Gram-negative bacteria and pathogenic fungi. Identification of active fungi based on internal transcribed spacer rRNA sequence analysis revealed that species in the orders Pleosporales, Hypocreales and Xylariales dominated. Differences in antimicrobial selectivity were observed among isolates from the same species. Some compounds present in the active extracts were tentatively identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Antimicrobial metabolites produced by vineyard ecosystem fungi may potentially limit colonization and spoilage of food products by food-borne pathogens, with minimal effect on probiotic bacteria.

  18. Effect of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles on SERS spectral variance of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li; Chen, Shaode; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-02-01

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively utilized in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for bacterial identification. However, Ag NPs are toxic to bacteria. Whether such toxicity can affect SERS features of bacteria and interfere with bacterial identification is still unknown and needed to explore. Here, by carrying out a comparative study on non-toxic Au NPs with that on toxic Ag NPs, we investigated the influence of nanoparticle concentration and incubation time on bacterial SERS spectral variance, both of which were demonstrated to be closely related to the toxicity of Ag NPs. Sensitive spectral alterations were observed on Ag NPs with increase of NPs concentration or incubation time, accompanied with an obvious decrease in number of viable bacteria. In contrast, SERS spectra and viable bacterial number on Au NPs were rather constant under the same conditions. A further analysis on spectral changes demonstrated that it was cell response (i.e. metabolic activity or death) to the toxicity of Ag NPs causing spectral variance. However, biochemical responses to the toxicity of Ag were very different in different bacteria, indicating the complex toxic mechanism of Ag NPs. Ag NPs are toxic to a great variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa etc., therefore, this work will be helpful in guiding the future application of SERS technique in various complex biological systems.

  19. Technical Note: Enhanced reactivity of nitrogenous organohalogen formation from plant litter to bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Ng, T. W.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, X. B.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Chow, A. T.; Wong, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    C1/C2 organohalogens (organohalogens with one or two carbon atoms) can have significant environmental toxicity and ecological impact, such as carcinogenesis, ozone depletion and global warming. Natural halogenation processes have been identified for a wide range of natural organic matter, including soils, plant and animal debris, algae, and fungi. Yet, few have considered these organohalogens generated from the ubiquitous bacteria, one of the largest biomass pools on Earth. Here, we report and confirm the formation of chloroform (CHCl3) dichloro-acetonitrile (CHCl2CN), chloral hydrate (CCl3CH(OH)2) and their brominated analogues by direct halogenation of seven strains of common bacteria and nine cellular monomers. Comparing different major C stocks during litter decomposition stages in terrestrial ecosystems, from plant litter, decomposed litter, to bacteria, increasing reactivity for nitrogenous organohalogen yield was observed with decreasing C/N ratio. Our results raise the possibility that natural halogenation of bacteria represents a significant and overlooked contribution to global organohalogen burdens. As bacteria are decomposers that alter the C quality by transforming organic matter pools from high to low C/N ratio and constitute a large organic N pool, the bacterial activity is expected to affect the C, N, and halogen cycling through natural halogenation reactions.

  20. Technical Note: Reactivity of C1 and C2 organohalogens formation - from plant litter to bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Ng, T. W.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, X. B.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Chow, A. T.; Wong, P. K.

    2012-10-01

    C1/C2 organohalogens (organohalogens with one or two carbon atoms) can have significant environmental toxicity and ecological impact, such as carcinogenesis, ozone depletion and global warming. Natural halogenation processes have been identified for a wide range of natural organic matter, including soils, plant and animal debris, algae, and fungi. Yet, few have considered these organohalogens generated from the ubiquitous bacteria, one of the largest biomass pools on earth. Here, we report and confirm the formation of chloroform (CHCl3) dichloro-acetonitrile (CHCl2CN), chloral hydrate (CCl3CH(OH)2) and their brominated analogues by direct halogenation of seven strains of common bacteria and nine cellular monomers. Comparing different major C stocks during litter decomposition stages in terrestrial ecosystems, from plant litter, decomposed litter, to bacteria, we found increasing reactivity for nitrogenous organohalogen yield with decreasing C/N ratio. Our results raise the possibility that natural halogenation of bacteria represents a significant and overlooked contribution to global organohalogen burdens. As bacteria are decomposers that alter the C quality by transforming organic matter pools from high to low C/N ratio and constitute a large organic N pool, the bacterial activity is expected to affect the C, N, and halogen cycling through natural halogenation reactions.

  1. Otomycosis due to filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    García-Agudo, Lidia; Aznar-Marín, Pilar; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Martos, Pedro; Marín-Casanova, Pilar; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Otomycosis is common throughout the world but barely studied in Spain. Our objective was to determine the microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of this pathology in Cadiz (Spain) between 2005 and 2010. Samples from patients with suspicion of otomycosis underwent a direct microscopic examination and culture on different media for fungi and bacteria. Mycological cultures were incubated at 30°C for at least seven days. Identification of fungi was based on colonial morphology and microscopic examination of fungal structure. From a total of 2,633 samples, microbial growth was present in 1,375 (52.2%) and fungal isolation in 390 (28.4%). We identified 228 yeasts and 184 filamentous fungi (13.4% of positive cultures and 47.2% of otomycosis), associated with yeasts in 22 cases (5.6%). The most frequent species were Aspergillus flavus (42.4%), A. niger (35.9%), A. fumigatus (12.5%), A. candidus (7.1%), A. terreus (1.6%), and Paecilomyces variotii (0.5%). Infection was predominant in men (54.9%) and patients beyond 55 years old (46.8%). The most common clinical symptoms were itching (98.9%), otalgia (59.3%), and hypoacusis (56.0%). Fall season reported the lowest number of cases (20.1%). Incidence of otomycosis and fungi producing otomycosis vary within the distinct geographical areas. In Cadiz, this infection is endemic due to warm temperatures, high humidity, sea bathing, and wind, which contributes to disseminate the conidia. Despite Aspergillus niger has been reported as the main causative agent, A. flavus is predominant in Cadiz. Although infection is usually detected in warm months, we observed a homogeneous occurrence of otomycosis in almost all the seasons.

  2. [Bacterial communities of brown and red algae from Peter the Great Bay, the Sea of Japan].

    PubMed

    Beleneva, I A; Zhukova, N V

    2006-01-01

    The structure of microbial communities of brown algae, red algae, and of the red alga Gracilaria verrucosa, healthy and affected with rotten thallus, were comparatively investigated; 61 strains of heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Most of them were identified to the genus level, some Vibrio spp., to the species level according to their phenotypic properties and the fatty acid composition of cellular lipids. The composition of the microflora of two species of brown algae was different. In Chordaria flagelliformis, Pseudomonas spp. prevailed, and in Desmarestia viridis, Bacillus spp. The composition of the microflora of two red algae, G. verrucosa and Camphylaephora hyphaeoides, differed mainly in the ratio of prevailing groups of bacteria. The most abundant were bacteria of the CFB cluster and pseudoalteromonads. In addition, the following bacteria were found on the surface of the algae: Sulfitobacter spp., Halomonas spp., Acinetobacter sp., Planococcus sp., Arthrobacter sp., and Agromyces sp. From tissues of the affected G. verrucosa, only vibrios were isolated, both agarolytic and nonagarolytic. The existence of specific bacterial communities characteristic of different species of algae is suggested and the relation of Vibrio sp. to the pathological process in the tissues of G. verrucosa is supposed.

  3. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  4. Antibody Production in Plants and Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2016-04-29

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a wide range of modern applications, including research, diagnostic, therapeutic, and industrial uses. Market demand for mAbs is high and continues to grow. Although mammalian systems, which currently dominate the biomanufacturing industry, produce effective and safe recombinant mAbs, they have a limited manufacturing capacity and high costs. Bacteria, yeast, and insect cell systems are highly scalable and cost effective but vary in their ability to produce appropriate posttranslationally modified mAbs. Plants and green algae are emerging as promising production platforms because of their time and cost efficiencies, scalability, lack of mammalian pathogens, and eukaryotic posttranslational protein modification machinery. So far, plant- and algae-derived mAbs have been produced predominantly as candidate therapeutics for infectious diseases and cancer. These candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models, and some have shown efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we review ongoing efforts to advance the production of mAbs in plants and algae.

  5. Algae as Reservoirs for Coral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Michael J.; Bythell, John C.; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2013-01-01

    Benthic algae are associated with coral death in the form of stress and disease. It's been proposed that they release exudates, which facilitate invasion of potentially pathogenic microbes at the coral-algal interface, resulting in coral disease. However, the original source of these pathogens remains unknown. This study examined the ability of benthic algae to act as reservoirs of coral pathogens by characterizing surface associated microbes associated with major Caribbean and Indo-Pacific algal species/types and by comparing them to potential pathogens of two dominant coral diseases: White Syndrome (WS) in the Indo-Pacific and Yellow Band Disease (YBD) in the Caribbean. Coral and algal sampling was conducted simultaneously at the same sites to avoid spatial effects. Potential pathogens were defined as those absent or rare in healthy corals, increasing in abundance in healthy tissues adjacent to a disease lesion, and dominant in disease lesions. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected in both WS and YBD and were also present within the majority of algal species/types (54 and 100% for WS and YBD respectively). Pathogenic ciliates were associated only with WS and not YBD lesions and these were also present in 36% of the Indo-Pacific algal species. Although potential pathogens were associated with many algal species, their presence was inconsistent among replicate algal samples and detection rates were relatively low, suggestive of low density and occurrence. At the community level, coral-associated microbes irrespective of the health of their host differed from algal-associated microbes, supporting that algae and corals have distinctive microbial communities associated with their tissue. We conclude that benthic algae are common reservoirs for a variety of different potential coral pathogens. However, algal-associated microbes alone are unlikely to cause coral death. Initial damage or stress to the coral via other competitive mechanisms is most likely a

  6. Molecular evolution in bacterial endosymbionts of fungi.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Dean M; Pawlowska, Teresa E

    2010-03-01

    The prediction that progressive coupling of host and symbiont metabolic and reproductive interests leads to reduced mixing of symbiont lineages has been verified extensively in maternally transmitted bacterial endosymbionts of insects. To test whether this prediction is also applicable to associations of bacteria with fungi, we explored patterns of molecular evolution in two lineages of mutualistic endosymbionts of fungi: the Burkholderia endosymbionts of Rhizopus microsporus (Mucormycotina) and Candidatus Glomeribacter gigasporarum endosymbionts of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomeromycota). We compared these two lineages with the closely related Candidatus Tremblaya princeps endosymbionts of mealybugs (Hemiptera, Coccoidea, Pseudococcidae) and to free-living Burkholderia species. To make inferences about the life histories of the endosymbionts, we relied on the empirically validated predictions of the nearly neutral theory of molecular evolution that a reduction of the effective population size increases the rate of fixation of slightly deleterious mutations. Our analyses showed that the slightly deleterious mutation accumulation patterns in the Burkholderia endosymbionts of Rhizopus were nearly indistinguishable from those in their free-living relatives. In contrast, Ca. Glomeribacter showed unique patterns of molecular evolution that differentiated them from both the Burkholderia endosymbionts of Rhizopus and from the Ca. Tremblaya endosymbionts of insects. These findings imply that reduced mixing of symbiont lineages is not a universal feature of symbioses between fungi and endocellular bacteria.

  7. Isolation, identification and antimicrobial activity of propolis-associated fungi.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Giovanni Gontijo; Pfenning, Ludwig Heinrich; de Moura, Fabiana; Salgado, Mírian; Takahashi, Jacqueline Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product widely known for its medicinal properties. In this work, fungi present on propolis samples were isolated, identified and tested for the production of antimicrobial metabolites. Twenty-two fungal isolates were obtained, some of which were identified as Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, Bipolaris hawaiiensis, Fusarium merismoides, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium janthinellum, Penicillium purpurogenum, Pestalotiopsis palustris, Tetracoccosporium paxianum and Trichoderma koningii. These fungi were grown in liquid media to obtain crude extracts that were evaluated for their antibiotic activity against pathogenic bacteria, yeast and Cladosporium cladosporioides and A. flavus. The most active extract was obtained from L. theobromae (minimum inhibitory concentration = 64 μg/mL against Listeria monocitogenes). Some extracts showed to be more active than the positive control in the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and L. monocitogenes. Therefore, propolis is a promising source of fungi, which produces active agents against relevant food poisoning bacteria and crop-associated fungi.

  8. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  9. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  10. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  11. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  12. 40 CFR 165.63 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to... bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime. (ii) The labeling of the pesticide product...

  13. [Morphology of fungi in the slides prepared from esophageal balloons].

    PubMed

    Liu, S F

    1986-01-01

    1,762 cases were selected at random from 17,000 persons screened by esophageal balloon in 4 communes of Linxian County. The morphologic appearance of fungi was studied in 4 slides of each case selected. According to the shape of clumps formed by fungi and bacteria in the slides, morphologic 4 types were seen: cotton-like, camel hair-like, hair-like and tree-branch-like. In the preliminary microscopic analysis, the following species of fungi were noted: Candida, Leptothrix, Actinomyces, Alternaria, Fusarium and Penicillium. Some of the fungi in the slides may have been taken from the oral or pharyngeal cavity, which may be due to, at least in part, the poor oral hygiene in the population examined. A positive association was shown between the quantity of fungi in the slides and the esophageal epithelial dysplasia and carcinoma, but its biological significance should be studied further.

  14. The rapid quantitation of the filamentous blue-green alga plectonema boryanum by the luciferase assay for ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, V. N.

    1974-01-01

    Plectonema boryanum is a filamentous blue green alga. Blue green algae have a procaryotic cellular organization similar to bacteria, but are usually obligate photoautotrophs, obtaining their carbon and energy from photosynthetic mechanism similar to higher plants. This research deals with a comparison of three methods of quantitating filamentous populations: microscopic cell counts, the luciferase assay for ATP and optical density measurements.

  15. Melanin as a virulence factor of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and other dimorphic pathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Taborda, Carlos P.; da Silva, Marcelo B.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2008-01-01

    Melanin pigments are substances produced by a broad variety of pathogenic microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, and helminths. Microbes predominantly produce melanin pigment via tyrosinases, laccases, catecholases, and the polyketide synthase pathway. In fungi, melanin is deposited in the cell wall and cytoplasm, and melanin particles (“ghosts”) can be isolated from these fungi that have the same size and shape of the original cells. Melanin has been reported in several human pathogenic dimorphic fungi including Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Sporothrix schenckii, Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, and Coccidioides posadasii. Melanization appears to contribute to virulence by reducing the susceptibility of melanized fungi to host defense mechanisms and antifungal drugs. PMID:18777637

  16. Giant viruses infecting algae.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, J L; Meints, R H

    1999-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus (PBCV-1) is the prototype of a family of large, icosahedral, plaque-forming, double-stranded-DNA-containing viruses that replicate in certain unicellular, eukaryotic chlorella-like green algae. DNA sequence analysis of its 330, 742-bp genome leads to the prediction that this phycodnavirus has 376 protein-encoding genes and 10 transfer RNA genes. The predicted gene products of approximately 40% of these genes resemble proteins of known function. The chlorella viruses have other features that distinguish them from most viruses, in addition to their large genome size. These features include the following: (a) The viruses encode multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site-specific endonucleases; (b) PBCV-1 encodes at least part, if not the entire machinery to glycosylate its proteins; (c) PBCV-1 has at least two types of introns--a self-splicing intron in a transcription factor-like gene and a splicesomal processed type of intron in its DNA polymerase gene. Unlike the chlorella viruses, large double-stranded-DNA-containing viruses that infect marine, filamentous brown algae have a circular genome and a lysogenic phase in their life cycle.

  17. Miocene Coralline algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bosence, D.W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The coralline algae (Order Corallinales) were sedimentologically and ecologically important during the Miocene, a period when they were particularly abundant. The many poorly described and illustrated species and the lack of quantitative data in coralline thalli make specific determinations particularly difficult, but some species are well known and widespread in the Tethyan area. The sedimentologic importance of the Miocene coralline algae is reflected in the abundance of in-situ coralline buildups, rhodoliths, and coralline debris facies at Malta and Spain; similar sequences are known throughout the Tethyan Miocene. In-situ buildups vary from leafy crustose biostromes to walled reefs with dense coralline crusts and branches. Growth forms are apparently related to hydraulic energy. Rhodoliths vary from leafy, crustose, and open-branched forms in muddy sediments to dense, crustose, and radial-branching forms in coarse grainstones. Rhodolith form and internal structure correlate closely with hydraulic energy. Coralline genera are conservative and, as such, are useful in paleoenvironmental analysis. Of particular interest are the restricted depth ranges of recent coralline genera. More research is needed on the sedimentology, paleoecology, and systematics of the Cenozoic corallines, as they have particular value in paleoenvironmental analysis.

  18. Cellular Auxin Transport in Algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyun; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-01-27

    The phytohormone auxin is one of the main directors of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxin is generated in apical plant parts and transported from cell-to-cell in a polar fashion. Auxin is present in all plant phyla, and the existence of polar auxin transport (PAT) is well established in land plants. Algae are a group of relatively simple, autotrophic, photosynthetic organisms that share many features with land plants. In particular, Charophyceae (a taxon of green algae) are closest ancestors of land plants. In the study of auxin function, transport and its evolution, the algae form an interesting research target. Recently, proof for polar auxin transport in Chara species was published and auxin related research in algae gained more attention. In this review we discuss auxin transport in algae with respect to land plants and suggest directions for future studies.

  19. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  20. Clonal reproduction in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John W.; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Branco, Sara; Sylvain, Iman; Ellison, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Research over the past two decades shows that both recombination and clonality are likely to contribute to the reproduction of all fungi. This view of fungi is different from the historical and still commonly held view that a large fraction of fungi are exclusively clonal and that some fungi have been exclusively clonal for hundreds of millions of years. Here, we first will consider how these two historical views have changed. Then we will examine the impact on fungal research of the concept of restrained recombination [Tibayrenc M, Ayala FJ (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 (48):E3305–E3313]. Using animal and human pathogenic fungi, we examine extrinsic restraints on recombination associated with bottlenecks in genetic variation caused by geographic dispersal and extrinsic restraints caused by shifts in reproductive mode associated with either disease transmission or hybridization. Using species of the model yeast Saccharomyces and the model filamentous fungus Neurospora, we examine intrinsic restraints on recombination associated with mating systems that range from strictly clonal at one extreme to fully outbreeding at the other and those that lie between, including selfing and inbreeding. We also consider the effect of nomenclature on perception of reproductive mode and a means of comparing the relative impact of clonality and recombination on fungal populations. Last, we consider a recent hypothesis suggesting that fungi thought to have the most severe intrinsic constraints on recombination actually may have the fewest. PMID:26195774

  1. Diversity and biochemical features of culturable fungi from the coastal waters of Southern China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fungi play a major role in various biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial and marine ecosystems. However, fungi in marine environments remain to be one of the most under-studied microbial groups. This study investigates the diversity of planktonic fungi from the coastal habitat off Pearl River Delta (China) using culture-dependent approach. A total of 22 fungi and 9 yeast isolates were recovered from 30 seawater and 2 sediment samples. Microscopic and ITS rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that most of the fungi belonged to the phylum Ascomycota and Basidiomycota with a very small percentage (3%) of the subphylum Mucoromycotina of the Phylum Zygomycota. Most of these fungal isolates exhibited considerable production of extracellular enzymes, cellulase, lipase and laccase. Fungal isolates of two genera Mucor and Aspergillus sp. demonstrated pelletization capability over a wide range of pH, suggesting them as potential agents towards algae harvesting and wastewater treatment. PMID:25401065

  2. Diversity and biochemical features of culturable fungi from the coastal waters of Southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Singh, Purnima; Liu, Ying; Pan, Shenquan; Wang, Guangyi

    2014-01-01

    Fungi play a major role in various biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial and marine ecosystems. However, fungi in marine environments remain to be one of the most under-studied microbial groups. This study investigates the diversity of planktonic fungi from the coastal habitat off Pearl River Delta (China) using culture-dependent approach. A total of 22 fungi and 9 yeast isolates were recovered from 30 seawater and 2 sediment samples. Microscopic and ITS rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that most of the fungi belonged to the phylum Ascomycota and Basidiomycota with a very small percentage (3%) of the subphylum Mucoromycotina of the Phylum Zygomycota. Most of these fungal isolates exhibited considerable production of extracellular enzymes, cellulase, lipase and laccase. Fungal isolates of two genera Mucor and Aspergillus sp. demonstrated pelletization capability over a wide range of pH, suggesting them as potential agents towards algae harvesting and wastewater treatment.

  3. Gibberellin biosynthesis in bacteria: separate ent-copalyl diphosphate and ent-kaurene synthases in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Dana; Chambers, Jacob; Lowry, Luke; Kim, Gunjune; Anterola, Aldwin; Bender, Kelly; Peters, Reuben J

    2009-01-22

    Gibberellins are ent-kaurene-derived diterpenoid phytohormones produced by plants, fungi, and bacteria. The distinct gibberellin biosynthetic pathways in plants and fungi are known, but not that in bacteria. Plants typically use two diterpene synthases to form ent-kaurene, while fungi use only a single bifunctional diterpene synthase. We demonstrate here that Bradyrhizobium japonicum encodes separate ent-copalyl diphosphate and ent-kaurene synthases. These are found in an operon whose enzymatic composition indicates that gibberellin biosynthesis in bacteria represents a third independently assembled pathway relative to plants and fungi. Nevertheless, sequence comparisons also suggest potential homology between diterpene synthases from bacteria, plants, and fungi.

  4. Recurring patterns in bacterioplankton dynamics during coastal spring algae blooms

    PubMed Central

    Teeling, Hanno; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Bennke, Christin M; Krüger, Karen; Chafee, Meghan; Kappelmann, Lennart; Reintjes, Greta; Waldmann, Jost; Quast, Christian; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Lucas, Judith; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Wiltshire, Karen H; Amann, Rudolf I

    2016-01-01

    A process of global importance in carbon cycling is the remineralization of algae biomass by heterotrophic bacteria, most notably during massive marine algae blooms. Such blooms can trigger secondary blooms of planktonic bacteria that consist of swift successions of distinct bacterial clades, most prominently members of the Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria and the alphaproteobacterial Roseobacter clade. We investigated such successions during spring phytoplankton blooms in the southern North Sea (German Bight) for four consecutive years. Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level. Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes. We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.001 PMID:27054497

  5. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  6. A lycopene β-cyclase/lycopene ε-cyclase/light-harvesting complex-fusion protein from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus can be modified to produce α-carotene and β-carotene at different ratios.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Andreas; Bauch, Matthias E; Pörschke, Yvonne; Lohr, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Biosynthesis of asymmetric carotenoids such as α-carotene and lutein in plants and green algae involves the two enzymes lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) and lycopene ε-cyclase (LCYE). The two cyclases are closely related and probably resulted from an ancient gene duplication. While in most plants investigated so far the two cyclases are encoded by separate genes, prasinophyte algae of the order Mamiellales contain a single gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of LCYB, LCYE and a C-terminal light-harvesting complex (LHC) domain. Here we show that the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Ostreococcus lucimarinus catalyzed the simultaneous formation of α-carotene and β-carotene when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The stoichiometry of the two products in E. coli could be altered by gradual truncation of the C-terminus, suggesting that the LHC domain may be involved in modulating the relative activities of the two cyclase domains in the algae. Partial deletions of the linker region between the cyclase domains or replacement of one or both cyclase domains with the corresponding cyclases from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced shifts of the α-carotene-to-β-carotene ratio, indicating that both the relative activities of the cyclase domains and the overall structure of the fusion protein have a strong impact on the product stoichiometry. The possibility to tune the product ratio of the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Mamiellales renders it useful for the biotechnological production of the asymmetric carotenoids α-carotene or lutein in bacteria or fungi.

  7. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  8. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  9. Respiratory Chain of Colorless Algae II. Cyanophyta

    PubMed Central

    Webster, D. A.; Hackett, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Whole cell difference spectra of the blue-green algae, Saprospira grandis, Leucothrix mucor, and Vitreoscilla sp. have one, or at the most 2, broad α-bands near 560 mμ. At −190° these bands split to give 4 peaks in the α-region for b and c-type cytochromes, but no α-band for a-type cytochromes is visible. The NADH oxidase activity of these organisms was shown to be associated with particulate fractions of cell homogenates. The response of this activity to inhibitors differed from the responses of the NADH oxidase activities of particulate preparations from the green algae and higher plants to the same inhibitors, but is more typical of certain bacteria. No cytochrome oxidase activity was present in these preparations. The respiration of Saprospira and Vitreoscilla can be light-reversibly inhibited by CO, and all 3 organisms have a CO-binding pigment whose CO complex absorbs near 570, 535, and 417 mμ. The action spectrum for the light reversal of CO-inhibited Vitreoscilla respiration shows maxima at 568, 534, and 416 mμ. The results suggest that the terminal oxidase in these blue-greens is an o-type cytochrome. Images PMID:5932404

  10. Biological importance of marine algae.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Ali A

    2010-01-01

    Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Algae can be classified into two main groups; first one is the microalgae, which includes blue green algae, dinoflagellates, bacillariophyta (diatoms)… etc., and second one is macroalgae (seaweeds) which includes green, brown and red algae. The microalgae phyla have been recognized to provide chemical and pharmacological novelty and diversity. Moreover, microalgae are considered as the actual producers of some highly bioactive compounds found in marine resources. Red algae are considered as the most important source of many biologically active metabolites in comparison to other algal classes. Seaweeds are used for great number of application by man. The principal use of seaweeds as a source of human food and as a source of gums (phycocollides). Phycocolloides like agar agar, alginic acid and carrageenan are primarily constituents of brown and red algal cell walls and are widely used in industry.

  11. Algae fuel clean electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, D.

    1993-02-08

    The paper describes plans for a 600-kW pilot generating unit, fueled by diesel and Chlorella, a green alga commonly seen growing on the surface of ponds. The plant contains Biocoil units in which Chlorella are grown using the liquid effluents from sewage treatment plants and dissolved carbon dioxide from exhaust gases from the combustion unit. The algae are partially dried and fed into the combustor where diesel fuel is used to maintain ignition. Diesel fuel is also used for start-up and as a backup fuel for seasonal shifts that affect the algae growing conditions. Since the algae use the carbon dioxide emitted during the combustion process, the process will not contribute to global warming.

  12. Logistic analysis of algae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Slegers, P M; Leduc, S; Wijffels, R H; van Straten, G; van Boxtel, A J B

    2015-03-01

    Energy requirements for resource transport of algae cultivation are unknown. This work describes the quantitative analysis of energy requirements for water and CO2 transport. Algae cultivation models were combined with the quantitative logistic decision model 'BeWhere' for the regions Benelux (Northwest Europe), southern France and Sahara. For photobioreactors, the energy consumed for transport of water and CO2 turns out to be a small percentage of the energy contained in the algae biomass (0.1-3.6%). For raceway ponds the share for transport is higher (0.7-38.5%). The energy consumption for transport is the lowest in the Benelux due to good availability of both water and CO2. Analysing transport logistics is still important, despite the low energy consumption for transport. The results demonstrate that resource requirements, resource distribution and availability and transport networks have a profound effect on the location choices for algae cultivation.

  13. Gas Exchange of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Elizabeth C. B.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1965-01-01

    Continuously growing cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Starr 252, operating at constant density and under constant environmental conditions, produced uniform photosynthetic quotient (PQ = CO2/O2) and O2 values during 6 months of observations. The PQ for the entire study was 0.90 ± 0.024. The PQ remained constant over a threefold light-intensity change and a threefold change in O2 production (0.90 ± 0.019). At low light intensities, when the rate of respiration approached the rate of photosynthesis, the PQ became extremely variable. Six lamps of widely different spectral-energy distribution produced no significant change in the PQ (0.90 ± 0.025). Oxygen production was directly related to the number of quanta available, irrespective of spectral-energy distribution. Such dependability in producing uniform PQ and O2 values warrants a consideration of algae to maintain a constant gas environment for submarine or spaceship use. Images Fig. 1 PMID:14339260

  14. Adaptive Immunity to Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases. PMID:25377140

  15. Fun with Fungi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLure, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on activities with fungi that may provoke the curiosity of early adolescents and increase their enjoyment and understanding of a vast, important portion of botany. Some of the activities may be conducted during the winter months when most fieldwork ceases. (PR)

  16. Lysis of Blue-Green Algae by Myxobacter

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Miriam

    1970-01-01

    Enrichment from local fishponds led to the isolation of a bacterium capable of lysing many species of unicellular and filamentous blue-green algae, as well as certain bacteria. The isolate is an aflagellate, motile rod which moves in a gliding, flexuous manner; the organism is capable of digesting starch and agar, but not cellulose and gelatin. Its deoxyribonucleic acid base pair composition (per cent guanine plus cytosine ∼70) shows a close resemblance to that of the fruiting myxobacteria. Algae in lawns on agar plates were lysed rapidly by the myxobacter, but only limited and slow lysis occurred in liquid media, and no lysis took place when liquid cultures were shaken. No diffusible lytic factors would be demonstrated. Continuous observation of the lytic process under a phase-contrast microscope suggested that a close contact between the polar tip of the myxobacter and the alga is necessary for lysis. The lytic action is limited to the vegetative cells of the algae, whereas heterocysts are not affected. The gas vacuoles of the algal host are the only remnant visible after completion of digestion by the myxobacter. Images PMID:4990764

  17. Mechanisms of humic substances degradation by fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Hadar, Y.; Grinhut, T.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are formed by secondary synthesis reactions (humification) during the decay process and transformation of biomolecules originating from plants and other dead organisms. In nature, HS are extremely resistant to biological degradation. Thus, these substances are major components in the C cycle and in the biosphere and therefore, the understanding of the process leading to their formation and transformation and degradation is vital. Fungi active in the decomposition process of HS include mainly ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that are common in the upper layer of forest and grassland soils. Many basidiomycetes belong to the white-rot fungi (WRF) and litter-decomposing fungi (LDF). These fungi are considered to be the most efficient lignin degraders due to their nonspecific oxidizing enzymes: manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase. Although bacteria dominate compost and participate in the turnover of HS, their ability to degrade stable macromolecules such as lignin and HS is limited. The overall objectives of this research were to corroborate biodegradation processes of HS by WRF. The specific objectives were: (i) To isolate, identify and characterize HS degrading WRF from biosolids (BS) compost; (ii) To study the biodegradation process of three types of HS, which differ in their structure, by WRF isolated from BS compost; and (iii) To investigate the mechanisms of HA degradation by WRF using two main approaches: (a) Study the physical and chemical analyses of the organic compounds obtained from direct fungal degradation of HA as well as elucidation of the relevant enzymatic reactions; and (b) Study the enzymatic and biochemical mechanisms involved during HA degradation. In order to study the capability of fungi to degrade HS, seventy fungal strains were isolated from biosolids (BS) compost. Two of the most active fungal species were identified based on rDNA sequences and designated Trametes sp. M23 and Phanerochaetesp., Y6

  18. Microbiota Influences Morphology and Reproduction of the Brown Alga Ectocarpus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Javier E.; González, Bernardo; Goulitquer, Sophie; Potin, Philippe; Correa, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Associated microbiota play crucial roles in health and disease of higher organisms. For macroalgae, some associated bacteria exert beneficial effects on nutrition, morphogenesis and growth. However, current knowledge on macroalgae–microbiota interactions is mostly based on studies on green and red seaweeds. In this study, we report that when cultured under axenic conditions, the filamentous brown algal model Ectocarpus sp. loses its branched morphology and grows with a small ball-like appearance. Nine strains of periphytic bacteria isolated from Ectocarpus sp. unialgal cultures were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing, and assessed for their effect on morphology, reproduction and the metabolites secreted by axenic Ectocarpus sp. Six of these isolates restored morphology and reproduction features of axenic Ectocarpus sp. Bacteria-algae co-culture supernatants, but not the supernatant of the corresponding bacterium growing alone, also recovered morphology and reproduction of the alga. Furthermore, colonization of axenic Ectocarpus sp. with a single bacterial isolate impacted significantly the metabolites released by the alga. These results show that the branched typical morphology and the individuals produced by Ectocarpus sp. are strongly dependent on the presence of bacteria, while the bacterial effect on the algal exometabolome profile reflects the impact of bacteria on the whole physiology of this alga. PMID:26941722

  19. Transformation in fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Fincham, J R

    1989-01-01

    Transformation with exogenous deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) now appears to be possible with all fungal species, or at least all that can be grown in culture. This field of research is at present dominated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and two filamentous members of the class Ascomycetes, Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa, with substantial contributions also from fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and another filamentous member of the class Ascomycetes, Podospora anserina. However, transformation has been demonstrated, and will no doubt be extensively used, in representatives of most of the main fungal classes, including Phycomycetes, Basidiomycetes (the order Agaricales and Ustilago species), and a number of the Fungi Imperfecti. The list includes a number of plant pathogens, and transformation is likely to become important in the analysis of the molecular basis of pathogenicity. Transformation may be maintained either by using an autonomously replicating plasmid as a vehicle for the transforming DNA or through integration of the DNA into the chromosomes. In S. cerevisiae and other yeasts, a variety of autonomously replicating plasmids have been used successfully, some of them designed for use as shuttle vectors for Escherichia coli as well as for yeast transformation. Suitable plasmids are not yet available for use in filamentous fungi, in which stable transformation is dependent on chromosomal integration. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, integration of transforming DNA is virtually always by homology; in filamentous fungi, in contrast, it occurs just as frequently at nonhomologous (ectopic) chromosomal sites. The main importance of transformation in fungi at present is in connection with gene cloning and the analysis of gene function. The most advanced work is being done with S. cerevisiae, in which the virtual restriction of stable DNA integration to homologous chromosome loci enables gene disruption and gene replacement to be carried out with greater

  20. Polysaccharides of the red algae.

    PubMed

    Usov, Anatolii I

    2011-01-01

    Red algae (Rhodophyta) are known as the source of unique sulfated galactans, such as agar, agarose, and carrageenans. The wide practical uses of these polysaccharides are based on their ability to form strong gels in aqueous solutions. Gelling polysaccharides usually have molecules built up of repeating disaccharide units with a regular distribution of sulfate groups, but most of the red algal species contain more complex galactans devoid of gelling ability because of various deviations from the regular structure. Moreover, several red algae may contain sulfated mannans or neutral xylans instead of sulfated galactans as the main structural polysaccharides. This chapter is devoted to a description of the structural diversity of polysaccharides found in the red algae, with special emphasis on the methods of structural analysis of sulfated galactans. In addition to the structural information, some data on the possible use of red algal polysaccharides as biologically active polymers or as taxonomic markers are briefly discussed.

  1. Neuroprotective Effects of Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Pangestuti, Ratih; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health effects. Among marine organisms, marine algae have been identified as an under-exploited plant resource, although they have long been recognized as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Presently, several lines of studies have provided insight into biological activities and neuroprotective effects of marine algae including antioxidant, anti-neuroinflammatory, cholinesterase inhibitory activity and the inhibition of neuronal death. Hence, marine algae have great potential to be used for neuroprotection as part of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and functional foods. This contribution presents an overview of marine algal neuroprotective effects and their potential application in neuroprotection. PMID:21673890

  2. Resistant Pathogens, Fungi, and Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guidry, Christopher A.; Mansfield, Sara A.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Cook, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    The first reports of antibiotic pathogens occurred a few short years after the introduction of these powerful new agents, heralding a new kind of war between medicine and pathogens. Although originally described in Staphylococcus aureus, resistance among bacteria has now become a grim race to determine which classes of bacteria will become more resistant, pitting the Gram positive staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci against the increasingly resistant Gram negative pathogens, e. g., carbapenemase-resistant enterobacteriaceae. In addition, the availability of antibacterial agents has allowed the development of whole new kinds of diseases caused by non-bacterial pathogens, related largely to fungi that are inherently resistant to antibacterials. All of these organisms are becoming more prevalent and, ultimately, more clinically relevant for surgeons. It is ironic that despite their ubiquity in our communities, there is seldom a second thought given to viral infections in patients with surgical illness. The extent of most surgeon’s interest in viral infections ends with hepatitis and HIV, no doubt related to transmissibility as well as the implications that these viruses might have in a patient’s hepatic or immune functions. There are chapters and even textbooks written about these viruses so these will not be considered here. Instead, we will present the growing body of knowledge of the herpes family viruses and their occurrence and consequences in patients with concomitant surgical disease or critical illness. We have also chosen to focus this chapter on previously immune competent patients, as the impact of herpes family viruses in immunosuppressed patients such as transplant or AIDS patients has received thorough treatment elsewhere. PMID:25440119

  3. Bacterial community composition associated with freshwater algae: species specificity vs. dependency on environmental conditions and source community.

    PubMed

    Eigemann, Falk; Hilt, Sabine; Salka, Ivette; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-03-01

    We studied bacterial associations with the green alga Desmodesmus armatus and the diatom Stephanodiscus minutulus under changing environmental conditions and bacterial source communities, to evaluate whether bacteria-algae associations are species-specific or more generalized and determined by external factors. Axenic and xenic algae were incubated in situ with and without allelopathically active macrophytes, and in the laboratory with sterile and nonsterile lake water and an allelochemical, tannic acid (TA). Bacterial community composition (BCC) of algae-associated bacteria was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), nonmetric multidimensional scaling, cluster analyses, and sequencing of DGGE bands. BCC of xenic algal cultures of both species were not significantly affected by changes in their environment or bacterial source community, except in the case of TA additions. Species-specific interactions therefore appear to overrule the effects of environmental conditions and source communities. The BCC of xenic and axenic D. armatus cultures subjected to in situ bacterial colonization, however, had lower similarities (ca. 55%), indicating that bacterial precolonization is a strong factor for bacteria-algae associations irrespective of environmental conditions and source community. Our findings emphasize the ecological importance of species-specific bacteria-algae associations with important repercussions for other processes, such as the remineralization of nutrients, and organic matter dynamics.

  4. Toxicity of 13 different antibiotics towards freshwater green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and their modes of action.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ling; Huang, Tao; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Xiaohong; Su, Limin; Li, Chao; Zhao, Yuanhui

    2017-02-01

    Although modes of action (MOAs) play a key role in the understanding of the toxic mechanism of chemicals, the MOAs have not been investigated for antibiotics to green algae. This paper is to discriminate excess toxicity from baseline level and investigate the MOAs of 13 different antibiotics to algae by using the determined toxicity values. Comparison of the toxicities shows that the inhibitors of protein synthesis to bacteria, such as azithromycin, doxycycline, florfenicol and oxytetracycline, exhibit significantly toxic effects to algae. On the other hand, the cell wall synthesis inhibitors, such as cefotaxime and amoxicillin, show relatively low toxic effects to the algae. The concentrations determined by HPLC indicate that quinocetone and amoxicillin can be easily photodegraded or hydrolyzed during the toxic tests. The toxic effects of quinocetone and amoxicillin to the algae are attributed to not only their parent compounds, but also their metabolites. Investigation on the mode of action shows that, except rifampicin, all the tested antibiotics exhibit excess toxicity to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (P. subcapitata). These antibiotics can be identified as reactive modes of action to the algae. They act as electrophilic mechanism of action to P. subcapitata. These results are valuable for the understanding of the toxic mechanism to algae.

  5. Microscopic Gardens: A Close Look at Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Mary Ann

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom activities using algae, including demonstration of eutrophication, examination of mating strains, and activities with Euglena. Includes on algal morphology/physiology, types of algae, and field sources for collecting these organisms. (JN)

  6. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica Louise.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  7. Endophytic fungi: a reservoir of antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Sunil K.; Verekar, Shilpa A.; Bhave, Sarita V.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug drug resistant bacteria are becoming increasingly problematic particularly in the under developed countries of the world. The most important microorganisms that have seen a geometric rise in numbers are Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium, Penicillin resistant Streptococcus pneumonia and multiple drug resistant tubercule bacteria to name a just few. New drug scaffolds are essential to tackle this every increasing problem. These scaffolds can be sourced from nature itself. Endophytic fungi are an important reservoir of therapeutically active compounds. This review attempts to present some data relevant to the problem. New, very specific and effective antibiotics are needed but also at an affordable price! A Herculean task for researchers all over the world! In the Asian subcontinent indigenous therapeutics that has been practiced over the centuries such as Ayurveda have been effective as “handed down data” in family generations. May need a second, third and more “in-depth investigations?” PMID:25620957

  8. 40 CFR 165.43 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to a tolerance under section... from contamination, fouling, or deterioration caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae,...

  9. 40 CFR 165.43 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to a tolerance under section... from contamination, fouling, or deterioration caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae,...

  10. 40 CFR 165.43 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to a tolerance under section... from contamination, fouling, or deterioration caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae,...

  11. 40 CFR 165.43 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to a tolerance under section... from contamination, fouling, or deterioration caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae,...

  12. 40 CFR 165.43 - Scope of pesticide products included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., fungi, protozoa, algae, or slime; and (B) In the intended use is subject to a tolerance under section... from contamination, fouling, or deterioration caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, algae,...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species Analipus japonicus, Eisenia...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species Gloiopeltis furcata, Porphyra...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species...

  3. Diversity of micro-fungi in an Antarctic dry valley.

    PubMed

    Baublis, J A; Wharton, R A; Volz, P A

    1991-01-01

    The fungal microflora of a dry valley in Southern Victoria Land near McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, was investigated. Samples were collected from introduced objects such as a mummified penguin and spent chewing tobacco in addition to the sparse soil found in rock fissures, isolated moss colonies, shoreline deposit materials, CaCO3 precipitates, and microbial mat debris obtained from the frozen surface of the lake in the basin of Taylor Valley. Using conventional media and techniques, all collection sites yielded populations of yeasts and filamentous fungi. Water samples and live microbial mats from beneath the lake ice yielded species of fungi along with an abundance of bacteria.

  4. Diversity of micro-fungi in an Antarctic dry valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baublis, J. A.; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Volz, P. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The fungal microflora of a dry valley in Southern Victoria Land near McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, was investigated. Samples were collected from introduced objects such as a mummified penguin and spent chewing tobacco in addition to the sparse soil found in rock fissures, isolated moss colonies, shoreline deposit materials, CaCO3 precipitates, and microbial mat debris obtained from the frozen surface of the lake in the basin of Taylor Valley. Using conventional media and techniques, all collection sites yielded populations of yeasts and filamentous fungi. Water samples and live microbial mats from beneath the lake ice yielded species of fungi along with an abundance of bacteria.

  5. Screening of Endophytic Fungi from Chlorophyta and Phaeophyta for Antibacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaweman, A. C.; Pamungkas, J.; Madduppa, H.; Thoms, C.; Tarman, K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophyta and Phaeophyta macroalgae are important sources of secondary metabolites with pharmaceutically relevant antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral bioactivities. Oftentimes, these algae-derived compounds are, in fact, produced by endophytic fungi living inside the macroalgal tissue. Numerous studies have shown that endophytic fungi can produce a broad range of active metabolites such as terpenes, alkaloids, and quinones. The aim of the present study was to screen fungal strains isolated from a variety of Caulerpa spp., Halimeda spp., and Sargassum spp. for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Thirteen morphologically different isolates were tested. Two of them showed pronounced activity against S. aureus in agar diffusion assays.

  6. Algae -- a poor man's HAART?

    PubMed

    Teas, Jane; Hebert, James R; Fitton, J Helen; Zimba, Paul V

    2004-01-01

    Drawing inferences from epidemiologic studies of HIV/AIDS and in vivo and in vitro HIV inhibition by algae, we propose algal consumption as one unifying characteristic of countries with anomalously low rates. HIV/AIDS incidence and prevalence in Eastern Asia ( approximately 1/10000 adults in Japan and Korea), compared to Africa ( approximately 1/10 adults), strongly suggest that differences in IV drug use and sexual behavior are insufficient to explain the 1000-fold variation. Even in Africa, AIDS/HIV rates vary. Chad has consistently reported low rates of HIV/AIDS (2-4/100). Possibly not coincidentally, most people in Japan and Korea eat seaweed daily and the Kanemba, one of the major tribal groups in Chad, eat a blue green alga (Spirulina) daily. Average daily algae consumption in Asia and Africa ranges between 1 and 2 tablespoons (3-13 g). Regular consumption of dietary algae might help prevent HIV infection and suppress viral load among those infected.

  7. Algae. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    The plants and plantlike organisms informally grouped together as algae show great diversity of form and size and occur in a wide variety of habitats. These extremely important photosynthesizers are also economically significant. For example, some species contaminate water supplies; others provide food for aquatic animals and for man; still others…

  8. Biological importance of marine algae

    PubMed Central

    El Gamal, Ali A.

    2009-01-01

    Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Algae can be classified into two main groups; first one is the microalgae, which includes blue green algae, dinoflagellates, bacillariophyta (diatoms)… etc., and second one is macroalgae (seaweeds) which includes green, brown and red algae. The microalgae phyla have been recognized to provide chemical and pharmacological novelty and diversity. Moreover, microalgae are considered as the actual producers of some highly bioactive compounds found in marine resources. Red algae are considered as the most important source of many biologically active metabolites in comparison to other algal classes. Seaweeds are used for great number of application by man. The principal use of seaweeds as a source of human food and as a source of gums (phycocollides). Phycocolloides like agar agar, alginic acid and carrageenan are primarily constituents of brown and red algal cell walls and are widely used in industry. PMID:23960716

  9. Mutagens manufactured in fungal culture may affect DNA/RNA of producing fungi.

    PubMed

    Paterson, R R M; Lima, N

    2009-04-01

    Self-produced mutagens in culture by fungi may affect DNA analysis of the same fungi. This has not been considered previously. Many fungi produce numerous mutagenic secondary metabolites (SM) in culture. There is a paradox of growing fungi in media to produce representative DNA which also support mutagenic SM. This is a crucial issue in developing diagnostic and phylogenetic methods, especially for closely-related fungi. For example, idh gene analysis of the patulin metabolic pathway in fungi can be interpreted as producing some false negative and positive results in terms of possession, or nonpossession, of the gene from mutated strains. The most obvious mycotoxins and fungi to consider in this regard are aflatoxins and Aspergillus, as aflatoxins are the most mutagenic natural compounds. Many other fungi and SM are relevant. Conditions to grow fungi have not been selected to inhibit SM production although relevant data exist. In fact, fungi repair damaged nucleic acid (NA) and are capable of removing toxins by employing transporter proteins. These and NA repair mechanisms could be inhibited by secondary metabolites. Mutagenic effects may involve inhibition of DNA stabilizing enzymes. There may be an equivalent situation for bacteria. Researchers need to devise methods to reduce SM for valid protocols. More work on how mutagens affect the NA of producing fungus in vitro is required. The current review assesses the potential seriousness of the situation with selected papers.

  10. The importance of vertical resolution in sea ice algae production models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Pedro; Assmy, Philipp; Hop, Haakon; Spreen, Gunnar; Gerland, Sebastian; Hudson, Stephen R.

    2015-05-01

    In this study an ice-algal mathematical model is used to resolve the vertical fine structure of sea ice with ice algae, and results are compared to simulations with ice algae located only at the bottom ice layer and to those where ice algae are distributed homogeneously across part of the ice column. Ice algae are reported to contribute 4-26% of overall Arctic Ocean primary production and are an important food source for the ice-associated ecosystem. Thus, it is important to estimate the future impacts of global warming on the contribution of ice algae to Arctic primary production. Primary production models, describing the relationships between ice-algal physiology and population dynamics, with environmental forcing and trophic interactions involving bacteria and grazers, can be applied to quantify such impacts. One important aspect in these models is how to represent the vertical distribution of ice algae in sea ice. In most models, only the bottom ice layer is considered where most of the algal biomass tends to be concentrated. However, since ice algae are also present along the entire ice column, this may lead to underestimation of ice-algal production. Some empirical data and model results suggest that ice algae located in the surface and interior layers may be kept at lower concentrations, in spite of high growth rates, due to grazing by micro- and meiofauna. Results obtained in this study show the importance of resolving vertically the distribution of ice algae to avoid bias in primary production estimates, well in line with empirical studies.

  11. Plant biomass degradation by fungi.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the topic is highly relevant in the field of plant pathogenic fungi as they degrade plant biomass to either gain access to the plant or as carbon source, resulting in significant crop losses. Finally, fungi are the main degraders of plant biomass in nature and as such have an essential role in the global carbon cycle and ecology in general. In this review we provide a global view on the development of this research topic in saprobic ascomycetes and basidiomycetes and in plant pathogenic fungi and link this to the other papers of this special issue on plant biomass degradation by fungi.

  12. Assembly of Photosynthetic Antenna Protein Complexes from Algae for Development of Nano-biodevice and Its Fuelization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-20

    public release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this proposal is to use photosynthetic antenna pigment ...nanobiophotonics) and its fuelization. The advantage of these pigment complexes from algae as well as from plants and photosynthetic bacteria is its...Abstract The purpose of this proposal is to use photosynthetic antenna pigment complex (LH) from algae in order to control the direction and

  13. Communication in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cottier, Fabien; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A.

    2012-01-01

    We will discuss fungal communication in the context of fundamental biological functions including mating, growth, morphogenesis, and the regulation of fungal virulence determinants. We will address intraspecies but also interkingdom signaling by systematically discussing the sender of the message, the molecular message, and receiver. Analyzing communication shows the close coevolution of fungi with organisms present in their environment giving insights into multispecies communication. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying microbial communication will promote our understanding of the “fungal communicome.” PMID:21961006

  14. Fusarium and other opportunistic hyaline fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter focuses on those fungi that grow in tissue in the form of hyaline or lightly colored septate hyphae. These fungi include Fusarium and other hyaline fungi. Disease caused by hyaline fungi is referred to as hyalohyphomycosis. Hyaline fungi described in this chapter include the anamorphic,...

  15. Glycolate Pathway in Algae 1

    PubMed Central

    Hess, J. L.; Tolbert, N. E.

    1967-01-01

    No glycolate oxidase activity could be detected by manometric, isotopic, or spectrophotometric techniques in cell extracts from 5 strains of algae grown in the light with CO2. However, NADH:glyoxylate reductase, phosphoglycolate phosphatase and isocitrate dehydrogenase were detected in the cell extracts. The serine formed by Chlorella or Chlamydomonas after 12 seconds of photosynthetic 14CO2 fixation contained 70 to 80% of its 14C in the carboxyl carbon. This distribution of label in serine was similar to that in phosphoglycerate from the same experiment. Thus, in algae serine is probably formed directly from phosphoglycerate. These results differ from those of higher plants which form uniformly labeled serine from glycolate in short time periods when phosphoglycerate is still carboxyl labeled. In glycolate formed by algae in 5 and 10 seconds of 14CO2 fixation, C2 was at least twice as radioactive as C1. A similar skewed labeling in C2 and C3 of 3-phosphoglycerate and serine suggests a common precursor for glycolate and 3-phosphoglycerate. Glycine formed by the algae, however, from the same experiments was uniformly labeled. Manganese deficient Chlorella incorporated only 2% of the total 14CO2 fixed in 10 minutes into glycolate, while in normal Chlorella 30% of the total 14C was found in glycolate. Manganese deficient Chlorella also accumulated more 14C in glycine and serine. Glycolate excretion by Chlorella was maximal in 10 mm bicarbonate and occurred only in the light, and was not influenced by the addition of glycolate. No time dependent uptake of significant amounts of either glycolate or phosphoglycolate was observed. When small amounts of glycolate-2-14C were fed to Chlorella or Scenedesmus, only 2 to 3% was metabolized after 30 to 60 minutes. The algae were not capable of significant glycolate metabolism as is the higher plant. The failure to detect glycolate oxidase, the low level glycolate-14C metabolism, and the formation of serine from phosphoglycerate

  16. The role of algae in mine drainage bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The effect of mine drainage effluent on aquatic ecosystems has been abundantly documented and remediation efforts to data have always been costly and temporary at best. Bioremediation, using natural environmental microbes, to treat acid mine drainage has shown great promise as an affordable, permanent treatment. At Lambda, we used mixatrophic cultures of bacteria, algae, protozoans and fungal groups on four different jobs and it has proven effective. The role of two particular algal groups, the Euglena mutabilis and the Ochramonas sp. are particularly of phycological interest.

  17. Capture of algae promotes growth and propagation in aquatic Utricularia

    PubMed Central

    Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Lendl, Thomas; Watzka, Margarete; Adlassnig, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Some carnivorous plants trap not only small animals but also algae and pollen grains. However, it remains unclear if these trapped particles are useless bycatch or whether they provide nutrients for the plant. The present study examines this question in Utricularia, which forms the largest and most widely spread genus of carnivorous plants, and which captures prey by means of sophisticated suction traps. Methods Utricularia plants of three different species (U. australis, U. vulgaris and U. minor) were collected in eight different water bodies including peat bogs, lakes and artificial ponds in three regions of Austria. The prey spectrum of each population was analysed qualitatively and quantitatively, and correlated with data on growth and propagation, C/N ratio and δ15N. Key Results More than 50 % of the prey of the Utricularia populations investigated consisted of algae and pollen, and U. vulgaris in particular was found to capture large amounts of gymnosperm pollen. The capture of algae and pollen grains was strongly correlated with most growth parameters, including weight, length, budding and elongation of internodes. The C/N ratio, however, was less well correlated. Other prey, such as moss leaflets, fungal hyphae and mineral particles, were negatively correlated with most growth parameters. δ15N was positively correlated with prey capture, but in situations where algae were the main prey objects it was found that the standard formula for calculation of prey-derived N was no longer applicable. Conclusions The mass capture of immotile particles confirms the ecological importance of autonomous firing of the traps. Although the C/N ratio was little influenced by algae, they clearly provide other nutrients, possibly including phosphorus and trace elements. By contrast, mosses, fungi and mineral particles appear to be useless bycatch. Correlations with chemical parameters indicate that Utricularia benefits from nutrient-rich waters by uptake

  18. Physical methods for genetic transformation of fungi and yeast.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Gómez-Lim, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M

    2014-06-01

    The production of transgenic fungi is a routine process. Currently, it is possible to insert genes from other fungi, viruses, bacteria and even animals, albeit with low efficiency, into the genomes of a number of fungal species. Genetic transformation requires the penetration of the transgene through the fungal cell wall, a process that can be facilitated by biological or physical methods. Novel methodologies for the efficient introduction of specific genes and stronger promoters are needed to increase production levels. A possible solution to this problem is the recently discovered shock-wave-mediated transformation. The objective of this article is to review the state of the art of the physical methods used for genetic fungi transformation and to describe some of the basic physics and molecular biology behind them.

  19. Fungi as a source of natural coumarins production.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tania Maria; Tavares, Lorena Benathar Ballod; de Oliveira, Débora

    2016-08-01

    Natural coumarins and derivatives are compounds that occur naturally in several organisms (plant, bacteria, and fungi) consisting of fused benzene and α-pyrone rings. These compounds show high technological potential applications in agrochemical, food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics industries. Therefore, the need for bulk production of coumarins and the advancement of the chemical and pharmaceutical industries led to the development of synthetic coumarin. However, biotransformation process, synthetic bioengineering, metabolic engineering, and bioinformatics have proven effective in the production of natural products. Today, these biological systems are recognized as green chemistry innovation and business strategy. This review article aims to report the potential of fungi for synthesis of coumarin. These microorganisms are described as a source of natural products capable of synthesizing many bioactive metabolites. The features, classification, properties, and industrial applications of natural coumarins as well as new molecules obtained by basidiomycetes and ascomycetes fungi are reported in order to explore a topic not yet discussed in the scientific literature.

  20. Physical methods for genetic transformation of fungi and yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Gómez-Lim, Miguel; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M.

    2014-06-01

    The production of transgenic fungi is a routine process. Currently, it is possible to insert genes from other fungi, viruses, bacteria and even animals, albeit with low efficiency, into the genomes of a number of fungal species. Genetic transformation requires the penetration of the transgene through the fungal cell wall, a process that can be facilitated by biological or physical methods. Novel methodologies for the efficient introduction of specific genes and stronger promoters are needed to increase production levels. A possible solution to this problem is the recently discovered shock-wave-mediated transformation. The objective of this article is to review the state of the art of the physical methods used for genetic fungi transformation and to describe some of the basic physics and molecular biology behind them.

  1. Bacteria Are Omnipresent on Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burdsall

    PubMed Central

    Seigle-Murandi, F.; Guiraud, P.; Croize, J.; Falsen, E.; Eriksson, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    Bacteria have been isolated from 10 different strains of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white rot fungus which degrades lignocellulosic materials. The investigations showed that one or more bacterial species were always associated with the fungus. Various attempts to eliminate the bacteria on the fungus were unsuccessful. Three different bacterial species were isolated and identified. One of these was Agrobacterium radiobacter, while another may represent a new taxon close to the genus Burkholderia. A third strain remains unidentified but is most probably a member of rRNA superfamily IV or the Woese (alpha) group. Besides P. chrysosporium, 23 other white rot fungi and 9 brown rot fungi were also investigated. None of these was associated with bacteria. The physiological significance of the association between the fungus and the bacteria remains to be elucidated. PMID:16535357

  2. The remote sensing of algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    State agencies need rapid, synoptic and inexpensive methods for lake assessment to comply with the 1972 Amendments to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. Low altitude aerial photography may be useful in providing information on algal type and quantity. Photography must be calibrated properly to remove sources of error including airlight, surface reflectance and scene-to-scene illumination differences. A 550-nm narrow wavelength band black and white photographic exposure provided a better correlation to algal biomass than either red or infrared photographic exposure. Of all the biomass parameters tested, depth-integrated chlorophyll a concentration correlated best to remote sensing data. Laboratory-measured reflectance of selected algae indicate that different taxonomic classes of algae may be discriminated on the basis of their reflectance spectra.

  3. Cultivation of phagotrophic algae with waste activated sludge as a fast approach to reclaim waste organics.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Xiao, Suo; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2016-03-15

    Substantial energy is reserved in waste activated sludge (WAS) organics but much of it is difficult to recover because the solid organics require long time to solubilize. In this work we introduced the new approach of recovering WAS organics into the biomass of phagotrophic algae. Phagotrophic algae have the unique ability to grow by ingesting insoluble organic particles including microbial cells. This phagotrophic ability renders the solubilization of WAS organics unnecessary and makes this approach remarkably fast. The approach consists of two stages: a short anaerobic digestion treatment followed by the algal growth on treated WAS. The short anaerobic digestion was exploited to release discrete bacteria from WAS flocs. Phagotrophic algae could then grow rapidly with the released bacteria as well as the solubilized nutrients in the treated WAS. The results showed that WAS organics could be quickly consumed by phagotrophic algae. Among all studied conditions the highest WAS volatile solids (VS) reduction was achieved with 72 h anaerobic digestion and 24 h algal growth. In this optimal process, 28% of WAS VS was reduced, and 41% and 20% of the reduced VS were converted into algal biomass and lipids, respectively. In comparison, only 18% WAS VS were reduced after the same time of aerobic digestion without algae addition. Through this approach, the amount of WAS organics requiring further treatment for final disposal is significantly reduced. With the production of significant amounts of algal biomass and lipids, WAS treatment is expected to be more economical and sustainable in material recycling.

  4. The diversity and distribution of fungi on residential surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel I; Miletto, Marzia; Taylor, John W; Bruns, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    The predominant hypothesis regarding the composition of microbial assemblages in indoor environments is that fungal assemblages are structured by outdoor air with a moderate contribution by surface growth, whereas indoor bacterial assemblages represent a mixture of bacteria entered from outdoor air, shed by building inhabitants, and grown on surfaces. To test the fungal aspect of this hypothesis, we sampled fungi from three surface types likely to support growth and therefore possible contributors of fungi to indoor air: drains in kitchens and bathrooms, sills beneath condensation-prone windows, and skin of human inhabitants. Sampling was done in replicated units of a university-housing complex without reported mold problems, and sequences were analyzed using both QIIME and the new UPARSE approach to OTU-binning, to the same result. Surfaces demonstrated a mycological profile similar to that of outdoor air from the same locality, and assemblages clustered by surface type. "Weedy" genera typical of indoor air, such as Cladosporium and Cryptococcus, were abundant on sills, as were a diverse set of fungi of likely outdoor origin. Drains supported more depauperate assemblages than the other surfaces and contained thermotolerant genera such as Exophiala, Candida, and Fusarium. Most surprising was the composition detected on residents' foreheads. In addition to harboring Malassezia, a known human commensal, skin also possessed a surprising richness of non-resident fungi, including plant pathogens such as ergot (Claviceps purperea). Overall, fungal richness across indoor surfaces was high, but based on known autecologies, most of these fungi were unlikely to be growing on surfaces. We conclude that while some endogenous fungal growth on typical household surfaces does occur, particularly on drains and skin, all residential surfaces appear - to varying degrees - to be passive collectors of airborne fungi of putative outdoor origin, a view of the origins of the indoor

  5. Halogenated Compounds from Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Vale, Carlos; Rauter, Amélia Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Marine algae produce a cocktail of halogenated metabolites with potential commercial value. Structures exhibited by these compounds go from acyclic entities with a linear chain to complex polycyclic molecules. Their medical and pharmaceutical application has been investigated for a few decades, however other properties, such as antifouling, are not to be discarded. Many compounds were discovered in the last years, although the need for new drugs keeps this field open as many algal species are poorly screened. The ecological role of marine algal halogenated metabolites has somehow been overlooked. This new research field will provide valuable and novel insight into the marine ecosystem dynamics as well as a new approach to comprehending biodiversity. Furthermore, understanding interactions between halogenated compound production by algae and the environment, including anthropogenic or global climate changes, is a challenging target for the coming years. Research of halogenated metabolites has been more focused on macroalgae than on phytoplankton. However, phytoplankton could be a very promising material since it is the base of the marine food chain with quick adaptation to environmental changes, which undoubtedly has consequences on secondary metabolism. This paper reviews recent progress on this field and presents trends on the role of marine algae as producers of halogenated compounds. PMID:20948909

  6. Parasites in algae mass culture

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Laura T.; Lane, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential for parasites to have a devastating effect on commercial scale monoculture. As commercial algal production continues to expand with a widening variety of applications, including biofuel, food and pharmaceuticals, the parasites associated with algae will become of greater interest and potential economic impact. A number of important algal parasites have been identified in algal mass culture systems in the last few years and this number is sure to grow as the number of commercial algae ventures increases. Here, we review the research that has identified and characterized parasites infecting mass cultivated algae, the techniques being proposed and or developed to control them, and the potential impact of parasites on the future of the algal biomass industry. PMID:24936200

  7. Synthetic polyester from algae oil.

    PubMed

    Roesle, Philipp; Stempfle, Florian; Hess, Sandra K; Zimmerer, Julia; Río Bártulos, Carolina; Lepetit, Bernard; Eckert, Angelika; Kroth, Peter G; Mecking, Stefan

    2014-06-23

    Current efforts to technically use microalgae focus on the generation of fuels with a molecular structure identical to crude oil based products. Here we suggest a different approach for the utilization of algae by translating the unique molecular structures of algae oil fatty acids into higher value chemical intermediates and materials. A crude extract from a microalga, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was obtained as a multicomponent mixture containing amongst others unsaturated fatty acid (16:1, 18:1, and 20:5) phosphocholine triglycerides. Exposure of this crude algae oil to CO and methanol with the known catalyst precursor [{1,2-(tBu2 PCH2)2C6H4}Pd(OTf)](OTf) resulted in isomerization/methoxycarbonylation of the unsaturated fatty acids into a mixture of linear 1,17- and 1,19-diesters in high purity (>99 %). Polycondensation with a mixture of the corresponding diols yielded a novel mixed polyester-17/19.17/19 with an advantageously high melting and crystallization temperature.

  8. Halogenated compounds from marine algae.

    PubMed

    Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Vale, Carlos; Rauter, Amélia Pilar

    2010-08-09

    Marine algae produce a cocktail of halogenated metabolites with potential commercial value. Structures exhibited by these compounds go from acyclic entities with a linear chain to complex polycyclic molecules. Their medical and pharmaceutical application has been investigated for a few decades, however other properties, such as antifouling, are not to be discarded. Many compounds were discovered in the last years, although the need for new drugs keeps this field open as many algal species are poorly screened. The ecological role of marine algal halogenated metabolites has somehow been overlooked. This new research field will provide valuable and novel insight into the marine ecosystem dynamics as well as a new approach to comprehending biodiversity. Furthermore, understanding interactions between halogenated compound production by algae and the environment, including anthropogenic or global climate changes, is a challenging target for the coming years. Research of halogenated metabolites has been more focused on macroalgae than on phytoplankton. However, phytoplankton could be a very promising material since it is the base of the marine food chain with quick adaptation to environmental changes, which undoubtedly has consequences on secondary metabolism. This paper reviews recent progress on this field and presents trends on the role of marine algae as producers of halogenated compounds.

  9. Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.K.; Wood, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    Six strains of algae and one Euglena sp. were tested for their ability to bioaccumulate nickel. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni was used together with a microplate technique to determine the conditions for nickel removal by axenic cultures of cyanobacteria, green algae, and one euglenoid. The cyanobacteria tested were found to be more sensitive to nickel toxicity than the green algae or the Euglena sp. The concentration factor (CF) for nickel was determined under a variety of conditions and found to be in the range from 0 to 3.0 x 10/sup 3/. The effect of environmental variables on nickel uptake was examined, and a striking pH effect for biaccumulation was observed, with most of the algal strains accumulating nickel optimally at approximately pH 8.0. Competition experiments for binding sites between nickel and other cations as well as with other complexing anions, showed that /sup 63/Ni uptake was affected only by cobalt and by humic acids.

  10. Time Course Transcriptome Changes in Shewanella algae in Response to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiling; Du, Pengcheng; Kan, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella algae, which produces tetrodotoxin and exists in various seafoods, can cause human diseases, such as spondylodiscitis and bloody diarrhea. In the present study, we focused on the temporal, dynamic process in salt-stressed S. algae by monitoring the gene transcript levels at different time points after high salt exposure. Transcript changes in amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism, membrane transport, regulatory functions, and cellular signaling were found to be important for the high salt response in S. algae. The most common strategies used by bacteria to survive and grow in high salt environments, such as Na+ efflux, K+ uptake, glutamate transport and biosynthesis, and the accumulation of compatible solutes, were also observed in S. algae. In particular, genes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and DNA repair were highly and steadily up-regulated, accompanied by rapid and instantaneous enhancement of the transcription of large- and small-ribosome subunits, which suggested that the structural changes in the cell wall and some stressful responses occurred in S. algae. Furthermore, the transcription of genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the glycolytic pathway was decreased, whereas the transcription of genes involved in anaerobic respiration was increased. These results, demonstrating the multi-pathway reactions of S. algae in response to salt stress, increase our understanding of the microbial stress response mechanisms. PMID:24789066

  11. Symbiotic associations in the phenotypically-diverse brown alga Saccharina japonica.

    PubMed

    Balakirev, Evgeniy S; Krupnova, Tatiana N; Ayala, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    The brown alga Saccharina japonica (Areschoug) Lane, Mayes, Druehl et Saunders is a highly polymorphic representative of the family Laminariaceae, inhabiting the northwest Pacific region. We have obtained 16S rRNA sequence data in symbiont microorganisms of the typical form (TYP) of S. japonica and its common morphological varieties, known as "longipes" (LON) and "shallow-water" (SHA), which show contrasting bathymetric distribution and sharp morphological, life history traits, and ecological differences. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequences shows that the microbial communities are significantly different in the three forms studied and consist of mosaic sets of common and form-specific bacterial lineages. The divergence in bacterial composition is substantial between the TYP and LON forms in spite of their high genetic similarity. The symbiont distribution in the S. japonica forms and in three other laminarialean species is not related to the depth or locality of the algae settlements. Combined with our previous results on symbiont associations in sea urchins and taking into account the highly specific character of bacteria-algae associations, we propose that the TYP and LON forms may represent incipient species passing through initial steps of reproductive isolation. We suggest that phenotype differences between genetically similar forms may be caused by host-symbiont interactions that may be a general feature of evolution in algae and other eukaryote organisms. Bacterial symbionts could serve as sensitive markers to distinguish genetically similar algae forms and also as possible growth-promoting inductors to increase algae productivity.

  12. Microcontact imprinting of algae on poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) for biofuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Janq; Lee, Mei-Hwa; Thomas, James L; Lu, Po-Hsun; Li, Ming-Huan; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2013-11-13

    Hydrogen can be produced using microorganisms (e.g., bacteria and algae); algal production has the additional ecological benefit of carbon dioxide fixation. The conversion of hydrogen to electricity via fuel cells may be more efficient compared to other energy sources of electricity. However, the anode of biofuel cells requires the immobilization of microorganisms or enzymes. In this work, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL), was coated on the electrode, and green algae was microcontact imprinted onto the EVAL film. The readsorption of algae onto algae-imprinted EVAL thin films was compared to determine the ethylene content that gave highest imprinting effectiveness and algal binding. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence spectrometry were employed to characterize the surface morphology, recognition capacity, and reusability of the algae-imprinted cavities. The recognition of an individual algal cell by binding to the imprinted cavities was directly observed by video microscopy. Finally, the power and current density of the algal biofuel cell using the algae-imprinted EVAL-coated electrode were measured at about 2-fold higher than electrode sputtered platinum on poly(ethylene terephthalate).

  13. An exogenous chloroplast genome for complex sequence manipulation in algae

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Bryan M.; Mikkelson, Kari L.; Gutierrez, Noel M.; Cunningham, Jennifer L.; Wolff, Kari L.; Szyjka, Shawn J.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Redding, Kevin E.; Mendez, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a system for cloning and modifying the chloroplast genome from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Through extensive use of sequence stabilization strategies, the ex vivo genome is assembled in yeast from a collection of overlapping fragments. The assembled genome is then moved into bacteria for large-scale preparations and transformed into C. reinhardtii cells. This system also allows for the generation of simultaneous, systematic and complex genetic modifications at multiple loci in vivo. We use this system to substitute genes encoding core subunits of the photosynthetic apparatus with orthologs from a related alga, Scenedesmus obliquus. Once transformed into algae, the substituted genome recombines with the endogenous genome, resulting in a hybrid plastome comprising modifications in disparate loci. The in vivo function of the genomes described herein demonstrates that simultaneous engineering of multiple sites within the chloroplast genome is now possible. This work represents the first steps toward a novel approach for creating genetic diversity in any or all regions of a chloroplast genome. PMID:22116061

  14. Sulfated phenolic acids from Dasycladales siphonous green algae.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Welling, Matthew; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-09-01

    Sulfated aromatic acids play a central role as mediators of chemical interactions and physiological processes in marine algae and seagrass. Among others, Dasycladus vermicularis (Scopoli) Krasser 1898 uses a sulfated hydroxylated coumarin derivative as storage metabolite for a protein cross linker that can be activated upon mechanical disruption of the alga. We introduce a comprehensive monitoring technique for sulfated metabolites based on fragmentation patterns in liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and applied it to Dasycladales. This allowed the identification of two new aromatic sulfate esters 4-(sulfooxy)phenylacetic acid and 4-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid. The two metabolites were synthesized to prove the mass spectrometry-based structure elucidation in co-injections. We show that both metabolites are transformed to the corresponding desulfated phenols by sulfatases of bacteria. In biofouling experiments with Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens the desulfated forms were more active than the sulfated ones. Sulfatation might thus represent a measure of detoxification that enables the algae to store inactive forms of metabolites that are activated by settling organisms and then act as defense.

  15. Metabolomics protocols for filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Gummer, Joel P A; Krill, Christian; Du Fall, Lauren; Waters, Ormonde D C; Trengove, Robert D; Oliver, Richard P; Solomon, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and transcriptomics are established functional genomics tools commonly used to study filamentous fungi. Metabolomics has recently emerged as another option to complement existing techniques and provide detailed information on metabolic regulation and secondary metabolism. Here, we describe broad generic protocols that can be used to undertake metabolomics studies in filamentous fungi.

  16. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Four Prymnesiophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Koid, Amy E.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C.; Caron, David A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists. PMID:24926657

  18. Effect of vegetation types on soil arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities in a karst region.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yueming; Pan, Fujing; He, Xunyang; Chen, Xiangbi; Su, Yirong

    2016-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria play important roles in plant growth and recovery in degraded ecosystems. The desertification in karst regions has become more severe in recent decades. Evaluation of the fungal and bacterial diversity of such regions during vegetation restoration is required for effective protection and restoration in these regions. Therefore, we analyzed relationships among AM fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria abundances, plant species diversity, and soil properties in four typical ecosystems of vegetation restoration (tussock (TK), shrub (SB), secondary forest (SF), and primary forest (PF)) in a karst region of southwest China. Abundance of AM fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, plant species diversity, and soil nutrient levels increased from the tussock to the primary forest. The AM fungus, nitrogen-fixing bacterium, and plant community composition differed significantly between vegetation types (p < 0.05). Plant richness and pH were linked to the community composition of fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, respectively. Available phosphorus, total nitrogen, and soil organic carbon levels and plant richness were positively correlated with the abundance of AM fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (p < 0.05). The results suggested that abundance of AM fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria increased from the tussock to the primary forest and highlight the essentiality of these communities for vegetation restoration.

  19. Antibacterial Derivatives of Marine Algae: An Overview of Pharmacological Mechanisms and Applications.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Emer; Abu-Ghannam, Nissreen

    2016-04-22

    The marine environment is home to a taxonomically diverse ecosystem. Organisms such as algae, molluscs, sponges, corals, and tunicates have evolved to survive the high concentrations of infectious and surface-fouling bacteria that are indigenous to ocean waters. Both macroalgae (seaweeds) and microalgae (diatoms) contain pharmacologically active compounds such as phlorotannins, fatty acids, polysaccharides, peptides, and terpenes which combat bacterial invasion. The resistance of pathogenic bacteria to existing antibiotics has become a global epidemic. Marine algae derivatives have shown promise as candidates in novel, antibacterial drug discovery. The efficacy of these compounds, their mechanism of action, applications as antibiotics, disinfectants, and inhibitors of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria are reviewed in this article.

  20. Antibacterial Derivatives of Marine Algae: An Overview of Pharmacological Mechanisms and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Emer; Abu-Ghannam, Nissreen

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment is home to a taxonomically diverse ecosystem. Organisms such as algae, molluscs, sponges, corals, and tunicates have evolved to survive the high concentrations of infectious and surface-fouling bacteria that are indigenous to ocean waters. Both macroalgae (seaweeds) and microalgae (diatoms) contain pharmacologically active compounds such as phlorotannins, fatty acids, polysaccharides, peptides, and terpenes which combat bacterial invasion. The resistance of pathogenic bacteria to existing antibiotics has become a global epidemic. Marine algae derivatives have shown promise as candidates in novel, antibacterial drug discovery. The efficacy of these compounds, their mechanism of action, applications as antibiotics, disinfectants, and inhibitors of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria are reviewed in this article. PMID:27110798

  1. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    PubMed

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions.

  2. A taxonomic and ecological overview of cheese fungi.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Jeanne; Cruaud, Corinne; Lacoste, Sandrine; Dupont, Joëlle

    2012-04-16

    Cheese is made from milk by a succession of microbes (bacteria, yeasts and fungi) that determine the consistency and flavor of the cheese. Apart from the emblematic species, Penicillium camemberti and Penicillium roqueforti, cheese fungi are not well known. Here we present a taxonomic and phylogenetic overview of the most important filamentous cheese Ascomycota based on 133 isolates provided by the producers of cheese and cheese starter cultures and 97 isolates from culture collections. We checked the congruence of different gene genealogies to circumscribe cheese species and our results allow us to propose molecular targets for their identification. To study their phylogenetic affiliation, we used LSU rDNA and showed that cheese fungi are found in two classes, the Eurotiomycetes with Penicillium species (Eurotiales) and Sporendonema casei/Sphaerosporium equinum (Onygenales), and the Sordariomycetes with Scopulariopsis species (Microascales) and Fusarium domesticum (Hypocreales). Some of these fungi, such as, P. camemberti, F. domesticum, Scopulariopsis flava and S. casei, are only known from cheeses and are probably adapted to this particular habitat, which is extremely rich in protein and fat. Other cheese fungi are ubiquitous, such as, P. roqueforti, Scopulariopsis candida and Scopulariopsis fusca.

  3. Major bioactive metabolites from marine fungi: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Saba; Ansari, Mohammad Israil; Ahmad, Anis; Mishra, Maitreyi

    2015-01-01

    Biologists and chemists of the world have been attracted towards marine natural products for the last five decades. Approximately 16,000 marine natural products have been isolated from marine organisms which have been reported in approximately 6,800 publications, proving marine microorganisms to be a invaluable source for the production of novel antibiotic, anti tumor, and anti inflammatory agents. The marine fungi particularly those associated with marine alga, sponge, invertebrates, and sediments appear to be a rich source for secondary metabolites, possessing Antibiotic, antiviral, antifungal and antiyeast activities. Besides, a few growth stimulant properties which may be useful in studies on wound healing, carcinogenic properties, and in the study of cancers are reported. Recent investigations on marine filamentous fungi looking for biologically active secondary metabolites indicate the tremendous potential of them as a source of new medicines. The present study reviews about some important bioactive metabolites reported from marine fungal strains which are anti bacterial, anti tumour and anti inflammatory in action. It highlights the chemistry and biological activity of the major bioactive alkaloids, polyketides, terpenoids, isoprenoid and non-isoprenoid compounds, quinones, isolated from marine fungi. PMID:26124556

  4. Bacterial tracking of motile algae assisted by algal cell's vorticity field.

    PubMed

    Locsei, J T; Pedley, T J

    2009-07-01

    Previously published experimental work by other authors has shown that certain motile marine bacteria are able to track free-swimming algae by executing a zigzag path and steering toward the algae at each turn. Here, we propose that the apparent steering behaviour could be a hydrodynamic effect, whereby an algal cell's vorticity and strain-rate fields rotate a pursuing bacterial cell in the appropriate direction. Using simplified models for the bacterial and algal cells, we numerically compute the trajectory of a bacterial cell and demonstrate the plausibility of this hypothesis.

  5. Interactions between microbial biofilms and marine fouling algae: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Mieszkin, Sophie; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A

    2013-01-01

    Natural and artificial substrata immersed in the marine environment are typically colonized by microorganisms, which may moderate the settlement/recruitment of algal spores and invertebrate larvae of macrofouling organisms. This mini-review summarizes the major interactions occurring between microbial biofilms and marine fouling algae, including their effects on the settlement, growth and morphology of the adult plants. The roles of chemical compounds that are produced by both bacteria and algae and which drive the interactions are reviewed. The possibility of using such bioactive compounds to control macrofouling will be discussed.

  6. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  7. [Effect of organic and inorganic toxic compounds on luminescence of luminous fungi].

    PubMed

    Vydriakova, G A; Gusev, A A; Medvedeva, S E

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of the development of the solid phase bioluminescent biotest using aerial mycelium of the luminous fungi was investigated. Effect of organic and inorganic toxic compounds (TC) at concentrations from 10(-6) to 1 mg/ml on luminescence of aerial mycelia of four species of luminous fungi-Armillaria borealis (Culture Collection of the Institute of Forest, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences), A. mellea, A. gallica, and Lampteromyces japonicus (Fungi Collection of the Botanical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences)--has been studied. Culture of A. mellea was shown to be most sensitive to solutions of the model TC. It was demonstrated that the sensitivity of the luminous fungi is comparable with the sensitivity of the bacteria that are used for environmental monitoring. Use of the aerial mycelium of the luminous fungi on the solid support as a test object is a promising approach in biotesting for the development of continuous biosensors for air monitoring.

  8. Polyextremotolerant black fungi: oligotrophism, adaptive potential, and a link to lichen symbioses.

    PubMed

    Gostinčar, Cene; Muggia, Lucia; Grube, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Black meristematic fungi can survive high doses of radiation and are resistant to desiccation. These adaptations help them to colonize harsh oligotrophic habitats, e.g., on the surface and subsurface of rocks. One of their most characteristic stress-resistance mechanisms is the accumulation of melanin in the cell walls. This, production of other protective molecules and a plastic morphology further contribute to ecological flexibility of black fungi. Increased growth rates of some species after exposure to ionizing radiation even suggest yet unknown mechanisms of energy production. Other unusual metabolic strategies may include harvesting UV or visible light or gaining energy by forming facultative lichen-like associations with algae or cyanobacteria. The latter is not entirely surprising, since certain black fungal lineages are phylogenetically related to clades of lichen-forming fungi. Similar to black fungi, lichen-forming fungi are adapted to growth on exposed surfaces with low availability of nutrients. They also efficiently use protective molecules to tolerate frequent periods of extreme stress. Traits shared by both groups of fungi may have been important in facilitating the evolution and radiation of lichen-symbioses.

  9. Polyextremotolerant black fungi: oligotrophism, adaptive potential, and a link to lichen symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Gostinčar, Cene; Muggia, Lucia; Grube, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Black meristematic fungi can survive high doses of radiation and are resistant to desiccation. These adaptations help them to colonize harsh oligotrophic habitats, e.g., on the surface and subsurface of rocks. One of their most characteristic stress-resistance mechanisms is the accumulation of melanin in the cell walls. This, production of other protective molecules and a plastic morphology further contribute to ecological flexibility of black fungi. Increased growth rates of some species after exposure to ionizing radiation even suggest yet unknown mechanisms of energy production. Other unusual metabolic strategies may include harvesting UV or visible light or gaining energy by forming facultative lichen-like associations with algae or cyanobacteria. The latter is not entirely surprising, since certain black fungal lineages are phylogenetically related to clades of lichen-forming fungi. Similar to black fungi, lichen-forming fungi are adapted to growth on exposed surfaces with low availability of nutrients. They also efficiently use protective molecules to tolerate frequent periods of extreme stress. Traits shared by both groups of fungi may have been important in facilitating the evolution and radiation of lichen-symbioses. PMID:23162543

  10. Photobioreactors for mass cultivation of algae.

    PubMed

    Ugwu, C U; Aoyagi, H; Uchiyama, H

    2008-07-01

    Algae have attracted much interest for production of foods, bioactive compounds and also for their usefulness in cleaning the environment. In order to grow and tap the potentials of algae, efficient photobioreactors are required. Although a good number of photobioreactors have been proposed, only a few of them can be practically used for mass production of algae. One of the major factors that limits their practical application in algal mass cultures is mass transfer. Thus, a thorough understanding of mass transfer rates in photobioreactors is necessary for efficient operation of mass algal cultures. In this review article, various photobioreactors that are very promising for mass production of algae are discussed.

  11. ["Depilation" by micro-algae?].

    PubMed

    Ditrich, H

    1996-01-01

    Itching, reddening and depilation of body hairs was reported by swimmers in the Attersee-lake in Austria. Initially, an environmental crime was suspected. However, further investigations showed that a biological cause was probably responsible for these symptoms. The accrustations found on body hairs turned out in the scanning electron microscope to be dried mucus containing numerous diatoms. The prevailing micro-algae were identified as Cyclotella comensis. Thus, although the phenomenon had a natural, harmless cause, it may happen again given the appropriate environmental conditions.

  12. GENETIC-BASED ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR BACTERIA AND FUNGI

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past two decades, advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have lead to a veritable explosion in the generation of nucleic acid sequence information (1). While these advances are illustrated most prominently by the successful sequencing of the human genome, they...

  13. Environmental Microbiology: Bacteria & Fungi on the Foods We Eat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segner, Suzanne; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G.

    2007-01-01

    The near daily news reports on food-borne diseases caused by contaminated produce, dairy, or meats suggests to the public that the safety of the U.S. food supply is in jeopardy. These reports, as well as a general distrust in federal agencies due in part to mad cow disease and toxigenic forms of "E. coli" in ground beef, have resulted in an…

  14. Cyanophora paradoxa genome elucidates origin of photosynthesis in algae and plants.

    PubMed

    Price, Dana C; Chan, Cheong Xin; Yoon, Hwan Su; Yang, Eun Chan; Qiu, Huan; Weber, Andreas P M; Schwacke, Rainer; Gross, Jeferson; Blouin, Nicolas A; Lane, Chris; Reyes-Prieto, Adrián; Durnford, Dion G; Neilson, Jonathan A D; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud; Steiner, Jürgen M; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang; Meuser, Jonathan E; Posewitz, Matthew C; Ball, Steven; Arias, Maria Cecilia; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Rensing, Stefan A; Symeonidi, Aikaterini; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Green, Beverley R; Rajah, Veeran D; Boore, Jeffrey; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-02-17

    The primary endosymbiotic origin of the plastid in eukaryotes more than 1 billion years ago led to the evolution of algae and plants. We analyzed draft genome and transcriptome data from the basally diverging alga Cyanophora paradoxa and provide evidence for a single origin of the primary plastid in the eukaryote supergroup Plantae. C. paradoxa retains ancestral features of starch biosynthesis, fermentation, and plastid protein translocation common to plants and algae but lacks typical eukaryotic light-harvesting complex proteins. Traces of an ancient link to parasites such as Chlamydiae were found in the genomes of C. paradoxa and other Plantae. Apparently, Chlamydia-like bacteria donated genes that allow export of photosynthate from the plastid and its polymerization into storage polysaccharide in the cytosol.

  15. Fungi: Strongmen of the Underground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrell, Patricia D.; Morrell, Jeffrey J.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an activity that stresses the role of fungi and decomposers, highlights the rapidity by which they complete this process, and allows students to experiment with ways to control the rate of decomposition. (CCM)

  16. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae

    SciTech Connect

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

  17. Methyl Halide Production by Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, G. D.; Varner, R. K.; Blanchard, R. O.; Sive, B. C.; Crill, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl), methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl iodide (CH3I) are methyl halide gases that contribute significant amounts of halogen radicals to the atmosphere. In an effort to better understand the global budget of methyl halides and their impact on the atmosphere, we need to identify the natural sources in addition to the known anthropogenic sources of these compounds. We are investigating the role of fungi in the production of methyl halides in the soils and wetlands in southern New Hampshire, USA. Previous research has shown that wood decay fungi and ectomycorrhizal fungi, which are within a group of fungi called basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. In our study, measurements of headspace gas extracted from flasks containing fungi grown in culture demonstrate that a variety of fungi, including basidiomycetes and non-basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. Our research sites include four ecosystems: an agricultural field, a temperate forest, a fresh water wetland, and coastal salt marshes. We have collected and isolated fungi at each site by culturing tissue samples of fruiting bodies and plant material, by using wood baits, and from the direct culture of soil. We compared the rates of methyl halide emissions from the fungi in the four ecosystems. In addition, we measured emissions from previously assayed fungal isolates after reintroducing them to sterilized soils that were collected from their original environments. Fungal biomass was determined by substrate-induced respiration (SIR). The emission rate by the fungus was determined by a linear regression of the concentration of methyl halide in the sample headspace over time divided by the fungal biomass.

  18. Nutritional And Taste Characteristics Of Algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Nakhost, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of chemical composition of blue-green algae Synechococcus 6311, as well as preparation of protein isolate from green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and incorporation into variety of food products evaluated for taste. Part of program to investigate growth of microalgae aboard spacecraft for use as food.

  19. SSMILes: Measuring the Nutrient Tolerance of Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedgepeth, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity integrating mathematics and science intended to introduce students to the use of metric measurement of mass as a way to increase the meaningfulness of observations about variables in life sciences. Involves measuring the nutrient tolerance of algae. Contains a reproducible algae nutrient graph. (Author/MKR)

  20. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  1. Take a Dip! Culturing Algae Is Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory activities using algae as the organisms of choice. These include examination of typical algal cells, demonstration of alternation of generations, sexual reproduction in Oedogonium, demonstration of phototaxis, effect of nitrate concentration on Ankistrodesmus, and study of competition between two algae in the same environment.…

  2. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  3. Composting of waste algae: a review.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Clarke, William; Pratt, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Although composting has been successfully used at pilot scale to manage waste algae removed from eutrophied water environments and the compost product applied as a fertiliser, clear guidelines are not available for full scale algae composting. The review reports on the application of composting to stabilize waste algae, which to date has mainly been macro-algae, and identifies the peculiarities of algae as a composting feedstock, these being: relatively low carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio, which can result in nitrogen loss as NH3 and even N2O; high moisture content and low porosity, which together make aeration challenging; potentially high salinity, which can have adverse consequence for composting; and potentially have high metals and toxin content, which can affect application of the product as a fertiliser. To overcome the challenges that these peculiarities impose co-compost materials can be employed.

  4. Advances in genetic engineering of marine algae.

    PubMed

    Qin, Song; Lin, Hanzhi; Jiang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Algae are a component of bait sources for animal aquaculture, and they produce abundant valuable compounds for the chemical industry and human health. With today's fast growing demand for algae biofuels and the profitable market for cosmetics and pharmaceuticals made from algal natural products, the genetic engineering of marine algae has been attracting increasing attention as a crucial systemic technology to address the challenge of the biomass feedstock supply for sustainable industrial applications and to modify the metabolic pathway for the more efficient production of high-value products. Nevertheless, to date, only a few marine algae species can be genetically manipulated. In this article, an updated account of the research progress in marine algal genomics is presented along with methods for transformation. In addition, vector construction and gene selection strategies are reviewed. Meanwhile, a review on the progress of bioreactor technologies for marine algae culture is also revisited.

  5. Algae inhibition experiment and load characteristics of the algae solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, L.; Gao, J. X.; Zhang, Y. X.; Yang, Z. K.; Zhang, D. Q.; He, W.

    2016-08-01

    It is necessary to inhibit microbial growth in an industrial cooling water system. This paper has developed a Monopolar/Bipolar polarity high voltage pulser with load adaptability for an algal experimental study. The load characteristics of the Chlorella pyrenoidosa solution were examined, and it was found that the solution load is resistive. The resistance is related to the plate area, concentration, and temperature of the solution. Furthermore, the pulser's treatment actually inhibits the algae cell growth. This article also explores the influence of various parameters of electric pulses on the algal effect. After the experiment, the optimum pulse parameters were determined to be an electric field intensity of 750 V/cm, a pulse width per second of 120μs, and monopolar polarity.

  6. Chaophilic or chaotolerant fungi: a new category of extremophiles?

    PubMed Central

    Zajc, Janja; Džeroski, Sašo; Kocev, Dragi; Oren, Aharon; Sonjak, Silva; Tkavc, Rok; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that few halophilic bacteria and archaea as well as certain fungi can grow at the highest concentrations of NaCl. However, data about possible life at extremely high concentrations of various others kosmotropic (stabilizing; like NaCl, KCl, and MgSO4) and chaotropic (destabilizing) salts (NaBr, MgCl2, and CaCl2) are scarce for prokaryotes and almost absent for the eukaryotic domain including fungi. Fungi from diverse (extreme) environments were tested for their ability to grow at the highest concentrations of kosmotropic and chaotropic salts ever recorded to support life. The majority of fungi showed preference for relatively high concentrations of kosmotropes. However, our study revealed the outstanding tolerance of several fungi to high concentrations of MgCl2 (up to 2.1 M) or CaCl2 (up to 2.0 M) without compensating kosmotropic salts. Few species, for instance Hortaea werneckii, Eurotium amstelodami, Eurotium chevalieri and Wallemia ichthyophaga, are able to thrive in media with the highest salinities of all salts (except for CaCl2 in the case of W. ichthyophaga). The upper concentration of MgCl2 to support fungal life in the absence of kosmotropes (2.1 M) is much higher than previously determined to be the upper limit for microbial growth (1.26 M). No fungal representatives showed exclusive preference for only chaotropic salts (being obligate chaophiles). Nevertheless, our study expands the knowledge of possible active life by a diverse set of fungi in biologically detrimental chaotropic environments. PMID:25566222

  7. Fungi producing significant mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of microfungi that are known to cause sickness or death in humans or animals. Although many such toxic metabolites are known, it is generally agreed that only a few are significant in causing disease: aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and ergot alkaloids. These toxins are produced by just a few species from the common genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Claviceps. All Aspergillus and Penicillium species either are commensals, growing in crops without obvious signs of pathogenicity, or invade crops after harvest and produce toxins during drying and storage. In contrast, the important Fusarium and Claviceps species infect crops before harvest. The most important Aspergillus species, occurring in warmer climates, are A. flavus and A. parasiticus, which produce aflatoxins in maize, groundnuts, tree nuts, and, less frequently, other commodities. The main ochratoxin A producers, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius, commonly occur in grapes, dried vine fruits, wine, and coffee. Penicillium verrucosum also produces ochratoxin A but occurs only in cool temperate climates, where it infects small grains. F. verticillioides is ubiquitous in maize, with an endophytic nature, and produces fumonisins, which are generally more prevalent when crops are under drought stress or suffer excessive insect damage. It has recently been shown that Aspergillus niger also produces fumonisins, and several commodities may be affected. F. graminearum, which is the major producer of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, is pathogenic on maize, wheat, and barley and produces these toxins whenever it infects these grains before harvest. Also included is a short section on Claviceps purpurea, which produces sclerotia among the seeds in grasses, including wheat, barley, and triticale. The main thrust of the chapter contains information on the identification of these fungi and their morphological characteristics, as well as factors

  8. Lactobacilli and dairy propionibacterium with potential as biopreservatives against food fungi and yeast contamination.

    PubMed

    Ho, P H; Luo, J B; Adams, M C

    2009-01-01

    Naturally fermented and raw foods contain a range of organisms that may have benefit as additives in some foods and food processing. In particular, potential anti-fungal properties of these organisms may be potentially utilised as natural alternatives to chemical additives used to delay and prevent spoilage by fungi and yeast. This study examined 12 novel bacteria previously isolated from food as possible biopreservatives. The bacteria from the lactobacilli and dairy propionibacterium groups were tested by agar overlay method for their ability to inhibit the growth of 10 fungi and one yeast commonly associated with food contamination. Eight among eleven tested lactic acid bacteria demonstrated broad spectrum of antifungal activity. Strong fungi inhibition was also demonstrated by the dairy propionibacterium, but efficacy was growth medium dependant. Only one fungi, Geotrichum candidum was highly resistant to the bacteria. Variation between the inhibition results for different bacteria identifies the importance of careful strain selection, and the benefits of strain combinations when selecting biopreservatives for foods.

  9. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-05

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  10. Ear infections with Shewanella alga: a bacteriologic, clinical and epidemiologic study of 67 cases.

    PubMed

    Holt, Hanne M.; Søgaard, Per; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    1997-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present bacteriologic and clinical data on 67 patients from the island of Funen, Denmark, with Shewanella alga, a bacterium rarely seen in Scandinavia, isolated from ear swabs. Included in the study is an examination of the occurrence of S. alga in sea water around the island. METHODS: Bacteriologic examination and antibiotic susceptibility testing of 67 clinical isolates, 11 sea-water isolates and two reference strains were conducted. Clinical information was obtained from the referring physicians. RESULTS: During 6 months S. alga was isolated from 67 patients, in 33 cases in pure culture. Seventy per cent of the patients were children between 3 and 15 years old who had clinical symptoms of acute or chronic otitis media. Previous ear disease was common (76%). Most of the cases (85%) occurred in August or September, and 47 of 55 patients reported contact with sea water shortly before symptoms developed. From seven of the patients, S. alga was isolated more than once. The species was also isolated from five of 10 bathing areas around the island of Funen. CONCLUSIONS: The patients were probably infected with S. alga during sea-water bathing in the unusually warm summer of 1994. Infections with marine bacteria are possible in countries with a temperate climate; patients with previous ear disease are at special risk.

  11. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  12. Rapid aggregation of biofuel-producing algae by the bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2013-10-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s.

  13. Fungi with multifunctional lifestyles: endophytic insect pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Barelli, Larissa; Moonjely, Soumya; Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the symbiotic, evolutionary, proteomic and genetic basis for a group of fungi that occupy a specialized niche as insect pathogens as well as endophytes. We focus primarily on species in the genera Metarhizium and Beauveria, traditionally recognized as insect pathogenic fungi but are also found as plant symbionts. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these fungi are more closely related to grass endophytes and diverged from that lineage ca. 100 MYA. We explore how the dual life cycles of these fungi as insect pathogens and endophytes are coupled. We discuss the evolution of insect pathogenesis while maintaining an endophytic lifestyle and provide examples of genes that may be involved in the transition toward insect pathogenicity. That is, some genes for insect pathogenesis may have been co-opted from genes involved in endophytic colonization. Other genes may be multifunctional and serve in both lifestyle capacities. We suggest that their evolution as insect pathogens allowed them to effectively barter a specialized nitrogen source (i.e. insects) with host plants for photosynthate. These ubiquitous fungi may play an important role as plant growth promoters and have a potential reservoir of secondary metabolites.

  14. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Results Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Conclusions Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model. PMID:22540986

  15. Anaerobic Fungi and Their Potential for Biogas Production.

    PubMed

    Dollhofer, Veronika; Podmirseg, Sabine Marie; Callaghan, Tony Martin; Griffith, Gareth Wyn; Fliegerová, Kateřina

    2015-01-01

    Plant biomass is the largest reservoir of environmentally friendly renewable energy on earth. However, the complex and recalcitrant structure of these lignocellulose-rich substrates is a severe limitation for biogas production. Microbial pro-ventricular anaerobic digestion of ruminants can serve as a model for improvement of converting lignocellulosic biomass into energy. Anaerobic fungi are key players in the digestive system of various animals, they produce a plethora of plant carbohydrate hydrolysing enzymes. Combined with the invasive growth of their rhizoid system their contribution to cell wall polysaccharide decomposition may greatly exceed that of bacteria. The cellulolytic arsenal of anaerobic fungi consists of both secreted enzymes, as well as extracellular multi-enzyme complexes called cellulosomes. These complexes are extremely active, can degrade both amorphous and crystalline cellulose and are probably the main reason of cellulolytic efficiency of anaerobic fungi. The synergistic use of mechanical and enzymatic degradation makes anaerobic fungi promising candidates to improve biogas production from recalcitrant biomass. This chapter presents an overview about their biology and their potential for implementation in the biogas process.

  16. Massive gene swamping among cheese-making Penicillium fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ropars, Jeanne; Aguileta, Gabriela; de Vienne, Damien M.; Giraud, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfers (HGT), i.e., the transmission of genetic material between species not directly attributable to meiotic gene exchange, have long been acknowledged as a major driver of prokaryotic evolution and is increasingly recognized as an important source of adaptation in eukaryotes. In fungi in particular, many convincing examples of HGT have been reported to confer selective advantages on the recipient fungal host, either promoting fungal pathogenicity on plants or increasing their toxicity by the acquisition of secondary metabolic clusters, resulting in adaptation to new niches and in some cases eventually even in speciation. These horizontal gene transfers involve single genes, complete metabolic pathways or even entire chromosomes. A recent study has uncovered multiple recent horizontal transfers of a 575 kb genomic island in cheese Penicillium fungi, representing ca. 2% of the Penicillium roqueforti’s genome, that may confer selective advantage in the competing cheese environment where bacteria and fungi occur. Novel phylogenomic methods are being developed, revealing massive HGT among fungi. Altogether, these recent studies indicate that HGT is a crucial mechanism of rapid adaptation, even among eukaryotes.

  17. Molecular characterization and bioactivity profile of the tropical sponge-associated bacterium Shewanella algae VCDB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachanamol, R. S.; Lipton, A. P.; Thankamani, V.; Sarika, A. R.; Selvin, J.

    2014-06-01

    The pigmented, rod-shaped, Gram-negative, motile bacteria isolated from marine sponge Callyspongia diffusa exhibiting bioactivity was characterized as Shewanella algae (GenBank: KC623651). The 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis showed its similarity with the member of Shewanella and placed in a separate cluster with the recognized bacteria S. algae (PSB-05 FJ86678) with which it showed 99.0 % sequence similarity. Growth of the strain was optimum at temperature 30 °C, pH 8.0 in the presence of 2.0-4.0 % of NaCl. High antibiotic activity against microbes such as Escherichia coli (MTCC 40), S. typhii (MTCC 98), P. vulgaris (MTCC 426), V. fluvialis, V. anguillarum, E. cloacae, and L. lactis was recorded. The growth of fungal pathogens such as Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was effectively controlled.

  18. Novel bacteria associated with Arctic seashore lichens have potential roles in nutrient scavenging.

    PubMed

    Sigurbjörnsdóttir, Margrét Auður; Heiðmarsson, Starri; Jónsdóttir, Anna Rut; Vilhelmsson, Oddur

    2014-05-01

    While generally described as a bipartite mutualistic association between fungi and algae or cyanobacteria, lichens also host diverse and heretofore little explored communities of nonphototrophic endolichenic bacteria. The composition and possible roles of these bacterial communities in the lichen symbiotic association constitute an emerging field of research. Saxicolous (rock-dwelling) seashore lichens present an unusual environment, characterized by rapid fluctuations in temperature, salinity, exposure to solar radiation, etc. The present study focuses on the bacterial biota associated with 4 species of crustose, halophilic, saxicolous seashore lichens found in northern Iceland. A denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis based characterization of the composition of the lichen-associated microbiotas indicated that they are markedly lichen-species-specific and clearly distinguishable from the environmental microbiota represented by control sampling. A collection of bacterial strains was investigated and partially identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains were found to belong to 7 classes: Alphaproteobacteria, Bacilli, Actinobacteria, Flavobacteria, Cytophagia, Sphingobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Several isolates display only a modest level of similarity to their nearest relatives found in GenBank, suggesting that they comprise previously undescribed taxa. Selected strains were tested for inorganic phosphate solubilization and biodegradation of several biopolymers, such as barley β-glucan, xylan, chitosan, and lignin. The results support a nutrient-scavenging role of the associate microbiota in the seashore lichen symbiotic association.

  19. The contribution of bacteria to algal growth by carbon cycling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Algal mass production in open systems is often limited by the availability of inorganic carbon substrate. In this paper, we evaluate how bacterial driven carbon cycling mitigates carbon limitation in open algal culture systems. The contribution of bacteria to carbon cycling was determined by quantifying algae growth with and without supplementation of bacteria. It was found that adding heterotrophic bacteria to an open algal culture dramatically enhanced algae productivity. Increases in algal productivity due to supplementation of bacteria of 4.8 and 3.4 times were observed in two batch tests operating at two different pH values over 7 days. A kinetic model is proposed which describes carbon limited algal growth, and how the limitation could be overcome by bacterial activity to re-mineralize photosynthetic end products.

  20. DGDG and Glycolipids in Plants and Algae.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Barbara; Dörmann, Peter; Hölzl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic organelles in plants and algae are characterized by the high abundance of glycolipids, including the galactolipids mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, DGDG) and the sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG). Glycolipids are crucial to maintain an optimal efficiency of photosynthesis. During phosphate limitation, the amounts of DGDG and SQDG increase in the plastids of plants, and DGDG is exported to extraplastidial membranes to replace phospholipids. Algae often use betaine lipids as surrogate for phospholipids. Glucuronosyldiacylglycerol (GlcADG) is a further glycolipid that accumulates under phosphate deprived conditions. In contrast to plants, a number of eukaryotic algae contain very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of 20 or more carbon atoms in their glycolipids. The pathways and genes for galactolipid and sulfolipid synthesis are largely conserved between plants, Chlorophyta, Rhodophyta and algae with complex plastids derived from secondary or tertiary endosymbiosis. However, the relative contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum- and plastid-derived lipid pathways for glycolipid synthesis varies between plants and algae. The genes for glycolipid synthesis encode precursor proteins imported into the photosynthetic organelles. While most eukaryotic algae contain the plant-like galactolipid (MGD1, DGD1) and sulfolipid (SQD1, SQD2) synthases, the red alga Cyanidioschyzon harbors a cyanobacterium-type DGDG synthase (DgdA), and the amoeba Paulinella, derived from a more recent endosymbiosis event, contains cyanobacterium-type enzymes for MGDG and DGDG synthesis (MgdA, MgdE, DgdA).

  1. Algae Biofuel in the Nigerian Energy Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elegbede, Isa; Guerrero, Cinthya

    2016-05-01

    The issue of energy consumption is one of the issues that have significantly become recognized as an important topic of global discourse. Fossil fuels production reportedly experiencing a gradual depletion in the oil-producing nations of the world. Most studies have relatively focused on biofuel development and adoption, however, the awareness of a prospect in the commercial cultivation of algae having potential to create economic boost in Nigeria, inspired this research. This study aims at exploring the potential of the commercialization of a different but commonly found organism, algae, in Nigeria. Here, parameters such as; water quality, light, carbon, average temperature required for the growth of algae, and additional beneficial nutrients found in algae were analysed. A comparative cum qualitative review of analysis was used as the study made use of empirical findings on the work as well as the author's deductions. The research explored the cultivation of algae with the two major seasonal differences (i.e. rainy and dry) in Nigeria as a backdrop. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in the contribution of algae and other sources of biofuels as a necessity for bioenergy in Nigeria. However, for an effective sustainability of this prospect, adequate measures need to be put in place in form of funding, provision of an economically-enabling environment for the cultivation process as well as proper healthcare service in the face of possible health hazard from technological processes. Further studies can seek to expand on the potential of cultivating algae in the Harmattan season.

  2. Competition between Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Benthic Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nicolaisen, Mette H.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Aa Lomstein, Bente

    2004-01-01

    The abundance, activity, and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were studied in prepared microcosms with and without microphytobenthic activity. In the microcosm without alga activity, both AOB abundance, estimated by real-time PCR, and potential nitrification increased during the course of the experiment. AOB present in the oxic zone of these sediments were able to fully exploit their nitrification potential because NH4+ did not limit growth. In contrast, AOB in the alga-colonized sediments reached less than 20% of their potential activity, suggesting starvation of cells. Starvation resulted in a decrease with time in the abundance of AOB as well as in nitrification potential. This decrease was correlated with an increase in alga biomass, suggesting competitive exclusion of AOB by microalgae. Induction of N limitation in the oxic zone of the alga-colonized sediments and O2 limitation of the majority of AOB in darkness were major mechanisms by which microalgae suppressed the growth and survival of AOB. The competition pressure from the algae seemed to act on the entire population of AOB, as no differences were observed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amoA fragments during the course of the experiment. Enumeration of bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene copies and d-amino acids suggested that the algae also affected other bacterial groups negatively. Our data indicate that direct competitive interaction takes place between algae and AOB and that benthic algae are superior competitors because they have higher N uptake rates and grow faster than AOB. PMID:15345441

  3. Melanized Fungi in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Revankar, Sanjay G.; Sutton, Deanna A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Melanized or dematiaceous fungi are associated with a wide variety of infectious syndromes. Many are soil organisms and are generally distributed worldwide, though certain species appear to have restricted geographic ranges. Though they are uncommon causes of disease, melanized fungi have been increasingly recognized as important pathogens, with most reports occurring in the past 20 years. The spectrum of diseases with which they are associated has also broadened and includes allergic disease, superficial and deep local infections, pneumonia, brain abscess, and disseminated infection. For some infections in immunocompetent individuals, such as allergic fungal sinusitis and brain abscess, they are among the most common etiologic fungi. Melanin is a likely virulence factor for these fungi. Diagnosis relies on careful microscopic and pathological examination, as well as clinical assessment of the patient, as these fungi are often considered contaminants. Therapy varies depending upon the clinical syndrome. Local infection may be cured with excision alone, while systemic disease is often refractory to therapy. Triazoles such as voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole have the most consistent in vitro activity. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathogenesis and optimal treatment of these uncommon infections. PMID:20930077

  4. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  5. Occurrence of filamentous fungi and yeasts in three different drinking water sources.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V J; Basílio, M C; Fernandes, D; Domingues, M; Paiva, J M; Benoliel, M J; Crespo, M T; San Romão, M V

    2009-08-01

    In order to determine the occurrence of fungi in different drinking water sources and capture variability in terms of matrix composition and seasonal effects, surface water, spring water, and groundwater samples were collected in numerous sampling events. The occurrence and significance of fungi detected in the different water sources are reported and discussed in terms of colony-forming units per millilitre and by the identification of the most frequently detected isolates, at the species level, based on morphology and other phenotypic characters. All the samples were also analyzed in terms of total coliforms and Escherichia coli that are widely monitored bacteria considered as microbiology indicators of water quality. All the groundwater samples showed significantly lower levels of total coliforms, E. coli, and fungi compared to the surface and spring water samples. No significant correlations were found between the levels of fungi detected in all the matrices and the physico-chemical parameters and bacteria regularly monitored by drinking water utilities. Fifty-two fungi isolates were identified in this study, most of which have never been described to occur in water sources. The results obtained show that fungi occur widely in drinking water sources and that further studies should be conducted to address their biodegradation potential as well as if the drinking water treatment processes currently used are effective in removing these organisms and the potential secondary metabolites produced.

  6. Method and apparatus for processing algae

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2012-07-03

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells. The lysate separates into at least two layers including a lipid-containing hydrophobic layer and an ionic liquid-containing hydrophilic layer. A salt or salt solution may be used to remove water from the ionic liquid-containing layer before the ionic liquid is reused. The used salt may also be dried and/or concentrated and reused. The method can operate at relatively low lysis, processing, and recycling temperatures, which minimizes the environmental impact of algae processing while providing reusable biofuels and other useful products.

  7. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  8. [Effects of different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on Tagetes erecta growth and diesel degradation].

    PubMed

    Geng, Chunnü; Li, Peijun; Chen, Suhua; Zhang, Hairong; Han, Guiyun

    2003-10-01

    The effects of G. mosseae, G. geospora, G. constrictum and bacteria on diesel tolerance of Tagetes erecta were investigated under greenhouse conditions. The results showed that AM fungi could still develop mycorrhizal assosiations with mum when the diesel concentration was 5,000 mg.kg-1. White mum was better than yellow mum in diesel tolerance, with 63.1% total biomass increased. The colonization rate of inoculating AM fungi treatment was 3.5%-29.9% higher than the control. G. mosseae and G. geospora were better strains, their biomass increasing 9.0% and 42.7% than the control, respectively, while the effect of inoculating mixed AM fungi was not obvious. Bacteria inhibited the colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on white mum, but promoted the vegetative and reproductive growth of mycorrhizal mum. Among 5 inoculation treatments, treatments of inoculating G. geospora and inoculating mixed AM fungi and bacteria were better, with 16.51% and 14.05% more diesel degradation rate than that of the control, respectively.

  9. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  10. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture...

  11. Proteome Studies of Filamentous Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Panisko, Ellen A.

    2011-04-20

    The continued fast pace of fungal genome sequence generation has enabled proteomic analysis of a wide breadth of organisms that span the breadth of the Kingdom Fungi. There is some phylogenetic bias to the current catalog of fungi with reasonable DNA sequence databases (genomic or EST) that could be analyzed at a global proteomic level. However, the rapid development of next generation sequencing platforms has lowered the cost of genome sequencing such that in the near future, having a genome sequence will no longer be a time or cost bottleneck for downstream proteomic (and transcriptomic) analyses. High throughput, non-gel based proteomics offers a snapshot of proteins present in a given sample at a single point in time. There are a number of different variations on the general method and technologies for identifying peptides in a given sample. We present a method that can serve as a “baseline” for proteomic studies of fungi.

  12. The bacterial biota on crustose (nonarticulated) coralline algae from Tasmanian waters.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T E; Garland, C D; McMeekin, T A

    1985-09-01

    The bacterial biota associated with the cuticle surface of healthy benthic samples of crustose nonarticulated coralline algae from the east coast of Tasmania (Australia) was examined by bacteriological cultivation and electron microscopy. In 32 samples studied, the viable count on Zobell's marine agar (supplemented with vitamins) was 3.3×10(6) bacteria g(-1) wet wt. (range 2.9×10(4)-2.7×10(7)). Of 732 strains isolated from 16 out of 32 samples and identified to genus level,Moraxella was the predominant genus (66%). In contrast,Moraxella comprised only 11% of 217 strains isolated from benthic seawater samples collected at the same time as coralline algae. In 22 out of 32 algal samples examined by scanning electron microscopy, the total count was 1.6 × 10(7) bacteria g(-1) wet wt. (range 5.1× 10(6)-3.8×107); the major morphotype was cocco-bacilli (80%). Several environmental factors did not significantly influence the viable count or generic distribution, or the total count or morphotypic distribution of bacteria on the cuticle. These factors included geographical site, season, storage of samples in aquarium conditions, and the presence or absence of abalone from shells that the coralline algae encrusted. The microbiota, consisting mostly of the nonmotile bacterial genusMoraxella, appeared to be highly adapted to its calcerous plant host.

  13. Chemical mediation of coral larval settlement by crustose coralline algae

    PubMed Central

    Tebben, J.; Motti, C. A; Siboni, Nahshon; Tapiolas, D. M.; Negri, A. P.; Schupp, P. J.; Kitamura, Makoto; Hatta, Masayuki; Steinberg, P. D.; Harder, T.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of marine invertebrates produce dispersive larvae which, in order to complete their life cycles, must attach and metamorphose into benthic forms. This process, collectively referred to as settlement, is often guided by habitat-specific cues. While the sources of such cues are well known, the links between their biological activity, chemical identity, presence and quantification in situ are largely missing. Previous work on coral larval settlement in vitro has shown widespread induction by crustose coralline algae (CCA) and in particular their associated bacteria. However, we found that bacterial biofilms on CCA did not initiate ecologically realistic settlement responses in larvae of 11 hard coral species from Australia, Guam, Singapore and Japan. We instead found that algal chemical cues induce identical behavioral responses of larvae as per live CCA. We identified two classes of CCA cell wall-associated compounds – glycoglycerolipids and polysaccharides – as the main constituents of settlement inducing fractions. These algae-derived fractions induce settlement and metamorphosis at equivalent concentrations as present in CCA, both in small scale laboratory assays and under flow-through conditions, suggesting their ability to act in an ecologically relevant fashion to steer larval settlement of corals. Both compound classes were readily detected in natural samples. PMID:26042834

  14. Biotransformation of arsenic by a Yellowstone thermoacidophilic eukaryotic alga

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jie; Lehr, Corinne R.; Yuan, Chungang; Le, X. Chris; McDermott, Timothy R.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic is the most common toxic substance in the environment, ranking first on the Superfund list of hazardous substances. It is introduced primarily from geochemical sources and is acted on biologically, creating an arsenic biogeocycle. Geothermal environments are known for their elevated arsenic content and thus provide an excellent setting in which to study microbial redox transformations of arsenic. To date, most studies of microbial communities in geothermal environments have focused on Bacteria and Archaea, with little attention to eukaryotic microorganisms. Here, we show the potential of an extremophilic eukaryotic alga of the order Cyanidiales to influence arsenic cycling at elevated temperatures. Cyanidioschyzon sp. isolate 5508 oxidized arsenite [As(III)] to arsenate [As(V)], reduced As(V) to As(III), and methylated As(III) to form trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) and dimethylarsenate [DMAs(V)]. Two arsenic methyltransferase genes, CmarsM7 and CmarsM8, were cloned from this organism and demonstrated to confer resistance to As(III) in an arsenite hypersensitive strain of Escherichia coli. The 2 recombinant CmArsMs were purified and shown to transform As(III) into monomethylarsenite, DMAs(V), TMAO, and trimethylarsine gas, with a Topt of 60–70 °C. These studies illustrate the importance of eukaryotic microorganisms to the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic in geothermal systems, offer a molecular explanation for how these algae tolerate arsenic in their environment, and provide the characterization of algal methyltransferases. PMID:19276121

  15. Chemical mediation of coral larval settlement by crustose coralline algae.

    PubMed

    Tebben, J; Motti, C A; Siboni, Nahshon; Tapiolas, D M; Negri, A P; Schupp, P J; Kitamura, Makoto; Hatta, Masayuki; Steinberg, P D; Harder, T

    2015-06-04

    The majority of marine invertebrates produce dispersive larvae which, in order to complete their life cycles, must attach and metamorphose into benthic forms. This process, collectively referred to as settlement, is often guided by habitat-specific cues. While the sources of such cues are well known, the links between their biological activity, chemical identity, presence and quantification in situ are largely missing. Previous work on coral larval settlement in vitro has shown widespread induction by crustose coralline algae (CCA) and in particular their associated bacteria. However, we found that bacterial biofilms on CCA did not initiate ecologically realistic settlement responses in larvae of 11 hard coral species from Australia, Guam, Singapore and Japan. We instead found that algal chemical cues induce identical behavioral responses of larvae as per live CCA. We identified two classes of CCA cell wall-associated compounds--glycoglycerolipids and polysaccharides--as the main constituents of settlement inducing fractions. These algae-derived fractions induce settlement and metamorphosis at equivalent concentrations as present in CCA, both in small scale laboratory assays and under flow-through conditions, suggesting their ability to act in an ecologically relevant fashion to steer larval settlement of corals. Both compound classes were readily detected in natural samples.

  16. Solar-driven hydrogen production in green algae.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Tamburic, Bojan; Zemichael, Fessehaye; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The twin problems of energy security and global warming make hydrogen an attractive alternative to traditional fossil fuels with its combustion resulting only in the release of water vapor. Biological hydrogen production represents a renewable source of the gas and can be performed by a diverse range of microorganisms from strict anaerobic bacteria to eukaryotic green algae. Compared to conventional methods for generating H(2), biological systems can operate at ambient temperatures and pressures without the need for rare metals and could potentially be coupled to a variety of biotechnological processes ranging from desalination and waste water treatment to pharmaceutical production. Photobiological hydrogen production by microalgae is particularly attractive as the main inputs for the process (water and solar energy) are plentiful. This chapter focuses on recent developments in solar-driven H(2) production in green algae with emphasis on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We review the current methods used to achieve sustained H(2) evolution and discuss possible approaches to improve H(2) yields, including the optimization of culturing conditions, reducing light-harvesting antennae and targeting auxiliary electron transport and fermentative pathways that compete with the hydrogenase for reductant. Finally, industrial scale-up is discussed in the context of photobioreactor design and the future prospects of the field are considered within the broader context of a biorefinery concept.

  17. Local innate host response and filamentous fungi in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Roilides, Emmanuel; Simitsopoulou, Maria

    2010-11-01

    Filamentous fungi especially Aspergillus spp. and Scedosporium spp. can colonize the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infection by these organisms may cause deterioration of lung function, mycetomas or local invasive disease. Although CF patients exert an excessive inflammatory response to inhaled bacteria, very little is known about the local innate immune response to filamentous fungi. In this paper, we review the innate immune response of respiratory tract of healthy individuals to filamentous fungi with some inference to CF patients and link the latter to existing data. We also report some preliminary findings on the in vitro antifungal responses of human phagocytes against Aspergillus spp. isolated from CF patients. Translation of these in vitro findings to appropriate in vivo systems and into clinical trials of immunomodulatory treatments may lead to improved strategies for appropriate innate host defenses in CF patients persistently infected with filamentous fungi.

  18. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joyce

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Algae Platform Review meeting.

  19. Collection, Isolation and Culture of Marine Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of collecting, isolating, and culturing microscopic and macroscopic marine algae are described. Three different culture media list of chemicals needed and procedures for preparing Erdschreiber's and Provasoli's E. S. media. (BC)

  20. Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis Caused by Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Fluke, Erin C; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2016-07-01

    Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is an orthopedic emergency most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci and occasionally, when associated with water exposure, Mycobacterium marinum. Shewanella algae, a gram-negative bacillus found in warm saltwater environments, has infrequently been reported to cause serious soft tissue infections and necrosis. In this case, S. algae caused complicated flexor tenosynovitis requiring open surgical irrigation and debridement. Flexor tenosynovitis caused by S. algae rapidly presented with all 4 Kanavel cardinal signs as well as subcutaneous purulence, ischemia, and necrosis, thus meeting the requirements for Pang et al group III classification of worst prognosis. Because of its rarity and virulence, S. algae should always be considered in cases of flexor tenosynovitis associated with traumatic water exposure to treat and minimize morbidity appropriately.

  1. Indole-3-acetic acid: A widespread physiological code in interactions of fungi with other organisms

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shih-Feng; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Chen, Hung-Wei; Liu, Yen-Yu; Lu, Hsueh-Yu; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Plants as well as microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi, produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IAA is the most common plant hormone of the auxin class and it regulates various aspects of plant growth and development. Thus, research is underway globally to exploit the potential for developing IAA-producing fungi for promoting plant growth and protection for sustainable agriculture. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that IAA biosynthesis evolved independently in bacteria, microalgae, fungi, and plants. Present studies show that IAA regulates the physiological response and gene expression in these microorganisms. The convergent evolution of IAA production leads to the hypothesis that natural selection might have favored IAA as a widespread physiological code in these microorganisms and their interactions. We summarize recent studies of IAA biosynthetic pathways and discuss the role of IAA in fungal ecology. PMID:26179718

  2. Role of Hydrophobicity in Adhesion of the Dissimilatory Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella alga to Amorphous Fe(III) Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Caccavo, F.; Schamberger, P. C.; Keiding, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga adheres to amorphous Fe(III) oxide were examined through comparative analysis of S. alga BrY and an adhesion-deficient strain of this species, S. alga RAD20. Approximately 100% of S. alga BrY cells typically adhered to amorphous Fe(III) oxide, while less than 50% of S. alga RAD20 cells adhered. Bulk chemical analysis, isoelectric point analysis, and cell surface analysis by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis demonstrated that the surfaces of S. alga BrY cells were predominantly protein but that the surfaces of S. alga RAD20 cells were predominantly exopolysaccharide. Physicochemical analyses and hydrophobic interaction assays demonstrated that S. alga BrY cells were more hydrophobic than S. alga RAD20 cells. This study represents the first quantitative analysis of the adhesion of a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium to amorphous Fe(III) oxide, and the results collectively suggest that hydrophobic interactions are a factor in controlling the adhesion of this bacterium to amorphous Fe(III) oxide. Despite having a reduced ability to adhere, S. alga RAD20 reduced Fe(III) oxide at a rate identical to that of S. alga BrY. This result contrasts with results of previous studies by demonstrating that irreversible cell adhesion is not requisite for microbial reduction of amorphous Fe(III) oxide. These results suggest that the interaction between dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and amorphous Fe(III) oxide is more complex than previously believed. PMID:16535706

  3. Speculations on a possible essential function of the gelatinous sheath of blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Lange, W

    1976-08-01

    Voluminous and often fluffy sheaths surrounding blue-green algal cells are observed (a) in productive natural waters, (b) in bacteria-containing laboratory cultures growing in inorganic nutrient media with added bacteria-assimilable organic matter, and (c) in axenic cultures in the same inorganic media even without added organic matter. The sheaths of bacteria-associated species in inorganic media without added organic matter are, by comparison, thin, and growth is meager. Repeated observations show that voluminous sheaths and vigorous growth of algal species are associated. It is suggested that formation and retention of a voluminous shealth provide a microenvironment around the algal cell where essential nutrients, present at only submarginal levels in the surrounding water, are concentrated and become readily available to the cell. The increase in nutrient concentration above a critical level, in turn, leads to vigorous algal growth. The voluminous sheath produced by the alga is not attacked by alga-associated bacteria when other assimilable organic matter is available; but in the absence of a more suitalble food, the bacteria feed on the less desirable gelatinous sheath, markedly reducing its thickness and causing meager algal growth.

  4. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-03

    We consider a general framework to predict the development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a lake driven by uncertain parameters. To quantify the concentration uncertainty of those algae groups via their joint probabilistic density function (PDF), we explore an approach based on the Fokker-Planck equation. Our result is presented in an example where abundant nutrients contribute to the proliferation of cyanobacteria and other minor algae groups.

  5. Marine Fungi: Their Ecology and Molecular Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Thomas A.; Jones, Meredith D. M.; Leonard, Guy; Bass, David

    2012-01-01

    Fungi appear to be rare in marine environments. There are relatively few marine isolates in culture, and fungal small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequences are rarely recovered in marine clone library experiments (i.e., culture-independent sequence surveys of eukaryotic microbial diversity from environmental DNA samples). To explore the diversity of marine fungi, we took a broad selection of SSU rDNA data sets and calculated a summary phylogeny. Bringing these data together identified a diverse collection of marine fungi, including sequences branching close to chytrids (flagellated fungi), filamentous hypha-forming fungi, and multicellular fungi. However, the majority of the sequences branched with ascomycete and basidiomycete yeasts. We discuss evidence for 36 novel marine lineages, the majority and most divergent of which branch with the chytrids. We then investigate what these data mean for the evolutionary history of the Fungi and specifically marine-terrestrial transitions. Finally, we discuss the roles of fungi in marine ecosystems.

  6. Effect of Interactions Among Algae on Nitrogen Fixation by Blue-Green Algae (Cyanobacteria) in Flooded Soils

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John T.; Greene, Sarah; Alexander, Martin

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) by algae in flooded soil was limited by interactions within the algal community. Nitrogen fixation by either indigenous algae or Tolypothrix tenuis was reduced severalfold by a dense suspension of the green alga Nephrocytium sp. Similarly, interactions between the nitrogen-fixing alga (cyanobacterium) Aulosira 68 and natural densities of indigenous algae limited nitrogen-fixing activity in one of two soils examined. This was demonstrated by developing a variant of Aulosira 68 that was resistant to the herbicide simetryne at concentrations that prevented development of indigenous algae. More nitrogen was fixed by the resistant variant in flooded soil containing herbicide than was fixed in herbicide-free soil by either the indigenous algae or indigenous algae plus the parent strain of Aulosira. Interference from indigenous algae may hamper the development of nitrogen-fixing algae introduced into rice fields in attempts to increase biological nitrogen fixation. PMID:16345463

  7. Biogas production experimental research using algae.

    PubMed

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Misevičius, Antonas

    2015-01-01

    The current study is on the the use of macro-algae as feedstock for biogas production. Three types of macro-algae, Cladophora glomerata (CG), Chara fragilis (CF), and Spirogyra neglecta (SN), were chosen for this research. The experimental studies on biogas production were carried out with these algae in a batch bioreactor. In the bioreactor was maintained 35 ± 1°C temperature. The results showed that the most appropriate macro-algae for biogas production are Spirogyra neglecta (SN) and Cladophora glomerata (CG). The average amount of biogas obtained from the processing of SN - 0.23 m(3)/m(3)d, CG - 0.20 m(3)/m(3)d, and CF - 0.12 m(3)/m(3)d. Considering the concentration of methane obtained during the processing of SN and CG, which after eight days and until the end of the experiment exceeded 60%, it can be claimed that biogas produced using these algae is valuable. When processing CF, the concentration of methane reached the level of 50% only by the final day of the experiment, which indicates that this alga is less suitable for biogas production.

  8. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kelman, Dovi; Posner, Ellen Kromkowski; McDermid, Karla J.; Tabandera, Nicole K.; Wright, Patrick R.; Wright, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer. PMID:22412808

  9. Complete genome sequence and transcriptomic analysis of a novel marine strain Bacillus weihaiensis reveals the mechanism of brown algae degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yueming; Chen, Peng; Bao, Yunjuan; Men, Yan; Zeng, Yan; Yang, Jiangang; Sun, Jibin; Sun, Yuanxia

    2016-11-30

    A novel marine strain representing efficient degradation ability toward brown algae was isolated, identified, and assigned to Bacillus weihaiensis Alg07. The alga-associated marine bacteria promote the nutrient cycle and perform important functions in the marine ecosystem. The de novo sequencing of the B. weihaiensis Alg07 genome was carried out. Results of gene annotation and carbohydrate-active enzyme analysis showed that the strain harbored enzymes that can completely degrade alginate and laminarin, which are the specific polysaccharides of brown algae. We also found genes for the utilization of mannitol, the major storage monosaccharide in the cell of brown algae. To understand the process of brown algae decomposition by B. weihaiensis Alg07, RNA-seq transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR were performed. The genes involved in alginate metabolism were all up-regulated in the initial stage of kelp degradation, suggesting that the strain Alg07 first degrades alginate to destruct the cell wall so that the laminarin and mannitol are released and subsequently decomposed. The key genes involved in alginate and laminarin degradation were expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. Overall, the model of brown algae degradation by the marine strain Alg07 was established, and novel alginate lyases and laminarinase were discovered.

  10. Complete genome sequence and transcriptomic analysis of a novel marine strain Bacillus weihaiensis reveals the mechanism of brown algae degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yueming; Chen, Peng; Bao, Yunjuan; Men, Yan; Zeng, Yan; Yang, Jiangang; Sun, Jibin; Sun, Yuanxia

    2016-01-01

    A novel marine strain representing efficient degradation ability toward brown algae was isolated, identified, and assigned to Bacillus weihaiensis Alg07. The alga-associated marine bacteria promote the nutrient cycle and perform important functions in the marine ecosystem. The de novo sequencing of the B. weihaiensis Alg07 genome was carried out. Results of gene annotation and carbohydrate-active enzyme analysis showed that the strain harbored enzymes that can completely degrade alginate and laminarin, which are the specific polysaccharides of brown algae. We also found genes for the utilization of mannitol, the major storage monosaccharide in the cell of brown algae. To understand the process of brown algae decomposition by B. weihaiensis Alg07, RNA-seq transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR were performed. The genes involved in alginate metabolism were all up-regulated in the initial stage of kelp degradation, suggesting that the strain Alg07 first degrades alginate to destruct the cell wall so that the laminarin and mannitol are released and subsequently decomposed. The key genes involved in alginate and laminarin degradation were expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. Overall, the model of brown algae degradation by the marine strain Alg07 was established, and novel alginate lyases and laminarinase were discovered. PMID:27901120

  11. Indoor fungi: companions and contaminants.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, A; Täubel, M; Hyvärinen, A

    2015-04-01

    This review discusses the role of fungi and fungal products in indoor environments, especially as agents of human exposure. Fungi are present everywhere, and knowledge for indoor environments is extensive on their occurrence and ecology, concentrations, and determinants. Problems of dampness and mold have dominated the discussion on indoor fungi. However, the role of fungi in human health is still not well understood. In this review, we take a look back to integrate what cultivation-based research has taught us alongside more recent work with cultivation-independent techniques. We attempt to summarize what is known today and to point out where more data is needed for risk assessment associated with indoor fungal exposures. New data have demonstrated qualitative and quantitative richness of fungal material inside and outside buildings. Research on mycotoxins shows that just as microbes are everywhere in our indoor environments, so too are their metabolic products. Assessment of fungal exposures is notoriously challenging due to the numerous factors that contribute to the variation of fungal concentrations in indoor environments. We also may have to acknowledge and incorporate into our understanding the complexity of interactions between multiple biological agents in assessing their effects on human health and well-being.

  12. Evolution of entomopathogenicity in fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent completions of a comprehensive study on the fungal phylogeny and a new classification reflecting that phylogeny form a new basis to examine questions about the origins and evolutionary implications of such major habits among fungi as the use living arthropods or other invertebrates as the...

  13. International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants (Melbourne Code): Appendices II-VIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Science requires a precise, stable, and simple system of nomenclature used by scientists in all countries of the world, dealing on the one hand with the terms that denote the ranks of taxonomic groups, and on the other with the scientific names that are applied to the individual taxonomic units of a...

  14. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  15. Bioactive terpenes from marine-derived fungi.

    PubMed

    Elissawy, Ahmed M; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Ebada, Sherif S; Singab, AbdelNasser B; Proksch, Peter

    2015-04-03

    Marine-derived fungi continue to be a prolific source of secondary metabolites showing diverse bioactivities. Terpenoids from marine-derived fungi exhibit wide structural diversity including numerous compounds with pronounced biological activities. In this review, we survey the last five years' reports on terpenoidal metabolites from marine-derived fungi with particular attention on those showing marked biological activities.

  16. Bioactive Terpenes from Marine-Derived Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Elissawy, Ahmed M.; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Ebada, Sherif S.; Singab, AbdelNasser B.; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Marine-derived fungi continue to be a prolific source of secondary metabolites showing diverse bioactivities. Terpenoids from marine-derived fungi exhibit wide structural diversity including numerous compounds with pronounced biological activities. In this review, we survey the last five years’ reports on terpenoidal metabolites from marine-derived fungi with particular attention on those showing marked biological activities. PMID:25854644

  17. Patterns of organic acids exuded by pioneering fungi from a glacier forefield are affected by carbohydrate sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Ivano; Goren, Asena; Schlumpf, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Bare soils in the area of retreating glaciers are ideal environments to study the role of microorganisms in the early soil formation and in processes of mineral weathering. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the source of carbohydrate would influence the patterns of organic acids exuded by fungal species. Three pioneering fungus species, isolated from fine granitic sediments in front of the Damma glacier from the central Swiss Alps, have previously been found to have the capability to exude organic acids and dissolve granite powder. In batch experiments, various carbohydrates, including glucose, cellulose, pectin, pollen, and cell remnants of cyanobacteria, fungi, and algae, were applied as carbohydrate sources and the patterns of exuded organic acids recorded. The results showed that two fungi, the zygomycete fungus Mucor hiemalis and the ascomycete fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, released a significantly higher amount of organic acids in dependence on specific carbohydrate sources. Pollen and algae as carbohydrate sources triggered significantly the exudation of malate in M. hiemalis, and pollen and cellulose that of oxalate in P. chrysogenum. We conclude that the occurrence of complex carbohydrate sources in nutrient-deficient deglaciated soils may positively influence the exudation of organic acids of fungi. In particular, pollen and remnants of other microorganisms can trigger the exudation of organic acids of fungi in order to promote the weathering of minerals and to make nutrients available that would otherwise be trapped in that cryospheric environment.

  18. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-12-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.

  19. First description of a laccase-like enzyme in soil algae.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Schlosser, Dietmar; Reisser, Werner

    2010-09-01

    Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) are versatile multi-copper oxidases so far found in higher plants, fungi, insects, prokaryotes and lichens. In the present study, the production of an extracellular laccase-like enzyme by the coccoid green soil alga Tetracystis aeria was investigated and the enzyme was partly characterized, thereby providing the first description of a laccase-like enzyme in soil algae. Enzyme production in algae cultures was considerably increased by addition of the fungal laccase inducer copper sulphate. Maximal enzyme production was observed during the stationary growth phase. Peroxidase or tyrosinase activity was not detected. The native enzyme exhibits an apparent molecular mass of about 212 kDa as observed with size exclusion chromatography and about 210-260 kDa as estimated by zymograms. The enzyme efficiently oxidizes 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (2,6-DMP), syringaldazine (SGZ) and the anthraquinone dye Acid Blue 62, while guaiacol and Remazol Brilliant Blue R are only poorly oxidized. The apparent kinetic parameters obtained for ABTS, 2,6-DMP and SGZ oxidation are within the range reported for fungal laccases. Oxidation of the phenolic substrate 2,6-DMP displays a remarkably high pH optimum (pH 8.0-8.5), which is interesting with respect to potential biotechnological applications.

  20. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-08-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nanoparticles thus synthesized have been investigated for their antimicrobial activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains and fungi. Their dimension is controlled by temperature, incubation time, pH and concentration of the solution. In this review, we have attempted to update the procedure of nanoparticle synthesis from algae, their characterization by UV-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and application in cutting-edge areas.