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Sample records for algae growth inhibition

  1. Use of Copper to Selectively Inhibit Brachionus calyciflorus (Predator) Growth in Chlorella kessleri (Prey) Mass Cultures for Algae Biodiesel Production

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Vishnupriya; Van Ginkel, Steven W.; Park, Sichoon; Igou, Thomas; Yi, Christine; Fu, Hao; Johnston, Rachel; Snell, Terry; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    A single Brachionus rotifer can consume thousands of algae cells per hour causing an algae pond to crash within days of infection. Thus, there is a great need to reduce rotifers in order for algal biofuel production to become reality. Copper can selectively inhibit rotifers in algae ponds, thereby protecting the algae crop. Differential toxicity tests were conducted to compare the copper sensitivity of a model rotifer—B. calyciflorus and an alga, C. kessleri. The rotifer LC50 was <0.1 ppm while the alga was not affected up to 5 ppm Cu(II). The low pH of the rotifer stomach may make it more sensitive to copper. However, when these cultures were combined, a copper concentration of 1.5 ppm was needed to inhibit the rotifer as the alga bound the copper, decreasing its bioavailability. Copper (X ppm) had no effect on downstream fatty acid methyl ester extraction. PMID:26404247

  2. Use of Copper to Selectively Inhibit Brachionus calyciflorus (Predator) Growth in Chlorella kessleri (Prey) Mass Cultures for Algae Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Vishnupriya; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Park, Sichoon; Igou, Thomas; Yi, Christine; Fu, Hao; Johnston, Rachel; Snell, Terry; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-08-31

    A single Brachionus rotifer can consume thousands of algae cells per hour causing an algae pond to crash within days of infection. Thus, there is a great need to reduce rotifers in order for algal biofuel production to become reality. Copper can selectively inhibit rotifers in algae ponds, thereby protecting the algae crop. Differential toxicity tests were conducted to compare the copper sensitivity of a model rotifer-B. calyciflorus and an alga, C. kessleri. The rotifer LC50 was <0.1 ppm while the alga was not affected up to 5 ppm Cu(II). The low pH of the rotifer stomach may make it more sensitive to copper. However, when these cultures were combined, a copper concentration of 1.5 ppm was needed to inhibit the rotifer as the alga bound the copper, decreasing its bioavailability. Copper (X ppm) had no effect on downstream fatty acid methyl ester extraction.

  3. Algae inhibition experiment and load characteristics of the algae solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, L.; Gao, J. X.; Zhang, Y. X.; Yang, Z. K.; Zhang, D. Q.; He, W.

    2016-08-01

    It is necessary to inhibit microbial growth in an industrial cooling water system. This paper has developed a Monopolar/Bipolar polarity high voltage pulser with load adaptability for an algal experimental study. The load characteristics of the Chlorella pyrenoidosa solution were examined, and it was found that the solution load is resistive. The resistance is related to the plate area, concentration, and temperature of the solution. Furthermore, the pulser's treatment actually inhibits the algae cell growth. This article also explores the influence of various parameters of electric pulses on the algal effect. After the experiment, the optimum pulse parameters were determined to be an electric field intensity of 750 V/cm, a pulse width per second of 120μs, and monopolar polarity.

  4. Bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl) ether, a marine algae derived bromophenol, inhibits the growth of Botrytis cinerea and interacts with DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Genzhu; Xiao, Lin; Xu, Xuanli; Liu, Xiaohui; Xu, Pingxiang; Lin, Xiukun

    2014-07-01

    Bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl) ether (BDDE) is a bromophenol isolated from marine algae. Previous reports have shown that BDDE possesses cytotoxic and antibacterial activity. In the present study, we demonstrate that BDDE displays broad-spectrum antifungal activities, especially on Botrytis cinerea. BDDE inhibits the growth of B. cinerea cultured on a solid medium of potato dextrose agar (PDA) as well as on the potato dextrose broth (PDB) medium. Moreover, BDDE decreases the incidence of fruit decay and severity of strawberries infected with B. cinerea. Further studies have revealed that BDDE decreases the germination rate and inhibits the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The inhibition mechanisms are related to the disruption of the cell membrane integrity in B. cinerea spores and newly formed germ tubes. This study also suggests that BDDE possibly interacts with DNA via intercalation and minor groove binding. The studies provide evidence that BDDE has potential application in the control of gray mold after fruit harvest and the compound could serve as a candidate or lead template for rational drug design and for the development of antifungal agents. PMID:24979270

  5. Estimation of alga growth stage and lipid content growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Embaye, Tsegereda N. (Inventor); Trent, Jonathan D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Method and system for estimating a growth stage of an alga in an ambient fluid. Measured light beam absorption or reflection values through or from the alga and through an ambient fluid, in each of two or more wavelength sub-ranges, are compared with reference light beam absorption values for corresponding wavelength sub-ranges for in each alga growth stage to determine (1) which alga growth stage, if any, is more likely and (2) whether estimated lipid content of the alga is increasing or has peaked. Alga growth is preferably terminated when lipid content has approximately reached a maximum value.

  6. Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Coutu, Sylvain; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Herbicide concentrations fluctuate widely in watercourses after crop applications and rain events. The level of concentrations in pulses can exceed the water chronic quality criteria. In the present study, we proposed modelling the effects of successive pulse exposure on algae. The deterministic model proposed is based on two parameters: (i) the typical growth rate of the algae, obtained by monitoring growth rates of several successive batch cultures in growth media, characterizing both the growth of the control and during the recovery periods; (ii) the growth rate of the algae exposed to pulses, determined from a dose-response curve obtained with a standard toxicity test. We focused on the herbicide isoproturon and on the freshwater alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus, and we validated the model prediction based on effect measured during five sequential pulse exposures in laboratory. The comparison between the laboratory and the modelled effects illustrated that the results yielded were consistent, making the model suitable for effect prediction of the herbicide photosystem II inhibitor isoproturon on the alga S. vacuolatus. More generally, modelling showed that both pulse duration and level of concentration play a crucial role. The application of the model to a real case demonstrated that both the highest peaks and the low peaks with a long duration affect principally the cell density inhibition of the alga S. vacuolatus. It is therefore essential to detect these characteristic pulses when monitoring of herbicide concentrations are conducted in rivers. PMID:25499055

  7. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica Louise.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  8. Effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on ROS production and growth inhibition using freshwater green algae pre-exposed to UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ling; Hamzeh, Mahsa; Dodard, Sabine; Zhao, Yuan H; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the possibility that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) toxicity in Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, using the dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) assay. Algae were exposed to nano-TiO2 under laboratory fluorescent lamps supplemented with UV irradiation for 3h, with or without a UV filter. Results showed that nano-TiO2 increased ROS production in UV-exposed cells, with or without a UV filter (LOEC values were 250 and 10mg/L, respectively). Sublethal effects of nano-TiO2 on UV pre-exposed algae were also examined. Toxicity studies indicated that exposure to nano-TiO2 agglomerates decreased algal growth following 3h pre-exposure to UV, with or without a UV filter (EC50s were 8.7 and 6.3mg/L, respectively). The present study suggests that the growth inhibitory effects of nano-TiO2 in algae occurred at concentrations lower than those that can elevate DCF fluorescence, and that ROS generation is not directly involved with the sublethal effects of nano-TiO2 in algae. PMID:25867689

  9. Effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on ROS production and growth inhibition using freshwater green algae pre-exposed to UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ling; Hamzeh, Mahsa; Dodard, Sabine; Zhao, Yuan H; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the possibility that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) toxicity in Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, using the dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) assay. Algae were exposed to nano-TiO2 under laboratory fluorescent lamps supplemented with UV irradiation for 3h, with or without a UV filter. Results showed that nano-TiO2 increased ROS production in UV-exposed cells, with or without a UV filter (LOEC values were 250 and 10mg/L, respectively). Sublethal effects of nano-TiO2 on UV pre-exposed algae were also examined. Toxicity studies indicated that exposure to nano-TiO2 agglomerates decreased algal growth following 3h pre-exposure to UV, with or without a UV filter (EC50s were 8.7 and 6.3mg/L, respectively). The present study suggests that the growth inhibitory effects of nano-TiO2 in algae occurred at concentrations lower than those that can elevate DCF fluorescence, and that ROS generation is not directly involved with the sublethal effects of nano-TiO2 in algae.

  10. Inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle via inhibition of growth and histidine decarboxylase activity of Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Koth Bong Woo Ri; Cho, Ji Young; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2014-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle. First, antimicrobial activities of brown algae extracts against Morganella morganii were investigated using a disk diffusion method. An ethanol extract of Ecklonia cava (ECEE) exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ECEE was 2 mg/ml. Furthermore, the brown algae extracts were examined for their ability to inhibit crude histidine decarboxylase (HDC) of M. morganii. The ethanol extract of Eisenia bicyclis (EBEE) and ECEE exhibited significant inhibitory activities (19.82% and 33.79%, respectively) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. To obtain the phlorotannin dieckol, ECEE and EBEE were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel column chromatography, and HPLC. Dieckol exhibited substantial inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.61 mg/ml, and exhibited competitive inhibition. These extracts were also tested on mackerel muscle. The viable cell counts and histamine production in mackerel muscle inoculated with M. morganii treated with ≥2.5 MIC of ECEE (weight basis) were highly inhibited compared with the untreated sample. Furthermore, treatment of crude HDC-inoculated mackerel muscle with 0.5% ECEE and 0.5% EBEE (weight basis), which exhibited excellent inhibitory activities against crude HDC, reduced the overall histamine production by 46.29% and 56.89%, respectively, compared with the untreated sample. Thus, these inhibitory effects of ECEE and EBEE should be helpful in enhancing the safety of mackerel by suppressing histamine production in this fish species.

  11. [Effects of turbulent fluctuation intensity on the growth of algae and water environment].

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Long, Tian-yu; San, Lei; An, Qiang; Huang, Ning-qiu

    2013-05-01

    Through a self-designed vertically oscillating grid experiment device, the experiment was carried out to research the effects of the turbulence fluctuation intensity on the growth of algae and water environment in the water with adequate nutrients by changing the vibration frequency under a certain light and temperature conditions. The results showed that: the turbulent fluctuation has significant effects on algae growing that weak turbulence fluctuation can promote the growth of algae and strong turbulence fluctuation will inhibit the growth of algae in the range of experimental level. With the increase of the turbulent fluctuation intensity, the peak of algal biomass gradually delayed. Changes of nitrogen and phosphorus in the experimental process have significant differences, when the vibration frequency was up to 2.0 Hz, the maximum reduction of TN and TP were 55.2% and 69.0% lower compared with 0.5 Hz, which was closely associated with the growth of algae. With the intensity of turbulent fluctuation increases, nitrogen-phosphorus ratio first increases and then decreases corresponding to the peak of the algal biomass. Turbulent fluctuation can promote the pH and, dissolved oxygen quickly adjusted to the level of algae growing required, and the most appropriate value remains unchanged.

  12. Determination of growth rate depression of some green algae by atrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Hersh, C.M.; Crumpton, W.G.

    1987-12-01

    A common contaminant of surface waters of agricultural regions is the triazine herbicide, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isoproplyamino-s-triazine). Atrazine effectively inhibits growth and photosynthesis of most plants, including freshwater algae. Both depression of growth rate and reduced yield have been used as parameters in studies of the effects of atrazine on algal growth. Considerable variation exists among algal toxicity methods despite attempts at standardization. Experimental endpoints range from percent inhibitions to EC50s. Algae from two different Iowa springs were the subjects of a study of naturally occurring atrazine tolerance. The authors report here the results of two aspects of that study: development of a quick method of assessing toxin effects on algal growth, and investigation of a ecologically meaningful endpoint for toxin-growth experiments.

  13. Biomass of algae growth on natural water medium.

    PubMed

    Ramaraj, Rameshprabu; Tsai, David Dah-Wei; Chen, Paris Honglay

    2015-01-01

    Algae are the dominant primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Since algae are highly varied group organisms, which have important functions in ecosystem, and their biomass is an essential biological resource. Currently, algae have been applied increasingly to diverse range of biomass applications. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the ecological algae features of microalgal production by natural medium, ecological function by lab scale of the symbiotic reactor which is imitated nature ecosystem, and atmospheric CO2 absorption that was related the algal growth of biomass to understand algae in natural water body better. Consequently, this study took advantages of using the unsupplemented freshwater natural medium to produce microalgae. Algal biomass by direct measurement of total suspended solids (TSS) and volatile suspended solids (VSS) resulted as 0.14g/L and 0.08g/L respectively. The biomass measurements of TSS and VSS are the sensible biomass index for algae production. The laboratory results obtained in the present study proved the production of algae by the natural water medium is potentially feasible.

  14. Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, Miyoshi; Mosley, S.P.; Barbero, L.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The growth of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was inhibited by terpene alcohols and the terpene aldehyde citral. The strongest activity was shown by citral. Nerol, geraniol, and citronellol also showed pronounced activity. Strong inhibition was linked to acyclic terpenes containing a primary alcohol or aldehyde function. Inhibition appeared to be taking place through the vapor phase rather than by diffusion through the agar medium from the terpene-treated paper disks used in the system. Inhibition through agar diffusion was shown by certain aged samples of terpene hydrocarbons but not by recently purchased samples.

  15. Inhibition of target of rapamycin signaling by rapamycin in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Crespo, José L; Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco J

    2005-12-01

    The macrolide rapamycin specifically binds the 12-kD FK506-binding protein (FKBP12), and this complex potently inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. The identification of TOR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) revealed that TOR is conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, research on TOR signaling in plants has been hampered by the natural resistance of plants to rapamycin. Here, we report TOR inactivation by rapamycin treatment in a photosynthetic organism. We identified and characterized TOR and FKBP12 homologs in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Whereas growth of wild-type Chlamydomonas cells is sensitive to rapamycin, cells lacking FKBP12 are fully resistant to the drug, indicating that this protein mediates rapamycin action to inhibit cell growth. Unlike its plant homolog, Chlamydomonas FKBP12 exhibits high affinity to rapamycin in vivo, which was increased by mutation of conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket. Furthermore, pull-down assays demonstrated that TOR binds FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. Finally, rapamycin treatment resulted in a pronounced increase of vacuole size that resembled autophagic-like processes. Thus, our findings suggest that Chlamydomonas cell growth is positively controlled by a conserved TOR kinase and establish this unicellular alga as a useful model system for studying TOR signaling in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  16. Fucoidan from Marine Brown Algae Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min-Kyoung; Jung, Uhee; Roh, Changhyun

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we elucidated the inhibitory effect of fucoidan from marine brown algae on the lipid accumulation in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes and its mechanism. The treatment of fucoidan in a dose-dependent manner was examined on lipid inhibition in 3T3-L1 cells by using Oil Red O staining. Fucoidan showed high lipid inhibition activity at 200 μg/mL concentration (P < 0.001). Lipolytic activity in adipocytes is highly dependent on hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), which is one of the most important targets of lipolytic regulation. Here, we examined the biological response of fucoidan on the protein level of lipolysis pathway. The expressed protein levels of total hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and its activated form, phosphorylated-HSL were significantly increased at concentration of 200 μg/mL fucoidan. Furthermore, insulin-induced 2-deoxy-d-[3H] glucose uptake was decreased up to 51% in fucoidan-treated cells as compared to control. Since increase of HSL and p-HSL expression and decrease of glucose uptake into adipocytes are known to lead to stimulation of lipolysis, our results suggest that fucoidan reduces lipid accumulation by stimulating lipolysis. Therefore, these results suggest that fucoidan can be useful for the prevention or treatment of obesity due to its stimulatory lipolysis. PMID:21892350

  17. Phosphorus-limited growth of a green alga and a blue-green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, D.S.; Brown, E.J.

    1981-12-01

    The phosphorus-limited growth kinetics of the chlorophyte Scenedesmus quadricauda and the cyanophyte Synechococcus Nageli were studied by using batch and continuous culturing techniques. The steady-state phosphate transport capability and the phosphorus storage capacity is higher in S. Nageli than in S. quadricauda. Synechococcus Nageli can also deplete phosphate to much lower levels than can S. quadricauda. These results, along with their morphological characteristics, were used to construct partial physiological profiles for each organism. The profiles indicate that this unicellular cyanophyte (cyanobacterium) is better suited for growth in phosphorus-limited oligotrophic niches than is this chlorophyte (green alga). (Refs. 44).

  18. Factors influencing stable isotopes and growth of algae in oil sands aquatic reclamation.

    PubMed

    Boutsivongsakd, Monique; Farwell, Andrea J; Chen, Hao; Dixon, D George

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies reported (15)N enrichment of biota in reclamation wetlands that contain oil sands processed material (e.g., processed water and tailings); however, there is little information on the factors controlling (15)N enrichment in these systems. In this microcosm study, the aim was to examine stable C and N isotopes and growth (chlorophyll a [chl a] and dry weight) of algae as a function of exposure to different sources and concentrations of water-soluble fractions (WSF) derived from tailings. Two sources of tailings including mature fine tailings (MFT) and consolidated tailings (CT) and peat-mineral overburden were utilized to generate separate WSF that differed in water quality. In general, there was (15)N enrichment of filamentous algae along the increasing gradient of WSF/nutrient concentrations in both CT and peat microcosms, and among the different sources, algae were more (15)N enriched in CT WSF than in peat WSF. Growth of filamentous algae was inhibited at higher WSF concentrations, possibly due to reduced light availability at elevated levels of fine clay particles in MFT microcosms and colored dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in peat microcosms. Filamentous algae displayed lower biomass and (15)N depletion in 100% peat WSF. This study indicated that both the quality (source) and quantity of WSF affected algal growth and directly and/or indirectly influenced δ(15)N of algae. The distinct (15)N enrichment of primary producers derived from tailings suggest that stable N isotopes might be useful to trace exposure to oil sands processed material in biota that utilize these resources in reclaimed systems constructed with tailings or natural systems that receive tailings dyke seepage. PMID:25506635

  19. Factors influencing stable isotopes and growth of algae in oil sands aquatic reclamation.

    PubMed

    Boutsivongsakd, Monique; Farwell, Andrea J; Chen, Hao; Dixon, D George

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies reported (15)N enrichment of biota in reclamation wetlands that contain oil sands processed material (e.g., processed water and tailings); however, there is little information on the factors controlling (15)N enrichment in these systems. In this microcosm study, the aim was to examine stable C and N isotopes and growth (chlorophyll a [chl a] and dry weight) of algae as a function of exposure to different sources and concentrations of water-soluble fractions (WSF) derived from tailings. Two sources of tailings including mature fine tailings (MFT) and consolidated tailings (CT) and peat-mineral overburden were utilized to generate separate WSF that differed in water quality. In general, there was (15)N enrichment of filamentous algae along the increasing gradient of WSF/nutrient concentrations in both CT and peat microcosms, and among the different sources, algae were more (15)N enriched in CT WSF than in peat WSF. Growth of filamentous algae was inhibited at higher WSF concentrations, possibly due to reduced light availability at elevated levels of fine clay particles in MFT microcosms and colored dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in peat microcosms. Filamentous algae displayed lower biomass and (15)N depletion in 100% peat WSF. This study indicated that both the quality (source) and quantity of WSF affected algal growth and directly and/or indirectly influenced δ(15)N of algae. The distinct (15)N enrichment of primary producers derived from tailings suggest that stable N isotopes might be useful to trace exposure to oil sands processed material in biota that utilize these resources in reclaimed systems constructed with tailings or natural systems that receive tailings dyke seepage.

  20. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs.

  1. Numerical simulation of alga growth and control in Dalian Bay.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Huang, Caisheng; Zhou, Jiti

    2013-12-01

    WAHMO model was used to simulate the distribution of pollutants in Dalian Bay, China as to predict well as the growth and control of alga. The observed and predicted values of main pollutants showed a good trend at all study locations and the different between them can be ignored. Simulation results illustrated that phosphate was one of limited factors to control algal growth at the location near the sewage outfall, meanwhile, away from the sewage outfall, the synergy of ammonium nitrogen and phosphate was the limited factor. PMID:25078837

  2. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs. PMID:25004359

  3. [Growth inhibition effect of immobilized pectinase on Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Qing; Peng, Qian; Lai, Yong-Hong; Ji, Kai-Yan; Han, Xiu-Lin

    2012-12-01

    To confirm the growth inhibition effect of immobilized pectinase on algae, co-cultivation method was used to investigate the effect of immobilized pectinase on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa. After co-cultivation, the damage status of the algae was observed through electron microscope, and the effect of immobilized pectase on the physiological and biochemical characteristics of the algae was also measured. The results showed that the algae and immobilized pectase co-cultivated solution etiolated distinctly on the third day and there was a significantly positive correlation between the extent of etiolation and the dosage as well as the treating time of the immobilized pectinase. Under electron microscope, plasmolysis was found in the slightly damaged cells, and the cell surface of these cells was rough, uneven and irregular; the severely damaged cells were collapsed or disintegrated completely. The algal yield and the chlorophyll a content decreased significantly with the increase of the treating time. The measurement of the malondiadehyde (MDA) value showed that the antioxidation system of the treated algal cells was destroyed, and their membrane lipid was severely peroxidated. The study indicated that the immobilized pectinase could efficiently inhibit the growth of M. aeruginosa, and the inhibitory rate reached up to 96%. PMID:23379158

  4. Effects of lead on growth, photosynthetic characteristics and production of reactive oxygen species of two freshwater green algae.

    PubMed

    Dao, Ly H T; Beardall, John

    2016-03-01

    In the natural environment, heavy metal contamination can occur as long-term pollution of sites or as pulses of pollutants from wastewater disposal. In this study two freshwater green algae, Chlorella sp. FleB1 and Scenedesmus YaA6, were isolated from lead-polluted water samples and the effects of 24 h vs 4 and 8 d exposure of cultures to lead on growth, photosynthetic physiology and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of these algae were investigated. In Chlorella sp. FleB1, there was agreement between lead impacts on chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and growth in most case. However, in Scenedesmus acutus YaA6 growth was inhibited at lower lead concentrations (0.03-0.87 × 10(-9) M), under which ROS, measured by 2',7' dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate fluorescence, were 4.5 fold higher than in controls but photosynthesis was not affected, implying that ROS had played a role in the growth inhibition that did not involve direct effects on photosynthesis. Effects of short-term (5 h, 24 h) vs long-term (4 d and 8 d) exposure to lead were also compared between the two algae. The results contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of lead toxicity to algae.

  5. Modeling algae growth in an open-channel raceway.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Scott Carlton

    2010-09-01

    Cost-effective implementation of microalgae as a solar-to-chemical energy conversion platform requires extensive system optimization; computer modeling can bring this to bear. This work uses modified versions of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) in conjunction with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers water-quality code (CE-QUAL) to simulate hydrodynamics coupled to growth kinetics of algae (Phaeodactylum tricornutum) in open-channel raceways. The model allows the flexibility to manipulate a host of variables associated with raceway-design, algal-growth, water-quality, hydrodynamic, and atmospheric conditions. The model provides realistic results wherein growth rates follow the diurnal fluctuation of solar irradiation and temperature. The greatest benefit that numerical simulation of the flow system offers is the ability to design the raceway before construction, saving considerable cost and time. Moreover, experiment operators can evaluate the impacts of various changes to system conditions (e.g., depth, temperature, flow speeds) without risking the algal biomass under study.

  6. Modeling algae growth in an open-channel raceway.

    PubMed

    James, Scott C; Boriah, Varun

    2010-07-01

    Cost-effective implementation of microalgae as a solar-to-chemical energy conversion platform requires extensive system optimization; computer modeling can bring this to bear. This work uses modified versions of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) in conjunction with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers' water-quality code (CE-QUAL) to simulate hydrodynamics coupled to growth kinetics of algae (Phaeodactylum tricornutum) in open-channel raceways. The model allows the flexibility to manipulate a host of variables associated with raceway-design, algal-growth, water-quality, hydrodynamic, and atmospheric conditions. The model provides realistic results wherein growth rates follow the diurnal fluctuation of solar irradiation and temperature. The greatest benefit that numerical simulation of the flow system offers is the ability to design the raceway before construction, saving considerable cost and time. Moreover, experiment operators can evaluate the impacts of various changes to system conditions (e.g., depth, temperature, flow speeds) without risking the algal biomass under study.

  7. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the DIC-pump in unicellular algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1989-04-01

    SHAM at 1 or 2 mM inhibits dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrating mechanisms in unicellular green algae as measured by photosynthetic oxygen evolution or by {sup 14}C-inorganic carbon uptake (using silicone oil centrifugation techniques). This inhibition was reversed by high levels of DIC whereby the cells do not require the concentrating mechanism. SHAM inhibited the DIC-pump, which uses external CO{sub 2}, in three species of algae, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Scenedesmus obliquus when adapted to low CO{sub 2} and assayed around neutral pH. Scenedesmus adapted to air at pH 9.0 to use external HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} were not affected by SHAM. It is important to establish low optimum concentrations of SHAM, which varied with the algal species. The mechanism of SHAM inhibition of the CO{sub 2} concentrating process is unknown. SHAM inhibits alternative respiration in these algae, but SHAM may also inhibit other reactions involving H{sup +} gradients or transporters associated with the DIC-pump.

  8. The growth and harvesting of algae in a micro-gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiltberger, Nancy L.

    1987-01-01

    Algae growth in a micro-gravity environment is an important factor in supporting man's permanent presence in space. Algae can be used to produce food, oxygen, and pure water in a manned space station. A space station is one example of a situation where a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) is imperative. In setting up a CELSS with an engineering approach at the Aerospace department of the University of Colorado, questions concerning algae growth in micro-g have arisen. The Get Away Special (GAS) Fluids Management project is a means through which many questions about the effects of a micro-g environment on the adequacy of growth rates, the viability of micro-organisms, and separation of gases and solids for harvesting purposes can be answered. In order to be compatible with the GAS tests, the algae must satisfy the following criteria: (1) rapid growth rates, (2) sustain viability over long periods of non-growth storage, and (3) very brief latency from storage to rapid growth. Testing indicates that the overall growth characteristics of Anacystis Nidulans satisfy the specifications of GAS's design constraints. In addition, data acquisition and the method of growth instigation are two specific problems being examined, as they will be encountered in interfacing with the GAS project. Flight testing will be two-fold, measurement of algae growth in micro-g and separation of algae from growth medium in an artificial gravitation field. Post flight results will provide information on algae viability in a micro-g environment as reflected by algal growth rates in space. Other post flight results will provide a basis for evaluating techniques for harvesting algae. The results from the GAS project will greatly assist the continuing effort of developing the CELSS and its applications for space.

  9. Uptake of caprolactam and its influence on growth and oxygen production of Desmodesmus quadricauda algae.

    PubMed

    Kalinová, Jana Pexová; Tříska, Jan; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Novák, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The consumption of polyamides produced from caprolactam is increasing continuously, and for that reason the danger of environmental contamination by this lactam is also rising. This study's aim was to evaluate the influence of caprolactam on the growth and oxygen production of the green alga Desmodesmus quadricauda and on caprolactam uptake by this alga. The presence of caprolactam in water was observed to cause the algae significantly to increase its oxygen production. Caprolactam concentration of 5,000 mg/L stopped algae growth after 6 days and influenced coenobia structure (seen as disappearance of pyrenoids, deformation of cells) but did not decrease the number of cells in the coenobia. Caprolactam uptake is probably passive but relatively rapid. Maximum concentration in the algae was reached after 18-24 h.

  10. Growth characteristics of algae during early stages of phytoplankton bloom in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuhong; Dan, Johnson; Zhang, Min; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-02-01

    Three treatments, sediment plus lake water (S+W), sterilized sediment plus lake water (SS+W), and sediment plus filtered lake water (S+FW), were recruited to investigate the growth characteristics of algae during pre-bloom and the importance of algal inocula in the water column and sediment. The results showed that in the water column, biomass of all algae increased in all treatments when recruitment was initiated, whereas this tendency differed among treatments with further increment of temperature. The process of algal growth consisted of two stages: Stage I, the onset of recruitment and Stage II, the subsequent growth of algae. Compared with S+W, in Stage I, SS+W significantly increased the biomass of cyanophytes by 178.70%, and decreased the biomass of non-cyanophytes by 43.40%; In Stage II, SS+W notably stimulated the growth of all algae, thus incurring the occurrence of phytoplankton bloom. Further analyses revealed that both metabolic activity and photochemical activity of algae were enhanced in SS+W, which resulted from the releasing of nutrients from sediment. These results suggest that algal growth in Stage II and algal inocula in the water column can be important factors for the formation of phytoplankton bloom. In addition, possible mechanisms promoting algal recruitment and subsequent growth of algae were explored.

  11. STUDIES ON PNEUMOCOCCUS GROWTH INHIBITION

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Oswald H.; Sia, Richard H. P.

    1924-01-01

    Somewhat discordant results which have been reported by others who have investigated the property of the whole blood of resistant animals to cause inhibition of growth or death of pneumococci have led us to investigate this matter and to develop a new technique in which the conditions as they are present in the animal body are more nearly imitated. The observations already made have rendered it probable that phagocytosis plays some rôle in any destructive power for pneumococcus which whole blood possesses. We have, therefore, employed mixtures of serum and leucocytes in our tests, since when blood is coagulated the conditions become highly artificial. Furthermore, in order to imitate more nearly the conditions in the circulating blood the mixtures have been constantly, though gently, agitated. For this purpose a specially devised apparatus has been employed. The mixtures of serum and leucocytes have been inoculated with varying numbers of pneumococci in the active growth phase and after varying intervals of time the tubes containing the mixtures of serum, leucocytes, and bacteria have been opened, examined microscopically, and cultures made. Employing this technique it has been found that the growth of pneumococci having low virulence for cats is markedly inhibited in mixtures of cat serum and cat leucocytes. It was impossible to recover pneumococci from the tubes showing no apparent growth, either when the contents were transplanted into various kinds of culture media, or when the contents were injected into mice of a variety highly susceptible to pneumococcus infection. 10,000 times the number of pneumococci sufficient ordinarily to kill a mouse failed to do so after a 24 hour sojourn in the cat serum-leucocyte mixture. Mixtures of dog serum and leucocytes exert a similar action. The serum and leucocytes of animals susceptible to pneumococcus infection (rabbits and guinea pigs,) on the other hand, failed to injure pneumococci even in extremely small quantities

  12. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  13. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrating process in unicellular green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, for measuring K{sub 0.5}(CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K{sub i}(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO{sub 2} uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar NaHCO{sub 3}), and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with 100 micromolar ({sup 14}C)HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO{sub 3}. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO{sub 2} accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  14. Salicylhydroxamic Acid (SHAM) Inhibition of the Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Concentrating Process in Unicellular Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Goyal, A; Tolbert, N E

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O(2) evolution, for measuring K(0.5)(CO(2) + HCO(3) (-)) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO(3) (-) to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K(1)(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO(2) uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O(2) evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar Na-HCO(3)), and the rate of (14)CO(2) fixation with 100 micromolar [(14)C] HCO(3) (-). Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O(2) evolution and (14)CO(2)-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO(3). Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO(2) accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  15. The effect of cadmium on the growth and antioxidant response for freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinfeng; Qiu, Hongchen; Chang, Zhaoyang; Jiang, Zaimin; Yin, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effect of exogenously applied cadmium on the physiological response of green algae Chlorella vulgaris. The study investigated the long-term effect (18 days) of cadmium on the levels of algae biomass, assimilation pigment composition, soluble protein, oxidative status (production of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion), antioxidant enzymes (such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase enzyme) in C. vulgaris. The results showed that growth, the amount of chlorophyll a (Chl a), chlorophyll b (Chl b) and carotenoids gradually decreased with increasing cadmium over 18 days exposure. Cadmium at concentration of 7 mg L(-1) inhibited algal growth expressed as the number of cells. Our research found that C. vulgaris has a high tolerance to cadmium. Contents of chlorophylls (Chl a and Chl b) and carotenoids (Car) of C. vulgaris was significantly decline with rising concentration of cadmium (p < 0.05). The decrease of 54.04 and 93.37 % in Chl a, 60.65 and 74.32 % in Chl b, 50.00 and 71.88 % in total carotenoids was noticed following the treatment with 3 and 7 mg L(-1) cadmium doses compared with control treatment, respectively. Cadmium treatments caused a significant change in the physiological competence (calculated as chlorophyll a/b) which increased with increasing Cd(II) doses up to 1 mg L(-1) but decreased at 3 mg L(-1). While accumulation of soluble protein was enhanced by presence of cadmium, the treatment with cadmium at 3 and 7 mg L(-1) increased the concentration of soluble proteins by 88, 95.8 % in C. vulgaris, respectively. Moreover, low doses of cadmium stimulated enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase) in C. vulgaris, The content of peroxidase increased with the increasing cadmium concentration, and had slightly decreased at the concentration of 7 mg L(-1), but was still higher than control group, which showed that cadmium

  16. The effect of cadmium on the growth and antioxidant response for freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinfeng; Qiu, Hongchen; Chang, Zhaoyang; Jiang, Zaimin; Yin, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effect of exogenously applied cadmium on the physiological response of green algae Chlorella vulgaris. The study investigated the long-term effect (18 days) of cadmium on the levels of algae biomass, assimilation pigment composition, soluble protein, oxidative status (production of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion), antioxidant enzymes (such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase enzyme) in C. vulgaris. The results showed that growth, the amount of chlorophyll a (Chl a), chlorophyll b (Chl b) and carotenoids gradually decreased with increasing cadmium over 18 days exposure. Cadmium at concentration of 7 mg L(-1) inhibited algal growth expressed as the number of cells. Our research found that C. vulgaris has a high tolerance to cadmium. Contents of chlorophylls (Chl a and Chl b) and carotenoids (Car) of C. vulgaris was significantly decline with rising concentration of cadmium (p < 0.05). The decrease of 54.04 and 93.37 % in Chl a, 60.65 and 74.32 % in Chl b, 50.00 and 71.88 % in total carotenoids was noticed following the treatment with 3 and 7 mg L(-1) cadmium doses compared with control treatment, respectively. Cadmium treatments caused a significant change in the physiological competence (calculated as chlorophyll a/b) which increased with increasing Cd(II) doses up to 1 mg L(-1) but decreased at 3 mg L(-1). While accumulation of soluble protein was enhanced by presence of cadmium, the treatment with cadmium at 3 and 7 mg L(-1) increased the concentration of soluble proteins by 88, 95.8 % in C. vulgaris, respectively. Moreover, low doses of cadmium stimulated enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase) in C. vulgaris, The content of peroxidase increased with the increasing cadmium concentration, and had slightly decreased at the concentration of 7 mg L(-1), but was still higher than control group, which showed that cadmium

  17. Bioconvective patterns, synchrony, and survival. [in light-limited growth model of motile algae culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    With and without bioconvective pattern formation, a theoretical model predicts growth in light-limited cultures of motile algae. At the critical density for pattern formation, the resulting doubly exponential population curves show an inflection. Such growth corresponds quantitatively to experiments in mechanically unstirred cultures. This attaches survival value to synchronized pattern formation.

  18. Inhibition of five natural products from Chinese herbs on the growth of Chattonella marina.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; He, Zheng-Bing; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2016-09-01

    The effects of five natural products from Chinese herbs including evodiamine, curcumin, 4-methoxysalicylaldehyde, esculin hydrate, and gramine on the growth of Chattonella marina, one of the most noxious red tide algae, were observed. Among them, gramine exhibited the highest inhibitory rate with LC50, 96h of 0.51 mg/l. After exposure to gramine, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased in C. marina, suggesting that gramine could induce microalgae oxidative stress. In addition, chlorophyll a and the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Fv/Fm) decreased following exposure to gramine, indicating the inhibition of photosynthesis activity in the microalgae. Combined with the fast inhibition against the algal cells and environmentally friendly character of gramine, we proposed that gramine might be a potential algaecide against marine harmful algae and that the oxidative damage and photosynthesis inhibition might be responsible for the toxicity of gramine on harmful algae. PMID:27250087

  19. Inhibition of five natural products from Chinese herbs on the growth of Chattonella marina.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; He, Zheng-Bing; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2016-09-01

    The effects of five natural products from Chinese herbs including evodiamine, curcumin, 4-methoxysalicylaldehyde, esculin hydrate, and gramine on the growth of Chattonella marina, one of the most noxious red tide algae, were observed. Among them, gramine exhibited the highest inhibitory rate with LC50, 96h of 0.51 mg/l. After exposure to gramine, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased in C. marina, suggesting that gramine could induce microalgae oxidative stress. In addition, chlorophyll a and the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Fv/Fm) decreased following exposure to gramine, indicating the inhibition of photosynthesis activity in the microalgae. Combined with the fast inhibition against the algal cells and environmentally friendly character of gramine, we proposed that gramine might be a potential algaecide against marine harmful algae and that the oxidative damage and photosynthesis inhibition might be responsible for the toxicity of gramine on harmful algae.

  20. The Shewanella algae strain YM8 produces volatiles with strong inhibition activity against Aspergillus pathogens and aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Gong, An-Dong; Li, He-Ping; Shen, Lu; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Ai-Bo; He, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Qing-Song; He, Jing-De; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus fungi and associated aflatoxins are ubiquitous in the production and storage of food/feed commodities. Controlling these microbes is a challenge. In this study, the Shewanella algae strain YM8 was found to produce volatiles that have strong antifungal activity against Aspergillus pathogens. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling revealed 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from YM8, of which dimethyl trisulfide was the most abundant. We obtained authentic reference standards for six of the VOCs; these all significantly reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination in Aspergillus; dimethyl trisulfide and 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-phenol showed the strongest inhibitory activity. YM8 completely inhibited Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize and peanut samples stored at different water activity levels, and scanning electron microscopy revealed severely damaged conidia and a complete lack of mycelium development and conidiogenesis. YM8 also completely inhibited the growth of eight other agronomically important species of phytopathogenic fungi: A. parasiticus, A. niger, Alternaria alternate, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum, Monilinia fructicola, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This study demonstrates the susceptibility of Aspergillus and other fungi to VOCs from marine bacteria and indicates a new strategy for effectively controlling these pathogens and the associated mycotoxin production during storage and possibly in the field. PMID:26500631

  1. The Shewanella algae strain YM8 produces volatiles with strong inhibition activity against Aspergillus pathogens and aflatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gong, An-Dong; Li, He-Ping; Shen, Lu; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Ai-Bo; He, Wei-Jie; Yuan, Qing-Song; He, Jing-De; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus fungi and associated aflatoxins are ubiquitous in the production and storage of food/feed commodities. Controlling these microbes is a challenge. In this study, the Shewanella algae strain YM8 was found to produce volatiles that have strong antifungal activity against Aspergillus pathogens. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling revealed 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from YM8, of which dimethyl trisulfide was the most abundant. We obtained authentic reference standards for six of the VOCs; these all significantly reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination in Aspergillus; dimethyl trisulfide and 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-phenol showed the strongest inhibitory activity. YM8 completely inhibited Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize and peanut samples stored at different water activity levels, and scanning electron microscopy revealed severely damaged conidia and a complete lack of mycelium development and conidiogenesis. YM8 also completely inhibited the growth of eight other agronomically important species of phytopathogenic fungi: A. parasiticus, A. niger, Alternaria alternate, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum, Monilinia fructicola, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This study demonstrates the susceptibility of Aspergillus and other fungi to VOCs from marine bacteria and indicates a new strategy for effectively controlling these pathogens and the associated mycotoxin production during storage and possibly in the field. PMID:26500631

  2. Comparing the effects of symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium) clades C1 and D on early growth stages of Acropora tenuis.

    PubMed

    Yuyama, Ikuko; Higuchi, Tomihiko

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals switch endosymbiotic algae of the genus Symbiodinium during their early growth stages and during bleaching events. Clade C Symbiodinium algae are dominant in corals, although other clades - including A and D - have also been commonly detected in juvenile Acroporid corals. Previous studies have been reported that only molecular data of Symbiodinium clade were identified within field corals. In this study, we inoculated aposymbiotic juvenile polyps with cultures of clades C1 and D Symbiodinium algae, and investigated the different effect of these two clades of Symbiodinium on juvenile polyps. Our results showed that clade C1 algae did not grow, while clade D algae grew rapidly during the first 2 months after inoculation. Polyps associated with clade C1 algae exhibited bright green fluorescence across the body and tentacles after inoculation. The growth rate of polyp skeletons was lower in polyps associated with clade C1 algae than those associated with clade D algae. On the other hand, antioxidant activity (catalase) of corals was not significantly different between corals with clade C1 and clade D algae. Our results suggested that clade D Symbiodinium algae easily form symbiotic relationships with corals and that these algae could contribute to coral growth in early symbiosis stages.

  3. [Growth inhibition and mechanism of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride on Chlorella vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Tao, Neng-Guo; Zhu, Run-Liang; Wang, Na

    2009-06-15

    Growth inhibition of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC), a cationic surfactants, on Chlorella vulgaris was investigated at batch culture in laboratory. Furthermore, the corresponding mechanisms were studied by the determination of absorption capacity, Zeta potential, activity of acid phosphatase and ultrastructure of algae. Results show that the growth inhibition by CATC is enhanced with its concentration increasing from 0.1 mg/L to 1 mg/L, and 96 h-EC50 of CTAC is 0.18 mg/L. In the presence of 0.3 mg/L CTAC in 8 d, the inhibition efficiency of biomass reaches 70.7%. Meanwhile, the absorption of nitrogen and iron is inhibited 83.9% and 86.2% respectively with Zeta potential of algae cell increasing from -12.5 mV to -6.7 mV. Furthermore, the relative activity of acid phosphatase declines to 23.1% at the same time. Plasmolysis, distortion of pyrenoid and swelling of lysosome is observed in the cell. Above phenomena indicates that CTAC increases the Zeta potential of algae cell and thus inhibites the absorption of nitrogen and iron. In addition, CTAC may affect the metabolism of phosphorus and change the ultrastructure of algae cell. PMID:19662866

  4. Recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate in green, blue-green, and diatom algae after exposure to atrazine.

    PubMed

    Brain, Richard A; Arnie, Joshua R; Porch, John R; Hosmer, Alan J

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated the recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate in green (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), blue-green (Anabaena flos-aquae), and diatom (Navicula pelliculosa) algae after pulsed exposure to atrazine. Subsequent to a grow-up period of 24 to 72 h to establish requisite cell density for adequate signal strength to measure photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield, algae were exposed to a pulse of atrazine for 48 h followed by a 48-h recovery period in control media. Photosynthesis was measured at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h of the exposure and recovery phases using pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry; growth rate and cell density were also concomitantly measured at these time points. Exposure to atrazine resulted in immediate, but temporary, inhibition of photosynthesis and growth; however, these effects were transient and fully reversible in the tested species of algae. For all three algal species, no statistically significant reductions (p ≤ 0.05) in growth rate or PSII quantum yield were detected at any of the treatment concentrations 48 h after atrazine was removed from the test system. Effects at test levels up to the highest tested exposure levels were consequently determined to be algistatic (reversible). Both biochemically and physiologically, recovery of photosynthesis and growth rate occur immediately, reaching control levels within hours following exposure. Therefore, pulsed exposure profiles of atrazine typically measured in Midwestern U.S. streams are unlikely to result in biologically meaningful changes in primary production given that the effects of atrazine are temporary and fully reversible in species representative of native populations.

  5. Algae-Produced Pfs25 Elicits Antibodies That Inhibit Malaria Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, James A.; Li, Fengwu; Tomosada, Lauren M.; Cox, Chesa J.; Topol, Aaron B.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Mayfield, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Subunit vaccines are significantly more expensive to produce than traditional vaccines because they are based primarily on recombinant proteins that must be purified from the expression system. Despite the increased cost, subunit vaccines are being developed because they are safe, effective, and can elicit antibodies that confer protection against diseases that are not currently vaccine-preventable. Algae are an attractive platform for producing subunit vaccines because they are relatively inexpensive to grow, genetically tractable, easily scaled to large volumes, have a short generation time, and are devoid of inflammatory, viral, or prion contaminants often present in other systems. We tested whether algal chloroplasts can produce malaria transmission blocking vaccine candidates, Plasmodium falciparum surface protein 25 (Pfs25) and 28 (Pfs28). Antibodies that recognize Pfs25 and Pfs28 disrupt the sexual development of parasites within the mosquito midgut, thus preventing transmission of malaria from one human host to the next. These proteins have been difficult to produce in traditional recombinant systems because they contain tandem repeats of structurally complex epidermal growth factor-like domains, which cannot be produced in bacterial systems, and because they are not glycosylated, so they must be modified for production in eukaryotic systems. Production in algal chloroplasts avoids these issues because chloroplasts can fold complex eukaryotic proteins and do not glycosylate proteins. Here we demonstrate that algae are the first recombinant system to successfully produce an unmodified and aglycosylated version of Pfs25 or Pfs28. These antigens are structurally similar to the native proteins and antibodies raised to these recombinant proteins recognize Pfs25 and Pfs28 from P. falciparum. Furthermore, antibodies to algae-produced Pfs25 bind the surface of in-vitro cultured P. falciparum sexual stage parasites and exhibit transmission blocking activity. Thus

  6. Responses of marine unicellular algae to brominated organic compounds in six growth media

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Yoder, M.J.; McLaughlin, L.L.; Lores, E.M.

    1987-12-01

    Marine unicellular algae, Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Chlorella sp. were exposed to the industrial brominated compounds tetrabromobisphenol A, decabromobiphenyloxide (DBBO), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromomethylbenzene (PBMB), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), and the herbicide bromoxynil (BROM), in six algal growth media. High concentrations of DBBO (1 mg liter-1), PBMB (1 mg liter-1), and PBEB (0.5 mg liter-1) reduced growth by less than 50%. EC50s of the other compounds varied with growth medium, with high EC50/low EC50 ratios between 1.3 and 9.9. Lowest EC50s, 9.3 to 12.0 micrograms liter-1, were obtained with S. costatum and HBCD. It is concluded that responses to toxicants in different media are the results of interactions among algae, growth medium, toxicant, and solvent carrier.

  7. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8 days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors. PMID:26716890

  8. Preparation of copper-chelate quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan/organic rectorite nanocomposites for algae inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jihai; Ye, Weijie; Wang, Xiaoying; Lin, Wensheng; Lin, Qixuan; Zhang, Qiang; Wu, Fangchengyuan

    2016-10-20

    Quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan/organic rectorite (QCMC/OREC) nanocomposites were rapidly prepared by intercalating QCMC into the layer of OREC under microwave irradiation. And then copper-chelate QCMC/OREC (QCMC/OREC-Cu) nanocomposites were obtained by mixing QCMC/OREC with CuSO4 solution. XRD and TEM results indicated that QCMC/OREC nanocomposites were obtained and QCMC was dispersed in the interlayer of OREC. Besides, FT-IR results revealed that the hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interaction in QCMC/OREC-Cu were both stronger than those in QCMC/OREC because of introducing the Cu(2+). The thermogravimetric analysis showed that the thermal stability of QCMC/OREC-Cu nanocomposites was higher than QCMC and QCMC/OREC. Algae inhibition assay revealed that QCMC/OREC-Cu nanocomposites had stronger antifouling activity than original QCMC and QCMC/OREC. This work provides important basis for developing novel antifouling materials.

  9. Seasonal occurrence and growth of benthic algae in the Patos Lagoon estuary, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, Ricardo; Seeliger, Ulrich

    1986-12-01

    The seasonal occurrence of 94 benthic algal species, including Cyanophyta, was observed on a monthly basis over one year in the Patos Lagoon estuary (32°S, 52°W), Brazil, and showed three patterns of algal periodicity. An aseasonal group of 46 species was present throughout the year and two groups of 24 species each occurred either during summer and fall or winter and spring. The seasonal growth of 55 green, brown and red algae was correlated with monthly variations of salinity, water temperature, daylength and light radiation energy, which were measured daily in the estuary. Summer/fall peak growth was observed in 15 algae most of which correlated significantly with high salinities alone or in combination with other factors during this period. Growth peak of 11 species in winter/spring was principally a function of low water temperatures alone or together with a reduced light regime. Both periodicity of benthic algae and their seasonal growth, as a more sensitive measure of their floristic affinity, demonstrated the presence of cool temperate and tropical elements in this flora typical for warm temperate biogeographic regions. Correlations between seasonal variation of algal growth and selected environmental parameters aided in the evaluation of causal factors for algal seasonality.

  10. Dolabelladienetriol, a Compound from Dictyota pfaffii Algae, Inhibits the Infection by Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Deivid Costa; Calegari-Silva, Teresa C.; Lopes, Ulisses G.; Teixeira, Valéria L.; de Palmer Paixão, Izabel C. N.; Cirne-Santos, Claudio; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer; Saraiva, Elvira M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy for leishmaniasis, a disease caused by Leishmania parasites, is expensive and causes side effects. Furthermore, parasite resistance constitutes an increasing problem, and new drugs against this disease are needed. In this study, we examine the effect of the compound 8,10,18-trihydroxy-2,6-dolabelladiene (Dolabelladienetriol), on Leishmania growth in macrophages. The ability of this compound to modulate macrophage function is also described. Methodology/Principal Findings Leishmania-infected macrophages were treated with Dolabelladienetriol, and parasite growth was measured using an infectivity index. Nitric oxide (NO), TNF-α and TGF-β production were assayed in macrophages using specific assays. NF-kB nuclear translocation was analyzed by western blot. Dolabelladienetriol inhibited Leishmania in a dose-dependent manner; the IC50 was 44 µM. Dolabelladienetriol diminished NO, TNF-α and TGF-β production in uninfected and Leishmania-infected macrophages and reduced NF-kB nuclear translocation. Dolabelladienetriol inhibited Leishmania infection even when the parasite growth was exacerbated by either IL-10 or TGF-β. In addition, Dolabelladienetriol inhibited Leishmania growth in HIV-1-co-infected human macrophages. Conclusion Our results indicate that Dolabelladienetriol significantly inhibits Leishmania in macrophages even in the presence of factors that exacerbate parasite growth, such as IL-10, TGF-β and HIV-1 co-infection. Our results suggest that Dolabelladienetriol is a promising candidate for future studies regarding treatment of leishmaniasis, associated or not with HIV-1 infection. PMID:22970332

  11. Nutrient cycling and the growth of benthic algae in experimentally acidified Little Rock Lake, WI

    SciTech Connect

    Detenbeck, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in nutrient-cycling and the growth of benthic algae resulting from decreased pH in low alkalinity lake systems were analyzed by laboratory, mesocosm, and whole-lake studies on Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin. Nutrients, transparency, an algal growth in the experimentally acidified basin were compared with conditions in an untreated reference basin. During the first summer following acidification (1985), accumulation rates of attached algae were significantly higher in the acidified basin than in the reference basin during June-August, but not in September. Color and winter silica values were significantly lower in the acidified basin relative to the reference basin following treatment. In addition, the lack of a fall decline in SiO/sub 2/ in the north basin in 1986 may signal pH-related changes in siliceous algal communities.

  12. Effect-directed analysis of contaminated sediments with partition-based dosing using green algae cell multiplication inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bandow, Nicole; Altenburger, Rolf; Streck, Georg; Brack, Werner

    2009-10-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) has been frequently and successfully used to identify key toxicants in sediment extracts. However, by disregarding bioavailability this approach may lead to a biased prioritisation of fractions and toxicants with respect to hazards and risks. To overcome this problem the present EDA of sediment components from the Bílina river (Most Czech Republic), that inhibit growth of the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus, applies a novel partition-based dosing technique to prioritize and identify major toxic fractions and compounds in comparison to conventional solvent dosing. The novel dosing technique is based on partitioning from loaded silicone rods to the aqueous phase similar to partition processes that determine exposure in native sediment-water systems. In the present study the application of partition-based dosing had a big influence suggesting polar compounds such as triclosan as key toxicants while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions did not exhibit significant effects. In contrast, conventional dosing prioritized mainly PAHs in agreement with previous studies. For both approaches individual toxicants could be confirmed quantitatively based on the index of confirmation quality (ICQ), which compares the effect of fractions and artificial mixtures of identified and quantified toxicants over the full range of effect levels. PMID:19848144

  13. Azoxystrobin-induced excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of photosynthesis in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the short-term toxicity of azoxystrobin (AZ), one of strobilurins used as an effective fungicidal agent to control the Asian soybean rust, on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. The median percentile inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of AZ for C. vulgaris was found to be 510 μg L(-1). We showed that the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk in 300 and 600 μg L(-1) AZ treatments by using the electron microscopy. Furthermore, 19, 75, and 300 μg L(-1) AZ treatments decreased the soluble protein content and chlorophyll concentrations in C. vulgaris and altered the energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expression levels in 48- and 96-h exposure periods. Simultaneously, our results showed that AZ could increase the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and compromise superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and glutathione (GSH) content. These situations might render C. vulgaris more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Overall, the present study indicated that AZ might be toxic to the growth of C. vulgaris, affect energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expressions, and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in C. vulgaris. PMID:25672875

  14. Azoxystrobin-induced excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of photosynthesis in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the short-term toxicity of azoxystrobin (AZ), one of strobilurins used as an effective fungicidal agent to control the Asian soybean rust, on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. The median percentile inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of AZ for C. vulgaris was found to be 510 μg L(-1). We showed that the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk in 300 and 600 μg L(-1) AZ treatments by using the electron microscopy. Furthermore, 19, 75, and 300 μg L(-1) AZ treatments decreased the soluble protein content and chlorophyll concentrations in C. vulgaris and altered the energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expression levels in 48- and 96-h exposure periods. Simultaneously, our results showed that AZ could increase the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and compromise superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and glutathione (GSH) content. These situations might render C. vulgaris more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Overall, the present study indicated that AZ might be toxic to the growth of C. vulgaris, affect energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expressions, and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in C. vulgaris.

  15. Growth condition study of algae function in ecosystem for CO2 bio-fixation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David Dah-Wei; Ramaraj, Rameshprabu; Chen, Paris Honglay

    2012-02-01

    Algae niche play a crucial role on carbon cycle and have great potential for CO(2) sequestration. This study was to investigate the CO(2) bio-fixation by the high rate pond (HRP) to mimic the algae function of nature. All the reactors can keep CO(2) consumption efficiencies over 100%. The statistical analyses proved HRPs were close to the natural system from all the growth conditions. The HRP could show the "natural optimization as nature" to perform as well as the artificial reactor of continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). In the nutrition study, the carbon mass balance indicated CO(2) was the main carbon source. Accordingly, the HRPs can keep a neutral pH range to provide dissolved oxygen (DO), to promote total nitrogen (TN)/total phosphorous (TP) removal efficiencies and to demonstrate self-purification process. Furthermore, the observations of different nitrogen species in the reactors demonstrated that the major nitrogen source was decided by pH. This finding logically explained the complex nitrogen uptake by algae in nature. Consequently, this study took advantage of HRP to explore the processes of efficient CO(2) uptake with the corresponding growth condition in the ecosystem. Those results contributed the further understanding of the role of CO(2) bio-fixation in nature and demonstrated HRP could be a potential ecological engineering alternative.

  16. Growth condition study of algae function in ecosystem for CO2 bio-fixation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David Dah-Wei; Ramaraj, Rameshprabu; Chen, Paris Honglay

    2012-02-01

    Algae niche play a crucial role on carbon cycle and have great potential for CO(2) sequestration. This study was to investigate the CO(2) bio-fixation by the high rate pond (HRP) to mimic the algae function of nature. All the reactors can keep CO(2) consumption efficiencies over 100%. The statistical analyses proved HRPs were close to the natural system from all the growth conditions. The HRP could show the "natural optimization as nature" to perform as well as the artificial reactor of continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). In the nutrition study, the carbon mass balance indicated CO(2) was the main carbon source. Accordingly, the HRPs can keep a neutral pH range to provide dissolved oxygen (DO), to promote total nitrogen (TN)/total phosphorous (TP) removal efficiencies and to demonstrate self-purification process. Furthermore, the observations of different nitrogen species in the reactors demonstrated that the major nitrogen source was decided by pH. This finding logically explained the complex nitrogen uptake by algae in nature. Consequently, this study took advantage of HRP to explore the processes of efficient CO(2) uptake with the corresponding growth condition in the ecosystem. Those results contributed the further understanding of the role of CO(2) bio-fixation in nature and demonstrated HRP could be a potential ecological engineering alternative. PMID:22196805

  17. Effects of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn on brown tide alga Aureococcus anophagefferens growth and metal accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Axe, Lisa; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Wei, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Trace metals play important roles in regulating phytoplankton growth and could influence algal bloom development. Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn on Aureococcus anophagefferens bloom (brown tide) development. Results show that the elevated Ni(2+) concentrations, e.g. those of brown tide waters in the northeastern US, greatly stimulated A. anophagefferens growth (as compared to the control without Ni addition), yet, only low amounts of dissolved Ni were sequestered, thus leaving excessive Ni directly promoting A. anophagefferens blooms. The medium effective concentration EC(50) (Me(2+)) suggests A. anophagefferens has similar Cd sensitivity but much greater Cu tolerance as compared to cyanobacteria, as such, excessive Cu could indirectly promote A. anophagefferens blooms by inhibiting competitors such as Synechococcus sp. The effects of Ni and Cu promoting growth are consistent with the recent genomic study of this alga. In addition, Zn(2+) concentrations lower than those in brown tide waters enhance A. anophagefferens growth, but Zn sequestration in A. anophagefferens would not substantially reduce total dissolved Zn in these waters. Overall, this study, showing that excessive Cu and Ni likely promote brown tides, provides evidence for trace metal linkages in algal bloom development.

  18. Growth and Metabolism of the Green Alga, Chlorella Pyrenoidosa, in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, W. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on living organisms during space flight has been a topic of interest for some time, and a substantial body of knowledge on the subject has accumulated. Despite this, comparatively little information is available regarding the influence of microgravity on algae, even though it has been suggested for long duration flight or occupancy in space that plant growth systems, including both higher plants and algae, are likely to be necessary for bioregenerative life support systems. High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating-Wall Vessel or HARV bioreactors developed at Johnson Space Center provide a laboratory-based approach to investigating the effects of microgravity on cellular reactions. In this study, the HARV bioreactor was used to examine the influence of simulated microgravity on the growth and metabolism of the green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa. After the first 2 days of culture, cell numbers increased more slowly in simulated microgravity than in the HARV gravity control; after 7 days, growth in simulated microgravity was just over half (58%) that of the gravity control and at 14 days it was less than half (42%). Chlorophyll and protein were also followed as indices of cell competence and function; as with growth, after 2-3 days, protein and chlorophyll levels were reduced in modeled microgravity compared to gravity controls. Photosynthesis is a sensitive biochemical index of the fitness of photosynthetic organisms; thus, CO2-dependent O2 evolution was tested as a measure of photosynthetic capacity of cells grown in simulated microgravity. When data were expressed with respect to cell number, modeled microgravity appeared to have little effect on CO2 fixation. Thus, even though the overall growth rate was lower for cells cultured in microgravity, the photosynthetic capacity of the cells appears to be unaffected. Cells grown in simulated microgravity formed loose clumps or aggregates within about 2 days of culture, with aggregation increasing over time

  19. [Annual variation of different phosphorus forms and response of algae growth in Meiliang bay of Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Wu, Xiao-fei; Li, Da-peng; Li, Xiang; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Based on the monthly investigations of different forms of phosphorus(P) and algae growth from January to December 2013 in Meiliang bay of Taihu Lake, the transformation of different P forms and the relationship between different P forms and algae growth was investigated under the dual conditions of disturbance due to wind and wave and algae growth. Results of the total P(TP), particulate P (PP), dissolved total P(DTP), dissolved inorganic P(DIP) and bioavailable P(BAP) showed that the monthly concentrations reached the maximum in summer and autumn while the minimum in winter and spring. In addition, the algae growth showed the same trends as above. However, no variation was found in the dissolved organic P(DOP) and bioavailable particulate P(BAPP). The bioavailability of PP was only 12.75% from June to October, which was obviously lower than the annual mean (37.14%). It was attributed to the acceleration on the transformation of PP to DTP due to the immobilization of sedimentary P under sediment disturbance and algae adsorption. The percentage of DTP in BAP was up to 69.33% (average), which was obviously higher than the percentage of bioavailable PP (30.66%, average) and the annual mean (56.63%) of DTP during the interval. In addition, the algae bloom appeared in the interval.

  20. Menaquinone analogs inhibit growth of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schlievert, Patrick M; Merriman, Joseph A; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Mueller, Elizabeth A; Spaulding, Adam R; Vu, Bao G; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N; Kohler, Petra L; Kirby, John R

    2013-11-01

    Gram-positive bacteria cause serious human illnesses through combinations of cell surface and secreted virulence factors. We initiated studies with four of these organisms to develop novel topical antibacterial agents that interfere with growth and exotoxin production, focusing on menaquinone analogs. Menadione, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and coenzymes Q1 to Q3 but not menaquinone, phylloquinone, or coenzyme Q10 inhibited the growth and to a greater extent exotoxin production of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae at concentrations of 10 to 200 μg/ml. Coenzyme Q1 reduced the ability of S. aureus to cause toxic shock syndrome in a rabbit model, inhibited the growth of four Gram-negative bacteria, and synergized with another antimicrobial agent, glycerol monolaurate, to inhibit S. aureus growth. The staphylococcal two-component system SrrA/B was shown to be an antibacterial target of coenzyme Q1. We hypothesize that menaquinone analogs both induce toxic reactive oxygen species and affect bacterial plasma membranes and biosynthetic machinery to interfere with two-component systems, respiration, and macromolecular synthesis. These compounds represent a novel class of potential topical therapeutic agents.

  1. Effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal in wastewater-based algae cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaochen; Zhou, Wenguang; Fu, Zongqiang; Cheng, Yanling; Min, Min; Liu, Yuhuan; Zhang, Yunkai; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2014-09-01

    Centrate, a type of nutrient-rich municipal wastewater was used to determine the effect of wastewater-borne bacteria on algal growth and nutrients removal efficiency in this study. The characteristics of algal and bacterial growth profiles, wastewater nutrient removal and effect of initial algal inoculums were systematically examined. The results showed that initial algal concentration had apparent effect on bacterial growth, and the presence of bacteria had a significant influence on algal growth pattern, suggesting symbiotic relationship between algae and bacteria at the initial stage of algae cultivation. The maximum algal biomass of 2.01 g/L with 0.1g/L initial algal inoculums concentration can be obtained during algae cultivation in raw centrate medium. The synergistic effect of centrate-borne bacteria and microalgae on algae growth and nutrient removal performance at initial fast growth stage has great potential to be applied to pilot-scale wastewater-based algae wastewater system cultivated in continuous or semi-continuous mode.

  2. Influence of the CO2 absorbent monoethanolamine on growth and carbon fixation by the green alga Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wookjin; Kim, Garam; Lee, Kisay

    2012-09-01

    The influence of monoethanolamine (MEA) as a CO(2) absorbent on photoautotrophic culture of CO(2)-fixing microalgae was investigated. When 300 ppm MEA (4.92 mM) was added to blank culture medium, the dissolved inorganic carbon and the molar absorption ratio increased to 51.0mg/L and 0.34 mol CO2 = mol MEA, respectively, which was an almost 6-fold increase in CO(2) solubility. When free MEA up to 300 mg/L was added to a green alga Scenedesmus sp. culture that was supplied 5% (v/v) CO(2) at 0.1 vvm, both cell growth rate and final cell density were enhanced compared to when no MEA was added. The cell growth rate reached 288.6 mg/L/d, which was equivalent to 539.6 mg-CO(2)/L/d as a CO(2)-fixation rate and enhancement of about 63.0% compared to not adding MEA. Chlorophyll-a content and nitrate consumption rate increased correspondingly. MEA doses higher than 400mg/L inhibited cell growth, probably due to toxicity of the carbamate intermediate.

  3. Aqueous Extracts of the Marine Brown Alga Lobophora variegata Inhibit HIV-1 Infection at the Level of Virus Entry into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kremb, Stephan; Helfer, Markus; Kraus, Birgit; Wolff, Horst; Wild, Christian; Schneider, Martha; Voolstra, Christian R.; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, marine algae have emerged as a rich and promising source of molecules with potent activities against various human pathogens. The widely distributed brown alga Lobophora variegata that is often associated with tropical coral reefs exerts strong antibacterial and antiprotozoal effects, but so far has not been associated with specific anti-viral activities. This study investigated potential HIV-1 inhibitory activity of L. variegata collected from different geographical regions, using a cell-based full replication HIV-1 reporter assay. Aqueous L. variegata extracts showed strong inhibitory effects on several HIV-1 strains, including drug-resistant and primary HIV-1 isolates, and protected even primary cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infection. Anti-viral potency was related to ecological factors and showed clear differences depending on light exposition or epiphyte growth. Assays addressing early events of the HIV-1 replication cycle indicated that L. variegata extracts inhibited entry of HIV-1 into cells at a pre-fusion step possibly by impeding mobility of virus particles. Further characterization of the aqueous extract demonstrated that even high doses had only moderate effects on viability of cultured and primary cells (PBMCs). Imaging-based techniques revealed extract effects on the plasma membrane and actin filaments as well as induction of apoptosis at concentrations exceeding EC50 of anti-HIV-1 activity by more than 400 fold. In summary, we show for the first time that L. variegata extracts inhibit HIV-1 entry, thereby suggesting this alga as promising source for the development of novel HIV-1 inhibitors. PMID:25144758

  4. Sludge-grown algae for culturing aquatic organisms: Part I. Algal growth in sludge extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, K. M.; Chiu, S. T.; Wong, M. H.

    1996-05-01

    This project is aimed at studying the feasibility of using sewage sludge to prepare culture media for microalgae ( Chlorella-HKBU) and the use of the sludge-grown algae as a feed for some aquatic organisms. Part I of the project included results on preparing sludge extracts and their use on algal culture. By comparing two culturing techniques, “aeration” and “shaking,” it was noted that both lag and log phases were shortened in the aeration system. A subsequent experiment noted that algal growth subject to aeration rates of 1.0 and 1.5 liters/min had similar lag and log phases. In addition, both aeration rates had a significantly higher ( P < 0.05) final cell density than that of 0.5 liters/min. A detailed study on the variation of growth conditions on the algal growth was done. The results indicated that pH values of all the cultures declined below 5 at day 12. The removal rates of ammonia N ranged from 62% to 70%. The sludge-grown algae contained a rather substantial amount of heavy metals (µg/g): Zn 289 581, Cu 443 682, Ni 310 963, Mn 96 126, Cr 25 118, and Fe 438 653. This implied that the rather high levels of heavy metals may impose adverse effects on higher trophic organisms.

  5. Comparisons of growth and biochemical composition between mixed culture of alga and yeast and monocultures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shiqing; Hu, Chaoqun; Du, Shaobo

    2007-11-01

    The alga Isochrysis galbana 8701 and the yeast Ambrosiozyma cicatricosa were mix-cultivated in the same medium for 7 d to compare their growth performance and biochemical composition with those of the same organisms cultured under monoculture conditions. The specific growth rates of both species were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the mixed culture than in the monocultures during the corresponding experimental phases. At the end of experiment, the biomass concentration obtained in the mixed culture reached 1.32+/-0.04 g/l of dry weight, which was significantly higher (p<0.05) than those obtained in monocultures, and the alga I. galbana in the mixed culture dominated the cell numbers making up 96.64% of the cells. The biochemical profile of the mixed culture is similar to that of the I. galbana monoculture with some variations; The percentages of both the fatty acids 14:00 and 18:00 detected in the mixed culture were significantly higher (p<0.05) than those detected in the I. galbana monoculture, while the content of the fatty acid 18:2(n-6) detected in the mixed culture was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that detected in the I. galbana monoculture. This study indicates the improved growth performance in mixed culture compared with monocultures and the similarities between the biochemical compositions of the mixed culture and the I. galbana monoculture.

  6. Polyoxin D inhibits growth of zoopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, J M; Covert, N L; Shenbagamurthi, P; Steinfeld, A S; Naider, F

    1983-01-01

    We demonstrated that polyoxin D at millimolar concentrations caused marked morphological alterations of the human pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. C. albicans incubated in the presence of this drug grew in long chains that were severely swollen. Polyoxin D inhibited the growth of C. neoformans and killed cells of both the yeast and the hyphal phase of C. albicans. These observations give the first evidence that polyoxin antibiotics can kill zoopathogenic fungi. Images PMID:6351734

  7. Impacts of ambient salinity and copper on brown algae: 1. Interactive effects on photosynthesis, growth, and copper accumulation.

    PubMed

    Connan, Solène; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2011-07-01

    The effect of copper enrichment and salinity on growth, photosynthesis and copper accumulation of two temperate brown seaweeds, Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus, was investigated in laboratory experiments. A significant negative impact of reduced salinity on photosynthetic activity and growth was observed for both species. After 15 days at a salinity of 5, photosynthesis of A. nodosum was entirely inhibited and growth ceased at a salinity of 15. Increased copper concentration negatively affected photosynthetic activity of A. nodosum and F. vesiculosus resulting in chlorosis and reduced seaweed growth; 5 mg L⁻¹ copper caused an inhibition of the photosynthesis and the degradation of seaweed tips. Under reduced salinity, copper toxicity was enhanced and caused an earlier impact on the physiology of seaweed tips. After exposure to copper and different salinities for 15 days, copper contents of seaweeds were closely related to copper concentration in the water; seaweed copper contents reached their maximum after 1 day of exposure; contents only increased again when additional, free copper was added to the water. At high water copper concentrations or low salinity, or a combination of both, copper content of A. nodosum decreased. By contrast, copper content of F. vesiculosus increased, suggesting that different binding sites or uptake mechanisms exist in the two species. The results suggest that when using brown seaweeds in biomonitoring in situ, any change in the environment will directly and significantly affect algal physiology and thus their metal binding capacity; the assessment of the physiological status of the algae in combination with the analysis of thallus metal content will enhance the reliability of the biomonitoring process. PMID:21549661

  8. Ormeloxifene efficiently inhibits ovarian cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Diane M.; Khan, Sheema; Nordquist, Jordan; Ebeling, Mara C.; Bauer, Nichole A.; Kopel, Lucas; Singh, Man Mohan; Halaweish, Fathi; Bell, Maria C.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer related deaths for women. Anticancer agents effective against chemo-resistant cells are greatly needed for ovarian cancer treatment. Repurposing drugs currently in human use is an attractive strategy for developing novel cancer treatments with expedited translation into clinical trials. Therefore, we examined whether ormeloxifene (ORM), a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) currently used for contraception, is therapeutically effective at inhibiting ovarian cancer growth. We report that ORM treatment inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cell lines, including cell lines resistant to cisplatin. Furthermore, ORM treatment decreases Akt phosphorylation, increases p53 phosphorylation, and modulates the expression and localization patterns of p27, cyclin E, cyclin D1, and CDK2. In a pre-clinical xenograft mouse ORM treatment significantly reduces tumorigenesis and metastasis. These results indicate that ORM effectively inhibits the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. ORM is currently in human use and has an established record of patient safety. Our encouraging in vitro and pre-clinical in vivo findings indicate that ORM is a promising candidate for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25306892

  9. Growth and high-resolution paleoenvironmental signals of rhodoliths (coralline red algae): A new biogenic archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfar, Jochen; Zack, Thomas; Kronz, Andreas; Zachos, James C.

    2000-09-01

    We investigated rhodoliths (coralline red algae) from a subtropical locality in the Gulf of California (Lithothamnium crassiusculum) and a subarctic locality in Newfoundland (Lithothamnium glaciale) for their potential as paleoenvironmental archives using microanalytical geochemical techniques to measure variations in δ18O, Mg, and Ca. Rhodoliths are potentially well suited as recorders of shallow water paleoenvironmental signals because they (1) have worldwide distribution from the tropics to polar regions, (2) are long lived from decades to centuries, and (3) display well-developed growth bands. Our results indicate that rhodolith growth bands preserve ultrahigh-resolution records of paleoceanographic-paleoclimatic change and likely constitute an important new archive for reconstructing the paleoenvironmental history of littoral-neritic areas in which these algae are found. The δ18O content of individually sampled rhodolith growth bands ranges from -2.4 to -4.6‰ in L. crassiusculum and from -3.2 to -0.3‰ in L. glaciale. In both cases, the range of δ18O values suggests a slightly lower amplitude of variation in sea surface temperature than that actually measured in the ocean at the two study sites. Both L. crassiusculum and L. glaciale show a negative offset from isotopic equilibrium. Electron microprobe analysis of magnesium and calcium in growth bands reveals cyclic variations with values ranging between 7.7-18.5 mol % MgCO3 in L. glaciale and 13.2-22.5 mol % MgCO3 in L. crassiusculum. In addition, electron microprobe element maps highlight individual growth bands, provide a powerful approach to study rhodolith formation, and indicate that the specimens we analyzed have vertical growth rates of 250-450 μm/yr.

  10. Biomass or growth rate endpoint for algae and aquatic plants: relevance for the aquatic risk assessment of herbicides.

    PubMed

    Bergtold, Matthias; Dohmen, Gerhard Peter

    2011-04-01

    Ecotoxicological studies with algae and aquatic plants are essential parts of the aquatic risk assessment for crop protection products (CPP). Growth rate is used as a response variable and in addition the effects on biomass and/or yield (in the following biomass) can be measured. The parameter biomass generally provides a lower numerical value compared with the growth rate for systematic and mathematical reasons. Therefore, some regulators prefer to use the EbC50 value (i.e., the concentration at which 50% reduction of biomass is observed) rather than ErC50 (the concentration at which a 50% inhibition of growth rate is observed) as the endpoint for ecotoxicological risk assessment. However, the parameter growth rate is scientifically more appropriate and robust against deviations in test conditions, permitting better interpretation of, and comparison between, studies. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the growth rate and biomass parameters with regard to their protectiveness and suitability for environmental risk assessment of CPP. It has been shown for a number of herbicides that the use of the EC50 value (without distinction between growth rate and biomass endpoints) from laboratory studies in combination with an assessment factor of 10 is sufficiently protective for aquatic plants (except for the herbicide 2,4-D). In this paper we evaluated EbC50 and ErC50 values separately. Data on 19 different herbicides were compiled from the literature or GLP reports. The EbC50 and ErC50 values obtained in laboratory studies were compared with effect concentrations in ecosystem studies (mainly mesocosm). This comparison of laboratory and field data shows that the overall aquatic risk assessment using ErC50 values in combination with the currently applied assessment factor of 10 is sufficient to exclude significant risk to aquatic plants in the environment. PMID:20836059

  11. Alpha-amylase Inhibition and Antioxidant Activity of Marine Green Algae and its Possible Role in Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, P. S.; Suthindhiran, K.; Jayasri, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In the continuing search for safe and efficient antidiabetic drug, marine algae become important source which provide several compounds of immense therapeutic potential. Alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, and antioxidant compounds are known to manage diabetes and have received much attention recently. In the present study, four green algae (Chaetomorpha aerea, Enteromorpha intestinalis, Chlorodesmis, and Cladophora rupestris) were chosen to evaluate alpha-amylase, alpha-glucosidase inhibitory, and antioxidant activity in vitro. Materials and Methods: The phytochemical constituents of all the extracts were qualitatively determined. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by inhibitory potential of extracts against alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase by spectrophotometric assays. Antioxidant activity was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and nitric oxide scavenging assay. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was carried out to determine the major compound responsible for its antidiabetic action. Results: Among the various extracts screened, chloroform extract of C. aerea (IC50 − 408.9 μg/ml) and methanol extract of Chlorodesmis (IC50 − 147.6 μg/ml) showed effective inhibition against alpha-amylase. The extracts were also evaluated for alpha-glucosidase inhibition, and no observed activity was found. Methanol extract of C. rupestris showed notable free radical scavenging activity (IC50 – 666.3 μg/ml), followed by H2O2 (34%) and nitric oxide (49%). Further, chemical profiling by GC-MS revealed the presence of major bioactive compounds. Phenol, 2,4-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl) and z, z-6,28-heptatriactontadien-2-one were predominantly found in the methanol extract of C. rupestris and chloroform extract of C. aerea. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that the selected algae exhibit notable alpha-amylase inhibition and antioxidant activity. Therefore, characterization of active compounds and its in vivo

  12. Effects of algae growth on cadmium remobilization and ecological risk in sediments of Taihu Lake.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Dandan; Su, Lili; Xu, Jiajun; Li, Shiyin; Ye, Xiang; Geng, Hong; Wang, Peifang; Li, Yi; Li, Yiping; Acharya, Kumud

    2016-05-01

    Indoor simulation experiment with 2.76 L microcosms using sediment from Taihu Lake were conducted to investigate the relationship between algae bloom and heavy metals release into a lake aquatic environment. The results showed that Microcystic aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) growth can enhance cadmium (Cd) mobilization from sediments to overlying water due to increasing pH and DO content of overlying water and changing the redox condition of surface sediment (0-2 cm) from weak oxidation to weak reduction. The dissolved Cd concentration in overlying water can be decreased during algal growth process. The remobilization of Cd from sediment can effectively reduce the ecological risk of total Cd in sediments. The results of this study showed that both Igeo and Er(i) can be used to effectively evaluate the ecological risk of heavy metal Cd in different fractions.

  13. Selenium nanoparticles inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phong A; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a key bacterium commonly found in numerous infections. S. aureus infections are difficult to treat due to their biofilm formation and documented antibiotic resistance. While selenium has been used for a wide range of applications including anticancer applications, the effects of selenium nanoparticles on microorganisms remain largely unknown to date. The objective of this in vitro study was thus to examine the growth of S. aureus in the presence of selenium nanoparticles. Results of this study provided the first evidence of strongly inhibited growth of S. aureus in the presence of selenium nanoparticles after 3, 4, and 5 hours at 7.8, 15.5, and 31 μg/mL. The percentage of live bacteria also decreased in the presence of selenium nanoparticles. Therefore, this study suggests that selenium nanoparticles may be used to effectively prevent and treat S. aureus infections and thus should be further studied for such applications.

  14. Rapamycin inhibits the growth of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Arcella, Antonietta; Biagioni, Francesca; Antonietta Oliva, Maria; Bucci, Domenico; Frati, Alessandro; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Giampaolo; Giangaspero, Felice; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    The molecular target of rapamycin (mTOR) is up-regulated in glioblastoma (GBM) and this is associated with the rate of cell growth, stem cell proliferation and disease relapse. Rapamycin is a powerful mTOR inhibitor and strong autophagy inducer. Previous studies analyzed the effects of rapamycin in GBM cell lines. However, to our knowledge, no experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of rapamycin neither in primary cells derived from GBM patients nor in vivo in brain GBM xenograft. These data are critical to get a deeper insight into the effects of such adjuvant therapy in GBM patients. In the present study, various doses of rapamycin were tested in primary cell cultures from GBM patients. These effects were compared with that obtained by the same doses of rapamycin in GBM cell lines (U87Mg). The effects of rapamycin were also evaluated in vivo, in brain tumors developed from mouse xenografts. Rapamycin, starting at the dose of 10nm inhibited cell growth both in U87Mg cell line and primary cell cultures derived from various GBM patients. When administered in vivo to brain xenografts in nude mice rapamycin almost doubled the survival time of mice and inhibited by more than 95% of tumor volume. PMID:23261661

  15. Growth Promotion of a Sea Water Algae with Sterile, Ulva pertusa Kjellman, Due to Supplemental Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Shinichi; Masuda, Atsunori; Ozawa, Tomoko; Ishiwata, Masaki; Yokoji, Shigemi; Saito, Naoki; Murakami, Katsusuke

    Ulva pertusa is widely used as human food and also to feed cultured fish. U. pertusa is expected to be used as a bio-filter for purification of breeding - circulation water in the terrestrial aquaculture of fish. Insufficient sunshine and lower temperature causes bad commercial production. In order to realize stable cultivation of U. pertusa throughout the year, experiments on the growth of a sea water algae with sterile, U. pertusa Kjellman, due to supplemental lighting were performed. An illuminance of 1×104 lx in the treatment areas and 2×104 lx in the control, when the illuminance was 8×104 lx in the greenhouse. Artificial lighting was added during the daytime in treatments 1˜3. The mounting height of each luminaire was adjusted to have a PPFD of 140 μmol m-2s-1. Each lamp had the R/FR PF ratio of 3.8, 1.2, 0.8. Considering of relationship between the growth and cumulative PPFD including daylight and supplemental lighting, the growth of the experimental area were superior to the control area. U. pertusa can be grown with warm sea water using supplemental lighting. But under the growth environment with daylight and supplemental lighting together, it is difficult to recognize whether the R/FR PF ratio influences photomorphogenesis.

  16. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Silva, Helton Colares; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda; Cavada, Benildo; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL), Vatairea macrocarpa (VML), Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL), Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL), and Hypnea musciformis (HML) showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining) and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units). The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins. PMID:24982871

  17. Ocean acidification alleviates low-temperature effects on growth and photosynthesis of the red alga Neosiphonia harveyi (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Olischläger, Mark; Wiencke, Christian

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to examine interactive effects between ocean acidification and temperature on the photosynthetic and growth performance of Neosiphonia harveyi. N. harveyi was cultivated at 10 and 17.5 °C at present (~380 µatm), expected future (~800 µatm), and high (~1500 µatm) pCO2. Chlorophyll a fluorescence, net photosynthesis, and growth were measured. The state of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) was examined by pH-drift experiments (with algae cultivated at 10 °C only) using ethoxyzolamide, an inhibitor of external and internal carbonic anhydrases (exCA and intCA, respectively). Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of acetazolamide (an inhibitor of exCA) and Tris (an inhibitor of the acidification of the diffusive boundary layer) on net photosynthesis was measured at both temperatures. Temperature affected photosynthesis (in terms of photosynthetic efficiency, light saturation point, and net photosynthesis) and growth at present pCO2, but these effects decreased with increasing pCO2. The relevance of the CCM decreased at 10 °C. A pCO2 effect on the CCM could only be shown if intCA and exCA were inhibited. The experiments demonstrate for the first time interactions between ocean acidification and temperature on the performance of a non-calcifying macroalga and show that the effects of low temperature on photosynthesis can be alleviated by increasing pCO2. The findings indicate that the carbon acquisition mediated by exCA and acidification of the diffusive boundary layer decrease at low temperatures but are not affected by the cultivation level of pCO2, whereas the activity of intCA is affected by pCO2. Ecologically, the findings suggest that ocean acidification might affect the biogeographical distribution of N. harveyi.

  18. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium.

    PubMed

    Xavier, J G; Geremias, T C; Montero, J F D; Vahey, B R; Benfatti, C A M; Souza, J C M; Magini, R S; Pimenta, A L

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml(-)(1)), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5×10(2)CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4×10(2)CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. PMID:27524086

  19. Growth and survival of Escherichia coli and enterococci populations in the macro-alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.; Sadowsky, M.J.; Whitman, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The macro-alga Cladophora glomerata is found in streams and lakes worldwide. High concentrations of Escherichia coli and enterococci have been reported in Cladophora along the Lake Michigan shore. The objective of this study was to determine if Cladophora supported growth of these indicator bacteria. Algal leachate readily supported in vitro multiplication of E. coli and enterococci, suggesting that leachates contain necessary growth-promoting substances. Growth was directly related to the concentration of algal leachate. E. coli survived for over 6 months in dried Cladophora stored at 4°C; residual E. coli grew after mat rehydration, reaching a carrying capacity of 8 log CFU g-1 in 48 h. Results of this study also show that the E. coli strains associated with Cladophora are highly related; in most instances they are genetically different from each other, suggesting that the relationship between E. coli and Cladophora may be casual. These findings indicate that Cladophora provides a suitable environment for indicator bacteria to persist for extended periods and to grow under natural conditions.

  20. Nitric Oxide Production Inhibition and Anti-Mycobacterial Activity of Extracts and Halogenated Sesquiterpenes from the Brazilian Red Alga Laurencia Dendroidea J. Agardh

    PubMed Central

    Biá Ventura, Thatiana Lopes; da Silva Machado, Fernanda Lacerda; de Araujo, Marlon Heggdorne; de Souza Gestinari, Lísia Mônica; Kaiser, Carlos Roland; de Assis Esteves, Francisco; Lasunskaia, Elena B.; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Muzitano, Michelle Frazão

    2015-01-01

    Background: Red algae of the genus Laurencia J. V. Lamouroux are a rich source of secondary metabolites with important pharmacological activities such as anti-tumoral, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, anti-viral, anti-leishmanial, anti-helminthic, anti-malarial, anti-trypanosomal, anti-microbial as well as anti-bacterial against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Objective: In the present study, we evaluated the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α production and the anti-mycobacterial activity of crude extracts from the red Alga Laurencia dendroidea (from the South-Eastern coast of Brazil). Halogenated sesquiterpenes elatol (1), obtusol (2) and cartilagineol (3), previously isolated from this Alga by our group, were also studied. Materials and Methods: The lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage cells (RAW 264.7) were used as inflammation model. Cytotoxic effect was determined using a commercial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) kit and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The growing Mycobacterium inhibition was verified against Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette–Guérin and M. tuberculosis H37 Rv strains. Results: The crude extract from Alga collected at Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil, was the most active inhibitor of both mycobacterial growth (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] 8.7 ± 1.4 μg/mL) and NO production by activated macrophages (IC50 5.3 ± 1.3 μg/mL). The assays with isolated compounds revealed the anti-mycobacterial activity of obtusol (2), whereas (-)-elatol (1) inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators, especially NO. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing an anti-mycobacterial effect of L. dendroidea extract and demonstrating the association of this activity with obtusol (2). Conclusion: The described effects of active compounds from L. dendroidea are promising for the control of inflammation in infectious diseases and specifically, against mycobacterial infections

  1. Field study of growth and calcification rates of three species of articulated coralline algae in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K; Martone, P T

    2014-04-01

    Ocean acidification caused by rising atmospheric CO₂ is predicted to negatively impact growth and calcification rates of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosystems and on carbon sequestration worldwide. In this study, we measured growth and calcification rates of three common species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plumosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum, and Corallina vancouveriensis) at an intertidal field site in British Columbia. Linear growth rates measured in the field were slow, although Bossiella grew significantly faster (0.22 cm mon⁻¹) than Calliarthron and Corallina (0.17 and 0.15 cm mon⁻¹, respectively). Growth rates in the field were generally slower than growth rates in the laboratory, suggesting that data generated in the laboratory may not be representative of natural field conditions. Growth rates did not decrease as fronds approached their maximum observed size, suggesting that maximum frond size might be determined not by intrinsic factors but by external factors such as wave-induced drag forces. Using growth data, we estimate that the largest observed Bossiella frond (20 cm²) and Calliarthron frond (40 cm²) were about 4- and 11-years-old, respectively, and had deposited approximately 1 and 6 g CaCO₃ in that time. Given the great abundance of coralline algae along the coast of British Columbia, deposition rates of CaCO₃ are expected to play a significant but poorly characterized role in carbon sequestration.

  2. Comparison of toxicity to terrestrial plants with algal growth inhibition by herbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Frank, M.L.

    1984-10-01

    The toxicities of 21 different herbicides to algae (Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris) and to terrestrial plants (radishes, barley, and bush beans or soybeans) were compared to order to determine the feasibility of using a short-term (96-h) algal growth inhibition test for identifying chemicals having potential toxicity in a 4-week terrestrial plant bioassay. The toxicity of each test chemical, usually in combination with a commercial formulation, was evaluated at six nominal concentrations, between 0 and 100 mg/L growth medium in the algal bioassay or between 0 and 100 mg/kg substate in the terrestrial plant bioassay, in terms of both (1) the no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC), i.e., the highest concentration tested at which no significant (P < 0.05, one-sided test) reduction in algal growth rate or in terrestrial plant yield, relative to controls, was observed; and (2) the concentration at which algal growth rate or terrestrial plant yield was reduced by 50% or more relative to controls. There was generally poor agreement between results from the two types of bioassays; results from algal growth inhibition tests were not significantly correlated with results from the terrestrial plant bioassays. Overall, there was an approximately 50% chance of an algal bioassay, using Selenastrum capricornutum, successfully screening (detecting) herbicide levels that reduced terrestrial plant yield. The results indicated that algal growth inhibition tests cannot be used generically to predict phytotoxicity of herbicides to terrestrial plant species. 7 references, 14 tables.

  3. Phlorotannins from Brown Algae: inhibition of advanced glycation end products formation in high glucose induced Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Shakambari, Ganeshan; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem; Varalakshmi, Perumal

    2015-06-01

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGE) generated in a non enzymatic protein glycation process are frequently associated with diabetes, aging and other chronic diseases. Here, we explored the protective effect of phlorotannins from brown algae Padina pavonica, Sargassum polycystum and Turbinaria ornata against AGEs formation. Phlorotannins were extracted from brown algae with methanol and its purity was analyzed by TLC and RP-HPLC-DAD. Twenty five grams of P. pavonica, S. polycystum, T. ornata yielded 27.6 ± 0.8 μg/ml, 37.7 μg/ml and 37.1 ± 0.74 μg/ml of phloroglucinol equivalent of phlorotannins, respectively. Antioxidant potentials were examined through DPPH assay and their IC50 values were P. pavonica (30.12 ± 0.99 μg), S. polycystum (40.9 ± 1.2 μg) and T. ornata (22.9 ± 1.3 μg), which was comparatively lesser than the control ascorbic acid (46 ± 0.2 μg). Further, anti-AGE activity was examined in vitro by BSA-glucose assay with the extracted phlorotannins of brown algae (P. pavonica, 15.16 ± 0.26 μg/ml; S. polycystum, 35.245 ± 2.3 μg/ml; T. ornata, 22.7 ± 0.3 μg/ml), which revealed the required concentration to inhibit 50% of albumin glycation (IC50) were lower for extracts than controls (phloroglucinol, 222.33 ± 4.9 μg/ml; thiamine, 263 μg/ml). Furthermore, brown algal extracts containing phlorotannins (100 μl) exhibited protective effects against AGE formation in vivo in C. elegans with induced hyperglycemia. PMID:26155677

  4. Quorum Sensing Inhibition by Asparagopsis taxiformis, a Marine Macro Alga: Separation of the Compound that Interrupts Bacterial Communication

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Bhavanath; Kavita, Kumari; Westphal, Jenny; Hartmann, Anton; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The majority of the marine algal species, though completing their life cycle in seawater, are rarely susceptible to fouling, making them an important source of quorum sensing (QS) inhibitory substances. The separation and characterization of QS inhibitors are crucial for any potential application. Thirty marine macroalgae were tested for QS inhibition activity by using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as the reporter strain, and among them, Asparagopsis taxiformis showed antibacterial, as well as antiquorum, sensing activities. Cinnamaldehyde (75 mM) and methanol were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The antiquorum sensing activity of A. taxiformis was further confirmed using the sensor strain, Serratia liquefaciens MG44, having green fluorescent protein (gfp). Methanolic extract of the alga was fractionated by solid phase extraction (SPE), and each fraction was tested for QS inhibition. Two types of activities were observed—zone of clearance (antibacterial activity) and zone of inhibition with or without finger-like projections (QS inhibition). Out of five SPE cartridges, Bond Elut PH showed clear separation of these two fractions. The Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transformation Mass Spectrometer (ICR-FT/MS) analysis of the fractions further supported the bioassay results. The presence of strong QS inhibitory compound in A. taxiformis indicates its potential use in antifouling preparations. PMID:23344114

  5. Growth and lipid content at low temperature of Arctic alga Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jae; Jung, Woongsic; Lim, Suyoun; Kim, Sanghee; Han, Se Jong; Choi, Han-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Biodiesel produced from microalgae is a promising source of alternative energy. In winter, however, outdoor mass cultivation for biodiesel production is hampered by poor growth. Here, we report that Arctic Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C exhibits optimal growth at 4 °C and reaches densities up to 1.4 × 10(7) cells mL(-1). Lipid body formation in the alga was visualized through BODIPY 505/515 staining and fluorescence microscopy. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) production level of KNM0029C was 178.6 mg L(-1) culture and 2.3-fold higher than that of C. reinhardtii CC-125 at 4 °C. Analysis of the FAME content showed a predominance of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as C16:3, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:2. C18:3 fatty acids comprised the largest fraction (20.7%), and the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (39.6%) was higher than that of saturated fatty acids (6.8%) at 4 °C. These results indicate that Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C, as a psychrophilic microalga, might represent a favorable source for biodiesel production in cold environments.

  6. Construction of a growth model in the green alga Tetraselmis subcordiformis using a response surface approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Niu, Jingyan; Liu, Jiahui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The green alga Tetraselmis subcordiformis has been widely used as a quality live food for aquaculture species, and also has been studied as a model organism for the photo-biological production of hydrogen. We attempted to quantify the relationship between T. subcordiformis specific growth rate (SGR) and three important environmental factors (temperature, salinity, and pH) using the central composite design and response surface method under laboratory conditions. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature and salinity were significant (P< 0.05), and they were equally important in impacting T. subcordiformis specific growth; the linear effect of pH was not significant (P>0.05); the interactive effect of temperature and pH was significant (P<0.05), whereas the temperature × salinity and salinity × pH interactions were not significant (P>0.05); all of the quadratic effects of the three factors were significant (P<0.05). A model equation for specific growth rate with the three factors was established, with the unadjusted and predictive R 2 as high as 0.990 and 0.921, respectively, suggesting that the model was a very good fit and that it could be used to predict SGR. Through optimizing the reliable model, an optimal 3-factor combination of 25 °C/35 of salinity/pH 7.9 was obtained, at which the maximum specific growth rate (0.65) was recorded, with a desirability value of 93.8%. These experimental results could serve as guidelines for increasing T. subcordiformis production efficiency.

  7. The influence of extracellular compounds produced by selected Baltic cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates on growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żak, Adam; Kosakowska, Alicja

    2015-12-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by bacteria, fungi, algae and plants could affect the growth and development of biological and agricultural systems. This natural process that occurs worldwide is known as allelopathy. The main goal of this work was to investigate the influence of metabolites obtained from phytoplankton monocultures on the growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris. We selected 6 species occurring in the Baltic Sea from 3 different taxonomic groups: cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Planktothrix agardhii), diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana; Chaetoceros wighamii) and dinoflagellates (Alexandrium ostenfeldii; Prorocentrum minimum). In this study we have demonstrated that some of selected organisms caused allelopathic effects against microalgae. Both the negative and positive effects of collected cell-free filtrates on C. vulgaris growth, chlorophyll a concentration and fluorescence parameters (OJIP, QY, NPQ) have been observed. No evidence has been found for the impact on morphology and viability of C. vulgaris cells.

  8. Contrasting ecotoxicity effects of zinc on growth and photosynthesis in a neutrophilic alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and an extremophilic alga (Cyanidium caldarium).

    PubMed

    Mikulic, Paulina; Beardall, John

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the contrasting ecotoxicity effects of zinc on growth and photosynthesis in a neutrophilic (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and an extremophilic (Cyanidium caldarium) alga. Experiments were carried out to see if cells acclimated to zinc would respond differently to cells that were unexposed to zinc. The study also aimed to see if extremophiles displayed different acclimation properties to neutrophiles. Results showed that the neutrophilic alga C. reinhardtii, was more susceptible to free zinc and had a lower IC50 value than the extremophile, however its stress response protected the photosynthetic apparatus. Upon acclimation, the photosynthetic abilities of C. reinhardtii were not significantly compromised when exposed to toxic levels of free zinc. On the other hand, C. caldarium had a stress response which allowed it to tolerate significantly higher amounts of free zinc in its environment compared to C. reinhardtii , however the stress response did not protect the photosynthetic apparatus, and upon acclimation C. caldarium was no better equipped to protect its photosynthetic integrity than unexposed cells. PMID:25048933

  9. Sulfated polysaccharide from the marine algae Hypnea musciformis inhibits TNBS-induced intestinal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    V Brito, Tarcisio; Barros, Francisco C N; Silva, Renan O; Dias Júnior, Genilson J; C Júnior, José Simião; Franco, Álvaro X; Soares, Pedro M G; Chaves, Luciano S; Abreu, Clara M W S; de Paula, Regina C M; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Freitas, Ana Lúcia P; R Barbosa, André Luiz

    2016-10-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides extracted from seaweed have important pharmacological properties. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize the sulfated polysaccharide (PLS) from the algae Hypnea musciformis and evaluate its protective effect in colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in rats. The sulfated polysaccharide possess a high molecular mass (1.24×10(5)gmol(-1)) and is composed of a κ-carrageenan, as depicted by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopic data. PLS was administered orally (10, 30, and 60mg/kg, p.o.) for three days, starting before TNBS (trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid) instillation (day 1). The rats were killed on day three, the portion of distal colon (5cm) was excised and evaluated macroscopic scores and wet weight. Then, samples of the intestinal were used for histological evaluation and quantification of glutathione, malonyldialdehyde acid, myeloperoxidase, nitrate/nitrite and cytokines. Our results demonstrate that PLS reduced the colitis and all analyzed biochemical parameters. Thus, we concluded that the PLS extracted from the marine algae H. musciformis reduced the colitis in animal model and may have an important promising application in the inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. Sulfated polysaccharide from the marine algae Hypnea musciformis inhibits TNBS-induced intestinal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    V Brito, Tarcisio; Barros, Francisco C N; Silva, Renan O; Dias Júnior, Genilson J; C Júnior, José Simião; Franco, Álvaro X; Soares, Pedro M G; Chaves, Luciano S; Abreu, Clara M W S; de Paula, Regina C M; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Freitas, Ana Lúcia P; R Barbosa, André Luiz

    2016-10-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides extracted from seaweed have important pharmacological properties. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize the sulfated polysaccharide (PLS) from the algae Hypnea musciformis and evaluate its protective effect in colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in rats. The sulfated polysaccharide possess a high molecular mass (1.24×10(5)gmol(-1)) and is composed of a κ-carrageenan, as depicted by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopic data. PLS was administered orally (10, 30, and 60mg/kg, p.o.) for three days, starting before TNBS (trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid) instillation (day 1). The rats were killed on day three, the portion of distal colon (5cm) was excised and evaluated macroscopic scores and wet weight. Then, samples of the intestinal were used for histological evaluation and quantification of glutathione, malonyldialdehyde acid, myeloperoxidase, nitrate/nitrite and cytokines. Our results demonstrate that PLS reduced the colitis and all analyzed biochemical parameters. Thus, we concluded that the PLS extracted from the marine algae H. musciformis reduced the colitis in animal model and may have an important promising application in the inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27474644

  11. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense.

  12. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense. PMID:24288981

  13. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or “decorating” collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  14. Triclosan causes toxic effects to algae in marine biofilms, but does not inhibit the metabolic activity of marine biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Johansson, C Henrik; Janmar, Lisa; Backhaus, Thomas

    2014-07-15

    Effects of the antimicrobial agent triclosan to natural periphyton communities (biofilms, comprising primarily microalgae and bacteria) were assessed in two independent experiments during spring and summer. For that purpose a semi-static test system was used in which periphyton was exposed to a concentration range of 5-9054 nmol/L triclosan. Effects on algae were analyzed as content and composition of photosynthetic pigments. The corresponding EC50 values were 39.25 and 302.45 nmol/L for the spring and summer experiment, respectively. Effects on periphytic bacteria were assessed as effects on carbon utilization patterns, using Biolog Ecoplates. No inhibition of either total carbon utilization or functional diversity was observed, indicating a pronounced triclosan tolerance of the marine bacteria. In contrast, a small stimulation of the total carbon utilization was observed at triclosan concentrations exceeding 100 nmol/L.

  15. Spirulan from blue-green algae inhibits fibrin and blood clots: its potent antithrombotic effects.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2015-05-01

    We investigated in vitro and in vivo fibrinolytic and antithrombotic activity of spirulan and analyzed its partial biochemical properties. Spirulan, a sulfated polysaccharide from the blue-green alga Arthrospira platensis, exhibits antithrombotic potency. Spirulan showed a strong fibrin zymogram lysis band corresponding to its molecular mass. It specifically cleaved Aα and Bβ, the major chains of fibrinogen. Spirulan directly decreased the activity of thrombin and factor X activated (FXa), procoagulant proteins. In vitro assays using human fibrin and mouse blood clots showed fibrinolytic and hemolytic activities of spirulan. Spirulan (2 mg/kg) showed antithrombotic effects in the ferric chloride (FeCl3 )-induced carotid arterial thrombus model and collagen and epinephrine-induced pulmonary thromboembolism mouse model. These results may be attributable to the prevention of thrombus formation and partial lysis of thrombus. Therefore, we suggest that spirulan may be a potential antithrombotic agent for thrombosis-related diseases. PMID:25651404

  16. Structure-activity analysis of harmful algae inhibition by congeneric compounds: case studies of fatty acids and thiazolidinediones.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haomin; Xiao, Xi; Shi, Jiyan; Chen, Yingxu

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of harmful algal blooms has been increasing significantly around the world. In order to ensure the safety of drinking water, procedures to screen potential materials as effective algicides are needed, and predictive methods which save both the labor and time compared with traditional experimental approaches, are particularly desirable. In this study, data from previous studies on the algal-growth inhibitory action of two kinds of compounds, namely, the action of fatty acids and thiazolidinediones on the harmful algae Heterosigma akashiwo and Chattonella marina, were modeled using multiple linear regression (MLR) based on quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). The models were shown to have highly predictive ability and stability, and provided insight into the inhibitory mechanisms of congeneric compounds. The main descriptors in the fatty-acid models were the Connolly accessible area and the number of rotatable bonds, illustrating that molecular surface area and shape are important in their algicidal actions. In the thiazolidinedione models, the critical volume, octanol-water partition coefficient (LogP), and Connolly solvent-excluded volume were found to be significant, indicating that hydrophobicity, substituent group size, and mode of action are mechanistically important. Our results showed the algicidal activity of a series of compounds on different algae could be modeled, and each model is efficacious for compounds that fall into the application domain of the QSAR model. This work demonstrates how reliable predictions of the algicidal activity of novel compounds and explanations of their inhibitory mechanisms can be obtained.

  17. A novel alphaproteobacterial ectosymbiont promotes the growth of the hydrocarbon-rich green alga Botryococcus braunii

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Yuuhiko; Okazaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Masaki; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Kai, Atsushi; Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-ichiro; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Makoto M.

    2015-01-01

    Botryococcus braunii is a colony-forming green alga that accumulates large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons within the colony. The utilization of B. braunii for biofuel production is however hindered by its low biomass productivity. Here we describe a novel bacterial ectosymbiont (BOTRYCO-2) that confers higher biomass productivity to B. braunii. 16S rDNA analysis indicated that the sequence of BOTRYCO-2 shows low similarity (<90%) to cultured bacterial species and located BOTRYCO-2 within a phylogenetic lineage consisting of uncultured alphaproteobacterial clones. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies and transmission electric microscopy indicated that BOTRYCO-2 is closely associated with B. braunii colonies. Interestingly, FISH analysis of a water bloom sample also found BOTRYCO-2 bacteria in close association with cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa colonies, suggesting that BOTRYCO-2 relatives have high affinity to phytoplankton colonies. A PCR survey of algal bloom samples revealed that the BOTRYCO-2 lineage is commonly found in Microcystis associated blooms. Growth experiments indicated that B. braunii Ba10 can grow faster and has a higher biomass (1.8-fold) and hydrocarbon (1.5-fold) yield in the presence of BOTRYCO-2. Additionally, BOTRYCO-2 conferred a higher biomass yield to BOT-22, one of the fastest growing strains of B. braunii. We propose the species name ‘Candidatus Phycosocius bacilliformis’ for BOTRYCO-2. PMID:26130609

  18. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2004-12-14

    Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  19. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2003-07-15

    Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  20. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2003-04-29

    Increasing the concentration of prolines such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that overexpress glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramnate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  1. Class XIII myosins from the green alga Acetabularia: driving force in organelle transport and tip growth?

    PubMed

    Vugrek, Oliver; Sawitzky, Heiko; Menzel, Diedrik

    2003-01-01

    The green alga Acetabularia cliftonii (Dasycladales) contains at least two myosin genes, which already have been assigned class XIII of the myosin superfamily (Cope et al., 1996, Structure 4: 969-987). Here we report a complete analysis of their gene structure and their corresponding transcripts Aclmyo1 and Aclmyo2. Despite promising Northern blot data no evidence for alternative splicing could be found. Dissecting the primary structure at complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) level we found a myosin typical organization in head, neck and variable tail region. Most striking is the extremely short tail region of Aclmyo1 with only 18 residues and the maximum number of 7 IQ motifs in Aclmyo2. Probing Acetabularia protein extracts with an antibody raised to a synthetic peptide derived from the amino terminal region in Alcmyo1 showed cross-reactivity to a polypeptide with a molecular mass of approximately 100 kD. This corresponds to the predicted molecular weight of Aclmyo1, which is 106 kD as deduced from the amino acid sequence. Additionally, the same cross-reactive protein is capable of binding F-actin as indicated by a co-sedimentation assay. Confocal laser scanning microscopy with raised antibody revealed co-localization with organelles, the budding region of lateral whorls and the cell apex suggesting involvement of putative Acetabularia myosin in organelle transport and tip growth.

  2. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Vishchuk, Olesia S; Sun, Huimin; Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-04-01

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo.

  3. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P.; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N.; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo. PMID:26936995

  4. Effect of algae growth on aerobic granulation and nutrients removal from synthetic wastewater by using sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenli; Li, Bing; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Lu, Baowang; Zhou, Beibei

    2015-03-01

    The effect of algae growth on aerobic granulation and nutrients removal was studied in two identical sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Sunlight exposure promoted the growth of algae in the SBR (Rs), forming an algal-bacterial symbiosis in aerobic granules. Compared to the control SBR (Rc), Rs had a slower granulation process with granules of loose structure and smaller particle size. Moreover, the specific oxygen uptake rate was significantly decreased for the granules from Rs with secretion of 25.7% and 22.5% less proteins and polysaccharides respectively in the extracellular polymeric substances. Although little impact was observed on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, algal-bacterial symbiosis deteriorated N and P removals, about 40.7-45.4% of total N and 44% of total P in Rs in contrast to 52.9-58.3% of TN and 90% of TP in Rc, respectively. In addition, the growth of algae altered the microbial community in Rs, especially unfavorable for Nitrospiraceae and Nitrosomonadaceae.

  5. Potential use of duckweed based anaerobic digester effluent as a feed source for heterotrophic growth of micro-algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, L.; Dupont, R.

    2013-12-01

    Finding an alternative source of energy for the growing world's demand is a challenging task being considered by many scientists. Various types of renewable energy alternatives are being investigated by researchers around the world. The abundance of duckweed (i.e., Lemna and Wolfia sp.) in wetlands and wastewater lagoons, their rapid growth, and their capacity for nutrient, metal and other contaminant removal from wastewater suggests their potential as an inexpensive source of biomass for biofuel production. Another source of biomass for biofuel and energy production is micro-algae. The large-scale growth of micro-algae can potentially be achieved in a smaller footprint and at a higher rate and lower cost via heterotrophic growth compared to autotrophic growth for specific species that can grow under both conditions. Here we describe two types of research. First, two lab-scale, 5 L anaerobic digesters containing municipal raw wastewater that were set up, maintained and monitored over the course of 6 months using duckweed as the feed source. The pH, salinity, amount of gas production and gas composition were measured on a daily basis. The results from these measurements show that duckweed can be used as a good source of biofuel production in the form of methane gas. The second set of reactors consisted of two 1 L batch fed reactors containing algae (Chlorella vulgaris) grown in the lab environment heterotrophically. The pH and DO were monitored on a daily basis in order to investigate their effect on algae growth. Lipid analysis of the harvested algal biomass was done to investigate the efficiency of harvestable biofuel products. A nutrient solution containing glucose as an energy source was used as the initial feed solution, and the potential substitution of the glucose solution with the organic carbon residue from the duckweed digester effluent was investigated. Methane production, carbon stabilization, and gas composition results from the duckweed fed anaerobic

  6. A reaction-diffusion-advection model of harmful algae growth with toxin degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Bin; Hsu, Sze-Bi; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of a reaction-diffusion-advection system modeling the dynamics of a single nutrient, harmful algae and algal toxin in a flowing water habitat with a hydraulic storage zone. We introduce the basic reproduction ratio R0 for algae and show that R0 serves as a threshold value for persistence and extinction of the algae. More precisely, we prove that the washout steady state is globally attractive if R0 < 1, while there exists a positive steady state and the algae is uniformly persistent if R0 > 1. With an additional assumption, we obtain the uniqueness and global attractivity of the positive steady state in the case where R0 > 1.

  7. Bioactivity of Benthic and Picoplanktonic Estuarine Cyanobacteria on Growth of Photoautotrophs: Inhibition versus Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Viviana R.; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding potential biochemical interactions and effects among cyanobacteria and other organisms is one of the main keys to a better knowledge of microbial population structuring and dynamics. In this study, the effects of cyanobacteria from benthos and plankton of estuaries on other cyanobacteria and green algae growth were evaluated. To understand how the estuarine cyanobacteria might influence the dynamics of phytoplankton, experiments were carried out with the freshwater species Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella sp., and the marine Synechocystis salina and Nannochloropsis sp. exposed to aqueous and organic (70% methanol) crude extracts of cyanobacteria for 96 h. The most pronounced effect observed was the growth stimulation. Growth inhibition was also observed for S. salina and M. aeruginosa target-species at the highest and lowest concentrations of cyanobacterial extracts. The methanolic crude extract of Phormidium cf. chalybeum LEGE06078 was effective against S. salina growth in a concentration-dependent manner after 96 h-exposure. All of the cyanobacterial isolates showed some bioactivity on the target-species growth, i.e., inhibitory or stimulating effects. These results indicate that the analyzed cyanobacterial isolates can potentially contribute to blooms’ proliferation of other cyanobacteria and to the abnormal growth of green algae disturbing the dynamic of estuarine phytoplankton communities. Since estuaries are transitional ecosystems, the benthic and picoplanktonic estuarine cyanobacteria can change both freshwater and marine phytoplankton succession, competition and bloom formation. Furthermore, a potential biotechnological application of these isolates as a tool to control cyanobacteria and microalgae proliferation can be feasible. This work is the first on the subject of growth responses of photoautotrophs to cyanobacteria from Atlantic estuarine environments. PMID:21673889

  8. The impact of supplementing lambs with algae on growth, meat traits and oxidative status.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, D L; Clayton, E H; Lamb, T A; van de Ven, R J; Refshauge, G; Kerr, M J; Bailes, K; Lewandowski, P; Ponnampalam, E N

    2014-10-01

    The current study examined the effect of supplementing lambs with algae. Forty, three month old lambs were allocated to receive a control ration based on oats and lupins (n=20) or the control ration with DHA-Gold™ algae (~2% of the ration, n=20). These lambs came from dams previously fed a ration based on either silage (high in omega-3) or oats and cottonseed meal (OCSM: high in omega-6) at joining (dam nutrition, DN). Lamb performance, carcase weight and GR fat content were not affected by treatment diet (control vs algae) or DN (silage vs OSCM). Health claimable omega-3 fatty acids (EPA+DHA) were significantly greater in the LL of lambs fed algae (125±6mg/100g meat) compared to those not fed algae (43±6mg/100g meat) and this effect was mediated by DN. Supplementing with algae high in DHA provides a means of improving an aspect of the health status of lamb meat.

  9. The Effect of Kanamycin and Tetracycline on Growth and Photosynthetic Activity of Two Chlorophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are routinely used in microalgae culture screening, stock culture maintenance, and genetic transformation. By studying the effect of antibiotics on microalgae growth, we can estimate the least value to inhibit growth of undesired pathogens in algal culture. We studied the effect of kanamycin and tetracycline on the growth and photosynthetic activity of two chlorophyte microalgae, Dictyosphaerium pulchellum and Micractinium pusillum. We measured CFU mL−1 on agar plates, optical density, fluorescence yields, and photosynthetic inhibition. Our results showed a significant effect of kan and tet on the tested microalgae species except tet, which showed a minor effect on M. pusillum. Both antibiotics are believed to interact with the protein synthesis machinery; hence, the inhibitory effect of the tested antibiotics was further confirmed by isolation and quantification of the whole cell protein. A significant reduction in protein quantity was observed at concentrations more than 5 mg L−1, except M. pusillum, which showed only a slight reduction in protein quantity even at the maximum tested concentration of tet (30 mg L−1). This study can further aid in aquaculture industry, for the maintenance of the microalgae stock cultures and it can also help the microalgae genetic engineers in the construction of molecular markers. PMID:27747232

  10. Thermogenesis, blood metabolites and hormones, and growth of lambs born to ewes supplemented with algae-derived docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Keithly, J I; Kott, R W; Berardinelli, J G; Moreaux, S; Hatfield, P G

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal lamb mortality is a major factor affecting profitability in the sheep industry, and lamb thermogenesis is a key element in neonatal lamb survival. Increased lamb vigor has been reported when ewes were supplemented during late gestation with algae-derived docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); however, the effects of DHA on lamb thermogenesis and immunocompetence have not been investigated. Eighty twin-bearing Targhee ewes (ages 2 to 5 yr; 68.5 ± 3 kg) were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 supplement treatments to determine the effects of feeding DHA to ewes during late gestation and early lactation on lamb thermogenesis, serum metabolites and hormones, and lamb growth. Supplement treatments were 12 g·ewe(-1)·d(-1) of algae-derived DHA (DHA Gold Advanced Bionutrition Corp., Columbia, MD; algae-derived DHA); and no algae-derived DHA (control). Supplements were individually fed daily during the last 30 d (±7 d) of gestation and pen fed (6 pens/treatment with 6 or 7 ewes/pen) during the first 38 d (±7 d) of lactation. One hour after lambing and before nursing, twin-born lambs were weighed, blood sampled via jugular puncture, and placed in a dry cold chamber for 30 min (0°C), and rectal temperatures were recorded every minute for 30 min. Lambs were removed from the cold chamber, blood sampled, warmed for 15 min, and returned to their dam. Ewes were blood sampled, and colostrum samples were collected 1 h postpartum. Ewe and lamb sera were assayed for glucose, NEFA, cortisol, and leptin. Lamb rectal temperature, glucose, NEFA, cortisol, leptin, and birth weights did not differ between treatments. The BW at 38 d was greater (P = 0.03) for lambs born to control ewes than for lambs born to algae-derived DHA-supplemented ewes; however, the colostrum of algae-derived DHA-supplemented ewes had a greater specific gravity (P = 0.05) than for control ewes. Overall, despite a potentially positive effect on ewe colostral IgG concentrations, supplementation of algae-derived DHA during

  11. Blue-Green Algae Inhibit the Development of Atherosclerotic Lesions in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chai Siah; Kim, Bohkyung; Pham, Tho X; Yang, Yue; Wegner, Casey J; Park, Young-Ki; Balunas, Marcy; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia and inflammation contribute to the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Our objective was to determine antiatherogenic effect of edible blue-green algae (BGA) species, that is, Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP), in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice, a well-established mouse model of atherosclerosis. Male ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol (HF/HC, 15% fat and 0.2% cholesterol by wt) control diet or a HF/HC diet supplemented with 5% (w/w) of NO or SP powder for 12 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerides (TG) were measured, and livers were analyzed for histology and gene expression. Morphometric analysis for lesions and immunohistochemical analysis for CD68 were conducted in the aorta and the aortic root. NO supplementation significantly decreased plasma TC and TG, and liver TC, compared to control and SP groups. In the livers of NO-fed mice, less lipid droplets were present with a concomitant decrease in fatty acid synthase protein levels than the other groups. There was a significant increase in hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein levels in SP-supplemented mice than in control and NO groups. Quantification of aortic lesions by en face analysis demonstrated that both NO and SP decreased aortic lesion development to a similar degree compared with control. While lesions in the aortic root were not significantly different between groups, the CD68-stained area in the aortic root was significantly lowered in BGA-fed mice than controls. In conclusion, both NO and SP supplementation decreased the development of atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting that they may be used as a natural product for atheroprotection. PMID:26566121

  12. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  13. Effects of alginate oligosaccharide mixtures on the growth and fatty acid composition of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Yokose, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Toru; Kim, Daekyung; Jiang, Zedong; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    Alginate is a natural acidic linear polysaccharide that is produced by brown seaweeds. It is currently used in a broad range of commercial enterprises, such as the food and medical products industries. Recent evidence has demonstrated that alginate oligosaccharides may function as growth promoting agents for certain plant cells, including those of some green algae. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green alga that is used as a model organism in fundamental molecular biology studies; it is also a producer of biohydrogen. In the present study, we examined effects of two types of alginate oligosaccharide mixtures (AOMs), which were prepared by either enzymatic degradation (ED) or acid hydrolysis (AH), on the growth of C. reinhardtii. Growth was significantly promoted by AOM (ED) in a concentration-dependent manner. The maximum effect was observed on day 4 of treatment. The fatty acid composition of C. reinhardtii was also influenced by AOM (ED); the levels of C16:0, C18:2 cis and C18:3 n-3 increased in treated cells. AOM (AH) and the other saccharides that we tested did not affect the growth of C. reinhardtii. The effects that we identified could promote efficient biomass production by reducing culture times and by changing cellular fatty acid levels.

  14. Anti-photoaging activity and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) by marine red alga, Corallina pilulifera methanol extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, BoMi; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Kim, Moon-Moo; Nam, Ki Wan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2009-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to ultraviolet A, appear to be increased by UV-irradiation-associated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the alga Corallina pilulifera methanol (CPM) extract has been shown to exert a potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UVA-induced oxidative stress of human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cell. Antioxidant evaluated by various antioxidant assays. These include reducing power, total antioxidant, DPPH radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging and protective effect on DNA damage caused by hydroxyl radicals generated. Further, the ROS level was detected using a fluorescence probe, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), which could be converted to highly fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF) with the presence of intracellular ROS on HT-1080 cells. Those various antioxidant activities were compared to standard antioxidants such as α-tocopherol. In addition, the in vitro activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HDF cell were inhibited by C. pilulifera methanol extract dose dependently by using gelatin zymography method. The results obtained in the present study suggested that the C. pilulifera methanol extract may be a potential source of natural anti-photoaging.

  15. Streptomycin affects the growth and photochemical activity of the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; García, Roberto Velasco; Gómez-Juárez, Evelyn Alicia; Salcedo-Álvarez, Martha Ofelia; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are increasingly being used in human and veterinary medicine, as well as pest control in agriculture. Recently, their emergence in the aquatic environment has become a global concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of streptomycin on growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 72h exposure. We found that growth, photosynthetic activity and the content of the D1 protein of photosystem II decreased. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission shows a reduction in the energy transfer between the antenna complex and reaction center. Also the activity of the oxygen evolution complex and electron flow between QA and QB were significantly reduced; in contrast, we found an increase in the reduction rate of the acceptor side of photosystem I. The foregoing can be attributed to the inhibition of the synthesis of the D1 protein and perhaps other coded chloroplast proteins that are part of the electron transport chain which are essential for the transformation of solar energy in the photosystems. We conclude that micromolar concentrations of streptomycin can affect growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris. The accumulation of antibiotics in the environment can become an ecological problem for primary producers in the aquatic environment. PMID:27344399

  16. Streptomycin affects the growth and photochemical activity of the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; García, Roberto Velasco; Gómez-Juárez, Evelyn Alicia; Salcedo-Álvarez, Martha Ofelia; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are increasingly being used in human and veterinary medicine, as well as pest control in agriculture. Recently, their emergence in the aquatic environment has become a global concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of streptomycin on growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 72h exposure. We found that growth, photosynthetic activity and the content of the D1 protein of photosystem II decreased. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission shows a reduction in the energy transfer between the antenna complex and reaction center. Also the activity of the oxygen evolution complex and electron flow between QA and QB were significantly reduced; in contrast, we found an increase in the reduction rate of the acceptor side of photosystem I. The foregoing can be attributed to the inhibition of the synthesis of the D1 protein and perhaps other coded chloroplast proteins that are part of the electron transport chain which are essential for the transformation of solar energy in the photosystems. We conclude that micromolar concentrations of streptomycin can affect growth and photosynthetic activity of Chlorella vulgaris. The accumulation of antibiotics in the environment can become an ecological problem for primary producers in the aquatic environment.

  17. Terpenes from the red alga Sphaerococcus coronopifolius inhibit the settlement of barnacles.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Veronica; Roussis, Vassilios; Garaventa, Francesca; Greco, Giuliano; Smyrniotopoulos, Vangelis; Vagias, Constantinos; Faimali, Marco

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we screened eight terpenes isolated from the organic extract of Sphaerococcus coronopifolius for their antifouling activity in order to find possible new sources of non-toxic or less toxic bioactive antifoulants. The anti-settlement activity (EC₅₀) and the degree of toxicity (LC₅₀) of S. coronopifolius metabolites was evaluated using larvae of the cirriped crustacean Amphibalanus (Balanus) amphitrite (cyprids and nauplii) as model organism. For five of eight tested metabolites EC₅₀ was lower than 5 mg/L. The most promising results were observed for bromosphaerol (3), which expressed an EC₅₀ value of 0.23 mg/L, in combination with low toxicity levels (LC₅₀ > 100 mg/L). The therapeutic ratio--an index used to estimate whether settlement inhibition is due to toxicity or other mechanisms--is also calculated and discussed.

  18. Endocannabinoids inhibit the growth of free-living amoebae.

    PubMed

    Dey, Rafik; Pernin, Pierre; Bodennec, Jacques

    2010-07-01

    The cannabinoid Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits the growth of some pathogenic amoebae in vitro and exacerbates amoebic encephalitis in animal models. However, the effects of endogenous cannabinoids on amoebae remain unknown. Therefore, we tested several endocannabinoids (N-acyl ethanolamines and 2-O-acyl glycerol) on different genera of amoebae. The results showed that all of the endocannabinoids tested inhibit amoebic growth at subpharmacological doses, with 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging from 15 to 20 microM. A nonhydrolyzable endocannabinoid had similar effects, showing that the inhibition seen results from endocannabinoids per se rather than from a catabolic product.

  19. Endocannabinoids Inhibit the Growth of Free-Living Amoebae▿

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Rafik; Pernin, Pierre; Bodennec, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits the growth of some pathogenic amoebae in vitro and exacerbates amoebic encephalitis in animal models. However, the effects of endogenous cannabinoids on amoebae remain unknown. Therefore, we tested several endocannabinoids (N-acyl ethanolamines and 2-O-acyl glycerol) on different genera of amoebae. The results showed that all of the endocannabinoids tested inhibit amoebic growth at subpharmacological doses, with 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging from 15 to 20 μM. A nonhydrolyzable endocannabinoid had similar effects, showing that the inhibition seen results from endocannabinoids per se rather than from a catabolic product. PMID:20479202

  20. Promotive effect of se on the growth and antioxidation of a blue-green alga Spirulina maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Gang, Zhou; Zhi-Li, Liu

    1998-12-01

    Cultures of a blue-green alga Spirulina maxima (Setch. et Gard.) Geitler with various concentrations of Se in Zarrouk's medium showed that not higher than 40 mg/L Se could promote its growth. The present experiments showed that S. maxima grown under normal conditions, has an oxidant stress defence system for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) removal, which is the Halliwell-Asada pathway. When 4 to 20 mg/L Se was added to the algal medium, this pathway was replaced by a so-called Sestressed pathway containing GSH peroxidase (GSH-POD). As a result of the occurrence of both higher activity of GSH-POD and lower levels of hydroxyl radical (OH·), the Se-stressed pathway scavenged H2O2 so effectively that the growth of S. maxima was promoted by 4 to 20 mg/L Se. While GSH-POD activity of the alga disappeared at 40 mg/L Se, the recovery of ascorbate peroxidase was observed. The lower levels of ascorbic acid and GSH made the Halliwell-Asada pathway for scavenging H2O2 less effective, while the highest activity of catalase might be responsible in part for the H2O2 removal, causing the level of OH· in S. maxima grown at 40 mg/L Se to be much higher than the OH· level in this alga grown at 4 to 20 mg/L Se, but lower than that in the control. The OH· level changes caused the growth of S. maxima cultured at 40 mg/L Se to increase slightly to close to that of the control.

  1. SELECTIVE REVERSIBLE INHIBITION OF MICROBIAL GROWTH WITH PYRITHIAMINE

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, D. W.; White, A. G. C.

    1943-01-01

    Growth of many microbial species was inhibited by pyrithiamine, the pyridine analog of thiamine. Growth of many other species was not influenced. In a series of bacteria, yeasts, and molds, it was found that inhibition of growth occurred only in those in which growth was stimulated by thiamine or its component pyrimidine and thiazole portions. The amount of pyrithiamine required for inhibition was correlated with the type of thiamine requirements of various species. The least amount was needed to inhibit organisms which required intact thiamine. Those which could use the pyrimidine and thiazole portions were not so readily inhibited. In the case of the former organisms, half maximal inhibition was produced by as little as 0.03 γ per cc. In all instances, the inhibition was overcome by sufficient amounts of thiamine. The synthesis of thiamine by insusceptible species was studied, and it was concluded that formation of thiamine or other antagonistic substance did not provide an adequate explanation of the resistance of these species to the action of pyrithiamine. PMID:19871344

  2. Timing of growth inhibition following shoot inversion in Pharbitis nil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Rahman, A. M.; Cline, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    Shoot inversion in Pharbitis nil results in the enhancement of ethylene production and in the inhibition of elongation in the growth zone of the inverted shoot. The initial increase in ethylene production previously was detected within 2 to 2.75 hours after inversion. In the present study, the initial inhibition of shoot elongation was detected within 1.5 to 4 hours with a weighted mean of 2.4 hours. Ethylene treatment of upright shoots inhibited elongation in 1.5 hours. A cause and effect relationship between shoot inversion-enhanced ethylene production and inhibition of elongation cannot be excluded.

  3. Green algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) adsorbs Bacillus thurigiensis (Bt) toxin, Cry1Ca insecticidal protein, without an effect on growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiamei; Chen, Xiuping; Li, Yunhe; Su, Changqing; Ding, Jiatong; Peng, Yufa

    2014-08-01

    The effect of purified Cry1Ca insecticidal protein on the growth of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied in a three-generation toxicity test. The C. pyrenoidosa medium with a density of 5.4 × 10(5) cells/mL was subcultured for three generations with added Cry1Ca at 0, 10, 100, and 1000 µg/L, and cell numbers were determined daily. To explore the distribution of Cry1Ca in C. pyrenoidosa and the culture medium, Cry1Ca was added at 1000 µg/L to algae with a high density of 4.8 × 10(6) cells/mL, and Cry1Ca content was determined daily in C. pyrenoidosa and the culture medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Our results showed that the growth curves of C. pyrenoidosa exposed to 10, 100, and 1000 µg/L of Cry1Ca almost overlapped with that of the blank control, and there were no statistically significant differences among the four treatments from day 0 to day 7, regardless of generation. Moreover, the Cry1Ca content in the culture medium and in C. pyrenoidosa sharply decreased under exposure of 1000 µg/L Cry1Ca with high initial C. pyrenoidosa cell density. The above results demonstrate that Cry1Ca in water can be rapidly adsorbed and degraded by C. pyrenoidosa, but it has no suppressive or stimulative effect on algae growth.

  4. Inhibition of rate of tumor growth by creatine and cyclocreatine.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, E E; Evans, A E; Cohn, M

    1993-01-01

    Growth rate inhibition of subcutaneously implanted tumors results from feeding rats and athymic nude mice diets containing 1% cyclocreatine or 1%, 2%, 5%, or 10% creatine. The tumors studied included rat mammary tumors (Ac33tc in Lewis female rats and 13762A in Fischer 344 female rats), rat sarcoma MCI in Lewis male rats, and tumors resulting from the injection of two human neuroblastoma cell lines, IMR-5 and CHP-134, in athymic nude mice. Inhibition was observed regardless of the time experimental diets were administered, either at the time of tumor implantation or after the appearance of palpable tumors. For mammary tumor Ac33tc, the growth inhibition during 24 days after the implantation was approximately 50% for both 1% cyclocreatine and 1% creatine, and inhibition increased as creatine was increased from 2% to 10% of the diet. For the other rat mammary tumor (13762A), there was approximately 35% inhibition by both 1% cyclocreatine and 2% creatine. In the case of the MCI sarcoma, the inhibitory effect appeared more pronounced at earlier periods of growth, ranging from 26% to 41% for 1% cyclocreatine and from 30% to 53% for 1% creatine; there was no significant difference in growth rate between the tumors in the rats fed 1% and 5% creatine. The growth rate of tumors in athymic nude mice, produced by implantation of the human neuroblastoma IMR-5 cell line, appeared somewhat more effectively inhibited by 1% cyclocreatine than by 1% creatine, and 5% creatine feeding was most effective. For the CHP-134 cell line, 33% inhibition was observed for the 1% cyclocreatine diet and 71% for the 5% creatine diet. In several experiments, a delay in appearance of tumors was observed in animals on the experimental diets. In occasional experiments, neither additive inhibited tumor growth rate for the rat tumors or the athymic mouse tumors. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8475072

  5. Stoichiometry of photosystem I, photosystem II, and phycobilisomes in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum as a function of growth irradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mustardy, L.; Gantt, E. ); Dennenberg, R.J.; Jursinic, P.A. )

    1989-11-01

    Cells of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161) exposed to increasing growth irradiance exhibited up to a three-fold reduction in photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) and phycobilisomes but little change in the relative numbers of these components. Batch cultures of P. cruentum were grown under four photon flux densities of continuous white light; 6 (low light LL), 35 (medium light, ML), 180 (high light, HL), and 280 (very high light, VHL) microeinsteins per square meter per second and sampled in the exponential phase of growth. Ratios of PSII to PSI ranged between 0.43 and 0.54. About three PSII centers per phycobilisome were found, regardless of growth irradiance. The phycoerythrin content of phycobilisomes decreased by about 25% for HL and VHL compared to LL and ML cultures. The unit sizes of PSI (chlorophyll/P{sub 700}) and PSII (chlorophyll/Q{sub A}) decreased by about 20% with increase in photon flux density from 6 to 280 microeinsteins per square meter per second. A threefold reduction in cell content of chlorophyll at the higher photon flux densities was accompanied by a twofold reduction in {beta}-carotene, and a drastic reduction in thylakoid membrane area. Cell content of zeaxanthin, the major carotenoid in P. cruentum, did not vary with growth irradiance, suggesting a role other than light-harvesting. HL cultures had a growth rate twice that of ML, eight times that of LL, and slightly greater than that of VHL cultures. Cell volume increased threefold from LL to VHL, but volume of the single chloroplast did not change. From this study it is evident that a relatively fixed stoichiometry of PSI, PSII, and phycobilisomes is maintained in the photosynthetic apparatus of this red alga over a wide range of growth irradiance.

  6. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  7. Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria)

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, D.L.; Pope, D.H.; Cherry, W.B.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1980-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Legionnaires disease bacterium) of serogroup 1 was isolated from an algal-bacterial mat community growing at 45/sup 0/C in a man-made thermal effluent. This isolate was grown in mineral salts medium at 45/sup 0/C in association with the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Fischerella sp. over a pH range of 6.9 to 7.6. L. pneumophila was apparently using algal extracellular products as its carbon and energy sources. These observations indicate that the temperature, pH, and nutritional requirements of L. pneumophila are not as stringent as those previously observed when cultured on complex media. This association between L. pneumophila and certain blue-green algae suggests an explanation for the apparent widespread distribution of the bacterium in nature.

  8. Growth of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under red and blue lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Sara S.; Cuello, Joel L.; Myhre, Graham; Pau, Stanley

    2011-03-01

    Red and blue lasers, holding promise as an electric light source for photosynthetic systems on account of being true monochromatic, high-power, and having high electrical-conversion efficiency, were employed in growing a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The laser treatments tested included: 655-nm Red; 680-nm Red; 655-nm Red+474-nm Blue and 680-nm Red+474-nm Blue. A white cold cathode lamp with spectral output similar to that of white fluorescent lamp served as control. C. reinhardtii successfully grew and divided under the 655 and 680-nm red lasers as well as under the white-light control. Supplementing either red with blue laser, however, resulted in increased algae cell count that significantly exceeded those under both red lasers and the white-light control on average by 241%.

  9. Vasorelaxation, Induced by Dictyota pulchella (Dictyotaceae), a Brown Alga, Is Mediated via Inhibition of Calcium Influx in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Thyago M.; Machado, Natália T.; Furtado, Fabíola F.; Oliveira-Filho, Abrahão A.; Alustau, Maria C.; Figueiredo, Camila S.; Miranda, George E. C.; Barbosa-Filho, José M.; Braga, Valdir A.; Medeiros, Isac A.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the cardiovascular effects elicited by Dictyota pulchella, a brown alga, using in vivo and in vitro approaches. In normotensive conscious rats, CH2Cl2/MeOH Extract (CME, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) from Dictyota pulchella produced dose-dependent hypotension (−4 ± 1; −8 ± 2; −53 ± 8 and −63 ± 3 mmHg) and bradycardia (−8 ± 6; −17 ± 11; −257 ± 36 and −285 ± 27 b.p.m.). In addition, CME and Hexane/EtOAc Phase (HEP) (0.01–300 μg/mL) from Dictyota pulchella induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in phenylephrine (Phe, 1 μM)-pre-contracted mesenteric artery rings. The vasorelaxant effect was not modified by the removal of the vascular endothelium or pre-incubation with KCl (20 mM), tetraethylammonium (TEA, 3 mM) or tromboxane A2 agonist U-46619 (100 nM). Furthermore, CME and HEP reversed CaCl2-induced vascular contractions. These results suggest that both CME and HEP act on the voltage-operated calcium channel in order to produce vasorelaxation. In addition, CME induced vasodilatation after the vessels have been pre-contracted with L-type Ca2+ channel agonist (Bay K 8644, 200 nM). Taken together, our data show that CME induces hypotension and bradycardia in vivo and that both CME and HEP induce endothelium-independent vasodilatation in vitro that seems to involve the inhibition of the Ca2+ influx through blockade of voltage-operated calcium channels. PMID:22073010

  10. The effects of sub-lethal UV-C irradiation on growth and cell integrity of cyanobacteria and green algae.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Zhang, Xihui; Au, Doris W T; Mao, Xianzhong; Yuan, Kan

    2010-01-01

    The effects of UV-C irradiation on algal growth and cell integrity were investigated to develop a potential method for preventing cyanobacterial blooms. The toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and three common freshwater green algae Chlorella ellipsoidea, Chlorella vulgaris, and Scenedesmus quadricanda were exposed to UV-C irradiation at 0-200mJcm(-2) and subsequently incubated for 9-15 d under normal culture conditions. Cell density and cell integrity were assessed using flow cytometry. The results suggested that UV-C irradiation at 20-200mJcm(-2) can suppress M. aeruginosa growth for 3-13 d in a dose-dependent manner. UV-C irradiation at 20 and 50mJcm(-2) is sub-lethal to M. aeruginosa cells as over 80% of the exposed cells remained intact. However, UV-C irradiation at 100 and 200mJcm(-2) induced severe cell disintegration in more than 70% of the irradiated cells. Neither significant suppression nor disintegration effects on green algae were observed for UV-C irradiation at 20-200mJcm(-2) in this study. Taken together, the sensitivity of M. aeruginosa to UV-C irradiation was significantly higher than that of the non-toxic C. ellipsoidea, C. vulgaris, and S. quadricauda, suggesting the potential application of sub-lethal UV-C irradiation for M. aeruginosa bloom control with a predictable low ecological risk. PMID:20005556

  11. Optimum dredging time for inhibition and prevention of algae-induced black blooms in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhong, Ji-Cheng; Yu, Ju-Hua; Shen, Qiu-Shi; Fan, Cheng-Xin; Kong, Fan-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Dredging, which is the removal of polluted surface sediments from a water body, is an effective means of preventing the formation of algae-induced black blooms. However, an inappropriate dredging time may contribute to rather than inhibit the formation of black blooms. To determine the optimum dredging time, four treatments were simulated with sediment samples collected from Lake Taihu: dredging in January 2014 (DW), April 2014 (DA), July 2014 (DS), and no dredging (UD). Results showed that typical characteristics associated with black blooms, such as high levels of nutrients (NH4 (+)-N and PO4 (3-)-P), Fe(2+), ∑S(2-) ([HS(-)] + [S(2-)]), and volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs), including dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), were more effectively suppressed in the water column by DW treatment than by UD treatment and the other two dredging treatments. The highest concentrations of NH4 (+)-N and PO4 (3-)-P in the UD water column were 4.09 and 4.03 times, respectively, those in the DW water column. DMS levels in the UD and DS water columns were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those in the DW water column, but DMDS and DMTS levels were not significantly different between the treatments. After several months of dredging, surface sediments of the DW and DA treatments were well oxidized, and concentrations of Fe(2+) and ∑S(2-) were lower than those in UD and DS treatments because of material circulation between sediments and the water column. Water content, which is important for the transport of matter to the overlying water, was lower in the dredged sediments than in the undredged sediments. These factors can suppress the release of Fe(2+) and ∑S(2-) into the water column, thereby inhibiting the formation of black blooms. Black coloration occurred in the UD water column on the seventh day, 2 days later, and earlier, respectively, than the DW and DS water columns and almost on the same day as in the

  12. Growth inhibition of Candida by human oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Steele, C; Leigh, J; Swoboda, R; Fidel, P L

    2000-11-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) caused by Candida albicans is a significant problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons. Recognizing the paucity of information on innate and/or adaptive mucosal host defenses against C. albicans, we recently reported that human and nonhuman primate and mouse vaginal epithelial cells inhibit the growth of C. albicans in vitro. In the present study, oral epithelial cells collected from saliva of healthy volunteers and a purified oral epithelial cell line were found to inhibit blastoconidia and/or hyphal growth of several Candida species. Cell contact was a strict requirement for the epithelial cell anti-Candida activity; neither saliva nor culture supernatants alone inhibited Candida growth, and addition of saliva to the coculture did not modulate the epithelial cell activity. Finally, epithelial cell anti-Candida activity was significantly lower in HIV-infected persons with OPC. Together, these results suggest that oral epithelial cells may play a role in innate resistance against OPC.

  13. Inhibition of Bacillus subtilis growth and sporulation by threonine.

    PubMed

    Lamb, D H; Bott, K F

    1979-01-01

    A 1-mg/ml amount of threonine (8.4 mM) inhibited growth and sporulation of Bacillus subtilis 168. Inhibition of sporulation was efficiently reversed by valine and less efficiently by pyruvate, arginine, glutamine, and isoleucine. Inhibition of vegetative growth was reversed by asparate and glutamate as well as by valine, arginine, or glutamine. Cells in minimal growth medium were inhibited only transiently by very high concentrations of threonine, whereas inhibition of sporulation was permanent. Addition of threonine prevented the normal increase in alkaline phosphatase and reduced the production of extracellular protease by about 50%, suggesting that threonine blocked the sporulation process relatively early. 2-Ketobutyrate was able to mimic the effect of threonine on sporulation. Sporulation in a strain selected for resistance to azaleucine was partially resistant. Seventy-five percent of the mutants selected for the ability to grow vegetatively in the presence of high threonine concentrations were found to be simultaneously isoleucine auxotrophs. In at least one of these mutants, the threonine resistance phenotpye could not be dissociated from the isoleucine requirement by transformation. This mutation was closely linked to a known ilvA mutation (recombination index, 0.16). This strain also had reduced intracellular threonine deaminase activity. These results suggest that threonine inhibits B. subtilis by causing valine starvation.

  14. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  15. Consistent fractionation of 13C in nature and in the laboratory: Growth-rate effects in some haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidigare, Robert R.; Fluegge, Arnim; Freeman, Katherine H.; Hanson, Kristi L.; Hayes, John M.; Hollander, David; Jasper, John P.; King, Linda L.; Laws, Edward A.; Milder, Jeffrey; Millero, Frank J.; Pancost, Richard; Popp, Brian N.; Steinberg, Paul A.; Wakeham, Stuart G.

    1997-06-01

    The carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying formation of biomass by alkenone-producing algae in natural marine environments varies systematically with the concentration of dissolved phosphate. Specifically, if the fractionation is expressed by єP ≈ δe - δp, where δe and δp are the δ13C values for dissolved CO2 and for algal biomass (determined by isotopic analysis of C37 alkadienones), respectively, and if Ce is the concentration of dissolved CO2, μmol kg-1, then b = 38 + 160*[PO4], where [PO4] is the concentration of dissolved phosphate, μM, and b = (25 - єp)Ce. The correlation found between b and [PO4] is due to effects linking nutrient levels to growth rates and cellular carbon budgets for alkenone-containing algae, most likely by trace-metal limitations on algal growth. The relationship reported here is characteristic of 39 samples (r2 = 0.95) from the Santa Monica Basin (six different times during the annual cycle), the equatorial Pacific (boreal spring and fall cruises as well as during an iron-enrichment experiment), and the Peru upwelling zone. Points representative of samples from the Sargasso Sea ([PO4] ≤ 0.1 μM) fall above the b = f[PO4] line. Analysis of correlations expected between μ (growth rate), єp, and Ce shows that, for our entire data set, most variations in єp result from variations in μ rather than Ce. Accordingly, before concentrations of dissolved CO2 can be estimated from isotopic fractionations, some means of accounting for variations in growth rate must be found, perhaps by drawing on relationships between [PO4] and Cd/Ca ratios in shells of planktonic foraminifera.

  16. Consistent fractionation of 13C in nature and in the laboratory: growth-rate effects in some haptophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Bidigare, R R; Fluegge, A; Freeman, K H; Hanson, K L; Hayes, J M; Hollander, D; Jasper, J P; King, L L; Laws, E A; Milder, J; Millero, F J; Pancost, R; Popp, B N; Steinberg, P A; Wakeham, S G

    1997-06-01

    The carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying formation of biomass by alkenone-producing algae in natural marine environments varies systematically with the concentration of dissolved phosphate. Specifically, if the fractionation is expressed by epsilon p approximately delta e - delta p, where delta e and delta p are the delta 13C values for dissolved CO2 and for algal biomass (determined by isotopic analysis of C37 alkadienones), respectively, and if Ce is the concentration of dissolved CO2, micromole kg-1, then b = 38 + 160*[PO4], where [PO4] is the concentration of dissolved phosphate, microM, and b = (25 - epsilon p)Ce. The correlation found between b and [PO4] is due to effects linking nutrient levels to growth rates and cellular carbon budgets for alkenone-containing algae, most likely by trace-metal limitations on algal growth. The relationship reported here is characteristic of 39 samples (r2 = 0.95) from the Santa Monica Basin (six different times during the annual cycle), the equatorial Pacific (boreal spring and fall cruises as well as during an iron-enrichment experiment), and the Peru upwelling zone. Points representative of samples from the Sargasso Sea ([PO4] < or = 0.1 microM) fall above the b = f[PO4] line. Analysis of correlations expected between mu (growth rate), epsilon p, and Ce shows that, for our entire data set, most variations in epsilon p result from variations in mu rather than Ce. Accordingly, before concentrations of dissolved CO2 can be estimated from isotopic fractionations, some means of accounting for variations in growth rate must be found, perhaps by drawing on relationships between [PO4] and Cd/Ca ratios in shells of planktonic foraminifera. PMID:11540616

  17. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  18. Recovery of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from ethanol - induced growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Walker-Caprioglio, H.M.; Rodriguez, R.J.; Parks, L.W.

    1985-09-01

    Ethanol caused altered mobility of the lipophilic probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene in plasma membrane preparations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because lipids had been shown to protect yeast cells against ethanol toxicity, sterols, fatty acids, proteins, and combinations of these were tested; however, protection from growth inhibition was not seen. Ethanol-induced, prolonged lag periods and diminished growth rates in S. cerevisiae were reduced by an autoconditioning of the medium by the inoculum.

  19. Algae biomass cultivation in nitrogen rich biogas digestate.

    PubMed

    Krustok, I; Diaz, J G; Odlare, M; Nehrenheim, E

    2015-01-01

    Because microalgae are known for quick biomass growth and nutrient uptake, there has been much interest in their use in research on wastewater treatment methods. While many studies have concentrated on the algal treatment of wastewaters with low to medium ammonium concentrations, there are several liquid waste streams with high ammonium concentrations that microalgae could potentially treat. The aim of this paper was to test ammonium tolerance of the indigenous algae community of Lake Mälaren and to use this mixed consortia of algae to remove nutrients from biogas digestate. Algae from Lake Mälaren were cultivated in Jaworski's Medium containing a range of ammonium concentrations and the resulting algal growth was determined. The algae were able to grow at NH4-N concentrations of up to 200 mg L(-1) after which there was significant inhibition. To test the effectiveness of the lake water algae on the treatment of biogas digestate, different pre-cultivation set-ups and biogas digestate concentrations were tested. It was determined that mixing pre-cultivated suspension algae with 25% of biogas digestate by volume, resulting in an ammonium concentration of around 300 mg L(-1), produced the highest algal growth. The algae were effective in removing 72.8±2.2% of NH4-N and 41.4±41.4% of PO4-P. PMID:26540532

  20. Algae biomass cultivation in nitrogen rich biogas digestate.

    PubMed

    Krustok, I; Diaz, J G; Odlare, M; Nehrenheim, E

    2015-01-01

    Because microalgae are known for quick biomass growth and nutrient uptake, there has been much interest in their use in research on wastewater treatment methods. While many studies have concentrated on the algal treatment of wastewaters with low to medium ammonium concentrations, there are several liquid waste streams with high ammonium concentrations that microalgae could potentially treat. The aim of this paper was to test ammonium tolerance of the indigenous algae community of Lake Mälaren and to use this mixed consortia of algae to remove nutrients from biogas digestate. Algae from Lake Mälaren were cultivated in Jaworski's Medium containing a range of ammonium concentrations and the resulting algal growth was determined. The algae were able to grow at NH4-N concentrations of up to 200 mg L(-1) after which there was significant inhibition. To test the effectiveness of the lake water algae on the treatment of biogas digestate, different pre-cultivation set-ups and biogas digestate concentrations were tested. It was determined that mixing pre-cultivated suspension algae with 25% of biogas digestate by volume, resulting in an ammonium concentration of around 300 mg L(-1), produced the highest algal growth. The algae were effective in removing 72.8±2.2% of NH4-N and 41.4±41.4% of PO4-P.

  1. Toxic effects of organic solvents on the growth of blue-green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, G.W.

    1987-06-01

    Relatively few reports have been published on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms, and these deal primarily with fish and aquatic invertebrates. Information for microbial systems are more limited with some data available for algae and slightly more for fungi. Aside from direct toxic effects of their own, solvents can interact synergistically and antagonistically with the toxicant in solution. This problem has been well documented with pesticides, and a procedure has been developed to identify and eliminate these effects from bioassays. The first step in choosing a solvent for use in microbial bioassays should be a detailed screening to identify solvents with inherently low toxicity to the test organism, followed by an interaction study to choose the best concentration to use. The purpose of the present study was to compare the inhibitory effects of six solvents commonly used in pesticide bioassays towards five species of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), in order to identify solvents with low toxicity for use in bioassays.

  2. Host specificity and growth of kelp gametophytes symbiotic with filamentous red algae (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Charlene B.; Garbary, David J.; Kim, Kwang Young; Chiasson, David M.

    2004-02-01

    Kelp gametophytes were previously observed in nature living endophytically in red algal cell walls. Here we examine the interactions of two kelp species and six red algae in culture. Gametophytes of Nereocystis luetkeana (Mertens) Postels et Ruprecht became endophytic in the cell walls of Griffithsia pacifica Kylin and Antithamnion defectum Kylin, and grew epiphytically in high abundance on G. japonica Okamura and Aglaothamnion oosumiense Itono. Alaria esculenta (Linnaeus) Greville from the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia became endophytic in Aglaothamnion oosumiense, Antithamnion defectum, Callithamnion sp., G. japonica, G. pacifica, and Pleonosporium abysicola Gardner, all from the Pacific Ocean. Some cultures were treated with phloroglucinol before infection to thicken the cell walls. The endophytic gametophytes were smaller and grew more slowly than gametophytes epiphytic on the same host. N. luetkeana failed to become endophytic in some of the potential hosts, and this may reflect host specificity, or culture artifacts. This work improves our understanding of the process of infection of red algae by kelp gametophytes, and broadens our knowledge of host specificity in endophytic symbioses.

  3. An efficient and reproducible method for improving growth of a soil alga (Chlorococcum infusionum) for toxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sun-Hwa; An, Youn-Joo

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated five methods of soil inoculation using the soil alga Chlorococcum infusionum to determine the most efficient and reproducible method for promoting the growth of soil algae for toxicity testing. The five techniques included application of C. infusionum in a circle on top of the soil, to a central spot on top of the soil, to a central spot in the subsoil, to one side on top of the soil, and application divided between a circle and a central spot on top of the soil. Of these, the first method generated the greatest amount of chlorophyll fluorescence and was the method with the best reproducibility. We evaluated the applicability of this method in an assessment of the toxicity of copper and nickel to C. infusionum in two representative standard soils. Copper (20-75 mg/kg for OECD soil and 20-60 mg/kg Lufa 2.2 soil) and nickel (400-500 mg/kg for OECD soil and 60-100 mg/kg Lufa 2.2 soil) reduced the chlorophyll fluorescence of C. infusionum when the inoculation was delivered in a circle on top of both soil types. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the suitability of different soil algal inoculation methods for terrestrial toxicity testing. PMID:26435085

  4. An efficient and reproducible method for improving growth of a soil alga (Chlorococcum infusionum) for toxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sun-Hwa; An, Youn-Joo

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated five methods of soil inoculation using the soil alga Chlorococcum infusionum to determine the most efficient and reproducible method for promoting the growth of soil algae for toxicity testing. The five techniques included application of C. infusionum in a circle on top of the soil, to a central spot on top of the soil, to a central spot in the subsoil, to one side on top of the soil, and application divided between a circle and a central spot on top of the soil. Of these, the first method generated the greatest amount of chlorophyll fluorescence and was the method with the best reproducibility. We evaluated the applicability of this method in an assessment of the toxicity of copper and nickel to C. infusionum in two representative standard soils. Copper (20-75 mg/kg for OECD soil and 20-60 mg/kg Lufa 2.2 soil) and nickel (400-500 mg/kg for OECD soil and 60-100 mg/kg Lufa 2.2 soil) reduced the chlorophyll fluorescence of C. infusionum when the inoculation was delivered in a circle on top of both soil types. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the suitability of different soil algal inoculation methods for terrestrial toxicity testing.

  5. [Experimental assessment of combined effect of nitrates and acute gamma-irradiation on green algae Scenedesmus quadricauda growth].

    PubMed

    Triapitsyna, G A; Tarasova, S P; Atamaniuk, N I; Osipov, D I; Priakhin, E A

    2012-01-01

    The combined effect of acute gamma-irradiation at doses of 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 Gy and nitrates in concentrations of 0.04 g/dm3 (that corresponds to maximum permissible concentrations for fishery waters), 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 g/dm3 (that is close to NO3(-) level in water of a reservoir R-17 used as radioactive waste storage of the "Mayak" Production Association) and 5.0 g/dm3 (that is close to NO3(-) level in the water of radioactive waste storage reservoir R-9) on the unicellular green algae Scenedesmus quadricauda growth has been studied in laboratory conditions. It was shown that the joint effects of nitrates and y-radiation had an antagonistic character. Thus, it may be concluded that chemical pollution is the factor limiting the development of green algae in reservoir R-17; probably, both factors, chemical and radiating, are essential to the algocenosis degradation in reservoir R-9. PMID:22891554

  6. [Experimental assessment of combined effect of nitrates and acute gamma-irradiation on green algae Scenedesmus quadricauda growth].

    PubMed

    Triapitsyna, G A; Tarasova, S P; Atamaniuk, N I; Osipov, D I; Priakhin, E A

    2012-01-01

    The combined effect of acute gamma-irradiation at doses of 0, 50, 100, 150 and 200 Gy and nitrates in concentrations of 0.04 g/dm3 (that corresponds to maximum permissible concentrations for fishery waters), 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 g/dm3 (that is close to NO3(-) level in water of a reservoir R-17 used as radioactive waste storage of the "Mayak" Production Association) and 5.0 g/dm3 (that is close to NO3(-) level in the water of radioactive waste storage reservoir R-9) on the unicellular green algae Scenedesmus quadricauda growth has been studied in laboratory conditions. It was shown that the joint effects of nitrates and y-radiation had an antagonistic character. Thus, it may be concluded that chemical pollution is the factor limiting the development of green algae in reservoir R-17; probably, both factors, chemical and radiating, are essential to the algocenosis degradation in reservoir R-9.

  7. The interactive effects of microcystin-LR and cylindrospermopsin on the growth rate of the freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carlos; Azevedo, Joana; Campos, Alexandre; Vasconcelos, Vítor; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-05-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN) are the most representative cyanobacterial cyanotoxins. They have been simultaneously detected in aquatic systems, but their combined ecotoxicological effects to aquatic organisms, especially microalgae, is unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of these cyanotoxins individually and as a binary mixture on the growth rate of the freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris. Using the MIXTOX tool, the reference model concentration addition (CA) was selected to evaluate the combined effects of MC-LR and CYN on the growth of the freshwater green algae due to its conservative prediction of mixture effect for putative similar or dissimilar acting chemicals. Deviations from the CA model such as synergism/antagonism, dose-ratio and dose-level dependency were also assessed. In single exposures, our results demonstrated that MC-LR and CYN had different impacts on the growth rates of C. vulgaris at the highest tested concentrations, being CYN the most toxic. In the mixture exposure trial, MC-LR and CYN showed a synergistic deviation from the conceptual model CA as the best descriptive model. MC-LR individually was not toxic even at high concentrations (37 mg L(-1)); however, the presence of MC-LR at much lower concentrations (0.4-16.7 mg L(-1)) increased the CYN toxicity. From these results, the combined exposure of MC-LR and CYN should be considered for risk assessment of mixtures as the toxicity may be underestimated when looking only at the single cyanotoxins and not their combination. This study also represents an important step to understand the interactions among MC-LR and CYN detected previously in aquatic systems. PMID:26910533

  8. Chlorinated englerins with selective inhibition of renal cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Akee, Rhone K; Ransom, Tanya; Ratnayake, Ranjala; McMahon, James B; Beutler, John A

    2012-03-23

    The chlorinated englerins (3-9) were isolated from Phyllanthus engleri and shown to selectively inhibit the growth of renal cancer cells. The compounds were shown to be extraction artifacts produced by exposure to chloroform decomposition products during their isolation. The most active compound, 3, was synthesized from englerin A (1). PMID:22280462

  9. Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Edra; Dorta, Fernando; Medina, Cristian; Ramírez, Alberto; Ramírez, Ingrid; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens. PMID:21673886

  10. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  11. Inhibition of tumor growth by elimination of granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    As observed for many types of cancers, heritable variants of ultraviolet light-induced tumors often grow more aggressively than the parental tumors. The aggressive growth of some variants is due to the loss of a T cell-recognized tumor-specific antigen; however, other variants retain such antigens. We have analyzed an antigen retention variant and found that the variant tumor cells grow at the same rate as the parental tumor cells in vitro, but grew more rapidly than the parental cells in the T cell-deficient host. The growth of the variant cells was stimulated in vitro by factors released from tumor-induced leukocytes and by several defined growth factors. In addition, the variant cancer cells actually attracted more leukocytes in vitro than the parental cells. Furthermore, elimination of granulocytes in vivo in nude mice by a specific antigranulocyte antibody inhibited the growth of the variant cancer, indicating that this tumor requires granulocytes for rapid growth. PMID:7807024

  12. A Lipid-Accumulating Alga Maintains Growth in Outdoor, Alkaliphilic Raceway Pond with Mixed Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Tisza A. S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-01

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (∼9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. The characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass productivity in an

  13. A Lipid-Accumulating Alga Maintains Growth in Outdoor, Alkaliphilic Raceway Pond with Mixed Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Bell, Tisza A S; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D; Fields, Matthew W; Peyton, Brent M

    2015-01-01

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal "crop." In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (∼9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. The characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass productivity in an open

  14. A lipid-accumulating alga maintains growth in outdoor, alkaliphilic raceway pond with mixed microbial communities

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Tisza A.S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-07

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (~9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgarismore » and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. As a result, the characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass

  15. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  16. Algae Derived Biofuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, Kauser

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  17. Abscisic acid inhibits root growth in Arabidopsis through ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xingju; Chen, Zhizhong; Gao, Junping; Gong, Zhizhong

    2014-07-01

    When first discovered in 1963, abscisic acid (ABA) was called abscisin II because it promotes abscission. Later, researchers found that ABA accelerates abscission via ethylene. In Arabidopsis, previous studies have shown that high concentrations of ABA inhibit root growth through ethylene signaling but not ethylene production. In the present study in Arabidopsis, we found that ABA inhibits root growth by promoting ethylene biosynthesis. The ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor L-α-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl)-glycine reduces ABA inhibition of root growth, and multiple mutants of ACS (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase) are more resistant to ABA in terms of root growth than the wild-type is. Two ABA-activated calcium-dependent protein kinases, CPK4 and CPK11, phosphorylate the C-terminus of ACS6 and increase the stability of ACS6 in ethylene biosynthesis. Plants expressing an ACS6 mutant that mimics the phosphorylated form of ACS6 produce more ethylene than the wild-type. Our results reveal an important mechanism by which ABA promotes ethylene production. This mechanism may be highly conserved among higher plants.

  18. Larvicidal algae.

    PubMed

    Marten, Gerald G

    2007-01-01

    Although most algae are nutritious food for mosquito larvae, some species kill the larvae when ingested in large quantities. Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) that kill larvae do so by virtue of toxicity. While blue-green algae toxins may offer possibilities for delivery as larvicides, the toxicity of live blue-green algae does not seem consistent enough for live algae to be useful for mosquito control. Certain species of green algae in the order Chlorococcales kill larvae primarily because they are indigestible. Where these algae are abundant in nature, larvae consume them to the exclusion of other food and then starve. Under the right circumstances, it is possible to introduce indigestible algae into a breeding habitat so they become abundant enough to render it unsuitable for mosquito production. The algae can persist for years, even if the habitat dries periodically. The main limitation of indigestible algae lies in the fact that, under certain conditions, they may not replace all the nutritious algae in the habitat. More research on techniques to ensure complete replacement will be necessary before indigestible algae can go into operational use for mosquito control.

  19. Biological activity of a red-tide alga--A. tamarense under co-cultured condition with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Su, Jian-qiang; Yu, Zhi-ming; Tian, Yun; Song, Xiu-xian; Hong, Hua-sheng; Zheng, Tian-ling

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between Alexandrium tamarense (Lebour) Balech, one of red-tide alga, and two strains of marine bacteria, Bacillius megaterium (S7) and B. halmapulus (S10) isolated from Xiamen Western Sea, was investigated by evaluating the growth state of A. tamarense and the variation of beta-glucosidase activity in co-culture system. The results showed the growth and multiplication of the alga were related with the concentration, genus speciality of the bacteria, and growth stage of the alga itself. The growth of A. tamarense was obviously inhibited by S7 and S10 at high concentration. Either inhibition or promotion contributed much more clearly in earlier than in later stage of the growth of the alga. Furthermore, there was a roughly similar variation trend of the activity of extra-cellular enzyme, beta-glucosidase, in the water of the separately co-cultured bacteria S7 and S10 with the alga. The beta-glucosidase activity (beta-GlcA) rapidly increased during the later algal growth accompanying the increase of the lysis of the alga cells. The obvious inhibition of A. tamarense by marine bacteria at high concentration and evident increase of beta-GlcA in co-colture system would help us in better understanding the relationship between red-tide alga and bacteria, and also enlightenedus the possible use of bacteria in the bio-control of red-tide.

  20. Growth inhibition of Mycobacterium smegmatis by mycobacteriophage-derived enzymes.

    PubMed

    Grover, Navdeep; Paskaleva, Elena E; Mehta, Krunal K; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2014-09-01

    We report the ability of mycobacteriophage-derived endolysins to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis. We expressed and purified LysB from mycobacteriophage Bxz2 and compared its activity with that of a previously reported LysB from mycobacteriophage Ms6. The esterase activity of Bxz2 LysB with pNP esters was 10-fold higher than that of the previously reported LysB but its lipolytic activity was significantly lower. The presence of surfactant - Tween 80 or Triton X-100 - significantly increased the activity of LysB. Characterization of LysB-treated M. smegmatis cells and LysB-treated purified cell wall by mass spectroscopy confirmed the hydrolytic activity of the enzyme. Both enzymes were equally effective in inhibiting the growth of M. smegmatis, demonstrating their potential as bacteriostatic agents.

  1. Rhizoids and protonemata of characean algae: model cells for research on polarized growth and plant gravity sensing.

    PubMed

    Braun, M; Limbach, C

    2006-12-01

    Gravitropically tip-growing rhizoids and protonemata of characean algae are well-established unicellular plant model systems for research on gravitropism. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying gravity sensing and gravity-oriented growth. While in higher-plant statocytes the role of cytoskeletal elements, especially the actin cytoskeleton, in the mechanisms of gravity sensing is still enigmatic, there is clear evidence that in the characean cells actin is intimately involved in polarized growth, gravity sensing, and the gravitropic response mechanisms. The multiple functions of actin are orchestrated by a variety of actin-binding proteins which control actin polymerisation, regulate the dynamic remodelling of the actin filament architecture, and mediate the transport of vesicles and organelles. Actin and a steep gradient of cytoplasmic free calcium are crucial components of a feedback mechanism that controls polarized growth. Experiments performed in microgravity provided evidence that actomyosin is a key player for gravity sensing: it coordinates the position of statoliths and, upon a change in the cell's orientation, directs sedimenting statoliths to specific areas of the plasma membrane, where contact with membrane-bound gravisensor molecules elicits short gravitropic pathways. In rhizoids, gravitropic signalling leads to a local reduction of cytoplasmic free calcium and results in differential growth of the opposite subapical cell flanks. The negative gravitropic response of protonemata involves actin-dependent relocation of the calcium gradient and displacement of the centre of maximal growth towards the upper flank. On the basis of the results obtained from the gravitropic model cells, a similar fine-tuning function of the actomyosin system is discussed for the early steps of gravity sensing in higher-plant statocytes.

  2. Multiple stressor effects of high light irradiance and photosynthetic herbicides on growth and survival of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Rüfenacht, Karin; Dannenhauer, Kerstin; Wiesendanger, Manuela; Eggen, Rik I L

    2010-10-01

    Exposure of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard to a combination of environmental stress by high light irradiance and chemical stress by each of the three herbicides paraquat, atrazine, and norflurazon resulted in diverse multiple stressor effects on growth and survival of the cells. Under low light conditions, growth analyzed by cell numbers was generally more sensitive to herbicide treatment than optical density-based growth rates or colony-forming unit endpoints, which both also analyzed the viability of the cells. However, growth analyzed by optical density and colony-forming units in herbicide-treated cultures was affected much more strongly by high light irradiance, as shown by reduced 50% effective concentrations, indicating extensive multiple stressor effects of the combined treatment on the viability of the cells. None of the currently used concepts for mixture toxicity (concentration addition, independent action, or effect summation) could accurately describe the effects measured by the two stressors in combination. Both synergistic and antagonistic interactions seem to occur depending on the light conditions and the parameter analyzed. The strong stimulation of toxicity by the combined stresses can be explained by the similar mode of toxic action of the treatments, all increasing the production of reactive oxygen species. Antagonistic effects, conversely, are probably attributable to the various protection mechanisms of photosynthetic organisms to increased light irradiance, which help the cells acclimate to specific light conditions and defend against the deleterious effects of excess light. These protection mechanisms can affect growth and viability under increased light conditions and also might influence the toxicity of the photosynthetic herbicides.

  3. Multiple stressor effects of high light irradiance and photosynthetic herbicides on growth and survival of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Rüfenacht, Karin; Dannenhauer, Kerstin; Wiesendanger, Manuela; Eggen, Rik I L

    2010-10-01

    Exposure of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard to a combination of environmental stress by high light irradiance and chemical stress by each of the three herbicides paraquat, atrazine, and norflurazon resulted in diverse multiple stressor effects on growth and survival of the cells. Under low light conditions, growth analyzed by cell numbers was generally more sensitive to herbicide treatment than optical density-based growth rates or colony-forming unit endpoints, which both also analyzed the viability of the cells. However, growth analyzed by optical density and colony-forming units in herbicide-treated cultures was affected much more strongly by high light irradiance, as shown by reduced 50% effective concentrations, indicating extensive multiple stressor effects of the combined treatment on the viability of the cells. None of the currently used concepts for mixture toxicity (concentration addition, independent action, or effect summation) could accurately describe the effects measured by the two stressors in combination. Both synergistic and antagonistic interactions seem to occur depending on the light conditions and the parameter analyzed. The strong stimulation of toxicity by the combined stresses can be explained by the similar mode of toxic action of the treatments, all increasing the production of reactive oxygen species. Antagonistic effects, conversely, are probably attributable to the various protection mechanisms of photosynthetic organisms to increased light irradiance, which help the cells acclimate to specific light conditions and defend against the deleterious effects of excess light. These protection mechanisms can affect growth and viability under increased light conditions and also might influence the toxicity of the photosynthetic herbicides. PMID:20872684

  4. Interactive effect of brassinosteroids and cytokinins on growth, chlorophyll, monosaccharide and protein content in the green alga Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Bajguz, Andrzej; Piotrowska-Niczyporuk, Alicja

    2014-07-01

    Interaction between brassinosteroids (BRs) (brassinolide, BL; 24-epibrassinolide, 24-epiBL; 28-homobrassinolide, 28-homoBL; castasterone, CS; 24-epicastasterone, 24-epiCS; 28-homocastasterone, 28-homoCS) and adenine- (trans-zeatin, tZ; kinetin, Kin) as well as phenylurea-type (1,3-diphenylurea, DPU) cytokinins (CKs) in the regulation of cell number, phytohormone level and the content of chlorophyll, monosaccharide and protein in unicellular green alga Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae) were examined. Chlorella vulgaris exhibited sensitivity to CKs in the following order of their stimulating properties: 10 nM tZ > 100 nM Kin >1 μM DPU. Exogenously applied BRs possessed the highest biological activity in algal cells at concentration of 10 nM. Among the BRs, BL was characterized by the highest activity, while 28-homoCS - by the lowest. The considerable increase in the level of all endogenous BRs by 27-46% was observed in C. vulgaris culture treated with exogenous 10 nM tZ. It can be speculated that CKs may stimulate BR activity in C. vulgaris by inducing the accumulation of endogenous BRs. CKs interacted synergistically with BRs increasing the number of cells and endogenous accumulation of proteins, chlorophylls and monosaccharides in C. vulgaris. The highest stimulation of algal growth and the contents of analyzed biochemical parameters were observed for BL applied in combination with tZ, whereas the lowest in the culture treated with both 28-homoCS and DPU. However, regardless of the applied mixture of BRs with CKs, the considerable increase in cell number and the metabolite accumulation was found above the level obtained in cultures treated with any single phytohormone in unicellular green alga C. vulgaris.

  5. The effects of growth phase and salinity on the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones produced by coastal haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Sinke-Schoen, Daniëlle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2014-09-01

    The isotopic fractionation of hydrogen during the biosynthesis of alkenones produced by marine haptophyte algae has been shown to depend on salinity and, as such, the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones is emerging as a palaeosalinity proxy. The relationship between fractionation and salinity has previously only been determined during exponential growth, whilst it is not yet known in which growth phases natural haptophyte populations predominantly exist. We have therefore determined the relationship between the fractionation factor, αalkenones-water, and salinity for C37 alkenones produced in different growth phases of batch cultures of the major alkenone-producing coastal haptophytes Isochrysis galbana (strain CCMP 1323) and Chrysotila lamellosa (strain CCMP 1307) over a range in salinity from ca. 10 to 35. αalkenones-water was similar in both species, ranging over 0.841-0.900 for I. galbana and 0.838-0.865 for C. lamellosa. A strong (0.85 ⩽ R2 ⩽ 0.97; p < 0.0001) relationship between salinity and fractionation factor was observed in both species at all growth phases investigated. This suggests that alkenone δD has the potential to be used as a salinity proxy in neritic areas where haptophyte communities are dominated by these coastal species. However, there was a marked difference in the sensitivity of αalkenones-water to salinity between different growth phases: in the exponential growth phase of I. galbana, αalkenones-water increased by 0.0019 per salinity unit (S-1), but was less sensitive at 0.0010 and 0.0008 S-1 during the stationary and decline phases, respectively. Similarly, in C. lamellosa αalkenones-water increased by 0.0010 S-1 in the early stationary phase and by 0.0008 S-1 during the late stationary phase. Assuming the shift in sensitivity of αalkenones-water to salinity observed at the end of exponential growth in I. galbana is similar in other alkenone-producing species, the predominant growth phase of natural populations of

  6. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits Insulin-Like Growth Factor Signaling, Growth, and Survival in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gary E.; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldenberg, David D.; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Weiss, William A.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Rosenthal, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling. PMID:17486636

  7. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits insulin-like growth factor signaling, growth, and survival in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary E; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A; Goldenberg, David D; Youngren, Jack F; Goldfine, Ira D; Weiss, William A; Matthay, Katherine K; Rosenthal, Stephen M

    2007-12-15

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling.

  8. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yanfei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-07-30

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment.

  9. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    PubMed

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements.

  10. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    PubMed

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements. PMID:20547408

  11. Dihydroartiminisin inhibits the growth and metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Buchu; Hu, Ke; Li, Shu; Zhu, Jing; Gu, Liying; Shen, Haoran; Hambly, Brett D; Bao, Shisan; Di, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Dihydroartiminisin (DHA), the active component of a Chinese herb (Artemisia annua), has been utilised as an anti-malarial drug since ancient China. DHA has also been shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer in vitro. However, the capacity of DHA to inhibit the development of ovarian cancer is still unclear. The adhesion, invasion, and migration of human ovarian cancer cell line (HO8910PM) was determined following DHA treatment in vitro, using Matrigel coated plate, transwell membrane chamber, and wound healing models, respectively. A mouse ovarian cancer model was established by orthotopic inoculation of HO8910PM cell line in nude mice. The growth and metastasis in vivo was determined 8 weeks post-implantation in response to DHA treatment. The expression of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) was evaluated using Western blotting. The expression of Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and infiltration of macrophages were determined, using immunohistochemistry. DHA inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with decreased expression of pFAK and MMP-2, but not MMP-9. DHA inhibited metastasis significantly in vivo, associated with reduced vWF expression and macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, DHA inhibits the development of ovarian cancer, in part via down-regulating pFAK, MMP-2, vWF and macrophage infiltration. PMID:22025319

  12. Effect of Ocean acidification on growth, calcification and recruitment of calcifying and non-calcifying epibionts of brown algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saderne, V.; Wahl, M.

    2012-03-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are leading to an acidification of the oceans by 0.4 pH units in the course of this century according to the more severe model scenarios. The excess of CO2 could notably affect the benthic communities of calcifiers and macrophytes in different aspects (photosynthesis, respiration and calcification). Seaweeds are key species of nearshore benthic ecosystems of the Baltic Sea. They frequently are the substratum of fouling epibionts like bryozoans and tubeworms. Most of those species secrete calcified structures and could therefore be impacted by the seawater pCO2. On the other hand, the biological activity of the host may substantially modulate the pH and pCO2 conditions in the thallus boundary layer where the epibionts live. The aim of the present study was to test the sensitivity of seaweed macrofouling communities to higher pCO2 concentrations. Fragments of the macroalga Fucus serratus bearing the calcifiers Spirorbis spirorbis (Annelida) and Electra pilosa (Bryozoa) and the non-calcifier Alcyonidium gelatinosum (Bryozoa) were maintained for 30 days under three pCO2 conditions: natural 460 ± 59 μatm and enriched 1193 ± 166 μatm and 3150 ± 446 μatm. Our study showed a significant reduction of growth rates and recruitment of Spirorbis individuals only at the highest pCO2. At a finer temporal resolution, the tubeworm recruits exhibited enhanced calcification of 40% during irradiation hours compared to dark hours, presumably due to the effect of photosynthetic and respiratory activities of the host alga on the carbonate system. Electra colonies showed significantly increased growth rates at 1193 μatm. No effect on Alcyonidium colonies growth rates was observed. Those results suggest a remarkable resistance of the algal macro-epibiontic communities to the most elevated pCO2 foreseen in year 2100 for open ocean (~1000 μatm) conditions possibly due to the modulation of environmental conditions by the biological activities of the host

  13. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease.

  14. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease. PMID:26116492

  15. Cell growth inhibition by sequence-specific RNA minihelices.

    PubMed Central

    Hipps, D; Schimmel, P

    1995-01-01

    RNA minihelices which reconstruct the 12 base pair acceptor-T psi C domains of transfer RNAs interact with their cognate tRNA synthetases. These substrates lack the anticodons of the genetic code and, therefore, cannot participate in steps of protein synthesis subsequent to aminoacylation. We report here that expression in Escherichia coli of either of two minihelices, each specific for a different amino acid, inhibited cell growth. Inhibition appears to be due to direct competition between the minihelix and its related tRNA for binding to their common synthetase. This competition, in turn, sharply lowers the pool of the specific charged tRNA for protein synthesis. Inhibition is relieved by single nucleotide changes which disrupt the minihelix-synthetase interaction. The results suggest that sequence-specific RNA minihelix substrates bind to cognate synthetases in vivo and can, in principle, act as cell growth regulators. Naturally occurring non-tRNA substrates for aminoacylation may serve a similar purpose. Images PMID:7664744

  16. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: inhibition of seed germination and root growth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2007-11-01

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50mg/L for radish, and about 20mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles.

  17. In-Situ Effects of Simulated Overfishing and Eutrophication on Benthic Coral Reef Algae Growth, Succession, and Composition in the Central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Christian; Roder, Cornelia; Villa Lizcano, Javier Felipe; Voolstra, Christian R; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing and land-derived eutrophication are major local threats to coral reefs and may affect benthic communities, moving them from coral dominated reefs to algal dominated ones. The Central Red Sea is a highly under-investigated area, where healthy coral reefs are contending against intense coastal development. This in-situ study investigated both the independent and combined effects of manipulated inorganic nutrient enrichment (simulation of eutrophication) and herbivore exclosure (simulation of overfishing) on benthic algae development. Light-exposed and shaded terracotta tiles were positioned at an offshore patch reef close to Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and sampled over a period of 4 months. Findings revealed that nutrient enrichment alone affected neither algal dry mass nor algae-derived C or N production. In contrast, herbivore exclusion significantly increased algal dry mass up to 300-fold, and in conjunction with nutrient enrichment, this total increased to 500-fold. Though the increase in dry mass led to a 7 and 8-fold increase in organic C and N content, respectively, the algal C/N ratio (18±1) was significantly lowered in the combined treatment relative to controls (26±2). Furthermore, exclusion of herbivores significantly increased the relative abundance of filamentous algae on the light-exposed tiles and reduced crustose coralline algae and non-coralline red crusts on the shaded tiles. The combination of the herbivore exclusion and nutrient enrichment treatments pronounced these effects. The results of our study suggest that herbivore reduction, particularly when coupled with nutrient enrichment, favors non-calcifying, filamentous algae growth with high biomass production, which thoroughly outcompetes the encrusting (calcifying) algae that dominates in undisturbed conditions. These results suggest that the healthy reefs of the Central Red Sea may experience rapid shifts in benthic community composition with ensuing effects for biogeochemical cycles if

  18. In-Situ Effects of Simulated Overfishing and Eutrophication on Benthic Coral Reef Algae Growth, Succession, and Composition in the Central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Christian; Roder, Cornelia; Villa Lizcano, Javier Felipe; Voolstra, Christian R; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing and land-derived eutrophication are major local threats to coral reefs and may affect benthic communities, moving them from coral dominated reefs to algal dominated ones. The Central Red Sea is a highly under-investigated area, where healthy coral reefs are contending against intense coastal development. This in-situ study investigated both the independent and combined effects of manipulated inorganic nutrient enrichment (simulation of eutrophication) and herbivore exclosure (simulation of overfishing) on benthic algae development. Light-exposed and shaded terracotta tiles were positioned at an offshore patch reef close to Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and sampled over a period of 4 months. Findings revealed that nutrient enrichment alone affected neither algal dry mass nor algae-derived C or N production. In contrast, herbivore exclusion significantly increased algal dry mass up to 300-fold, and in conjunction with nutrient enrichment, this total increased to 500-fold. Though the increase in dry mass led to a 7 and 8-fold increase in organic C and N content, respectively, the algal C/N ratio (18±1) was significantly lowered in the combined treatment relative to controls (26±2). Furthermore, exclusion of herbivores significantly increased the relative abundance of filamentous algae on the light-exposed tiles and reduced crustose coralline algae and non-coralline red crusts on the shaded tiles. The combination of the herbivore exclusion and nutrient enrichment treatments pronounced these effects. The results of our study suggest that herbivore reduction, particularly when coupled with nutrient enrichment, favors non-calcifying, filamentous algae growth with high biomass production, which thoroughly outcompetes the encrusting (calcifying) algae that dominates in undisturbed conditions. These results suggest that the healthy reefs of the Central Red Sea may experience rapid shifts in benthic community composition with ensuing effects for biogeochemical cycles if

  19. In-Situ Effects of Simulated Overfishing and Eutrophication on Benthic Coral Reef Algae Growth, Succession, and Composition in the Central Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Christian; Roder, Cornelia; Villa Lizcano, Javier Felipe; Voolstra, Christian R.; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing and land-derived eutrophication are major local threats to coral reefs and may affect benthic communities, moving them from coral dominated reefs to algal dominated ones. The Central Red Sea is a highly under-investigated area, where healthy coral reefs are contending against intense coastal development. This in-situ study investigated both the independent and combined effects of manipulated inorganic nutrient enrichment (simulation of eutrophication) and herbivore exclosure (simulation of overfishing) on benthic algae development. Light-exposed and shaded terracotta tiles were positioned at an offshore patch reef close to Thuwal, Saudi Arabia and sampled over a period of 4 months. Findings revealed that nutrient enrichment alone affected neither algal dry mass nor algae-derived C or N production. In contrast, herbivore exclusion significantly increased algal dry mass up to 300-fold, and in conjunction with nutrient enrichment, this total increased to 500-fold. Though the increase in dry mass led to a 7 and 8-fold increase in organic C and N content, respectively, the algal C/N ratio (18±1) was significantly lowered in the combined treatment relative to controls (26±2). Furthermore, exclusion of herbivores significantly increased the relative abundance of filamentous algae on the light-exposed tiles and reduced crustose coralline algae and non-coralline red crusts on the shaded tiles. The combination of the herbivore exclusion and nutrient enrichment treatments pronounced these effects. The results of our study suggest that herbivore reduction, particularly when coupled with nutrient enrichment, favors non-calcifying, filamentous algae growth with high biomass production, which thoroughly outcompetes the encrusting (calcifying) algae that dominates in undisturbed conditions. These results suggest that the healthy reefs of the Central Red Sea may experience rapid shifts in benthic community composition with ensuing effects for biogeochemical cycles if

  20. Effect of Ocean acidification on growth, calcification and reproduction of calcifying and non-calcifying epibionts of brown algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saderne, V.; Wahl, M.

    2012-04-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are leading to an acidification of the oceans of 0.4 pH units in the course of this century according to the more severe model scenarios. The excess of CO2 could notably affect the benthic communities of calcifiers and macrophytes in different aspects (photosynthesis, respiration and calcification). Seaweeds are one of the key species of nearshore benthic ecosystems of the Baltic Sea. They are the substratum of several fouling epibionts like bryozoans and tubeworms. Most of those species are bearing calcified structures and could therefore be potentially impacted by the seawater pCO2. On the other hand, the biological activity of the host may substantially modulate the pH and pCO2 conditions in the boundary layer where the epibionts live. The aim of the present study was to test the sensitivity of seaweed macrofouling communities to higher pCO2 concentration. Fragments of macroalgae Fucus serratus bearing the calcifiers Spirorbis spirorbis (Annelida) and Electra pilosa (Bryozoa) and the non-calcifier Alcyonidium gelatinosum (Bryozoa) were maintained for 30 days under three pCO2: natural 460 ± 59 µatm and enriched 1193 ± 166 µatm and 3150 ± 446 µatm. Our study showed a significant reduction of growth rates and reproduction of Spirorbis individuals at the highest pCO2. Tubeworms Juveniles exhibited enhanced calcification of 40 % when in the light compare to dark, presumably due to effect of photosynthetic and respiratory activities of the host alga. Electra colonies showed significantly improved growth rates at 1193 µatm. The overall net dissolution of the communities was significantly higher at 3150 µatm. No effect on Alcyonidium colonies growth rates was observed. Those results suggest a remarkable resistance of the algal macro-epibiontic communities to the most elevated pCO2 predicted for 2100 for open ocean (~1000 µatm) conditions. Concerns remains with regards to higher pCO2 possibly found in the future Baltic Sea.

  1. Zinc toxicity to the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata decreases under phosphate limiting growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, C; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Smolders, E

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that phosphorus (P) deficiency can increase the sensitivity of microalgae to toxic trace metals, potentially due to reduced metal detoxification at low cell P quota. The existing evidence is, however, inconsistent. This study was set up to determine the combined effects of zinc (Zn) and P supplies on Zn and P bioaccumulation and growth of the green microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Zinc toxicity was investigated in (i) a 24h growth rate assay with cells varying in initial cell P quota (0.5-1.7% P on cell dry weight) with no supplemental P during Zn exposure (Expt. 1) and in (ii) a 48h growth assay initiated with cells at the end of a 14-days steady state culture at three P addition rates (RARs) between 0.8 and 1.6day(-1) (Expt.2). The solution Zn concentrations required to reduce final cell density by 10% relative to control (EbC10) were 5-fold (Expt.1) or 2-fold (Expt.2) lower at the highest P supply than at the lowest P supply, i.e. Zn was more toxic at higher P supply, in contrast with the suggestions from previous studies. Cell P quota increased with increasing Zn in the exposure solution (Expt.2), thereby partially overcoming P deficiency under moderate Zn toxicity compared to low Zn exposure. Similarly, cell Zn increased with increasing P supply, potentially induced by Zn-P complexation or precipitation inside the cell. A dynamic growth model accounting for effects of external Zn and internal P on the specific growth rate was calibrated to all data. This model shows that the effect of solution Zn on specific growth rate (ErC50) was statistically unaffected by cell P quota. In contrast, this model predicts that the EbC10 (i.e. EC10 based on cell numbers) varies with P supply because cell P depends on external P and Zn. Moreover, scenario analysis predicts even contrasting trends of the EbC10 with increasing P supply depending on the duration of the growth assay and the P supply scenario. Our data at two experimental

  2. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth.

    PubMed

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A; Cerise, Jane E; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M

    2015-10-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway results in rapid onset of anagen and subsequent hair growth. We show that JAK inhibition regulates the activation of key hair follicle populations such as the hair germ and improves the inductivity of cultured human dermal papilla cells by controlling a molecular signature enriched in intact, fully inductive dermal papillae. Our findings open new avenues for exploration of JAK-STAT inhibition for promotion of hair growth and highlight the role of this pathway in regulating the activation of hair follicle stem cells. PMID:26601320

  3. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A.; Cerise, Jane E.; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C.; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway results in rapid onset of anagen and subsequent hair growth. We show that JAK inhibition regulates the activation of key hair follicle populations such as the hair germ and improves the inductivity of cultured human dermal papilla cells by controlling a molecular signature enriched in intact, fully inductive dermal papillae. Our findings open new avenues for exploration of JAK-STAT inhibition for promotion of hair growth and highlight the role of this pathway in regulating the activation of hair follicle stem cells. PMID:26601320

  4. Pharmacologic inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling promotes hair growth.

    PubMed

    Harel, Sivan; Higgins, Claire A; Cerise, Jane E; Dai, Zhenpeng; Chen, James C; Clynes, Raphael; Christiano, Angela M

    2015-10-01

    Several forms of hair loss in humans are characterized by the inability of hair follicles to enter the growth phase (anagen) of the hair cycle after being arrested in the resting phase (telogen). Current pharmacologic therapies have been largely unsuccessful in targeting pathways that can be selectively modulated to induce entry into anagen. We show that topical treatment of mouse and human skin with small-molecule inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway results in rapid onset of anagen and subsequent hair growth. We show that JAK inhibition regulates the activation of key hair follicle populations such as the hair germ and improves the inductivity of cultured human dermal papilla cells by controlling a molecular signature enriched in intact, fully inductive dermal papillae. Our findings open new avenues for exploration of JAK-STAT inhibition for promotion of hair growth and highlight the role of this pathway in regulating the activation of hair follicle stem cells.

  5. Prolonged cyclic strain inhibits human endothelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Kelly J; Liu, Xiao-ming; Durante, William

    2016-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is continuously exposed to cyclic mechanical strain due to the periodic change in vessel diameter as a result of pulsatile blood flow. Since emerging evidence indicates the cyclic strain plays an integral role in regulating endothelial cell function, the present study determined whether application of a physiologic regimen of cyclic strain (6% at 1 hertz) influences the proliferation of human arterial endothelial cells. Prolonged exposure of human dermal microvascular or human aortic endothelial cells to cyclic strain for up to 7 days resulted in a marked decrease in cell growth. The strain-mediated anti-proliferative effect was associated with the arrest of endothelial cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, did not involve cell detachment or cytotoxicity, and was due to the induction of p21. Interestingly, the inhibition in endothelial cell growth was independent of the strain regimen since prolonged application of constant or intermittent 6% strain was also able to block endothelial cell proliferation. The ability of chronic physiologic cyclic strain to inhibit endothelial cell growth represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which hemodynamic forces maintain these cells in a quiescent, non-proliferative state. PMID:26709656

  6. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  7. S-metolachlor pulse exposure on the alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus: effects during exposure and the subsequent recovery.

    PubMed

    Vallotton, Nathalie; Moser, Daya; Eggen, Rik I L; Junghans, Marion; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2008-09-01

    In streams and creeks, the aquatic flora is exposed to fluctuating concentrations of herbicides during and following their application. Peak concentrations of herbicides, like the chloroacetanilide S-metolachlor, are usually detected following rain events. In this study, we assessed the effect of S-metolachlor pulse exposure on the algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus. We measured the time-dependency of effects during exposure on algae population and identified the algae development stage most sensitive to S-metolachlor. Furthermore, we assessed the time-to-recovery of the algae following exposure. A 6h pulse exposure at 598microgl(-1) was sufficient to inhibit cell reproduction by 50%. However, the exposure period had to coincide with the cell development stage specifically inhibited by S-metolachlor, which is the end of the cell growth phase. In algae populations composed of cells at all development stages, we initially observed an increase in the size of some algal cells, ultimately leading to an inhibition of the growth rate. In these experimental conditions, effects were observed after 18h of exposure and greatly increased with time. The recovery of algae following exposure to strongly inhibiting S-metolachlor concentrations was delayed and only occurred after 29h. These findings suggest that peak exposure to S-metolachlor may affect the growth of sensitive alga in surface waters, considering that the effects extend beyond the period of exposure. PMID:18602658

  8. Effects of free Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} ions on growth and metal accumulation in freshwater algae

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, K.; Behra, R.; Sigg, L.

    1997-02-01

    Five species of unicellular green algae were exposed to a broad range of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} concentrations to examine the relationship between the free Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} ion concentrations and algal growth at metal concentrations relevant for freshwater phytoplankton. The authors estimated extra- and intracellular metal concentrations and characterized the adsorption of copper and zinc on algal surfaces. The optimal growth rate of Scenedesmus subspicatus occurred in a broad range of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} concentrations (from 10{sup {minus}15} to 10{sup {minus}7} and from 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}55} M, respectively). Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reacted more sensitively toward copper, optimal growth was achieved only at a pCu (= {minus}log[Cu{sup 2+}]) around 11, whereas growth was optimal over about three orders of magnitude of the free Cu{sup 2+} concentration (from 10{sup {minus}13} to 10{sup {minus}10} M). Chlamydomonas cultures isolated from Lake Constance tolerated Cu{sup 2+} concentrations over seven orders of magnitude (pCu = 7 to 14). The growth of algae showed a high tolerance toward high intracellular copper and zinc concentrations. This suggests that the cells may immobilize the metals intracellularly. The affinity of copper for algal surfaces is higher than that of zinc in the experimental concentration range: adsorption constants log K{sub Cu} (11.06) > log K{sub Zn} (6.49) (pH = 7.9). These freshwater algae tolerate higher Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} concentrations than marine algal species. In comparison to the lake data, the results obtained from the culture algae indicate a possible role for copper as a limiting factor for certain algal species in eutrophic lakes.

  9. Transcriptional analysis of cell growth and morphogenesis in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias (Streptophyta), with emphasis on the role of expansin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptophyte green algae share several characteristics of cell growth and cell wall formation with their relatives, the embryophytic land plants. The multilobed cell wall of Micrasterias denticulata that rebuilds symmetrically after cell division and consists of pectin and cellulose, makes this unicellular streptophyte alga an interesting model system to study the molecular controls on cell shape and cell wall formation in green plants. Results Genome-wide transcript expression profiling of synchronously growing cells identified 107 genes of which the expression correlated with the growth phase. Four transcripts showed high similarity to expansins that had not been examined previously in green algae. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that these genes are most closely related to the plant EXPANSIN A family, although their domain organization is very divergent. A GFP-tagged version of the expansin-resembling protein MdEXP2 localized to the cell wall and in Golgi-derived vesicles. Overexpression phenotypes ranged from lobe elongation to loss of growth polarity and planarity. These results indicate that MdEXP2 can alter the cell wall structure and, thus, might have a function related to that of land plant expansins during cell morphogenesis. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential of M. denticulata as a unicellular model system, in which cell growth mechanisms have been discovered similar to those in land plants. Additionally, evidence is provided that the evolutionary origins of many cell wall components and regulatory genes in embryophytes precede the colonization of land. PMID:21943227

  10. Control of ambient pH on growth and stable isotopes in phytoplanktonic calcifying algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, Michaël.

    2015-08-01

    The present work examines the relationship between pH-induced changes in growth and stable isotopic composition of coccolith calcite in two coccolithophore species with a geological perspective. These species (Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Coccolithus pelagicus) with differing physiologies and vital effects possess a growth optimum corresponding to average pH of surface seawater in the geological period during their first known occurrence. The "ancestral" C. pelagicus has much wider pH tolerance in terms of growth rates than the more recently evolved G. oceanica. Diminished growth rates are explained by the challenge of proton translocation into the extracellular environment at low pH and enhanced aqueous CO2 limitation at high pH. Reducing the cell dynamics in this way leads to a lower degree of oxygen isotopic disequilibrium in G. oceanica. In contrast, the slower growing species C. pelagicus, which typically precipitates near-equilibrium calcite, does not show any modulation of oxygen isotope signals with changing pH. Overall, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions are best explained by the degree of utilization of the internal dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) pool and the dynamics of isotopic reequilibration inside the cell. Thus, the "carbonate ion effect" may not apply to coccolithophores. This difference with foraminifera can be traced to different modes of DIC incorporation into these two distinct biomineralizing organisms. From a geological perspective, these findings have implications for refining the use of oxygen isotopes to infer more reliable sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from fossil carbonates and contribute to a better understanding of how climate-relevant parameters are recorded in the sedimentary archive.

  11. Structural effects of ionic liquids on microalgal growth inhibition and microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Phuong Thuy; Cho, Chul-Woong; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated structural effects of various ionic liquids (ILs) on microalgal growth inhibition and microbial biodegradability. For this, we tested pyridinium- and pyrrolidinium-based ILs with various alkyl chain lengths and bromide anion, and compared the toxicological effects with log EC50 values of imidazolium-based IL with the same alkyl chains and anion from literature. Comparing determined EC50 values of cationic moieties with the same alkyl chain length, pyridinium-based ILs were found to be slightly more toxic towards the freshwater green alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, than a series of pyrrolidinium and imidazolium except to 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide. Concerning the biodegradation study of 12 ILs using the activated sludge microorganisms, the results showed that the pyridinium derivatives except to 1-propyl-3-methylpyridinium cation were degraded. Whereas in case of imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based compounds, only n-hexyl and n-octyl substituted cations were fully degraded but no significant biodegradation was observed for the short chains (three and four alkyl chains).

  12. Piperlongumine inhibits lung tumor growth via inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Son, Dong Ju; Gu, Sun Mi; Woo, Ju Rang; Ham, Young Wan; Lee, Hee Pom; Kim, Wun Jae; Jung, Jae Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Piperlongumine has anti-cancer activity in numerous cancer cell lines via various signaling pathways. But there has been no study regarding the mechanisms of PL on the lung cancer yet. Thus, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects and possible mechanisms of PL on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vivo and in vitro. Our findings showed that PL induced apoptotic cell death and suppressed the DNA binding activity of NF-κB in a concentration dependent manner (0–15 μM) in NSCLC cells. Docking model and pull down assay showed that PL directly binds to the DNA binding site of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p50 subunit, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis showed that PL binds to p50 concentration-dependently. Moreover, co-treatment of PL with NF-κB inhibitor phenylarsine oxide (0.1 μM) or p50 siRNA (100 nM) augmented PL-induced inhibitory effect on cell growth and activation of Fas and DR4. Notably, co-treatment of PL with p50 mutant plasmid (C62S) partially abolished PL-induced cell growth inhibition and decreased the enhanced expression of Fas and DR4. In xenograft mice model, PL (2.5–5 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth of NSCLC dose-dependently. Therefore, these results indicated that PL could inhibit lung cancer cell growth via inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27198178

  13. Towards an organic palaeosalinity proxy: the effect of salinity, growth rate and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones produced by haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2013-04-01

    Palaeosalinity is one of the most important oceanographic parameters which currently cannot be quantified with reasonable accuracy from sedimentary records. Schouten et al.1 established that the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes between growth water and alkenones produced by the haptophyte algae Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica is salinity dependent. As such, the δD values of alkenones recovered from sediment cores can be used to reconstruct variations in palaeo- sea surface salinity.2 However, to accurately determine absolute palaeosalinity requires a better constraining of the relationship between this hydrogen fractionation, salinity and other parameters such as growth rate and growth phase. Here, we present results from our ongoing work to constrain the relationship between the fractionation factor αalkenone-water, salinity, growth rate and growth phase for the major alkenone-producing haptophytes. In batch cultures of different strains of the open-ocean haptophyte E. huxleyi sampled during the exponential growth phase, αC37alkenone-growthwater increases by between 0.0022 and 0.0033 per unit increase in salinity. A similar relationship is observed in batch cultures of the coastal haptophyte Isochrysis galbana, where α increases with each unit of salinity by 0.0019 - slightly less than for E. huxleyi. However, absolute αC37alkenone-growthwater values vary strongly between species suggesting that species composition has a strong impact on the δD value of alkenones. The fractionation factor for alkenones produced by batch cultures of I. galbana is affected by growth phase: the rate of change of αC37alkenone-growthwater with each unit of salinity decreases from 0.0019 in the exponential phase to 0.0010 during the stationary phase. We also show the effect of varying growth rate over the range 0.2-0.8 day-1 on the fractionation factor for alkenones produced by E. huxleyi grown in continuous culture. These data show that alkenone δD can be used to

  14. Effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, S. ); Sengar, R.M.S. ); Mittal, S.; Bhattacharjee, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Algal species (65) were isolated from oil refinery effluent. Twenty-five of these species were cultured in Benecke's medium in a growth chamber, along with controls. Retardation in algal growth, inhibition in algal photosynthesis, and discoloration was observed in petroleum enriched medium. Few forms, viz. Cyclotella sp., Cosmarium sp., and Merismopedia sp. could not survive. The lag phase lengthened by several days and slope of exponential phase was also depressed. Chlamydomonas sp., Scenedesmus sp., Ankistrodesmus sp., Nitzschia sp. and Navicula sp. were comparatively susceptible to petroleum. Depression in carbon fixation, cell numbers, and total dry algal mass was noticeable, showing toxicity to both diatoms and green algae.

  15. The edible red alga, Gracilaria verrucosa, inhibits lipid accumulation and ROS production, but improves glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Woo, Mi-Seon; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2013-07-01

    Gracilaria verrucosa is a red alga that is widely distributed in seaside areas of many countries. We examined the effect of G. verrucosa extract on adipogenesis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells. Oil red O staining and a nitroblue tetrazolium assay showed that G. verrucosa extract inhibited lipid accumulation and ROS production, respectively. mRNA levels of adipogenic transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, as well as of their target gene, adipocyte protein 2, were reduced upon treatment with G. verrucosa extract. However, G. verrucosa extract increased glucose uptake, glucose transporter-4 expression, and AMP-activated protein kinaseα (AMPKα) phosphorylation compared to the control. Our results suggest that the anti-adipogenic and insulin-sensitive effects of G. verrucosa extract can be recapitulated to activation of AMPKα.

  16. Inhibitory effects of soluble algae products (SAP) released by Scenedesmus sp. LX1 on its growth and lipid production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Yu, Yin; Wu, Yin-Hu; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2013-10-01

    Soluble algal products (SAP) accumulated in culture medium via water reuse may affect the growth of microalga during the cultivation. Scenedesmus sp. LX1, a freshwater microalga, was used in this study to investigate the effect of SAP on growth and lipid production of microalga. Under the SAP concentrations of 6.4-25.8 mg L(-1), maximum algal density (K) and maximum growth rate (Rmax) of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 were decreased by 50-80% and 35-70% compared with the control group, respectively. The effect of SAP on lipid accumulation of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 was non-significant. According to hydrophilic-hydrophobic and acid-base properties, SAP was fractionized into six fractions. All of the fractions could inhibit the growth of Scenedesmus sp. LX1. Organic bases (HIB, HOB) and hydrophilic acids (HIA) showed the strongest inhibition. HIA could also decrease the lipid content of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 by 59.2%. As the inhibitory effect, SAP should be seriously treated before water reuse.

  17. Inhibitory effects of soluble algae products (SAP) released by Scenedesmus sp. LX1 on its growth and lipid production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Yu, Yin; Wu, Yin-Hu; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2013-10-01

    Soluble algal products (SAP) accumulated in culture medium via water reuse may affect the growth of microalga during the cultivation. Scenedesmus sp. LX1, a freshwater microalga, was used in this study to investigate the effect of SAP on growth and lipid production of microalga. Under the SAP concentrations of 6.4-25.8 mg L(-1), maximum algal density (K) and maximum growth rate (Rmax) of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 were decreased by 50-80% and 35-70% compared with the control group, respectively. The effect of SAP on lipid accumulation of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 was non-significant. According to hydrophilic-hydrophobic and acid-base properties, SAP was fractionized into six fractions. All of the fractions could inhibit the growth of Scenedesmus sp. LX1. Organic bases (HIB, HOB) and hydrophilic acids (HIA) showed the strongest inhibition. HIA could also decrease the lipid content of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 by 59.2%. As the inhibitory effect, SAP should be seriously treated before water reuse. PMID:23982061

  18. Targeting GIPC/Synectin in Pancreatic Cancer Inhibits Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Muders, Michael H.; Vohra, Pawan K.; Dutta, Shamit K; Wang, Enfeng; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Wang, Ling; Udugamasooriya, D. Gomika; Memic, Adnan; Rupashinghe, Chamila N.; Baretton, Gustavo B.; Aust, Daniela E.; Langer, Silke; Datta, Kaustubh; Simons, Michael; Spaller, Mark R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Translational Relevance The five year survival rate in patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is less than 4%. Accordingly, new targets for the treatment of this deadly disease are urgently needed. In this study, we show that targeting GAIP interacting protein C-terminal (GIPC, also known as Synectin) and its PDZ-domain reduces pancreatic cancer growth significantly in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the blockage of GIPC/Synectin was accompanied by a reduction of IGF-1R protein levels. In summary, the use of a GIPC-PDZ domain inhibitor may be a viable option in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in future. Purpose Various studies have demonstrated the importance of GAIP interacting protein, C-terminus (GIPC, also known as Synectin) as a central adaptor molecule in different signaling pathways and as an important mediator of receptor stability. GIPC/Synectin is associated with different growth promoting receptors like IGF-1R and integrins. These interactions were mediated through its PDZ domain. GIPC/Synectin has been shown to be overexpressed in pancreatic and breast cancer. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the importance of GIPC/Synectin in pancreatic cancer growth and to evaluate a possible therapeutic strategy by using a GIPC-PDZ domain inhibitor. Furthermore, the effect of targeting GIPC on the IGF-1 receptor as one of its associated receptors was tested. Experimental Design In vivo effects of GIPC/Synectin knockdown were studied after lentiviral transduction of luciferase-expressing pancreatic cancer cells with shRNA against GIPC/Synectin. Additionally, a GIPC-PDZ-targeting peptide was designed. This peptide was tested for its influence on pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Results Knockdown of GIPC/Synectin led to a significant inhibition of pancreatic adenocarcinoma growth in an orthotopic mouse model. Additionally, a cell-permeable GIPC-PDZ inhibitor was able to block tumor growth significantly without showing

  19. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Growth and Metabolism of the Green Alga, Chlorella Pyrenoiosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, W. A.; Kelly, S. E.; Valluri, J. V.

    2008-06-01

    The Long-duration future habitation of space will require a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) to simultaneously revitalize atmosphere (liberate oxygen and fix carbon dioxide), purify water (via transpiration), and generate food. The environmental conditions available in the Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB) provide a novel environment due to the reduction of stress from gravity that influences the growth and protein production of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Chlorella grown in the HFB conditions exhibited a 3 fold increase in protein production and a 3.5 fold increase in chlorophyll content while averaging a doubling time of 1.47 days.

  20. Effect of centrifugation on water recycling and algal growth to enable algae biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Igou, Thomas; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Penalver-Argueso, Patricia; Fu, Hao; Doi, Shusuke; Narode, Asmita; Cheruvu, Sarasija; Zhang, Qian; Hassan, Fariha; Woodruff, Frazier; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-12-01

    The latest research shows that algal biofuels, at the production levels mandated in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, will place significant demands on water and compete with agriculture meant for food production. Thus, there is a great need to recycle water while producing algal biofuels. This study shows that when using a synthetic medium, soluble algal products, bacteria, and other inhibitors can be removed by centrifugation and enable water recycling. Average water recovery reached 84% and water could be recycled at least 10 times without reducing algal growth.

  1. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro- and macro-algae.

    PubMed

    Wu, HongYan; Zou, DingHui; Gao, KunShan

    2008-12-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO(2) pump to absorb CO(2) from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO(2) into the ocean. The increasing atmospheric CO(2) and subsequent rise of pCO(2) in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO(3) (-) concentration, affect photosynthetic CO(2) fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to utilize the large HCO(3) (-) pool in seawater, enriched CO(2) up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photosynthesis is not limited by CO(2) in seawater, increased CO(2) levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO(2) levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO(2) conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO(2) oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO(2) and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physiology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO(2) and low-pH ocean.

  2. Cinnamic acid increases lignin production and inhibits soybean root growth.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Böhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth.

  3. Cinnamic acid increases lignin production and inhibits soybean root growth.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Böhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  4. Effect of naturally occurring apatites on growth and morphology of algae.

    PubMed

    Smith, E A; Mayfield, C I; Wong, P T; Silverberg, B A

    1977-09-01

    Crystals (30--100 micrometer) of selected naturally occurring apatite (Ca10 (PO4)6(OH, F)2) samples were added to P-free (less than 0.001 microgram/ml total P) Bristol's medium (1-1000 microgram/ml of apatite) as the sole source of ortho-PO43-. The media were inoculated with washed, non-axenic cells of three chlorophycean algal species cultivated under PO43--deficient conditions. Phase-contrast and scanning electron microscopy revealed that at low slurry densities (1-10 microgram/ml of apatite), Ankistrodesmus braunii (ATCC 2744) cells were morphologically distorted. At concentrations of 100 and 1000 microgram/ml of apatite, more than 85% of the cells had undergone autospore formation within 7--10 days of incubation at 20 degrees C. Most autospores formed failed to germinate under high nutrient conditions. Scenedesmus longus (No. 1236) formed colonies when cultivated in Bristol's medium but daughter cells displayed a Chodatella-like unicellular morphology when grown in apatite media. Test algal species (Chlamydomonas dysosmos, S. longus, A. braunii) showed a marked preference for growth on apatite crystals over non-nutritive surfaces. Unialgal and mixed-algal cultures produced an extensive matrix of extracellular fibrous material in response to growth on crystals at concentrations greater than 10 microgram/ml of apatite. PMID:907915

  5. Salicylate Accumulation Inhibits Growth at Chilling Temperature in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ian M.; Clarke, Shannon M.; Wood, Jacqueline E.; Mur, Luis A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of Arabidopsis plants in chilling conditions could be related to their levels of salicylic acid (SA). Plants with the SA hydroxylase NahG transgene grew at similar rates to Col-0 wild types at 23°C, and growth of both genotypes was slowed by transfer to 5°C. However, at 5°C, NahG plants displayed relative growth rates about one-third greater than Col-0, so that by 2 months NahG plants were typically 2.7-fold larger. This resulted primarily from greater cell expansion in NahG rosette leaves. Specific leaf areas and leaf area ratios remained similar in both genotypes. Net assimilation rates were similar in both genotypes at 23°C, but higher in NahG at 5°C. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements revealed no PSII photodamage in chilled leaves of either genotype. Col-0 shoots at 5°C accumulated SA, particularly in glucosylated form. SA in NahG shoots showed similar tendencies at 5°C, but at greatly depleted levels. Catechol was not detected as a metabolite of the NahG transgene product. We also examined growth and SA levels in SA signaling and metabolism mutants at 5°C. The partially SA-insensitive npr1 mutant displayed growth intermediate between NahG and Col-0, while the SA-deficient eds5 mutant behaved like NahG. In contrast, the cpr1 mutant at 5°C accumulated very high levels of SA and its growth was much more inhibited than wild type. At both temperatures, cpr1 was the only SA-responsive genotype in which oxidative damage (measured as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) was significantly different from wild type. PMID:15173571

  6. Factors determining growth and vertical distribution of planktonic algae in extremely acidic mining lakes (pH 2.7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissinger, Vera

    2003-04-01

    In this thesis, I investigated the factors influencing the growth and vertical distribution of planktonic algae in extremely acidic mining lakes (pH 2-3). In the focal study site, Lake 111 (pH 2.7; Lusatia, Germany), the chrysophyte, Ochromonas sp., dominates in the upper water strata and the chlorophyte, Chlamydomonas sp., in the deeper strata, forming a pronounced deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). Inorganic carbon (IC) limitation influenced the phototrophic growth of Chlamydomonas sp. in the upper water strata. Conversely, in deeper strata, light limited its phototrophic growth. When compared with published data for algae from neutral lakes, Chlamydomonas sp. from Lake 111 exhibited a lower maximum growth rate, an enhanced compensation point and higher dark respiration rates, suggesting higher metabolic costs due to the extreme physico-chemical conditions. The photosynthetic performance of Chlamydomonas sp. decreased in high-light-adapted cells when IC limited. In addition, the minimal phosphorus (P) cell quota was suggestive of a higher P requirement under IC limitation. Subsequently, it was shown that Chlamydomonas sp. was a mixotroph, able to enhance its growth rate by taking up dissolved organic carbon (DOC) via osmotrophy. Therefore, it could survive in deeper water strata where DOC concentrations were higher and light limited. However, neither IC limitation, P availability nor in situ DOC concentrations (bottom-up control) could fully explain the vertical distribution of Chlamydomonas sp. in Lake 111. Conversely, when a novel approach was adopted, the grazing influence of the phagotrophic phototroph, Ochromonas sp., was found to exert top-down control on its prey (Chlamydomonas sp.) reducing prey abundance in the upper water strata. This, coupled with the fact that Chlamydomonas sp. uses DOC for growth, leads to a pronounced accumulation of Chlamydomonas sp. cells at depth; an apparent DCM. Therefore, grazing appears to be the main factor influencing the

  7. Entry Inhibition of Influenza Viruses with High Mannose Binding Lectin ESA-2 from the Red Alga Eucheuma serra through the Recognition of Viral Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Kubo, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Nishizono, Akira; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2015-06-01

    Lectin sensitivity of the recent pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1-2009) was screened for 12 lectins with various carbohydrate specificity by a neutral red dye uptake assay with MDCK cells. Among them, a high mannose (HM)-binding anti-HIV lectin, ESA-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra, showed the highest inhibition against infection with an EC50 of 12.4 nM. Moreover, ESA-2 exhibited a wide range of antiviral spectrum against various influenza strains with EC50s of pico molar to low nanomolar levels. Besides ESA-2, HM-binding plant lectin ConA, fucose-binding lectins such as fungal AOL from Aspergillus oryzae and AAL from Aleuria aurantia were active against H1N1-2009, but the potency of inhibition was of less magnitude compared with ESA-2. Direct interaction between ESA-2 and a viral envelope glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (HA), was demonstrated by ELISA assay. This interaction was effectively suppressed by glycoproteins bearing HM-glycans, indicating that ESA-2 binds to the HA of influenza virus through HM-glycans. Upon treatment with ESA-2, no viral antigens were detected in the host cells, indicating that ESA-2 inhibited the initial steps of virus entry into the cells. ESA-2 would thus be useful as a novel microbicide to prevent penetration of viruses such as HIV and influenza viruses to the host cells. PMID:26035023

  8. Entry Inhibition of Influenza Viruses with High Mannose Binding Lectin ESA-2 from the Red Alga Eucheuma serra through the Recognition of Viral Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Kubo, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Nishizono, Akira; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2015-01-01

    Lectin sensitivity of the recent pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1-2009) was screened for 12 lectins with various carbohydrate specificity by a neutral red dye uptake assay with MDCK cells. Among them, a high mannose (HM)-binding anti-HIV lectin, ESA-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra, showed the highest inhibition against infection with an EC50 of 12.4 nM. Moreover, ESA-2 exhibited a wide range of antiviral spectrum against various influenza strains with EC50s of pico molar to low nanomolar levels. Besides ESA-2, HM-binding plant lectin ConA, fucose-binding lectins such as fungal AOL from Aspergillus oryzae and AAL from Aleuria aurantia were active against H1N1-2009, but the potency of inhibition was of less magnitude compared with ESA-2. Direct interaction between ESA-2 and a viral envelope glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (HA), was demonstrated by ELISA assay. This interaction was effectively suppressed by glycoproteins bearing HM-glycans, indicating that ESA-2 binds to the HA of influenza virus through HM-glycans. Upon treatment with ESA-2, no viral antigens were detected in the host cells, indicating that ESA-2 inhibited the initial steps of virus entry into the cells. ESA-2 would thus be useful as a novel microbicide to prevent penetration of viruses such as HIV and influenza viruses to the host cells. PMID:26035023

  9. Erlotinib Inhibits Growth of a Patient-Derived Chordoma Xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Siu, I-Mei; Ruzevick, Jacob; Zhao, Qi; Connis, Nick; Jiao, Yuchen; Bettegowda, Chetan; Xia, Xuewei; Burger, Peter C.; Hann, Christine L.; Gallia, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors that occur along the neuraxis. Primary treatment is surgery, often followed by radiotherapy. Treatment options for patients with recurrence are limited and, notably, there are no FDA approved therapeutic agents. Development of therapeutic options has been limited by the paucity of preclinical model systems. We have established and previously reported the initial characterization of the first patient-derived chordoma xenograft model. In this study, we further characterize this model and demonstrate that it continues to resemble the original patient tumor histologically and immunohistochemically, maintains nuclear expression of brachyury, and is highly concordant with the original patient tumor by whole genome genotyping. Pathway analysis of this xenograft demonstrates activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In vitro studies demonstrate that two small molecule inhibitors of EGFR, erlotinib and gefitinib, inhibit proliferation of the chordoma cell line U-CH 1. We further demonstrate that erlotinib significantly inhibits chordoma growth in vivo. Evaluation of tumors post-treatment reveals that erlotinib reduces phosphorylation of EGFR. This is the first demonstration of antitumor activity in a patient-derived chordoma xenograft model and these findings support further evaluation of EGFR inhibitors in this disease. PMID:24260133

  10. Erlotinib inhibits growth of a patient-derived chordoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Siu, I-Mei; Ruzevick, Jacob; Zhao, Qi; Connis, Nick; Jiao, Yuchen; Bettegowda, Chetan; Xia, Xuewei; Burger, Peter C; Hann, Christine L; Gallia, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors that occur along the neuraxis. Primary treatment is surgery, often followed by radiotherapy. Treatment options for patients with recurrence are limited and, notably, there are no FDA approved therapeutic agents. Development of therapeutic options has been limited by the paucity of preclinical model systems. We have established and previously reported the initial characterization of the first patient-derived chordoma xenograft model. In this study, we further characterize this model and demonstrate that it continues to resemble the original patient tumor histologically and immunohistochemically, maintains nuclear expression of brachyury, and is highly concordant with the original patient tumor by whole genome genotyping. Pathway analysis of this xenograft demonstrates activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In vitro studies demonstrate that two small molecule inhibitors of EGFR, erlotinib and gefitinib, inhibit proliferation of the chordoma cell line U-CH 1. We further demonstrate that erlotinib significantly inhibits chordoma growth in vivo. Evaluation of tumors post-treatment reveals that erlotinib reduces phosphorylation of EGFR. This is the first demonstration of antitumor activity in a patient-derived chordoma xenograft model and these findings support further evaluation of EGFR inhibitors in this disease.

  11. Sanguinarine suppresses prostate tumor growth and inhibits survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Lou, Wei; Chun, Jae Yeon; Cho, Daniel S; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Evans, Christopher P; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C

    2010-03-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequently occurring disease and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths of men in the United States. Current treatments have proved inadequate in curing or controlling prostate cancer, and a search for agents for the management of this disease is urgently needed. Survivin plays an important role in both progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to chemotherapy. Altered expression of survivin in prostate cancer cells is associated with cancer progression, drug/radiation resistance, poor prognosis, and short patient survival. In the present study, the authors performed a cell-based rapid screen of the Prestwick Chemical Library consisting of 1120 Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds with known safety and bioavailability in humans to identify potential inhibitors of survivin and anticancer agents for prostate cancer. Sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived primarily from the bloodroot plant, was identified as a novel inhibitor of survivin that selectively kills prostate cancer cells over "normal" prostate epithelial cells. The authors found that sanguinarine inhibits survivin protein expression through protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells and in vivo tumor formation. Administration of sanguinarine, beginning 3 days after ectopic implantation of DU145 human prostate cancer cells, reduces both tumor weight and volume. In addition, sanguinarine sensitized paclitaxel-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, offering a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming taxol resistance. These results suggest that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent either alone or in combination with taxol for treatment of prostate cancer overexpressing survivin. PMID:21318089

  12. The green alga, Cladophora, promotes Escherichia coli growth and contamination of recreational waters in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heuvel, A.V.; McDermott, C.; Pillsbury, R.; Sandrin, T.; Kinzelman, J.; Ferguson, J.; Sadowsky, M.; Byappanahalli, M.; Whitman, R.; Kleinheinz, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    A linkage between Cladophora mats and exceedances of recreational water quality criteria has been suggested, but not directly studied. Th is study investigates the spatial and temporal association between Escherichia coli concentrations within and near Cladophora mats at two northwestern Lake Michigan beaches in Door County, Wisconsin. Escherichia coli concentrations in water underlying mats were significantly greater than surrounding water (p < 0.001). Below mat E. coli increased as the stranded mats persisted at the beach swash zone. Water adjacent to Cladophora mats had lower E. coli concentrations, but surpassed EPA swimming criteria the majority of sampling days. A signifi cant positive association was found between E. coli concentrations attached to Cladophora and in underlying water (p < 0.001). The attached E. coli likely acted as a reservoir for populating water underlying the mat. Fecal bacterial pathogens, however, could not be detected by microbiological culture methods either attached to mat biomass or in underlying water. Removal of Cladophora mats from beach areas may improve aesthetic and microbial water quality at affected beaches. These associations and potential natural growth of E. coli in bathing waters call into question the efficacy of using E. coli as a recreational water quality indicator of fecal contaminations. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  13. The Study of Algae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  14. Liver acid sphingomyelinase inhibits growth of metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yosuke; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Yasuda, Ichiro; Saibara, Toshiji; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Seishima, Mitsuru; Kozawa, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) regulates the homeostasis of sphingolipids, including ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). These sphingolipids regulate carcinogenesis and proliferation, survival, and apoptosis of cancer cells. However, the role of ASM in host defense against liver metastasis remains unclear. In this study, the involvement of ASM in liver metastasis of colon cancer was examined using Asm-/- and Asm+/+ mice that were inoculated with SL4 colon cancer cells to produce metastatic liver tumors. Asm-/- mice demonstrated enhanced tumor growth and reduced macrophage accumulation in the tumor, accompanied by decreased numbers of hepatic myofibroblasts (hMFs), which express tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), around the tumor margin. Tumor growth was increased by macrophage depletion or by Timp1 deficiency, but was decreased by hepatocyte-specific ASM overexpression, which was associated with increased S1P production. S1P stimulated macrophage migration and TIMP1 expression in hMFs in vitro. These findings indicate that ASM in the liver inhibits tumor growth through cytotoxic macrophage accumulation and TIMP1 production by hMFs in response to S1P. Targeting ASM may represent a new therapeutic strategy for treating liver metastasis of colon cancer.

  15. Inhibition of Glioblastoma Growth by the Thiadiazolidinone Compound TDZD-8

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-SanCristobal, Marina; Garcia-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Background Thiadiazolidinones (TDZD) are small heterocyclic compounds first described as non-ATP competitive inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In this study, we analyzed the effects of 4-benzyl-2-methyl-1,2,4-thiadiazolidine-3,5-dione (TDZD-8), on murine GL261 cells growth in vitro and on the growth of established intracerebral murine gliomas in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Our data show that TDZD-8 decreased proliferation and induced apoptosis of GL261 glioblastoma cells in vitro, delayed tumor growth in vivo, and augmented animal survival. These effects were associated with an early activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and increased expression of EGR-1 and p21 genes. Also, we observed a sustained activation of the ERK pathway, a concomitant phosphorylation and activation of ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK) and an inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at Ser 9. Finally, treatment of glioblastoma stem cells with TDZD-8 resulted in an inhibition of proliferation and self-renewal of these cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that TDZD-8 uses a novel mechanism to target glioblastoma cells, and that malignant progenitor population could be a target of this compound. PMID:21079728

  16. Growth under Red Light Enhances Photosystem II Relative to Photosystem I and Phycobilisomes in the Red Alga Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F X; Dennenberg, R J; Jursinic, P A; Gantt, E

    1990-07-01

    Acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to light absorbed primarily by photosystem I (PSI) or by photosystem II (PSII) was studied in the unicellular red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161). Cultures grown under green light of 15 microeinsteins per square meter per second (PSII light; absorbed predominantly by the phycobilisomes) exhibited a PSII/PSI ratio of 0.26 +/- 0.05. Under red light (PSI light; absorbed primarily by chlorophyll) of comparable quantum flux, cells contained nearly five times as many PSII per PSI (1.21 +/- 0.10), and three times as many PSII per cell. About 12% of the chlorophyll was attributed to PSII in green light, 22% in white light, and 39% in red light-grown cultures. Chlorophyll antenna sizes appeared to remain constant at about 75 chlorophyll per PSII and 140 per PSI. Spectral quality had little effect on cell content or composition of the phycobilisomes, thus the number of PSII per phycobilisome was substantially greater in red light-grown cultures (4.2 +/- 0.6) than in those grown under green (1.6 +/- 0.3) or white light (2.9 +/- 0.1). Total photosystems (PSI + PSII) per phycobilisome remained at about eight in each case. Carotenoid content and composition was little affected by the spectral composition of the growth light. Zeaxanthin comprised more than 50% (mole/mole), beta-carotene about 40%, and cryptoxanthin about 4% of the carotenoid pigment. Despite marked changes in the light-harvesting apparatus, red and green light-grown cultures have generation times equal to that of cultures grown under white light of only one-third the quantum flux.

  17. The fate of glyphosate in water hyacinth and its physiological and biochemical influences on growth of algae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Baolong.

    1989-01-01

    Absorption, translocation, distribution, exudation, and guttation of {sup 14}C-glyphosate in water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) were studied. Glyphosphate entered the plant by foliage and solution treatment. Plants were harvested and separated into the following parts: treated leaf blade, treated leaf petiole, young leaf blade, young leaf petiole, old leak blade, old leaf petiole, and root. Each part was extracted with methanol. Treated leaves, which exist only in foliage treatment, were washed with water and chloroform to remove the glyphosate residues. All {sup 14}C counting was made by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Autoradiography was used to locate {sup 14}C-glyphosate after foliage treatment. Results indicated that glyphosate can be absorbed from the leaf surface and translocated rapidly through phloem tissues into the whole plant body. The roots of water hyacinth absorbed glyphosate without vertical transport. Guttation of glyphosate occurred in treated leaf tips. Exudation of glyphosate from roots of water hyacinth occurred within 8 hr after foliage treatment. Chlorella vulgaris, Chlamydomonas reihardii, Anabaena cylindrica, and Chroococcus turgidus were used to explore the physiological and biochemical effects of glyphosate on algae. Spectrophotometric assays were performed for algal growth, chlorophyll, carotenoids, phycobiliprotein, carbohydrate, and protein. TLC procedures and an image analyzer were used to detect the metabolites of glyphosate inside algal cells. The common visible symptom of glyphosate toxicity in all algal cells were bleaching effect and reduction of contents of carbohydrate, protein, and pigments. The results highly suggested that glyphosate injured the algal cells by destruction of photosynthetic pigments and resulted in lowering the contents of carbohydrate and protein in algal cells.

  18. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles for Dunaliella tertiolecta and comparison with SiO2 and TiO2 effects at population growth inhibition levels.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, S; Oliviero, M; Miglietta, M; Rametta, G; Manzo, S

    2016-04-15

    The increasing use of oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial products has intensified the potential release into the aquatic environment where algae represent the basis of the trophic chain. NP effects upon algae population growth were indeed already reported in literature, but the concurrent effects at cellular and genomic levels are still largely unexplored. Our work investigates the genotoxic (by COMET assay) and cytotoxic effects (by qualitative ROS production and cell viability) of ZnO nanoparticles toward marine microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta. A comparison at defined population growth inhibition levels (i.e. 50% Effect Concentration, EC50, and No Observed Effect Concentration, NOEC) with SiO2 and TiO2 genotoxic effects and previously investigated cytotoxic effects (Manzo et al., 2015) was performed in order to elucidate the possible diverse mechanisms leading to algae growth inhibition. After 72h exposure, ZnO particles act firstly at the level of cell division inhibition (EC50: 2mg Zn/L) while the genotoxic action is evident only starting from 5mg Zn/L. This outcome could be ascribable mainly to the release of toxic ions from the aggregate of ZnO particle in the proximity of cell membrane. In the main, at EC50 and NOEC values for ZnO NPs showed the lowest cytotoxic and genotoxic effect with respect to TiO2 and SiO2. Based on Mutagenic Index (MI) the rank of toxicity is actually: TiO2>SiO2>ZnO with TiO2 and SiO2 that showed similar MI values at both NOEC and EC50 concentrations. The results presented herein suggest that up to TiO2 NOEC (7.5mg/L), the algae DNA repair mechanism is efficient and the DNA damage does not result in an evident algae population growth inhibition. A similar trend for SiO2, although at lower effect level with respect to TiO2, is observable. The comparison among all the tested nanomaterial toxicity patterns highlighted that the algae population growth inhibition occurred through pathways specific for each NP also related to their

  19. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles for Dunaliella tertiolecta and comparison with SiO2 and TiO2 effects at population growth inhibition levels.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, S; Oliviero, M; Miglietta, M; Rametta, G; Manzo, S

    2016-04-15

    The increasing use of oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial products has intensified the potential release into the aquatic environment where algae represent the basis of the trophic chain. NP effects upon algae population growth were indeed already reported in literature, but the concurrent effects at cellular and genomic levels are still largely unexplored. Our work investigates the genotoxic (by COMET assay) and cytotoxic effects (by qualitative ROS production and cell viability) of ZnO nanoparticles toward marine microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta. A comparison at defined population growth inhibition levels (i.e. 50% Effect Concentration, EC50, and No Observed Effect Concentration, NOEC) with SiO2 and TiO2 genotoxic effects and previously investigated cytotoxic effects (Manzo et al., 2015) was performed in order to elucidate the possible diverse mechanisms leading to algae growth inhibition. After 72h exposure, ZnO particles act firstly at the level of cell division inhibition (EC50: 2mg Zn/L) while the genotoxic action is evident only starting from 5mg Zn/L. This outcome could be ascribable mainly to the release of toxic ions from the aggregate of ZnO particle in the proximity of cell membrane. In the main, at EC50 and NOEC values for ZnO NPs showed the lowest cytotoxic and genotoxic effect with respect to TiO2 and SiO2. Based on Mutagenic Index (MI) the rank of toxicity is actually: TiO2>SiO2>ZnO with TiO2 and SiO2 that showed similar MI values at both NOEC and EC50 concentrations. The results presented herein suggest that up to TiO2 NOEC (7.5mg/L), the algae DNA repair mechanism is efficient and the DNA damage does not result in an evident algae population growth inhibition. A similar trend for SiO2, although at lower effect level with respect to TiO2, is observable. The comparison among all the tested nanomaterial toxicity patterns highlighted that the algae population growth inhibition occurred through pathways specific for each NP also related to their

  20. Curcumin associated magnetite nanoparticles inhibit in vitro melanoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Fernanda França; dos Santos, Michelly Christine; dos Passos, Debora Cristina Silva; Lima, Emilia Celma de Oliveira; Guillo, Lidia Andreu

    2011-09-01

    Curcumin is a natural product possessing therapeutic properties but the low water solubility of this compound limits its use. We have successfully incorporated curcumin into a bilayer of dodecanoic acid attached to magnetite nanoparticles in an effort to maximize solubility and delivery efficiency. Curcumin/magnetite nanoparticles were characterized using diffused reflectance infra-red fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Moreover curcumin associated magnetite nanoparticles inhibited in vitro melanoma cell growth. An inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 66.0 +/- 3.0 microM (48 +/- 2.2 microg-iron/mL) was observed for the curcumin/magnetite nanoparticles. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that curcumin associated magnetite nanoparticles were internalized by the melanoma cells and remained in the cytoplasm. The curcumin/magnetic nanoparticles synthesized in this study possess magnetic and water solubility properties making this a novel curcumin formulation with therapeutic potential.

  1. Functional Characterization of Pseudomonas Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition (CDI) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mercy, Chryslène; Ize, Bérengère; Salcedo, Suzana P.; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Bigot, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Contact-dependent inhibition (CDI) toxins, delivered into the cytoplasm of target bacterial cells, confer to host strain a significant competitive advantage. Upon cell contact, the toxic C-terminal region of surface-exposed CdiA protein (CdiA-CT) inhibits the growth of CDI- bacteria. CDI+ cells express a specific immunity protein, CdiI, which protects from autoinhibition by blocking the activity of cognate CdiA-CT. CdiA-CT are separated from the rest of the protein by conserved peptide motifs falling into two distinct classes, the “E. coli”- and “Burkholderia-type”. CDI systems have been described in numerous species except in Pseudomonadaceae. In this study, we identified functional toxin/immunity genes linked to CDI systems in the Pseudomonas genus, which extend beyond the conventional CDI classes by the variability of the peptide motif that delimits the polymorphic CdiA-CT domain. Using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as a model, we identified the translational repressor RsmA as a negative regulator of CDI systems. Our data further suggest that under conditions of expression, P. aeruginosa CDI systems are implicated in adhesion and biofilm formation and provide an advantage in competition assays. All together our data imply that CDI systems could play an important role in niche adaptation of Pseudomonadaceae. PMID:26808644

  2. Nitrogenous wastewater treatment by activated algae

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    A biological treatability study by activated algae process was performed with synthetic wastewater containing a high concentration of nitrogen. It was found that the wastewater could be processed at all nitrogen removal rates. The yield coefficient and decay coefficient for heterotrophic bacteria were 0.06 (COD basis) and 0.019 day/sup -1/ (COD bases) respectively. The yield coefficient and decay coefficient for nitrifiers were 0.06 and 0.02 day/sup -1/ respectively. NH/sup +//sub 4/-N seemed to inhibit bacteriological growth as the yield coefficients values were significantly lower. Nitrification was observed at all the nitrogen loadings. Diffusion of NH/sub 3/ into the atmosphere was the dominant mechanism of nitrogen removal. The results demonstrated a symbiotic relationship between algae and bacteria.

  3. Kaempferol inhibits Entamoeba histolytica growth by altering cytoskeletal functions.

    PubMed

    Bolaños, Verónica; Díaz-Martínez, Alfredo; Soto, Jacqueline; Marchat, Laurence A; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther

    2015-11-01

    The flavonoid kaempferol obtained from Helianthemum glomeratum, an endemic Mexican medicinal herb used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, has been shown to inhibit growth of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in vitro; however, the mechanisms associated with this activity have not been documented. Several works reported that kaempferol affects cytoskeleton in mammalian cells. In order to gain insights into the action mechanisms involved in the anti-amoebic effect of kaempferol, here we evaluated the effect of this compound on the pathogenic events driven by the cytoskeleton during E. histolytica infection. We also carried out a two dimensional gel-based proteomic analysis to evidence modulated proteins that could explain the phenotypical changes observed in trophozoites. Our results showed that kaempferol produces a dose-dependent effect on trophozoites growth and viability with optimal concentration being 27.7 μM. Kaempferol also decreased adhesion, it increased migration and phagocytic activity, but it did not affect erythrocyte binding nor cytolytic capacity of E. histolytica. Congruently, proteomic analysis revealed that the cytoskeleton proteins actin, myosin II heavy chain and cortexillin II were up-regulated in response to kaempferol treatment. In conclusion, kaempferol anti-amoebic effects were associated with deregulation of proteins related with cytoskeleton, which altered invasion mechanisms.

  4. ABCB5-Targeted Chemoresistance Reversal Inhibits Merkel Cell Carcinoma Growth.

    PubMed

    Kleffel, Sonja; Lee, Nayoung; Lezcano, Cecilia; Wilson, Brian J; Sobolewski, Kristine; Saab, Karim R; Mueller, Hansgeorg; Zhan, Qian; Posch, Christian; Elco, Christopher P; DoRosario, Andrew; Garcia, Sarah S; Thakuria, Manisha; Wang, Yaoyu E; Wang, Linda C; Murphy, George F; Frank, Markus H; Schatton, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer with profound but poorly understood resistance to chemotherapy, which poses a significant barrier to clinical MCC treatment. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5) confers resistance to standard-of-care MCC chemotherapeutic agents and provide proof-of-principle that ABCB5 blockade can inhibit human MCC tumor growth through sensitization to drug-induced cell cytotoxicity. ABCB5 expression was detected in both established MCC lines and clinical MCC specimens at levels significantly higher than those in normal skin. Carboplatin- and etoposide-resistant MCC cell lines exhibited increased expression of ABCB5, along with enhanced ABCB1 and ABCC3 transcript expression. ABCB5-expressing MCC cells in heterogeneous cancers preferentially survived treatment with carboplatin and etoposide in vitro and in human MCC xenograft-bearing mice in vivo. Moreover, patients with MCC also exhibited enhanced ABCB5 positivity after carboplatin- and etoposide-based chemotherapy, pointing to clinical significance of this chemoresistance mechanism. Importantly, ABCB5 blockade reversed MCC drug resistance and impaired tumor growth in xenotransplantation models in vivo. Our results establish ABCB5 as a chemoresistance mechanism in MCC and suggest utility of this molecular target for improved MCC therapy. PMID:26827764

  5. Effect of Different Light Qualities on Growth, Pigment Content, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in the Red Alga Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Spectral light changes evoke different morphogenetic and photosynthetic responses that can vary among different algae species. The aim of this study is to investigate the photosynthetic characteristics of the red macroalgae grown under different spectrum environments. In this study, Pyropia haitanensis were cultured under blue, red, and green LED and fluorescent tubes light. The growth rate, photopigment composition, chlorophyll fluorescence, and antioxidative enzymes activities in different light spectrums were investigated. The results revealed that growth rate was significantly higher in the thalli grown under blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light. Contents of Chl a and phycobiliprotein in red light were lower among all the growth conditions. Furthermore, a striking increase in SOD and CAT activity was observed in red light treatment along with the NPQ increase. The results revealed that the photosynthetic efficiency and increased growth rate of P. haitanensis benefitted from light spectrums such as blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light by pigment composition and photochemical efficiency manipulation, whereas red light has disadvantageous effects. Accordingly, the results for improving quality and the economic yield of algae species in some extent and the combination of different wavelengths could allow better economic resource exploitation. PMID:27642603

  6. Treatment with algae extracts promotes flocculation, and enhances growth and neutral lipid content in Nannochloropsis oculata--a candidate for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rebecca L; Rand, Jonathan D; Caldwell, Gary S

    2012-12-01

    Marine microalgae represent a potentially valuable feedstock for biofuel production; however, large-scale production is not yet economically viable. Optimisation of productivity and lipid yields is required and the cost of biomass harvesting and dewatering must be significantly reduced. Microalgae produce a wide variety of biologically active metabolites, many of which are involved in inter- and intra-specific interactions (the so-called infochemicals). The majority of infochemicals remain unidentified or uncharacterised. Here, we apply known and candidate (undefined extracts) infochemicals as a potential means to manipulate the growth and lipid content of Nannochloropsis oculata-a prospective species for biofuel production. Five known infochemicals (β-cyclocitral, trans,trans-2,4-decadienal, hydrogen peroxide, norharman and tryptamine) and crude extracts prepared from Skeletonema marinoi and Dunaliella salina cultures at different growth stages were assayed for impacts on N. oculata over 24 h. The neutral lipid content of N. oculata increased significantly with exposure to three infochemicals (β-cyclocitral, decadienal and norharman); however the effective concentrations affected a significant decrease in growth. Exposure to particular crude extracts significantly increased both growth and neutral lipid levels. In addition, water-soluble extracts of senescent S. marinoi cultures induced a degree of flocculation in the N. oculata. These preliminary results indicate that artificial manipulation of N. oculata cultures by application of algae infochemicals could provide a valuable tool towards achieving economically viable large-scale algae biofuel production.

  7. Effect of Different Light Qualities on Growth, Pigment Content, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in the Red Alga Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Spectral light changes evoke different morphogenetic and photosynthetic responses that can vary among different algae species. The aim of this study is to investigate the photosynthetic characteristics of the red macroalgae grown under different spectrum environments. In this study, Pyropia haitanensis were cultured under blue, red, and green LED and fluorescent tubes light. The growth rate, photopigment composition, chlorophyll fluorescence, and antioxidative enzymes activities in different light spectrums were investigated. The results revealed that growth rate was significantly higher in the thalli grown under blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light. Contents of Chl a and phycobiliprotein in red light were lower among all the growth conditions. Furthermore, a striking increase in SOD and CAT activity was observed in red light treatment along with the NPQ increase. The results revealed that the photosynthetic efficiency and increased growth rate of P. haitanensis benefitted from light spectrums such as blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light by pigment composition and photochemical efficiency manipulation, whereas red light has disadvantageous effects. Accordingly, the results for improving quality and the economic yield of algae species in some extent and the combination of different wavelengths could allow better economic resource exploitation.

  8. Effect of Different Light Qualities on Growth, Pigment Content, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in the Red Alga Pyropia haitanensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Wu, Huanyang

    2016-01-01

    Spectral light changes evoke different morphogenetic and photosynthetic responses that can vary among different algae species. The aim of this study is to investigate the photosynthetic characteristics of the red macroalgae grown under different spectrum environments. In this study, Pyropia haitanensis were cultured under blue, red, and green LED and fluorescent tubes light. The growth rate, photopigment composition, chlorophyll fluorescence, and antioxidative enzymes activities in different light spectrums were investigated. The results revealed that growth rate was significantly higher in the thalli grown under blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light. Contents of Chl a and phycobiliprotein in red light were lower among all the growth conditions. Furthermore, a striking increase in SOD and CAT activity was observed in red light treatment along with the NPQ increase. The results revealed that the photosynthetic efficiency and increased growth rate of P. haitanensis benefitted from light spectrums such as blue, green, and fluorescent tubes light by pigment composition and photochemical efficiency manipulation, whereas red light has disadvantageous effects. Accordingly, the results for improving quality and the economic yield of algae species in some extent and the combination of different wavelengths could allow better economic resource exploitation. PMID:27642603

  9. Do furanic and phenolic compounds of lignocellulosic and algae biomass hydrolyzate inhibit anaerobic mixed cultures? A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Monlau, F; Sambusiti, C; Barakat, A; Quéméneur, M; Trably, E; Steyer, J-P; Carrère, H

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest on the use of both lignocellulosic and algae biomass to produce biofuels (i.e. biohydrogen, ethanol and methane), as future alternatives to fossil fuels. In this purpose, thermal and thermo-chemical pretreatments have been widely investigated to overcome the natural physico-chemical barriers of such biomass and to enhance biofuel production from lignocellulosic residues and, more recently, marine biomass (i.e. macro and microalgae). However, the pretreatment technologies lead not only to the conversion of carbohydrate polymers (ie cellulose, hemicelluloses, starch, agar) to soluble monomeric sugar (ie glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose), but also the generation of various by-products (i.e. furfural and 5-HMF). In the case of lignocellulosic residues, part of the lignin can also be degraded in lignin derived by-products, mainly composed of phenolic compounds. Although the negative impact of such by-products on ethanol production has been widely described in literature, studies on their impact on biohydrogen and methane production operated with mixed cultures are still very limited. This review aims to summarise and discuss literature data on the impact of pre-treatment by-products on H2-producing dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion processes when using mixed cultures as inoculum. As a summary, furanic (5-HMF, furfural) and phenolic compounds were found to be stronger inhibitors of the microbial dark fermentation than the full anaerobic digestion process. Such observations can be explained by differences in process parameters: anaerobic digestion is performed with more complex mixed cultures, lower substrate/inoculum and by-products/inoculum ratios and longer batch incubation times than dark fermentation. Finally, it has been reported that, during dark fermentation process, the presence of by-products could lead to a metabolic shift from H2-producing pathways (i.e. acetate and butyrate) to non-H2-producing pathways (i

  10. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  11. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  12. Anti-Angiogenic Properties of BDDPM, a Bromophenol from Marine Red Alga Rhodomela confervoides, with Multi Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiyu; Wang, Li-Jun; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ning; Li, Xiangqian; Liu, Shaofang; Luo, Jiao; Shi, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Bis-(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxy-phenyl)-methane (BDDPM) is a bromophenol first isolated from Rhodomelaceae confervoides. Our previous studies showed that BDDPM exerts PTP1B-inhibiting activity and anti-cancer activity against a wide range of tumor cells while it also showed lower cytotoxicity against normal cells. In the present study, we found that BDDPM exhibits significant activities toward angiogenesis in vitro. BDDPM inhibits multiple angiogenesis processes, including endothelial cell sprouting, migration, proliferation, and tube formation. Further kinase assays investigations found that BDDPM is a potent selective, but multi-target, receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKs) inhibitor. BDDPM (10 μM) inhibits the activities of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 and 3 (FGFR2, 3), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) (inhibition rate: 57.7%, 78.6%, 78.5% and 71.1%, respectively). Moreover, BDDPM also decreases the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as well as nitric oxide (NO) production in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that BDDPM can be exploited as an anti-angiogenic drug, or as a lead compound for the development of novel multi-target RTKs inhibitors. PMID:26075871

  13. MECHANISMS OF FLUID SHEAR-INDUCED INHIBITION OF POPULATION GROWTH IN A RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net population growth of some dinoflagellates is inhibited by fluid shear at shear stresses comparable with those generated during oceanic turbulence. Decreased net growth may occur through lowered cell division, increased mortality, or both. The dominant mechanism under various ...

  14. Stable chloroplast transformation of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium species.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, Miri; Raveh, Dina; Sivan, Alex; Arad, Shoshana Malis; Shapira, Michal

    2002-05-01

    Red algae are extremely attractive for biotechnology because they synthesize accessory photosynthetic pigments (phycobilins and carotenoids), unsaturated fatty acids, and unique cell wall sulfated polysaccharides. We report a high-efficiency chloroplast transformation system for the unicellular red microalga Porphyridium sp. This is the first genetic transformation system for Rhodophytes and is based on use of a mutant form of the gene encoding acetohydroxyacid synthase [AHAS(W492S)] as a dominant selectable marker. AHAS is the target enzyme of the herbicide sulfometuron methyl, which effectively inhibits growth of bacteria, fungi, plants, and algae. Biolistic transformation of synchronized Porphyridium sp. cells with the mutant AHAS(W492S) gene that confers herbicide resistance gave a high frequency of sulfomethuron methyl-resistant colonies. The mutant AHAS gene integrated into the chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. This system paves the way for expression of foreign genes in red algae and has important biotechnological implications.

  15. Inhibited growth of colon cancer carcinomatosis by antibodies to vascular endothelial and epidermal growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, R M; Ahmad, S A; Liu, W; Reinmuth, N; Jung, Y D; Tseng, W W; Drazan, K E; Bucana, C D; Hicklin, D J; Ellis, L M

    2001-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate colon cancer growth and metastasis. Previous studies utilizing antibodies against the VEGF receptor (DC101) or EGF receptor (C225) have demonstrated independently that these agents can inhibit tumour growth and induce apoptosis in colon cancer in in vivo and in vitro systems. We hypothesized that simultaneous blockade of the VEGF and EGF receptors would enhance the therapy of colon cancer in a mouse model of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Nude mice were given intraperitoneal injection of KM12L4 human colon cancer cells to generate peritoneal metastases. Mice were then randomized into one of four treatment groups: control, anti-VEGFR (DC101), anti-EGFR (C225), or DC101 and C225. Relative to the control group, treatment with DC101 or with DC101+C225 decreased tumour vascularity, growth, proliferation, formation of ascites and increased apoptosis of both tumour cells and endothelial cells. Although C225 therapy did not change any of the above parameters, C225 combined with DC101 led to a significant decrease in tumour vascularity and increases in tumour cell and endothelial cell apoptosis (vs the DC101 group). These findings suggest that DC101 inhibits angiogenesis, endothelial cell survival, and VEGF-mediated ascites formation in a murine model of colon cancer carcinomatosis. The addition of C225 to DC101 appears to lead to a further decrease in angiogenesis and ascites formation. Combination anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR therapy may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the management of colon peritoneal carcinomatosis. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506500

  16. Inhibition of mitogen stimulated growth of human colon cancer cells by interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, A. W.; Condon, M. E.; O'Donnell, K.

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant human interferon alpha inhibits growth of a human colon cancer cell line, Colo 205. To explore the mechanisms of IFN induced growth inhibition, quiescent Colo 205 cells were stimulated to proliferate in serum-free media by defined growth factors. Addition of insulin, transferrin and selenium (ITS) stimulated DNA synthesis, as measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation, in a dose-dependent manner. IFN-alpha (at concentrations greater than 100 U ml-1) inhibited ITS stimulated DNA synthesis by 63%. Inhibition of cell cycle traverse was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis. Although IFN inhibited growth of ITS-treated cells, steady state levels of c-myc mRNA remained above levels observed in unstimulated cells. IFN inhibited DNA synthesis only when added prior to mitogen stimulation. IFN, added 6 h after exposure of quiescent cells to ITS, failed to inhibit cell growth. Addition of increasing concentrations of ITS failed to overcome the IFN-induced growth inhibition. These results suggest IFN may inhibit cell growth in part by antagonizing the action of growth factors. Images Figure 4 PMID:3166905

  17. [Mechanism of the inhibitory action of allelochemical dibutyl phthalate on algae Gymnodinium breve].

    PubMed

    Bie, Cong-Cong; Li, Feng-Min; Wang, Yi-Fei; Wang, Hao-Yun; Zhao, Ya-Han; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of inhibitory action of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) on red tide algae Gymnodinium breve. The effects of DBP on malonaldehyde, subcellular structure and superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms were investigated. The results showed that MDA accumulated in the algae cell under DBP exposure, and for the 3 mg x L(-1) DBP treated algae culture a peak value of 0.34 micromol x (10(9) cells) (-1) occurred at 72 h, which was about 2. 3 times than that of the control. TEM pictures showed the disruption of DBP on the subcellular structure of G. breve. A morphological phenomenon appeared that the algae cell was commonly found small tubules or apical parts around the cell membrane, and almost all normal cell organelles were indistinguishable finally. The activity of CuZn-SOD (main cytoplast located isoform with little in cloroplast) under DBP exposure was higher than that of the control, and no significant difference was observed on Fe-SOD (chloroplast located isoform) activity, but for the Mn-SOD (mitochondrial isoform), the activity was significantly inhibited. These results indicated that DBP might inhibit the algae growth from the plasma membrane and the mitochondria, resulting in oxidative damage in algae cell and a final death. This paper will give a theoretical support to the practical usage of the allelochemical on red tide algae.

  18. Growth of Streptomyces Hygroscopicus in Rotating-Wall Bioreactor Under Simulated Microgravity Inhibits Rapamycin Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  19. Growth of Steptomyces hygroscopicus in rotating-wall bioreactor under simulated microgravity inhibits rapamycin production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin, in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  20. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; DeWitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models. PMID:26459930

  1. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  2. Growth Hormone Inhibits Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Majumdar, Neena; List, Edward O; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frank, Stuart J; Manzano, Anna; Bartrons, Ramon; Puchowicz, Michelle; Kopchick, John J; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2015-09-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are reported to have low growth hormone (GH) production and/or hepatic GH resistance. GH replacement can resolve the fatty liver condition in diet-induced obese rodents and in GH-deficient patients. However, it remains to be determined whether this inhibitory action of GH is due to direct regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Therefore, an adult-onset, hepatocyte-specific, GH receptor (GHR) knockdown (aLivGHRkd) mouse was developed to model hepatic GH resistance in humans that may occur after sexual maturation. Just 7 days after aLivGHRkd, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) was increased in male and female chow-fed mice, compared with GHR-intact littermate controls. However, hepatosteatosis developed only in male and ovariectomized female aLivGHRkd mice. The increase in DNL observed in aLivGHRkd mice was not associated with hyperactivation of the pathway by which insulin is classically considered to regulate DNL. However, glucokinase mRNA and protein levels as well as fructose-2,6-bisphosphate levels were increased in aLivGHRkd mice, suggesting that enhanced glycolysis drives DNL in the GH-resistant liver. These results demonstrate that hepatic GH actions normally serve to inhibit DNL, where loss of this inhibitory signal may explain, in part, the inappropriate increase in hepatic DNL observed in NAFLD patients. PMID:26015548

  3. Further evidence that naphthoquinone inhibits Toxoplasma gondii growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luciana Lemos Rangel; Portes, Juliana de Araujo; de Araújo, Marlon Heggdorne; Silva, Jéssica Lays Sant'ana; Rennó, Magdalena Nascimento; Netto, Chaquip Daher; da Silva, Alcides José Monteiro; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; De Souza, Wanderley; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely disseminated disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan parasite. Standard treatment causes many side effects, such as depletion of bone marrow cells, skin rashes and gastrointestinal implications. Therefore, it is necessary to find chemotherapeutic alternatives for the treatment of this disease. It was shown that a naphthoquinone derivative compound is active against T. gondii, RH strain, with an IC50 around 2.5 μM. Here, three different naphthoquinone derivative compounds with activity against leukemia cells and breast carcinoma cell were tested against T. gondii (RH strain) infected LLC-MK2 cell line. All the compounds were able to inhibit parasite growth in vitro, but one of them showed an IC50 activity below 1 μM after 48 h of treatment. The compounds showed low toxicity to the host cell. In addition, these compounds were able to induce tachyzoite-bradyzoite conversion confirmed by morphological changes, Dolichus biflorus lectin cyst wall labeling and characterization of amylopectin granules in the parasites by electron microscopy analysis using the Thierry technique. Furthermore, the compounds induced alterations on the ultrastructure of the parasite. Taken together, our results point to the naphthoquinone derivative (LQB 151) as a potential compound for the development of new drugs for the treatment of toxoplasmosis. PMID:26335616

  4. MiR-503 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth via inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yao; Tian, Qinggang; He, Jiantai; Huang, Ming; Yang, Chao; Gong, Liansheng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been demonstrated to play key roles in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-503 in HCC has not been fully uncovered. In this study, we found that miR-503 was significantly downregulated in HCC tissues compared to nontumorous liver tissues. Moreover, lower miR-503 levels were associated with the malignant progression of HCC, and the expression of miR-503 was also decreased in several common HCC cell lines compared to normal human liver cell line THLE-3. Overexpression of miR-503 inhibited proliferation but induced apoptosis of LM3 and HepG2 cells. Bioinformatical analysis and luciferase reporter assay further identified insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) as a novel target of miR-503 in 293T cells. Moreover, overexpression of miR-503 led to a significant decrease in the protein levels of IGF-1R, while knockdown of miR-503 enhanced its protein levels in LM3 and HepG2 cells. Besides, overexpression of IGF-1R reversed the effects of miR-503-mediated HCC cell proliferation and apoptosis, indicating that IGF-1R acts as a downstream effector of miR-503 in HCC cells. Furthermore, IGF-1R was found to be significantly upregulated in HCC tissues compared to nontumorous liver tissues. In addition, the mRNA levels of IGF-1R were inversely correlated to the miR-503 levels in the HCC tissues. Thus, we demonstrate that miR-503 inhibits the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of HCC cells, partly at least, by directly targeting IGF-1R, and suggest that IGF-1R may serve as a promising target for the treatment of HCC. PMID:27366090

  5. Antibiotic activity of lectins from marine algae against marine vibrios.

    PubMed

    Liao, W-R; Lin, J-Y; Shieh, W-Y; Jeng, W-L; Huang, R

    2003-07-01

    Saline and aqueous ethanol extracts of marine algae and the lectins from two red algal species were assayed for their antibiotic activity against marine vibrios. Experimental studies were also carried out on the influence of environmental factors on such activity, using batch cultures. The results indicated that many of the saline extracts of the algal species were active and that the activity was selective against those vibrios assayed. The algal extracts were active against Vibrio pelagius and the fish pathogen V. vulnificus, but inactive against V. neresis. Algal lectins from Eucheuma serra (ESA) and Galaxaura marginata (GMA) strongly inhibited V. vulnificus but were inactive against the other two vibrios. The antibacterial activity of algal extracts was inhibited by pretreatment with various sugars and glycoprotein. Extracts of the two red algae, E. serra and Pterocladia capillacea, in saline and aqueous ethanol, inhibited markedly the growth rate of V. vulnificus at very low concentrations. Culture results indicated that metabolites active against V. vulnificus were invariably produced in P. capillacea over a wide range of temperature, light intensity, and nutritional conditions. Enhanced antibacterial activity occurred when P. capillacea was grown under higher irradiance, severe nutrient stress and moderate temperature (20 degrees C), reflecting the specific antibiotic characteristics of this alga. The strong antibiotic activity of lectins towards fish pathogenic bacteria reveals one of the important roles played by algal lectins, as well as the potential high economic value of those marine algae assayed for aquaculture and for biomedical purposes. PMID:12884128

  6. Stoichiometry of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and Phycobilisomes in the Red Alga Porphyridium cruentum as a Function of Growth Irradiance 1

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Francis X.; Dennenberg, Ronald J.; Mustardy, Laszlo; Jursinic, Paul A.; Gantt, Elisabeth

    1989-01-01

    Cells of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161) exposed to increasing growth irradiance exhibited up to a three-fold reduction in photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) and phycobilisomes but little change in the relative numbers of these components. Batch cultures of P. cruentum were grown under four photon flux densities of continuous white light; 6 (low light, LL), 35 (medium light, ML), 180 (high light, HL), and 280 (very high light, VHL) microeinsteins per square meter per second and sampled in the exponential phase of growth. Ratios of PSII to PSI ranged between 0.43 and 0.54. About three PSII centers per phycobilisome were found, regardless of growth irradiance. The phycoerythrin content of phycobilisomes decreased by about 25% for HL and VHL compared to LL and ML cultures. The unit sizes of PSI (chlorophyll/P700) and PSII (chlorophyll/QA) decreased by about 20% with increase in photon flux density from 6 to 280 microeinsteins per square meter per second. A threefold reduction in cell content of chlorophyll at the higher photon flux densities was accompanied by a twofold reduction in β-carotene, and a drastic reduction in thylakoid membrane area. Cell content of zeaxanthin, the major carotenoid in P. cruentum, did not vary with growth irradiance, suggesting a role other than light-harvesting. HL cultures had a growth rate twice that of ML, eight times that of LL, and slightly greater than that of VHL cultures. Cell volume increased threefold from LL to VHL, but volume of the single chloroplast did not change. From this study it is evident that a relatively fixed stoichiometry of PSI, PSII, and phycobilisomes is maintained in the photosynthetic apparatus of this red alga over a wide range of growth irradiance. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667130

  7. Cellular Auxin Transport in Algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyun; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is one of the main directors of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxin is generated in apical plant parts and transported from cell-to-cell in a polar fashion. Auxin is present in all plant phyla, and the existence of polar auxin transport (PAT) is well established in land plants. Algae are a group of relatively simple, autotrophic, photosynthetic organisms that share many features with land plants. In particular, Charophyceae (a taxon of green algae) are closest ancestors of land plants. In the study of auxin function, transport and its evolution, the algae form an interesting research target. Recently, proof for polar auxin transport in Chara species was published and auxin related research in algae gained more attention. In this review we discuss auxin transport in algae with respect to land plants and suggest directions for future studies. PMID:27135491

  8. Cellular Auxin Transport in Algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyun; van Duijn, Bert

    2014-01-27

    The phytohormone auxin is one of the main directors of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxin is generated in apical plant parts and transported from cell-to-cell in a polar fashion. Auxin is present in all plant phyla, and the existence of polar auxin transport (PAT) is well established in land plants. Algae are a group of relatively simple, autotrophic, photosynthetic organisms that share many features with land plants. In particular, Charophyceae (a taxon of green algae) are closest ancestors of land plants. In the study of auxin function, transport and its evolution, the algae form an interesting research target. Recently, proof for polar auxin transport in Chara species was published and auxin related research in algae gained more attention. In this review we discuss auxin transport in algae with respect to land plants and suggest directions for future studies.

  9. Compounds in a particular production lot of tryptic soy broth inhibit Staphylococcus aureus cell growth.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masaki; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus Newman strain and several methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates were grown on agar plates prepared with conventional lots of tryptic soy broth (TSB). Cell growth of these strains was inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of a particular product lot (lot A), whereas the cell growth of S. aureus RN4220 strain and several other MRSA clinical isolates was not inhibited. The cell growth of a strain of S. epidermidis was also inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of lot A, whereas the cell growth of Bacillus subtilis, Lactococcus lactis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Salmonella enterica, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli was not inhibited. Although cell growth of the Newman strain was inhibited on agar plates containing TSB of lot A that was autoclaved in stainless steel or glass containers, cell growth inhibition was not observed when the medium was autoclaved in polypropylene containers. Compounds that inhibited the cell growth of the Newman strain were extracted from a polypropylene tube that was preincubated with liquid medium prepared from TSB of lot A. These findings suggest that polypropylene-binding compounds in TSB of lot A inhibited the cell growth of S. aureus Newman strain, some MRSA clinical isolates, and S. epidermidis.

  10. Synergistic effect of auxins and brassinosteroids on the growth and regulation of metabolite content in the green alga Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Bajguz, Andrzej; Piotrowska-Niczyporuk, Alicja

    2013-10-01

    The relationships between brassinosteroids (BRs) (brassinolide, BL; 24-epiBL; 28-homoBL; castasterone, CS; 24-epiCS; 28-homoCS) and auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA; indole-3-butyric acid, IBA; indole-3-propionic acid, IPA) in the regulation of cell number, phytohormone level and metabolism in green alga Chlorella vulgaris were investigated. Exogenously applied auxins had the highest biological activity in algal cells at 50 μM. Among the auxins, IAA was characterized by the highest activity, while IBA - by the lowest. BRs at 0.01 μM were characterized by the highest biological activity in relation to auxin-treated and untreated cultures of C. vulgaris. The application of 50 μM IAA stimulated the level of all detected endogenous BRs in C. vulgaris cells. The stimulatory effect of BRs in green algae was arranged in the following order: BL > 24-epiBL > 28-homoBL > CS > 24-epiCS > 28-homoCS. Auxins cooperated synergistically with BRs stimulating algal cell proliferation and endogenous accumulation of proteins, chlorophylls and monosaccharides in C. vulgaris. The highest stimulation of algal growth and the contents of analyzed biochemical parameters were observed for the mixture of BL with IAA, whereas the lowest in the culture treated with both 28-homoCS and IBA. However, regardless of the applied mixture of BRs with auxins, the considerable increase in cell number and the metabolite accumulation was found above the level obtained in cultures treated with any single phytohormone. Obtained results confirm that both groups of plant hormones cooperate synergistically in the control of growth and metabolism of unicellular green alga C. vulgaris.

  11. Interaction of TiO2 nanoparticles with the marine microalga Nitzschia closterium: growth inhibition, oxidative stress and internalization.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bin; Chen, Bijuan; Sun, Xuemei; Qu, Keming; Ma, Feifei; Du, Meirong

    2015-03-01

    The toxicity of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to the marine microalga Nitzschia closterium was investigated by examining growth inhibition, oxidative stress and uptake. The results indicated that the toxicity of TiO2 particles to algal cells significantly increased with decreasing nominal particle size, which was evidenced by the 96 EC50 values of 88.78, 118.80 and 179.05 mg/L for 21 nm, 60 nm and 400 nm TiO2 particles, respectively. The growth rate was significantly inhibited when the alga was exposed to 5mg/L TiO2 NPs (21 nm). Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities were first induced and subsequently inhibited following exposure to 5mg/L TiO2 NPs. The depletion of antioxidant enzymes with a concomitant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) posed a hazard to membrane integrity. A combination of flow cytometry analysis, transmission electron microscopy and Ti content measurement indicated that TiO2 NPs were internalized in N. closterium cells. The level of extracellular ROS, which was induced by TiO2 NPs under visible light, was negligible when compared with the intracellular ROS level (accounting for less than 6.0% of the total ROS level). These findings suggest that elevated TiO2 nanotoxicity in marine environments is related to increased ROS levels caused by internalization of TiO2 NPs. PMID:25483108

  12. Interaction of TiO2 nanoparticles with the marine microalga Nitzschia closterium: growth inhibition, oxidative stress and internalization.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bin; Chen, Bijuan; Sun, Xuemei; Qu, Keming; Ma, Feifei; Du, Meirong

    2015-03-01

    The toxicity of TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to the marine microalga Nitzschia closterium was investigated by examining growth inhibition, oxidative stress and uptake. The results indicated that the toxicity of TiO2 particles to algal cells significantly increased with decreasing nominal particle size, which was evidenced by the 96 EC50 values of 88.78, 118.80 and 179.05 mg/L for 21 nm, 60 nm and 400 nm TiO2 particles, respectively. The growth rate was significantly inhibited when the alga was exposed to 5mg/L TiO2 NPs (21 nm). Measurements of antioxidant enzyme activities showed that superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities were first induced and subsequently inhibited following exposure to 5mg/L TiO2 NPs. The depletion of antioxidant enzymes with a concomitant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) posed a hazard to membrane integrity. A combination of flow cytometry analysis, transmission electron microscopy and Ti content measurement indicated that TiO2 NPs were internalized in N. closterium cells. The level of extracellular ROS, which was induced by TiO2 NPs under visible light, was negligible when compared with the intracellular ROS level (accounting for less than 6.0% of the total ROS level). These findings suggest that elevated TiO2 nanotoxicity in marine environments is related to increased ROS levels caused by internalization of TiO2 NPs.

  13. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, Patrick R. Brannick, Katherine E. Wang, Wei Gupta, Rupesh K. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-04-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) for 24–96 h to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24–96 h of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydroxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. - Highlights: • DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth by dysregulating cell cycle regulators. • DEHP induces antral follicle atresia by dysregulating apoptosis regulators. • DEHP

  14. Environmental estrogens inhibit growth of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by modulating the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrea M; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Martin, Lincoln E; Sheridan, Mark A

    2014-01-15

    Although environmental estrogens (EE) have been found to disrupt a wide variety of developmental and reproductive processes in vertebrates, there is a paucity of information concerning their effects on organismal growth, particularly postembryonic growth. In this study, we exposed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol (E2) β-sitosterol (βS), or 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) to assess the effects of EE on overall organismal growth and on the growth hormone-insulin-like-growth factor (GH-IGF) system. EE treatment significantly reduced food conversion, body condition, and body growth. EE-inhibited growth resulted from alterations in peripheral elements of the GH-IGF system, which includes multiple GH receptors (GHRs), IGFs, and IGF receptors (IGFRs). In general, E2, βS, and NP reduced the expression of GHRs, IGFs, and IGFRs; however, the effects varied in an EE-, tissue-, element type-specific manner. For example, in liver, E2 was more efficacious than either βS, and NP in reducing GHR expression, and the effect of E2 was greater on GHR 1 than GHR2 mRNA. By contrast, in gill, all EEs affected GHR expression in a similar manner and there was no difference in the effect on GHR1 and GHR 2 mRNA. With regard to IGF expression, all EEs reduced hepatic IGF1 and IGF2 mRNA levels, whereas as in gill, only E2 and NP significantly reduced IGF1 and IGF2 expression. Lastly, E2 and NP reduced the expression of IGFR1A and IGFR1B mRNA expression similarly in gill and red and white muscle, whereas βS had no effect on expression of IGFR mRNAs. These findings indicate that EEs disrupt post-embryonic growth by reducing GH sensitivity, IGF production, and IGF sensitivity.

  15. Inhibition of growth of Toxoplasma gondii in cultured fibroblasts by human recombinant gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, E R; Guyre, P M

    1984-01-01

    The growth of Toxoplasma gondii in cultured human fibroblasts was inhibited by recombinant human gamma interferon at concentrations of 8 to 16 U/ml. The interferon was titrated by observing a total inhibition of parasite plaque formation 7 days after infection. Inhibition of the growth of T. gondii in the early days after infection was measured by marked reductions in the incorporation of radioactive uracil, a precursor that can only be used by the parasites. This assay showed that when cells were pretreated with gamma interferon for 1 day and then infected, inhibition of T. gondii growth could be readily detected 1 or 2 days after infection. When the pretreatment was omitted and parasites and gamma interferon were added at the same time, no inhibition of parasite growth could be detected 1 day later, although it was apparent after 2 days. Cultures from which the gamma interferon had been removed by washing after a 1-day treatment showed inhibition of T. gondii growth. Gamma interferon had no effect on the viability of extracellular parasites, but it did inhibit the synthesis of host cell RNA and protein by ca. 50% 3 days after treatment. This degree of inhibition is unlikely, of itself, to compromise the growth of T. gondii. Recombinant alpha and beta interferons had no effect on the growth of T. gondii. Images PMID:6425215

  16. Selective inhibition of growth-related gene expression in murine keratinocytes by transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, R J; Bascom, C C; Sipes, N J; Graves-Deal, R; Weissman, B E; Moses, H L

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is a potent inhibitor of epithelial cell proliferation. A nontumorigenic epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent epithelial cell line, BALB/MK, is reversibly growth arrested by TGF beta. TGF beta will also abrogate EGF-stimulated mitogenesis of quiescent BALB/MK cells. Increased levels of calcium (greater than 1.0 mM) will induce differentiation in BALB/MK cells; in contrast, TGF beta-mediated growth inhibition does not result in induction of terminal differentiation. In the present study, the effects of TGF beta and calcium on growth factor-inducible gene expression were examined. TGF beta markedly decreased c-myc and KC gene expression in rapidly growing BALB/MK cells and reduced the EGF induction of c-myc and KC in a quiescent population of cells. TGF beta exerted its control over c-myc expression at a posttranscriptional level, and this inhibitory effect was dependent on protein synthesis. TGF beta had no effect on c-fos gene expression, whereas 1.5 mM calcium attenuated EGF-induced c-fos expression in quiescent cells. Expression of beta-actin, however, was slightly increased in both rapidly growing and EGF-restimulated quiescent BALB/MK cells treated with TGF beta. Thus, in this system, TGF beta selectively reduced expression of certain genes associated with cell proliferation (c-myc and KC), and at least part of the TGF beta effect was at a posttranscriptional level. Images PMID:2463471

  17. Growth-inhibiting effects of 12 antibacterial agents and their mixtures on the freshwater microalga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Hua; Ying, Guang-Guo; Su, Hao-Chang; Stauber, Jennifer L; Adams, Merrin S; Binet, Monique T

    2008-05-01

    The growth-inhibiting and binary joint effects of 12 antibacterial agents on the freshwater green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (Korschikov) Hindák were investigated over 72-h exposures. The toxicity values (the median inhibitory concentration value, in micromoles) in decreasing order of sensitivity were triclosan (0.0018)>triclocarban (0.054)>roxithromycin (0.056)>clarithromycin (0.062)>tylosin (0.20)>tetracycline (2.25)>chlortetracycline (3.49)>norfloxacin (5.64)>sulfamethoxazole (7.50)>ciprofloxacin (20.22)>sulfamethazine (31.26)>trimethoprim (137.78). Several of these antibacterial compounds would be toxic at the micrograms per liter concentrations reported in surface waters and sewage effluents. Simple additive effects were observed in binary mixtures of sulfonamides, and most tylosin, triclosan, or triclocarban combinations. Potentially synergistic effects were observed in binary mixtures of the same class, such as macrolides, tetracyclines, and fluoroquinolones, as well as in some combined drugs, such as trimethoprim and sulfonamides or tylosin and tetracyclines. Potentially antagonistic effects were only observed between tylosin and triclocarban, triclosan and norfloxacin, and triclocarban and norfloxacin. Although present at low concentrations in the aquatic environment, mixtures of these antibacterial agents can potentially affect algal growth in freshwater systems due to their combined action.

  18. Fluorescent minerals - A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark.

  19. Fluorescent minerals--A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments.

    PubMed

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark.

  20. Fluorescent minerals--A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments.

    PubMed

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark. PMID:26256632

  1. XET Activity is Found Near Sites of Growth and Cell Elongation in Bryophytes and Some Green Algae: New Insights into the Evolution of Primary Cell Wall Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Van Sandt, Vicky S. T.; Stieperaere, Herman; Guisez, Yves; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Vissenberg, Kris

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims In angiosperms xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET)/hydrolase (XTH) is involved in reorganization of the cell wall during growth and development. The location of oligo-xyloglucan transglucosylation activity and the presence of XTH expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the earliest diverging extant plants, i.e. in bryophytes and algae, down to the Phaeophyta was examined. The results provide information on the presence of an XET growth mechanism in bryophytes and algae and contribute to the understanding of the evolution of cell wall elongation in general. Methods Representatives of the different plant lineages were pressed onto an XET test paper and assayed. XET or XET-related activity was visualized as the incorporation of fluorescent signal. The Physcomitrella genome database was screened for the presence of XTHs. In addition, using the 3′ RACE technique searches were made for the presence of possible XTH ESTs in the Charophyta. Key Results XET activity was found in the three major divisions of bryophytes at sites corresponding to growing regions. In the Physcomitrella genome two putative XTH-encoding cDNA sequences were identified that contain all domains crucial for XET activity. Furthermore, XET activity was located at the sites of growth in Chara (Charophyta) and Ulva (Chlorophyta) and a putative XTH ancestral enzyme in Chara was identified. No XET activity was identified in the Rhodophyta or Phaeophyta. Conclusions XET activity was shown to be present in all major groups of green plants. These data suggest that an XET-related growth mechanism originated before the evolutionary divergence of the Chlorobionta and open new insights in the evolution of the mechanisms of primary cell wall expansion. PMID:17098750

  2. Negative impact on growth and photosynthesis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in the presence of the estrogen 17α-ethynylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Tessa; Falk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that estrogenic compounds affect development of fertilized eggs of many species of birds, fish and amphibians through disrupted activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA). The most potent activity comes from the most commonly occurring synthetic sterol, 17α-Ethynylestradiol (EE2). Less is known about the responses of aquatic phytoplankton to these compounds. Here we show for the first time that, in comparision to the control, the addition of 7 µM EE2 reduced the growth rate of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by 68% for cells grown at high CO2. When cells were grown in ambient air (low Ci) with a fully activated carbon concentrating mechanism through the induction of CA activity, the growth rates were reduced by as much as 119%. A reduced growth rate could be observed at EE2 concentrations as low as 10 pM. This was accompanied by a reduced maximum capacity for electron transport in photosystem II as determined by a lower FV/FM for low Ci-grown cells, which indicates the involvement of CAH3, a CA specifically located in the thylakoid lumen involved in proton pumping across the thylakoid membranes. These results were in agreement with an observed reduction in the chloroplastic affinity for Ci as shown by a strong increase in the Michaelis-Menten K0.5 for HCO3-. In itself, a lowering of the growth rate of a green alga by addition of the sterol EE2 warrants further investigation into the potential environmental impact by the release of treated waste water.

  3. Study of a two-stage growth of DHA-producing marine algae Schizochytrium limacinum SR21 with shifting dissolved oxygen level.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhanyou; Liu, Yan; Frear, Craig; Chen, Shulin

    2009-01-01

    The culture protocol of Schizochytrium limacinum SR 21, a known docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) producing marine algae was modified in this study to better fit fermentation parameters, particularly control of dissolved oxygen (DO) to the known reproductive and growth biology of the microorganism. The cultures controlled at 50% DO saturation produced a cell density of 181 million cells/ml, whereas cultures with 10% DO produced only 98.4 million cells/ml. A fixed-agitation rate of 150 rpm resulted in an even lower density of 22.5 million cells/ml. Fifty percent DO saturation level led to a decreased pH, as well as a negative correlation with lipid accumulation, while low oxygen concentration was obligatory for lipid accumulation. This study indicated that high DO was preferred for the cells' reproduction via release of zoospores. Thus, the culture of S. limacinum SR21 should be best divided into two stages: (1) a cell-number-increasing stage in which cell reproduction and cell number increase with little increase in the size and weight of each cell; and (2) a cell-size-increasing stage in which cells stop reproduction but cell size enlarges due to lipids accumulation. With such a protocol, the production of algae biomass and DHA was improved to levels of 37.9 g/L and 6.56 g/L, respectively. The two-stage culture process could be potentially used not only for omega-3 PUFA production, but also in other single cell oil (SCO)-producing processes, including biodiesel production from algae.

  4. Laboratory study on the ecological impact of sophorolipid used for harmful algae elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Kim, Eunki; Sun, Song

    2010-11-01

    We studied the role of sophorolipid in inhibiting harmful algae bloom (HAB). Different sophorolipid concentrations were tested on marine microalgae, zooplankton, fish, and bivalve ( Mytilus edulis) in laboratory. The result shows that sophorolipid could inhibit the growth of algal species selectively. Among three algae species selected, Platymonas helgolandica var. tsingtaoensis was promoted with increasing sophorolipid concentration; Isochrysis galbana was inhibited seven days later in sophorolipid concentration below 40 mg/L; and Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima was inhibited obviously in only a high sophorolipid concentration over 20 mg/L. Therefore, sophorolipid in a low concentration at <20 mg/L could remove certain harmful algae species effectively without harming other non-harmful microalgae. For other animals, sophorolipid could inhibit the growth of ciliate Strombidium sp. by 50% at 20 mg/L sophorolipid concentration after 96 h. The concentration in 96-h LC50 for Calanus sinicus, Neomysis awatschensis, Lateolabrax japonicus, and Paralichthys olivaceus was 15, 150, 60, and 110 mg/L, respectively. The 24 h LC50 value for Artemia salina was 600 mg/L. The relative clearance rate of mussel Mytilus edulis decreased to 80%, 40%, and 20% of the control group after being exposed to 20, 50, and 100 mg/L sophorolipid for 24 h. Therefore, the toxicity for mitigation of harmful algae bloom at previously recommended concentration of 5-20 mg/L sophorolipid is low for most tested organisms in this reaserch.

  5. Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by two mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, S. P.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles by at least two mechanisms. First, it inhibits auxin-induced H(+)-excretion needed for the initiation of rapid elongation. Galactose cannot be doing so by directly interfering with the ATPase since fusicoccin-induced H(+)-excretion is not affected. Secondly, galactose inhibits long-term auxin-induced growth, even in an acidic (pH 4.5) solution. This may be due to an inhibition of cell wall synthesis. However, galactose does not reduce the capacity of walls to be loosened by H+, given exogenously or excreted in response to fusicoccin.

  6. Polymer film deposition on agar using a dielectric barrier discharge jet and its bacterial growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T.-C.; Cho, J.; Mcintyre, K.; Jo, Y.-K.; Staack, D.

    2012-08-01

    Polymer film deposition on agar in ambient air was achieved using the helium dielectric barrier discharge jet (DBD jet) fed with polymer precursors, and the bacterial growth inhibition due to the deposited film was observed. The DBD jet with precursor addition was more efficient at sterilization than a helium-only DBD jet. On the areas where polymer films cover the agar the bacterial growth was significantly inhibited. The inhibition efficacy showed dependence on the film thickness. The DBD jet without precursor also created a modified agar layer, which may slow the growth of some bacterial strains.

  7. Effect of Trichoderma on plant growth: A balance between inhibition and growth promotion.

    PubMed

    Ousley, M A; Lynch, J M; Whipps, J M

    1993-11-01

    The effect of lettuce (Latuca sativa L.) germination and growth in nonsterilized potting compost of 0.1% and 1.0% w/w incorporation of fermenter biomass inocula of six strains of Trichoderma was investigated. Except for strains WT and T35 at 0.1 % w/w, all inocula inhibited germination. Biomass of strains WT, T35, 20, and 47 at 1.0% promoted shoot fresh weight, whereas strains TH1 and 8MF2 were inhibitory. In contrast, when biomass of strains WT, TH1, and 8MF2 was autoclaved and incorporated at 1%, shoot fresh weight was promoted, but the biomass of T35 was inhibitory. None of the strains incorporated at 0.1 % w/w increased shoot fresh weight, and autoclaved biomass of TH1, T35, and 20 incorporated at 0.1% w/w resulted in lower shoot fresh weights in comparison with uninoculated controls. The shoot dry weight of lettuce seedlings could be enhanced by germinating seeds in uninoculated compost and after five days' growth transferring them into WT-inoculated compost. Inoculum of strain TH1 when applied using this method was very inhibitory. With WT the degree of increase in shoot fresh weight and germination rate declined as the fermentation time to produce inocula was increased.

  8. Effect of Trichoderma on plant growth: A balance between inhibition and growth promotion.

    PubMed

    Ousley, M A; Lynch, J M; Whipps, J M

    1993-11-01

    The effect of lettuce (Latuca sativa L.) germination and growth in nonsterilized potting compost of 0.1% and 1.0% w/w incorporation of fermenter biomass inocula of six strains of Trichoderma was investigated. Except for strains WT and T35 at 0.1 % w/w, all inocula inhibited germination. Biomass of strains WT, T35, 20, and 47 at 1.0% promoted shoot fresh weight, whereas strains TH1 and 8MF2 were inhibitory. In contrast, when biomass of strains WT, TH1, and 8MF2 was autoclaved and incorporated at 1%, shoot fresh weight was promoted, but the biomass of T35 was inhibitory. None of the strains incorporated at 0.1 % w/w increased shoot fresh weight, and autoclaved biomass of TH1, T35, and 20 incorporated at 0.1% w/w resulted in lower shoot fresh weights in comparison with uninoculated controls. The shoot dry weight of lettuce seedlings could be enhanced by germinating seeds in uninoculated compost and after five days' growth transferring them into WT-inoculated compost. Inoculum of strain TH1 when applied using this method was very inhibitory. With WT the degree of increase in shoot fresh weight and germination rate declined as the fermentation time to produce inocula was increased. PMID:24190096

  9. Bismuth(III) deferiprone effectively inhibits growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    PubMed

    Barton, Larry L; Lyle, Daniel A; Ritz, Nathaniel L; Granat, Alex S; Khurshid, Ali N; Kherbik, Nada; Hider, Robert; Lin, Henry C

    2016-04-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been implicated in inflammatory bowel diseases and ulcerative colitis in humans and there is an interest in inhibiting the growth of these sulfide-producing bacteria. This research explores the use of several chelators of bismuth to determine the most effective chelator to inhibit the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. For our studies, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was grown with nitrate as the electron acceptor and chelated bismuth compounds were added to test for inhibition of growth. Varying levels of inhibition were attributed to bismuth chelated with subsalicylate or citrate but the most effective inhibition of growth by D. desulfuricans was with bismuth chelated by deferiprone, 3-hydroxy-1,2-dimethyl-4(1H)-pyridone. Growth of D. desulfuricans was inhibited by 10 μM bismuth as deferiprone:bismuth with either nitrate or sulfate respiration. Our studies indicate deferiprone:bismuth has bacteriostatic activity on D. desulfuricans because the inhibition can be reversed following exposure to 1 mM bismuth for 1 h at 32 °C. We suggest that deferiprone is an appropriate chelator for bismuth to control growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria because deferiprone is relatively nontoxic to animals, including humans, and has been used for many years to bind Fe(III) in the treatment of β-thalassemia. PMID:26896170

  10. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    SciTech Connect

    Vesper, M.J. ); Cross, J.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 {mu}M) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 {mu}M. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of ({sup 3}H)IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of ({sup 3}H)IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H{sup +} secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth.

  11. Retinoic acid receptor alpha mediates growth inhibition by retinoids in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells.

    PubMed

    Nicke, B; Kaiser, A; Wiedenmann, B; Riecken, E O; Rosewicz, S

    1999-08-11

    Although retinoids have been suggested to inhibit chemically induced colon carcinogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying retinoid-mediated growth regulation in colon carcinoma cells are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the biological effects of retinoids on growth in HT29 colon carcinoma cells. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment of HT29 cells resulted in a profound inhibition of anchorage-independent growth without biochemical or morphological evidence for induction of differentiation. Treatment with the selective RARalpha agonist Ro 40-6055 completely mimicked the effects of ATRA on growth and transactivation of a betaRAREx2-luciferase reporter construct, while RARbeta- and gamma-specific analogues were ineffective. Furthermore, ATRA-regulated growth and transactivation could be completely blocked by a RARalpha-selective receptor antagonist. Thus, ATRA potently inhibits anchorage-independent growth in HT29 cells and this effect is mainly if not exclusively mediated by the retinoic acid receptor alpha.

  12. Gellan sulfate inhibits Plasmodium falciparum growth and invasion of red blood cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Recuenco, Frances Cagayat; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Ishiwa, Akiko; Enomoto-Rogers, Yukiko; Fundador, Noreen Grace V.; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Murakoshi, Fumi; Gong, Haiyan; Inomata, Atsuko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Iwata, Tadahisa; Kato, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we assessed the sulfated derivative of the microbial polysaccharide gellan gum and derivatives of λ and κ-carrageenans for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 and Dd2 growth and invasion of red blood cells in vitro. Growth inhibition was assessed by means of flow cytometry after a 96-h exposure to the inhibitors and invasion inhibition was assessed by counting ring parasites after a 20-h exposure to them. Gellan sulfate strongly inhibited invasion and modestly inhibited growth for both P. falciparum 3D7 and Dd2; both inhibitory effects exceeded those achieved with native gellan gum. The hydrolyzed λ-carrageenan and oversulfated κ-carrageenan were less inhibitory than their native forms. In vitro cytotoxicity and anticoagulation assays performed to determine the suitability of the modified polysaccharides for in vivo studies showed that our synthesized gellan sulfate had low cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activity. PMID:24740150

  13. Imatinib mesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, Charlotta; Joutsiniemi, Saima; Lindstedt, Ken A.; Juutilainen, Timo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K. . E-mail: kari.eklund@hus.fi

    2006-08-18

    Synovial fibroblast is the key cell type in the growth of the pathological synovial tissue in arthritis. Here, we show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of PDGF-receptor signalling by imatinib mesylate (1 {mu}M) completely abrogated the PDGF-stimulated proliferation and inhibited approximately 70% of serum-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Similar extent of inhibition was observed when PDGF was neutralized with anti-PDGF antibodies, suggesting that imatinib mesylate does not inhibit pathways other than those mediated by PDGF-receptors. No signs of apoptosis were detected in synovial fibroblasts cultured in the presence of imatinib. These results suggest that imatinib mesylate specifically inhibits PDGF-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, and that inhibition of PDGF-receptors could represent a feasible target for novel antirheumatic therapies.

  14. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum dihydropteroate synthetase and growth in vitro by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Meshnick, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Michaelis-Menten inhibitory constants (Kis) and the concentrations required for 50% inhibition of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydropteroate synthetase were determined for six sulfa drugs. These drugs inhibited the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (50% lethal concentration) at concentrations of 30 to 500 nM; these concentrations were 100 to 1,000 times lower than the concentrations required for 50% inhibition and Kis (6 to 500 microM). The uptake of p-aminobenzoic acid was not inhibited by the sulfa drugs. However, infected erythrocytes took up more labeled sulfamethoxazole than did uninfected erythrocytes. Thus, the concentration of sulfa drugs by malaria parasites may explain how sulfa drugs inhibit in vitro growth of parasites through the inhibition of dihydropteroate synthetase. PMID:2024960

  15. Growth of the nuclear envelope in the vegetative phase of the green alga Acetabularia. Evidence for assembly from membrane components synthesized in the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The primary nucleus of the green alga Acetabularia grows about 25,000- fold in volume while it is separated from the endoplasmic reticulum and the whole cytoplasm by a special paranuclear cisterna of a vacuolar labyrinthum system which shows only very few (two to six per square micrometer) and small (ca. 40-120 nm in diamter) fenestrations. The nuclear envelope does not bear polyribosomes, nor do they occur in the entire zone intermediate between the nuclear envelope and the paranuclear cisterna. It is suggested that this special form of nuclear envelope growth takes place by assembly from cytoplasmically synthesized proteins that are translocated across the paranuclear cisterna in a nonmembrane-structured form. PMID:1158977

  16. Growth of the nuclear envelope in the vegetative phase of the green alga Acetabularia. Evidence for assembly from membrane components synthesized in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Franke, W W; Spring, H; Scheer, U; Zerban, H

    1975-09-01

    The primary nucleus of the green alga Acetabularia grows about 25,000-fold in volume while it is separated from the endoplasmic reticulum and the whole cytoplasm by a special paranuclear cisterna of a vacuolar labyrinthum system which shows only very few (two to six per square micrometer) and small (ca. 40-120 nm in diamter) fenestrations. The nuclear envelope does not bear polyribosomes, nor do they occur in the entire zone intermediate between the nuclear envelope and the paranuclear cisterna. It is suggested that this special form of nuclear envelope growth takes place by assembly from cytoplasmically synthesized proteins that are translocated across the paranuclear cisterna in a nonmembrane-structured form.

  17. Chloride anion transporters inhibit growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Share, Andrew I; Patel, Khushali; Nativi, Cristina; Cho, Eun J; Francesconi, Oscar; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A; Roelens, Stefano; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2016-06-18

    A series of aminopyrrolic receptors were tested as anion transporters using POPC liposome model membranes. Many were found to be effective Cl(-) transporters and to inhibit clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus growth in vitro. The best transporters proved effective against the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, Mu50 and HP1173. Tris-thiourea tren-based chloride transporters were also shown to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in vitro.

  18. Inhibition of Growth of Salmonella by Native Flora of Broiler Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Some bacteria in the cecal microflora of broilers can inhibit colonization of chicks by Salmonella. Beneficial cecal bacteria may reduce Salmonella colonization by competing for nutrients and attachment sites or by producing metabolites that inhibit Salmonella growth. The purpose of th...

  19. The FGF-2-Derived Peptide FREG Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Maria S; Faraone, Debora; D'Arcangelo, Daniela; De Marchis, Francesco; Toietta, Gabriele; Ribatti, Domenico; Parazzoli, Alberto; Colombo, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Previous data report that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-derived peptide FREG potently inhibits FGF-2-dependent angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that FREG inhibits up to 70% in vitro growth and invasion/migration of smooth muscle and melanoma cells. Such inhibition is mediated by platelet-derived growth factor-receptor-α (PDGF-Rα); in fact, proliferation and migration were restored upon PDGF-Rα neutralization. Further experiments demonstrated that FREG interacts with PDGF-Rα both in vitro and in vivo and stimulates its phosphorylation. We have previously shown that overexpressing PDGF-Rα strongly inhibits melanoma growth in vivo; we, therefore, hypothesized that PDGF-Rα agonists may represent a novel tool to inhibit melanoma growth in vivo. To support this hypothesis, FREG was inoculated intravenously (i.v.) in a mouse melanoma model and markedly inhibited pulmonary metastases formation. Immunohistochemical analyses showed less proliferation, less angiogenesis, and more apoptosis in metastasized lungs upon FREG treatment, as compared to untreated controls. Finally, in preliminary acute toxicity studies, FREG showed no toxicity signs in healthy animals, and neither microscopic nor macroscopic toxicity at the liver, kidney, and lungs level. Altogether, these data indicate that FREG systemic treatment strongly inhibits melanoma metastases development and indicate for the first time that agonists of PDGF-Rα may control melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20924364

  20. The FGF-2-derived peptide FREG inhibits melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Maria S; Faraone, Debora; D'Arcangelo, Daniela; De Marchis, Francesco; Toietta, Gabriele; Ribatti, Domenico; Parazzoli, Alberto; Colombo, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2011-02-01

    Previous data report that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-derived peptide FREG potently inhibits FGF-2-dependent angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that FREG inhibits up to 70% in vitro growth and invasion/migration of smooth muscle and melanoma cells. Such inhibition is mediated by platelet-derived growth factor-receptor-α (PDGF-Rα); in fact, proliferation and migration were restored upon PDGF-Rα neutralization. Further experiments demonstrated that FREG interacts with PDGF-Rα both in vitro and in vivo and stimulates its phosphorylation. We have previously shown that overexpressing PDGF-Rα strongly inhibits melanoma growth in vivo; we, therefore, hypothesized that PDGF-Rα agonists may represent a novel tool to inhibit melanoma growth in vivo. To support this hypothesis, FREG was inoculated intravenously (i.v.) in a mouse melanoma model and markedly inhibited pulmonary metastases formation. Immunohistochemical analyses showed less proliferation, less angiogenesis, and more apoptosis in metastasized lungs upon FREG treatment, as compared to untreated controls. Finally, in preliminary acute toxicity studies, FREG showed no toxicity signs in healthy animals, and neither microscopic nor macroscopic toxicity at the liver, kidney, and lungs level. Altogether, these data indicate that FREG systemic treatment strongly inhibits melanoma metastases development and indicate for the first time that agonists of PDGF-Rα may control melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20924364

  1. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits antral follicle growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroid hormone production in cultured mouse antral follicles

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Patrick R.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant found in consumer products that causes ovarian toxicity. Antral follicles are the functional ovarian units and must undergo growth, survival from atresia, and proper regulation of steroidogenesis to ovulate and produce hormones. Previous studies have determined that DEHP inhibits antral follicle growth and decreases estradiol levels in vitro; however, the mechanism by which DEHP elicits these effects is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEHP directly alters regulators of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and steroidogenesis to inhibit antral follicle functionality. Antral follicles from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control or DEHP (1-100μg/ml) for 24-96 hr to establish the temporal effects of DEHP on the follicle. Following 24-96 hr of culture, antral follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis, and media were subjected to measurements of hormone levels. DEHP increased the mRNA levels of cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase 4, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 and decreased the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A prior to growth inhibition. Additionally, DEHP increased the mRNA levels of BCL2-associated agonist of cell death, BCL2-associated X protein, BCL2-related ovarian killer protein, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and Bcl2-like 10, leading to an increase in atresia. Further, DEHP decreased the levels of progesterone, androstenedione, and testosterone prior to the decrease in estradiol levels, with decreased mRNA levels of side-chain cleavage, 17α-hydorxylase-17,20-desmolase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and aromatase. Collectively, DEHP directly alters antral follicle functionality by inhibiting growth, inducing atresia, and inhibiting steroidogenesis. PMID:25701202

  2. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000-2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  3. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000–2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  4. Paracrine expression of a native soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibits tumor growth, metastasis, and mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Corey K.; Kendall, Richard L.; Cabrera, Gustavo; Soroceanu, Liliana; Heike, Yuji; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Siegal, Gene P.; Mao, Xianzhi; Bett, Andrew J.; Huckle, William R.; Thomas, Kenneth A.; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and selective vascular endothelial cell mitogen and angiogenic factor. VEGF expression is elevated in a wide variety of solid tumors and is thought to support their growth by enhancing tumor neovascularization. To block VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, tumor cells were transfected with cDNA encoding the native soluble FLT-1 (sFLT-1) truncated VEGF receptor which can function both by sequestering VEGF and, in a dominant negative fashion, by forming inactive heterodimers with membrane-spanning VEGF receptors. Transient transfection of HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells with a gene encoding sFLT-1 significantly inhibited their implantation and growth in the lungs of nude mice following i.v. injection and their growth as nodules from cells injected s.c. High sFLT-1 expressing stably transfected HT-1080 clones grew even slower as s.c. tumors. Finally, survival was significantly prolonged in mice injected intracranially with human glioblastoma cells stably transfected with the sflt-1 gene. The ability of sFLT-1 protein to inhibit tumor growth is presumably attributable to its paracrine inhibition of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, since it did not affect tumor cell mitogenesis in vitro. These results not only support VEGF receptors as antiangiogenic targets but also demonstrate that sflt-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:9671758

  5. Inhibition of Mycobacterial Growth In Vitro following Primary but Not Secondary Vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Helen A.; Tanner, Rachel; Wallis, Robert S.; Meyer, Joel; Manjaly, Zita-Rose; Harris, Stephanie; Satti, Iman; Silver, Richard F.; Hoft, Dan; Kampmann, Beate; Walker, K. Barry; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Fruth, Uli; Barker, Lew; McShane, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine, there are more than 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year, and there is an urgent need for better TB vaccines. TB vaccine candidates are selected for evaluation based in part on the detection of an antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response. The measurement of mycobacterial growth in blood specimens obtained from subjects immunized with investigational TB vaccines may be a better in vitro correlate of in vivo vaccine efficacy. We performed a clinical study with 30 United Kingdom adults who were followed for 6 months to evaluate the abilities of both a whole-blood- and a novel peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based mycobacterial growth inhibition assay to measure a response to primary vaccination and revaccination with BCG. Using cryopreserved PBMCs, we observed a significant improvement in mycobacterial growth inhibition following primary vaccination but no improvement in growth inhibition following revaccination with BCG (P < 0.05). Mycobacterial growth inhibition following primary BCG vaccination was not correlated with purified protein derivative (PPD) antigen-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) responses. We demonstrate that a mycobacterial growth inhibition assay can detect improved capacity to control growth following primary immunization, but not revaccination, with BCG. This is the first study to demonstrate that an in vitro growth inhibition assay can identify a difference in vaccine responses by comparing both primary and secondary BCG vaccinations, suggesting that in vitro growth inhibition assays may serve as better surrogates of clinical efficacy than the assays currently used for the assessment of candidate TB vaccines. PMID:23986316

  6. Hypergravity inhibits elongation growth of azuki bean epicotyls independently of the direction of stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Kamisaka, S.; Hoson, T.

    We examined the effects of basipetal, horizontal, and acropetal hypergravity stimulation on growth and cell wall properties of azuki bean seedlings. Horizontal and acropetal hypergravity inhibited elongation growth of epicotyls by decreasing the cell wall extensibility, as did basipetal hypergravity. Hypergravity stimulation increased the thickness of cell walls and suppressed xyloglucan breakdown regardless of direction. All hypergravity treatments increased the pH in the apoplastic fluid, which is involved in the processes of the suppression of xyloglucan breakdown. Gadolinium and lanthanum, both blockers of mechanoreceptors, nullified the growth-inhibiting effects of hypergravity. These results show that growth inhibition by hypergravity is independent of its direction in azuki bean epicotyls. The findings also suggest that mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane perceive the gravity signal independently of its direction, and affect growth of azuki bean epicotyls.

  7. Two genetically separable phases of growth inhibition induced by blue light in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, B. M.; Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    High fluence-rate blue light (BL) rapidly inhibits hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis, as in other species, after a lag time of 30 s. This growth inhibition is always preceded by the activation of anion channels. The membrane depolarization that results from the activation of anion channels by BL was only 30% of the wild-type magnitude in hy4, a mutant lacking the HY4 BL receptor. High-resolution measurements of growth made with a computer-linked displacement transducer or digitized images revealed that BL caused a rapid inhibition of growth in wild-type and hy4 seedlings. This inhibition persisted in wild-type seedlings during more than 40 h of continuous BL. By contrast, hy4 escaped from the initial inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and grew faster than wild type for approximately 30 h. Wild-type seedlings treated with 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, a potent blocker of the BL-activated anion channel, displayed rapid growth inhibition, but, similar to hy4, these seedlings escaped from inhibition after approximately 1 h of BL and phenocopied the mutant for at least 2.5 h. The effects of 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid and the HY4 mutation were not additive. Taken together, the results indicate that BL acts through HY4 to activate anion channels at the plasma membrane, causing growth inhibition that begins after approximately 1 h. Neither HY4 nor anion channels appear to participate greatly in the initial phase of inhibition.

  8. Ivermectin inhibits growth of Chlamydia trachomatis in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pettengill, Matthew A; Lam, Verissa W; Ollawa, Ikechukwu; Marques-da-Silva, Camila; Ojcius, David M

    2012-01-01

    Ivermectin is currently approved for treatment of both clinical and veterinary infections by nematodes, including Onchocerca cervicalis in horses and Onchocerca volvulus in humans. However, ivermectin has never been shown to be effective against bacterial pathogens. Here we show that ivermectin also inhibits infection of epithelial cells by the bacterial pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis, at doses that could be envisioned clinically for sexually-transmitted or ocular infections by Chlamydia. PMID:23119027

  9. Inhibition of the growth of Alexandrium tamarense by algicidal substances in Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata).

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye; Zhang, Xin-Lian; Qi, Yu-Zao

    2009-10-01

    The wood sawdust from Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) exhibited stronger inhibition on the growth of Alexandrium tamarense than those from alder (Alnus cremastogyne), pine (Pinus massoniana), birch (Betula alnoides) and sapele (Entandrophragma cylindricum). The water extract, acetone-water extract and essential oil from fir sawdust were all shown to inhibit the growth of A. tamarense. The inhibition of fir essential oil was the strongest among all the above wood sources while the half effective concentration was only 0.65 mg/L. These results suggested that the fir essential oil may play an important role in the algicidal effect of Chinese fir. PMID:19634014

  10. Inhibition of Escherichia coli growth and diaminopimelic acid epimerase by 3-chlorodiaminopimelic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, R J; Bohme, E H; Wiseman, J S; Vaal, M; Nichols, J S

    1988-01-01

    The diaminopimelic acid (DAP) analog, 3-chloro-DAP, was synthesized and tested as the racemic acid for antibacterial activity and for inhibition of DAP epimerase. 3-Chloro-DAP was a potent inhibitor of DAP epimerase purified from Escherichia coli (Ki = 200 nM), and it is argued that 3-chloro-DAP is converted to a tight-binding transition state analog at the active site of this enzyme. Furthermore, 3-chloro-DAP inhibited growth of two E. coli mutants. In one of the mutants known for supersusceptibility to beta-lactams, inhibition was not seen until the mid-log phase of growth, while in the other mutant, a DAP auxotroph, inhibition occurred much earlier. Growth inhibition was reversed by DAP in both strains. In the auxotroph, the reversal was specific for meso-DAP, indicating that DAP epimerase was the target for 3-chloro-DAP. Thus we suggest a novel mechanism of bacterial growth inhibition which depends on DAP epimerase inhibition by a DAP analog. PMID:3056252

  11. Phosphatase and tensin homolog reconstruction and vascular endothelial growth factor knockdown synergistically inhibit the growth of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongbo; Shen, Xiaomeng; Guo, Caiping; Zhu, Huijun; Zhou, Lanzhen; Zhu, Yongqiang; Wang, Huixia; Zheng, Yi; Huang, Laiqiang

    2010-12-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly malignant tumor with poor prognosis. Two hallmarks of this disease are a high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and a depletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). In the present study, combined gene therapy using wild-type PTEN reconstruction and VEGF siRNA was examined for its effectiveness in inhibiting tumor growth and tumorigenicity of PTEN-null GBM cells. In U251 GBM cells, PTEN restoration reduced proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at G0/G1 stage, and promoted apoptosis via inhibition of PIK/AKT signaling pathway. Unexpectedly, anchorage-dependent and -independent colony formation ability and the capacity for wound-healing migration of U251 cells with stable expression of VEGF siRNA were significantly inhibited, suggesting that VEGF also appeared to function as an autocrine growth factor in addition to its well-known pro-angiogenic paracrine function. Further, a combined treatment of PTEN restoration and VEGF siRNA had the best tumor suppression effect. In a xenograft study in null mice, both the restoration of PTEN and the expression of VEGF siRNA could significantly inhibit the growth of U251 GBMs, whereas tumor growth was entirely suppressed by a combination of the two treatments. Therefore, the combination of PTEN expression and VEGF knockdown represents an effective gene therapy strategy for malignant gliomas.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  13. Enhancement or inhibition of tumor growth by interferon: dependence on treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Murasko, D M; Fresa, K; Mark, R

    1983-12-15

    MSC cells are tumor cells originally induced in BALB/c mice by Moloney sarcoma virus. In these studies we demonstrated that, although these tumor cells are sensitive in vitro both to lysis by NK or NK-like cells and to the growth-inhibitory effect of murine L-cell interferon (IFN), the growth of the tumor in vivo could be either inhibited or enhanced by IFN. The outcome of in vivo IFN treatment was dependent on the timing and route of IFN administration relative to tumor challenge. IFN given systematically at the same time as tumor challenge resulted in enhancement of primary tumor formation, rate of tumor growth and subsequent progressive tumor growth. In contrast, IFN administered at the site of tumor inoculation on days 1-3 after tumor challenge inhibited tumor formation and growth. Histopathology of tissue sections obtained from the site of tumor challenge confirmed these results. Similar studies performed in mice given 450 rads of X-irradiation showed that IFN could still inhibit tumor growth when administered at the site of tumor inoculation on days 1-3 after tumor challenge. IFN administered simultaneously with tumor challenge, however, did not enhance tumor growth in irradiated mice. These results are consistent with the interpretation that 1) inhibition of MSC-induced tumor growth by IFN has a radioresistant component and 2) the enhancement of MSC-induced tumor formation by IFN is dependent on interaction with a radiosensitive population of cells, possibly lymphoid cells. PMID:6360916

  14. Influence of Polymers on the Crystal Growth Rate of Felodipine: Correlating Adsorbed Polymer Surface Coverage to Solution Crystal Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schram, Caitlin J; Taylor, Lynne S; Beaudoin, Stephen P

    2015-10-20

    The bioavailability of orally administered drugs that exhibit poor aqueous solubility can be enhanced with the use of supersaturating dosage forms. Stabilization of these forms by preventing or inhibiting crystallization in solution is an important area of study. Polymers can be used to stabilize supersaturated systems; however, the properties that impact their effectiveness as crystal growth rate inhibitors are not yet fully understood. In this study, the impact of various polymers on the crystal growth rate of felodipine and the conformation of these polymers adsorbed to crystalline felodipine was investigated in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of crystal growth inhibition. It was determined that polymer hydrophobicity impacted polymer adsorption as well as adsorbed polymer conformation. Polymer conformation impacts its surface coverage, which was shown to directly correlate to the polymer's effectiveness as a growth rate inhibitor. By modeling this correlation, it is possible to predict polymer effectiveness given the surface coverage of the polymer.

  15. MAG, myelin and overcoming growth inhibition in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    McKerracher, Lisa; Rosen, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    While neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) have the capacity to regenerate their axons after injury, they fail to do so, in part because regeneration is limited by growth inhibitory proteins present in CNS myelin. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) was the first myelin-derived growth inhibitory protein identified, and its inhibitory activity was initially elucidated in 1994 independently by the Filbin lab and the McKerracher lab using cell-based and biochemical techniques, respectively. Since that time we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning the numerous growth inhibitory proteins that are present in myelin, and we also have dissected many of the neuronal signaling pathways that act as stop signs for axon regeneration. Here we give an overview of the early research efforts that led to the identification of myelin-derived growth inhibitory proteins, and the importance of this family of proteins for understanding neurotrauma and CNS diseases. We further provide an update on how this knowledge has been translated towards current clinical studies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26441514

  16. Growth under red light enhances phototsystem II relative to photosystem I and phycobilisomes in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Gantt, E. ); Dennenberg, R.J.; Jursinic, P.A. )

    1990-07-01

    Acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to light absorbed primarily by photosystem I (PSI) or by photosystem II (PSII) was studied in the unicellular red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161). Cultures grown under green light of 15 microeinsteins per square meter per second (PSII light; absorbed predominantly by the phycobilisomes) exhibited a PSII/PSI ratio of 0.26 {plus minus} 0.05. Under red light (PSI light; absorbed primarily by chlorophyll) of comparable quantum flux, cells contained nearly five times as many PSII per PSI, and three times as many PSII per cell. About 12% of the chlorophyll was attributed to PSII in green light, 22% in white light, and 39% in red light-grown cultures. Chlorophyll antenna sizes appeared to remain constant at about 75 chlorophyll per PSII and 140 per PSI. Spectral quality had little effect on cell content or composition of the phycobilisomes, thus the number of PSII per phycobilisome was substantially greater in red light-grown cultures than in those grown under green or white light. Total photosystems (PSI + PSII) per phycobilisome remained at about eight in each case. Zeaxanthin comprised more than 50% (mole/mole), {beta}-carotene about 40%, and cryptoxanthin about 4% of the carotenoid pigment.

  17. The effect of lead on the growth, content of primary metabolites, and antioxidant response of green alga Acutodesmus obliquus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Niczyporuk, Alicja; Bajguz, Andrzej; Talarek, Marta; Bralska, Monika; Zambrzycka, Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    Green unicellular alga Acutodesmus obliquus (Turpin) Hegewald et Hanagata (SAG strain no. 276-6) (Chlorophyceae) was used for determination of phytotoxicity of lead (Pb) at the range of concentrations 0.01-500 μM during 7 days of culture. The accumulation of Pb in algal cells was found to be increased in a concentration- and duration-dependent manner. The highest Pb uptake value was obtained in response to 500 μM Pb on the seventh day of cultivation. The decrease in the number and the size of cells and the contents of selected primary metabolites (photosynthetic pigments, monosaccharides, and proteins) in A. obliquus cells were observed under Pb stress. Heavy metal stimulated also formation of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) and oxidative damage as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, the deleterious effects of Pb resulting from the cellular oxidative state can be alleviated by enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbate, glutathione) antioxidant systems. These results suggest that A. obliquus is a promising bioindicator of heavy metal toxicity in aquatic environment, and it has been identified as good scavenger of Pb from aqueous solution. PMID:26233754

  18. Comparison of toxicity of class-based organic chemicals to algae and fish based on discrimination of excess toxicity from baseline level.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin J; Tai, Hong W; Yu, Yang; Wen, Yang; Wang, Xiao H; Zhao, Yuan H

    2015-07-01

    Toxicity data to fish and algae were used to investigate excess toxicity between species. Results show that chemicals exhibiting excess toxicity to fish also show excess toxicity to algae for most of the compounds. This indicates that they share the same mode of action between species. Similar relationships between logKOW and toxicities to fish and algae for baseline and less inert compounds suggest that they have similar critical body residues in the two species. Differences in excess toxicity for some compounds suggest that there is a difference of physiological structure and metabolism between fish and algae. Some reactive compounds (e.g. polyamines) exhibit greater toxic effects for algae than those for fish because of relatively low bio-uptake potential of these hydrophilic compounds in fish as compared with that in algae. Esters exhibiting greater toxicity in fish than that in algae indicate that metabolism can affect the discrimination of excess toxicity from baseline level. Algae growth inhibition is a very good surrogate for fish lethality. This is not only because overall toxicity sensitivity to algae is greater than that to fish, but also the excess toxicity calculated from algal toxicity can better reflect reactivity of compounds with target molecules than fish toxicity.

  19. Inhibition of the growth of Lewis lung carcinoma by indomethacin in conventional, nude, and beige mice.

    PubMed

    Maca, R D

    1988-12-01

    The effects of a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, indomethacin (Indo), on the growth of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) growing as primary subcutaneous tumors in either conventional C57BL/6 mice, T cell deficient nude mice, or natural killer (NK) cell deficient beige mice were studied. In conventional mice, Indo, when continuously administered in the drinking water, consistently and significantly inhibited, in a dose-related fashion, the growth of LLC implanted either subcutaneously in the footpad or in the inguinal region; however, the degree of inhibition of footpad tumor appeared to be greater than that of inguinal tumor. Maximum inhibition was found when Indo was initiated before detectable or measurable tumor developed. If Indo treatment was initiated after tumor growth was evident, then Indo was found to be less effective, although significant inhibition was still observed. Indo also effectively inhibited LLC growing either in the footpad or in the inguinal region of nude or beige mice. The degree of inhibition of both footpad and inguinal tumors in both these mice was comparable to that seen in conventional C57BL/6 mice, indicating that mature T cells, NK cells, or soluble products produced only by these cells are not involved in mediating or modulating the inhibitory effects of Indo on LLC growth. Although Indo treatment significantly inhibited LLC growth in vivo, continuous treatment of cultured LLC cells with Indo in vitro did not decrease the growth of cultured cells. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of Indo in vivo is not the result of a direct inhibitory effect of Indo on these tumor cells. Lastly, this inhibitory effect of Indo in vivo could not be reversed or negated, not even in part, by the simultaneous, daily i.p. administration of 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2. This finding suggests that the inhibitory effect of Indo involves a mechanism other than the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. PMID:3216222

  20. Energetics of Streptococcal Growth Inhibition by Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Philip; Marquis, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    Growth of Streptococcus faecalis in complex media with various fuel sources appeared to be limited by the rate of supply of adenosine-5′ -triphosphate (ATP) at 1 atm and also under 408 atm of hydrostatic pressure. Growth under pressure was energetically inefficient, as indicated by an average cell yield for exponentially growing cultures of only 10.7 g (dry weight) per mol of ATP produced compared with a 1-atm value of 15.6. Use of ATP for pressure-volume work or for turnover of protein, peptidoglycan, or stable ribonucleic acid (RNA) did not appear to be significant causes of growth inefficiency under pressure. In addition, there did not seem to be an increased ATP requirement for ion uptake because cells growing at 408 atm had significantly lower internal K+ levels than did those growing at 1 atm. Pressure did stimulate the membrane adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) or S. faecalis at ATP concentrations greater than 0.5 mM. Intracellular ATP levels were found to vary during the culture cycle from about 2.5 μmol/ml of cytoplasmic water for lag-phase or stationary-phase cells to maxima for exponentially growing cells of about 7.5 μmol/ml at 1 atm and 5.5 μmol/ml at 408 atm. N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide at a 10 μM concentration improved growth efficiency under pressure, as did Mg2+ or Ca2+ ions at 50 mM concentration. These agents also enhanced ATP pooling, and it seemed that at least part of the growth inefficiency under pressure was due to increased ATPase activity. In all, it appeared that S. faecalis growing under pressure has somewhat reduced ATP supply but significantly increased demand and that the inhibitory effects of pressure can be interpreted largely in terms of ATP supply and demand. PMID:405925

  1. Nutritional And Taste Characteristics Of Algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Nakhost, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of chemical composition of blue-green algae Synechococcus 6311, as well as preparation of protein isolate from green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and incorporation into variety of food products evaluated for taste. Part of program to investigate growth of microalgae aboard spacecraft for use as food.

  2. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  3. Proximity-Dependent Inhibition of Growth of Mannheimia haemolytica by Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Dassanayake, Rohana P.; Kugadas, Abirami; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Call, Douglas R.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia trehalosi have been identified in the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis). Of these pathogens, M. haemolytica has been shown to consistently cause fatal pneumonia in BHS under experimental conditions. However, M. haemolytica has been isolated by culture less frequently than the other bacteria. We hypothesized that the growth of M. haemolytica is inhibited by other bacteria in the lungs of BHS. The objective of this study was to determine whether P. multocida inhibits the growth of M. haemolytica. Although in monoculture both bacteria exhibited similar growth characteristics, in coculture with P. multocida there was a clear inhibition of growth of M. haemolytica. The inhibition was detected at mid-log phase and continued through the stationary phase. When cultured in the same medium, the growth of M. haemolytica was inhibited when both bacteria were separated by a membrane that allowed contact (pore size, 8.0 μm) but not when they were separated by a membrane that limited contact (pore size, 0.4 μm). Lytic bacteriophages or bactericidal compounds could not be detected in the culture supernatant fluid from monocultures of P. multocida or from P. multocida-M. haemolytica cocultures. These results indicate that P. multocida inhibits the growth of M. haemolytica by a contact- or proximity-dependent mechanism. If the inhibition of growth of M. haemolytica by P. multocida occurs in vivo as well, it could explain the inconsistent isolation of M. haemolytica from the lungs of pneumonic BHS. PMID:22798357

  4. Fungicides effectively used for growth inhibition of several fungi could induce mycotoxin biosynthesis in toxigenic species.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Heydt, M; Stoll, D; Geisen, R

    2013-09-16

    Seven different commercial fungicides (Aliette, Rovral, Cantus, Ortiva, Luna Experience, Fenomenal and Mancozeb) were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of the fungal species Penicillium nordicum, Penicillium verrucosum, Verticillium dahliae and Cladosporium sp. In case of the mycotoxigenic strains P. nordicum and P. verrucosum, the biosynthesis of the mycotoxins ochratoxin and citrinin was determined. Interestingly individual fungicides were only able to inhibit the growth of the analyzed fungi to some extent. In case of P. verrucosum the fungicide "Rovral", an iprodion belonging to the substance class of imidazoles, led to a decrease in the growth rate but to a strong induction of mycotoxin biosynthesis as has been described earlier for the strobilurins. Consequently before using a given fungicide to protect crops and enhance storage life, the applicability of this chemical compound should be tested not only for its ability to inhibit fungal growth but also for its effect on level of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:24036489

  5. Fungicides effectively used for growth inhibition of several fungi could induce mycotoxin biosynthesis in toxigenic species.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Heydt, M; Stoll, D; Geisen, R

    2013-09-16

    Seven different commercial fungicides (Aliette, Rovral, Cantus, Ortiva, Luna Experience, Fenomenal and Mancozeb) were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of the fungal species Penicillium nordicum, Penicillium verrucosum, Verticillium dahliae and Cladosporium sp. In case of the mycotoxigenic strains P. nordicum and P. verrucosum, the biosynthesis of the mycotoxins ochratoxin and citrinin was determined. Interestingly individual fungicides were only able to inhibit the growth of the analyzed fungi to some extent. In case of P. verrucosum the fungicide "Rovral", an iprodion belonging to the substance class of imidazoles, led to a decrease in the growth rate but to a strong induction of mycotoxin biosynthesis as has been described earlier for the strobilurins. Consequently before using a given fungicide to protect crops and enhance storage life, the applicability of this chemical compound should be tested not only for its ability to inhibit fungal growth but also for its effect on level of secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  6. l-Methionine inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Maximo A.; Bosland, Maarten C.; da Silva, Cássio P.; Sares, Claudia T. Gomes; de Oliveira, Alana M. Cerqueira; Kemp, Rafael; dos Reis, Rodolfo B.; Martins, Vilma R.; Sampaio, Suely V.; Bland, Kirby I.; Grizzle, William E.; dos Santos, José S.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that l-methionine inhibits proliferation of breast, prostate, and colon cancer cells. This study extends these findings to BXPC-3 (mutated p53) and HPAC (wild-type p53) pancreatic cancer cells and explores the reversibility of these effects. Cells were exposed to l-methionine (5 mg/ml) for 7 days or for 3 days, followed by 4 days of culture without l-methionine (recovery). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle effects were assessed by flow cytometry after staining for Ki-67 or annexin V/propidium iodide. Cell proliferation was reduced by 31–35% after 7 days of methionine exposure; the effect persisted in BXPC-3 and HPAC cells after 4 days of recovery. Methionine increased apoptosis by 40–75% in HPAC cells, but not in BXPC-3 cells. Continuous exposure to methionine caused accumulation of BXPC-3 cells in the S phase and HPAC cells in both the G0/G1 and S phases; however, after 4 days of recovery, these effects disappeared. In conclusion, l-methionine inhibits proliferation and interferes with the cell cycle of BXPC-3 and HPAC pancreatic cancer cells; the effects on apoptosis remarkably persisted after methionine withdrawal. Apoptosis was induced only in BXPC-3 cells. Some of the differences in the effects of methionine between cell lines may be related to disparate p53 status. These findings warrant further studies on the potential therapeutic benefit of l-methionine against pancreatic cancer. PMID:24126240

  7. L-Methionine inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Maximo A; Bosland, Maarten C; da Silva, Cássio P; Gomes Sares, Claudia T; de Oliveira, Alana M Cerqueira; Kemp, Rafael; dos Reis, Rodolfo B; Martins, Vilma R; Sampaio, Suely V; Bland, Kirby I; Grizzle, William E; dos Santos, José S

    2014-02-01

    We have previously shown that L-methionine inhibits proliferation of breast, prostate, and colon cancer cells. This study extends these findings to BXPC-3 (mutated p53) and HPAC (wild-type p53) pancreatic cancer cells and explores the reversibility of these effects. Cells were exposed to L-methionine (5 mg/ml) for 7 days or for 3 days, followed by 4 days of culture without L-methionine (recovery). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle effects were assessed by flow cytometry after staining for Ki-67 or annexin V/propidium iodide. Cell proliferation was reduced by 31-35% after 7 days of methionine exposure; the effect persisted in BXPC-3 and HPAC cells after 4 days of recovery. Methionine increased apoptosis by 40-75% in HPAC cells, but not in BXPC-3 cells. Continuous exposure to methionine caused accumulation of BXPC-3 cells in the S phase and HPAC cells in both the G0/G1 and S phases; however, after 4 days of recovery, these effects disappeared. In conclusion, L-methionine inhibits proliferation and interferes with the cell cycle of BXPC-3 and HPAC pancreatic cancer cells; the effects on apoptosis remarkably persisted after methionine withdrawal. Apoptosis was induced only in BXPC-3 cells. Some of the differences in the effects of methionine between cell lines may be related to disparate p53 status. These findings warrant further studies on the potential therapeutic benefit of L-methionine against pancreatic cancer.

  8. Algae control for hydrogeneration canals

    SciTech Connect

    Grahovac, P.

    1997-02-16

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to assess and develop control practices for nuisance algae growth in power canal that delivers water to hydro-generation facilities. This growth results in expenditures related not only to lost generation but also labor and materials costs associated with implementing remediation procedures. On an industry-wide basis these costs associated with nuisance algal growth are estimated to be several million dollars per year.

  9. Inhibition of intracellular growth of Listeria monocytogenes by antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, C; Avril, J L; Cartier, F; Berche, P

    1994-01-01

    We studied the activities of 15 antibiotics on the intracellular growth of Listeria monocytogenes in a HeLa cell line. After 24 h of contact with the infected cells, the antibiotics most effective against the intracellular growth of the 10 strains tested were amoxicillin, temafloxacin, and sparfloxacin, which nevertheless failed to totally eliminate the intracellular bacteria. Rifampin and co-trimoxazole had variable effects, depending on the isolates studied. The most active combinations were amoxicillin-sparfloxacin, co-trimoxazole-gentamicin, and sparfloxacin-co-trimoxazole. The results suggest the value of using a cell culture technique to study the activities of antibiotics against certain bacteria with intracellular sites of multiplication. PMID:8203836

  10. SIAH-1 inhibits cell growth by altering the mitotic process.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, H; Faille, A; Linares-Cruz, G; Nemani, M; Le Deist, F; Germani, A; Chassoux, D; Millot, G; Roperch, J P; Amson, R; Telerman, A; Calvo, F

    1999-11-25

    SIAH-1, the human homologue of the drosophila seven in absentia gene, is a p53-p21Waf-1 inducible gene. We report that stable transfection with SIAH-1 of the epithelial breast cancer cell line MCF-7 blocks its growth process. The transfectants show a redistribution of SIAH-1 protein within the nucleus, more specifically to the nuclear matrix, associated to dramatic changes in cell morphology and defective mitosis. Multinucleated giant cells (2-12 nuclei in more than 50% cells) were a most striking observation associated with tubulin spindle disorganization and defective cytokinesis. There were also present at high frequency abortive mitotic figures, DNA bridges and persistance of intercellular bridges and midbodies, along with an increased expression of p21Waf-1. These results indicate that the mechanism of growth arrest induced by SIAH-1 in MCF-7 cells involves disorganization of the mitotic program, mainly during nuclei separation and cytokinesis.

  11. CH5137291, an androgen receptor nuclear translocation-inhibiting compound, inhibits the growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Hiromitsu; Nishimoto, Ayako; Nakamura, Ryo; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Miho; Tachibana, Kazutaka; Shiraishi, Takuya; Yoshino, Hitoshi; Honma, Akie; Emura, Takashi; Ohta, Masateru; Nakagawa, Toshito; Houjo, Takao; Corey, Eva; Vessella, Robert L; Aoki, Yuko; Sato, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Resistance of prostate cancer to castration is currently an unavoidable problem. The major mechanisms underlying such resistance are androgen receptor (AR) overexpression, androgen-independent activation of AR, and AR mutation. To address this problem, we developed an AR pure antagonist, CH5137291, with AR nuclear translocation-inhibiting activity, and compared its activity and characteristics with that of bicalutamide. Cell lines corresponding to the mechanisms of castration resistance were used: LNCaP-BC2 having AR overexpression and LNCaP-CS10 having androgen-independent AR activation. VCaP and LNCaP were used as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cells. In vitro functional assay clearly showed that CH5137291 inhibited the nuclear translocation of wild-type ARs as well as W741C- and T877A-mutant ARs. In addition, it acted as a pure antagonist on the transcriptional activity of these types of ARs. In contrast, bicalutamide did not inhibit the nuclear translocation of these ARs, and showed a partial/full agonistic effect on the transcriptional activity. CH5137291 inhibited cell growth more strongly than bicalutamide in VCaP and LNCaP cells as well as in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 cells in vitro. In xenograft models, CH5137291 strongly inhibited the tumor growth of LNCaP, LNCaP-BC2, and LNCaP-CS10, whereas bicalutamide showed a weaker effect in LNCaP and almost no effect in LNCaP-BC2 and LNCaP-CS10 xenografts. Levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in plasma correlated well with the antitumor effect of both agents. CH5137291 inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors that had become resistant to bicalutamide treatment. A docking model suggested that CH5137291 intensively collided with the M895 residue of helix 12, and therefore strongly inhibited the folding of helix 12, a cause of AR agonist activity, in wild-type and W741C-mutant ARs. In cynomolgus monkeys, the serum concentration of CH5137291 increased dose-dependently and PSA level decreased 80% at 100 mg/kg. CH

  12. Inhibiting Delta-6 Desaturase Activity Suppresses Tumor Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Chengwei; Qu, Xiying; Wan, Jianbo; Rong, Rong; Huang, Lili; Cai, Chun; Zhou, Keyuan; Gu, Yan; Qian, Steven Y.; Kang, Jing X.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a tumor-supportive microenvironment is characterized by high levels of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic eicosanoids derived from omega-6 (n−6) arachidonic acid (AA). Although the metabolic pathways (COX, LOX, and P450) that generate these n−6 AA eicosanoids have been targeted, the role of endogenous AA production in tumorigenesis remains unexplored. Delta-6 desaturase (D6D) is the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for the synthesis of n−6 AA and increased D6D activity can lead to enhanced n−6 AA production. Here, we show that D6D activity is upregulated during melanoma and lung tumor growth and that suppressing D6D activity, either by RNAi knockdown or a specific D6D inhibitor, dramatically reduces tumor growth. Accordingly, the content of AA and AA-derived tumor-promoting metabolites is significantly decreased. Angiogenesis and inflammatory status are also reduced. These results identify D6D as a key factor for tumor growth and as a potential target for cancer therapy and prevention. PMID:23112819

  13. Transcription factor LSF (TFCP2) inhibits melanoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yuji; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Tanaka, Asami; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Inoue, Yuji; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu; Kyoya, Mikiko; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Late SV40 factor 3 (LSF), a transcription factor, contributes to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, decreased expression level of LSF in skin melanoma compared to that in benign melanocytic tumors and nevi in mice and humans was found in this study. Anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of melanoma cells was suppressed by LSF overexpression through an increased percentage of G1 phase cells and an increased p21CIP1 expression level in vitro and in vivo. Anchorage-dependent growth in LSF-overexpressed melanoma cells was promoted by depletion of LSF in the LSF-overexpressed cells. Integrated results of our EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed binding of LSF within a 150-bp upstream region of the transcription start site of p21CIP1 in melanoma cells. Taken together, our results suggest potential roles of LSF as a growth regulator through control of the transcription of p21CIP1 in melanocytes and melanoma cells as well as a biomarker for nevus. PMID:26506241

  14. Leaf Litter Inhibits Growth of an Amphibian Fungal Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Stoler, Aaron B; Berven, Keith A; Raffel, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Past studies have found a heterogeneous distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Recent studies have accounted for some of this heterogeneity through a positive association between canopy cover and Bd abundance, which is attributed to the cooling effect of canopy cover. We questioned whether leaf litter inputs that are also associated with canopy cover might also alter Bd growth. Leaf litter inputs exhibit tremendous interspecific chemical variation, and we hypothesized that Bd growth varies with leachate chemistry. We also hypothesized that Bd uses leaf litter as a growth substrate. To test these hypotheses, we conducted laboratory trials in which we exposed cultures of Bd to leachate of 12 temperate leaf litter species at varying dilutions. Using a subset of those 12 litter species, we also exposed Bd to pre-leached litter substrate. We found that exposure to litter leachate and substrate reduced Bd spore and sporangia densities, although there was substantial variation among treatments. In particular, Bd densities were inversely correlated with concentrations of phenolic acids. We conducted a field survey of phenolic concentrations in natural wetlands which verified that the leachate concentrations in our lab study are ecologically relevant. Our study reinforces prior indications that positive associations between canopy cover and Bd abundance are likely mediated by water temperature effects, but this phenomenon might be counteracted by changes in aquatic chemistry from leaf litter inputs. PMID:26935822

  15. Fish oil constituent docosahexa-enoic acid selectively inhibits growth of human papillomavirus immortalized keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Auborn, K

    1999-02-01

    The omega-3-fatty acids inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells whereas omega-6-fatty acids stimulate growth. In this study, we examined effects of these fatty acids on human pre-cancerous cells. Cervical keratinocytes, immortalized with the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, were treated with linoleic acid, an omega-6-fatty acid, and the omega-3-fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. Using both cell counts and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, docosahexaenoic acid inhibited growth of these cells to a greater extent than eicosapenta-enoic acid. Linoleic acid had no effect. The effect of docosahexaenoic acid was dose dependent and caused growth arrest. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibited growth of HPV16 immortalized foreskin keratinocytes and laryngeal keratinocytes grown from explants of benign tumors caused by papillomavirus, but had no effect on normal foreskin and laryngeal keratinocytes. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibited growth in the presence of estradiol, a growth stimulator for these cells. Indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor like docosahexaenoic acid, had only minimal effect on growth. Alpha-tocopherol, a peroxidation inhibitor, abrogated effects of docosahexaenoic acid implying that inhibitory effects were via lipid peroxidation. PMID:10069461

  16. Sumoylation Inhibits the Growth Suppressive Properties of Ikaros.

    PubMed

    Apostolov, Apostol; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Oravecz, Attila; Goepp, Marie; Kirstetter, Peggy; Marchal, Patricia; Ittel, Antoine; Mauvieux, Laurent; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Ikaros transcription factor is a tumor suppressor that is also important for lymphocyte development. How post-translational modifications influence Ikaros function remains partially understood. We show that Ikaros undergoes sumoylation in developing T cells that correspond to mono-, bi- or poly-sumoylation by SUMO1 and/or SUMO2/3 on three lysine residues (K58, K240 and K425). Sumoylation occurs in the nucleus and requires DNA binding by Ikaros. Sumoylated Ikaros is less effective than unsumoylated forms at inhibiting the expansion of murine leukemic cells, and Ikaros sumoylation is abundant in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells, but not in healthy peripheral blood leukocytes. Our results suggest that sumoylation may be important in modulating the tumor suppressor function of Ikaros.

  17. Sumoylation Inhibits the Growth Suppressive Properties of Ikaros

    PubMed Central

    Goepp, Marie; Kirstetter, Peggy; Marchal, Patricia; Ittel, Antoine; Mauvieux, Laurent; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Ikaros transcription factor is a tumor suppressor that is also important for lymphocyte development. How post-translational modifications influence Ikaros function remains partially understood. We show that Ikaros undergoes sumoylation in developing T cells that correspond to mono-, bi- or poly-sumoylation by SUMO1 and/or SUMO2/3 on three lysine residues (K58, K240 and K425). Sumoylation occurs in the nucleus and requires DNA binding by Ikaros. Sumoylated Ikaros is less effective than unsumoylated forms at inhibiting the expansion of murine leukemic cells, and Ikaros sumoylation is abundant in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells, but not in healthy peripheral blood leukocytes. Our results suggest that sumoylation may be important in modulating the tumor suppressor function of Ikaros. PMID:27315244

  18. Decreased abundance of crustose coralline algae due to ocean acidification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Andersson, Andreas J; Jokiel, Paul L.; Rodgers, Ku'ulei S.; Mackenzie, Fred T.

    2008-01-01

    Owing to anthropogenic emissions, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide could almost double between 2006 and 2100 according to business-as-usual carbon dioxide emission scenarios1. Because the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere2, 3, 4, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will lead to increasing dissolved inorganic carbon and carbon dioxide in surface ocean waters, and hence acidification and lower carbonate saturation states2, 5. As a consequence, it has been suggested that marine calcifying organisms, for example corals, coralline algae, molluscs and foraminifera, will have difficulties producing their skeletons and shells at current rates6, 7, with potentially severe implications for marine ecosystems, including coral reefs6, 8, 9, 10, 11. Here we report a seven-week experiment exploring the effects of ocean acidification on crustose coralline algae, a cosmopolitan group of calcifying algae that is ecologically important in most shallow-water habitats12, 13, 14. Six outdoor mesocosms were continuously supplied with sea water from the adjacent reef and manipulated to simulate conditions of either ambient or elevated seawater carbon dioxide concentrations. The recruitment rate and growth of crustose coralline algae were severely inhibited in the elevated carbon dioxide mesocosms. Our findings suggest that ocean acidification due to human activities could cause significant change to benthic community structure in shallow-warm-water carbonate ecosystems.

  19. DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF/VEGFR2-activated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyeong Sim; Lee, Kangwook; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Kang Min; Shin, Yong Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth requires a process called angiogenesis, a new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels, as newly formed vessels provide tumor cells with oxygen and nutrition. Danggui-Sayuk-Ga-Osuyu-Saenggang-Tang (DSGOST), one of traditional Chinese medicines, has been widely used in treatment of vessel diseases including Raynaud's syndrome in Northeast Asian countries including China, Japan and Korea. Therefore, we hypothesized that DSGOST might inhibit tumor growth by targeting newly formed vessels on the basis of its historical prescription. Here, we demonstrate that DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by inhibiting VEGF-induced angiogenesis. DSGOST inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenic abilities of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, which resulted from its inhibition of VEGF/VEGFR2 interaction. Furthermore, DSGOST attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in vivo by reducing angiogenic vessel numbers, while not affecting pancreatic tumor cell viability. Thus, our data conclude that DSGOST inhibits VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis, suggesting a new indication for DSGOST in treatment of cancer. PMID:26967562

  20. Inhibition of growth in solid solution-aqueous solution systems by non-incorporating impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, Carlos M.

    2011-03-01

    Crystal growth inhibition by non-incorporating impurities has been described and quantified since 1958 by the so-called step pinning model by Cabrera and Vermilyea [1]. In the original model, as well as in its recent improvements by Weaver et al. in 2006 and 2007 [2,3], only the inhibition by the adsorption of impurities on crystal surfaces with fixed compositions is considered. However, most of the crystals found in nature are solid solutions with more or less wide chemical variability. Therefore, in order to provide more realistic models of crystal growth inhibition in natural systems, it is fundamental to study in detail the inhibition of surfaces of solid solutions by non-incorporating impurities. In this paper, the Cabrera-Vermilyea model has been generalised for the case of growth inhibition in solid solution-aqueous solution (SS-AS) systems. This generalisation was made by considering that supersaturation and the physicochemical properties of the solid solutions are functions of the solid composition. The main implication of the model is that a progressive inhibition of growth of a solid solution by increasing the concentration of an adsorbed impurity results in compositional changes on the growing surfaces.

  1. Dual effect of metformin on growth inhibition and oestradiol production in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rice, S; Pellat, L; Ahmetaga, A; Bano, G; Mason, H D; Whitehead, S A

    2015-04-01

    Evidence has been accumulating for a role for metformin in reducing breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. It inhibits growth of breast cancer cells via several mechanisms, primarily the AMPK/mTOR signalling pathway. Another possible protective mechanism may be the ability of metformin to inhibit aromatase activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of metformin on the basal growth of MCF-7 cells, after oestradiol (E2) stimulation and after the inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin. Secondly, we investigated the effects of metformin on the activity of a number of steroidogenic enzymes and the mRNA expression of aromatase and steroid sulphatase (STS). High doses of metformin significantly inhibited both basal and oestrogen-stimulated cell division. Low-dose rapamycin (10-10 M) did not inhibit growth, but the addition of metformin induced a significant reduction in growth. High-dose rapamycin (10-8 M) inhibited growth, and this was further attenuated by the addition of metformin. Exposure to low (10-7 M) and high (10-4 M) doses of metformin for 7-10 days significantly reduced the conversion of androstenedione (ANDRO) and testosterone (TESTO) (both requiring aromatase), but not the conversion of oestrone or oestrone sulphate (ES) via 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/sulphatase to E2. This attenuation was via a downregulation in the expression of total aromatase mRNA and promoter II, whilst the expression of sulphatase was unaffected by metformin. In conclusion, plasma levels of metformin have a dual therapeutic action, first by directly inhibiting cell proliferation which can be augmented by rapamycin analogues, and secondly, by inhibiting aromatase activity and reducing the local conversion of androgens to E2.

  2. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal trigger for the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the primary site of thermal damage is not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions", as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (re)growth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as the cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater) nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. This provides a new standpoint to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  3. Role of calcium in growth inhibition induced by a novel cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Westhoff, B. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Our laboratory has purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells. Evidence presented here demonstrates that sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition in BALB-c 3T3 cells is influenced by calcium, such that a decrease in the calcium concentration in the growth medium results in an increase in sensitivity to CeReS-18. Calcium did not alter CeReS-18 binding to its cell surface receptor and CeReS-18 does not bind calcium directly. Addition of calcium, but not magnesium, to CeReS-18-inhibited 3T3 cells results in reentry into the cell cycle. A greater than 3-hour exposure to increased calcium is required for escape from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. The calcium ionophore ionomycin could partially mimic the effect of increasing extracellular calcium, but thapsigargin was ineffective in inducing escape from growth inhibition. Increasing extracellular calcium 10-fold resulted in an approximately 7-fold increase in total cell-associated 45Ca+2, while free intracellular calcium only increased approximately 30%. However, addition of CeReS-18 did not affect total cell-associated calcium or the increase in total cell-associated calcium observed with an increase in extracellular calcium. Serum addition induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and influx across the plasma membrane in 3T3 cells, and pretreatment of 3T3 cells with CeReS-18 appeared to inhibit these calcium mobilization events. These results suggest that a calcium-sensitive step exists in the recovery from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. CeReS-18 may inhibit cell proliferation through a novel mechanism involving altering the intracellular calcium mobilization/regulation necessary for cell cycle progression.

  4. Breast cancer growth inhibition by delivery of the MDGI-derived peptide P108.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; Kurtz, A

    2000-05-11

    Mammary derived growth inhibitor (MDGI) is a member of the family of cytoplasmic fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), which bind hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids, retinoids, eicosanoids and prostaglandines. MDGI and an 11 amino acid MDGI-derived conserved C-terminal peptide (P108) inhibits growth of normal mammary epithelial cells in tissue and organ culture, but fails to inhibit proliferation of many breast cancer cell lines in vitro. Here, the effects of peptide P108 on tumor growth of MCF-7, MDA-MB468 and MDA-MB231 human breast cancer cell lines in nude mice were tested. To deliver P108 into tumors, a novel peptide production system was applied for expression and secretion of small bioactive peptides in mammalian cells. Functional differentiation was observed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells upon P108 expression. In addition, EGF-dependent colony formation in soft agar by MDA-MB468 cells was inhibited by secreted P108. Tumor growth in athymic nude mice was suppressed in all three cell lines tested. Furthermore, P108 expressed by MCF-7/P108 cells caused paracrine tumor growth inhibition of MDA-MB231 cells. These results indicate that breast cancer inhibition by P108 is independent of binding to hydrophobic ligands and is perhaps mediated by interference with EGF-dependent signaling pathways.

  5. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate.

  6. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  7. Somatostatin Receptor-1 Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n=5, p<0.05, t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47%, (n=5, p<0.05, t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  8. Bisphenol A inhibits cultured mouse ovarian follicle growth partially via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Craig, Zelieann R.; Wang, Wei; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor that inhibits growth of mouse ovarian follicles and disrupts steroidogenesis at a dose of 438 μM. However, the effects of lower doses of BPA and its mechanism of action in ovarian follicles are unknown. We hypothesized that low doses of BPA inhibit follicular growth and decrease estradiol levels through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway. Antral follicles from wild-type and Ahr knock-out (AhrKO) mice were cultured for 96 hours. Follicle diameters and estradiol levels then were compared in wild-type and AhrKO follicles ± BPA (0.004 - 438 μM). BPA inhibited follicle growth (110 - 438 μM) and decreased estradiol levels (43.8 - 438 μM) in wild-type and AhrKO follicles. However, at BPA 110 μM, inhibition of growth in AhrKO follicles was attenuated compared to wild-type follicles. These data suggest that BPA may inhibit follicle growth partially via the AHR pathway, whereas its effects on estradiol synthesis likely involve other mechanisms. PMID:23928317

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Pangestuti, Ratih; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health effects. Among marine organisms, marine algae have been identified as an under-exploited plant resource, although they have long been recognized as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Presently, several lines of studies have provided insight into biological activities and neuroprotective effects of marine algae including antioxidant, anti-neuroinflammatory, cholinesterase inhibitory activity and the inhibition of neuronal death. Hence, marine algae have great potential to be used for neuroprotection as part of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and functional foods. This contribution presents an overview of marine algal neuroprotective effects and their potential application in neuroprotection. PMID:21673890

  10. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-08-01

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization—citrate and hydroxycitrate—exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation

  11. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-08-01

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor–crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization—citrate and hydroxycitrate—exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor–crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of

  12. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-25

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization--citrate and hydroxycitrate--exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation of

  13. GSK1904529A, an insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor inhibitor, inhibits glioma tumor growth, induces apoptosis and inhibits migration

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, QIANG; ZHANG, JUNXIA; CUI, QINYING; LI, XIAODONG; GAO, GE; WANG, YANFEN; XU, YUPING; GAO, XIAOQUN

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignancy of the central nervous system, with a poor prognosis. The therapeutic options for malignant gliomas are limited and far from satisfactory, and novel treatment strategies are urgently required to improve the outcome of the disease. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation, motility and survival. The dysregulation of this signaling pathway has been implicated in the development of malignant gliomas. In the present study, GSK1904529A, a small molecule inhibitor of IGF-1R, suppressed glioma cell viability, induced glioma cell apoptosis and inhibited glioma cell migration in vitro. In addition, GSK1904529A inhibited glioma tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested GSK1904529A as a promising agent for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:26035416

  14. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  15. The effect of various carbon sources on the growth of single-celled cyanophyta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avilov, I. A.; Sidorenkova, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    In 19 strains of unicellular blue-green algae, belonging to general Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Aphanocapsa and Aphanothece, the capacity of growth under mixotrophic conditions in mineral media with organic carbon sources (carbohydrates, polyols) was investigated. At moderate light intensity (1200 lx) and 0.5% of carbon source there was revealed: (1) Stimulation of growth; (2) Partial or complete inhibition of growth; (3) No influence of carbohydrate and polyols on the growth of some algae strains. Three physiological groups for the investigated strains have been outlined on the basis of data obtained. The possibility of using the differences revealed in classification of unicellular blue-green algae is discussed.

  16. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kanayo; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  17. Calcium ion involvement in growth inhibition of mechanically stressed soybean (Glycine max) seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A 40-50% reduction in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Century 84] hypocotyl elongation occurred 24 h after application of mechanical stress. Exogenous Ca2+ at 10 mM inhibited growth by 28% if applied with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 to the zone of maximum hypocotyl elongation. La3+ was even more inhibitory than Ca2+, especially above 5 mM. Treatment with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) alone had no effect on growth of non-stressed seedlings at the concentrations used but negated stress-induced growth reduction by 36% at 4 mM when compared to non-treated, stressed controls. Treatment with EDTA was ineffective in negating stress-induced growth inhibition. Calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium, chlorpromazine, and 48/80 also negated stress-induced growth reduction by 23, 50, and 35%, respectively.

  18. Pharmacologic inhibition of MEK signaling prevents growth of canine hemangiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nicholas J.; Nickoloff, Brian J.; Dykema, Karl J.; Boguslawski, Elissa A.; Krivochenitser, Roman I.; Froman, Roe E.; Dawes, Michelle J.; Baker, Laurence H.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Kamstock, Debra A.; Kitchell, Barbara E.; Furge, Kyle A.; Duesbery, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare neoplasm of endothelial origin that has limited treatment options and poor five-year survival. As a model for human AS, we studied primary cells and tumorgrafts derived from canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA), which is also an endothelial malignancy with similar presentation and histology. Primary cells isolated from HSA showed constitutive ERK activation. The MEK inhibitor CI-1040 reduced ERK activation and the viability of primary cells derived from visceral, cutaneous, and cardiac HSA in vitro. HSA-derived primary cells were also sensitive to sorafenib, an inhibitor of B-Raf and multi-receptor tyrosine kinases. In vivo, CI-1040 or PD0325901 decreased the growth of cutaneous cell-derived xenografts and cardiac-derived tumorgrafts. Sorafenib decreased tumor size in both in vivo models, although cardiac tumorgrafts were more sensitive. In human AS, we noted that 50% of tumors stained positively for phosphorylated ERK1/2 and that the expression of several MEK-responsive transcription factors was up-regulated. Our data showed that MEK signaling is essential for the growth of HSA in vitro and in vivo and provided evidence that the same pathways are activated in human AS. This indicates that MEK inhibitors may form part of an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of canine HSA or human AS, and it highlights the utility of spontaneous canine cancers as a model of human disease. PMID:23804705

  19. Elevated major ion concentrations inhibit larval mayfly growth and development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brent R; Weaver, Paul C; Nietch, Christopher T; Lazorchak, James M; Struewing, Katherine A; Funk, David H

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances, including those from developing energy resources, can alter stream chemistry significantly by elevating total dissolved solids. Field studies have indicated that mayflies (Order Ephemeroptera) are particularly sensitive to high total dissolved solids. In the present study, the authors measured 20-d growth and survivorship of larval Neocloeon triangulifer exposed to a gradient of brine salt (mixed NaCl and CaCl2 ) concentrations. Daily growth rates were reduced significantly in all salt concentrations above the control (363 µS cm(-1) ) and larvae in treatments with specific conductance >812 µS cm(-1) were in comparatively earlier developmental stages (instars) at the end of the experiment. Survivorship declined significantly when specific conductance was >1513 µS cm(-1) and the calculated 20-d 50% lethal concentration was 2866 µS cm(-1) . The present study's results provide strong experimental evidence that elevated ion concentrations similar to those observed in developing energy resources, such as oil and gas drilling or coal mining, can adversely affect sensitive aquatic insect species.

  20. Elevated major ion concentrations inhibit larval mayfly growth and development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brent R; Weaver, Paul C; Nietch, Christopher T; Lazorchak, James M; Struewing, Katherine A; Funk, David H

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances, including those from developing energy resources, can alter stream chemistry significantly by elevating total dissolved solids. Field studies have indicated that mayflies (Order Ephemeroptera) are particularly sensitive to high total dissolved solids. In the present study, the authors measured 20-d growth and survivorship of larval Neocloeon triangulifer exposed to a gradient of brine salt (mixed NaCl and CaCl2 ) concentrations. Daily growth rates were reduced significantly in all salt concentrations above the control (363 µS cm(-1) ) and larvae in treatments with specific conductance >812 µS cm(-1) were in comparatively earlier developmental stages (instars) at the end of the experiment. Survivorship declined significantly when specific conductance was >1513 µS cm(-1) and the calculated 20-d 50% lethal concentration was 2866 µS cm(-1) . The present study's results provide strong experimental evidence that elevated ion concentrations similar to those observed in developing energy resources, such as oil and gas drilling or coal mining, can adversely affect sensitive aquatic insect species. PMID:25307284

  1. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling☆

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P.N.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5 mM at 24 h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  2. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential.

  3. Methoxychlor and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Aberdeen, Graham; Babus, Janice K; Albrecht, Eugene D; Flaws, Jodi A

    2007-08-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, inhibits growth and induces atresia of antral follicles in rodents. MXC metabolites, mono-OH MXC (mono-OH) and bis-OH MXC (HPTE), are thought to be more toxic than the parent compound. Although studies have examined effects of MXC in rodents, few studies have evaluated the effects of MXC in primates. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from adult baboon ovaries and cultured with vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide; DMSO), MXC (1-100 micro g/ml), mono-OH (0.1-10 micro g/ml), or HPTE (0.1-10 micro g/ml) for 96 hr. Growth was monitored at 24 hr intervals. After culture, follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE significantly inhibited follicular growth and increased atresia compared to DMSO. Moreover, the adverse effects of MXC and its metabolites on growth and atresia in baboon antral follicles were observed at lower (100-fold) doses than those causing similar effects in rodents. These data suggest that MXC and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles, and that primate follicles are more sensitive to MXC than rodent follicles.

  4. The effect of polyamine biosynthesis inhibition on growth and differentiation of the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Pieckenstain, F L; Gárriz, A; Chornomaz, E M; Sánchez, D H; Ruiz, O A

    2001-12-01

    We studied the effects of several polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on growth, differentiation, free polyamine levels and in vivo and in vitro activity of polyamine biosynthesis enzymes in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) were potent inhibitors of mycelial growth. The effect of DFMO was due to inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). No evidence for the existence of an arginine decarboxylase (ADC) pathway was found. The effect of DFMA was partly due to inhibition of ODC, presumably after its conversion into DFMO by mycelial arginase, as suggested by the high activity of this enzyme detected both in intact mycelium and mycelial extracts. In addition, toxic effects of DFMA on cellular processes other than polyamine metabolism might have occurred. Cyclohexylamine (CHA) slightly inhibited mycelial growth and caused an important decrease of free spermidine associated with a drastic increase of free putrescine concentration. Methylglyoxal bis-[guanyl hydrazone] (MGBG) had no effect on mycelial growth. Excepting MGBG, all the inhibitors strongly decreased sclerotial formation. Results demonstrate that sclerotial development is much more sensitive to polyamine biosynthesis inhibition than mycelial growth. Our results suggest that mycelial growth can be supported either by spermidine or putrescine, while spermidine (or the putrescine/spermidine ratio) is important for sclerotial formation to occur. Ascospore germination was completely insensitive to the inhibitors.

  5. The anti-hypertensive drug prazosin inhibits glioblastoma growth via the PKCδ-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Assad Kahn, Suzana; Costa, Silvia Lima; Gholamin, Sharareh; Nitta, Ryan T; Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Coelho, Paulo Lucas Cerqueira; El-Habr, Elias; Cadusseau, Josette; Varlet, Pascale; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Devaux, Bertrand; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Cheshier, Samuel H; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Haiech, Jacques; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    A variety of drugs targeting monoamine receptors are routinely used in human pharmacology. We assessed the effect of these drugs on the viability of tumor-initiating cells isolated from patients with glioblastoma. Among the drugs targeting monoamine receptors, we identified prazosin, an α1- and α2B-adrenergic receptor antagonist, as the most potent inducer of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cell death. Prazosin triggered apoptosis of glioblastoma-initiating cells and of their differentiated progeny, inhibited glioblastoma growth in orthotopic xenografts of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cells, and increased survival of glioblastoma-bearing mice. We found that prazosin acted in glioblastoma-initiating cells independently from adrenergic receptors. Its off-target activity occurred via a PKCδ-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway, which resulted in caspase-3 activation. Blockade of PKCδ activation prevented all molecular changes observed in prazosin-treated glioblastoma-initiating cells, as well as prazosin-induced apoptosis. Based on these data, we conclude that prazosin, an FDA-approved drug for the control of hypertension, inhibits glioblastoma growth through a PKCδ-dependent mechanism. These findings open up promising prospects for the use of prazosin as an adjuvant therapy for glioblastoma patients. PMID:27138566

  6. WNT signaling drives cholangiocarcinoma growth and can be pharmacologically inhibited

    PubMed Central

    Boulter, Luke; Guest, Rachel V.; Kendall, Timothy J.; Wilson, David H.; Wojtacha, Davina; Robson, Andrew J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Samuel, Kay; Van Rooijen, Nico; Barry, Simon T.; Wigmore, Stephen J.; Sansom, Owen J.; Forbes, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage and is refractory to surgical intervention and chemotherapy. Despite a global increase in the incidence of CC, little progress has been made toward the development of treatments for this cancer. Here we utilized human tissue; CC cell xenografts; a p53-deficient transgenic mouse model; and a non-transgenic, chemically induced rat model of CC that accurately reflects both the inflammatory and regenerative background associated with human CC pathology. Using these systems, we determined that the WNT pathway is highly activated in CCs and that inflammatory macrophages are required to establish this WNT-high state in vivo. Moreover, depletion of macrophages or inhibition of WNT signaling with one of two small molecule WNT inhibitors in mouse and rat CC models markedly reduced CC proliferation and increased apoptosis, resulting in tumor regression. Together, these results demonstrate that enhanced WNT signaling is a characteristic of CC and suggest that targeting WNT signaling pathways has potential as a therapeutic strategy for CC. PMID:25689248

  7. Possible mechanism of mannose inhibition of sucrose-supported growth in N2-fixing Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, T Y

    1990-01-01

    When mannose was added to a sucrose-supported culture of Azotobacter vinelandii under N2-fixing conditions, cell growth was inhibited. The degree of inhibition was proportional to the amount of mannose and to the aeration rate (T.-Y. Wong, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54:473-475, 1988). In this report, we demonstrate that once inside the cell, mannose was phosphorylated to mannose 6-phosphate. It was then isomerized to fructose 6-phosphate and to glucose 6-phosphate. Mannose inhibited sucrose uptake noncompetitively. The decrease in sucrose uptake after mannose addition coincided with a lower rate of respiration and a decrease in nitrogenase activity. The decrease in sucrose uptake and in the ATP pool may decrease the electron flow and reduce protection of the nitrogenase from O2. Cells became very sensitive to O2, and therefore, cell growth was inhibited under high aeration conditions. PMID:2310189

  8. Carbon Monoxide Expedites Metabolic Exhaustion to Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Barbara; Gallo, David; Csizmadia, Eva; Harris, Clair; Belcher, John; Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Penacho, Nuno; Seth, Pankaj; Sukhatme, Vikas; Ahmed, Asif; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Helczynski, Leszek; Bjartell, Anders; Persson, Jenny Liao; Otterbein, Leo E

    2013-01-01

    One classical feature of cancer cells is their metabolic acquisition of a highly glycolytic phenotype. Carbon monoxide (CO), one of the products of the cytoprotective molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cancer cells, has been implicated in carcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. However, the functional contributions of CO and HO-1 to these processes are poorly defined. In human prostate cancers, we found that HO-1 was nuclear localized in malignant cells, with low enzymatic activity in moderately differentiated tumors correlating with relatively worse clinical outcomes. Exposure to CO sensitized prostate cancer cells but not normal cells to chemotherapy, with growth arrest and apoptosis induced in vivo in part through mitotic catastrophe. CO targeted mitochondria activity in cancer cells as evidenced by higher oxygen consumption, free radical generation and mitochondrial collapse. Collectively, our findings indicated that CO transiently induces an anti-Warburg effect by rapidly fueling cancer cell bioenergetics, ultimately resulting in metabolic exhaustion. PMID:24121491

  9. Growth rate inhibition of phytopathogenic fungi by characterized chitosans

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Junior, Enio N.; Gueddari, Nour E. El; Moerschbacher, Bruno. M.; Franco, Telma T.

    2012-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of fifteen chitosans with different degrees of polymerization (DP) and different degrees of acetylation (FA) on the growth rates (GR) of four phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum, and Rhizopus stolonifer) were examined using a 96-well microtiter plate and a microplate reader. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the chitosans ranged from 100 μg ×mL-1 to 1,000 μg ×mL-1 depending on the fungus tested and the DP and FA of the chitosan. The antifungal activity of the chitosans increased with decreasing FA. Chitosans with low FA and high DP showed the highest inhibitory activity against all four fungi. P. expansum and B. cinerea were relatively less susceptible while A. alternata and R. stolonifer were relatively more sensitive to the chitosan polymers. Scanning electron microscopy of fungi grown on culture media amended with chitosan revealed morphological changes. PMID:24031893

  10. Growth rate inhibition of phytopathogenic fungi by characterized chitosans.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Junior, Enio N; Gueddari, Nour E El; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Franco, Telma T

    2012-04-01

    The inhibitory effects of fifteen chitosans with different degrees of polymerization (DP) and different degrees of acetylation (FA) on the growth rates (GR) of four phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum, and Rhizopus stolonifer) were examined using a 96-well microtiter plate and a microplate reader. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the chitosans ranged from 100 μg ×mL(-1) to 1,000 μg ×mL(-1) depending on the fungus tested and the DP and FA of the chitosan. The antifungal activity of the chitosans increased with decreasing FA. Chitosans with low FA and high DP showed the highest inhibitory activity against all four fungi. P. expansum and B. cinerea were relatively less susceptible while A. alternata and R. stolonifer were relatively more sensitive to the chitosan polymers. Scanning electron microscopy of fungi grown on culture media amended with chitosan revealed morphological changes.

  11. Antiangiogenic and proapoptotic activities of allyl isothiocyanate inhibit ascites tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Akhilesh; D'Souza, Saritha S; Tickoo, Sanjay; Salimath, Bharathi P; Singh, H B

    2009-03-01

    The authors investigate the antiangiogenic and proapoptotic effects of mustard essential oil containing allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and explore its mechanism of action on Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells. Swiss albino mice transplanted with EAT cells were used to study the effect of AITC. AITC was effective at a concentration of 10 mum as demonstrated by the inhibition of proliferation of EAT cells when compared with the normal HEK293 cells. It significantly reduced ascites secretion and tumor cell proliferation by about 80% and inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor expression in tumor-bearing mice in vivo. It also reduced vessel sprouting and exhibited potent antiangiogenic activity in the chorioallantoic membrane and cornea of the rat. AITC arrested the growth of EAT cells by inducing apoptosis and effectively arrested cell cycle progression at the G1 phase. The results clearly suggest that AITC inhibits tumor growth by both antiangiogenic and proapoptotic mechanisms.

  12. Hydroperoxide lyase products, hexanal, hexenal and nonenal, inhibit soybean seedling growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, H.W.; Dornbos, D.L. Jr. )

    1989-04-01

    Hexanal, a product of hydroperoxide lyase, inhibited the germination and growth of soybean seeds. Hexanal was continuously delivered to germinating seeds as a vapor dissolved in air with a flow-through system (100 ml/min). Only 0.8 {mu}g hexanal/ml air was required to inhibit seedling growth by 50%; nearly 100% inhibition occurred with a dose of 1.8 {mu}g hexanal/ml air. In the absence of hexanal brown spots were often visible on the seedlings, but at sublethal doses of hexanal, the seedlings were largely devoid of these spots. The relative toxicity of three hydroperoxide lyase products, hexanal, trans-2-hexanal and trans-2-nonenal, were compared with a Petri-dish bioassay. The order of toxicity against seedling growth was hexenal>hexanal>nonenal.

  13. [Larval survival and growth of Arbacia punctulata (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) fed with five micro-algae at two salinities].

    PubMed

    García, Marina; Rosas, Jesús; Hernández, Iván; Velásquez, Aidé; Cabrera, Tomas; Maneiro, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Fertilized eggs from an spontaneously spawn of thirty sexually mature sea urchins (Arbacia punctulata) were incubated to complete embryonic development. The echinopluteus larvae (3 ind/ml) were distributed into 50 plastic containers (25 containers at 30 psu and 25 containers at 40 psu) and fed on Tetraselmis chuii, Nannochloropsis oculata, Isochrysis galbana, Chaetoceros gracilis and C. calcitrans under a natural photoperiod. The water of the containers was partially renewed (75%) everyday. Larval anatomic development aspects, daily survival and growth were determined. The growth was determined through postoral arms and body length measurement, and body diameter of twelve larvae during metamorphosis. During the planktonic larval phase, only the I. galbana diet produced similar results for both salinities. The relative growth of larvae was isometric (I) for larvae fed on I. galbana at two salinities and positive allometric for those fed on C. gracilis and C. calcitrans at both salinities. In this study A. punctulata started metamorphosis at day 14 and was completed 30 days after fecundation. Significant differences were detected in post-settlement body growth between the two salinities (F = 23.58, p < 0.05): growth was better for larvae at 30 psu (final body diameter was 3.14 +/- 0.44 mm). The final rate of planktonic larvae was highest with I. galbana (58.33%). For juveniles the rate was 6.48% for those fed on C. gracilis (40 psu in both larvae and juveniles). We recommend the use of this diet and 40 psu for survival or 30 psu for growth. PMID:17469263

  14. Inhibition of vitamin B12-dependent microbial growth by nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Alston, T.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In methionine-free media, nitrous oxide inhibits the growth of an auxotrophic strain of Escherichia coli lacking a cobalamin-independent pathway for the de novo synthesis of methionine. Prototrophic E. coli is similarly inhibited by nitrous oxide if the cobalamin-independent pathway is selectively depressed by sulfanilamide. Nitrous oxide thus effectively inactivates cobalamin-dependent 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase in intact bacteria.

  15. Fighting arboviral diseases: low toxicity on mammalian cells, dengue growth inhibition (in vitro), and mosquitocidal activity of Centroceras clavulatum-synthesized silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Aruna, Palanimuthu; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Paulpandi, Manickam; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Wei, Hui; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Nicoletti, Marcello; Syuhei, Ban; Canale, Angelo; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has rapidly spread in all regions of the world in recent years. Female mosquitoes, mainly Aedes aegypti, transmit dengue. Approximately 3,900 million people, in 128 countries, are at risk of dengue infection. Recently, a focus has been provided on the potential of green-synthesized nanoparticles as inhibitors of the production of dengue viral envelope (E) protein in Vero cells and downregulators of the expression of dengue viral E gene. Algae are an outstanding reservoir of novel compounds, which may help in the fight against mosquito-borne diseases. In this research, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were rapidly synthesized using a cheap extract of the alga Centroceras clavulatum. AgNP were characterized by UV–vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In mosquitocidal assays, LC50 values of C. clavulatum extract against A. aegypti larvae and pupae were 269.361 ppm (larva I), 309.698 ppm (larva II), 348.325 ppm (larva III), 387.637 ppm (larva IV), and 446.262 ppm (pupa). C. clavulatum extract also exhibited moderate antioxidant activity, both in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging assays. LC50 values of C. clavulatum-synthesized AgNP were 21.460 ppm (larva I), 23.579 ppm (larva II), 25.912 ppm (larva III), 29.155 ppm (larva IV), and 33.877 ppm (pupa). Furthermore, C. clavulatum-synthesized AgNP inhibited dengue (serotype dengue virus type-2 (DEN-2)) viral replication in Vero cells. Notably, 50 μg/ml of green-synthesized AgNP showed no cytotoxicity on Vero cells while reduced DEN-2 viral growth of more than 80%; 12.5 μg/ml inhibited viral growth of more than 50%. Cellular internalization assays highlighted that untreated infected cells showed high intensity of fluorescence emission, which denotes high level of viral internalization. Conversely

  16. Inhibition of prolidase activity by nickel causes decreased growth of proline auxotrophic CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Miltyk, Wojciech; Surazynski, Arkadiusz; Kasprzak, Kazimierz S; Fivash, Matthew J; Buzard, Gregory S; Phang, James M

    2005-04-15

    Occupational exposure to nickel has been epidemiologically linked to increased cancer risk in the respiratory tract. Nickel-induced cell transformation is associated with both genotoxic and epigenetic mechanisms that are poorly understood. Prolidase [E.C.3.4.13.9] is a cytosolic Mn(II)-activated metalloproteinase that specifically hydrolyzes imidodipeptides with C-terminal proline or hydroxyproline and plays an important role in the recycling of proline for protein synthesis and cell growth. Prolidase also provides free proline as substrate for proline oxidase, whose gene is activated by p53 during apoptosis. The inhibition of prolidase activity by nickel has not yet been studied. We first showed that Ni(II) chloride specifically inhibited prolidase activity in CHO-K1 cells in situ. This interpretation was possible because CHO-K1 cells are proline auxotrophs requiring added free proline or proline released from added Gly-Pro by prolidase. In a dose-dependent fashion, Ni(II) inhibited growth on Gly-Pro but did not inhibit growth on proline, thereby showing inhibition of prolidase in situ in the absence of nonspecific toxicity. Studies using cell-free extracts showed that Ni(II) inhibited prolidase activity when present during prolidase activation with Mn(II) or during incubation with Gly-Pro. In kinetic studies, we found that Ni(II) inhibition of prolidase varied with respect to Mn(II) concentration. Analysis of these data suggested that increasing concentrations of Mn(II) stabilized the enzyme protein against Ni(II) inhibition. Because prolidase is an important enzyme in collagen metabolism, inhibition of the enzyme activity by nickel could alter the metabolism of collagen and other matrix proteins, and thereby alter cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions involved in gene expression, genomic stability, cellular differentiation, and cell proliferation. PMID:15696600

  17. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  18. The Lignan-containing Extract of Schisandra chinensis Berries Inhibits the Growth of Chlamydia pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Elina; Hanski, Leena L; Yrjönen, Teijo; Vuorela, Heikki J; Vuorela, Pia M

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and selectivity of an extract of Schisandra chinensis berries against Chlamydia pneumoniae and C. trachomatis. Among the ethnopharmacological uses of the extract from Schisandrae fructus are cough and pneumonia. Therefore we focused on respiratory pathogens. The extract completely inhibited the growth of C. pneumoniae strain CV6 at 250 μg/mL concentration. The inhibition of C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis growth was dose dependent and established with three different strains. The extract inhibited C. pneumoniae production of infectious progeny in a dose dependent manner. Chlamydia selectivity was elucidated with growth inhibition measurements of three other respiratory bacterial species. A pure compound found in Schisandra chinensis berries, schisandrin B at 20.0 μg/mL concentration inhibited the growth of both C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis. The extract was found to be non-toxic to the human host cells. These findings highlight the potential of the extract from Schisandra chinensis berries as a source for antichlamydial compounds.

  19. Xanthatin, a novel potent inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Yu, Jing; Pei, Chong Gang; Li, Yun Yan; Tu, Ping; Gao, Gui Ping; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer treatment. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, xanthatin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. The biochemical profiles of xanthatin were investigated using kinase assay, migration assay, tube formation, Matrigel plug assay, western blot, immunofluorescence and human tumor xenograft model. Xanthatin significantly inhibited growth, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cell as well as inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated angiogenesis. In addition, it inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator. Moreover, xanthatin directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Oral administration of xanthatin could markedly inhibit human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that xanthatin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate. PMID:26617743

  20. Curcumin inhibits growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through iron chelation.

    PubMed

    Minear, Steven; O'Donnell, Allyson F; Ballew, Anna; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Stearns, Tim; Cyert, Martha S

    2011-11-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from turmeric, is an ancient therapeutic used in India for centuries to treat a wide array of ailments. Interest in curcumin has increased recently, with ongoing clinical trials exploring curcumin as an anticancer therapy and as a protectant against neurodegenerative diseases. In vitro, curcumin chelates metal ions. However, although diverse physiological effects have been documented for this compound, curcumin's mechanism of action on mammalian cells remains unclear. This study uses yeast as a model eukaryotic system to dissect the biological activity of curcumin. We found that yeast mutants lacking genes required for iron and copper homeostasis are hypersensitive to curcumin and that iron supplementation rescues this sensitivity. Curcumin penetrates yeast cells, concentrates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, and reduces the intracellular iron pool. Curcumin-treated, iron-starved cultures are enriched in unbudded cells, suggesting that the G(1) phase of the cell cycle is lengthened. A delay in cell cycle progression could, in part, explain the antitumorigenic properties associated with curcumin. We also demonstrate that curcumin causes a growth lag in cultured human cells that is remediated by the addition of exogenous iron. These findings suggest that curcumin-induced iron starvation is conserved from yeast to humans and underlies curcumin's medicinal properties.

  1. Naphthenic acids inhibit root water transport, gas exchange and leaf growth in aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, M; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2002-12-01

    Effects of sodium naphthenates (NAs) on root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and gas exchange processes were examined in aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) seedlings grown in solution culture. Exposure of roots to NAs for 3-5 weeks significantly decreased Lp and stomatal conductance. Root-absorbed NAs also decreased leaf chlorophyll concentration, net photosynthesis and leaf growth. Short-term (< or = 2 h) exposure of excised roots to NAs significantly decreased root water flow (Qv) with a concomitant decline in root respiration. We conclude that NAs metabolically inhibited Lp, likely by affecting water channel activity, and that this inhibition could be responsible for the observed reductions in gas exchange and leaf growth.

  2. Algal Feedback and Removal Efficiency in a Sequencing Batch Reactor Algae Process (SBAR) to Treat the Antibiotic Cefradine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianqiu; Zheng, Fengzhu; Guo, Ruixin

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies focused on the removal capability for contaminants when the algae grown in an unexposed, unpolluted environment and ignored whether the feedback of algae to the toxic stress influenced the removal capability in a subsequent treatment batch. The present research investigated and compared algal feedback and removal efficiency in a sequencing batch reactor algae process (SBAR) to remove cefradine. Three varied pollution load conditions (10, 30 and 60 mg/L) were considered. Compared with the algal characteristics in the first treatment batch at 10 and 30 mg/L, higher algal growth inhibition rates were observed in the second treatment batch (11.23% to 20.81%). In contrast, algae produced more photosynthetic pigments in response to cefradine in the second treatment batch. A better removal efficiency (76.02%) was obtained during 96 h when the alga treated the antibiotic at 60 mg/L in the first treatment batch and at 30 mg/L in the second treatment batch. Additionally, the removal rate per unit algal density was also improved when the alga treated the antibiotic at 30 or 60 mg/L in the first treatment batch, respectively and at 30 mg/L in the second treatment batch. Our result indicated that the green algae were also able to adapt to varied pollution loads in different treatment batches.

  3. Algal Feedback and Removal Efficiency in a Sequencing Batch Reactor Algae Process (SBAR) to Treat the Antibiotic Cefradine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianqiu; Zheng, Fengzhu; Guo, Ruixin

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies focused on the removal capability for contaminants when the algae grown in an unexposed, unpolluted environment and ignored whether the feedback of algae to the toxic stress influenced the removal capability in a subsequent treatment batch. The present research investigated and compared algal feedback and removal efficiency in a sequencing batch reactor algae process (SBAR) to remove cefradine. Three varied pollution load conditions (10, 30 and 60 mg/L) were considered. Compared with the algal characteristics in the first treatment batch at 10 and 30 mg/L, higher algal growth inhibition rates were observed in the second treatment batch (11.23% to 20.81%). In contrast, algae produced more photosynthetic pigments in response to cefradine in the second treatment batch. A better removal efficiency (76.02%) was obtained during 96 h when the alga treated the antibiotic at 60 mg/L in the first treatment batch and at 30 mg/L in the second treatment batch. Additionally, the removal rate per unit algal density was also improved when the alga treated the antibiotic at 30 or 60 mg/L in the first treatment batch, respectively and at 30 mg/L in the second treatment batch. Our result indicated that the green algae were also able to adapt to varied pollution loads in different treatment batches. PMID:26177093

  4. Algal Feedback and Removal Efficiency in a Sequencing Batch Reactor Algae Process (SBAR) to Treat the Antibiotic Cefradine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianqiu; Zheng, Fengzhu; Guo, Ruixin

    2015-01-01

    Many previous studies focused on the removal capability for contaminants when the algae grown in an unexposed, unpolluted environment and ignored whether the feedback of algae to the toxic stress influenced the removal capability in a subsequent treatment batch. The present research investigated and compared algal feedback and removal efficiency in a sequencing batch reactor algae process (SBAR) to remove cefradine. Three varied pollution load conditions (10, 30 and 60 mg/L) were considered. Compared with the algal characteristics in the first treatment batch at 10 and 30 mg/L, higher algal growth inhibition rates were observed in the second treatment batch (11.23% to 20.81%). In contrast, algae produced more photosynthetic pigments in response to cefradine in the second treatment batch. A better removal efficiency (76.02%) was obtained during 96 h when the alga treated the antibiotic at 60 mg/L in the first treatment batch and at 30 mg/L in the second treatment batch. Additionally, the removal rate per unit algal density was also improved when the alga treated the antibiotic at 30 or 60 mg/L in the first treatment batch, respectively and at 30 mg/L in the second treatment batch. Our result indicated that the green algae were also able to adapt to varied pollution loads in different treatment batches. PMID:26177093

  5. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro by Bulgarian propolis: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Derejian, Sirigan; Koumanova, Radka; Katsarov, Nikolai; Gergova, Galina; Mitov, Ivan; Nikolov, Rossen; Krastev, Zacharii

    2003-05-01

    Bee glue (propolis) possesses antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anaesthetic and immunostimulating activities. The aim of the study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of Bulgarian propolis on Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro. Activity of 30% ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) against 38 clinical isolates of H. pylori was evaluated by using the agar-well diffusion method. Ethanol was used as a control. In addition, the effect of propolis on the growth of 26 H. pylori and 18 Campylobacter strains was tested by the disc diffusion method. Mean diameters of H. pylori growth inhibition by the agar-well diffusion method, using 30, 60 or 90 microl EEP or 30 microl ethanol per well, were 17.8, 21.2, 28.2 and 8.5 mm, respectively. EEP was significantly more active than ethanol against H. pylori (P < 0.001). The results obtained by the disc diffusion method were similar. The use of moist propolis discs resulted in mean diameters of growth inhibition of 21.4 mm for H. pylori and 13.6 mm for Campylobacter spp. Dried propolis discs exhibited antibacterial effect against 73.1% of H. pylori isolates, with a considerable zone of growth inhibition (> or = 15 mm) in 36.4% of isolates. Using dried propolis discs resulted in mean diameters of growth inhibition of 12.4 mm for H. pylori and 11.6 mm for Campylobacter spp. In conclusion, Bulgarian propolis possesses considerable antibacterial activity against H. pylori, and can also inhibit the growth of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. The potential of propolis in the prevention or treatment of H. pylori infection is worth further extensive evaluation.

  6. Calcium influences sensitivity to growth inhibition induced by a cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While studies concerning mitogenic factors have been an important area of research for many years, much less is understood about the mechanisms of action of cell surface growth inhibitors. We have purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) which can reversibly inhibit the proliferation of diverse cell types. The studies discussed in this article show that three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibit sixty-fold greater sensitivity than other fibroblasts and epithelial-like cells to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. Growth inhibition induced by CeReS-18 treatment is a reversible process, and the three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibited either single or multiple cell cycle arrest points, although a predominantly G0/G1 cell cycle arrest point was exhibited in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The sensitivity of the mouse keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition was not affected by the degree of tumorigenic progression in the cell lines and was not due to differences in CeReS-18 binding affinity or number of cell surface receptors per cell. However, the sensitivity of both murine fibroblasts and keratinocytes could be altered by changing the extracellular calcium concentration, such that increased extracellular calcium concentrations resulted in decreased sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced proliferation inhibition. Thus the increased sensitivity of the murine keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18 could be ascribed to the low calcium concentration used in their propagation. Studies are currently under way investigating the role of calcium in CeReS-18-induced growth arrest. The CeReS-18 may serve as a very useful tool to study negative growth control and the signal transduction events associated with cell cycling.

  7. A functional connection between pRB and transforming growth factor beta in growth inhibition and mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sarah M; Bergsied, Jacqueline; Isaac, Christian E; Coschi, Courtney H; Martens, Alison L; Hojilla, Carlo V; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Dimattia, Gabriel E; Khoka, Rama; Wang, Jean Y J; Dick, Frederick A

    2009-08-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a crucial mediator of breast development, and loss of TGF-beta-induced growth arrest is a hallmark of breast cancer. TGF-beta has been shown to inhibit cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity, which leads to the accumulation of hypophosphorylated pRB. However, unlike other components of TGF-beta cytostatic signaling, pRB is thought to be dispensable for mammary development. Using gene-targeted mice carrying subtle missense changes in pRB (Rb1(DeltaL) and Rb1(NF)), we have discovered that pRB plays a critical role in mammary gland development. In particular, Rb1 mutant female mice have hyperplastic mammary epithelium and defects in nursing due to insensitivity to TGF-beta growth inhibition. In contrast with previous studies that highlighted the inhibition of cyclin/CDK activity by TGF-beta signaling, our experiments revealed that active transcriptional repression of E2F target genes by pRB downstream of CDKs is also a key component of TGF-beta cytostatic signaling. Taken together, our work demonstrates a unique functional connection between pRB and TGF-beta in growth control and mammary gland development.

  8. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  9. Growth inhibition and root ultrastructure of cucumber seedlings exposed to allelochemicals from rye (Secale cereale).

    PubMed

    Burgos, N R; Talbert, R E; Kim, K S; Kuk, Y I

    2004-03-01

    Inhibition of "Calypso" cucumber seedling growth by rye allelochemicals, 2(3H)-benzoxazolinone BOA and 2,4-dihydroxy-1,4(2H)-benzoxazin-3-one DIBOA, was studied by analyzing the growth of seedling tissues and organs. Light and electron microscopy of seedling root cells were also carried out to investigate the mechanism(s) of root growth inhibition and mode of action of these compounds. BOA inhibited root elongation and reduced the number of cucumber lateral roots by 77 and 100% at 0.1 and 0.43 mg BOA/ml deionized (DI) water, respectively. DIBOA also inhibited root growth, but did not affect the number of lateral roots. BOA increased size of cucumber cortical root cells fivefold, but DIBOA had no effect. Both compounds reduced the regeneration of root cap cells and increased the width of cortical cells resulting in increased root diameter. BOA and DIBOA caused increased cytoplasmic vacuolation, reduced ribosome density and dictyosomes, reduced number of mitochondria, and reduced lipid catabolism. Starch granules in amyloplasts of seedling roots treated with BOA and DIBOA were also greatly reduced compared to the control. Changes in cellular ultrastructure indicated that BOA and DIBOA reduced root growth by disrupting lipid metabolism, reducing protein synthesis, and reducing transport or secretory capabilities.

  10. The rhizobacterium Arthrobacter agilis produces dimethylhexadecylamine, a compound that inhibits growth of phytopathogenic fungi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Becerra, Crisanto; Macías-Rodríguez, Lourdes I; López-Bucio, José; Flores-Cortez, Idolina; Santoyo, Gustavo; Hernández-Soberano, Christian; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    Plant diseases caused by fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea and the oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi affect agricultural production worldwide. Control of these pests can be done by the use of fungicides such as captan, which may have deleterious effects on human health. This study demonstrates that the rhizobacterium Arthrobacter agilis UMCV2 produces volatile organic compounds that inhibit the growth of B. cinerea in vitro. A single compound from the volatile blends, namely dimethylhexadecylamine (DMHDA), could inhibit the growth of both B. cinerea and P. cinnamomi when supplied to the growth medium in low concentrations. DMHDA also inhibited the growth of beneficial fungi Trichoderma virens and Trichoderma atroviride but at much higher concentrations. DMHDA-related aminolipids containing 4, 8, 10, 12, and 14 carbons in the alkyl chain were tested for their inhibitory effect on the growth of the pathogens. The results show that the most active compound from those tested was dimethyldodecylamine. This effect correlates with a decrease in the number of membrane lipids present in the mycelium of the pathogen including eicosanoic acid, (Z)-9-hexadecenoic acid, methyl ester, and (Z)-9-octadecenoic acid, methyl ester. Strawberry leaflets treated with DMHDA were not injured by the compound. These data indicate that DMHDA and related compounds, which can be produced by microorganisms may effectively inhibit the proliferation of certain plant pathogens. PMID:23674267

  11. Bee Venom Promotes Hair Growth in Association with Inhibiting 5α-Reductase Expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Seeun; Erdogan, Sedef; Hwang, Dahyun; Hwang, Seonwook; Han, Eun Hye; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Alopecia is an important issue that can occur in people of all ages. Recent studies show that bee venom can be used to treat certain diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, neuralgia, and multiple sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of bee venom on alopecia, which was measured by applying bee venom (0.001, 0.005, 0.01%) or minoxidil (2%) as a positive control to the dorsal skin of female C57BL/6 mice for 19 d. Growth factors responsible for hair growth were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis using mice skins and human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs). Bee venom promoted hair growth and inhibited transition from the anagen to catagen phase. In both anagen phase mice and dexamethasone-induced catagen phase mice, hair growth was increased dose dependently compared with controls. Bee venom inhibited the expression of SRD5A2, which encodes a type II 5α-reductase that plays a major role in the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, bee venom stimulated proliferation of hDPCs and several growth factors (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and 7) in bee venom-treated hDPCs dose dependently compared with the control group. In conclusion, bee venom is a potentially potent 5α-reductase inhibitor and hair growth promoter. PMID:27040904

  12. Wavelength specificity of growth, photosynthesis, and hydrocarbon production in the oil-producing green alga Botryococcus braunii.

    PubMed

    Baba, Masato; Kikuta, Fumie; Suzuki, Iwane; Watanabe, Makoto M; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2012-04-01

    The effect of monochromatic light on growth, photosynthesis, and hydrocarbon production was tested in Botryococcus braunii Bot-144 (race B), which produces triterpenoid hydrocarbons. The growth was higher in order of red, blue, and green light. The color of red light-grown cells became more orange-yellow and their shape dominantly changed to grape-like with long branches. Photosynthetic carbon fixation activity was higher in order of blue, red, and green light-grown cells, but photosystem activities showed no difference. In the pulse-chase experiments with (14)CO(2), no major difference was observed in the production of lipids, hydrocarbons, polysaccharides, or proteins among the three kinds of cells, although hydrocarbon production was slightly lower in green light-grown cells. These results indicate that blue and red light were more effective for growth, photosynthetic CO(2) fixation, and hydrocarbon production than green light, and that red light is the most efficient light source when calculated based on photoenergy supplied.

  13. The Rac1 inhibitor, NSC23766, depolarizes adhesive secretion, endomembrane cycling, and tip growth in the fucoid alga, Silvetia compressa.

    PubMed

    Hable, Whitney E; Reddy, Sriharshan; Julien, Lindsay

    2008-04-01

    Proper cell morphogenesis is dependent on the establishment and expression of cellular polarity. In the fucoid zygote, cell shape is critical for establishing the developmental pattern of the adult, and is achieved by guiding insertion of new membrane and wall to the rhizoid tip. Selection and growth of the appropriate tip site are accompanied by formation of dynamic actin arrays associated with the actin-nucleating Arp2/3 complex. In eukaryotes, a major pathway for activation of the Arp2/3 complex is via the Rho family GTPase, Rac1, which stimulates the Scar/WAVE complex. To determine whether Rac1 controls actin nucleation in Silvetia compressa (J. Agardh) E. Serrao, T. O. Cho, S. M. Boo et Brawley, we tested the effects of the Rac1-specific inhibitory compound, NSC23766, on actin dependent processes and on actin arrays. We found that NSC23766 disrupted polar secretion of adhesive, polarization of endomembranes, and tip-focused growth in the rhizoid. Similarly, NSC23766 altered actin and Arp2 localization in the growing rhizoid. In contrast, NSC23766 had no effect on selection of the growth site or on cytokinesis. These data suggest that Rac1 participates in nucleation of specific actin arrays in the developing zygote.

  14. Differential chlorate inhibition of Chaetomium globosum germination, hyphal growth, and perithecia synthesis.

    PubMed

    Biles, Charles L; Wright, Desiree; Fuego, Marianni; Guinn, Angela; Cluck, Terry; Young, Jennifer; Martin, Markie; Biles, Josiah; Poudyal, Shubhra

    2012-12-01

    Chaetomium globosum Kunze:Fr is a dermatophytic, dematiaceous fungus that is ubiquitous in soils, grows readily on cellulolytic materials, and is commonly found on water-damaged building materials. Chlorate affects nitrogen metabolism in fungi and is used to study compatibility among anamorphic fungi by inducing nit mutants. The effect of chlorate toxicity on C. globosum was investigated by amending a modified malt extract agar (MEA), oat agar, and carboxymethyl cellulose agar (CMC) with various levels of potassium chlorate (KClO(3)). C. globosum perithecia production was almost completely inhibited (90-100 %) at low levels of KClO(3) (0.1 mM) in amended MEA. Inhibition of perithecia production was also observed on oat agar and CMC at 1 and 10 mM, respectively. However, hyphal growth in MEA was only inhibited 20 % by 0.1-100 mM KClO(3) concentrations. Hyphal growth was never completely inhibited at the highest levels tested (200 mM). Higher levels of KClO(3) were needed on gypsum board to inhibit perithecia synthesis. In additional experiments, KClO(3) did not inhibit C. globosum, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger, Penicillum expansum, and airborne fungal spore germination. The various fungal spores were not inhibited by KClO(3) at 1-100 mM levels. These results suggest that C. globosum perithecia synthesis is more sensitive to chlorate toxicity than are hyphal growth and spore germination. This research provides basic information that furthers our understanding about perithecia formation and may help in developing control methods for fungal growth on building materials.

  15. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Venteris, Erik R; McBride, Robert C; Coleman, Andre M; Skaggs, Richard L; Wigmosta, Mark S

    2014-03-18

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources, as well as transportation and utility infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and strains of the order Sphaeropleales. A total of 64,000 sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively applied screening criteria and tracked their impact on the number of potential sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrated maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Sphaeropleales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Results were driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low-salinity freshwater (<400 mg L(-1)) constrained Sphaeropleales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species like Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  16. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Venteris, Erik R; McBride, Robert C; Coleman, Andre M; Skaggs, Richard L; Wigmosta, Mark S

    2014-03-18

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources, as well as transportation and utility infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and strains of the order Sphaeropleales. A total of 64,000 sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively applied screening criteria and tracked their impact on the number of potential sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrated maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Sphaeropleales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Results were driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low-salinity freshwater (<400 mg L(-1)) constrained Sphaeropleales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species like Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements. PMID:24559117

  17. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-02-21

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  18. Inhibition of human fibroblast growth in vitro by a snake oil.

    PubMed

    Datubo-Brown, D D; Blight, A

    1990-03-01

    The inhibitory effects of boa constrictor fat (BCF) oil on the growth kinetics of keloid and normal dermal fibroblasts were tested in fibroblasts cultures. BCF significantly (p less than 0.0001) inhibited the in vitro growth of both keloid and normal dermal fibroblasts. Although the active ingredient(s) in this snake oil is not yet determined, it is postulated that fatty acids which are the main constituents of the oil may in part account for this observed in vitro effect.

  19. Extracellular calcium increases bisphosphonate-induced growth inhibition of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Journé, Fabrice; Kheddoumi, Naïma; Chaboteaux, Carole; Duvillier, Hugues; Laurent, Guy; Body, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Bisphosphonates have become standard therapy for the treatment of skeletal complications related to breast cancer. Although their therapeutic effects mainly result from an inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption, in vitro data indicate that they also act directly on breast cancer cells, inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Methods The present study examined the effects of calcium (from 0.6 to 2.0 mmol/l) on the antitumour activity of the bisphosphonate ibandronate (1 to 1,000 nmol/l) on MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Cell culture densities were determined using crystal violet staining assay. Apoptotic cell death was assessed by annexin V-phycoerythrin and 7-amino-actinomycin double staining. Results At low calcium concentration, 30 μmol/l ibandronate had no effect on MDA-MB-231 cells growth and only slightly inhibited MCF-7 cells growth. Higher calcium levels significantly increased growth inhibition as well as cell apoptosis induced by ibandronate. We observed similar effects with zoledronic acid. Of note, enhancement of ibandronate-induced growth inhibition was also observed in other breast cancer cell lines (T-47D, ZR-75, Hs-578T and BT-549 cells). The growth inhibitory effect of ibandronate in the presence of high concentrations of calcium was partly suppressed by the calcium chelator EGTA (ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid). In addition, in the presence of calcium at high concentrations, cells accumulated more [14C]ibandronate than at low calcium concentrations. We obtained further evidence of enhancement of cellular ibandronate accumulation by calcium by demonstrating that high calcium levels increased the inhibition of protein prenylation induced by the bisphosphonate. Conclusion Altogether, our data suggest that extracellular calcium, probably through its binding to ibandronate, markedly increased its cellular accumulation and its inhibitory activity on breast tumour cells. Thus, calcium released during the process of

  20. Modelling the effects of pulse exposure of several PSII inhibitors on two algae.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    Subsequent to crop application and during precipitation events, herbicides can reach surface waters in pulses of high concentrations. These pulses can exceed the Annual Average Environmental Quality Standards (AA-EQS), defined in the EU Water Framework Directive, which aims to protect the aquatic environment. A model was developed in a previous study to evaluate the effects of pulse exposure for the herbicide isoproturon on the alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus. In this study, the model was extended to other substances acting as photosystem II inhibitors and to other algae. The measured and predicted effects were equivalent when pulse exposure of atrazine and diuron were tested on S. vacuolatus. The results were consistent for isoproturon on the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The model is thus suitable for the effect prediction of phenylureas and triazines and for the algae used: S. vacuolatus and P. subcapitata. The toxicity classification obtained from the dose-response curves (diuron>atrazine>isoproturon) was conserved for the pulse exposure scenarios modelled for S. vacuolatus. Toxicity was identical for isoproturon on the two algae when the dose-response curves were compared and also for the pulse exposure scenarios. Modelling the effects of any pulse scenario of photosystem II inhibitors on algae is therefore feasible and only requires the determination of the dose-response curves of the substance and growth rate of unexposed algae. It is crucial to detect the longest pulses when measurements of herbicide concentrations are performed in streams because the model showed that they principally affect the cell density inhibition of algae. PMID:26011414

  1. Modelling the effects of pulse exposure of several PSII inhibitors on two algae.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    Subsequent to crop application and during precipitation events, herbicides can reach surface waters in pulses of high concentrations. These pulses can exceed the Annual Average Environmental Quality Standards (AA-EQS), defined in the EU Water Framework Directive, which aims to protect the aquatic environment. A model was developed in a previous study to evaluate the effects of pulse exposure for the herbicide isoproturon on the alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus. In this study, the model was extended to other substances acting as photosystem II inhibitors and to other algae. The measured and predicted effects were equivalent when pulse exposure of atrazine and diuron were tested on S. vacuolatus. The results were consistent for isoproturon on the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The model is thus suitable for the effect prediction of phenylureas and triazines and for the algae used: S. vacuolatus and P. subcapitata. The toxicity classification obtained from the dose-response curves (diuron>atrazine>isoproturon) was conserved for the pulse exposure scenarios modelled for S. vacuolatus. Toxicity was identical for isoproturon on the two algae when the dose-response curves were compared and also for the pulse exposure scenarios. Modelling the effects of any pulse scenario of photosystem II inhibitors on algae is therefore feasible and only requires the determination of the dose-response curves of the substance and growth rate of unexposed algae. It is crucial to detect the longest pulses when measurements of herbicide concentrations are performed in streams because the model showed that they principally affect the cell density inhibition of algae.

  2. Pharmacological Inhibition of Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 Suppresses Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mediated Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Elena; Coletta, Isabella; Polenzani, Lorenzo; Mangano, Giorgina; Alisi, Maria Alessandra; Cazzolla, Nicola; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background Blockade of Prostaglandin (PG) E2 production via deletion of microsomal Prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) gene reduces tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo on xenograft tumors. So far the therapeutic potential of the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 has not been elucidated. PGE2 promotes epithelial tumor progression via multiple signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we evaluated the antitumor activity of AF3485, a compound of a novel family of human mPGES-1 inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo, in mice bearing human A431 xenografts overexpressing EGFR. Treatment of the human cell line A431 with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) increased mPGES-1 expression, PGE2 production and induced EGFR phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) expression. AF3485 reduced PGE2 production, both in quiescent and in cells stimulated by IL-1β. AF3485 abolished IL-1β-induced activation of the EGFR, decreasing VEGF and FGF-2 expression, and tumor-mediated endothelial tube formation. In vivo, in A431 xenograft, AF3485, administered sub-chronically, decreased tumor growth, an effect related to inhibition of EGFR signalling, and to tumor microvessel rarefaction. In fact, we observed a decrease of EGFR phosphorylation, and VEGF and FGF-2 expression in tumours explanted from treated mice. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 reduces squamous carcinoma growth by suppressing PGE2 mediated-EGFR signalling and by impairing tumor associated angiogenesis. These results underscore the potential of mPGES-1 inhibitors as agents capable of controlling tumor growth. PMID:22815767

  3. Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits growth of mouse ovarian antral follicles through an oxidative stress pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei Craig, Zelieann R. Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S. Gupta, Rupesh K. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-15

    Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer that has been shown to inhibit growth of mouse antral follicles, however, little is known about the mechanisms by which DEHP does so. Oxidative stress has been linked to follicle growth inhibition as well as phthalate-induced toxicity in non-ovarian tissues. Thus, we hypothesized that DEHP causes oxidative stress and that this leads to inhibition of the growth of antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice (age 31–35 days) were cultured with vehicle control (dimethylsulfoxide [DMSO]) or DEHP (1–100 μg/ml) ± N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant at 0.25–1 mM). During culture, follicles were measured daily. At the end of culture, follicles were collected and processed for in vitro reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays to measure the presence of free radicals or for measurement of the expression and activity of various key antioxidant enzymes: Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT). The results indicate that DEHP inhibits the growth of follicles compared to DMSO control and that NAC (0.25–1 mM) blocks the ability of DEHP to inhibit follicle growth. Furthermore, DEHP (10 μg/ml) significantly increases ROS levels and reduces the expression and activity of SOD1 compared to DMSO controls, whereas NAC (0.5 mM) rescues the effects of DEHP on ROS levels and SOD1. However, the expression and activity of GPX and CAT were not affected by DEHP treatment. Collectively, these data suggest that DEHP inhibits follicle growth by inducing production of ROS and by decreasing the expression and activity of SOD1. -- Highlights: ► DEHP inhibits growth and increases reactive oxygen species in ovarian antral follicles in vitro. ► NAC rescues the effects of DEHP on the growth and reactive oxygen species levels in follicles. ► DEHP decreases the expression and activity of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, which can be rescued by NAC, in antral

  4. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Volatiles of bacterial antagonists inhibit mycelial growth of the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kai, Marco; Effmert, Uta; Berg, Gabriele; Piechulla, Birgit

    2007-05-01

    Bacterial antagonists are bacteria that negatively affect the growth of other organisms. Many antagonists inhibit the growth of fungi by various mechanisms, e.g., secretion of lytic enzymes, siderophores and antibiotics. Such inhibition of fungal growth may indirectly support plant growth. Here, we demonstrate that small organic volatile compounds (VOCs) emitted from bacterial antagonists negatively influence the mycelial growth of the soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. Strong inhibitions (99-80%) under the test conditions were observed with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia R3089, Serratia plymuthica HRO-C48, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila P69, Serratia odorifera 4Rx13, Pseudomonas trivialis 3Re2-7, S. plymuthica 3Re4-18 and Bacillus subtilis B2g. Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12 and Burkholderia cepacia 1S18 achieved 30% growth reduction. The VOC profiles of these antagonists, obtained through headspace collection and analysis on GC-MS, show different compositions and complexities ranging from 1 to almost 30 compounds. Most volatiles are species-specific, but overlapping volatile patterns were found for Serratia spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Many of the bacterial VOCs could not be identified for lack of match with mass-spectra of volatiles in the databases. PMID:17180381

  6. Growth cone collapse and inhibition of neurite growth by Botulinum neurotoxin C1: a t-SNARE is involved in axonal growth

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The growth cone is responsible for axonal growth, where membrane expansion is most likely to occur. Several recent reports have suggested that presynaptic proteins are involved in this process; however, the molecular mechanism details are unclear. We suggest that by cleaving a presynaptic protein syntaxin, which is essential in targeting synaptic vesicles as a target SNAP receptor (t-SNARE), neurotoxin C1 of Clostridium botulinum causes growth cone collapse and inhibits axonal growth. Video-enhanced microscopic studies showed (a) that neurotoxin C1 selectively blocked the activity of the central domain (the vesicle-rich region) at the initial stage, but not the lamellipodia in the growth cone; and (b) that large vacuole formation occurred probably through the fusion of smaller vesicles from the central domain to the most distal segments of the neurite. The total surface area of the accumulated vacuoles could explain the membrane expansion of normal neurite growth. The gradual disappearance of the surface labeling by FITC-WGA on the normal growth cone, suggesting membrane addition, was inhibited by neurotoxin C1. The experiments using the peptides derived from syntaxin, essential for interaction with VAMP or alpha-SNAP, supported the results using neurotoxin C1. Our results demonstrate that syntaxin is involved in axonal growth and indicate that syntaxin may participate directly in the membrane expansion that occurs in the central domain of the growth cone, probably through association with VAMP and SNAPs, in a SNARE-like way. PMID:8698815

  7. In vivo inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and growth in tobacco ovary tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Galston, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Post fertilization growth of tobacco ovary tissues treated with inhibitors of polyamine (PA) biosynthesis was examined in relation to endogenous PA titers and the activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.19) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, EC 4.1.1.17). DL-alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), specific, irreversible ("suicide") inhibitors of ODC and ADC in vitro, were used to modulate PA biosynthesis in excised flowers. ODC represented >99% of the total decarboxylase activity in tobacco ovaries. In vivo inhibition of ODC with DFMO resulted in a significant decrease in PA titers, ovary fresh weight and protein content. Simultaneous inhibition of both decarboxylases by DFMO and DFMA produced only a marginally greater depression in growth and PA titers, indicating that ODC activity is rate-limiting for PA biosynthesis in these tissues. Paradoxically, DFMA alone inhibited PA biosynthesis, not as a result of a specific inhibition of ADC, but primarily through the inactivation of ODC. In vivo inhibition of ODC by DFMA appears to result from arginase-mediated hydrolysis of this inhibitor to urea and DFMO, the suicide substrate for ODC. Putrescine conjugates in tobacco appear to function as a storage form of this amine which, upon hydrolysis, may contribute to Put homeostasis during growth.

  8. Capsaicin Inhibits Preferentially the NADH Oxidase and Growth of Transformed Cells in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Morre, Dorothy M.

    1995-03-01

    A hormone- and growth factor-stimulated NADH oxidase of the mammalian plasma membrane, constitutively activated in transformed cells, was inhibited preferentially in HeLa, ovarian carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, and HL-60 cells, all of human origin, by the naturally occurring quinone analog capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-noneamide), compared with plasma membranes from human mammary epithelial, rat liver, normal rat kidney cells, or HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide. With cells in culture, capsaicin preferentially inhibited growth of HeLa, ovarian carcinoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, and HL-60 cells but was largely without effect on the mammary epithelial cells, rat kidney cells, or HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with dimethyl sulfoxide. Inhibited cells became smaller and cell death was accompanied by a condensed and fragmented appearance of the nuclear DNA, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, suggestive of apoptosis. The findings correlate capsaicin inhibition of cell surface NADH oxidase activity and inhibition of growth that correlate with capsaicin-induced apoptosis.

  9. In vivo inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and growth in tobacco ovary tissues.

    PubMed

    Slocum, R D; Galston, A W

    1985-01-01

    Post fertilization growth of tobacco ovary tissues treated with inhibitors of polyamine (PA) biosynthesis was examined in relation to endogenous PA titers and the activities of arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.19) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, EC 4.1.1.17). DL-alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), specific, irreversible ("suicide") inhibitors of ODC and ADC in vitro, were used to modulate PA biosynthesis in excised flowers. ODC represented >99% of the total decarboxylase activity in tobacco ovaries. In vivo inhibition of ODC with DFMO resulted in a significant decrease in PA titers, ovary fresh weight and protein content. Simultaneous inhibition of both decarboxylases by DFMO and DFMA produced only a marginally greater depression in growth and PA titers, indicating that ODC activity is rate-limiting for PA biosynthesis in these tissues. Paradoxically, DFMA alone inhibited PA biosynthesis, not as a result of a specific inhibition of ADC, but primarily through the inactivation of ODC. In vivo inhibition of ODC by DFMA appears to result from arginase-mediated hydrolysis of this inhibitor to urea and DFMO, the suicide substrate for ODC. Putrescine conjugates in tobacco appear to function as a storage form of this amine which, upon hydrolysis, may contribute to Put homeostasis during growth.

  10. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (re)growth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater) nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i) the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance) of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii) the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  11. Honokiol inhibits the growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tripti; Gupta, Nirzari A; Xu, Su; Prasad, Ram; Velu, Sadanandan E; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2015-08-28

    Here, we report the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia plant, on human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Treatment of HNSCC cell lines from different sub-sites, SCC-1 (oral cavity), SCC-5 (larynx), OSC-19 (tongue) and FaDu (pharynx) with honokiol inhibited their cell viability, which was associated with the: (i) induction of apoptosis, (ii) correction of dysregulatory cell cycle proteins of G0/G1 phase. Honokiol decreased the expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mTOR and their downstream signaling molecules. Treatment of FaDu and SCC-1 cell lines with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR pathway, also reduced cell viability of HNSCC cells. Administration of honokiol by oral gavage (100 mg/kg body weight) significantly (P < 0.01-0.001) inhibited the growth of SCC-1 and FaDu xenografts in athymic nude mice, which was associated with: (i) inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, (ii) induction of apoptosis, (iii) reduced expressions of cyclins and Cdks, and (iv) inhibition of EGFR signaling pathway. Molecular docking analysis of honokiol in EGFR binding site indicated that the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol against HNSCC is mediated through its firm binding with EGFR, which is better than that of gefitinib, a commonly used drug for HNSCC treatment.

  12. Deferred Growth Inhibition Assay to Quantify the Effect of Bacteria-derived Antimicrobials on Competition.

    PubMed

    Moran, Josephine C; Crank, Emma L; Ghabban, Hanaa A; Horsburgh, Malcolm J

    2016-01-01

    Competitive exclusion can occur in microbial communities when, for example, an inhibitor-producing strain outcompetes its competitor for an essential nutrient or produces antimicrobial compounds that its competitor is not resistant to. Here we describe a deferred growth inhibition assay, a method for assessing the ability of one bacterium to inhibit the growth of another through the production of antimicrobial compounds or through competition for nutrients. This technique has been used to investigate the correlation of nasal isolates with the exclusion of particular species from a community. This technique can also be used to screen for lantibiotic producers or potentially novel antimicrobials. The assay is performed by first culturing the test inhibitor-producing strain overnight on an agar plate, then spraying over the test competitor strain and incubating again. After incubation, the extent of inhibition can be measured quantitatively, through the size of the zone of clearing around the inhibitor-producing strain, and qualitatively, by assessing the clarity of the inhibition zone. Here we present the protocol for the deferred inhibition assay, describe ways to minimize variation between experiments, and define a clarity scale that can be used to qualitatively assess the degree of inhibition. PMID:27684443

  13. Deferred Growth Inhibition Assay to Quantify the Effect of Bacteria-derived Antimicrobials on Competition.

    PubMed

    Moran, Josephine C; Crank, Emma L; Ghabban, Hanaa A; Horsburgh, Malcolm J

    2016-09-03

    Competitive exclusion can occur in microbial communities when, for example, an inhibitor-producing strain outcompetes its competitor for an essential nutrient or produces antimicrobial compounds that its competitor is not resistant to. Here we describe a deferred growth inhibition assay, a method for assessing the ability of one bacterium to inhibit the growth of another through the production of antimicrobial compounds or through competition for nutrients. This technique has been used to investigate the correlation of nasal isolates with the exclusion of particular species from a community. This technique can also be used to screen for lantibiotic producers or potentially novel antimicrobials. The assay is performed by first culturing the test inhibitor-producing strain overnight on an agar plate, then spraying over the test competitor strain and incubating again. After incubation, the extent of inhibition can be measured quantitatively, through the size of the zone of clearing around the inhibitor-producing strain, and qualitatively, by assessing the clarity of the inhibition zone. Here we present the protocol for the deferred inhibition assay, describe ways to minimize variation between experiments, and define a clarity scale that can be used to qualitatively assess the degree of inhibition.

  14. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. Submicromolar methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase, and an induction of apoptosis in cancerous colon HCT11...

  15. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity.

  16. Inhibition of growth of the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by ajoene.

    PubMed

    San-Blas, G; San-Blas, F; Gil, F; Mariño, L; Apitz-Castro, R

    1989-09-01

    Ajoene, a garlic-derived compound that prevents platelet activation, inhibited the growth of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a fungal pathogen for humans, by affecting the integrity of the fungal cytoplasmic membrane. This action may be the basis for the study of ajoene as a possible specific antifungal drug.

  17. Inhibition of histone deacetylase 6 activity reduces cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cebotaru, Liudmila; Liu, Qiangni; Yanda, Murali K; Boinot, Clement; Outeda, Patricia; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Valeriu

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelium and increased intracystic fluid secretion via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are thought to contribute to cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) expression and activity are increased in certain cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and in Pkd1-mutant renal epithelial cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity with specific inhibitors slows cancer growth. Here we studied the effect of tubacin, a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, on cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Treatment with tubacin prevented cyst formation in MDCK cells, an in vitro model of cystogenesis. Cyclic AMP stimulates cell proliferation and activates intracystic CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in ADPKD. Treatment with tubacin downregulated cyclic AMP levels, inhibited cell proliferation, and inhibited cyclic AMP-activated CFTR chloride currents in MDCK cells. We also found that tubacin reduced cyst growth by inhibiting proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells, downregulated cyclic AMP levels, and improved renal function in a Pkd1-conditional mouse model of ADPKD. Thus, HDAC6 could play a role in cyst formation and could serve as a potential therapeutic target in ADPKD. PMID:27165822

  18. A molecular framework for the inhibition of Arabidopsis root growth in response to boron toxicity.

    PubMed

    Aquea, Felipe; Federici, Fernan; Moscoso, Cristian; Vega, Andrea; Jullian, Pastor; Haseloff, Jim; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2012-04-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants and is taken up in the form of boric acid (BA). Despite this, a high BA concentration is toxic for the plants, inhibiting root growth and is thus a significant problem in semi-arid areas in the world. In this work, we report the molecular basis for the inhibition of root growth caused by boron. We show that application of BA reduces the size of root meristems, correlating with the inhibition of root growth. The decrease in meristem size is caused by a reduction of cell division. Mitotic cell number significantly decreases and the expression level of key core cell cycle regulators is modulated. The modulation of the cell cycle does not appear to act through cytokinin and auxin signalling. A global expression analysis reveals that boron toxicity induces the expression of genes related with abscisic acid (ABA) signalling, ABA response and cell wall modifications, and represses genes that code for water transporters. These results suggest that boron toxicity produces a reduction of water and BA uptake, triggering a hydric stress response that produces root growth inhibition.

  19. Ionene polymers for selectively inhibiting the vitro growth of malignant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Ionene polymers of the structure ##STR1## WHERE X AND Y ARE INTEGERS FROM 3 TO 16, Z.sup.- is an anion such as a halogen and n is an integer from 50 to 150 are found to bind negatively charged mammalian cells such as malignant cells and can be utilized to selectively inhibit the growth of malignant cells in vitro.

  20. Blue Laser Inhibits Bacterial Growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Natanael Teixeira Alves; Santos, Marcos Ferracioli; Gomes, Rosana Caetano; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; Martinez, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of blue laser on bacterial growth of the main species that usually colonize cutaneous ulcers, as well as its effect over time following irradiation. Background data: The use of blue laser has been described as an adjuvant therapeutic method to inhibit bacterial growth, but there is no consensus about the best parameters to be used. Methods: Strains of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 were suspended in saline solution at a concentration of 1.5×103 colony forming units (CFU)/mL. Next, 300 μL of this suspension was transferred to a microtitulation plate and exposed to a single blue laser irradiation (450 nm) at fluences of 0 (control), 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 J/cm2. Each suspension was spread over the surface of a Petri plate before being incubated at 37°C, and counts of CFU were determined after 24 and 48 h. Results: Blue laser inhibited the growth of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa at fluences >6 J/cm2. On the other hand, E. coli was inhibited at all fluences tested, except at 24 J/cm2. Conclusions: Blue laser light was capable of inhibiting bacterial growth at low fluences over time, thus presenting no time-dependent effect. PMID:25954830

  1. Calcitonin inhibits the growth of human gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Yamatani, T; Arima, N; Yamashita, Y; Fujita, T; Chiba, T

    1992-02-18

    Calcitonin has a wide variety of actions on gastrointestinal function. In this study, we investigated the effects of calcitonin on the growth of human gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III in comparison with those of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Calcitonin, but not CGRP, significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the growth of KATO III cells. This inhibition of cell growth was accompanied by an increase in cyclic AMP production. The proliferation of KATO III cells was also inhibited by forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, although agents which do not stimulate cyclic AMP production had no effect. Furthermore, in the presence of GTP, calcitonin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in KATO III cell membranes, and this increase was reduced in the absence of GTP. On the other had, neither calcitonin nor CGRP enhanced the turnover of inositolphospholipid or the intracellular Ca2+ level. In addition, 125I-labeled human calcitonin was specifically bound to KATO III cell membranes, and this binding was dose-dependently displaced by unlabeled calcitonin but not CGRP. Furthermore, the specific binding of 125I-labeled human calcitonin to KATO III cell membranes was significantly reduced by addition of GTP but not ATP. These results suggest that calcitonin inhibits the growth of human gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III by stimulating cyclic AMP production via a GTP-dependent process coupled to specific calcitonin receptors. PMID:1313594

  2. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity. PMID:27430914

  3. Hypergravity inhibits elongation growth of azuki bean epicotyls independently of the direction of stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Kamisaka, S.; Hoson, T.

    Basipetal-hypergravity stimuli inhibit elongation growth of azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) epicotyls by decreasing the cell wall extensibility via an increase in the molecular mass of xyloglucans. An increase in the pH in the apoplastic fluid is hypothesized to be involved in the processes of the increase in the molecular mass of xyloglucans due to basipetal-hypergravity. Also, it has been shown that mechanoreceptors are responsible for the perception of gravity stimuli in growth inhibition by basipetal-hypergravity. However, whether or not these hypergravity effects are dependent on the direction of hypergravity stimuli has not been elucidated. It is important to study the effects of hypergravity in other directions for clarifying the nature of graviperception mechanism. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effects of basipetal-, horizontal- and acropetal-hypergravity stimuli on growth and the cell wall properties of azuki bean seedlings. Horizontal- and acropetal-hypergravity inhibited elongation growth of epicotyls by decreasing the cell wall extensibility, as did basipetal-hypergravity. Hypergravity stimuli in all directions increased the weight-average molecular mass of xyloglucans by decreasing the activity of the xyloglucan-degrading enzymes. Moreover, horizontal- and acropetal-hypergravity increased the pH in the apoplastic fluid, as did basipetal-hypergravity. On the other hand, hypergravity in any direction had no effects on growth of azuki bean epicotyls in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium, which are blockers of mechanoreceptors. These results revealed that growth inhibition by hypergravity is not dependent on the direction of hypergravity stimuli in azuki bean epicotyls. The data also suggest that epicotyls perceive the magnitude of gravity signal by mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane independently of the direction of stimuli, and utilize it to regulate their growth.

  4. miR-382 inhibits tumor growth and enhance chemosensitivity in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Jin, Hua; Xu, Cheng-Xiong; Sun, Bo; Mao, Zhi; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of miRNAs is involved in osteosarcoma (OS). Here, we demonstrate that miR-382 is decreased in specimens of OS patients with a poor chemoresponse compared to those with a good chemoresponse. In addition, our clinical data show that decreased miR-382 was associated with poor survival in OS patients. Overexpression of miR-382 inhibited cell growth and chemoresistance by targeting KLF12 and HIPK3, respectively. In contrast, inhibition of miR-382 or overexpression of target genes stimulated OS cell growth and chemoresistance both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-382 is a tumor suppressor miRNA and induction of miR-382 is a potential strategy to inhibit OS progression. PMID:25344865

  5. Time-Dependent Effects in Algae for Chemicals with Different Adverse Outcome Pathways: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Vogs, Carolina; Altenburger, Rolf

    2016-07-19

    Chemicals affect unicellular algae as a result of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic processes. The internal concentration of chemicals in algae cells typically reaches equilibrium within minutes, while damage cumulatively increases over hours. The time gap between the steady state of internal exposure and damage development is thus suspected to span up to hours, mainly due to toxicodynamic processes. The quantification of rate-limited toxicodynamic processes, aggregated as a progressive effect from an initiating molecular event through biological key events toward the adverse outcome on algae growth inhibition, might discriminate between different adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). To support our hypothesis, we selected six chemicals according to different physicochemical properties and three distinctly dissimilar AOPs. The time courses of internal concentrations were linked to the observed affected Scenedesmus vacuolatus growth using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling. Effects on cell growth were explained by effect progression and not by the time to reach internal equilibrium concentration. Effect progression rates ranged over 6 orders of magnitude for all chemicals but varied by less than 1 order of magnitude within similar AOP (photosystem II inhibitors > reactive chemicals > lipid biosynthesis inhibitors), meaning that inhibitors of photosystem II advance an effect toward algae growth fastest compared to reactive chemicals and inhibitors of lipid biosynthesis. PMID:27149222

  6. Time-Dependent Effects in Algae for Chemicals with Different Adverse Outcome Pathways: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Vogs, Carolina; Altenburger, Rolf

    2016-07-19

    Chemicals affect unicellular algae as a result of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic processes. The internal concentration of chemicals in algae cells typically reaches equilibrium within minutes, while damage cumulatively increases over hours. The time gap between the steady state of internal exposure and damage development is thus suspected to span up to hours, mainly due to toxicodynamic processes. The quantification of rate-limited toxicodynamic processes, aggregated as a progressive effect from an initiating molecular event through biological key events toward the adverse outcome on algae growth inhibition, might discriminate between different adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). To support our hypothesis, we selected six chemicals according to different physicochemical properties and three distinctly dissimilar AOPs. The time courses of internal concentrations were linked to the observed affected Scenedesmus vacuolatus growth using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic modeling. Effects on cell growth were explained by effect progression and not by the time to reach internal equilibrium concentration. Effect progression rates ranged over 6 orders of magnitude for all chemicals but varied by less than 1 order of magnitude within similar AOP (photosystem II inhibitors > reactive chemicals > lipid biosynthesis inhibitors), meaning that inhibitors of photosystem II advance an effect toward algae growth fastest compared to reactive chemicals and inhibitors of lipid biosynthesis.

  7. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J.; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O.M. Zack

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and antiinflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  8. Peptide nucleic acids inhibit growth of Brucella suis in pure culture and in infected murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Parthiban; Alexander, Jeffry C.; Seleem, Mohamed N.; Jain, Neeta; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Wattam, Alice R.; Setubal, João C.; Boyle, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are single-stranded, synthetic nucleic acid analogues containing a pseudopeptide backbone in place of the phosphodiester sugar–phosphate. When PNAs are covalently linked to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) they readily penetrate the bacterial cell envelope, inhibit expression of targeted genes and cause growth inhibition both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. However, the effectiveness of PNAs against Brucella, a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, was unknown. The susceptibility of a virulent Brucella suis strain to a variety of PNAs was assessed in pure culture as well as in murine macrophages. The studies showed that some of the PNAs targeted to Brucella genes involved in DNA (polA, dnaG, gyrA), RNA (rpoB), cell envelope (asd), fatty acid (kdtA, acpP) and protein (tsf) synthesis inhibit the growth of B. suis in culture and in macrophages after 24 h of treatment. PNA treatment inhibited Brucella growth by interfering with gene expression in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner at micromolar concentrations. The most effective PNA in broth culture was that targeting polA at ca. 12 μM. In contrast, in B. suis-infected macrophages, the most effective PNAs were those targeting asd and dnaG at 30 μM; both of these PNAs had little inhibitory effect on Brucella in broth culture. The polA PNA that inhibits wild-type B. suis also inhibits the growth of wild-type Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308 in culture. This study reveals the potential usefulness of antisense PNA constructs as novel therapeutic agents against intracellular Brucella. PMID:23305655

  9. Inhibition of transforming growth factor β signaling promotes epiblast formation in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom; De Sutter, Petra

    2015-02-15

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways--TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)--significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only.

  10. Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling Promotes Epiblast Formation in Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Sabitri; Heindryckx, Björn; Van der Jeught, Margot; Neupane, Jitesh; O'Leary, Thomas; Lierman, Sylvie; De Vos, Winnok H.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana; Deroo, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Early lineage segregation in preimplantation embryos and maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are both regulated by specific signaling pathways. Small molecules have been shown to modulate these signaling pathways. We examined the influence of several small molecules and growth factors on second-lineage segregation of the inner cell mass toward hypoblast and epiblast lineage during mouse embryonic preimplantation development. We found that the second-lineage segregation is influenced by activation or inhibition of the transforming growth factor (TGF)β pathway. Inhibition of the TGFβ pathway from the two-cell, four-cell, and morula stages onward up to the blastocyst stage significantly increased the epiblast cell proliferation. The epiblast formed in the embryos in which TGFβ signaling was inhibited was fully functional as demonstrated by the potential of these epiblast cells to give rise to pluripotent ESCs. Conversely, activating the TGFβ pathway reduced epiblast formation. Inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 pathway and activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 signaling reduced the formation of both epiblast and hypoblast cells. Activation of the protein kinase A pathway and of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway did not influence the second-lineage segregation in mouse embryos. The simultaneous inhibition of three pathways—TGFβ, GSK3β, and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)—significantly enhanced the proliferation of epiblast cells than that caused by inhibition of either TGFβ pathway alone or by combined inhibition of the GSK3β and FGF/Erk pathways only. PMID:25245024

  11. Platelet-derived growth factor-receptor alpha strongly inhibits melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Faraone, Debora; Aguzzi, Maria Simona; Toietta, Gabriele; Facchiano, Angelo M; Facchiano, Francesco; Magenta, Alessandra; Martelli, Fabio; Truffa, Silvia; Cesareo, Eleonora; Ribatti, Domenico; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; it is highly metastatic and responds poorly to current therapies. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-Rs) is reported to be reduced in metastatic melanoma compared with benign nevi or normal skin; we then hypothesized that PDGF-Ralpha may control growth of melanoma cells. We show here that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Ralpha respond to serum with a significantly lower proliferation compared with that of controls. Apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, pRb dephosphorylation, and DNA synthesis inhibition were also observed in cells overexpressing PDGF-Ralpha. Proliferation was rescued by PDGF-Ralpha inhibitors, allowing to exclude nonspecific toxic effects and indicating that PDGF-Ralpha mediates autocrine antiproliferation signals in melanoma cells. Accordingly, PDGF-Ralpha was found to mediate staurosporine cytotoxicity. A protein array-based analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway revealed that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Ralpha show a strong reduction of c-Jun phosphorylated in serine 63 and of protein phosphatase 2A/Balpha and a marked increase of p38gamma, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3, and signal regulatory protein alpha1 protein expression. In a mouse model of primary melanoma growth, infection with the Ad-vector overexpressing PDGF-Ralpha reached a significant 70% inhibition of primary melanoma growth (P < .001) and a similar inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. All together, these data demonstrate that PDGF-Ralpha strongly impairs melanoma growth likely through autocrine mechanisms and indicate a novel endogenous mechanism involved in melanoma control. PMID:19649203

  12. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Receptor α Strongly Inhibits Melanoma Growth In Vitro and In Vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Faraone, Debora; Aguzzi, Maria Simona; Toietta, Gabriele; Facchiano, Angelo M; Facchiano, Francesco; Magenta, Alessandra; Martelli, Fabio; Truffa, Silvia; Cesareo, Eleonora; Ribatti, Domenico; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Facchiano, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer; it is highly metastatic and responds poorly to current therapies. The expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-Rs) is reported to be reduced in metastatic melanoma compared with benign nevi or normal skin; we then hypothesized that PDGF-Rα may control growth of melanoma cells. We show here that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα respond to serum with a significantly lower proliferation compared with that of controls. Apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, pRb dephosphorylation, and DNA synthesis inhibition were also observed in cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα. Proliferation was rescued by PDGF-Rα inhibitors, allowing to exclude nonspecific toxic effects and indicating that PDGF-Rα mediates autocrine antiproliferation signals in melanoma cells. Accordingly, PDGF-Rα was found to mediate staurosporine cytotoxicity. A protein array-based analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway revealed that melanoma cells overexpressing PDGF-Rα show a strong reduction of c-Jun phosphorylated in serine 63 and of protein phosphatase 2A/Bα and a marked increase of p38γ, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3, and signal regulatory protein α1 protein expression. In a mouse model of primary melanoma growth, infection with the Ad-vector overexpressing PDGF-Rα reached a significant 70% inhibition of primary melanoma growth (P < .001) and a similar inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. All together, these data demonstrate that PDGF-Rα strongly impairs melanoma growth likely through autocrine mechanisms and indicate a novel endogenous mechanism involved in melanoma control. PMID:19649203

  13. Effect of Alexandrium tamarense on three bloom-forming algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Juan; Xie, Jin; Yang, Weidong; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the allelopathic properties of Alexandrium tamarense (Laboar) Balech on the growth of Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu, Chattonella marina (Subrahmanyan) Hara et Chihara and Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada) Hada in a laboratory experiment. We examined the growth of A. tamarense, C. marina, P. donghaiense and H. Akashiwo in co-cultures and the effect of filtrates from A. tamarense cultures in various growth phases, on the three harmful algal bloom (HAB)-forming algae. In co-cultures with A. tamarense, both C. marina and H. akashiwo were dramatically suppressed at high cell densities; in contrast, the growth of P. donghaiense varied in different inoculative ratios of A. tamarense and P. donghaiense. When the ratio was 1:1 ( P. donghaiense: A. tamarense), growth of P. donghaiense was inhibited considerably, while the growth of P. donghaiense was almost the same as that of the control when the ratio was 9:1. The growth difference of P. donghaiense, C. marina and H. akashiwo when co-cultured with A. tamarense indicated that the allelopathic effect may be one of the important factors in algal competition and phytoplankton succession involving A. tamarense. In addition, the filtrate from A. tamarense culture had negative impacts on these three HAB algae, and such inhibition varied with different growth phases of A. tamarense in parallel with reported values of PSP toxin content in Alexandrium cells. This implied that PSP toxin was possibly involved in allelopathy of A. tamarense. However, the rapid decomposition and inactivation of PSP toxin above pH 7 weakened this possibility. Further studies on the allelochemicals responsible for the allelopathy of A. tamarense need to be carried out in future.

  14. Inhibition of Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth by allelochemicals identified in cereals.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio; Rubiales, Diego

    2013-10-16

    Orobanche crenata is a parasitic weed that causes severe yield losses in important grain and forage legume crops. Cereals have been reported to inhibit O. crenata parasitism when grown intercropped with susceptible legumes, but the responsible metabolites have not been identified. A number of metabolites have been reported in cereals that have allelopathic properties against weeds, pests, and pathogens. We tested the effect of several allelochemicals identified in cereals on O. crenata seed germination and radicle development. We found that 2-benzoxazolinone, its derivative 6-chloroacetyl-2-benzoxazolinone, and scopoletin significantly inhibited O. crenata seed germination. Benzoxazolinones, l-tryptophan, and coumalic acid caused the stronger inhibition of radicle growth. Also, other metabolites reduced radicle length, this inhibition being dose-dependent. Only scopoletin caused cell necrotic-like darkening in the young radicles. Prospects for their application to parasitic weed management are discussed.

  15. Inhibition of Orobanche crenata seed germination and radicle growth by allelochemicals identified in cereals.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio; Rubiales, Diego

    2013-10-16

    Orobanche crenata is a parasitic weed that causes severe yield losses in important grain and forage legume crops. Cereals have been reported to inhibit O. crenata parasitism when grown intercropped with susceptible legumes, but the responsible metabolites have not been identified. A number of metabolites have been reported in cereals that have allelopathic properties against weeds, pests, and pathogens. We tested the effect of several allelochemicals identified in cereals on O. crenata seed germination and radicle development. We found that 2-benzoxazolinone, its derivative 6-chloroacetyl-2-benzoxazolinone, and scopoletin significantly inhibited O. crenata seed germination. Benzoxazolinones, l-tryptophan, and coumalic acid caused the stronger inhibition of radicle growth. Also, other metabolites reduced radicle length, this inhibition being dose-dependent. Only scopoletin caused cell necrotic-like darkening in the young radicles. Prospects for their application to parasitic weed management are discussed. PMID:24044614

  16. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  17. Growth inhibition by bupivacaine is associated with inactivation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Beigh, Mushtaq Ahmad; Showkat, Mehvish; Bashir, Basharat; Bashir, Asma; Hussain, Mahboob ul; Andrabi, Khurshid Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Bupivacaine is an amide type long acting local anesthetic used for epidural anesthesia and nerve blockade in patients. Use of bupivacaine is associated with severe cytotoxicity and apoptosis along with inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. Although inhibition of Erk, Akt, and AMPK seemingly appears to mediate some of the bupivacaine effects, potential downstream targets that mediate its effect remain unknown. S6 kinase 1 is a common downstream effector of several growth regulatory pathways involved in cell growth and proliferation known to be affected by bupivacaine. We have accordingly attempted to relate the growth inhibitory effects of bupivacaine with the status of S6K1 activity and we present evidence that decrease in cell growth and proliferation by bupivacaine is mediated through inactivation of S6 kinase 1 in a concentration and time dependent manner. We also show that ectopic expression of constitutively active S6 kinase 1 imparts substantial protection from bupivacaine induced cytotoxicity. Inactivation of S6K1 though associated with loss of putative mTOR mediated phosphorylation did not correspond with loss of similar phosphorylations in 4EBP1 indicating that S6K1 inhibition was not mediated through inactivation of mTORC1 signaling pathway or its down regulation.

  18. Inhibition of Receptor Signaling and of Glioblastoma-derived Tumor Growth by a Novel PDGFRβ Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Esposito, Carla L; Rienzo, Anna; Catuogno, Silvia; Iaboni, Margherita; Condorelli, Gerolama; de Franciscis, Vittorio; Cerchia, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) is a cell-surface tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. It represents a compelling therapeutic target in many human tumors, including glioma. A number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors under development as antitumor agents have been found to inhibit PDGFRβ. However, they are not selective as they present multiple tyrosine kinase targets. Here, we report a novel PDGFRβ-specific antagonist represented by a nuclease-resistant RNA-aptamer, named Gint4.T. This aptamer is able to specifically bind to the human PDGFRβ ectodomain (Kd: 9.6 nmol/l) causing a strong inhibition of ligand-dependent receptor activation and of downstream signaling in cell lines and primary cultures of human glioblastoma cells. Moreover, Gint4.T aptamer drastically inhibits cell migration and proliferation, induces differentiation, and blocks tumor growth in vivo. In addition, Gint4.T aptamer prevents PDGFRβ heterodimerization with and resultant transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. As a result, the combination of Gint4.T and an epidermal growth factor receptor–targeted aptamer is better at slowing tumor growth than either single aptamer alone. These findings reveal Gint4.T as a PDGFRβ-drug candidate with translational potential. PMID:24566984

  19. Devazepide, a nonpeptide antagonist of CCK receptors, induces apoptosis and inhibits Ewing tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jaime; Agra, Noelia; Fernández, Noemí; Pestaña, Angel; Alonso, Javier

    2009-08-01

    The Ewing family of tumors is a group of highly malignant tumors that mainly arise in bone and most often affect children and young adults in the first two decades of life. Despite the use of multimodal therapy, the long-term disease-free survival rate of patients with Ewing tumors is still disappointingly low, making the discovery of innovative therapeutic strategies all the more necessary. We have recently shown that cholecystokinin (CCK), a neuroendocrine peptide, involved in many biological functions, including cell growth and proliferation, is a relevant target of the EWS/FLI1 oncoprotein characteristic of Ewing tumors. CCK silencing inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo, suggesting that CCK acts as an autocrine growth factor for Ewing cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of two CCK receptor antagonists, devazepide (a CCK1-R antagonist) and L365 260 (a CCK2-R antagonist), on the growth of Ewing tumor cells. Devazepide (10 micromol/l) inhibited cell growth of four different Ewing tumor cells in vitro (range 85-88%), whereas the effect of the CCK2-R antagonist on cell growth was negligible. In a mouse tumor xenograft model, devazepide reduced tumor growth by 40%. Flow cytometry experiments showed that devazepide, but not L365 260, induced apoptosis of Ewing tumor cells. In summary, devazepide induces cell death of Ewing tumor cells, suggesting that it could represent a new therapeutic approach in the management of Ewing's tumor patients.

  20. AtOPR3 specifically inhibits primary root growth in Arabidopsis under phosphate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongyan; Pan, Xiaoying; Deng, Yuxia; Wu, Huamao; Liu, Pei; Li, Xuexian

    2016-01-01

    The primary root plays essential roles in root development, nutrient absorption, and root architectural establishment. Primary root growth is generally suppressed by phosphate (P) deficiency in A. thaliana; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely elusive to date. We found that AtOPR3 specifically inhibited primary root growth under P deficiency via suppressing root tip growth at the transcriptional level, revealing an important novel function of AtOPR3 in regulating primary root response to the nutrient stress. Importantly, AtOPR3 functioned to down-regulate primary root growth under P limitation mostly by its own, rather than depending on the Jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Further, AtOPR3 interacted with ethylene and gibberellin signaling pathways to regulate primary root growth upon P deficiency. In addition, the AtOPR3's function in inhibiting primary root growth upon P limitation was also partially dependent on auxin polar transport. Together, our studies provide new insights into how AtOPR3, together with hormone signaling interactions, modulates primary root growth in coping with the environmental stress in Arabidopsis.

  1. AtOPR3 specifically inhibits primary root growth in Arabidopsis under phosphate deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongyan; Pan, Xiaoying; Deng, Yuxia; Wu, Huamao; Liu, Pei; Li, Xuexian

    2016-01-01

    The primary root plays essential roles in root development, nutrient absorption, and root architectural establishment. Primary root growth is generally suppressed by phosphate (P) deficiency in A. thaliana; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely elusive to date. We found that AtOPR3 specifically inhibited primary root growth under P deficiency via suppressing root tip growth at the transcriptional level, revealing an important novel function of AtOPR3 in regulating primary root response to the nutrient stress. Importantly, AtOPR3 functioned to down-regulate primary root growth under P limitation mostly by its own, rather than depending on the Jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Further, AtOPR3 interacted with ethylene and gibberellin signaling pathways to regulate primary root growth upon P deficiency. In addition, the AtOPR3’s function in inhibiting primary root growth upon P limitation was also partially dependent on auxin polar transport. Together, our studies provide new insights into how AtOPR3, together with hormone signaling interactions, modulates primary root growth in coping with the environmental stress in Arabidopsis. PMID:27101793

  2. Growth inhibition and differences in protein profiles in azadirachtin-treated Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Lai, Duo; Yuan, Mei; Xu, Hanhong

    2014-04-01

    Azadirachtin A is a very effective biopesticide widely used in insect pest control. It has strong antifeeding and growth inhibitory activity against most insects, however, its mode of action is still unclear. Proteomic experiments using 2DE indicate significant effects of Azadirachtin A on the amount of proteins related to growth inhibition in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Twenty-one spots with different intensity in azadirachtin-treated larvae were identified. These proteins are involved in cytoskeletal organization, transcription and translation, hormonal regulation, and energy metabolism. Protein network analysis reveals heat shock protein 23 to be a potential target of azadirachtin. These results provide new insights into understanding the mechanism of growth inhibition in insects in response to azadirachtin. PMID:24458307

  3. Growth inhibition of thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, in hydrolysates from cassava pulp.

    PubMed

    Rugthaworn, Prapassorn; Murata, Yoshinori; Machida, Masashi; Apiwatanapiwat, Waraporn; Hirooka, Akiko; Thanapase, Warunee; Dangjarean, Hatairat; Ushiwaka, Satoru; Morimitsu, Kozo; Kosugi, Akihiko; Arai, Takamitsu; Vaithanomsat, Pilanee

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we report the inhibition of Kluyveromyces marxianus TISTR5925 growth and ethanol fermentation in the presence of furan derivatives and weak acids (acetic acid and lactic acid) at high temperatures. Cassava pulp, obtained as the waste from starch processing, was collected from 14 starch factories located in several provinces of Thailand. At a high temperature (42 °C), the cassava pulp hydrolysate from some starch factories strongly inhibited growth and ethanol production of both K. marxianus (strain TISTR5925) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain K3). HPLC detected high levels of lactic acid and acetic acid in the hydrolysates, suggesting that these weak acids impaired the growth of K. marxianus at high temperature. We isolated Trp-requiring mutants that had reduced tolerance to acetic acid compared to the wild-type. This sensitivity to acetic acid was suppressed by supplementation of the medium with tryptophan.

  4. Hormone activities and the cell cycle machinery in immunity-triggered growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Reitz, M U; Gifford, M L; Schäfer, P

    2015-04-01

    Biotic stress and diseases caused by pathogen attack pose threats in crop production and significantly reduce crop yields. Enhancing immunity against pathogens is therefore of outstanding importance in crop breeding. However, this must be balanced, as immune activation inhibits plant growth. This immunity-coupled growth trade-off does not support resistance but is postulated to reflect the reallocation of resources to drive immunity. There is, however, increasing evidence that growth-immunity trade-offs are based on the reconfiguration of hormone pathways, shared by growth and immunity signalling. Studies in roots revealed the role of hormones in orchestrating growth across different cell types, with some hormones showing a defined cell type-specific activity. This is apparently highly relevant for the regulation of the cell cycle machinery and might be part of the growth-immunity cross-talk. Since plants are constantly exposed to Immuno-activating microbes under agricultural conditions, the transition from a growth to an immunity operating mode can significantly reduce crop yield and can conflict our efforts to generate next-generation crops with improved yield under climate change conditions. By focusing on roots, we outline the current knowledge of hormone signalling on the cell cycle machinery to explain growth trade-offs induced by immunity. By referring to abiotic stress studies, we further introduce how root cell type-specific hormone activities might contribute to growth under immunity and discuss the feasibility of uncoupling the growth-immunity cross-talk.

  5. Modelling algae growth and dissolved oxygen in the Seine River downstream the Paris urban area: contribution of high frequency measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Escoffier, Nicolas; Groleau, Alexis; Poulin, Michel; Flipo, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen is a key variable in the hydro-ecological functioning of river systems. The accurate representation of the different biogeochemical processes affecting algal blooms and dissolved oxygen in the water column in hydro-ecological models is crucial for the use of these models as reliable management tools. This study focuses on the water quality of the Seine River along a 225 km stretch, from Paris to the Seine estuary. The study area is highly urbanized and located downstream France's largest agricultural area, and therefore receives large amounts of nutrients. During the last decades, nutrient inputs have been significantly reduced, especially with the implementation of new sewage water treatment technologies. Even though the frequency and the intensity of observed algal blooms have decreased, blooms were observed in 2011 and 2012. These blooms are generally followed by a period of high organic matter accumulation, leading to high mineralization fluxes and potential oxygen depletion. The hydrodynamics and the water quality of the Seine River are simulated for the 2011-2012 period with the distributed process-based hydro-ecological model ProSe (Even et al., 1998). The simulated chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen concentrations are compared to high frequency measurements at the Bougival monitoring station (50 km downstream from Paris), which is part of the CarboSeine monitoring network. The high frequency continuous dataset allows calibrating of primary producers' physiological parameters. New growth parameters are defined for the diatom community. The blooms occur at the end of the winter period (march 2011 and march 2012) and the optimal temperature for diatom growth is calibrated at 10°C, based on an analysis of the physiological response of the diatom community. One of the main outcomes of the modelling exercise is that the precise identification of the constituting communities of algal blooms must be achieved prior to the modelling itself. With the

  6. Magnetic separation of algae

    DOEpatents

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  7. Inhibition of growth of Zymomonas mobilis by model compounds found in lignocellulosic hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the pretreatment of biomass feedstocks and subsequent conditioning prior to saccharification, many toxic compounds are produced or introduced which inhibit microbial growth and in many cases, production of ethanol. An understanding of the toxic effects of compounds found in hydrolysate is critical to improving sugar utilization and ethanol yields in the fermentation process. In this study, we established a useful tool for surveying hydrolysate toxicity by measuring growth rates in the presence of toxic compounds, and examined the effects of selected model inhibitors of aldehydes, organic and inorganic acids (along with various cations), and alcohols on growth of Zymomonas mobilis 8b (a ZM4 derivative) using glucose or xylose as the carbon source. Results Toxicity strongly correlated to hydrophobicity in Z. mobilis, which has been observed in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae for aldehydes and with some exceptions, organic acids. We observed Z. mobilis 8b to be more tolerant to organic acids than previously reported, although the carbon source and growth conditions play a role in tolerance. Growth in xylose was profoundly inhibited by monocarboxylic organic acids compared to growth in glucose, whereas dicarboxylic acids demonstrated little or no effects on growth rate in either substrate. Furthermore, cations can be ranked in order of their toxicity, Ca++ > > Na+ > NH4+ > K+. HMF (5-hydroxymethylfurfural), furfural and acetate, which were observed to contribute to inhibition of Z. mobilis growth in dilute acid pretreated corn stover hydrolysate, do not interact in a synergistic manner in combination. We provide further evidence that Z. mobilis 8b is capable of converting the aldehydes furfural, vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and to some extent syringaldehyde to their alcohol forms (furfuryl, vanillyl, 4-hydroxybenzyl and syringyl alcohol) during fermentation. Conclusions Several key findings in this report provide a

  8. Role of bicarbonate/CO2 in the inhibition of Escherichia coli growth by cyanate.

    PubMed Central

    Kozliak, E I; Fuchs, J A; Guilloton, M B; Anderson, P M

    1995-01-01

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give two CO2 molecules. The gene for cyanase is part of the cyn operon, which includes cynT and cynS, encoding carbonic anhydrase and cyanase, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase functions to prevent depletion of cellular bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition (the product CO2 can diffuse out of the cell faster than noncatalyzed hydration back to bicarbonate). Addition of cyanate to the culture medium of a delta cynT mutant strain of E. coli (having a nonfunctional carbonic anhydrase) results in depletion of cellular bicarbonate, which leads to inhibition of growth and an inability to catalyze cyanate degradation. These effects can be overcome by aeration with a higher partial CO2 pressure (M. B. Guilloton, A. F. Lamblin, E. I. Kozliak, M. Gerami-Nejad, C. Tu, D. Silverman, P. M. Anderson, and J. A. Fuchs, J. Bacteriol. 175:1443-1451, 1993). The question considered here is why depletion of bicarbonate/CO2 due to the action of cyanase on cyanate in a delta cynT strain has such an inhibitory effect. Growth of wild-type E. coli in minimal medium under conditions of limited CO2 was severely inhibited, and this inhibition could be overcome by adding certain Krebs cycle intermediates, indicating that one consequence of limiting CO2 is inhibition of carboxylation reactions. However, supplementation of the growth medium with metabolites whose syntheses are known to depend on a carboxylation reaction was not effective in overcoming inhibition related to the bicarbonate deficiency induced in the delta cynT strain by addition of cyanate. Similar results were obtained with a deltacyn strain (since cyanase is absent, this strain does not develop a bicarbonate deficiency when cyanate is added); however, as with the deltacynT strain, a higher partial CO(2) pressure in the aerating gas or expression of carbonic anhydrase activity (which contributes to a higher intercellular

  9. Role of bicarbonate/CO2 in the inhibition of Escherichia coli growth by cyanate.

    PubMed

    Kozliak, E I; Fuchs, J A; Guilloton, M B; Anderson, P M

    1995-06-01

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give two CO2 molecules. The gene for cyanase is part of the cyn operon, which includes cynT and cynS, encoding carbonic anhydrase and cyanase, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase functions to prevent depletion of cellular bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition (the product CO2 can diffuse out of the cell faster than noncatalyzed hydration back to bicarbonate). Addition of cyanate to the culture medium of a delta cynT mutant strain of E. coli (having a nonfunctional carbonic anhydrase) results in depletion of cellular bicarbonate, which leads to inhibition of growth and an inability to catalyze cyanate degradation. These effects can be overcome by aeration with a higher partial CO2 pressure (M. B. Guilloton, A. F. Lamblin, E. I. Kozliak, M. Gerami-Nejad, C. Tu, D. Silverman, P. M. Anderson, and J. A. Fuchs, J. Bacteriol. 175:1443-1451, 1993). The question considered here is why depletion of bicarbonate/CO2 due to the action of cyanase on cyanate in a delta cynT strain has such an inhibitory effect. Growth of wild-type E. coli in minimal medium under conditions of limited CO2 was severely inhibited, and this inhibition could be overcome by adding certain Krebs cycle intermediates, indicating that one consequence of limiting CO2 is inhibition of carboxylation reactions. However, supplementation of the growth medium with metabolites whose syntheses are known to depend on a carboxylation reaction was not effective in overcoming inhibition related to the bicarbonate deficiency induced in the delta cynT strain by addition of cyanate. Similar results were obtained with a deltacyn strain (since cyanase is absent, this strain does not develop a bicarbonate deficiency when cyanate is added); however, as with the deltacynT strain, a higher partial CO(2) pressure in the aerating gas or expression of carbonic anhydrase activity (which contributes to a higher intercellular

  10. Methoxychlor inhibits growth of antral follicles by altering cell cycle regulators.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Meachum, Sharon; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel; Peretz, Jackye; Yao, Humphrey H; Flaws, Jodi A

    2009-10-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) reduces fertility in female rodents, decreases antral follicle numbers, and increases atresia through oxidative stress pathways. MXC also inhibits antral follicle growth in vitro. The mechanism by which MXC inhibits growth of follicles is unknown. The growth of follicles is controlled, in part, by cell cycle regulators. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that MXC inhibits follicle growth by reducing the levels of selected cell cycle regulators. Further, we tested whether co-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), prevents the MXC-induced reduction in cell cycle regulators. For in vivo studies, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with MXC or vehicle for 20 days. Treated ovaries were subjected to immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. For in vitro studies, antral follicles isolated from adult cycling CD-1 mouse ovaries were cultured with vehicle, MXC, and/or NAC for 48, 72 and 96 h. Levels of cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were measured using in vivo and in vitro samples. The results indicate that MXC decreased PCNA staining, and Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels compared to controls. NAC co-treatment restored follicle growth and expression of Ccnd2 and Cdk4. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC exposure reduces the levels of Ccnd2 and Cdk4 in follicles, and that protection from oxidative stress restores Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels. Therefore, MXC-induced oxidative stress may decrease the levels of cell cycle regulators, which in turn, results in inhibition of the growth of antral follicles.

  11. Methoxychlor inhibits growth of antral follicles by altering cell cycle regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rupesh K. Meachum, Sharon Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel Peretz, Jackye Yao, Humphrey H. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2009-10-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) reduces fertility in female rodents, decreases antral follicle numbers, and increases atresia through oxidative stress pathways. MXC also inhibits antral follicle growth in vitro. The mechanism by which MXC inhibits growth of follicles is unknown. The growth of follicles is controlled, in part, by cell cycle regulators. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that MXC inhibits follicle growth by reducing the levels of selected cell cycle regulators. Further, we tested whether co-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), prevents the MXC-induced reduction in cell cycle regulators. For in vivo studies, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with MXC or vehicle for 20 days. Treated ovaries were subjected to immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. For in vitro studies, antral follicles isolated from adult cycling CD-1 mouse ovaries were cultured with vehicle, MXC, and/or NAC for 48, 72 and 96 h. Levels of cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were measured using in vivo and in vitro samples. The results indicate that MXC decreased PCNA staining, and Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels compared to controls. NAC co-treatment restored follicle growth and expression of Ccnd2 and Cdk4. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC exposure reduces the levels of Ccnd2 and Cdk4 in follicles, and that protection from oxidative stress restores Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels. Therefore, MXC-induced oxidative stress may decrease the levels of cell cycle regulators, which in turn, results in inhibition of the growth of antral follicles.

  12. Synergistic growth inhibition by sorafenib and vitamin K2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, Bicheng; Zhang, Anran; Zhao, Yong; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Jian; Gao, Jianfei; Fang, Dianchun; Rao, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that has been proven effective as a single-agent therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma, and there is a strong rationale for investigating its use in combination with other agents. Vitamin K2 is nearly non-toxic to humans and has been shown to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the effects of a combination of sorafenib and vitamin K2 on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. METHODS: Flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) and nude mouse xenograft assays were used to examine the effects of sorafenib and vitamin K2 on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Western blotting was used to elucidate the possible mechanisms underlying these effects. RESULTS: Assays for 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) revealed a strong synergistic growth-inhibitory effect between sorafenib and vitamin K2. Flow cytometry showed an increase in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis after treatment with a combination of these two drugs at low concentrations. Sorafenib-mediated inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation was promoted by vitamin K2, and downregulation of Mcl-1, which is required for sorafenib-induced apoptosis, was observed after combined treatment. Vitamin K2 also attenuated the downregulation of p21 expression induced by sorafenib, which may represent the mechanism by which vitamin K2 promotes the inhibitory effects of sorafenib on cell proliferation. Moreover, the combination of sorafenib and vitamin K2 significantly inhibited the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our results determined that combined treatment with sorafenib and vitamin K2 can work synergistically to inhibit the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. This finding raises the possibility that this combined treatment strategy might be promising as a new therapy against

  13. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  14. Targeted blockade of JAK/STAT3 signaling inhibits ovarian carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Gritsina, Galina; Xiao, Fang; O'Brien, Shane W.; Gabbasov, Rashid; Maglaty, Marisa A.; Xu, Ren-Huan; Thapa, Roshan J.; Zhou, Yan; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Litwin, Samuel; Balachandran, Siddharth; Sigal, Luis J.; Huszar, Dennis; Connolly, Denise C.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the fifth leading cause of death among women in the United States. Persistent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) is frequently detected in OC. STAT3 is activated by Janus family kinases (JAK) via cytokine receptors, growth factor receptor and non-growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases. Activation of STAT3 mediates tumor cell proliferation, survival, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis, and recent work demonstrates that STAT3 activation suppresses anti-tumor immune responses and supports tumor-promoting inflammation. We hypothesized that therapeutic targeting of the JAK/STAT3 pathway would inhibit tumor growth by direct effects on OC cells and by inhibition of cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME). To test this, we evaluated the effects of a small molecule JAK inhibitor, AZD1480, on cell viability, apoptosis, proliferation, migration and adhesion of OC cells in vitro. We then evaluated the effects of AZD1480 on in vivo tumor growth and progression, gene expression, tumor-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and immune cell populations in a transgenic mouse model of OC. AZD1480-treatment inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and DNA binding, and migration and adhesion of cultured OC cells and ovarian tumor growth rate, volume and ascites production in mice. In addition, drug treatment led to altered gene expression, decreased tumor-associated MMP activity, and fewer suppressor T cells in the peritoneal tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing mice than control mice. Taken together, our results show pharmacological inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway leads to disruption of functions essential for ovarian tumor growth and progression and represents a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:25646015

  15. Positive and negative effects of habitat-forming algae on survival, growth and intra-specific competition of limpets.

    PubMed

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Burrows, Michael T; Jackson, Angus C; Mayer-Pinto, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of environmental change on the distribution and abundance of strongly interacting organisms, such as intertidal macroalgae and their grazers, needs a thorough knowledge of their underpinning ecological relationships. Control of grazer-plant interactions is bi-directional on northwestern European coasts: grazing by limpets structures populations of macroalgae, while macroalgae provide habitat and food for limpets. Scottish shores dominated by the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus support lower densities and larger sizes of limpets Patella vulgata than shores with less Fucus. These patterns may be due to differences in inter-size-class competitive interactions of limpets among shores with different covers of Fucus. To examine this model, densities of small and large limpets were manipulated in plots with and without Fucus. Amounts of biofilm were measured in each plot. The presence of Fucus increased survival but hindered growth of small (15 mm TL) limpets, which were negatively affected by the presence of large limpets (31 mm TL). In contrast, large limpets were not affected by the presence of Fucus or of small limpets. This suggests the occurrence of asymmetric inter-size-class competition, which was influenced by the presence of macroalgae. Macroalgae and increased densities of limpets did not influence amounts of biofilm. Our findings highlight the role of interactions among organisms in generating ecological responses to environmental change.

  16. Miocene Coralline algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bosence, D.W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The coralline algae (Order Corallinales) were sedimentologically and ecologically important during the Miocene, a period when they were particularly abundant. The many poorly described and illustrated species and the lack of quantitative data in coralline thalli make specific determinations particularly difficult, but some species are well known and widespread in the Tethyan area. The sedimentologic importance of the Miocene coralline algae is reflected in the abundance of in-situ coralline buildups, rhodoliths, and coralline debris facies at Malta and Spain; similar sequences are known throughout the Tethyan Miocene. In-situ buildups vary from leafy crustose biostromes to walled reefs with dense coralline crusts and branches. Growth forms are apparently related to hydraulic energy. Rhodoliths vary from leafy, crustose, and open-branched forms in muddy sediments to dense, crustose, and radial-branching forms in coarse grainstones. Rhodolith form and internal structure correlate closely with hydraulic energy. Coralline genera are conservative and, as such, are useful in paleoenvironmental analysis. Of particular interest are the restricted depth ranges of recent coralline genera. More research is needed on the sedimentology, paleoecology, and systematics of the Cenozoic corallines, as they have particular value in paleoenvironmental analysis.

  17. New tools for chloroplast genetic engineering allow the synthesis of human growth hormone in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wannathong, Thanyanan; Waterhouse, Janet C; Young, Rosanna E B; Economou, Chloe K; Purton, Saul

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the exploitation of microalgae in industrial biotechnology. Potentially, these phototrophic eukaryotes could be used for the low-cost synthesis of valuable recombinant products such as bioactive metabolites and therapeutic proteins. The algal chloroplast in particular represents an attractive target for such genetic engineering, both because it houses major metabolic pathways and because foreign genes can be targeted to specific loci within the chloroplast genome, resulting in high-level, stable expression. However, routine methods for chloroplast genetic engineering are currently available only for one species-Chlamydomonas reinhardtii-and even here, there are limitations to the existing technology, including the need for an expensive biolistic device for DNA delivery, the lack of robust expression vectors, and the undesirable use of antibiotic resistance markers. Here, we describe a new strain and vectors for targeted insertion of transgenes into a neutral chloroplast locus that (i) allow scar-less fusion of a transgenic coding sequence to the promoter/5'UTR element of the highly expressed endogenous genes psaA or atpA, (ii) employ the endogenous gene psbH as an effective but benign selectable marker, and (iii) ensure the successful integration of the transgene construct in all transformant lines. Transformation is achieved by a simple and cheap method of agitation of a DNA/cell suspension with glass beads, with selection based on the phototrophic rescue of a cell wall-deficient ΔpsbH strain. We demonstrate the utility of these tools in the creation of a transgenic line that produces high levels of functional human growth hormone. PMID:26887319

  18. Inhibition of enterobacteria and Listeria growth by lactic, acetic and formic acids.

    PubMed

    Ostling, C E; Lindgren, S E

    1993-07-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of undissociated lactic, acetic and formic acids were evaluated for 23 strains of enterobacteria and two of Listeria monocytogenes. The evaluation was performed aerobically and anaerobically in a liquid test system at pH intervals of between 4.2 and 5.4. Growth of the enterobacteria was inhibited at 2-11 mmol l-1, 0.5-14 mmol l-1 and 0.1-1.5 mmol l-1 of undissociated lactic, acetic and formic acids, respectively. The MIC value was slightly lower with anaerobic conditions compared with aerobic conditions. The influence of protons on the inhibition was observed for acetic acid at the low pH values. Undissociated lactic acid was 2 to 5 times more efficient in inhibiting L. monocytogenes than enterobacteria. Acetic acid had a similar inhibitory action on L. monocytogenes compared with enterobacteria. Inorganic acid (HCl) inhibited most enterobacteria at pH 4.0; some strains, however, were able to initiate growth to pH 3.8. The results indicate that the values of undissociated acid which occur in a silage of pH 4.1-4.5 are about 10-100 times higher than required in order to protect the forage from the growth of enterobacteria and L. monocytogenes.

  19. Potential mechanisms for the inhibition of tumor cell growth by manganese superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Kim, K H; Rodriguez, A M; Carrico, P M; Melendez, J A

    2001-06-01

    Studies from many laboratories have shown that overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits the growth of numerous tumor cell types. The inhibition of tumor cell growth can be attributed to the increase in the steady-state levels of H2O2 as a result of the increased dismuting activity of MnSOD. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of MnSOD enhances the activity of the superoxide (O2*-)-sensitive enzyme aconitase, decreases the intracellular GSH/GSSG ratio, and dose-dependently inhibits pyruvate carboxylase activity. Thus, alterations in the steady-state concentrations of mitochondrial O2*- and H2O2 as a result of MnSOD overexpression can alter the metabolic capacity of the cell leading to inhibition of cell growth. Furthermore, we propose that MnSOD overexpression can modulate the activity of nitric oxide (*NO) by preventing its reaction with O2*-. This hypothesis suggests that the redox environment of the mitochondria can be altered to favor the activity of *NO rather than peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and may explain the enhanced toxicity of *NO-generating compounds toward MnSOD-overexpressing cell lines. These findings indicate that therapeutic strategies targeted at overexpressing MnSOD in tumor tissue may be more effective when used in combination with agents that deplete the oxidant-buffering and enhance the *NO-generating capacity of the tumor and host, respectively. PMID:11491650

  20. Anticancer activity of MPT0G157, a derivative of indolylbenzenesulfonamide, inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Samir; Lai, Ssu-Chia; Liou, Jing-Ping; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multifaceted functions by coordinating the interaction of signal pathways with chromatin structure remodeling and the activation of non-histone proteins; these epigenetic regulations play an important role during malignancy progression. HDAC inhibition shows promise as a new strategy for cancer therapy; three HDAC inhibitors have been approved. We previously reported that N-hydroxy-3-{4-[2-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-acrylamide (MPT0G157), a novel indole-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamide compound, demonstrated potent HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated its anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. MPT0G157 treatment significantly inhibited different tumor growth at submicromolar concentration and was particularly potent in human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. Apoptosis and inhibited HDACs activity induced by MPT0G157 was more potent than that by the marketed drugs PXD101 (Belinostat) and SAHA (Vorinostat). In an in vivo model, MPT0G157 markedly inhibited HCT116 xenograft tumor volume and reduced matrigel-induced angiogenesis. The anti-angiogenetic effect of MPT0G157 was found to increase the hyperacetylation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and promote hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) degradation followed by down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G157 has potential as a new drug candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26087180

  1. Anticancer activity of MPT0G157, a derivative of indolylbenzenesulfonamide, inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Chia; Huang, Fang-I; Mehndiratta, Samir; Lai, Ssu-Chia; Liou, Jing-Ping; Yang, Chia-Ron

    2015-07-30

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) display multifaceted functions by coordinating the interaction of signal pathways with chromatin structure remodeling and the activation of non-histone proteins; these epigenetic regulations play an important role during malignancy progression. HDAC inhibition shows promise as a new strategy for cancer therapy; three HDAC inhibitors have been approved. We previously reported that N-hydroxy-3-{4-[2-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-acrylamide (MPT0G157), a novel indole-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamide compound, demonstrated potent HDAC inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we evaluated its anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. MPT0G157 treatment significantly inhibited different tumor growth at submicromolar concentration and was particularly potent in human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. Apoptosis and inhibited HDACs activity induced by MPT0G157 was more potent than that by the marketed drugs PXD101 (Belinostat) and SAHA (Vorinostat). In an in vivo model, MPT0G157 markedly inhibited HCT116 xenograft tumor volume and reduced matrigel-induced angiogenesis. The anti-angiogenetic effect of MPT0G157 was found to increase the hyperacetylation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and promote hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) degradation followed by down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Our results demonstrate that MPT0G157 has potential as a new drug candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:26087180

  2. Inhibition of Fusarium graminearum growth and mycotoxin production by phenolic extract from Spirulina sp.

    PubMed

    Pagnussatt, Fernanda Arnhold; Del Ponte, Emerson Medeiros; Garda-Buffon, Jaqueline; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a fungal species complex pathogenic occurring worldwide, mainly associated with cereal crops. The most important Fusarium mycotoxins are fumonisins, zearalenone and trichothecenes. The availability of efficient control measures that are less harmful to both the environment and the consumers is urgent. For such, phenolic acids (PAs) from natural sources are known to reduce fungal contaminations. This work aimed to identify the PAs present in a culture extract of Spirulina algae (strain LEB-18) and evaluate its effect on mycelial growth rate, glucosamine level, amylase activity and mycotoxin production by four strains of two lineages of F. graminearum. Results showed that amendment of potato dextrose media with LEB-18 extract (3% w/v), which was mainly composed by gallic acid, greatly reduced radial growth of fungal colonies compared to media containing a single PA and the control. Also, average reductions of 40% and 62% in the glucosamine levels and the amylase activity were observed. In general, the LEB-18 extract and the PAs reduced mycotoxin concentration, with an average reduction of 68% for the trichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol and nivalenol. PMID:24485311

  3. Inhibition of Fusarium graminearum growth and mycotoxin production by phenolic extract from Spirulina sp.

    PubMed

    Pagnussatt, Fernanda Arnhold; Del Ponte, Emerson Medeiros; Garda-Buffon, Jaqueline; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a fungal species complex pathogenic occurring worldwide, mainly associated with cereal crops. The most important Fusarium mycotoxins are fumonisins, zearalenone and trichothecenes. The availability of efficient control measures that are less harmful to both the environment and the consumers is urgent. For such, phenolic acids (PAs) from natural sources are known to reduce fungal contaminations. This work aimed to identify the PAs present in a culture extract of Spirulina algae (strain LEB-18) and evaluate its effect on mycelial growth rate, glucosamine level, amylase activity and mycotoxin production by four strains of two lineages of F. graminearum. Results showed that amendment of potato dextrose media with LEB-18 extract (3% w/v), which was mainly composed by gallic acid, greatly reduced radial growth of fungal colonies compared to media containing a single PA and the control. Also, average reductions of 40% and 62% in the glucosamine levels and the amylase activity were observed. In general, the LEB-18 extract and the PAs reduced mycotoxin concentration, with an average reduction of 68% for the trichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol and nivalenol.

  4. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Sreenivasan, Prem K; McBain, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD); sodium fluoride (FD); stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1); or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC) was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC), a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC) was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices. PMID:26882309

  5. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Sreenivasan, Prem K; McBain, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD); sodium fluoride (FD); stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1); or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC) was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC), a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC) was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices.

  6. Simultaneous Assessment of Acidogenesis-Mitigation and Specific Bacterial Growth-Inhibition by Dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Sreenivasan, Prem K.; McBain, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Dentifrices can augment oral hygiene by inactivating bacteria and at sub-lethal concentrations may affect bacterial metabolism, potentially inhibiting acidogenesis, the main cause of caries. Reported herein is the development of a rapid method to simultaneously measure group-specific bactericidal and acidogenesis-mitigation effects of dentifrices on oral bacteria. Saliva was incubated aerobically and anaerobically in Tryptone Soya Broth, Wilkins-Chalgren Broth with mucin, or artificial saliva and was exposed to dentifrices containing triclosan/copolymer (TD); sodium fluoride (FD); stannous fluoride and zinc lactate (SFD1); or stannous fluoride, zinc lactate and stannous chloride (SFD2). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined turbidometrically whilst group-specific minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were assessed using growth media and conditions selective for total aerobes, total anaerobes, streptococci and Gram-negative anaerobes. Minimum acid neutralization concentration (MNC) was defined as the lowest concentration of dentifrice at which acidification was inhibited. Differences between MIC and MNC were calculated and normalized with respect to MIC to derive the combined inhibitory and neutralizing capacity (CINC), a cumulative measure of acidogenesis-mitigation and growth inhibition. The overall rank order for growth inhibition potency (MIC) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was: TD> SFD2> SFD1> FD. Acidogenesis-mitigation (MNC) was ordered; TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1. CINC was ordered TD> FD> SFD2> SFD1 aerobically and TD> FD> SFD1> SFD2 anaerobically. With respect to group-specific bactericidal activity, TD generally exhibited the greatest potency, particularly against total aerobes, total anaerobes and streptococci. This approach enables the rapid simultaneous evaluation of acidity mitigation, growth inhibition and specific antimicrobial activity by dentifrices. PMID:26882309

  7. Deletion of muscle GRP94 impairs both muscle and body growth by inhibiting local IGF production

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Elisabeth R.; Park, SooHyun; James, Jose K.; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Philippou, Anastassios; Eletto, Davide; Lei, Hanqin; Brisson, Becky; Ostrovsky, Olga; Li, Zihai; Argon, Yair

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are critical for development and growth of skeletal muscles, but because several tissues produce IGFs, it is not clear which source is necessary or sufficient for muscle growth. Because it is critical for production of both IGF-I and IGF-II, we ablated glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) in murine striated muscle to test the necessity of local IGFs for normal muscle growth. These mice exhibited smaller skeletal muscles with diminished IGF contents but with normal contractile function and no apparent endoplasmic reticulum stress response. This result shows that muscles rely on GRP94 primarily to support local production of IGFs, a pool that is necessary for normal muscle growth. In addition, body weights were ∼30% smaller than those of littermate controls, and circulating IGF-I also decreased significantly, yet glucose homeostasis was maintained with little disruption to the growth hormone pathway. The growth defect was complemented on administration of recombinant IGF-I. Thus, unlike liver production of IGF-I, muscle IGF-I is necessary not only locally but also globally for whole-body growth.—Barton, E. R., Park, S., James, J. K., Makarewich, C. A., Philippou, A., Eletto, D., Lei, H., Brisson, B., Ostrovsky, O., Li, Z., Argon, Y. Deletion of muscle GRP94 impairs both muscle and body growth by inhibiting local IGF production. PMID:22649033

  8. A novel direct activator of AMPK inhibits prostate cancer growth by blocking lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zadra, Giorgia; Photopoulos, Cornelia; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Heidari, Pedram; Weng, Qing Ping; Fedele, Giuseppe; Liu, Hong; Scaglia, Natalia; Priolo, Carmen; Sicinska, Ewa; Mahmood, Umar; Signoretti, Sabina; Birnberg, Neal; Loda, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    5′AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) constitutes a hub for cellular metabolic and growth control, thus representing an ideal therapeutic target for prostate cancers (PCas) characterized by increased lipogenesis and activation of mTORC1 pathway. However, whether AMPK activation itself is sufficient to block cancer cell growth remains to be determined. A small molecule screening was performed and identified MT 63–78, a specific and potent direct AMPK activator. Here, we show that direct activation of AMPK inhibits PCa cell growth in androgen sensitive and castration resistant PCa (CRPC) models, induces mitotic arrest, and apoptosis. In vivo, AMPK activation is sufficient to reduce PCa growth, whereas the allelic loss of its catalytic subunits fosters PCa development. Importantly, despite mTORC1 blockade, the suppression of de novo lipogenesis is the underpinning mechanism responsible for AMPK-mediated PCa growth inhibition, suggesting AMPK as a therapeutic target especially for lipogenesis-driven PCas. Finally, we demonstrate that MT 63–78 enhances the growth inhibitory effect of AR signaling inhibitors MDV3100 and abiraterone. This study thus provides a rationale for their combined use in CRPC treatment. PMID:24497570

  9. In vitro growth inhibition of human cancer cells by novel honokiol analogs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyh Ming; Prakasha Gowda, A S; Sharma, Arun K; Amin, Shantu

    2012-05-15

    Honokiol possesses many pharmacological activities including anti-cancer properties. Here in, we designed and synthesized honokiol analogs that block major honokiol metabolic pathway which may enhance their effectiveness. We studied their cytotoxicity in human cancer cells and evaluated possible mechanism of cell cycle arrest. Two analogs, namely 2 and 4, showed much higher growth inhibitory activity in A549 human lung cancer cells and significant increase of cell population in the G0-G1 phase. Further elucidation of the inhibition mechanism on cell cycle showed that analogs 2 and 4 inhibit both CDK1 and cyclin B1 protien levels in A549 cells. PMID:22533983

  10. In vitro growth inhibition of human cancer cells by novel honokiol analogs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jyh Ming; Prakasha Gowda, A S; Sharma, Arun K; Amin, Shantu

    2012-05-15

    Honokiol possesses many pharmacological activities including anti-cancer properties. Here in, we designed and synthesized honokiol analogs that block major honokiol metabolic pathway which may enhance their effectiveness. We studied their cytotoxicity in human cancer cells and evaluated possible mechanism of cell cycle arrest. Two analogs, namely 2 and 4, showed much higher growth inhibitory activity in A549 human lung cancer cells and significant increase of cell population in the G0-G1 phase. Further elucidation of the inhibition mechanism on cell cycle showed that analogs 2 and 4 inhibit both CDK1 and cyclin B1 protien levels in A549 cells.

  11. Prophylactic Administration of Fucoidan Represses Cancer Metastasis by Inhibiting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) in Lewis Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tse-Hung; Chiu, Yi-Han; Chan, Yi-Lin; Chiu, Ya-Huang; Wang, Hang; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Li, Tsung-Lin; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidan, a heparin-like sulfated polysaccharide, is rich in brown algae. It has a wide assortment of protective activities against cancer, for example, induction of hepatocellular carcinoma senescence, induction of human breast and colon carcinoma apoptosis, and impediment of lung cancer cells migration and invasion. However, the anti-metastatic mechanism that fucoidan exploits remains elusive. In this report, we explored the effects of fucoidan on cachectic symptoms, tumor development, lung carcinoma cell spreading and proliferation, as well as expression of metastasis-associated proteins in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells-inoculated mice model. We discovered that administration of fucoidan has prophylactic effects on mitigation of cachectic body weight loss and improvement of lung masses in tumor-inoculated mice. These desired effects are attributed to inhibition of LLC spreading and proliferation in lung tissues. Fucoidan also down-regulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Moreover, the tumor-bearing mice supplemented with fucoidan indeed benefit from an ensemble of the chemo-phylacticity. The fact is that fucoidan significantly decreases viability, migration, invasion, and MMPs activities of LLC cells. In summary, fucoidan is suitable to act as a chemo-preventative agent for minimizing cachectic symptoms as well as inhibiting lung carcinoma metastasis through down-regulating metastatic factors VEGF and MMPs. PMID:25854641

  12. Prophylactic administration of fucoidan represses cancer metastasis by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in Lewis tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tse-Hung; Chiu, Yi-Han; Chan, Yi-Lin; Chiu, Ya-Huang; Wang, Hang; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Li, Tsung-Lin; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2015-04-01

    Fucoidan, a heparin-like sulfated polysaccharide, is rich in brown algae. It has a wide assortment of protective activities against cancer, for example, induction of hepatocellular carcinoma senescence, induction of human breast and colon carcinoma apoptosis, and impediment of lung cancer cells migration and invasion. However, the anti-metastatic mechanism that fucoidan exploits remains elusive. In this report, we explored the effects of fucoidan on cachectic symptoms, tumor development, lung carcinoma cell spreading and proliferation, as well as expression of metastasis-associated proteins in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells-inoculated mice model. We discovered that administration of fucoidan has prophylactic effects on mitigation of cachectic body weight loss and improvement of lung masses in tumor-inoculated mice. These desired effects are attributed to inhibition of LLC spreading and proliferation in lung tissues. Fucoidan also down-regulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Moreover, the tumor-bearing mice supplemented with fucoidan indeed benefit from an ensemble of the chemo-phylacticity. The fact is that fucoidan significantly decreases viability, migration, invasion, and MMPs activities of LLC cells. In summary, fucoidan is suitable to act as a chemo-preventative agent for minimizing cachectic symptoms as well as inhibiting lung carcinoma metastasis through down-regulating metastatic factors VEGF and MMPs.

  13. Methyl anthranilate and γ-decalactone inhibit strawberry pathogen growth and achene Germination.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Alan H; Evans, Shane Alan; Folta, Kevin M

    2013-12-26

    Plant volatile compounds have been shown to affect microbial growth and seed germination. Here two fruity volatiles found in strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa ), γ-decalactone ("peachlike" aroma) and methyl anthranilate ("grapelike" aroma), were tested for effects on relevant pathogens and seedling emergence. Significant growth reduction was observed for Botrytis cinerea , Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , Colletotrichum acutatum , Phomopsis obscurans , and Gnomonia fragariae at 1 mM γ-decalactone or methyl anthranilate, and 5 mM γ-decalactone or methyl anthranilate supplemented medium resulted in complete cessation of fungal growth. Phytophthora cactorum was especially sensitive to 1 mM γ-decalactone, showing complete growth inhibition. Bacteriostatic effects were observed in Xanthamonas cultures. Postharvest infestations on store-bought strawberries were inhibited with volatile treatment. The γ-decalactone volatile inhibited strawberry and Arabidopsis thaliana germination. These findings show that two compounds contributing to strawberry flavor may also contribute to shelf life and suggest that γ-decalactone may play an ecological role by preventing premature germination. PMID:24328200

  14. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C; van Alphen, Lieke B; Patry, Robert T; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-12-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  15. Protein turnover and cellular autophagy in growing and growth-inhibited 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, T.; Pfeifer, U. )

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between growth, protein degradation, and cellular autophagy was tested in growing and in growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers. For the biochemical evaluation of DNA and protein metabolism, growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers with high cell density and growing 3T3 cell monolayers with low cell density were labeled simultaneously with ({sup 14}C)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)leucine. The evaluation of the DNA turnover and additional ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography showed that 24 to 5% of 3T3 cells continue to replicate even in the growth-inhibited state, where no accumulation of protein and DNA can be observed. Cell loss, therefore, has to be assumed to compensate for the ongoing cell proliferation. When the data of protein turnover were corrected for cell loss, it was found that the rate constant of protein synthesis in nongrowing monolayers was reduced to half the value found in growing monolayers. Simultaneously, the rate constant of protein degradation in nongrowing monolayers was increased to about 1.5-fold the value of growing monolayers. These data are in agreement with the assumption that cellular autophagy represents a major pathway of regulating protein degradation in 3T3 cells and that the regulation of autophagic protein degradation is of relevance for the transition from a growing to a nongrowing state.

  16. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yang-Fan; Yan, Guang-Ning; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Qiao-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) methyltransferase is the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which acts as a transcription repressor via the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone 3 (H3K27me3). EZH2 has been recognised as an oncogene in several types of tumors; however, its role in osteosarcoma has not been fully elucidated. Herein, we show that EZH2 silencing inhibits tumor growth and lung metastasis in osteosarcoma by facilitating re-expression of the imprinting gene tumor-suppressing STF cDNA 3 (TSSC3). Our previous study showed that TSSC3 acts as a tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma. In this study, we found that EZH2 was abnormally elevated in osteosarcoma, and its overexpression was associated with poor prognosis in osteosarcoma. Silencing of EZH2 resulted in tumor growth inhibition, apoptosis and chemosensitivity enhancement. Moreover, suppression of EZH2 markedly inhibited tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, EZH2 knockdown facilitated the re-expression of TSSC3 by reducing H3K27me3 in the promoter region. Cotransfection with siEZH2 and siTSSC3 could partially reverse the ability of siEZH2 alone. We have demonstrated that EZH2 plays a crucial role in tumor growth and distant metastasis in osteosarcoma; its oncogenic role is related to its regulation of the expression of TSSC3. PMID:26265454

  17. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C.; van Alphen, Lieke B.; Patry, Robert T.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  18. α-Tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; Chen, Shaohua; Van Doren, Jeremiah; Li, Dongli; Farichon, Chelsea; He, Yan; Zhang, Qiuyan; Zhang, Kun; Conney, Allan H; Goodin, Susan; Du, Zhiyun; Zheng, Xi

    2015-06-01

    α‑Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α‑tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL‑60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL‑60 cells with α‑tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration‑dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL‑60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α‑tomatine in HL‑60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α‑tomatine and cell membrane‑associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α‑tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor‑κB by the phorbol ester, 12‑O‑tetradecanoylphorbol‑13‑acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL‑60 cells treated with α‑tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α‑tomatine inhibited the growth of HL‑60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α‑tomatine may have useful anti‑leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  19. α-tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HUARONG; CHEN, SHAOHUA; VAN DOREN, JEREMIAH; LI, DONGLI; FARICHON, CHELSEA; HE, YAN; ZHANG, QIUYAN; ZHANG, KUN; CONNEY, ALLAN H; GOODIN, SUSAN; DU, ZHIYUN; ZHENG, XI

    2015-01-01

    α-tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α-tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL-60 cells with α-tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α-tomatine in HL-60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α-tomatine and cell membrane-associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α-tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor-κB by the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated with α-tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α-tomatine inhibited the growth of HL-60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α-tomatine may have useful anti-leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  20. Activation of PPARalpha inhibits IGF-I-mediated growth and survival responses in medulloblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Katarzyna; Pannizzo, Paola; Grabacka, Maja; Croul, Sidney; Del Valle, Luis; Khalili, Kamel; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies suggest a potential role of lipid lowering drugs, fibrates and statins, in anticancer treatment. One candidate for tumor chemoprevention is fenofibrate, which is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Our results demonstrate elevated expression of PPARalpha in the nuclei of neoplatic cells in 12 out of 13 cases of medulloblastoma, and of PPARgamma in six out of 13 cases. Further analysis demonstrated that aggressive mouse medulloblastoma cells, BsB8, express PPARalpha in the absence PPARgamma, and human medulloblastoma cells, D384 and Daoy, express both PPARalpha and PPARgamma. Mouse and human cells responded to fenofibrate by a significant increase of PPAR-mediated transcriptional activity, and by a gradual accumulation of cells in G1 and G2/M phase of the cell cycle, leading to the inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated apoptosis. Preincubation of BsB8 cells with fenofibrate attenuated IGF-I-induced IRS-1, Akt, ERKs and GSK3beta phosphorylation, and inhibited clonogenic growth. In Daoy and D384 cells, fenofibrate also inhibited IGF-I-mediated growth responses, and simultaneous delivery of fenofibrate with low dose of the IGF-IR inhibitor, NVP-AEW541, completely abolished their clonogenic growth and survival. These results indicate a strong supportive role of fenofibrate in chemoprevention against IGF-I-induced growth responses in medulloblastoma.

  1. TQ inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo via repression of Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiquan; Zhao, Yan; Lu, Xinlan; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Yuanyuan; Ren, Mudan; Lu, Guifang; Zhang, Dan; Sun, Zhenguo; Xu, Zhipeng; Song, Jee Hoon; Cheng, Yulan; Meltzer, Stephen J.; He, Shuixiang

    2015-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) has been reported to possess anti-tumor activity in various types of cancer. However, its effects and molecular mechanism of action in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still not completely understood. We observed that TQ inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro, where treatment with TQ arrested the cell cycle in G1 by upregulating p21 and downregulating cyclinD1 and CDK2 expression; moreover, TQ induced apoptosis by decreasing expression of Bcl-2 and increasing expression of Bax. Simultaneously, TQ demonstrated a suppressive impact on the Notch pathway, where overexpression of NICD1 reversed the inhibitory effect of TQ on cell proliferation, thereby attenuating the repressive effects of TQ on the Notch pathway, cyclinD1, CDK2 and Bcl-2, and also diminishing upregulation of p21 and Bax. In a xenograft model, TQ inhibited HCC growth in nude mice; this inhibitory effect in vivo, as well as of HCC cell growth in vitro, was associated with a discernible decline in NICD1 and Bcl-2 levels and a dramatic rise in p21 expression. In conclusion, TQ inhibits HCC cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, achieving these effects by repression of the Notch signaling pathway, suggesting that TQ represents a potential preventive or therapeutic agent in HCC patients. PMID:26416455

  2. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products inhibits melanoma growth in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Ayako; Matsui, Takanori; Maeda, Sayaka; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Inoue, Hiroyoshi; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2014-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that diabetes is associated with an increased risk of cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. We investigated here whether DNA aptamer directed against advanced glycation end products (AGE-aptamer) inhibited melanoma growth in nude mice. G361 melanoma cells were injected intradermally into the upper flank of athymic nude mice. Mice received continuous intraperitoneal infusion (0.136 μg/day) of either AGE-aptamer (n=9) or Control-aptamer (n=8) by an osmotic mini pump. Tumor volume was measured at 4-day interval, and G361 melanoma was excised at day 43 after the aptamer treatment. We further examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on proliferation of AGE-exposed endothelial cells and G361 cells. AGE-aptamer significantly inhibited the in vivo-tumor growth of G361 melanoma. Immunohistochemical and western blotting analyses of G361 melanoma revealed that AGE-aptamer decreased expression levels of proliferating nuclear antigen, CD31 and Mac-3, markers of endothelial cells and macrophages, respectively. AGE-aptamer significantly decreased the number of tumor-associated vessels. AGE, receptor for AGE (RAGE) and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were also reduced in AGE-aptamer-treated G361 melanoma. AGE-aptamer inhibited the AGE-induced proliferation and tube formation of endothelial cells as well as the growth of G361 cells in vitro. The present findings suggest that AGE-aptamer could inhibit the AGE-RAGE axis in G361 melanoma and resultantly suppress the tumor growth in nude mice by blocking the angiogenesis. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing the progression of malignant melanoma in diabetes.

  3. MicroRNA-375 inhibits colorectal cancer growth by targeting PIK3CA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yihui; Tang, Qingchao; Li, Mingqi; Jiang, Shixiong; Wang, Xishan

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-375 is downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth by targeting PIK3CA. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in xenograft nude mice model. - Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by triggering RNA degradation or interfering with translation. Aberrant miRNA expression is involved in human disease including cancer. Herein, we showed that miR-375 was frequently down-regulated in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues when compared to normal human colon tissues. PIK3CA was identified as a potential miR-375 target by bioinformatics. Overexpression of miR-375 in SW480 and HCT15 cells reduced PIK3CA protein expression. Subsequently, using reporter constructs, we showed that the PIK3CA untranslated region (3′-UTR) carries the directly binding site of miR-375. Additionally, miR-375 suppressed CRC cell proliferation and colony formation and led to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-375 overexpression resulted in inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. SiRNA-mediated silencing of PIK3CA blocked the inhibitory effect of miR-375 on CRC cell growth. Lastly, we found overexpressed miR-375 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, we propose that overexpression of miR-375 may provide a selective growth inhibition for CRC cells by targeting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  4. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-02-15

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36μM) for 18-96h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26792615

  5. MiR-34a inhibits colon cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor α.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Yulin; Lu, Shuming; Zhang, Zhuqing; Meng, Hua; Liang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The microRNA (miRNA), miR‑34a is significant in colon cancer progression. In the present study, the role of miR‑34a in colon cancer cell proliferation and metastasis was investigated. It was found that the expression of miR‑34a in colon cancer tissues and cell lines was lower when compared with that of normal tissues and cells. Further research demonstrated that miR‑34a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest, and suppressed metastasis and epithelial mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells. Bioinformatic prediction indicated that platelet‑derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) was a potential target gene of miR‑34a and a luciferase assay identified that PDGFRA was a novel direct target gene of miR‑34a. In addition, assays of western blot analyses and quantitative reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that miR‑34a decreased PDGFRA mRNA expression and protein levels in colon cancer cells. Assessment of cellular function indicated that miR‑34a inhibited colon cancer progression via PDGFRA. These findings demonstrate that miR‑34a may act as a negative regulator in colon cancer by targeting PDGFRA.

  6. Nimbolide inhibits pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis through ROS-mediated apoptosis and inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Gonzalez, Elizabeth; Arumugam, Arunkumar; Nandy, Sushmita; Gonzalez, Viviana; Medel, Joshua; Camacho, Fernando; Ortega, Andrew; Bonkoungou, Sandrine; Narayan, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Alok kumar; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity rates of pancreatic cancer are high because of its extremely invasive and metastatic nature. Its lack of symptoms, late diagnosis and chemo-resistance and the ineffective treatment modalities warrant the development of new chemo-therapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer. Agents from medicinal plants have demonstrated therapeutic benefits in various human cancers. Nimbolide, an active molecule isolated from Azadirachta indica, has been reported to exhibit several medicinal properties. This study assessed the anticancer properties of nimbolide against pancreatic cancer. Our data reveal that nimbolide induces excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby regulating both apoptosis and autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells. Experiments with the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine diphosphate salt and the apoptosis inhibitor z-VAD-fmk demonstrated that nimbolide-mediated ROS generation inhibited proliferation (through reduced PI3K/AKT/mTOR and ERK signaling) and metastasis (through decreased EMT, invasion, migration and colony forming abilities) via mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic cell death but not via autophagy. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that nimbolide was effective in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis. Overall, our data suggest that nimbolide can serve as a potential chemo-therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26804739

  7. miR-134 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Wei, Furong; Zhang, Jianbo; Wang, Xingwu; Li, Baosheng

    2016-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently activated in a wide range of solid tumours and represents an important therapeutic target. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been recognized as a rational and potential modality for anti-EGFR therapies. However, more EGFR-targeting miRNAs need to be explored. In this study, we identified a novel EGFR-targeting miRNA, miRNA-134 (miR-134), in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Luciferase assays confirmed that EGFR is a direct target of miR-134. In addition, the overexpression of miR-134 inhibited EGFR-related signaling and suppressed NSCLC cells proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, suggesting that miR-134 functions as a tumour suppressor in NSCLC. Further mechanistic investigation including RNAi and rescue experiments suggested that the down-regulation of EGFR by miR-134 partially contributes to the antiproliferative role of miR-134. Last, in vivo experiments demonstrated that miR-134 suppressed tumour growth of A549 xenograft in nude mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-134 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by targeting the EGFR.